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Sample records for hiatal hernia subjects

  1. Hiatal hernia

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment can relieve most symptoms of hiatal hernia. ... may include: Pulmonary (lung) aspiration Slow bleeding and iron deficiency anemia (due to a large hernia) Strangulation (closing off) of the hernia

  2. Hiatal hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chest pain Heartburn , worse when bending over or lying down Swallowing difficulty A hiatal hernia by itself ... symptoms include: Avoiding large or heavy meals Not lying down or bending over right after a meal ...

  3. Large Hiatal Hernia Compressing the Heart.

    PubMed

    Matar, Andrew; Mroue, Jad; Camporesi, Enrico; Mangar, Devanand; Albrink, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We describe a 41-year-old man with De Mosier's syndrome who presented with exercise intolerance and dyspnea on exertion caused by a giant hiatal hernia compressing the heart with relief by surgical treatment. PMID:26704030

  4. Do large hiatal hernias affect esophageal peristalsis?

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J; Kia, Leila; Luger, Daniel; Soper, Nathaniel; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aim Large hiatal hernias can be associated with a shortened or tortuous esophagus. We hypothesized that these anatomic changes may alter esophageal pressure topography (EPT) measurements made during high-resolution manometry (HRM). Our aim was to compare EPT measures of esophageal motility in patients with large hiatal hernias to those of patients without hernia. Methods Among 2000 consecutive clinical EPT, we identified 90 patients with large (>5 cm) hiatal hernias on endoscopy and at least 7 evaluable swallows on EPT. Within the same database a control group without hernia was selected. EPT was analyzed for lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, Distal Contractile Integral (DCI), contraction amplitude, Contractile Front Velocity (CFV) and Distal Latency time (DL). Esophageal length was measured on EPT from the distal border of upper esophageal sphincter to the proximal border of the LES. EPT diagnosis was based on the Chicago Classification. Results The manometry catheter was coiled in the hernia and did not traverse the crural diaphragm in 44 patients (49%) with large hernia. Patients with large hernias had lower average LES pressures, lower DCI, slower CFV and shorter DL than patients without hernia. They also exhibited a shorter mean esophageal length. However, the distribution of peristaltic abnormalities was not different in patients with and without large hernia. Conclusions Patients with large hernias had an alteration of EPT measurements as a consequence of the associated shortened esophagus. However, the distribution of peristaltic disorders was unaffected by the presence of hernia. PMID:22508779

  5. [Diagnosis and surgical therapy of hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Koch, O O; Köhler, G; Antoniou, S A; Pointner, R

    2014-08-01

    Using the usual diagnostic tools like barium swallow examination, endoscopy, and manometry, we are able to diagnose a hiatal hernia, but it is not possible to predict the size of the hernia opening or, respectively, the size of the hiatal defect. At least a correlation can be expected if the gastroesophageal junction is endoscopically assessed in a retroflexed position, and graded according to Hill. So far, it is not possible to come to a clear conclusion how the hiatal closure during hiatal hernia repair should be performed. There is no consensus on using a mesh, and when using a mesh which type or shape should be used. Further studies including long-term results on this issue are necessary. However, it seems obvious to make the decision depending on certain conditions found during operation, and not on preoperative findings. PMID:24647816

  6. Hiatal hernia repair with biologic mesh reinforcement reduces recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E; Shaligram, A; Reynoso, J F; Kothari, V; Oleynikov, D

    2014-01-01

    The utility of mesh reinforcement for small hiatal hernia found especially during antireflux surgery is unknown. Initial reports for the use of biological mesh for crural reinforcement during repair for defects greater than 5 cm have been shown to decrease recurrence rates. This study compares patients with small hiatal hernias who underwent onlay biologic mesh buttress repair versus those with suture cruroplasty alone. This is a single-institution retrospective review of all patients undergoing repair of hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm between 2002 and 2009. The patients were evaluated based on surgical repair: one group undergoing crural reinforcement with onlay biologic mesh and other group with suture cruroplasty only. Seventy patients with hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm were identified. Thirty-eight patients had hernia repair with biologic mesh, and 32 patients had repair with suture cruroplasty only. Recurrence rate at 1 year was 16% (5/32) in patients who had suture cruroplasty only and 0% (0/38) in the group with crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh (statistically significant, P = 0.017). Suture cruroplasty alone appears to be inadequate for hiatal hernias measuring 1-5 cm with significant recurrence rate and failure of antireflux surgery. Crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh may reduce hiatal hernia recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias. PMID:23441634

  7. Current readings: Failed hiatal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sumeet K; Shah, Parth

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent hiatal hernia is noted in up to 70% of patients undergoing reoperative antireflux procedure. Role of short esophagus vis-à-vis a need for Collis gastroplasty, mesh reinforcement of hiatus, and access of surgery (thoracotomy vs laparotomy) have been debated. The aim of this article is to review selected recent publications that address these issues. PMID:25837548

  8. Hiatal Hernia Repair with Novel Biological Graft Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Sasse, Kent C.; Ackerman, Ellen; Brandt, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hiatal hernias are repaired laparoscopically with increasing use of reinforcement material. Both synthetic and biologically derived materials reduce the recurrence rate compared to primary crural repair. Synthetic mesh introduces complications, such as mesh erosion, fibrosis, and infection. Urinary bladder matrix (UBM) represents a biologically derived material for use in hiatal hernia repair reinforcement with the potential to improve durability of repair without incurring the risks of other reinforcement materials. Methods: The 15 cases presented involved hiatal hernia repair with primary crural repair with UBM reinforcement and fundoplication. Patients were followed for an average of 3 years, and were assessed with upper gastrointestinal (GI) series, endoscopy, and assessments of subjective symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Results: Hernia diameters averaged 6 cm. Each repair was successful and completed laparoscopically. UBM exhibited favorable handling characteristics when placed as a horseshoe-type graft sutured to the crura. One patient underwent endoscopic balloon dilatation of a mild postoperative stenosis that resolved. No other complications occurred. In more than 3 years of follow-up, there have been no recurrences or long-term complications. GERD-health-related quality of life (HRQL) scores averaged 6 (range, 0–12, of a possible 50), indicating little reflux symptomatology. Follow-up upper GI series were obtained in 9 cases and showed intact repairs. An upper endoscopy was performed in 8 patients and showed no recurrences. Conclusion: Surgeons may safely use laparoscopic fundoplication with UBM reinforcement for successful repair of hiatal hernias. In this series, repairs with UBM grafts have been durable at 3 years of follow-up and may serve as an alternative to synthetic mesh reinforcement of hiatal hernia repairs. PMID:27186066

  9. Hiatal Hernia as a Total Gastrectomy Complication

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Bruna do Nascimento; de Oliveira, Marcos Belotto; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer, gastric cancer is the third leading cause of death among men and the fifth among women in Brazil. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment. The most serious complications associated with surgery are fistulas and dehiscence of the jejunal-esophageal anastomosis. Hiatal hernia refers to herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm, though this occurrence is rarely reported as a complication in gastrectomy. Case Report A 76-year-old man was diagnosed with intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. He underwent a total laparoscopic-assisted gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy on May 19, 2015. The pathology revealed a pT4pN3 gastric adenocarcinoma. The patient became clinically stable and was discharged 10 days after surgery. He was subsequently started on adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy; however, 9 days after the second cycle, he was brought to the emergency room with nausea and severe epigastric pain. A CT scan revealed a hiatal hernia with signs of strangulation. The patient underwent emergent repair of the hernia and suffered no postoperative complications. He was discharged from the hospital 9 days after surgery. Conclusion Hiatal hernia is not well documented, and its occurrence in the context of gastrectomy is an infrequent complication.

  10. Electrocardiographic changes in hiatal hernia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Seresini, Giuseppe; Racheli, Marco; Bortolotti, Monica; Virgillo, Adriana; Novali, Adriana; Benetello, Claudia; Pasini, Gian Franco

    2009-01-01

    We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman admitted to our department for suspected silent myocardial ischaemia with the evidence of T wave inversion in anterior lead. All the instrumental exams excluded inducible myocardial ischaemia. A gastroscopy showed a moderate hiatal hernia. We postulate that electrocardiogram modification could be attributed to hiatal hernia. PMID:19918411

  11. Prosthetic Bioabsorbable Mesh for Hiatal Hernia Repair During Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has become a valuable primary bariatric operation. It has an acceptable complication profile and amount of weight loss. However, one of the most distressing complications to the patient is reflux postoperatively. There is thought to be a relationship between a hiatal hernia and postoperative reflux. There is disagreement on how to address a hiatal hernia intraoperatively, and the use of mesh is controversial. Our objectives were to examine the use of a prosthetic bioabsorbable mesh for repair of a large hiatal hernia during a sleeve gastrectomy and to examine the incidence of reflux and mesh-related complications in the near term. Methods: This is a case series of patients with hiatal hernia undergoing a primary sleeve gastrectomy. None of the patients had a previous hiatal hernia repair. Three patients with large hiatal hernias diagnosed preoperatively or intraoperatively were included. The hiatus of the diaphragm was repaired with a posterior crural closure, and a piece of prosthetic bioabsorbable mesh was placed posteriorly to reinforce the repair. Results: There were 3 patients. The mean follow-up period was 12 months. There were no mesh-related complications. One of the patients needed to resume proton pump inhibitors to control reflux. Conclusion: The use of a prosthetic bioabsorbable mesh to repair a hiatal hernia simultaneously with a sleeve gastrectomy is safe. There were no mesh-related complications at 1 year. PMID:24398209

  12. Hiatal hernia in a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pup.

    PubMed

    Biancani, Barbara; Field, Cara L; Dennison, Sophie; Pulver, Robert; Tuttle, Allison D

    2012-06-01

    A 2-wk-old stranded harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) rescued by Mystic Aquarium showed signs of the presence of a hiatal hernia during rehabilitation. Contrast radiographs of esophagus and stomach revealed an intrathoracic radiodensity that contains filling defects typical of stomach, consistent with gastric rugal folds. Mural thickening was observed at the level of the cardia consistent with a diagnosis of a hiatal hernia. Although clinical improvement was noted with medical therapy and tube feeding, surgical correction of the hiatal hernia was considered necessary for full resolution. However, owing to the animal's low body weight, the corrective hernia surgery was postponed until the body condition improved. The seal needed to be surgically treated for a corneal ulcer, and while anesthetized with isoflurane, the seal became dyspneic and developed cardiac arrhythmias; ultimately cardiac arrest ensued. Resuscitation was unsuccessfully attempted and the seal was euthanized. Necropsy confirmed the radiographic diagnosis and further characterized a paraesophageal hiatal hernia. PMID:22779241

  13. Laparoscopic Hiatal Hernia Repair in 221 Patients: Outcomes and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Thackeray, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hiatal hernia is a common condition often associated with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The objectives of this study were to examine the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair (LHHR) with biologic mesh to reduce and/or alleviate GERD symptoms and associated hiatal hernia recurrence. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed consecutive LHHR procedures with biologic mesh performed by a single surgeon from July 2009 to October 2014. The primary efficacy outcome measures were relief from GERD symptoms, as measured according to the GERD–health-related quality-of-life (GERD-HRQL) scale and hiatal hernia recurrence. A secondary outcome measure was overall safety of the procedure. Results: A total of 221 patients underwent LHHR with biologic mesh during the study period, and pre- and postoperative GERD-HRQL studies were available for 172 of them. At baseline (preoperative), the mean GERD-HRQL score for all procedures was 18.5 ± 14.4. At follow-up (mean, 14.5 ± 11.0 months [range, 2.0–56.0]), the score showed a statistically significant decline to a mean of 4.4 ± 7.5 (P < .0001). To date, 8 patients (3.6%, 8/221) have had a documented anatomic hiatal hernia recurrence. However, a secondary hiatal hernia repair reoperation was necessary in only 1 patient. Most complications were minor (dysphagia, nausea and vomiting). However, there was 1 death caused by a hemorrhage that occurred 1 week after surgery. Conclusions: Laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair using biologic mesh, both with and without a simultaneous bariatric or antireflux procedure, is an efficacious and safe therapeutic option for management of hiatal hernia, prevention of recurrence, and relief of symptomatic GERD. PMID:26884676

  14. Resorbable biosynthetic mesh for crural reinforcement during hiatal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Alicuben, Evan T; Worrell, Stephanie G; DeMeester, Steven R

    2014-10-01

    The use of mesh to reinforce crural closure during hiatal hernia repair is controversial. Although some studies suggest that using synthetic mesh can reduce recurrence, synthetic mesh can erode into the esophagus and in our opinion should be avoided. Studies with absorbable or biologic mesh have not proven to be of benefit for recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of hiatal hernia repair with modern resorbable biosynthetic mesh in combination with adjunct tension reduction techniques. We retrospectively analyzed all patients who had crural reinforcement during repair of a sliding or paraesophageal hiatal hernia with Gore BioA resorbable mesh. Objective follow-up was by videoesophagram and/or esophagogastroduodenoscopy. There were 114 patients. The majority of operations (72%) were laparoscopic primary repairs with all patients receiving a fundoplication. The crura were closed primarily in all patients and reinforced with a BioA mesh patch. Excessive tension prompted a crural relaxing incision in four per cent and a Collis gastroplasty in 39 per cent of patients. Perioperative morbidity was minor and unrelated to the mesh. Median objective follow-up was one year, but 18 patients have objective follow-up at two or more years. A recurrent hernia was found in one patient (0.9%) three years after repair. The use of crural relaxing incisions and Collis gastroplasty in combination with crural reinforcement with resorbable biosynthetic mesh is associated with a low early hernia recurrence rate and no mesh-related complications. Long-term follow-up will define the role of these techniques for hiatal hernia repair. PMID:25264654

  15. Initial outcomes of laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair with mesh.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, Alana; Vu, Steven; Armstrong, Chris; Smith, Brian R; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2013-10-01

    The use of mesh in laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair (LHR) may reduce the risk of late hernia recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate initial outcomes and recurrence rate of 92 patients who underwent LHR reinforced with a synthetic bioabsorbable mesh. Surgical approaches included LHR and Nissen fundoplication (n = 64), LHR without fundoplication (n = 10), reoperative LHR (n = 9), LHR with a bariatric operation (n = 6), and emergent LHR (n = 3). The mean length of hospital stay was 2 ± 3 days (range, 1 to 30 days). There were no conversions to open laparotomy and no intraoperative complications. One of 92 patients (1.1%) required intensive care unit stay. The 90-day mortality was zero. Minor complications occurred in 3.3 per cent, major complications in 2.2 per cent, and late complications in 5.5 per cent of patients. There were no perforations or early hernia recurrence. The 30-day reoperation rate was 1.1 per cent. For patients with available 1-year follow-up, the overall recurrence rate was 18.5 per cent with a mean follow-up of 30 months (range, 12 to 51 months). LHR repair with mesh is associated with low perioperative morbidity and no mortality. The use of bioabsorbable mesh appears to be safe with no early hiatal hernia recurrence or late mesh erosion. Longer follow-up is needed to determine the long-term rate of hernia recurrence associated with LHR with mesh. PMID:24160791

  16. V/Q Matched Defect Larger than Hiatal Hernia Itself.

    PubMed

    Wachsmann, Jason W; Kim, Chun K

    2015-01-01

    We present the case report of a patient 83 year old female who developed progressive shortness of breath and subsequently underwent scintigraphic evaluation of her symptoms with a ventilation/perfusion scintigraphic exam. A matched perfusion defect was seen involving the basal segments of the left lower lobe. Following this, the patient was examined with a contrast enhanced CT of the chest to further investigate the defect, which revealed compression of the bronchi and vasculature of the left lower lobe basal segments by the hernia larger than the actual hernia. To our knowledge there has not been a case report of a large hiatal hernia as a cause of matched lower lobe defect. PMID:26420992

  17. Transesophageal two-dimensional echocardiographic identification of hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Frans, Ebenezer E; Nanda, Navin C; Patel, Vinod; Vengala, Srinivas; Mehmood, Farhat; Fonbah, William S; Bodiwala, Kunal

    2005-07-01

    We report a case of a middle-aged woman in whom a transesophageal echocardiogram showed a mass-like lesion posteriorly near the descending thoracic aorta. We were able to make a definitive diagnosis of this mass as a hiatal hernia because of a thick inner lining measuring 6-9 mm in thickness similar to the stomach mucosa, and the presence of a few microbubbles within the mass. In addition, the microbubbles increased considerably after 10 cc of agitated normal saline flush via a nasogastric tube. PMID:15966940

  18. Treatment of giant hiatal hernia by laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Duinhouwer, Lucia E.; Biter, L. Ulas; Wijnhoven, Bas P.; Mannaerts, Guido H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a risk factor for hiatal hernia. In addition, much higher recurrence rates are reported after standard surgical treatment of hiatal hernia in morbidly obese patients. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is an effective surgical treatment for morbid obesity and is known to effectively control symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD). Case presentation Two patients suffering from giant hiatal hernias where a combined LRYGB and hiatal hernia repair (HHR) with mesh was performed are presented in this paper. There were no postoperative complications and at 1 year follow-up, there was no sign of recurrence of the hernia. Discussion The gold standard for all symptomatic reflux patients is still surgical correction of the paraesophageal hernia, including complete reduction of the hernia sac, resection of the sac, hiatal closure and fundoplication. However, HHR outcome is adversely affected by higher BMI levels, leading to increased HH recurrence rates in the obese. Conclusion Concomitant giant hiatal hernia repair with LRYGB appears to be safe and feasible. Moreover, LRYGB plus HHR appears to be a good alternative for HH patients suffering from morbid obesity as well than antireflux surgery alone because of the additional benefit of significant weight loss and improvement of obesity related co-morbidity. PMID:25723747

  19. Esophageal hiatal hernia in three exotic felines--Lynx lynx, Puma concolore, Panthera leo.

    PubMed

    Hettlich, Bianca F; Hobson, H Phil; Ducoté, Julie; Fossum, Theresa W; Johnson, James H

    2010-03-01

    Hiatal hernia was diagnosed in three exotic felines-lynx (Lynx lynx), cougar (Puma concolore), and lion (Panthera leo). All cats had a history of anorexia. Thoracic and abdominal radiographs showed evidence of a soft tissue mass within the caudal mediastinum suggestive of a hiatal hernia in all animals. A barium esophagram was performed in one case. All animals underwent thoracic or abdominal surgery for hernia reduction. Surgical procedures included: intercostal thoracotomy with herniorrhaphy and esophagopexy (lynx and cougar), and incisional gastropexy (lion). Concurrent surgical procedures performed were gastrotomy for gastric foreign body removal and jejunostomy tube placement. Clinical signs related to the hiatal hernia disappeared after surgery and recurrence of signs was not reported for the time of follow-up. PMID:20722259

  20. Hiatal hernia in pediatric patients: laparoscopic versus open approaches

    PubMed Central

    Namgoong, Jung-Man; Kim, Seong-Chul; Hwang, Ji-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of laparoscopic approach for hiatal hernia (HH) in pediatric patients. Methods This was a retrospective study of 33 patients younger than 18 years who underwent an operation for HH between January 1999 and December 2012. Results The HH symptoms were various and included regurgitation, vomiting, weight loss, cough, hoarseness, and cyanosis. Among the 33 patients, there were 25 sliding types, 1 paraesophageal type, and 7 mixed types. Open surgery (OS) and laparoscopic surgery (LS) were used in 16 and 17 patients, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in sex, age, or body weight between the groups. The median operating time was longer in the LS group (150 minutes; range, 90-250 minutes vs. 125 minutes; range, 66-194 minutes; P = 0.028). Time to oral intake was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (1 day; range, 1-3 days vs. 2 days; range, 1-7 days; P = 0.001) and time to full feeding was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (6 days; range, 3-16 days vs. 10 days; range, 3-33 days; P = 0.048). There were no differences in length of hospital stay and complications between the two groups. There was no perioperative mortality or recurrence of HH. Conclusion A good surgical outcome for laparoscopic correction of HH was seen in pediatric patients. PMID:24851228

  1. Laparoscopic treatment of type III and IV hiatal hernia – authors’ experience

    PubMed Central

    Grzesiak-Kuik, Agata; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There are four types of hiatal hernias, and diagnosis is established on the basis of gastroscopy in the majority of cases. Type III represents a mixed type in which the abdominal esophagus as well as the gastric cardia and fundus protrude into the thorax through the pathologically widened esophageal hiatus. Type IV, the so-called upside down stomach, can be considered an evolutionary form of type III, and refers to herniation of nearly the whole stomach (except for the cardia and pylorus) into the thorax. Types III and IV of hiatal hernias represent a group of rare diaphragmatic defects; thus, most centers do not possess considerable experience in their treatment. Frequently, laparoscopic treatment is implemented, although, according to some authors, conversion to laparotomy, thoracotomy, or thoracolaparotomy is necessary in selected cases. Aim To analyze the outcomes of laparoscopic treatment of the largest hiatal hernias, i.e. type III and IV hernias. Material and methods A total of 25 patients diagnosed with type III and IV hiatal hernia were included in further analysis. Results As many as 19 out of 25 patients (76%) assessed the outcome of the surgery as evidently positive and reported marked improvement in the quality of life. Conclusions The laparoscopic technique constitutes an excellent and safe method of repair of even the most complex defects in the esophageal hiatus. Therefore, the minimally invasive technique combined with an anti-reflux procedure should be the method of choice in patients with type III and IV hernia. PMID:25097681

  2. A case of ultrasound diagnosis of fetal hiatal hernia in late third trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Stefania; Lanna, Mariano Matteo; Napolitano, Marcello; Maestri, Luciano; Faiola, Stefano; Rustico, Mariangela; Ferrazzi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hiatal hernia is a condition characterized by herniation of the abdominal organs, most commonly the stomach, through a physiological but overlax esophageal hiatus into the thoracic cavity. Prenatal diagnosis of this anomaly is unusual and only eight cases have been reported in the literature. In this paper we describe a case of congenital hiatal hernia that was suspected at ultrasound at 39 weeks' gestation, on the basis of a cystic mass in the posterior mediastinum, juxtaposed to the vertebral body. Postnatal upper gastrointestinal tract series confirmed the prenatal diagnosis. Postnatal management was planned with no urgency. Hiatal hernia is not commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of fetal cystic chest anomalies. This rare case documents the importance of prenatal diagnosis of this anomaly for prenatal counseling and postnatal management. PMID:25984374

  3. Hiatal Hernia Repair with Gore Bio-A Tissue Reinforcement: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Antonino, Agrusa; Giorgio, Romano; Giuseppe, Frazzetta; Giovanni, De Vita; Silvia, Di Giovanni; Daniela, Chianetta; Giuseppe, Di Buono; Vincenzo, Sorce; Gaspare, Gulotta

    2014-01-01

    Type I hiatal hernia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in 50–90% of cases. Several trials strongly support surgery as an effective alternative to medical therapy. Today, laparoscopic fundoplication is considered as the procedure of choice. However, primary laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair is associated with upto 42% recurrence rate. Mesh reinforcement of the crural closure decreases the recurrence but can lead to complications, above all nonabsorbable ones. We experiment a new totally absorbable mesh by Gore. Case. We present a case of a 65-year-old female patient with a 6-year classic history of GERD. Endoscopy revealed a large hiatal hernia and esophagitis. pH study was positive for acid reflux; esophageal manometry revealed LES intrathoracic dislocation. With laparoscopic approach, the hiatal hernia defect was identified and primarily repaired, by crural closure. Gore Bio-A Tissue Reinforcement was trimmed to fit the defect accommodating the esophagus. Nissen fundoplication was performed. Result. Bio-A mesh was easily placed laparoscopically. It has good handling and could be cut and tailored intraoperatively for optimal adaptation. There were no short-term complications. Conclusion. Crural closure reinforcement can be done readily with this new totally absorbable mesh replaced by soft tissue over six months. However, further data and studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. PMID:24864221

  4. Hiatal hernia repair with gore bio-a tissue reinforcement: our experience.

    PubMed

    Antonino, Agrusa; Giorgio, Romano; Giuseppe, Frazzetta; Giovanni, De Vita; Silvia, Di Giovanni; Daniela, Chianetta; Giuseppe, Di Buono; Vincenzo, Sorce; Gaspare, Gulotta

    2014-01-01

    Type I hiatal hernia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in 50-90% of cases. Several trials strongly support surgery as an effective alternative to medical therapy. Today, laparoscopic fundoplication is considered as the procedure of choice. However, primary laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair is associated with upto 42% recurrence rate. Mesh reinforcement of the crural closure decreases the recurrence but can lead to complications, above all nonabsorbable ones. We experiment a new totally absorbable mesh by Gore. Case. We present a case of a 65-year-old female patient with a 6-year classic history of GERD. Endoscopy revealed a large hiatal hernia and esophagitis. pH study was positive for acid reflux; esophageal manometry revealed LES intrathoracic dislocation. With laparoscopic approach, the hiatal hernia defect was identified and primarily repaired, by crural closure. Gore Bio-A Tissue Reinforcement was trimmed to fit the defect accommodating the esophagus. Nissen fundoplication was performed. Result. Bio-A mesh was easily placed laparoscopically. It has good handling and could be cut and tailored intraoperatively for optimal adaptation. There were no short-term complications. Conclusion. Crural closure reinforcement can be done readily with this new totally absorbable mesh replaced by soft tissue over six months. However, further data and studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. PMID:24864221

  5. LAPAROSCOPIC GASTROPEXY FOR CORRECTION OF A HIATAL HERNIA IN A NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL (MIROUNGA ANGUSTIROSTRIS).

    PubMed

    Greene, Rebecca; Van Bonn, William G; Dennison, Sophie E; Greig, Denise J; Gulland, Frances M D

    2015-06-01

    A female northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) weaned pup presented with malnutrition. During rehabilitation, the seal developed regurgitation and reduced lung sounds on auscultation. Radiographs and endoscopy performed under sedation suggested a diaphragmatic hernia. A Type I (or sliding) hiatal hernia was confirmed with a positive contrast upper gastrointestinal study, revealing varying degrees of herniation of the gastric fundus through the diaphragm into the caudal thorax as well as esophageal reflux. The animal was treated preoperatively with an H2 antagonist and antinausea medication. A laparoscopic gastropexy was performed under general anesthesia. The animal recovered well postoperatively and resolution of clinical signs was achieved. The animal was released back into the wild 21 kg above admit weight. To our knowledge, we report here the first surgical correction of a hiatal hernia in a marine mammal. PMID:26056907

  6. Gastric dilatation and volvulus in a brachycephalic dog with hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Aslanian, M E; Sharp, C R; Garneau, M S

    2014-10-01

    A brachycephalic dog was presented with an acute onset of retching and abdominal discomfort. The dog had a chronic history of stertor and exercise intolerance suggestive of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome. Radiographs were consistent with a Type II hiatal hernia. The dog was referred and within hours of admission became acutely painful and developed tympanic abdominal distension. A right lateral abdominal radiograph confirmed gastric dilatation and volvulus with herniation of the pylorus through the hiatus. An emergency exploratory coeliotomy was performed, during which the stomach was derotated, and an incisional gastropexy, herniorrhaphy and splenectomy were performed. A staphylectomy was performed immediately following the exploratory coeliotomy. The dog recovered uneventfully. Gastric dilatation and volvulus is a potentially life-threatening complication that can occur in dogs with Type II hiatal hernia and should be considered a surgical emergency. PMID:24871205

  7. [Anisakiasis in a patient with a small hiatal hernia. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Mercado P, Rubén; Torres H, Patricio; Gil L, Luis Carlos; Goldin G, Luis

    2006-12-01

    We describe the presence of anisakiasis in a patient who had a small hiatal hernia. A 60 year-old women presented general malaise, burning pain, flatulence, persistent nausea and abdominal distension during five days before consulting. She referred that she ate a dish of marinated raw fish with lemon and pepper ("cebiche") and after a few hours the symptoms began. An esophagogastroscopy showed a white colour larva of approximately three cm with the cephalic end partially adhered and localized in the mucosa of the hiatal hernia. During the procedure the worm was easily extracted. The morphologic study of the specimen identified it as a stage IV larva of Pseudoterranova sp. The clinical condition of the patient improved after the extraction of the parasite. PMID:17277874

  8. Incidence of hiatal hernia in service members, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Francis L; Taubman, Stephen B

    2016-08-01

    From 2005 through 2014, a total of 27,276 active component service members had incident diagnoses of hiatal hernia documented in their medical records. The overall incidence rate was 19.7 cases per 10,000 person-years (p-yrs); annual incidence rates ranged from 16.5 to 22.2 cases per 10,000 p-yrs. Rates overall increased monotonically with increasing age and were higher among Air Force and Army members, officers, and healthcare workers than their respective counterparts. During the surveillance period, the 27,276 service members who had incident diagnoses of hiatal hernia accounted for 44,092 hiatal hernia-related encounters overall (1.6 encounters per case). Among all incident cases, 235 (0.86%) had surgical repairs documented during the period. The frequency of surgical treatment of hiatal hernias among military members mirrored the low frequency in U.S. civilian practice. During 2010-2014, most surgical procedures (79%) were accomplished via laparoscopic approaches. The incidence rates of hiatal hernia diagnoses reported here likely greatly underestimate the true incidence in U.S. military populations. Reasons for the underestimates and comparisons with other populations are discussed. PMID:27602798

  9. Biomechanical analyses of prosthetic mesh repair in a hiatal hernia model.

    PubMed

    Alizai, Patrick Hamid; Schmid, Sofie; Otto, Jens; Klink, Christian Daniel; Roeth, Anjali; Nolting, Jochen; Neumann, Ulf Peter; Klinge, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    Recurrence rate of hiatal hernia can be reduced with prosthetic mesh repair; however, type and shape of the mesh are still a matter of controversy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical properties of four conventional meshes: pure polypropylene mesh (PP-P), polypropylene/poliglecaprone mesh (PP-U), polyvinylidenefluoride/polypropylene mesh (PVDF-I), and pure polyvinylidenefluoride mesh (PVDF-S). Meshes were tested either in warp direction (parallel to production direction) or perpendicular to the warp direction. A Zwick testing machine was used to measure elasticity and effective porosity of the textile probes. Stretching of the meshes in warp direction required forces that were up to 85-fold higher than the same elongation in perpendicular direction. Stretch stress led to loss of effective porosity in most meshes, except for PVDF-S. Biomechanical impact of the mesh was additionally evaluated in a hiatal hernia model. The different meshes were used either as rectangular patches or as circular meshes. Circular meshes led to a significant reinforcement of the hiatus, largely unaffected by the orientation of the warp fibers. In contrast, rectangular meshes provided a significant reinforcement only when warp fibers ran perpendicular to the crura. Anisotropic elasticity of prosthetic meshes should therefore be considered in hiatal closure with rectangular patches. PMID:24599834

  10. Resorbable synthetic mesh supported with omentum flap in the treatment of giant hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Pérez Lara, F J; Marín, R; del Rey, A; Oliva, H

    2014-01-01

    Covering a large hiatal hernia with a mesh has become a basic procedure in the last few years. However, mesh implants are associated with high complication rates (esophageal erosion, perforation, fistula, etc.). We propose using a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap as a possible solution to this problem. A 54-year-old female patient with a large hiatal defect (9 cm) was laparoscopically implanted with a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap. The surgical procedure was successful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. On a follow-up examination 6 months after surgery, she remained free of relapse or complication signs. Supporting an implanted resorbable mesh with an omental flap may be a solution to the problems posed by large esophageal hiatus defects. However, more studies based on larger patient samples and longer follow-up periods are necessary. PMID:25216419

  11. Resorbable Synthetic Mesh Supported With Omentum Flap in the Treatment of Giant Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Lara, F. J.; Marín, R.; del Rey, A.; Oliva, H.

    2014-01-01

    Covering a large hiatal hernia with a mesh has become a basic procedure in the last few years. However, mesh implants are associated with high complication rates (esophageal erosion, perforation, fistula, etc.). We propose using a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap as a possible solution to this problem. A 54-year-old female patient with a large hiatal defect (9 cm) was laparoscopically implanted with a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap. The surgical procedure was successful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. On a follow-up examination 6 months after surgery, she remained free of relapse or complication signs. Supporting an implanted resorbable mesh with an omental flap may be a solution to the problems posed by large esophageal hiatus defects. However, more studies based on larger patient samples and longer follow-up periods are necessary. PMID:25216419

  12. Management of large para-esophageal hiatal hernias.

    PubMed

    Collet, D; Luc, G; Chiche, L

    2013-12-01

    Para-esophageal hernias are relatively rare and typically occur in elderly patients. The various presenting symptoms are non-specific and often occur in combination. These include symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux (GERD) in 26 to 70% of cases, microcytic anemia in 17 to 47%, and respiratory symptoms in 9 to 59%. Respiratory symptoms are not completely resolved by surgical intervention. Acute complications such as gastric volvulus with incarceration or strangulation are rare (estimated incidence of 1.2% per patient per year) but gastric ischemia leading to perforation is the main cause of mortality. Only patients with symptomatic hernias should undergo surgery. Prophylactic repair to prevent acute incarceration should only be undertaken in patients younger than 75 in good condition; surgical indications must be discussed individually beyond this age. The laparoscopic approach is now generally accepted. Resection of the hernia sac is associated with a lower incidence of recurrence. Repair of the hiatus can be reinforced with prosthetic material (either synthetic or biologic), but the benefit of prosthetic repair has not been clearly shown. Results of prosthetic reinforcement vary in different studies; it has been variably associated with four times fewer recurrences or with no measurable difference. A Collis type gastroplasty may be useful to lengthen a foreshortened esophagus, but no objective criteria have been defined to support this approach. The anatomic recurrence rate can be as high as 60% at 12years. But most recurrences are asymptomatic and do not affect the quality of life index. It therefore seems more appropriate to evaluate functional results and quality of life measures rather than to gauge success by a strict evaluation of anatomic hernia reduction. PMID:24060742

  13. Acute gastric volvulus: a deadly but commonly forgotten complication of hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Brandon; Vincentelli, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare condition resulting from rotation of the stomach beyond 180 degrees. It is a difficult condition to diagnose, mostly because it is rarely considered. Furthermore, the imaging findings are often subtle resulting in many cases being diagnosed at the time of surgery or, as in our case, at autopsy. We present the case of a 76-year-old man with an extensive medical history, including coronary artery disease with multiple bypass grafts, who became diaphoretic and nauseated while eating. His presumptive diagnosis at arrival to the hospital was an acute coronary event; however, his initial cardiac work-up was negative. A computed tomography scan revealed a type III hiatal hernia. The following day, after consistent complaints of nausea and episodes of nonbloody emesis, he suddenly became hypotensive, tachycardic and had an episode of coffee-ground emesis. Subsequently, the patient's condition suddenly deteriorated and resuscitation attempts were unsuccessful. The autopsy revealed a partially sliding hiatal hernia, which was consistent with the radiologic impression. Additionally, a gastric volvulus was present with extensive, focally transmural necrosis involving the body/fundus. Gastric volvulus is a rare entity with variable, nonspecific clinical presentations, which requires a high level of suspicion for radiologic diagnosis. Acute cases have a high mortality rate and require emergency surgery. This case highlights the value of autopsy in the diagnosis of unsuspected cases of gastric volvulus when death occurs prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284537

  14. Hill classification is superior to the axial length of a hiatal hernia for assessment of the mechanical anti-reflux barrier at the gastroesophageal junction

    PubMed Central

    Hansdotter, Ida; Björ, Ove; Andreasson, Anna; Agreus, Lars; Hellström, Per; Forsberg, Anna; Talley, Nicholas J.; Vieth, Michael; Wallner, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is multifactorial, including the mechanical anti-reflux barrier of the gastroesophageal junction. This barrier can be evaluated endoscopically in two ways: by measuring the axial length of any hiatal hernia present or by assessing the gastroesophageal flap valve. The endoscopic measurement of axial length is troublesome because of the physiological dynamics in the area. Grading the gastroesophageal flap valve is easier and has proven reproducible. The aim of the present study was to compare the two endoscopic grading methods with regard to associations with GERD. Patients and methods: Population-based subjects underwent endoscopic examination assessing the axial length of hiatus hernia, the gastroesophageal flap valve using the Hill classification, esophagitis using the Los Angeles (LA) classification, and columnar metaplasia using the Z-line appearance (ZAP) classification. Biopsies were taken from the squamocolumnar junction to assess the presence of intestinal metaplasia. Symptoms were recorded with the validated Abdominal Symptom Questionnaire. GERD was defined according to the Montreal definition. Results: In total, 334 subjects were included in the study and underwent endoscopy; 86 subjects suffered from GERD and 211 presented no symptoms or signs of GERD. Based on logistic regression, the estimated area under the curve statistic (AUC) for Hill (0.65 [95 %CI 0.59 – 0.72]) was higher than the corresponding estimate for the axial length of a hiatal hernia (0.61 [95 %CI 0.54 – 0.68]), although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.225). Conclusion: From our data, and in terms of association with GERD, the Hill classification was slightly stronger compared to the axial length of a hiatal hernia, but we could not verify that the Hill classification was superior as a predictor. The Hill classification may replace the axial length of a hiatal

  15. Cardiac complications after laparoscopic large hiatal hernia repair. Is it related with staple fixation of the mesh? -Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Maria del Carmen; Diaz, María; López, Fernando; Martí-Obiol, Roberto; Ortega, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic Nissen operation with mesh reinforcement remains being the most popular operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Complications related to mesh placement have been widely described. Cardiac complications are rare, but have a fatal outcome if they are misdiagnosed. Presentation of cases We sought to outline our institutional experience of three patients who developed cardiac complications following a laparoscopic Nissen operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Discussion Laparoscopic hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication are safe and effective procedures for the hiatal hernia repair, but they are not exempt from complications. Fixation technique and material used must be taken into account. We have conducted a review of the literature on complications related to these procedures. Conclusion In the differential diagnosis of hemodynamic instability after laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair, cardiac tamponade and other cardiac complications should be considered. PMID:26635954

  16. The laparoscopic hiatoplasty with antireflux surgery is a safe and effective procedure to repair giant hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although minimally invasive repair of giant hiatal hernias is a very surgical challenge which requires advanced laparoscopic learning curve, several reports showed that is a safe and effective procedure, with lower morbidity than open approach. In the present study we show the outcomes of 13 patients who underwent a laparoscopic repair of giant hiatal hernia. Methods A total of 13 patients underwent laparoscopic posterior hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication. Follow-up evaluation was done clinically at intervals of 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery using the Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Health-Related Quality of Life scale, a barium swallow study, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, an oesophageal manometry, a combined ambulatory 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring. Anatomic recurrence was defined as any evidence of gastric herniation above the diaphragmatic edge. Results There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open technique. Symptomatic GORD-HQL outcomes demonstrated a statistical significant decrease of mean value equal to 3.2 compare to 37.4 of preoperative assessment (p < 0.0001). Combined 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring after 12 months did not show any evidence of pathological acid or non acid reflux. Conclusion All patients were satisfied of procedure and no hernia recurrence was recorded in the study group, treated respecting several crucial surgical principles, e.g., complete sac excision, appropriate crural closure, also with direct hiatal defect where possible, and routine use of antireflux procedure. PMID:24401085

  17. Evaluation of conventional laparoscopic versus robot-assisted laparoscopic redo hiatal hernia and antireflux surgery: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tolboom, Robert C; Draaisma, Werner A; Broeders, Ivo A M J

    2016-03-01

    Surgery for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia leads to recurrence or persisting dysphagia in a minority of patients. Redo antireflux surgery in GERD and hiatal hernia is known for higher morbidity and mortality. This study aims to evaluate conventional versus robot-assisted laparoscopic redo antireflux surgery, with the objective to detect possible advantages for the robot-assisted approach. A single institute cohort of 75 patients who underwent either conventional laparoscopic or robot-assisted laparoscopic redo surgery for recurrent GERD or severe dysphagia between 2008 and 2013 were included in the study. Baseline characteristics, symptoms, medical history, procedural data, hospital stay, complications and outcome were prospectively gathered. The main indications for redo surgery were dysphagia, pyrosis or a combination of both in combination with a proven anatomic abnormality. The mean time to redo surgery was 1.9 and 2.0 years after primary surgery for the conventional and robot-assisted groups, respectively. The number of conversions was lower in the robot-assisted group compared to conventional laparoscopy (1/45 vs. 5/30, p = 0.035) despite a higher proportion of patients with previous surgery by laparotomy (9/45 vs. 1/30, p = 0.038). Median hospital stay was reduced by 1 day (3 vs. 4, p = 0.042). There were no differences in mortality, complications or outcome. Robotic support, when available, can be regarded beneficial in redo surgery for GERD and hiatal hernia. Results of this observational study suggest technical feasibility for minimal-invasive robot-assisted redo surgery after open primary antireflux surgery, a reduced number of conversions and shorter hospital stay. PMID:26809755

  18. Hiatal Hernia After Open versus Minimally Invasive Esophagectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Oor, J E; Wiezer, M J; Hazebroek, E J

    2016-08-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is an infrequent yet potentially life-threatening complication after esophagectomy. Several studies have reported the incidence of this complication after both open and minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE). This meta-analysis aimed to determine the pooled incidence of HH after both types of esophagectomy and, importantly, to provide insight in the outcome of subsequent HH repair. A systematic search was performed of the PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases. Article selection was performed using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) criteria. Articles describing the incidence of HH after different open and minimally invasive techniques were included. Only when five or more comparable studies reported on the same outcome were data pooled. The incidence of postoperative HH and the outcome of HH repair were analyzed. Twenty-six studies published between 1985 and 2015 were included, describing a total of 6058 patients who underwent esophagectomy, of whom 240 were diagnosed with a postoperative HH. The pooled incidence of symptomatic HH after MIE was 4.5 %, compared to a pooled incidence of 1.0 % after open esophagectomy. 11 studies reported on the outcome of HH repair in 125 patients. A pooled morbidity rate after HH repair of 25 % was found. During follow-up, a pooled recurrence rate of 14 % was reported in 11 of the included studies. The pooled incidence of HH after MIE is higher compared to open esophagectomy. Most importantly, surgical repair of these HHs is associated with a high morbidity rate. Both radiologists and surgeons should be aware of this rare yet potentially life-threatening complication. PMID:26926480

  19. Transmural gastric migration of dual-sided PTFE/ePTFEE mesh after laparoscopic surgery for a recurrent hiatal hernia with dysphagia: case report.

    PubMed

    Acin-Gandara, D; Miliani-Molina, C; Carneros-Martin, Ja; Martinez-Pineiro, J; Vega, M De; Pereira-Perez, F

    2014-01-01

    Several series have shown that laparoscopic fundoplication is feasible and safe for the treatment of hiatal hernia, although a high recurrence rate of 42% has been published. The use of mesh repair in these hernias has shown fewer recurrences than primary suture with small number of complications reported.Some of these are severe fibrosis within the hiatus, mesh erosion of the intestinal wall, esophageal strictures, mesh migration into the upper gastrointestinal tract and esophageal perforations. We present a case with late erosion and complete transmural gastric migration of the mesh after surgery. In these cases, the patients may require complex surgical intervention.That was not the case in our patient, who did not require further surgery because the mesh migrated completely. It is therefore advisable to use a mesh very selectively for the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernias, taking into account the surgeon's experience, the anatomy of the hiatus and the symptoms of the patient. PMID:25149620

  20. Reversibility of cardiopulmonary impairment after laparoscopic repair of large hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Asti, Emanuele; Bonavina, Luigi; Lombardi, Massimo; Bandera, Francesco; Secchi, Francesco; Guazzi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Giant hiatus hernia with or without intrathoracic gastric volvulus often presents with symptoms suggestive of both cardiac and pulmonary compression. Cardiopulmonary impairment may be reversible in these patients by laparoscopic crural repair and fundoplication as shown in this case report. Cardiac magnetic resonance and the cardiopulmonary exercise test may help selecting patients for surgery. These preliminary findings led us to start a prospective study using this multimodality diagnostic approach. PMID:26210719

  1. Cameron Lesions in Patients with Hiatal Hernias: Prevalence, Presentation, and Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Darrell M.; Kushnir, Vladimir; Kalra, Gorav; Rosenstock, Aron; Alsakka, Mohammed A.; Patel, Amit; Sayuk, Gregory; Gyawali, C. Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims Cameron lesions, as defined by erosions and ulcerations at the diaphragmatic hiatus, are found in the setting of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in patients with a hiatus hernia (HH). The study aim was to determine the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of Cameron lesions. Patients and methods This is a retrospective cohort study evaluating consecutive patients undergoing upper endoscopy over a two year period. Endoscopy reports were systematically reviewed to determine presence or absence of Cameron lesions and hiatus hernia. Inpatient and outpatient records were reviewed to determine prevalence, risk factors, and outcome of medical treatment of Cameron lesions. Results Of 8260 upper endoscopic examinations, 1306 (20.2%) reported a HH. When categorized by size, 65.6% of HH were small (<3 cm), 23.0% moderate (3-4.9 cm) and 11.4% were large (≥5 cm). Of these, 43 patients (mean age 65.2 years, 49% female) had Cameron lesions, with a prevalence of 3.3% in the presence of HH. Prevalence was highest with large HH (12.8%). On univariate analysis, large HH, frequent NSAID use, GI bleeding (both occult and overt) and nadir hemoglobin level were significantly greater with Cameron lesions compared to HH without Cameron lesions (p≤0.03). Large HH size and NSAID use were identified as independent risk factors for Cameron lesions on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions Cameron lesions are more prevalent in the setting of large HH and NSAID use, can be associated with GI bleeding, and can respond to medical management. PMID:24758713

  2. Impact of hiatal hernia on histological pattern of non-erosive reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Hiatus hernia (HH) has major pathophysiological effects favoring gastroesophageal reflux and hence contributing to esophageal mucosa injury, especially in patients with severe gastroesophageal disease. However, prospective studies investigating the impact of HH on the esophageal mucosa in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) are lacking. This study evaluated the association between the presence of (HH) and the histological findings in symptomatic patients with NERD. Methods Fifty consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were enrolled. After conventional endoscopy, Lugol solution was applied and biopsy specimens were obtained. Histological parameters including basal zone hyperplasia, papillary length and cellular infiltration were evaluated. The chi-square test with Yates' correlation was used for comparing discrete parameters between groups. However, Fisher's exact probability test was used where the expected frequencies were lower than 5. Wilcoxon's test for unpaired samples was preferred in cases of semi-quantitative parameters. Results The presence of HH along with more severe findings (0.01

  3. Mechanisms of Barrett’s esophagus (clinical): LES dysfunction, hiatal hernia, peristaltic defects

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Barrett’s esophagus, with the potential to develop into esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), is a major complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, about 50% of patients developing EAC had no known GERD beforehand. Hence, while GERD symptoms, esophagitis, and Barrett’s have a number of common determinants (esophagogastric junction (EGJ) incompetence, impaired esophageal clearance mechanisms, hiatus hernia) they also have some independent determinants. Further, although excess esophageal acid exposure plays a major role in the genesis of long-segment Barrett’s esophagus there is minimal evidence supporting this for short-segment Barrett’s. Hence, these may have unique pathophysiological features as well. Long-segment Barrett’s seems to share most, if not all, of the risk factors for esophagitis, particularly high-grade esophagitis. However, it is uncertain if EGJ function and acid clearance are more severely impaired in patients with long-segment Barrett’s compared to patients with high-grade esophagitis. With respect to short-segment Barrett’s, the acid pocket may play an important pathogenic role. Conceptually, extension of the acid pocket into the distal esophagus, also known as intra-sphincteric reflux, provides a mechanism or acid exposure of the distal esophageal mucosa without the occurrence of discrete reflux events, which are more likely to prompt reflux symptoms and lead to the development of esophagitis. Hence, intra-sphincteric reflux related to extension of the acid/no acid interface at the proximal margin of the acid pocket may be key in the development of short segment Barrett’s. However, currently this is still somewhat speculative and further studies are required to confirm this. PMID:25743453

  4. Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... surrounds the muscle. This layer is called the fascia. Which type of hernia you have depends on ... problems. Surgery repairs the weakened abdominal wall tissue (fascia) and closes any holes. Most hernias are closed ...

  5. Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a hernia. Sometimes, hernias occur with: Heavy lifting Straining while using the toilet Any activity that ... Extra weight Fluid in the abdomen ( ascites ) Heavy lifting Peritoneal dialysis Poor nutrition Smoking Overexertion Undescended testicles

  6. [Perineal hernia].

    PubMed

    Mandarano, R; Giorgi, G; Venturini, N; Mancini, E; Natale, A; Tiburzi, C

    1999-01-01

    The authors base this study on a case of perineal hernia referred to their attention. In the light of the scant international literature on this subject, they focus on the topographical anatomy of the pelvic floor in order to gain a clearer understanding of this pathology, as well as their classification into median, lateral, anterior and posterior forms. Above all, the authors draw attention to the importance of the differential diagnosis of perineal hernia from Bartholin cysts or vulvar tumours in relation to anterior perineal hernia, and perianal abscesses in relation to posterior hernia. They underline the value of ultrasonography or TAC during the diagnostic procedure. Lastly, they examine the channels of aggression for this type of hernia which may be abdominal, perianal or combined (abdominal and peri-anal), as well as the repair techniques used, varying from direct suture with non-absorbable material to the use of prolene mesh or flaps if the hernia breech is very large. PMID:10528488

  7. Fibrin Sealant: A Review of the History, Biomechanics, and Current Applications for Prosthetic Fixation in Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jefferson Tyler; Webb, David L; Stoikes, Nathaniel F N; Voeller, Guy R

    2015-11-01

    The role of surgical adhesives in hernia repair has continued to evolve. The purpose of this chapter is to review the role of fibrin sealant and its application in general surgery for mesh fixation, specifically the history, biomechanics, and clinical utilization. The utilization of fibrin sealant for repair of groin hernias, both open and laparoscopic, ventral hernias, and hiatal hernias will be discussed. PMID:26696538

  8. Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair: current controversies.

    PubMed

    Soper, Nathaniel J; Teitelbaum, Ezra N

    2013-10-01

    The advent of laparoscopy has significantly improved postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing surgical repair of a paraesophageal hernia. Although this minimally invasive approach considerably reduces postoperative pain and recovery times, and may improve physiologic outcomes, laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair remains a complex operation requiring advanced laparoscopic skills and experience with the anatomy of the gastroesophageal junction and diaphragmatic hiatus. In this article, we describe our approach to patient selection, preoperative evaluation, operative technique, and postoperative management. Specific attention is paid to performing an adequate hiatal dissection and esophageal mobilization, the decision of whether to use a mesh to reinforce the crural repair, and construction of an adequate antireflux barrier (ie, fundoplication). PMID:24105282

  9. Laparoscopic Repair of Paraesophageal Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Borao, Frank; Squillaro, Anthony; Mansson, Jonas; Barker, William; Baker, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopy has quickly become the standard surgical approach to repair paraesophageal hernias. Although many centers routinely perform this procedure, relatively high recurrence rates have led many surgeons to question this approach. We sought to evaluate outcomes in our cohort of patients with an emphasis on recurrence rates and symptom improvement and their correlation with true radiologic recurrence seen on contrast imaging. Methods: We retrospectively identified 126 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic repair of a large paraesophageal hernia between 2000 and 2010. Clinical outcomes were reviewed, and data were collected regarding operative details, perioperative and postoperative complications, symptoms, and follow-up imaging. Radiologic evidence of any size hiatal hernia was considered to indicate a recurrence. Results: There were 95 female and 31 male patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 71 ± 14 years. Laparoscopic repair was completed successfully in 120 of 126 patients, with 6 operations converted to open procedures. Crural reinforcement with mesh was performed in 79% of patients, and 11% underwent a Collis gastroplasty. Fundoplications were performed in 90% of patients: Nissen (112), Dor (1), and Toupet (1). Radiographic surveillance, obtained at a mean time interval of 23 months postoperatively, was available in 89 of 126 patients (71%). Radiographic evidence of a recurrence was present in 19 patients (21%). Reoperation was necessary in 6 patients (5%): 5 for symptomatic recurrence (4%) and 1 for dysphagia (1%). The median length of stay was 4 days. Conclusion: Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair results in an excellent outcome with a short length of stay when performed at an experienced center. Radiologic recurrence is observed relatively frequently with routine surveillance; however, many of these recurrences are small, and few patients require correction of the recurrence. Furthermore, these

  10. The role of hiatus hernia in GERD.

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Increased esophageal acid exposure in gastroesophageal reflux disease has several potential causes, some related primarily to physiological dysfunction of the LES and others related to anatomic distortion of the gastroesophageal junction as occurs with hiatus hernia. One attractive feature of implicating hiatal hernias in the pathogenesis of reflux disease is that, like reflux disease, axial hernias become more common with age and obesity. However, the importance of hiatus hernia is obscured by imprecise definition and an all-or-none conceptualization that has led to wide variation in estimates of prevalence among normal or diseased populations. There are at least three potentially significant radiographic features of a hiatus hernia: axial length during distention, axial length at rest, and competence of the diaphragmatic hiatus. Although any or all of these features may be abnormal in a particular instance of hiatus hernia, each is of different functional significance. Grouping all abnormalities of the gastroesophageal junction as "hiatus hernia" without detailing the specifics of each case defies logic. Mechanistically, the gastroesophageal junction must protect against reflux both in static and dynamic conditions. During abrupt increases in intra-abdominal pressure, the crural diaphragm normally serves as a "second sphincter," and this mechanism is substantially impaired in individuals with a gaping hiatus. Large, non-reducing hernias also impair the process of esophageal emptying, thereby prolonging acid clearance time following a reflux event (especially while in the supine posture). These anatomically-determined functional impairments of the gastroesophageal junction lead to increased esophageal acid exposure. Thus, although hiatus hernia may or may not be an initiating factor at the inception of reflux disease, it clearly can act as a sustaining factor accounting for the frequently observed chronicity of the disease. PMID:10780571

  11. Umbilical hernia

    MedlinePlus

    An umbilical hernia is an outward bulging (protrusion) of the lining of the abdomen or part of the abdominal ... An umbilical hernia in an infant occurs when the muscle through which the umbilical cord passes does not close ...

  12. [Lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Teiblum, Sandra Sofie; Hjørne, Flemming Pii; Bisgaard, Thue

    2010-03-22

    Lumbar hernia is a rare condition. Lumbar hernia should be considered a rare differential diagnosis to unexplained back pain. Symptoms are scarce and diffuse and can vary with the size and content of the hernia. As there is a 25% risk of incarceration, operation is indicated even in asymptomatic hernias. We report a case of lumbar hernia in a woman with a slow growing mass in the lumbar region. She presented with pain and a computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. She underwent open surgery and fully recovered with recurrence within the first half year. PMID:20334799

  13. Esophagogastric junction distensibility in hiatus hernia.

    PubMed

    Lottrup, C; McMahon, B P; Ejstrud, P; Ostapiuk, M A; Funch-Jensen, P; Drewes, A M

    2016-07-01

    Hiatus hernia is known to be an important risk factor for developing gastroesophageal reflux disease. We aimed to use the endoscopic functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP) to evaluate the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. EndoFLIP assessments were made in 30 patients with hiatus hernia and Barrett's esophagus, and in 14 healthy controls. The EndoFLIP was placed straddling the esophagogastric junction and the bag distended stepwise to 50 mL. Cross-sectional areas of the bag and intra-bag pressures were recorded continuously. Measurements were made in the separate sphincter components and hiatus hernia cavity. EndoFLIP measured functional aspects such as sphincter distensibility and pressure of all esophagogastric junction components and visualized all hiatus hernia present at endoscopy. The lower esophageal sphincter in hiatus hernia patients had a lower pressure (e.g. 47.7 ± 13.0 vs. 61.4 ± 19.2 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the common esophagogastric junction in controls. In hiatus hernia patients, the crural diaphragm had a lower pressure (e.g. 29.6 ± 10.1 vs. 47.7 ± 13.0 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the lower esophageal sphincter. There was a significant association between symptom scores in patients and EndoFLIP assessment. Conclusively, EndoFLIP was a useful tool. To evaluate the presence of a hiatus hernia and to measure the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. Furthermore, EndoFLIP distinguished the separate esophagogastric junction components in hiatus hernia patients, and may help us understand the biomechanics of the esophagogastric junction and the mechanisms behind hiatal herniation. PMID:25789842

  14. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  15. Umbilical hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    Umbilical hernia repair is surgery to repair an umbilical hernia . An umbilical hernia is a sac (pouch) formed from the ... the hole or weak spot caused by the umbilical hernia. Your surgeon may also lay a piece ...

  16. Transthoracic Collis-Nissen repair for massive type IV paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed

    Itano, Hideki; Okamoto, Shiroh; Kodama, Kanji; Horita, Naokatsu

    2008-09-01

    An 80-year-old woman presented with type IV massive hiatal hernia with intrathoracic upside-down stomach and transverse colon. She was dyspneic and vomited upon consuming food or water. Consequently, she developed aspiration pneumonia. Both esophagoscopy and upper gastrointestinal series demonstrated significant cephalad displacement of the gastroesophageal junction. A Collis-Nissen hernial repair by muscle-sparing mini-thoracotomy was performed successfully. To date, 3 years after surgery, the patient is enjoying normal oral intake, has an excellent activities of daily living level, and there is no hernia recurrence. Cases of massive paraesophageal hernia are frequently associated with esophageal shortening that causes tension on the repairs and late failure. Advantages of the transthoracic approach in such cases include feasibility of direct esophageal mobilization, accurate assessment of esophageal tension, and facilitation of Collis gastroplasty. The true indication for transthoracic Collis-Nissen repair among cases of paraesophageal hiatal hernia with a short esophagus should be acknowledged more in the era of laparoscopy. PMID:18791669

  17. Correlations of third-trimester hiatal biometry obtained using four-dimensional translabial ultrasonography with the delivery route in nulliparous pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate normal hiatal dimensions in the third trimester in nulliparous Thai pregnant women and to establish which biometric factors were associated with various pregnancy outcomes. Methods: Fifty-seven consecutive nulliparous pregnant Thai women in their third trimester were recruited on a voluntary basis from April to October 2014. All subjects underwent four-dimensional (4D) translabial ultrasonography. Hiatal biometric parameters were measured at rest, while performing a Valsalva maneuver, and during contraction. Information about the patients’ eventual deliveries was obtained from their medical records. Results: The mean values of the patients’ age, body mass index, and gestational age at the time of examination were 27.4±5.47 years, 26.7±3.48 kg/m2, and 36.6±1.49 weeks, respectively. No subjects had vaginal lumps or experienced prolapse greater than stage 1 of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system. Ultrasonography showed that the mean values of the hiatal area at rest, while performing a Valsalva maneuver, and during contraction were 13.10±2.92 cm2, 17.50±4.81 cm2, and 9.69±2.09 cm2, respectively. The hiatal area at rest, the axial measurement at rest, and the axial measurement while performing a Valsalva maneuver were significantly associated with the route of delivery (P=0.02, P=0.04, and P=0.03, respectively). Conclusion: The route of delivery was associated with hiatal biometric values measured using 4D translabial ultrasonography, based on the results of nulliparous Thai women in the third trimester. PMID:26403960

  18. Paraesophageal Hernia Repair With Partial Longitudinal Gastrectomy in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, John; El-Hayek, Kevin; Brethauer, Stacy; Schauer, Philip; Zelisko, Andrea; Chand, Bipan; O'Rourke, Colin; Kroh, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with hiatal hernia in obese patients has proven difficult, as studies demonstrate poor symptom control and high failure rates in this patient population. Recent data have shown that incorporating weight loss procedures into the treatment of reflux may improve overall outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 28 obese and morbidly obese patients who presented from December 2007 through July 2013 with large or recurrent type 3 or 4 paraesophageal hernia. All of the patients underwent combined paraesophageal hernia repair and partial longitudinal gastrectomy. Charts were retrospectively reviewed, and the patients were contacted to determine symptomatic relief. Results: Mean preoperative body mass index was 38.1 ± 4.9 kg/m2. Anatomic failure of prior fundoplication occurred in 7 patients (25%). The remaining 21 had primary paraesophageal hernia, 3 of which were type 4. Postoperative complications included pulmonary embolism (n = 1), pulmonary decompensation (n = 2), and wound infection (n = 1). Mean hospital stay was 5 ± 3 days. Upper gastrointestinal esophagogram was performed in 21 patients with no immediate recurrence or staple line dehiscence. Mean excess weight loss was 44 ± 25%. All of the patients surveyed experienced near to total resolution of their preoperative symptoms within the first month. At 1 year, symptom scores decreased significantly. At 27 months, however, there was a mild increase in the scores. Return of severe symptoms occurred in 2 patients, both of whom underwent conversion to gastric bypass. Conclusions: Combined laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair with longitudinal partial gastrectomy offers a safe, feasible approach to the management of large or recurrent paraesophageal hernia in well-selected obese and morbidly obese patients. Short-term results were promising; however, intermediate results showed increasing rates of reflux symptoms that required

  19. Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... the likelihood of a hernia including persistent coughing, difficulty with bowel movements or urination, or frequent need for straining. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair? Keep reading... Page 1 of 2 1 2 » Brought to ...

  20. Hernias (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with them. Hernias in kids can be treated (hernia repair is the one of the most common surgeries ... intestine that is caught and squeezed in the groin area may block the passage of food though ...

  1. Robotic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Escobar Dominguez, Jose E; Gonzalez, Anthony; Donkor, Charan

    2015-09-01

    Inguinal hernias have been described throughout the history of medicine with many efforts to achieve the cure. Currently, with the advantages of minimally invasive surgery, new questions arise: what is going to be the best approach for inguinal hernia repair? Is there a real benefit with the robotic approach? Should minimally invasive hernia surgery be the standard of care? In this report we address these questions by describing our experience with robotic inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26153353

  2. Incarcerated recurrent Amyand's hernia

    PubMed Central

    Quartey, Benjamin; Ugochukwu, Obinna; Kuehn, Reed; Ospina, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Amyand's hernia is a rarity and a recurrent case is extremely rare. A 71-year-old male with a previous history of right inguinal hernia repair presented to the emergency department with a 1-day history of pain in the right groin. A physical examination revealed a nonreducible right inguinal hernia. A computed tomography scan showed a 1.3-cm appendix with surrounding inflammation within a right inguinal hernia. An emergent right groin exploration revealed an incarcerated and injected non-perforated appendix and an indirect hernia. Appendectomy was performed through the groin incision, and the indirect hernia defect was repaired with a biological mesh (Flex-HD). We hereby present this unique case – the first reported case of recurrent Amyand's hernia and a literature review of this anatomical curiosity. PMID:23248506

  3. Two Ports Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Medhat M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Several laparoscopic treatment techniques were designed for improving the outcome over the last decade. The various techniques differ in their approach to the inguinal internal ring, suturing and knotting techniques, number of ports used in the procedures, and mode of dissection of the hernia sac. Patients and Surgical Technique. 90 children were subjected to surgery and they undergone two-port laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia in children. Technique feasibility in relation to other modalities of repair was the aim of this work. 90 children including 75 males and 15 females underwent surgery. Hernia in 55 cases was right-sided and in 15 left-sided. Two patients had recurrent hernia following open hernia repair. 70 (77.7%) cases were suffering unilateral hernia and 20 (22.2%) patients had bilateral hernia. Out of the 20 cases 5 cases were diagnosed by laparoscope (25%). The patients' median age was 18 months. The mean operative time for unilateral repairs was 15 to 20 minutes and bilateral was 21 to 30 minutes. There was no conversion. The complications were as follows: one case was recurrent right inguinal hernia and the second was stitch sinus. Discussion. The results confirm the safety and efficacy of two ports laparoscopic hernia repair in congenital inguinal hernia in relation to other modalities of treatment. PMID:25785196

  4. JAMA Patient Page: Abdominal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an operation. Umbilical hernia Abdominal wall Intestinal loop Peritoneum Skin Peritoneum Umbilical annulus SYMPTOMS The first symptom of a ... vomiting, or constipation. Inguinal hernia Indirect inguinal hernia Peritoneum Deep inguinal ring Inguinal canal Superficial inguinal ring ...

  5. Toxoplasma gondii infection and abdominal hernia: evidence of a new association

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We performed a retrospective, observational study in 1156 adult subjects from the general population of Durango City, Mexico, Fifty five subjects with a history of abdominal hernia repair and 1101 subjects without hernia were examined with enzyme-linked immunoassays for the presence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies. Results The seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies and IgG titers was significantly higher in subjects with abdominal hernia repair than those without hernia. There was a tendency for subjects with hernia repair to have a higher seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgM antibodies than subjects without hernia. The seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies in subjects with hernia repair was significantly higher in subjects ≥ 50 years old than those < 50 years old. Further analysis in subjects aged ≥ 50 years showed that the seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies was also significantly higher in individuals with hernia repair than those without hernia (OR = 2.72; 95% CI: 1.10-6.57). Matching by age and sex further showed that the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma infection was significantly higher in patients with hernia repair than those without hernia (OR: 4.50; 95% CI: 1.22-17.33). Conclusions Results indicate that infection with Toxoplasma is associated with abdominal hernia. The contributing role of infection with Toxoplasma in abdominal hernia was observed mainly in subjects aged ≥ 50 years old. Our results might have clinical, prevention and treatment implications and warrant for further investigation. PMID:21682896

  6. Inguinal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips for applicants; human subjects research information; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and small business programs Research Programs & Contacts Research program and staff ...

  7. Athletic pubalgia (sports hernia).

    PubMed

    Litwin, Demetrius E M; Sneider, Erica B; McEnaney, Patrick M; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    Athletic pubalgia or sports hernia is a syndrome of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain that may occur in athletes and nonathletes. Because the differential diagnosis of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain is so broad, only a small number of patients with chronic lower abdomen and groin pain fulfill the diagnostic criteria of athletic pubalgia (sports hernia). The literature published to date regarding the cause, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of sports hernias is confusing. This article summarizes the current information and our present approach to this chronic lower abdomen and groin pain syndrome. PMID:21419964

  8. Association Between Thoracic Aortic Disease and Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Christian; Eriksson, Per; Franco‐Cereceda, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background The study hypothesis was that thoracic aortic disease (TAD) is associated with a higher‐than‐expected prevalence of inguinal hernia. Such an association has been reported for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and hernia. Unlike AAA, TAD is not necessarily detectable with clinical examination or ultrasound, and there are no population‐based screening programs for TAD. Therefore, conditions associated with TAD, such as inguinal hernia, are of particular clinical relevance. Methods and Results The prevalence of inguinal hernia in subjects with TAD was determined from nation‐wide register data and compared to a non‐TAD group (patients with isolated aortic stenosis). Groups were balanced using propensity score matching. Multivariable statistical analysis (logistic regression) was performed to identify variables independently associated with hernia. Hernia prevalence was 110 of 750 (15%) in subjects with TAD versus 29 of 301 (9.6%) in non‐TAD, P=0.03. This statistically significant difference remained after propensity score matching: 21 of 159 (13%) in TAD versus 14 of 159 (8.9%) in non‐TAD, P<0.001. Variables independently associated with hernia in multivariable analysis were male sex (odds ratio [OR] with 95% confidence interval [95% CI]) 3.4 (2.1 to 5.4), P<0.001; increased age, OR 1.02/year (1.004 to 1.04), P=0.014; and TAD, OR 1.8 (1.1 to 2.8), P=0.015. Conclusions The prevalence of inguinal hernia (15%) in TAD is higher than expected in a general population and higher in TAD, compared to non‐TAD. TAD is independently associated with hernia in multivariable analysis. Presence or history of hernia may be of importance in detecting TAD, and the association warrants further study. PMID:25146705

  9. Handlebar hernia in children.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P J; Green, M; Ramesh, A N

    2011-05-01

    Handlebar hernia is a rare form of traumatic abdominal wall hernia usually occurring in children. As the name suggests, it results from the blunt impact of a handlebar after a fall from a bicycle. A classic case is described of such a hernia occurring in a 14-year-old boy who presented with minimal external signs of injury, but was found to have significant traumatic disruption to the abdominal wall musculature and peritoneum, requiring surgical repair. A review of the English literature found only 25 cases of handlebar hernias in children less than 16 years of age. The average age is 9 years, and two-thirds of cases occur in boys. The frequency of associated visceral injury is low. The majority of reported cases were managed with surgical exploration and simple suture repair. Despite minimal signs on examination, the history should raise suspicion of significant underlying muscular disruption. PMID:21098798

  10. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some hernia repairs are performed using a small telescope known as a laparoscope. If your surgeon has ... in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). Laparoscopic repair offers a ...

  11. Hernias: inguinal and incisional.

    PubMed

    Kingsnorth, Andrew; LeBlanc, Karl

    2003-11-01

    In the past decade hernia surgery has been challenged by two new technologies: by laparoscopy, which has attempted to change the traditional open operative techniques, and by prosthetic mesh, which has achieved much lower recurrence rates. The demand by health care providers for increasingly efficient and cost-effective surgery has resulted in modifications to pathways of care to encourage more widespread adoption of day case, outpatient surgery, and local anaesthesia. In addition, the UK National Institute for Clinical Excellence has recommended strategies for bilateral and recurrent hernias. Here, we discuss these strategies and review some neglected aspects of hernia management such as trusses, antibiotic cover, return to work and activity, and emergency surgery. Many of the principles of management apply equally to inguinal and incisional hernias. We recommend that the more difficult and complex of the procedures be referred to specialists. PMID:14615114

  12. Diaphragmatic hernia following oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer – Are we too radical?

    PubMed Central

    Argenti, F.; Luhmann, A.; Dolan, R.; Wilson, M.; Podda, M.; Patil, P.; Shimi, S.; Alijani, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diaphragmatic herniation (DH) of abdominal contents into the thorax after oesophageal resection is a recognised and serious complication of surgery. While differences in pressure between the abdominal and thoracic cavities are important, the size of the hiatal defect is something that can be influenced surgically. As with all oncological surgery, safe resection margins are essential without adversely affecting necessary anatomical structure and function. However very little has been published looking at the extent of the hiatal resection. We aim to present a case series of patients who developed DH herniation post operatively in order to raise discussion about the ideal extent of surgical resection required. Methods We present a series of cases of two male and one female who had oesophagectomies for moderately and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the lower oesophagus who developed post-operative DH. We then conducted a detailed literature review using Medline, Pubmed and Google Scholar to identify existing guidance to avoid this complication with particular emphasis on the extent of hiatal resection. Discussion Extended incision and partial resection of the diaphragm are associated with an increased risk of postoperative DH formation. However, these more extensive excisions can ensure clear surgical margins. Post-operative herniation can be an early or late complication of surgery and despite the clear importance of hiatal resection only one paper has been published on this subject which recommends a more limited resection than was carried out in our cases. Conclusion This case series investigated the recommended extent of hiatal dissection in oesophageal surgery. Currently there is no clear guidance available on this subject and further studies are needed to ascertain the optimum resection margin that results in the best balance of oncological parameters vs. post operative morbidity. PMID:27158485

  13. Umbilical hernia repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Umbilical hernias are fairly common. They are obvious at birth and are caused by a small defect ... surgically. In most cases, by age 3 the umbilical hernia shrinks and closes without treatment. The indications ...

  14. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  15. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  16. Laparoscopic hernia repair--when is a hernia not a hernia?

    PubMed

    Bunting, David; Szczebiot, Lukasz; Cota, Alwyn

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of diagnoses can present as inguinal hernia. Laparoscopic techniques are being increasingly used in the repair of inguinal hernias and offer the potential benefit of identifying additional pathology. The authors present the first reported case of a hydrocele of the canal of Nuck diagnosed laparoscopically. We review the incidence of identifying additional pathology through laparoscopy for inguinal hernia repair. We suggest that in patients with atypical presenting features of a hernia, the transabdominal preperitoneal, rather than a totally extraperitoneal, approach to groin hernia repair should be considered because of its greater diagnostic potential. PMID:24398212

  17. Laparoscopic Hernia Repair—When Is a Hernia Not a Hernia?

    PubMed Central

    Szczebiot, Lukasz; Cota, Alwyn

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of diagnoses can present as inguinal hernia. Laparoscopic techniques are being increasingly used in the repair of inguinal hernias and offer the potential benefit of identifying additional pathology. The authors present the first reported case of a hydrocele of the canal of Nuck diagnosed laparoscopically. We review the incidence of identifying additional pathology through laparoscopy for inguinal hernia repair. We suggest that in patients with atypical presenting features of a hernia, the transabdominal preperitoneal, rather than a totally extraperitoneal, approach to groin hernia repair should be considered because of its greater diagnostic potential. PMID:24398212

  18. Inguinal hernia - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You or your child had surgery to repair an inguinal hernia caused by a weakness in the abdominal wall in your groin area. You or your child probably had general (asleep and pain-free) or spinal or epidural (numb from the waist down) anesthesia. If ...

  19. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... bulges out of a weak spot in the groin. Usually this tissue is part of the intestine. ... Your surgeon makes a cut (incision) in your groin area. The hernia is ... wall. This repairs the weakness in the wall. At the end ...

  20. Ventral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    You will probably receive general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free) for this surgery. If your hernia is small, you may receive a spinal or epidural block and medicine to relax you. You will be awake, but pain-free. Your surgeon will make a surgical cut in ...

  1. Sports Hernia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The minimal repair technique for sports hernias repairs only the weak area of the posterior abdominal wall along with decompressing the genitofemoral nerve. This technique has been shown to return athletes to competition rapidly. This study compares the clinical outcomes of the minimal repair technique with the traditional modified Bassini repair. Hypothesis: Athletes undergoing the minimal repair technique for a sports hernia would return to play more rapidly compared with athletes undergoing the traditional modified Bassini repair. Methods: A retrospective study of 28 patients who underwent sports hernia repair at the authors’ institution was performed. Fourteen patients underwent the modified Bassini repair, and a second group of 14 patients underwent the minimal repair technique. The 2 groups were compared with respect to time to return to sport, return to original level of competition, and clinical outcomes. Results: Patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at a median of 5.6 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks), which was significantly faster compared with the modified Bassini repair group, with a median return of 25.8 weeks (range, 4-112 weeks; P = 0.002). Thirteen of 14 patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at their previous level, while 9 of 14 patients in the Bassini group were able to return to their previous level of sport (P = 0.01). Two patients in each group had recurrent groin pain. One patient in the minimal repair group underwent revision hernia surgery for recurrent pain, while 1 patient in the Bassini group underwent hip arthroscopy for symptomatic hip pain. Conclusion: The minimal repair technique allows athletes with sports hernias to return to play faster than patients treated with the modified Bassini. PMID:24427419

  2. Terminal ileum gangrene secondary to a type IV paraesophageal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ching Tsai; Hsiao, Po Jen; Chiu, Chih Chien; Chan, Jenq Shyong; Lin, Yee Fung; Lo, Yuan Hung; Hsiao, Chia Jen

    2016-01-01

    Type IV paraesophageal hernia (PEH) is very rare, and is characterized by the intrathoracic herniation of the abdominal viscera other than the stomach into the chest. We describe a 78-year-old woman who presented at our emergency department because of epigastric pain that she had experienced over the past 24 h. On the day after admission, her pain became severe and was accompanied by right chest pain and dyspnea. Chest radiography revealed an intrathoracic intestinal gas bubble occupying the right lower lung field. Emergency explorative laparotomy identified a type IV PEH with herniation of only the terminal ileum through a hiatal defect into the right thoracic cavity. In this report, we also present a review of similar cases in the literature published between 1980 and 2015 in PubMed. There were four published cases of small bowel herniation into the thoracic cavity during this period. Our patient represents a rare case of an individual diagnosed with type IV PEH with incarceration of only the terminal ileum. PMID:26937153

  3. Unusual Complications of Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Emegoakor, CD; Dike, EI; Emegoakor, FC

    2014-01-01

    Incisional hernia represents a breakdown or loss of continuity of a fascial closure. These hernias are of particular concern not only for the high recurrence rates among them but also for the challenges that follow their repair. It is known to occur in 11-23% of laparotomies. This paper presents two unusual complications of incisional hernia managed by the authors. One ruptured incisional hernia with evisceration of gut and a case of incarcerated gravid uterus in a woman in labour. The case records of the two patients with unusual complications of incisional hernia were pooled and presented to highlight the clinical presentation and management options of this condition. The patient with ruptured hernia and eviscerated gut presented immediately and was resuscitated and the hernia repaired with polypropylene mesh. The patient with incarcerated uterus had caesarean section and mesh repair of the hernia. Incisional hernia can present with unusual complications. The management is very challenging. Good knowledge and skills are required to deal with this condition. PMID:25506498

  4. Unusual complications of incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Emegoakor, Cd; Dike, Ei; Emegoakor, Fc

    2014-11-01

    Incisional hernia represents a breakdown or loss of continuity of a fascial closure. These hernias are of particular concern not only for the high recurrence rates among them but also for the challenges that follow their repair. It is known to occur in 11-23% of laparotomies. This paper presents two unusual complications of incisional hernia managed by the authors. One ruptured incisional hernia with evisceration of gut and a case of incarcerated gravid uterus in a woman in labour. The case records of the two patients with unusual complications of incisional hernia were pooled and presented to highlight the clinical presentation and management options of this condition. The patient with ruptured hernia and eviscerated gut presented immediately and was resuscitated and the hernia repaired with polypropylene mesh. The patient with incarcerated uterus had caesarean section and mesh repair of the hernia. Incisional hernia can present with unusual complications. The management is very challenging. Good knowledge and skills are required to deal with this condition. PMID:25506498

  5. Pelvic Floor Ultrasound Imaging: Are Physiotherapists Interchangeable in the Assessment of Levator Hiatal Biometry?

    PubMed Central

    Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; Auchincloss, Cindy; McLean, Linda

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate inter-examiner reliability in the ultrasound (US) assessment of levator hiatal dimensions when different physiotherapists perform independent data acquisition and analysis. Methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, 14 asymptomatic nulliparous women were imaged at rest, during pelvic floor muscle contraction, and during Valsalva manoeuvre by two physiotherapists using three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) transperineal US. Examiners each measured the dimensions of the levator hiatus (area and antero-posterior and transverse diameters) from the US volumes they respectively acquired. Inter-examiner reliability was determined using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs), and inter-examiner agreement was determined using Bland–Altman analyses. Results: The ICC results demonstrated very good inter-examiner reliability (ICC=0.84–0.98); Bland–Altman results showed high inter-examiner agreement across all measurements. Conclusions: Trained examiners may be considered interchangeable in the US assessment of levator hiatal biometry. Overall, trained physiotherapists using transperineal US imaging to assess levator hiatal biometry can be confident when comparing their own clinical findings to those of their colleagues and to findings published in the literature. PMID:25922555

  6. Transient left paraduodenal hernia.

    PubMed

    Ovali, Gulgun Yilmaz; Orguc, Sebnem; Unlu, Murat; Pabuscu, Yuksel

    2005-09-01

    A 52-year-old woman with acute deterioration of recurrent abdominal pain was admitted to the hospital. Spiral computed tomography (CT) of abdomen was performed. A left paraduodenal hernia was identified on CT. There was no clinical sign or imaging finding suggesting intestinal obstruction or mesenteric ischemia. She refused surgical intervention since her pain was intermittant and decreasing. On the fifth day of hospitalization the patient's pain resolved completely and the follow-up CT demonstrated regression of the herniation. PMID:15994059

  7. [Congenital lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Peláez Mata, D J; Alvarez Muñoz, V; Fernández Jiménez, I; García Crespo, J M; Teixidor de Otto, J L

    1998-07-01

    Hernias in the lumbar region are abdominal wall defects that appear in two possible locations: the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft and the inferior lumbar triangle of Petit. There are 40 cases reported in the pediatric literature, and only 16 are considered congenital, associated with the lumbocostovertebral syndrome and/or meningomyelocele. A new case is presented. A premature newborn with a mass in the left flank that increases when the patient cries and reduces easily. The complementary studies confirm the diagnosis of lumbar hernia and reveal the presence of lumbocostovertebral syndrome associated. At the time of operation a well defined fascial defect at the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft is primarily closed. The diagnosis of lumbar hernia is not difficult to establish but it is necessary the screening of the lumbocostovertebral syndrome. We recommend the surgical treatment before 12 months of age; the objective is to close the defect primarily or to use prosthetic material if necessary. PMID:12602034

  8. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  9. Prosthetic Mesh Repair for Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Tatar, Cihad; Tüzün, İshak Sefa; Karşıdağ, Tamer; Kızılkaya, Mehmet Celal; Yılmaz, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Incarcerated inguinal hernia is a commonly encountered urgent surgical condition, and tension-free repair is a well-established method for the treatment of non-complicated cases. However, due to the risk of prosthetic material-related infections, the use of mesh in the repair of strangulated or incarcerated hernia has often been subject to debate. Recent studies have demonstrated that biomaterials represent suitable materials for performing urgent hernia repair. Certain studies recommend mesh repair only for cases where no bowel resection is required; other studies, however, recommend mesh repair for patients requiring bowel resection as well. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of different surgical techniques performed for strangulated hernia, and to evaluate the effect of mesh use on postoperative complications. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 151 patients who had been admitted to our hospital’s emergency department to undergo surgery for a diagnosis of incarcerated inguinal hernia. The patients were divided into two groups based on the applied surgical technique. Group 1 consisted of 112 patients treated with mesh-based repair techniques, while Group 2 consisted of 39 patients treated with tissue repair techniques. Patients in Group 1 were further divided into two sub-groups: one consisting of patients undergoing bowel resection (Group 3), and the other consisting of patients not undergoing bowel resection (Group 4). Results: In Group 1, it was observed that eight (7.14%) of the patients had wound infections, while two (1.78%) had hematomas, four (3.57%) had seromas, and one (0.89%) had relapse. In Group 2, one (2.56%) of the patients had a wound infection, while three (7.69%) had hematomas, one (2.56%) had seroma, and none had relapses. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to wound infection, seroma

  10. Laparoscopic paracolostomy hernia mesh repair.

    PubMed

    Virzí, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Virzí; Scaravilli, Francesco; Francesco, Scaravilli; Ragazzi, Salvatore; Salvatore, Ragazzi; Piazza, Diego; Diego, Piazza

    2007-12-01

    Paracolostomy hernia is a common occurrence, representing a late complication of stoma surgery. Different surgical techniques have been proposed to repair the wall defect, but the lowest recurrence rates are associated with the use of mesh. We present the case report of a patient in which laparoscopic paracolostomy hernia mesh repair has been successfully performed. PMID:18097321

  11. Vesicocutaneous fistula after sliding hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Varun; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sureka, Sanjoy

    2016-01-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias are usually direct inguinal hernias containing various abdominal viscera. The incidence of bladder forming a part of an inguinal hernia, called as “scrotal cystocele,” is 1–4%. The risk of bladder injury is as high as 12% when repairing this type of hernia. This case report emphasizes this aspect in a 65-year-old man who presented with urinary leak through the scrotal wound following right inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26941501

  12. CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Burton E.

    1954-01-01

    Treatment of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in infants is a matter of semi-emergency and should be done as soon as adequate preparations can be made because sometimes fatal complications develop swiftly. In preoperative preparation there is great advantage in thorough decompression of the abdominal viscera, stomach, bowel and bladder. As to operation, the author believes the abdominal approach has most to recommend it. In the postoperative period, continued gastric suction for a brief time, parenteral administration of fluids and use of a Mistogen tent with a high moist oxygen content will facilitate rapid recovery. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:13209363

  13. Delayed Presentation of Traumatic Right-Sided Diaphragmatic Hernia after Abdominoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jadlowiec, Caroline C.; Sakorafas, Lois U.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are rare and challenging to diagnose. Following trauma, diagnosis may occur immediately or in a delayed fashion. It is believed that left traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are more common as a result of the protective right-sided anatomic lie of the liver. If unrecognized, traumatic diaphragmatic injuries are subject to enlarge over time as a result of the normal pressure changes observed between the thoracic and abdominal cavities. Additionally, abrupt changes to the pressure gradients, such as those which occur with positive pressure ventilation or surgical manipulation of the abdominal wall, can act as a nidus for making an asymptomatic hernia symptomatic. We report our experience with a delayed traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia presenting with large bowel incarceration two months after abdominoplasty. In our review of the literature, we were unable to find any reports of delayed presentation of a traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia occurring acutely following abdominoplasty. PMID:24900935

  14. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  15. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Juan A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  16. Sports Hernia: Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain Can Be A Pain Page Content If ... speeds, sports hernias are frequently confused with common muscle strain ,” says Michael Sampson, DO, who practices in ...

  17. A technique for the laparoscopic repair of paraoesophageal hernia without mesh.

    PubMed

    D'Netto, Trevor J; Falk, Gregory L

    2014-04-01

    Laparoscopic paraoesophageal hernia repair is a challenging procedure, both in surgical technical difficulty and in prevention of recurrence, in the setting of operating on an older patient cohort with associated co-morbidities. However, modifications based on sound surgical principles can lead to better outcomes. This article describes and illustrates in detail the technique for the laparoscopic repair of paraoesophageal hernia without mesh with cardio-oesophageal junction fixation. The data and results of the study supporting this technique have been published previously by Gibson et al. (Surgical Endoscopy 27: 618-623, 2013). The previously published article has reported on the numbers of patients, mean age, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification System, body mass index, duration of follow-up, complications, Visick scores and quality of life pre- and post-operatively. The principles of complete reduction of the hernia sac, preservation of both crura, mobilisation of the phreno-oesophageal ligament and phreno-gastric attachments, adequate mediastinal mobilisation of the oesophagus and the cardio-oesophageal junction into the abdomen without tension, preservation of both vagi, a tension-free crural repair including the fascial aspects adjacent to the diaphragm, an anterior hiatal repair in combination with the recognised posterior approximation, a loose fundoplication and a secure cardiopexy to the median arcuate ligament and multiple points of attachment; we have found leads to good operative results(Gibson et. al.) without the need for mesh. This article outlines in detail the operative technique guided by these principles with annotated intra-operative photographs illustrating the anatomy and procedure. The technique used by our team since March 2009 for the last 154 cases, based on the experience of an aggregate of 544 cases since 1999, we believe results in an acceptable level of symptomatic and anatomic recurrence without using

  18. A genome-wide association study identifies four novel susceptibility loci underlying inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Eric; Makki, Nadja; Shen, Ling; Chen, David C.; Tian, Chao; Eckalbar, Walter L.; Hinds, David; Ahituv, Nadav; Avins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most commonly performed operations in the world, yet little is known about the genetic mechanisms that predispose individuals to develop inguinal hernias. We perform a genome-wide association analysis of surgically confirmed inguinal hernias in 72,805 subjects (5,295 cases and 67,510 controls) and confirm top associations in an independent cohort of 92,444 subjects with self-reported hernia repair surgeries (9,701 cases and 82,743 controls). We identify four novel inguinal hernia susceptibility loci in the regions of EFEMP1, WT1, EBF2 and ADAMTS6. Moreover, we observe expression of all four genes in mouse connective tissue and network analyses show an important role for two of these genes (EFEMP1 and WT1) in connective tissue maintenance/homoeostasis. Our findings provide insight into the aetiology of hernia development and highlight genetic pathways for studies of hernia development and its treatment. PMID:26686553

  19. [Congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis].

    PubMed

    Barrero Candau, R; Garrido Morales, M

    2007-04-01

    We report a new case of congenital lumbar hernia. This is first case reported of congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis. We review literature and describe associated malformations reported that would be role out in every case of congenital lumbar hernia. PMID:17650728

  20. Abdominal wall herniae and their underlying pathology

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, Emma; Al-Akash, Musallam

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of pseudomyxoma peritonei presenting as a strangulated inguinal hernia. We review the current literature regarding the incidence of underlying pathology in patients presenting with abdominal wall herniae and discuss the need for histological assessment of the hernia sac in selected patients. We highlight the importance of assessing for and being aware of significant underlying pathology in certain patients. PMID:26855074

  1. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A hernia... contents. This generic type of device includes the umbilical truss. (b) Classification. Class I...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A hernia... contents. This generic type of device includes the umbilical truss. (b) Classification. Class I...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A hernia... contents. This generic type of device includes the umbilical truss. (b) Classification. Class I...

  4. A case of de Garengeot hernia: the feasibility of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Al-Subaie, Saud; Mustafa, Hatem; Al-Sharqawi, Noura; Al-Haddad, Mohanned; Othman, Feras

    2015-01-01

    Introduction de Garengeot hernia is described as the presence of an appendix in a femoral hernia. This rare hernia usually presents with both diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. Presentation of case We report a case of a 59 year-old woman with a one-year history of a right irreducible femoral hernia. She underwent diagnostic laparoscopy with an intraoperative diagnosis of de Garengeot hernia. This was followed by a laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach for hernia repair. Discussion The long-standing presentation of de Garengeot hernia is seldomly reported in literature. There has been no standard approach of treatment for de Garengeot hernias described, possibly due to the rarity of this condition. The unusual presentation of the hernia prompted us to undergo a diagnostic laparoscopy first, during which the appendix was seen incarcerated in a femoral hernia sac. We were easily able to proceed for a laparoscopic TAPP approach for hernia repair without the need for conversion to an open repair. Conclusion We were able to obtain an accurate diagnosis of an appendix within a long-standing irreducible femoral hernia through diagnostic laparoscopy followed by transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach for hernia repair. We would like to underline the usefulness of laparoscopy as a valuable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of this unusual presentation of groin hernias. PMID:26432998

  5. The Management of Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsnorth, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Many thousand laparotomy incisions are created each year and the failure rate for closure of these abdominal wounds is between 10–15%, creating a large problem of incisional hernia. In the past many of these hernias have been neglected and treated with abdominal trusses or inadequately managed with high failure rates. The introduction of mesh has not had a significant impact because surgeons are not aware of modern effective techniques which may be used to reconstruct defects of the abdominal wall. This review will cover recent advances in incisional hernia surgery which affect the general surgeon, and also briefly review advanced techniques employed by specialist surgeons in anterior abdominal wall surgery. PMID:16719992

  6. The management of incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Kingsnorth, Andrew

    2006-05-01

    Many thousand laparotomy incisions are created each year and the failure rate for closure of these abdominal wounds is between 10-15%, creating a large problem of incisional hernia. In the past many of these hernias have been neglected and treated with abdominal trusses or inadequately managed with high failure rates. The introduction of mesh has not had a significant impact because surgeons are not aware of modern effective techniques which may be used to reconstruct defects of the abdominal wall. This review will cover recent advances in incisional hernia surgery which affect the general surgeon, and also briefly review advanced techniques employed by specialist surgeons in anterior abdominal wall surgery. PMID:16719992

  7. When is surgery necessary for a groin hernia?

    PubMed

    Berliner, S D

    1990-01-01

    Hernias are one of the most common causes of symptoms in the groin. Surgery is needed for all femoral and indirect inguinal hernias to prevent incarceration and strangulation. Asymptomatic direct hernias can be observed if they are not enlarging. Atypical symptoms in a patient with a hernia must be evaluated to exclude other disease. Fortunately, most groin hernias can be repaired electively. PMID:2296562

  8. [Management of umbilical hernia in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Loriau, J; Manaouil, D; Mauvais, F

    2002-06-01

    The treatment of umbilical hernia in the setting of cirrhosis poses unique and specific management problems due to the pathophysiology of cirrhotic ascites. The high intra-abdominal pressures generated by ascites when applied to areas of parietal weakness are the cause of hernia formation and enlargement. Successful surgical treatment depends on minimization or elimination of ascites. Umbilical rupture and hernia strangulation are the most life-threatening complications of umbilical hernia with ascites and they demand urgent surgical intervention. In non-emergency situations, medical therapy to control ascites should precede hernia repair. When ascites is refractory to medical therapy, treatment will vary depending on whether transplantation is an option. In liver transplantation candidates, hernia repair can be performed at the end of the transplantation procedure. If transplanation is not envisaged, concomitant treatment of both ascites and hernia is best achieved by placement of a peritoneo-venous shunt at the time of the parietal repair. PMID:12391663

  9. Laparoscopic Repair of Ventral Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Heniford, B Todd; Park, Adrian; Ramshaw, Bruce J.; Voeller, Guy

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic repair of ventral hernias. Summary Background Data: The recurrence rate after standard repair of ventral hernias may be as high as 12-52%, and the wide surgical dissection required often results in wound complications. Use of a laparoscopic approach may decrease rates of complications and recurrence after ventral hernia repair. Methods: Data on all patients who underwent laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) performed by 4 surgeons using a standardized procedure between November 1993 and October 2002 were collected prospectively (85% of patients) or retrospectively. Results: LVHR was completed in 819 of the 850 patients (422 men; 428 women) in whom it was attempted. Thirty-four percent of completed LVHRs were for recurrent hernias. The patient mean body mass index was 32; the mean defect size was 118 cm2. Mesh, averaging 344 cm2, was used in all cases. Mean operating time was 120 min, mean estimated blood loss was 49 mL, and hospital stay averaged 2.3 days. There were 128 complications in 112 patients (13.2%). One patient died of a myocardial infarction. The most common complications were ileus (3%) and prolonged seroma (2.6%). During a mean follow-up time of 20.2 months (range, 1-94 months), the hernia recurrence rate was 4.7%. Recurrence was associated with large defects, obesity, previous open repairs, and perioperative complications. Conclusion: In this large series, LVHR had a low rate of conversion to open surgery, a short hospital stay, a moderate complication rate, and a low risk of recurrence. PMID:14501505

  10. Intrathoracic Hernia after Total Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yoshihiko; Murakami, Masahiko; Otsuka, Koji; Saito, Kazuhiko; Saito, Akira; Motegi, Kentaro; Date, Hiromi; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ariyoshi, Tomotake; Goto, Satoru; Yamazaki, Kimiyasu; Fujimori, Akira; Watanabe, Makoto; Aoki, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic hernias after total gastrectomy are rare. We report the case of a 78-year-old man who underwent total gastrectomy with antecolic Roux-Y reconstruction for residual gastric cancer. He had alcoholic liver cirrhosis and received radical laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy for gastric cancer 3 years ago. Early gastric cancer in the remnant stomach was found by routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. We initially performed endoscopic submucosal dissection, but the vertical margin was positive in a pathological result. We performed total gastrectomy with antecolic Roux-Y reconstruction by laparotomy. For adhesion of the esophageal hiatus, the left chest was connected with the abdominal cavity. A pleural defect was not repaired. Two days after the operation, the patient was suspected of having intrathoracic hernia by chest X-rays. Computed tomography showed that the transverse colon and Roux limb were incarcerated in the left thoracic cavity. He was diagnosed with intrathoracic hernia, and emergency reduction and repair were performed. Operative findings showed that the Roux limb and transverse colon were incarcerated in the thoracic cavity. After reduction, the orifice of the hernia was closed by suturing the crus of the diaphragm with the ligament of the jejunum and omentum. After the second operation, he experienced anastomotic leakage and left pyothorax. Anastomotic leakage was improved with conservative therapy and he was discharged 76 days after the second operation.

  11. Paraduodenal hernia and jejunal diverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Goodney, Philip P; Pindyck, Frank

    2004-02-01

    A case of left-sided paraduodenal hernia and jejunal diverticulosis is described in 75-year-old man who presented with chronic intermittent abdominal pain, weight loss, and anemia. A brief review of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical presentation displays the variety of symptoms associated with these rare conditions. PMID:14731138

  12. [Idiopathic Lumbar Hernia: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Takuya; Inamoto, Teruo; Matsunaga, Tomohisa; Uchimoto, Taizo; Saito, Kenkichi; Takai, Tomoaki; Minami, Koichiro; Takahara, Kiyoshi; Nomi, Hayahito; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old woman, complained of an indolent lump about 60 × 70 mm in size in the left lower back. We conducted a computed tomography scan, which exhibited a hernia of Gerota'sfascia-commonly called superior lumbar hernia. In the right lateral position, the hernia contents were observed to attenuate, hence only closure of the hernial orifice was conducted by using Kugel patch, without removal of the hernia sack. Six months after the surgery, she has had no relapse of the hernia. Superior lumbar hernia, which occurs in an anatomically brittle region in the lower back, is a rare and potentially serious disease. The urologic surgeon should bear in mind this rarely seen entity. PMID:26699890

  13. Management of voluminous abdominal incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, J-L; Poghosyan, T; Pogoshian, T; Corigliano, N; Canard, G; Veyrie, N

    2012-10-01

    Incisional hernia is one of the classic complications after abdominal surgery. The chronic, gradual increase in size of some of these hernias is such that the hernia ring widens to a point where there is a loss of substance in the abdominal wall, herniated organs can become incarcerated or strangulated while poor abdominal motility can alter respiratory function. The surgical treatment of small (<5 cm) incisional hernias is safe and straightforward, by either laparotomy or laparoscopy. For large hernias, surgical repair is often difficult. After reintegration of herniated viscera into the abdominal cavity, the abdominal wall defect must be closed anatomically in order to restore the function to the abdominal wall. Prosthetic reinforcement of the abdominal wall is mandatory for long-term successful repair. There are multiple techniques for prosthetic hernia repair, but placement of Dacron mesh in the retromuscular plane is our preference. PMID:23137643

  14. Uncommon content in congenial inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Harjai, Man Mohan

    2014-10-01

    Although sliding indirect inguinal hernias containing the ipsilateral ovary and fallopian tube are not uncommon in infant girls, sliding hernias containing uterus with both ovaries and fallopian tubes are extremely rare. At surgery, a 5-month-old infant girl was found to have an indirect hernia in which the uterus and fallopian tubes were sliding components with a wide deep inguinal ring. PMID:25336812

  15. Hybrid Approaches for Complex Parastomal Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Xie, Jia-Ming; Miao, Jian-Qing; Wu, Hao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the major complications of colostomy with high occurrence. From October 2011 to November 2014, a retrospective study was conducted by analyzing and following up data of 16 patients suffering from parastomal hernia who underwent a hybrid technique repair. The safety and efficacy of the hybrid technique for parastomal hernia repair was investigated in terms of complications. All cases were operated successfully and had no major immediate postoperative complications other than mild abdominal pain in 5 cases. No long-term postoperative complications were reported in the follow-up. The authors found hybrid technique to be safe and effective for parastomal hernia repair with fewer complications. PMID:26787038

  16. Massive hiatus hernia complicated by jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Ruelan V.; D'Netto, Trevor J.; Hook, Henry C.; Falk, Gregory L.; Vivian, SarahJayne

    2015-01-01

    Giant para-oesophageal hernia may include pancreas with pancreatic complication and rarely jaundice. Repair is feasible and durable by laparoscopy. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is diagnostic. PMID:26246452

  17. Current Trends in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Patapis, Paul; Zavras, Nick; Tzanetis, Panagiotis; Machairas, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical technique, postoperative complications, and possible recurrence after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) in comparison with open ventral hernia repair (OVHR), based on the international literature. Database: A Medline search of the current English literature was performed using the terms laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and incisional hernia repair. Conclusions: LVHR is a safe alternative to the open method, with the main advantages being minimal postoperative pain, shorter recovery, and decreased wound and mesh infections. Incidental enterotomy can be avoided by using a meticulous technique and sharp dissection to avoid thermal injury. PMID:26273186

  18. Recurrent spigelian hernia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Losanoff, Julian E; Richman, Bruce W; Jones, James W

    2003-02-01

    Only seven cases of spigelian hernia recurrence have been previously reported. We report the case of a 75-year-old male patient who presented with extremely large hernia after four unsuccessful suture repairs over 12 years. The abdominal wall defect was repaired with Marlex mesh. The advantage of using prosthetic mesh in both primary and recurrent spigelian hernia is supported by recent clinical research data indicating a generalized collagen metabolism disorder in patients with primary and recurrent hernia. Mesh repair allows for tension-free anatomic restoration of distorted tissues associated with repair failures. PMID:12641349

  19. Obturator hernia of the fallopian tube.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Tassei; Tanaka, Nobutaka

    2013-06-01

    Obturator hernia of the fallopian tube is extremely rare. Multidetector computed tomography of a 43-year-old nulliparous woman with sudden onset lower right abdominal pain showed a low-density mass in the right obturator canal suspected of being an obturator hernia of the uterine adnexa. She was diagnosed as having an incarcerated obturator hernia of the fallopian tube at operation and treated with prosthetic mesh. Obturator hernia of the fallopian tube is very rare, and all cases reported in the literature were localized on the right side, perhaps due to the lesser mobility of the left than the right fallopian tube. PMID:22990633

  20. ADULT ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA IN IBADAN

    PubMed Central

    Ayandipo, O.O; Afuwape, O.O; Irabor, D.O; Abdurrazzaaq, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal wall hernias are very common diseases encountered in surgical practice. Groin hernia is the commonest type of abdominal wall hernias. There are several methods of hernia repair but tension-free repair (usually with mesh) offers the least recurrent rate. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of anterior abdominal wall hernias and our experience in the surgical management of identified hernias Method: The project was a retrospective study of all patients with abdominal wall hernia presenting into surgical divisions of University College Hospital Ibadan during a 6 year period (January 2008 to December 2013). Relevant information was retrieved from their case notes and analysed. Results: The case records of 1215 (84.7%) patients out of 1435 were retrieved. Elective surgery was done in 981(80.7%) patients while 234 (19.3%) patients had emergency surgery. There were 922 (84.8%) groin hernias and post-operative incisional hernia accounted for 9.1% (111) of the patients. About half (49.1%) of those with incisional hernia were post obstetric and gynaecologic procedure followed by post laparotomy incisional hernias 16 (14%) and others (23.5%). The ratio of inguinal hernia to other types in this study is 3:1. Hollow viscus resection and emergency surgery were predictors of wound infection statistically significant in predicting wound infection (P < 0.001). Peri-operative morbidity/mortality at 28 days post operation was documented in 113 patients (12.1%). One year recurrence rate of groin hernia was 2.1%. Conclusion: The pattern of presentation and management of anterior wall hernias are still the same compared with the earlier study in this hospital. New modality of treatment should be adopted as the standard choice of care. Abdominal wall hernias are very common clinical presentation. Modified Bassini repair was the preferred method of repair due to its simplicity. Mesh repair is becoming more common in recent time but high cost and initial non

  1. Obturator hernia: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Tokushima, Midori; Aihara, Hidetoshi; Tago, Masaki; Tomonaga, Motosuke; Sakanishi, Yuta; Yoshioka, Tsuneaki; Hyakutake, Masaki; Kyoraku, Itaru; Sugioka, Takashi; Yamashita, Shu-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 90 Final Diagnosis: Obturator hernia Symptoms: Epigastric pain • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Obturator hernia (OH) can be difficult to diagnose because it shows only nonspecific signs and symptoms. Although pain in a lower limb caused by compression of the obturator nerve by the hernia in the obturator canal (Howship-Romberg sign) is a characteristic sign, its presence is rather rare. Case Report: We herein describe the case of a 90-year-old woman with an OH that was difficult to diagnose because of her slight abdominal signs and symptoms on admission and subtle abdominal computed tomography (CT) findings. Although the CT images revealed the presence of an OH, this finding was overlooked because it contained only a part of the small intestine wall, which is called the Richter type. Fortunately, her condition improved dramatically with only conservative treatment. Conclusions: Although early diagnosis is essential to reduce morbidity and mortality, OH can be a diagnostic challenge even with abdominal CT. PMID:25006359

  2. Laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Willekes, C L; Edoga, J K; Frezza, E E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this report is to describe the authors' technique for the laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias and the outcome in their series of patients. METHODS: Thirty patients underwent elective laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias. All were pure type II paraesophageal hernias as defined by upper gastrointestinal contrast studies. All operations were performed by a single surgeon (JKE) assisted by five different chief surgical residents. The authors have used various prototypes of a laparoscopic utility belt to reduce the physician requirement to the surgeon and a first assistant. The operative setup and specific techniques of the repair are described and illustrated. A concomitant anti-reflux procedure was performed in the last 23 patients. RESULTS: Satisfactory repair using video-laparoscopic techniques was achieved in all cases. There were no deaths. Complications occurred in 8 of 30 patients. Postoperative gastroesophageal reflux developed in three of the first seven patients in whom fundoplication was not performed. Three consecutive patients had left lower lobe atelectasis believed to be related to endotracheal tube displacement during the passage of the bougie. One patient had postoperative dysphagia. There was one case of major deep venous thrombosis with pulmonary embolism. Twenty-eight of 30 patients were discharged home by postoperative day 3. Twenty-four of 30 patients had returned to normal activity by the time of their first postoperative office visit 1 week after surgery. Images Figure 9. Figure 10. PMID:8998118

  3. National results after ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Helgstrand, Frederik

    2016-07-01

    Ventral hernia repairs are among the most frequently performed surgical procedures. The variations of repair techniques are multiple and outcome has been unacceptable. Despite the high volume, it has been difficult to obtain sufficient data to provide evidence for best practice. In order to monitor national surgical quality and provide the warranted high volume data, the first national ventral hernia register (The Danish Ventral Hernia Database) was established in 2007 in Denmark. The present study series show that data from a well-established database supported by clinical examinations, patient files, questionnaires, and administrative data makes it possible to obtain nationwide high volume data and to achieve evidence for better outcome in a complex surgical condition as ventral hernia. Due to the high volume and included variables on surgical technique, it is now possible to make analyses adjusting for a variety of surgical techniques and different hernia specifications. We documented high 30-day complications and recurrence rates for both primary and secondary ventral hernias in a nationwide cohort. Furthermore, recurrence found by clinical examination was shown to exceed the number of patients undergoing reoperation for recurrence by a factor 4-5. The nationwide adjusted analyses proved that open mesh and laparoscopic repair for umbilical and epigastric hernias does not differ in 30-day outcome or in risk of recurrence. There is a minor risk reduction in early complications after open sutured repairs. However, the risk for a later recurrence repair is significantly higher after sutured repairs compared with mesh repairs. The study series showed that large hernia defects and open re-pairs were independent predictors for 30-day complications after an incisional hernia repair. Open procedures and large hernia defects were independent risk factors for a later recurrence re-pair. However, patients with large defects (> 15 cm) seemed to benefit from an open mesh

  4. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A...

  5. Periappendicular Abscess Presenting within an Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Loberant, Norman; Bickel, Amitai

    2015-01-01

    The presence of the appendix within an inguinal hernia is a rare finding. We present the case of an elderly woman who developed appendicitis within an inguinal hernia, complicated by a supervening periappendicular abscess. She was successfully treated with a combination of antibiotics and percutaneous drainage. PMID:26605128

  6. Liver scan in traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Liver imaging was performed in two patients with traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia. It has elucidated the cause of obliteration of the right hemidiaphragmatic shadow on the chest x-ray. These cases are illustrative of the usefulness of liver imaging in the diagnosis of traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia as well as hepatic injury.

  7. [Neonatal occlusion due to a lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Hunald, F A; Ravololoniaina, T; Rajaonarivony, M F V; Rakotovao, M; Andriamanarivo, M L; Rakoto-Ratsimba, H

    2011-10-01

    A Petit lumbar hernia is an uncommon hernia. Congenital forms are seen in children. Incarceration may occur as an unreducible lumbar mass, associated with bilious vomiting and abdominal distention. Abdominal X-ray shows sided-wall bowel gas. In this case, reduction and primary closure must be performed as emergency repair. PMID:21868206

  8. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A...

  9. Laparoscopic repair of an incarcerated femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Yagan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A femoral hernia is a rare, acquired condition, which has been reported in less than 5% of all abdominal wall hernias, with a female to male ratio of 4:1. Presentation of case We report a case in a female patient who had a previous open inguinal herniorrhaphy three years previously. She presented with right sided groin pain of one month duration. Ultrasound gave a differential diagnosis of a recurrent inguinal hernia or a femoral hernia. A transabdominal preperitoneal repair was performed and the patient made an uneventful recovery. Discussion Laparoscopic repair of a femoral hernia is still in its infancy and even though the outcomes are superior to an open repair, open surgery remains the standard of care. The decision to perform a laparoscopic trans abdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair was facilitated by the patient having previous open hernia surgery. The learning curve for laparoscopic femoral hernia repair is steep and requires great commitment from the surgeon. Once the learning curve has been breached this is a feasible method of surgical repair. This is demonstrated by the fact that this case report is from a rural hospital in Canada. Conclusion Laparoscopic femoral hernia repair involves more time and specialized laparoscopic skills. The advantages are a lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of inguinodynia. PMID:26581083

  10. Current trends in laparoscopic groin hernia repair: A review

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Harvinder Singh; Kumar, Awanish; Agarwal, Prerit; Agarwal, Akshay Anand

    2015-01-01

    Hernia is a common problem of the modern world with its incidence more in developing countries. Inguinal hernia is the most common groin hernia repaired worldwide. With advancement in technology operative techniques of repair have also evolved. A PubMed and COCHRANE database search was accomplished in this regard to establish the current status of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in view of recent published literature. Published literature support that laparoscopic hernia repair is best suited for recurrent and bilateral inguinal hernia although it may be offered for primary inguinal hernia if expertise is available. PMID:26380826

  11. Current trends in laparoscopic groin hernia repair: A review.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Harvinder Singh; Kumar, Awanish; Agarwal, Prerit; Agarwal, Akshay Anand

    2015-09-16

    Hernia is a common problem of the modern world with its incidence more in developing countries. Inguinal hernia is the most common groin hernia repaired worldwide. With advancement in technology operative techniques of repair have also evolved. A PubMed and COCHRANE database search was accomplished in this regard to establish the current status of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in view of recent published literature. Published literature support that laparoscopic hernia repair is best suited for recurrent and bilateral inguinal hernia although it may be offered for primary inguinal hernia if expertise is available. PMID:26380826

  12. Laparoscopic Repair of Left Lumbar Hernia After Laparoscopic Left Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Luca; Gumbs, Andrew; Turner, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar hernias, rarely seen in clinical practice, can be acquired after open or laparoscopic flank surgery. We describe a successful laparoscopic preperitoneal mesh repair of multiple trocar-site hernias after extraperitoneal nephrectomy. All the key steps including creating a peritoneal flap, reducing the hernia contents, and fixation of the mesh are described. A review of the literature on this infrequent operation is presented. Laparoscopic repair of lumbar hernias has all the advantages of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. PMID:21333197

  13. The management of abdominal wall hernias – in search of consensus

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Kamil; Śmietański, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic repair is becoming an increasingly popular alternative in the treatment of abdominal wall hernias. In spite of numerous studies evaluating this technique, indications for laparoscopic surgery have not been established. Similarly, implant selection and fixation techniques have not been unified and are the subject of scientific discussion. Aim To assess whether there is a consensus on the management of the most common ventral abdominal wall hernias among recognised experts. Material and methods Fourteen specialists representing the boards of European surgical societies were surveyed to determine their choice of surgical technique for nine typical primary ventral and incisional hernias. The access method, type of operation, mesh prosthesis and fixation method were evaluated. In addition to the laparoscopic procedures, the number of tackers and their arrangement were assessed. Results In none of the cases presented was a consensus of experts obtained. Laparoscopic and open techniques were used equally often. Especially in the group of large hernias, decisions on repair methods were characterised by high variability. The technique of laparoscopic mesh fixation was a subject of great variability in terms of both method selection and the numbers of tackers and sutures used. Conclusions Recognised experts have not reached a consensus on the management of abdominal wall hernias. Our survey results indicate the need for further research and the inclusion of large cohorts of patients in the dedicated registries to evaluate the results of different surgical methods, which would help in the development of treatment algorithms for surgical education in the future. PMID:25960793

  14. Sportsman's hernia? An ambiguous term.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulou, Alexandra; Schilders, Ernest

    2016-04-01

    Groin pain is common in athletes. Yet, there is disagreement on aetiology, pathomechanics and terminology. A plethora of terms have been employed to explain inguinal-related groin pain in athletes. Recently, at the British Hernia Society in Manchester 2012, a consensus was reached to use the term inguinal disruption based on the pathophysiology while lately the Doha agreement in 2014 defined it as inguinal-related groin pain, a clinically based taxonomy. This review article emphasizes the anatomy, pathogenesis, standard clinical assessment and imaging, and highlights the treatment options for inguinal disruption. PMID:27026822

  15. Endoscopic extraperitoneal repair of a Grynfeltt hernia.

    PubMed

    Postema, R R; Bonjer, H J

    2002-04-01

    There are three types of lumbar hernia: congenital, acquired, and incisional hernias. Acquired hernia can appear in two forms: the inferior (Petit) type and the superior type, first described by Grynfeltt in 1866. We report endoscopic extraperitoneal repair of a Grynfeltt hernia. A 46-year-old woman presented with a painful swelling in the left lumbar region that had caused her increasing discomfort. The diagnosis of Grynfeltt's hernia was made, and she underwent surgery. With the patient in a left-side decubitus position, access to the extraperitoneal space was gained by inserting a 10-mm inflatable balloon trocar just anteriorly to the midaxillary line between the 12th rib and the superior iliac crest through a muscle-splitting incision into the extraperitoneal space. After the balloon trocar had been removed a blunt-tip trocar was inserted. Using two 5-mm trocars, one above and another below the 10-mm port in the midaxillary line, the hernia could be reduced. A polypropylene mesh graft was introduced through the 10-mm trocar and tacked with spiral tackers. The patient could be discharged the next day after requiring only minimal analgesics. At this writing, 2 (1/2) years after the operation, there is no sign of recurrence. This Grynfeltt hernia could safely be treated using the extraperitoneal approach, which obviates opening and closing the peritoneum, thereby reducing operative time and possibly postoperative complications. PMID:11972231

  16. Laparoscopic Versus Open Umbilical Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Mason, Edward; Duncan, Titus; Wilson, Russell

    2003-01-01

    Background: The use of prosthetic material for open umbilical hernia repair has been reported to reduce recurrence rates. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes after laparoscopic versus open umbilical hernia repair. Methods: We reviewed all umbilical hernia repairs performed from November 1995 to October 2000. Demographic data, hernia characteristics, and outcomes were compared. Results: Of the 76 patients identified, 32 underwent laparoscopic repair (LR), 24 primary suture repairs (PSR), and 20 open repairs with mesh (ORWM). Preoperative characteristics were similar between groups. Hernia size was similar between LR and ORWM groups, and both were larger than that in the PSR group. ORWM compared with the other techniques resulted in longer operating time, more frequent use of drains, higher complication rates, and prolonged return to normal activities (RTNA). The length of stay (LOS) was longer in the ORWM than in the PSR group. When compared with ORWM, LR resulted in lower recurrence rates. LR resulted in fewer recurrences in patients with previous repairs and hernias larger than 3 cm than in both open techniques. Conclusions: LR results in faster RTNA, and lower complication and recurrence rates compared with those in ORWM. Patients with larger hernias and previous repairs benefit from LR. PMID:14626398

  17. [Intervention-specific complications of hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Dietz, U A; Wiegering, A; Germer, C T

    2014-02-01

    Hernia surgery is generally a rewarding task, patient satisfaction is high and the long-term results are generally good. Incisional hernias are more heterogeneous and there is a higher variability of morphologies to be matched with the available therapeutic approaches but the majority of patients are also satisfied with the results. This positive scenario for hernia surgery can be largely attributable to careful preoperative planning, effective surgical techniques and a high degree of standardization. The picture is somewhat clouded by the complications associated with hernia surgery. If complications do arise, the outcome largely depends on how well the surgeon responds. For inguinal and femoral hernias, the risk profile of the patient is crucial to the surgical planning and the wrong operation on the wrong patient can be disastrous. Open procedures have complication risks in common but the question of how best to deal with the nerves has yet to be answered. Endoscopic procedures are an indispensable part of the hernia surgery repertoire and the hernia specialist should be proficient in TEP and TAPP techniques. Ventral and incisional hernias have higher complication rates and the treatment is similar despite differences in etiology and pathophysiology. Although open procedures are better for morphological reconstruction they are accompanied by a higher complication rate. Laparoscopic procedures had a severe complication profile early on but the situation has greatly improved today due to continued refinement of the learning curve. A critical approach to the application of methods and meshes, a deep knowledge of anatomical peculiarities and the careful planning of tactics for dealing with intraoperative problems are the hallmarks of today's good hernia surgeon. PMID:24435828

  18. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal approach for recurrent inguinal hernia: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Aly; Hokkam, Emad N.; Ellabban, Goda M.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The repair of the recurrent hernia is a daunting task because of already weakened tissues and distorted anatomy. Open posterior preperitoneal approach gives results far superior to those of the anterior approach. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair is an evolving technique associated with advantages of a minimally invasive approach. The present work aimed at comparing these three approaches for repair of recurrent inguinal hernia regarding complications and early recurrence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 180 patients were divided randomly into three equal groups: A, B, and C. Group A patients were subjected to open posterior preperitoneal approach , those of group B were subjected to transinguinal anterior tension-free repair and group C patients were subjected to TAPP. The primary end point was recurrence and the secondary end points were time off from work, postoperative pain, scrotal swelling, and wound infections. RESULTS: The mean hospital stay, the mean time to return to work and the mean time off from work were less in group C then A and B. Chronic postoperative pain was observed in eight patients in group A (13.33%), in 18 patients in group B (30%) and six patients in group C (10%). The overall complication rate was 19.7% in both groups A and C and 34.36% in group B. CONCLUSION: In recurrent inguinal hernia, the laparoscopic and open posterior approaches are equally effective in term of operative outcome. The open preperitoneal hernia repair is inexpensive, has a low recurrence rate. Postoperative recovery is short and postoperative pain is minimal. This approach gives results far superior to those of the commonly used anterior approach. However, while laparoscopic hernia repair requires a lengthy learning curve and is difficult to learn and perform, it has advantages of less post-operative pain, early recovery with minimal hospital stay, low post-operative complications and recurrence. Trial

  19. [Pubic osteotomy in obturator gliding hernia].

    PubMed

    Fritz, T; Teklote, J; Kraus, T

    1997-12-01

    Hernias of the obturator foramen are rare. They are described mostly in elderly female patients in poor health. Often the correct diagnosis is stumbled upon as a result of surprising intraoperative findings. Surgical therapy is indicated often by the clinical symptoms of an incarcerated hernia. Herniation of the entire urinary bladder with hemorrhagic infarction has never been described before. For an anatomical reduction of the hernia it was necessary to resect the superior pubic ramus. For plastic reconstruction a marlex mesh was used. PMID:9483360

  20. De Garengeot hernia: a forgotten rare entity?

    PubMed Central

    Madiha, Ahmedi; Rares, Hard; Abdus, Samee

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 79-year-old woman who presented with an increasingly painful lump in her right groin for 24 h. An incidental femoral hernia was detected on her CT scan nearly 8 months ago while investigating her medical conditions. However, its management was deferred on account of ongoing medical illness. Exploration of the lump revealed a gangrenous appendix strangulated within the femoral canal (de Garengeot hernia). The hernia was repaired primarily after appendicectomy. The patient was discharged after making an uneventful recovery. PMID:24722706

  1. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of lumbar hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Man Sup; Lee, Hae Wan; Yu, Chang Hee

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare surgical entity without a standard method of repair. With advancements in laparoscopic techniques, successful lumbar herniorrhaphy can be achieved by the creation of a completely extraperitoneal working space and secure fixation of a wide posterior mesh. We present a total extraperitoneal laparoendoscopic repair of lumbar hernia, which allowed for minimal invasiveness while providing excellent anatomical identification, easy mobilization of contents and wide secure mesh fixation. A total extraperitoneal method of lumbar hernia repair by laparoscopic approach is feasible and may be an ideal option. PMID:22111086

  2. [Anatomy and mechanism of inguinal hernias].

    PubMed

    Flament, J B; Avisse, C; Delattre, J F

    1997-02-01

    Anterior abdominal wall presents a weak point between the pelvic bone and the muscular arch of transverse and internal oblique muscles. This myo-pectineal orifice, crossed by the inguinal ligament is closed by the transversalis fascia. All groin hernias, inguinal directs, indirects or femoral, result from a defect of the transversalis fascia. They have two causes. Congenital hernias result from a persisting peritoneo-vaginal canal. Acquired hernias result from a progressive weakening of the transversalis fascia depending on connective tissue insufficiency and increase of intra-abdominal pressure. PMID:9122597

  3. [Traumatic Spigelian hernia. Elective extraperitoneal laparoscopic repair].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Egea, Alfredo; Campillo-Soto, Alvaro; Girela-Baena, Enrique; Torralba-Martínez, José Antonio; Corral de la Calle, Miquel; Aguayo-Albasini, José Luis

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic Spigelian hernia is rare. These hernias are usually treated in the same admission through open surgery. We present a case of Spigelian hernia in a high anatomical location following injury, with a cutaneous lesion and preperitoneal hematoma. Delayed parietal repair was performed through extraperitoneal laparoscopy. Elective laparoscopic repair in this case avoided surgery in an injured area, providing clear cosmetic advantages to the patient. We describe a modification to the classical approach to facilitate access to high-lying Spigelian defects. PMID:16426535

  4. Symptomatic Morgagni Hernia Misdiagnosed As Chilaiditi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, Phyllis A.

    2011-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome, symptomatic interposition of bowel beneath the right hemidiaphragm, is uncommon and usually managed without surgery. Morgagni hernia is an uncommon diaphragmatic hernia that generally requires surgery. In this case a patient with a longstanding diagnosis of bowel interposition (Chilaiditi sign) presented with presumed Chilaiditi syndrome. Abdominal computed tomography was performed and revealed no bowel interposition; instead, a Morgagni hernia was found and surgically repaired. Review of the literature did not reveal similar misdiagnosis or recommendations for advanced imaging in patients with Chilaiditi sign or syndrome to confirm the diagnosis or rule out other potential diagnoses. PMID:21691487

  5. Sports Hernia/Athletic Pubalgia

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports hernia/athletic pubalgia has received increasing attention as a source of disability and time lost from athletics. Studies are limited, however, lacking consistent objective criteria for making the diagnosis and assessing outcomes. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed database through January 2013 and hand searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Review article. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Nonsurgical outcomes have not been well reported. Various surgical approaches have return-to–athletic activity rates of >80% regardless of the approach. The variety of procedures and lack of outcomes measures in these studies make it difficult to compare one surgical approach to another. There is increasing evidence that there is an association between range of motion–limiting hip disorders (femoroacetabular impingement) and sports hernia/athletic pubalgia in a subset of athletes. This has added increased complexity to the decision-making process regarding treatment. Conclusion: An association between femoroacetabular impingement and athletic pubalgia has been recognized, with better outcomes reported when both are managed concurrently or in a staged manner. PMID:24587864

  6. Amyand's hernia: Our experience in the laparoscopic era.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Diwakar; Swain, Sudeepta; Wani, Majid; Reddy, Prasanna Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Amyand's hernia is a rare presentation of inguinal hernia, in which the appendix is present within the hernia sac. This entity is a diagnostic challenge due to its rarity and vague clinical presentation. A laparoscopic approach can confirm the diagnosis as well as serve as a therapeutic tool. When the appendix is not inflamed within the inguinal hernia sac, then appendicectomy is not always necessary. Our case series emphasize the same presumption as three patient of Amyand's hernia underwent laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernioplasty without appendicectomy. The aim of this paper is to review the literature with regards to Amyand's hernia and provide new insight in its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25883458

  7. Delayed iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia after thoracoscopic lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sai-Bo; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Zhao, Bai-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia after thoracoscopic lobectomy is extremely rare. We present a 55-year-old female patient who developed an iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia with gastric perforation several months after VATS (video-assisted thoracic surgery) left upper lobectomy with systematic lymphadenectomy. During the readmission, urgent laparotomy was performed. Intraoperatively, the choledochoscopy was introduced into left thoracic cavity through the diaphragmatic defect for dissecting the secondary inflammatory adhesions and achieving satisfactory hemostasis. It appears to be an efficient and feasible approach for the patients who have been diagnosed as delayed diaphragmatic hernia concomitant with remarkable intra-abdominal findings and have a history of thoracic surgery. We consider that delayed-onset diaphragmatic hernia should be suspected in patients complaining of nausea or vomiting after VATS procedure, although it is very rare. PMID:27293866

  8. Genetics Home Reference: congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center: Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia University of Michigan Health System These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the diagnosis and management of various health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy ...

  9. [Historical evolution of inguinal hernia treatment].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ortega, M Fernando; Cárdenas-Martínez, Guadalupe; López-Castañeda, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    Hernia (know breuk in Dutch, rompure in French, keal in Greek and rupture in English) has plagued humans throughout recorded history and descriptions of hernia reduction date back to the Ebers papyrus in Egypt. In medicine it is difficult to find historical periods, but we found two eras of uneven time: pre-technique and technique. The first was distinguished by a blend of empiricism and magic, and the second for greater comprehension of the human body; however much of modern surgical techniques result from contributions of early surgeons. Nonetheless, it was not until the late 19th century that hernia surgeon Eduardo Bassini published his work Nuovo Metodo per la Cura Radiacale dell"Ernia Inguinale (in 1889). Among the most notable contemporany classic hernia repairs are the Bassini, Halsted, Shouldice, and Tension-free repair techniques. PMID:14617414

  10. Inguinal hernia repair: toward Asian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lomanto, Davide; Cheah, Wei-Keat; Faylona, Jose Macario; Huang, Ching Shui; Lohsiriwat, Darin; Maleachi, Andy; Yang, George Pei Cheung; Li, Michael Ka-Wai; Tumtavitikul, Sathien; Sharma, Anil; Hartung, Rolf Ulrich; Choi, Young Bai; Sutedja, Barlian

    2015-02-01

    Groin hernias are very common, and surgical treatment is usually recommended. In fact, hernia repair is the most common surgical procedure performed worldwide. In countries such as the USA, China, and India, there may easily be over 1 million repairs every year. The need for this surgery has become an important socioeconomic problem and may affect health-care providers, especially in aging societies. Surgical repair using mesh is recommended and widely employed in Western countries, but in many developing countries, tissue-to-tissue repair is still the preferred surgical procedure due to economic constraints. For these reason, the development and implementation of guidelines, consensus, or recommendations may aim to clarify issues related to best practices in inguinal hernia repair in Asia. A group of Asian experts in hernia repair gathered together to debate inguinal hernia treatments in Asia in an attempt to reach some consensus or develop recommendations on best practices in the region. The need for recommendations or guidelines was unanimously confirmed to help overcome the discrepancy in clinical practice between countries; the experts decided to focus mainly on the technical aspects of open repair, which is the most common surgery for hernia in our region. After the identification of 12 main topics for discussion (indication, age, and sex; symptomatic and asymptomatic hernia: type of hernia; type of treatment; hospital admission; preoperative care; anesthesia; surgical technique; perioperative care; postoperative care; early complications; and long-term complications), a search of the literature was carried out according to the five levels of the Oxford Classification of Evidence and the four grades of recommendation. PMID:25598054

  11. [Inguino-crural hernia with neoplastic content].

    PubMed

    Ayala Espina, J M; Triviño López, A; Santonja Garriga, J L; Rubio Barbón, S

    1995-04-01

    We report a case of incarcerated crural hernia including omentum with metastases of pancreatic carcinoma. The scarce literature is reviewed. The possibility of mistaking an incarcerated crural hernia for an inguinal lymph node may result in a ganglionar biopsy ending up in a crural herniography under local anaesthesia. We recommend that all hernial sacs be examined, especially those of adult patients and, in such cases, a crural herniography with prolene should be made in view of its remarkably technical simplicity. PMID:7794644

  12. Anatomical repair of large incisional hernias.

    PubMed Central

    Loh, A.; Rajkumar, J. S.; South, L. M.

    1992-01-01

    We present a method of repair for large incisional hernias using lateral relieving incisions of the anterior rectus sheath. This is a modification of the methods previously described by Young (1), Hunter (2) and Maguire and Young (3). There were no recurrences in the 13 patients reviewed. Other methods of repair for large incisional hernias are discussed. Images Figure 2a,b Figure 3a,b Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1567126

  13. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  14. Symposium on the management of inguinal hernias: 3. Laparoscopic groin hernia surgery: the TAPP procedure

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, Demetrius E.M.; Pham, Quynh N.; Oleniuk, Fredrick H.; Kluftinger, Andreas M.; Rossi, Ljubomir

    1997-01-01

    Objective To describe the technique and results of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernia repair. Design A case series, with a detailed description of the operative technique. Setting A university affiliated hospital. Patients A consecutive series of 554 patients (494 male, 60 female) who underwent laparoscopic hernia repair in a single institution. The mean follow-up was 14 months. Interventions Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair was performed in almost all patients. Simple closure was performed in a patient with a strangulated hernia, and a mesh-based repair was used in a patient with bilateral obturator hernias. Main outcome measures Complications and recurrence. Results The laparoscopic TAPP repair was successful in 550 of the 554 patients who underwent 632 hernia repairs. Conversion was necessary in 4 patients. Complications were infrequent and there were no recurrences. Only 3.4% of patients were lost to follow-up. The most frequent complications were urinary retention (27) and hematoma and seroma (38) in the early postoperative period. Neuralgia (11) and hydrocele (10) also occurred. Mesh infection occurred in only 1 patient and port-site hernias in 3 patients. There was 1 death from an acute myocardial infarction. Conclusion Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair is associated with an exceedingly low recurrence rate and an acceptable complication rate. PMID:9194780

  15. Hernias

    MedlinePlus

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  16. Rare Hernias Presenting as Acute Abdomen- A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ulahannan, Sansho Elavumkal; Kurien, John S; Joseph, Aneesh; Kurien, Annie Sandhya; Varghese, Sandeep Abraham; Thomas, Bindhya; Varghese, Fobin

    2016-01-01

    Hernia is an abnormal protrusion of an organ or tissue through a defect in its surrounding walls. It can be divided into internal, external and diaphragmatic hernias. Most of them can be asymptomatic. If they become symptomatic they can present with features of intestinal obstruction, incarceration or strangulation. In this case series we compare the incidence of these rare presentations of hernias with world literature and to warn surgeons not to cut the obstructing band in cases of internal hernias. In this case series, we review the clinical details of 7 rare presentations of hernia, who presented with various types of hernias to a tertiary care centre in Kerala over a period of one year. Of these 7 cases 6 cases were internal hernias (3 left paraduodenal hernias, 2 transmesentric hernias, and 1 pericaecal hernia) and a case of spigelian hernia above the level of umbilicus. All of them presented as acute abdomen in the emergency department. Among these 7 cases, only one case was diagnosed preoperatively. Three patients had bowel gangrene and had to undergo resection- anastomosis of the bowel. The survival rate among these cases was 100% as compared to 50% in the world literature if they had been left untreated. Even though internal hernias are a rare entity, we need to have it as a differential diagnosis in case of intestinal obstruction, in a previously non-operated abdomen. PMID:27134943

  17. [Surgical treatment of recurrent inguinal hernia using prosthetic materials].

    PubMed

    Paino, O; Rosato, L; Cossavella, D; Catania, S; Coluccio, G

    1998-03-01

    The authors affirm that plastic surgery using graft materials is a feasible technique also in case of recurrent inguinal hernia. They follow with interest the evolution of laparoscopic techniques which are still the cause of some perplexity. The paper reports a series of nine recurrent inguinal hernias out of 447 inguinal hernias operated during the period May 1994-May 1996. PMID:9617112

  18. [Trusses in the current management of hernia].

    PubMed

    Gianom, D; Schubiger, C; Decurtins, M

    2002-11-01

    To assess the frequency and reasons for truss prescription, we surveyed 437 general practitioners collaborating with the surgical department of the Kantonsspital Winterthur and all members of the Swiss Association of Orthotists. 59% of the general practitioners answered. For 85% of them trusses are obsolete. Based on the data of the orthotists, an estimated 1740 trusses are issued in Switzerland annually (250 per million population). In Switzerland approximately 16,000 hernia operations are performed annually. Therefore, 11% of hernia patients are supplied with a truss rather than referred for a consultant surgical opinion. Patients can be divided into groups, one that wears the truss only for a short time in order to delay surgery for medical or occupational reasons and another group, especially elderly patients, that wears the truss permanently. Poor hernia control and pain, hernia incarceration, or dissatisfaction with the uncomfortable truss are reasons for referral to a surgeon. In our personal experience with 14 patients, all judged their situation after the operation better than with the truss. Our study confirms that despite advances in hernia surgery and in the use of regional and local anesthesia trusses are often prescribed. PMID:12430061

  19. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernia: one-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael S.

    1993-05-01

    In this study, 101 consecutive laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repairs (LTPR) were performed in 62 patients by a single surgeon. The series was begun in April 1991, and involved repair of 49 direct, 41 indirect, 4 femoral, 3 umbilical, 3 sliding, and 1 incisional hernias. Twelve cases were bilateral, eleven hernias were incarcerated, and fifteen hernias were recurrent. There were no intraoperative complications, and none of the procedures required conversion to open surgery. Patients experienced the following postoperative complications: transient testicular pain (1), transient anterior thigh paresthesias (2), urinary retention requiring TURP (1), and hernia recurrences (2). Follow up has ranged from 4 - 15 months and initial results have been encouraging.

  20. Left paraduodenal hernia: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Gavin A; Yurcisin, Basil J; Sell, Harry S

    2010-01-01

    Paraduodenal hernias are congenital internal hernias that usually present with non-specific symptoms, and are therefore rarely diagnosed preoperatively. Left-sided paraduodenal hernias are three times more likely to occur than right-sided ones. Both hernias present similarly, but have a differing embryological basis. Here, the case of a 76-year-old woman with a left paraduodenal hernia presenting with small bowel obstruction is presented, and a brief discussion of the literature on its diagnosis and management given. PMID:22797200

  1. Choice of imaging modality in the diagnosis of sciatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Labib, Peter L. Z.; Malik, Sohail N.

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic hernias are one of the rarest types of hernia and often pose diagnostic difficulty to clinicians. We report a case of an 80-year-old lady with a sciatic hernia who had a falsely negative computed tomography (CT) but was found to have a colonic hernia on ultrasonography. The authors recommend that for patients in which there is a high degree of clinical suspicion for a sciatic hernia and a negative CT, ultrasonography may be considered as a useful imaging modality to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:24968433

  2. Transfascial suture in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair; friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Sahu, Diwakar; Das, Somak; Wani, Majid Rasool; Reddy, Prasanna Kumar

    2015-01-01

    'Suture hernia' is fairly a new and rare type of ventral hernia. It occurs at the site of transfascial suture, following laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR). Employment of transfascial sutures in LVHR is still debatable in contrast to tackers. Prevention of mesh migration and significant post-operative pain are the pros and cons with the use of transfascial sutures, respectively. We report an unusual case of suture hernia or transfascial hernia, which can further intensify this dispute, but at the same time will provide insight for future consensus. PMID:25883460

  3. Laparoscopy for Hemoperitoneum After Traditional Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kasamatsu, Hajime; Fujita, Sadanori; Mori, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Hemoperitoneum after inguinal hernia repair, with the exception of laparoscopic herniorrhaphy, is extremely rare. No other case of hemoperitoneum after traditional open inguinal hernia repair has been reported in the English-language literature. A 39-year-old woman had undergone inguinal hernia repair with the Bassini repair technique. Lower abdominal pain and anemia occurred on postoperative day 1. Laparoscopy was performed and revealed hemoperitoneum caused as a complication of inguinal hernia repair. The abdominal cavity was thoroughly washed with saline solution, and the aspirated blood was processed and reinfused. Laparoscopy for hemoperitoneum as a complication after inguinal hernia repair was very useful for both diagnosis and treatment. PMID:12166761

  4. [Disease picture of intra-abdominal hernias in childhood].

    PubMed

    Waldschmidt, J; Pankrath, K; Charissis, G

    1985-01-01

    Through the demonstration of 3 cases (6-year-old-girl with right mesenterico-parietal hernia; 2 year-old-boy with a transverso-mesocolic hernia; 10-months-old-boy with a hernia in the mesenterium of a M.D.) we discuss the problems of intraabdominal hernia. The evaluation of the disease can take many forms. Only one third of the children remains without symptoms; the other third has a chronic evaluation and the last third an acute abdomen. Once diagnosed internal hernia must soon be operated. PMID:4058161

  5. Laparoscopic Repair of Internal Transmesocolic Hernia of Transverse Colon

    PubMed Central

    Kishiki, Tomokazu; Mori, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Yoshikazu; Matsuoka, Hiroyoshi; Abe, Nobutsugu; Masaki, Tadahiko; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Internal hernias are often misdiagnosed because of their rarity, with subsequent significant morbidity. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old Japanese man with no history of surgery was referred for intermittent abdominal pain. CT suggested the presence of a transmesocolic internal hernia. The patient underwent a surgical procedure and was diagnosed with transmesocolic internal hernia. We found internal herniation of the small intestine loop through a defect in the transverse mesocolon, without any strangulation of the small intestine. We were able to complete the operation laparoscopically. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. Discussion. Transmesocolic hernia of the transverse colon is very rare. Transmesocolic hernia of the sigmoid colon accounts for 60% of all other mesocolic hernias. Paraduodenal hernias are difficult to distinguish from internal mesocolic transverse hernias. We can rule out paraduodenal hernias with CT. Conclusion. The patient underwent a surgical procedure and was diagnosed with transmesocolic internal hernia. We report a case of a transmesocolic hernia of the transverse colon with intestinal obstruction that was diagnosed preoperatively and for which laparoscopic surgery was performed. PMID:26246930

  6. Chronic pain after open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nikkolo, Ceith; Lepner, Urmas

    2016-01-01

    Following the widespread use of mesh repairs, recurrence rates after inguinal hernia surgery have become acceptable and focus has shifted from recurrence to chronic pain. Although pain can be controlled with analgesics, chronic postsurgical pain is a major clinical problem, which can significantly influence the patient's quality of life. The rate of chronic pain after inguinal hernia mesh repair can reach 51.6%. The reasons for posthernioplasty chronic pain are often unclear. It has been linked to nerve injury and nerve entrapment, but there is also association between the rate of chronic pain and the type of mesh used for hernia repair. As there are >160 meshes available in the market, it is difficult to choose a mesh whose usage would result in the best outcome. Different mesh characteristics have been studied, among them weight of mesh has probably gained the most attention. The choice of adequate therapy for chronic groin pain after inguinal hernia repair is controversial. The European Hernia Society recommends that a multidisciplinary approach at a pain clinic should be considered for the treatment of chronic postoperative pain. Although surgical treatment of chronic posthernioplasty pain is limited because of the lack of relevant research data, resection of entrapped nerves, mesh removal in the case of mesh related pain or removal of fixation sutures can be beneficial for the patient with severe pain after inguinal hernia surgery. One drawback of published studies is the lack of consensus over definition of chronic pain, which makes it complicated to compare the results of different studies and to conduct meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Therefore, a uniform definition of chronic pain and its best assessment methods should be developed in order to conduct top quality multicenter randomized trials. Further research to develop meshes with optimal parameters is of vital importance and should be encouraged. PMID:26567717

  7. Durability of laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Edye, M B; Canin-Endres, J; Gattorno, F; Salky, B A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To define a method of primary repair that would minimize hernia recurrence and to report medium-term follow-up of patients who underwent laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernia to verify durability of the repair and to assess the effect of inclusion of an antireflux procedure. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Primary paraesophageal hernia repair was completed laparoscopically in 55 patients. There were five recurrences within 6 months when the sac was not excised (20%). After institution of a technique of total sac excision in 30 subsequent repairs, no early recurrences were observed. METHODS: Inclusion of an antireflux procedure, incidence of subsequent hernia recurrence, dysphagia, and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms were recorded in clinical follow-up of patients who underwent a laparoscopic procedure. RESULTS: Mean length of follow-up was 29 months. Forty-nine patients were available for follow-up, and one patient had died of lung cancer. Mean age at surgery was 68 years. The surgical morbidity rate in elderly patients was no greater than in younger patients. Eleven patients (22%) had symptoms of mild to moderate reflux, and 15 were taking acid-reduction medication for a variety of dyspeptic complaints. All but 2 of these 15 had undergone 360 degrees fundoplication at initial repair. Two patients (4%) had late recurrent hernia, each small, demonstrated by esophagram or endoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic repair in the medium term appeared durable. The incidence of postsurgical reflux symptoms was unrelated to inclusion of an antireflux procedure. In the absence of motility data, partial fundoplication was preferred, although dysphagia after floppy 360 degrees wrap was rare. With the low morbidity rate of this procedure, correction of symptomatic paraesophageal hernia appears indicated in patients regardless of age. Images Figure 1. PMID:9790342

  8. Mesh plug repair and groin hernia surgery.

    PubMed

    Robbins, A W; Rutkow, I M

    1998-12-01

    Since the mid-1980s, dramatic progress has been made in the evolution of hernia surgery, highlighted by the increasing use of prosthetic mesh. Among the mesh-based "tension-free" hernioplasties, the use of mesh plugs has garnered a large number of spirited enthusiasts, and plug herniorrhaphy has become the fastest growing hernia repair currently employed by the American surgeon. To demonstrate the simplicity and effectiveness of mesh plugs, a 9-year experience with almost 3300 patients is reported. Technical details are discussed and presentation of a literature search serves to further emphasize the utilitarian nature of this elegantly unsophisticated surgical operation. PMID:9927981

  9. Laparoscopic repair of ventral / incisional hernias

    PubMed Central

    Chowbey, Pradeep K; Sharma, Anil; Mehrotra, Magan; Khullar, Rajesh; Soni, Vandana; Baijal, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Despite its significant prevalence, there is little in the way of evidence-based guidelines regarding the timing and method of repair of incisional hernias. To add to the above is the formidable rate of recurrence that has been seen with conventional tissue repairs of these hernias. With introduction of different prosthetic materials and laparoscopic technique, it was hoped that an improvement in the recurrence and complication rates would be realized. The increasing application of the laparoscopic technique across the world indicates that these goals might indeed be achieved. PMID:21187995

  10. The usefulness of laparoscopic hernia repair in the management of incisional hernia following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hegab, Bassem; Abdelfattah, Mohamed Rabei; Azzam, Ayman; Al Sebayel, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The reported incidence of incisional hernia following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) varies from 4% to 23%. Postoperative wound complications are less frequent after laparoscopic repair while maintaining low recurrence rates. We present our experience in managing this complication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospectively, collected data of all patients who underwent liver transplant and developed incisional hernias were analyzed. Patients’ demographic data, anthropometric data, transplantation-related data, and repair-related operative and postoperative data were collected. Risk factors for post-transplant incisional hernia were appraised in our patients. Patients were divided into two groups: Group A included patients who had their incisional hernia repaired through the laparoscopic approach, and Group B included patients who had their incisional hernia repaired through open conventional approach. RESULTS: A total of 488 liver transplantations were performed at our institution between May 2001 and end of December 2012. Thirty-three patients developed incisional hernias after primary direct closure of the abdominal wall with an overall incidence of 6.9%. Hernia repair was done in 25 patients. Follow-up ranged from 6.4 to 106.1 months with a mean of 48.3 ± 28.3 months. All patients were living at the end of the follow up except four patients (16%). Group A included 13 patients, and Group B included 12 patients. The size of defects and operative time did not differ significantly between both the groups. On the other hand, hospital stay was significantly shorter in laparoscopic group. Complication rate following laparoscopic repair was insignificantly different for open repair. CONCLUSION: In experienced hands, laparoscopic incisional hernia repair in post-liver transplant setting proved to be a safe and feasible alternative to open approach and showed superior outcome expressed in shorter hospital stay, with low recurrence and complication

  11. Spinal hernia tissue autofluorescence spectrum.

    PubMed

    Varanius, Darius; Terbetas, Gunaras; Vaitkus, Juozas V; Vaitkuviene, Aurelija

    2013-02-01

    The laser intervertebral disc decompression may provide appropriate relief in properly selected patients with contained disc herniations. The present investigation aims to characterise intervertebral disc material by autofluorescence induced by laser light. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is associated with progressive biochemical changes in disc material. Percutaneous laser disc decompression has become rather popular for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation, but there are problems in the selection of patients. For this purpose, recognition of the disc composition is necessary. We propose a new type of spectroscopic investigation. It is advantageous to the characterization of intervertebral disc material. Intervertebral disc specimens were removed during open surgery from different disc locations. Preoperative patients' MRI was evaluated using the Pfirrmann disc degeneration and Komori scale for migrating of herniated nucleus pulposus. Adjacent slices of stained disc sections were evaluated by histology/histochemistry and autofluorescence spectra. Comparison of the MRI, spectral, histological and histochemical data was performed. The MRI Komori scale correlated with the histology Boos degeneration index. In the histochemistry, collagens other than collagens I and II of the disc were distinguished with best positive correlation coefficient (0.829) and best negative one (-0.904) of proteoglycans of sequester to Boos index. A correlation of the IV Gaussian component of the hernia spectra with the Boos index was established. The Gaussian component correlation with different collagen types and proteoglycan was determined for the disc and sequester. "Autofluorescence-based diagnosis" refers to the evaluation of disc degeneration by histological and histochemical evaluation; it can provide additional data on the degeneration of an intervertebral disc. PMID:22389123

  12. Approaching porcine hernia inguinalis/scrotalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candidate genes for the genetic defect hernia inguinalis were selected and microsatellite markers developed from PAC clones using the targeted oligonucleotide-mediated microsatellite identification (TOMMI) approach. Four markers (S0894, S0898, S0899 and S0903) were either uninformative or could not ...

  13. Hiatus Hernia Repair with Bilateral Oesophageal Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite advances in surgical repair of hiatus hernias, there remains a high radiological recurrence rate. We performed a novel technique incorporating bilateral oesophageal fixation and evaluated outcomes, principally symptom improvement and hernia recurrence. Methods. A retrospective study was performed on a prospective database of patients undergoing hiatus hernia repair with bilateral oesophageal fixation. Retrospective and prospective quality of life (QOL), PPI usage, and patient satisfaction data were obtained. Hernia recurrence was assessed by either barium swallow or gastroscopy. Results. 87 patients were identified in the database with a minimum of 3 months followup. There were significant improvements in QOL scores including GERD HRQL (29.13 to 4.38, P < 0.01), Visick (3 to 1), and RSI (17.45 to 5, P < 0.01). PPI usage decreased from a median of daily to none, and there was high patient satisfaction (94%). 57 patients were assessed for recurrence with either gastroscopy or barium swallow, and one patient had evidence of recurrence on barium swallow at 45 months postoperatively. There was an 8% complication rate and no mortality or oesophageal perforation. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that our technique is both safe and effective in symptom control, and our recurrence investigations demonstrate at least short term durability. PMID:26065030

  14. What is a Certified Hernia Center? The Example of the German Hernia Society and German Society of General and Visceral Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Köckerling, Ferdinand; Berger, Dieter; Jost, Johannes O.

    2014-01-01

    To date, the scientific definition “hernia center” does not exist and this term is being used by hospitals and private institutions as a marketing instrument. Hernia surgery has become increasingly more complex over the past 25 years. Differentiated use of the various techniques in hernia surgery has been adopted as a “tailored approach” program and requires intensive engagement with, and extensive experience of, the entire field of hernia surgery. Therefore, there is a need for hernia centers. A basic requirement for a credible certification process for hernia centers involves definition of requirements and its verification by hernia societies and/or non-profit organizations that are interested in assuring the best possible quality of hernia surgery. At present, there are two processes for certification of hernia centers by hernia societies or non-profit organizations. PMID:25593950

  15. What is a Certified Hernia Center? The Example of the German Hernia Society and German Society of General and Visceral Surgery.

    PubMed

    Köckerling, Ferdinand; Berger, Dieter; Jost, Johannes O

    2014-01-01

    To date, the scientific definition "hernia center" does not exist and this term is being used by hospitals and private institutions as a marketing instrument. Hernia surgery has become increasingly more complex over the past 25 years. Differentiated use of the various techniques in hernia surgery has been adopted as a "tailored approach" program and requires intensive engagement with, and extensive experience of, the entire field of hernia surgery. Therefore, there is a need for hernia centers. A basic requirement for a credible certification process for hernia centers involves definition of requirements and its verification by hernia societies and/or non-profit organizations that are interested in assuring the best possible quality of hernia surgery. At present, there are two processes for certification of hernia centers by hernia societies or non-profit organizations. PMID:25593950

  16. Congenital Spigelian hernia with cryptorchidism: probably a new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raveenthiran, V

    2005-12-01

    Nearly 28% of pediatric Spigelian hernias reported in the literature are associated with ipsilateral cryptorchidism. However, the pathogenetic relationship between the two has not been satisfactorily explained in the past. This paper describes a male neonate born with cryptorchidism and imperforate anus. Anal stenosis following the treatment of imperforate anus had let to the development of multiple hernias including Spigelian hernia on the right side. Surgical exploration revealed the right testis being located within the Spigelian hernia. Based on the sequence of events, it is hypothesized that Spigelian hernia in this case is a sequela of maldescended testis and raised intraabdominal pressure. As this explanation is also applicable to all of the previously reported cases, the author suggests that the combination of Spigelian hernia and ipsilateral cryptorchidism could probably form a hitherto unrecognized new syndrome. PMID:15782280

  17. A case of De Garengeot hernia requiring early surgery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chao-Wen; Tsao, Min-Jen; Su, Ming-Shan

    2015-01-01

    De Garengeot hernia is a rare clinical entity defined as the presence of a vermiform appendix within a femoral hernia sac. A 50-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a painful lump over her right groin region. A bedside ultrasound was performed and soft tissue lesion was suspected. CT was performed and revealed a swollen tubular structure with fat stranding within the mass. De Garengeot hernia with acute appendicitis was diagnosed preoperatively, and an emergency appendectomy and hernioplasty were performed. Although it is usually an incidental finding during hernioplasty, De Garengeot hernia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with an incarcerated femoral hernia. Mesh repair can be performed depending on the clinical situation. We report a rare case of incarcerated femoral hernia with acute appendicitis that required early surgical management to avoid associated complications. PMID:26199302

  18. Left Inguinal Bladder Hernia that Causes Dilatation in the Ureter.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Mustafa; Atcı, Nesrin; Oruc, Cem; Akkucuk, Seckin; Aydogan, Akin

    2016-05-01

    The scrotal bladder hernia is a rare condition that may present as scrotal swelling and urinary system obstruction or infection symptoms. Diagnosis of this condition before the operation decreases the severe complications like bladder injury during operation. In this article, a 75-year-old man presented to our clinic with right inguinal swelling and lower urinary system infection. Inguinal bladder hernia was diagnosed after performing a computed tomography. The hernia was repaired without any complications. PMID:27179171

  19. [Spigelian hernia. Clinical and anatomo-surgical considerations].

    PubMed

    Gioiella, M; Martini, A; Mutarelli, A; Pindozzi, V; Donnarumma, G; Manzo, V A

    1993-06-15

    The authors describe a case of Spigelian hernia observed and treated. This hernia is uncommon, although the true incidence is probably greater than the small number of patients reported in literature. The signs and symptoms of the hernia are not always characteristic and then a correct diagnosis can be difficult. Sometime instrumental examination is essential for diagnosis, when clinical examination is not clear. Surgical repair as mandatory for a correct reconstruction of the abdominal wall and a prevention of recurrences. PMID:8414104

  20. Clinicoradiological Images of a Rare Type of Lumbar Hernia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Arjun; Mukherjee, Sujoy; Garg, Cheena

    2015-12-01

    A surgeon will rarely see a case of lumbar hernia in his lifetime. They are usually divided into superior and inferior types, but in cases of huge hernias where anatomical delineation is not possible, they are called as diffuse. Further classification into primary and secondary types (on the basis of etiology) and congenital and acquired types is done. Evisceration in a lumbar hernia can be present due to secondary causes but never spontaneously. This is therefore probably the first reported case of a primary eviscerated diffuse lumbar hernia. PMID:26884669

  1. Bochdalek Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in an Adult Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R. D.; Katz, M. G.; Fargnoli, A. S.; Kendle, A. P.; Mihalko, K. L.; Bridges, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare condition. The aetiology of CDH is often unclear. In our case, a hollow mass was noted on MRI. Cardiac ejection fraction was diminished (47.0%) compared to 60.5% (average of 10 other normal animals, P < 0.05). The final diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) was made when the sheep underwent surgery. The hernia was right-sided and contained the abomasum. Lung biopsy demonstrated incomplete development with a low number of bronchopulmonary segments and vessels. The likely cause of this hernia was genetic malformation. PMID:26293994

  2. Bilateral Morgagni Hernia: A Unique Presentation of a Rare Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernia is an unusual congenital herniation of abdominal content through the triangular parasternal gaps of the anterior diaphragm. They are commonly asymptomatic and right-sided. We present a case of a bilateral Morgagni hernia resulting in delayed growth in a 10-month-old boy. The presentation was unique due to its bilateral nature and its symptomatic compression of the mediastinum. Diagnosis was made by 3D reconstructed CT angiogram. The patient underwent medical optimization until he was safely able to tolerate laparoscopic surgical repair of his hernia. Upon laparoscopy, the CT findings were confirmed and the hernia was repaired.

  3. Bochdalek Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in an Adult Sheep.

    PubMed

    Williams, R D; Katz, M G; Fargnoli, A S; Kendle, A P; Mihalko, K L; Bridges, C R

    2016-06-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare condition. The aetiology of CDH is often unclear. In our case, a hollow mass was noted on MRI. Cardiac ejection fraction was diminished (47.0%) compared to 60.5% (average of 10 other normal animals, P < 0.05). The final diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) was made when the sheep underwent surgery. The hernia was right-sided and contained the abomasum. Lung biopsy demonstrated incomplete development with a low number of bronchopulmonary segments and vessels. The likely cause of this hernia was genetic malformation. PMID:26293994

  4. Abdominal wall hernias in the setting of cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Belghiti, J; Durand, F

    1997-01-01

    In cirrhotic patients, umbilical hernias occur almost exclusively when longstanding ascites is present. Umbilical hernias expose cirrhotic patients to potentially life-threatening complications such as strangulation (which can be precipitated by rapid removal of ascitic fluid) and rupture (which is usually preceded by cutaneous ulcerations on the surface of the hernia). In cirrhotic patients, prevention of umbilical hernias is based on prevention of ascites. When prevention has failed, medical treatment of ascites should be first attempted. In patients in whom medical treatment is effective, and after ascites has disappeared, surgical treatment of umbilical hernia can be safely performed in most cases. In patients in whom medical treatment is ineffective and who develop refractory ascites, treatment strategy for umbilical hernia depends on the presence or absence of indication for liver transplantation. In patients who are candidates for liver transplantation, careful local care with pressure bandage must be performed until transplantation. Herniorrhaphy must be performed at the time of transplantation. In patients with refractory ascites, and who are not candidates for transplantation, portocaval shunt, transjugular intrahepatic portocaval shunt (both followed by surgical herniorrhaphy when ascites has disappeared) or concomitant peritoneo-venous shunt and herniorrhaphy should be considered. In contrast to umbilical hernias, groin hernias are not markedly influenced by ascites. However, ascites is a major risk factor for surgery. Therefore, surgical repair should not be recommended in patients with ascites and poor liver function. In cirrhotic patients with incisional hernia, prosthetic devices should be avoided because of the high risk of bacterial infection. PMID:9308126

  5. Endometriosis in a spigelian hernia sac: an unexpected finding.

    PubMed

    Moris, Demetrios; Michalinos, Adamantios; Vernadakis, Spiridon

    2015-01-01

    Describes the existence of endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac. Spigelian Hernia is a rare ventral hernia, presenting difficulties in diagnosis and carrying a high incarceration and obstruction risk. Endometriomas occur due to implantation of endometrial cells into a surgical wound, most often after a cesarean delivery. A 37-year-old woman presented to our department with persistent abdominal pain, exacerbating during menses, and vomiting for 2 days. Physical examination revealed a mass-like lesion in the border between the left-upper and left-lower quadrant. Ultrasound examination was inconclusive and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed an abdominal wall mass. During surgery, a spigelian hernia was found 5 to 7 cm above a previous cesarean incision. Tissue like "chocolate cysts" was present at the hernia sac. Hernia was repaired while tissue was excised and sent for histological examination that confirmed the diagnosis. Spigelian hernia is a hernia presenting difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. Endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac is a rare diagnosis, confirmed only histologically. Clinical suspicion can be posed only through symptoms and thorough investigation. PMID:25594648

  6. Increasing Body Mass Index Is Inversely Related to Groin Hernias.

    PubMed

    Ravanbakhsh, Samine; Batech, Michael; Tejirian, Talar

    2015-10-01

    Few studies describe the relationship between obesity and groin hernias. Our objective was to investigate the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and groin hernias in a large population. Patients with the diagnosis of inguinal or femoral hernia with and without incarceration or strangulation were identified using the Kaiser Permanente Southern California regional database including 14 hospitals over a 7-year period. Patients were stratified by BMI. There were 47,950 patients with a diagnosis of a groin hernia--a prevalence of 2.28 per cent. Relative to normal BMI (20-24.9 kg/m(2)), lower BMI was associated with an increased risk for hernia diagnosis. With increasing BMI, the risk of incarceration or strangulation increased. Additionally, increasing age, male gender, white race, history of hernia, tobacco use history, alcohol use, and higher comorbidity index increased the chance of a groin hernia diagnosis. Complications were higher for women, patients with comorbidities, black race, and alcohol users. Our study is the largest to date correlating obesity and groin hernias in a diverse United States population. Obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) is associated with a lower risk of groin hernia diagnosis, but an increased risk of complications. This inverse relationship may be due to limitations of physical exam in obese patients. PMID:26463305

  7. An unusual outcome of a giant ventral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Muhammad; Alsenani, Mohammad; Al-Akeely, Muhammad; Al-Qahtani, Hamad

    2015-01-01

    Hernias are routine general surgical problems that may present in any age group, regardless of the patient’s socioeconomic status. We present a rare case of a complicated ventral hernia leading to short bowel. This is an unusual case and is very rarely reported in the literature. This current case report describes a 54-year-old gentleman who presented to the hospital with a giant strangulated ventral hernia causing massive bowel ischemia and resulting in a short bowel. The literature on large abdominal wall hernias leading to short bowel is reviewed, and a discussion on short bowel syndrome is also presented. PMID:26219451

  8. Endometriosis in a Spigelian Hernia Sac: An Unexpected Finding

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Demetrios; Michalinos, Adamantios; Vernadakis, Spiridon

    2015-01-01

    Describes the existence of endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac. Spigelian Hernia is a rare ventral hernia, presenting difficulties in diagnosis and carrying a high incarceration and obstruction risk. Endometriomas occur due to implantation of endometrial cells into a surgical wound, most often after a cesarean delivery. A 37-year-old woman presented to our department with persistent abdominal pain, exacerbating during menses, and vomiting for 2 days. Physical examination revealed a mass-like lesion in the border between the left-upper and left-lower quadrant. Ultrasound examination was inconclusive and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed an abdominal wall mass. During surgery, a spigelian hernia was found 5 to 7 cm above a previous cesarean incision. Tissue like “chocolate cysts” was present at the hernia sac. Hernia was repaired while tissue was excised and sent for histological examination that confirmed the diagnosis. Spigelian hernia is a hernia presenting difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. Endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac is a rare diagnosis, confirmed only histologically. Clinical suspicion can be posed only through symptoms and thorough investigation. PMID:25594648

  9. Endoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair for inguinal disruption (Sportsman's hernia): rationale and design of a prospective observational cohort study (TEP-ID-study)

    PubMed Central

    Voorbrood, C E H; Goedhart, E; Verleisdonk, E J M M; Sanders, F; Naafs, D; Burgmans, J P J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic inguinal pain is a frequently occurring problem in athletes. A diagnosis of inguinal disruption is performed by exclusion of other conditions causing groin pain. Up to now, conservative medical management is considered to be the primary treatment for this condition. Relevant large and prospective clinical studies regarding the treatment of inguinal disruption are limited; however, recent studies have shown the benefits of the totally extraperitoneal patch (TEP) technique. This study provides a complete assessment of the inguinal area in athletes with chronic inguinal pain before and after treatment with the TEP hernia repair technique. Methods and analysis We describe the rationale and design of an observational cohort study for surgical treatment with the endoscopic TEP hernia repair technique in athletes with a painful groin (inguinal disruption). The study is being conducted in a high-volume, single centre hospital with specialty in TEP hernia repair. Patients over 18 years, suffering from inguinal pain for at least 3 months during or after playing sports, and whom have not undergone previous inguinal surgery and have received no benefit from physiotherapy are eligible for inclusion. Patients with any another cause of inguinal pain, proven by physical examination, inguinal ultrasound, X-pelvis/hip or MRI are excluded. Primary outcome is reduction in pain after 3 months. Secondary outcomes are pain reduction, physical functioning, and resumption of sport (in frequency and intensity). Ethics and dissemination An unrestricted research grant for general study purposes was assigned to the Hernia Centre. This study itself is not directly subject to the above mentioned research grant or any other financial sponsorship. We intend to publish the outcome of the study, regardless of the findings. All authors will give final approval of the manuscript version to be published. PMID:26739740

  10. Umbilical hernia in Xhosa infants and children.

    PubMed Central

    James, T

    1982-01-01

    During the period 12 March 1980 to 10 March 1981 a consecutive series of 1200 Xhosa (Black) infants and young children, ranging in age from the newborn to the prepubertal, who attended the general outpatients department for a variety of medical complaints were examined for umbilical herniation. None had undergone any surgical operation, and patients with conditions possibly associated with umbilical herniation were excluded. Evidence of umbilical protrusion was found in 742 (61.8%), with a similar incidence in males and females. The overall incidence was reflected in each age group by a preponderance of children with umbilical hernia. This study confirms the validity of a generally-held impression that in Black children there is a strong tendency towards the persistence of umbilical hernia when it appears after separation of the cord. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7086806

  11. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in the older child.

    PubMed Central

    Booker, P D; Meerstadt, P W; Bush, G H

    1981-01-01

    Five children aged between 9 months and 7 years were admitted to hospital each with an unsuspected congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In 4 the diagnosis was pneumonia with a secondary pleural effusion or lung abscess. Initial investigations were unhelpful to the admitting physician; two of the children had had a previous chest x-ray which was normal. For 3 children the correct diagnosis was only made at necropsy. It is suggested that the possibility of a congenital diaphragmatic hernia be considered in any patient who has an indefinable diaphragm and cystic lesion on his chest x-ray film. Barium studies with the patient in Trendelenburg's position are of value in excluding the presence of bowel in the chest. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7247437

  12. What is inside the hernia sac?

    PubMed Central

    Virgínia, Ana Araújo; Santos, Cláudia; Contente, Helena; Branco, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Most ovarian inguinal hernias occur in children and are frequently associated with congenital genitalia defects. The authors present the case of a multiparous 89-year-old woman, without any genitalia defect, who was brought to the emergency department with an irreducible inguinal hernia. The patient was proposed for emergency surgery during which we encountered an ovary and a fallopian tube inside the hernial sac. An oophorosalpingectomy and a Lichtenstein procedure were carried out and the postoperative period was uneventful. This case shows that, even though it is rare, a hernial sac may contain almost any intra-abdominal organ, including those least frequent such as the appendix, an ovary or the fallopian tubes. PMID:27511751

  13. Chronic Pain after Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Manangi, Mallikarjuna; Shivashankar, Santhosh

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic postherniorrhaphy groin pain is defined as pain lasting >6 months after surgery, which is one of the most important complications occurring after inguinal hernia repair, which occurs with greater frequency than previously thought. Material and Methods. Patients undergoing elective inguinal hernioplasty in Victoria Hospital from November 2011 to May 2013 were included in the study. A total of 227 patients met the inclusion criteria and were available for followup at end of six months. Detailed preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative details of cases were recorded according to proforma. The postoperative pain and pain at days two and seven and at end of six months were recorded on a VAS scale. Results. Chronic pain at six-month followup was present in 89 patients constituting 39.4% of all patients undergoing hernia repair. It was seen that 26.9% without preoperative pain developed chronic pain whereas 76.7% of patients with preoperative pain developed chronic pain. Preemptive analgesia failed to show statistical significance in development of chronic pain (P = 0.079). Nerve injury was present in 22 of cases; it was found that nerve injury significantly affected development of chronic pain (P = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, it was found that development of chronic pain following hernia surgery was dependent upon factors like preoperative pain, type of anesthesia, nerve injury, postoperative local infiltration, postoperative complication, and most importantly the early postoperative pain. Conclusions. In the present study, we found that chronic pain following inguinal hernia repair causes significant morbidity to patients and should not be ignored. Preemptive analgesia and operation under local anesthesia significantly affect pain. Intraoperative identification and preservation of all inguinal nerves are very important. Early diagnosis and management of chronic pain can remove suffering of the patient.

  14. [Median incisional hernias and coexisting parastomal hernias : new surgical strategies and an algorithm for simultaneous repair].

    PubMed

    Köhler, G

    2014-08-01

    The co-occurrence of incisional and parastomal hernias (PSH) remains a surgical challenge. Standardized treatment guidelines are missing, and the patients concerned require an individualized surgical approach. The laparoscopic techniques can be performed with incised and/or stoma-lateralizing flat meshes with intraperitoneal onlay placement. The purely laparoscopic and laparoscopic-assisted approaches with 3-D meshes offer advantages regarding the complete coverage of the edges of the stomal areas and the option of equilateral or contralateral stoma relocation in cases of PSH, which are difficult to handle due to scarring, adhesions, and large fascial defects > 5 cm with intestinal hernia sac contents. A relevant stoma prolapse can be relocated by tunnel-like preformed 3-D meshes and shortening the stoma bowel. The positive effect on prolapse prevention arises from the dome of the 3-D mesh, which is directed toward the abdominal cavity and tightly fits to the bowel. In cases of large incisional hernias (> 8-10 cm in width) or young patients with higher physical demands, an open abdominal wall reconstruction in sublay technique is required. Component separation techniques that enable tension-free ventral fascial closure should be preferred to mesh-supported defect bridging methods. The modified posterior component separation with transversus abdominis release (TAR) and the minimally invasive anterior component separation are superior to the original Ramirez technique with respect to wound morbidity. By using 3-D textile implants, which were specially designed for parastomal hernia prevention, the stoma can be brought out through the lateral abdominal wall without increased risk of parastomal hernia or prolapse development. An algorithm for surgical treatment, in consideration of the complexity of combined hernias, is introduced for the first time. PMID:24823998

  15. Sports hernia and femoroacetabular impingement in athletes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Munegato, Daniele; Bigoni, Marco; Gridavilla, Giulia; Olmi, Stefano; Cesana, Giovanni; Zatti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between sports hernias and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in athletes. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched for articles relating to sports hernia, athletic pubalgia, groin pain, long-standing adductor-related groin pain, Gilmore groin, adductor pain syndrome, and FAI. The initial search identified 196 studies, of which only articles reporting on the association of sports hernia and FAI or laparoscopic treatment of sports hernia were selected for systematic review. Finally, 24 studies were reviewed to evaluate the prevalence of FAI in cases of sports hernia and examine treatment outcomes and evidence for a common underlying pathogenic mechanism. RESULTS: FAI has been reported in as few as 12% to as high as 94% of patients with sports hernias, athletic pubalgia or adductor-related groin pain. Cam-type impingement is proposed to lead to increased symphyseal motion with overload on the surrounding extra-articular structures and muscle, which can result in the development of sports hernia and athletic pubalgia. Laparoscopic repair of sports hernias, via either the transabdominal preperitoneal or extraperitoneal approach, has a high success rate and earlier recovery of full sports activity compared to open surgery or conservative treatment. For patients with FAI and sports hernia, the surgical management of both pathologies is more effective than sports pubalgia treatment or hip arthroscopy alone (89% vs 33% of cases). As sports hernias and FAI are typically treated by general and orthopedic surgeons, respectively, a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis and treatment is recommended for optimal treatment of patients with these injuries. CONCLUSION: The restriction in range of motion due to FAI likely contributes to sports hernias; therefore, surgical treatment of both pathologies represents an optimal therapy. PMID:26380829

  16. Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal Hernia Repair Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Erin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has become increasingly popular as an alternative to open surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal procedure with the use of staple fixation and polypropylene mesh. Methods: A retrospective chart review examined outcomes of 1240 laparoscopic hernia operations in 783 patients, focusing on intraoperative and early postoperative complications, pain, and time until return to work and normal physical activities. Results: There were no intraoperative complications in this series; 106 patients experienced early postoperative complications across 8 evaluated categories: urinary retention (4.1%), seroma (3.0%), testicular/hemiscrotal swelling (1.9%), testicular atrophy (0%), hydrocele (0.6%), mesh infection (0.1%), and neurological symptoms (transient, 1.0%; persistent, 0.2%). Patients used an average of 5.6 Percocet pills after the procedure, and mean times until return to work and normal activities, including their routine exercise regimen, were 3.0 and 3.8 days, respectively. Conclusion: Complication rates and convalescence times were considered equivalent or superior to those found in other studies assessing both laparoscopic and open techniques. The usage of multiple Endostaples did not result in increased neurologic complications in the early postoperative period when compared with findings in the literature. In the hands of an experienced surgeon, total extraperitoneal repair is a safe, effective alternative to open inguinal hernia repair. PMID:27493471

  17. Laparoscopic Hernia Repair and Bladder Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bhoyrul, Sunil; Mulvihill, Sean J.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Bladder injury is a complication of laparoscopic surgery with a reported incidence in the general surgery literature of 0.5% and in the gynecology literature of 2%. We describe how to recognize and treat the injury and how to avoid the problem. Case Reports: We report two cases of bladder injury repaired with a General Surgical Interventions (GSI) trocar and a balloon device used for laparoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair. One patient had a prior appendectomy; the other had a prior midline incision from a suprapubic prostatectomy. We repaired the bladder injury, and the patients made a good recovery. Conclusion: When using the obturator and balloon device, it is important to stay anterior to the preperitoneal space and bladder. Prior lower abdominal surgery can be considered a relative contraindication to extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair. Signs of gas in the Foley bag or hematuria should alert the surgeon to a bladder injury. A one- or two-layer repair of the bladder injury can be performed either laparoscopically or openly and is recommended for a visible injury. Mesh repair of the hernia can be completed provided no evidence exists of urinary tract infection. A Foley catheter is placed until healing occurs. PMID:11394432

  18. The Laparoscopic Approach to Paraesophageal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Nason, Katie S.; Levy, Ryan M.; Witteman, Bart P.L.; Luketich, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair continues to be one of the most challenging procedures facing the minimally invasive surgeon. A thorough understanding of the tenets of the operation and advanced skills in minimally invasive laparoscopy are needed for long-term freedom from symptomatic and anatomic recurrence. These include complete reduction of the hernia sac from the mediastinum back into the abdomen with careful preservation of the integrity of muscle and peritoneal lining of the crura, aggressive and complete mobilization of the esophagus to the level of the inferior pulmonary vein, clear identification of the gastroesophageal junction to allow accurate assessment of the intraabdominal esophageal length and use of Collis gastroplasty when esophageal lengthening is required for a tension-free intraabdominal repair. Liberal mobilization of the phrenosplenic and phrenogastric attachments substantially increases the mobility of the left limb of the crura, allowing for a tension-free primary closure in a large percentage of patients. The following describes our current approach to laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair following a decade of refinement in a high-volume center. PMID:22160778

  19. Incarcerated obturator hernia: early diagnostic using helical computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Avaro, J-P; Biance, N; Savoie, P-H; Peycru, T; Pauleau, G; Richez, P; Charpentier, R; Balandraud, P

    2008-04-01

    Obturator hernia is a rare event with poor clinical signs. Delayed diagnosis is a cause of increased mortality due to ruptured gangrenous bowel. We report a case of incarcerated obturator hernia which highlights the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) scanning in diagnosing this condition. PMID:17628737

  20. Undiagnosed diaphragmatic hernia--the importance of preanesthetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ricco, Carolina H; Graham, Lynelle

    2007-06-01

    A 6-year-old, neutered male, Pembroke Welsh corgi was presented for hind limb paralysis. After anesthetic induction, marked cyanosis and hypotension were noted. Diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed based upon radiographic findings. Risks and complications associated with undiagnosed diaphragmatic hernia and the importance of thorough physical examination and patient assessment are discussed. PMID:17616059

  1. Left paramesocolic hernia presenting as post appendicectomy abdominal cocoon.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ramnik; Gabra, H Os; Nour, Shawqui

    2010-11-01

    We describe a rare case of left mesocolic hernia presenting as post appendicectomy intestinal obstruction in a girl. Laparotomy confirmed partial peritoneal encapsulation of upper small bowel due to herniation of jejunal loops into the left mesocolic hernia sac. Reduction of contents, resection of the sac and repair of the defect concluded the procedure uneventfully. PMID:21149902

  2. Evolution and advances in laparoscopic ventral and incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Vorst, Alan L; Kaoutzanis, Christodoulos; Carbonell, Alfredo M; Franz, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Primary ventral hernias and ventral incisional hernias have been a challenge for surgeons throughout the ages. In the current era, incisional hernias have increased in prevalence due to the very high number of laparotomies performed in the 20th century. Even though minimally invasive surgery and hernia repair have evolved rapidly, general surgeons have yet to develop the ideal, standardized method that adequately decreases common postoperative complications, such as wound failure, hernia recurrence and pain. The evolution of laparoscopy and ventral hernia repair will be reviewed, from the rectoscopy of the 4th century to the advent of laparoscopy, from suture repair to the evolution of mesh reinforcement. The nuances of minimally invasive ventral and incisional hernia repair will be summarized, from preoperative considerations to variations in intraoperative practice. New techniques have become increasingly popular, such as primary defect closure, retrorectus mesh placement, and concomitant component separation. The advent of robotics has made some of these repairs more feasible, but only time and well-designed clinical studies will tell if this will be a durable modality for ventral and incisional hernia repair. PMID:26649152

  3. Simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias under local anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Amid, P K; Shulman, A G; Lichtenstein, I L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors confirm the advantages of simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias, indicate that it is feasible to perform the procedure under local anesthesia, and suggest that when an open tension-free technique is used, the results are superior to those of laparoscopic repair of bilateral inguinal hernias. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Between 1971 and 1995, simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias were performed in 2953 men. Initially, between 1971 and 1984, patients with indirect hernias underwent the traditional tissue approximation repair. Those with direct hernias had the same procedure, with the repair additionally buttressed by a sheet of Marlex mesh (Davol, Inc., Cronston, RI). Between 1984 and 1995, both direct and indirect hernias were repaired using the open tension-free hernioplasty procedure. METHOD: The 2953 patients underwent simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias under local anesthesia in a private practice setting in general hospitals. RESULTS: In those cases in which the "tension free" technique was used, patients experienced minimal to mild postoperative pain and had a short recovery period, with a recurrence rate of 0.1%. CONCLUSIONS: Uncomplicated bilateral inguinal hernias in adults are best treated simultaneously. It is feasible to perform the operation under local anesthesia, and when an open tension-free repair is used, postoperative pain and recovery periods are equally comparable with those of laparoscopic repair, although the complication and the recurrence rates are significantly less. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8604904

  4. [Surgery of inguinal hernias in the geriatric patient].

    PubMed

    Palumbo, P; Pulcini, M; Vietri, F; Turano, R; Gallinaro, L; Montesano, G; Martinelli, V

    1997-10-01

    The Authors report a series of 73 elderly patients undergone to Lichtenstein hernioplasty with local anaesthesia. Treatment of inguinal hernia in emergency involves a high mortality; on the contrary, the lack of complications and a very good patient compliance shows that elective repair of inguinal hernia should be preferred and performed in the elderly. PMID:9479989

  5. Incidence of Ostomy Site Incisional Hernias after Stoma Closure.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Stephen P; Francis, Jacquelyn K; Valerian, Brian T; Canete, Jonathan J; Chismark, A David; Lee, Edward C

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the incidence of ostomy site incisional hernias after stoma reversal at a single institution. This is a retrospective analysis from 2001 to 2011 evaluating the following demographics: age, gender, indication for stoma, urgent versus elective operation, time to closure, total follow-up time, the incidence of and reoperation for stoma incisional hernia, diabetes, postoperative wound infection, smoking status within six months of surgery, body mass index, and any immunosuppressive medications. A total of 365 patients were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 30 months. The clinical hernia rate was 19 percent. Significant risk factors for hernia development were age, diabetes, end colostomies, loop colostomies, body mass index >30, and undergoing an urgent operation. The median time to clinical hernia detection was 32 months. Sixty-four percent of patients required surgical repair of their stoma incisional hernia. A significant number of patients undergoing stoma closure developed an incisional hernia at the prior stoma site with the majority requiring definitive repair. These hernias are a late complication after stoma closure and likely why they are under-reported in the literature. PMID:26736162

  6. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: an unusual cause of obstructive jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Jones, HG; Kadhim, A; Nutt, M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias in adults are exceedingly rare. They have been reported to cause dyspnoea, gastric reflux and intestinal obstruction. We present the case of a young woman with obstructive jaundice secondary to a Bochdalek hernia of the right hemidiaphragm. We discuss the aetiologies, presentation, investigation and treatment of the disorder, and make recommendations on the management. PMID:22524906

  7. Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia: imaging aspects in three cases*

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; de Campos, José Ribas Milanez; Aranha, André Galante Alencar; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão

    2013-01-01

    Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia is uncommon and mostly related to blunt or penetrating trauma. We report three similar cases of cough-induced transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia, highlighting the anatomic findings obtained with different imaging modalities (radiography, ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonance) in each of the cases. PMID:24068274

  8. Diaphragmatic Hernia after Transhiatal Esophagectomy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohun; Kim, Si-Wook; Hong, Jong-Myeon

    2016-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia was found in a patient who had undergone transhiatal esophagectomy for early esophageal cancer. Chest X-ray was not helpful, but abdominal or chest computed tomography was useful for accurate diagnosis. Primary repair through thoracotomy was performed and was found to be feasible and effective. However, long-term follow-up is required because hernia recurrence is common. PMID:27525243

  9. Surgical correction of a diaphragmatic hernia in a newborn calf

    PubMed Central

    Bellavance, Anne; Bonneville-Hébert, Ariane; Desrochers, André; Fecteau, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    A 2-day-old Holstein calf was admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital (VTH) in St-Hyacinthe for respiratory distress. Thoracic auscultations revealed asymmetric lung sounds. A diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed on thoracic radiographs. Herniorrhaphy was performed; postoperative recovery was uneventful. This case indicates that diaphragmatic hernia in calves can be surgically treated successfully. PMID:20885833

  10. Painful incarcerated hernia following a rugby union lineout

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R. H.; Thomas, G. O.

    1999-01-01

    Discussion related to hernias in sport usually involves the diagnosis and treatment of chronic musculotendinous groin disruption. A case of acute trauma in an incarcerated inguinal hernia, occurring in a rugby union player during a lineout, is presented. The injury arose as a result of a change in the laws of the game. 




 PMID:10027060

  11. ROBOTIC ASSISTED SINGLE SITE FOR BILATERAL INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    BOSI, Henrique Rasia; GUIMARÃES, José Ricardo; CAVAZZOLA, Leandro Totti

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The inguinal hernia is one of the most frequent surgical diseases, being frequent procedure and surgeon´s everyday practice. Aim: To present technical details in making hernioplasty using robotic equipment on bilateral inguinal hernia repair with single port and preliminary results with the method. Method: The bilateral inguinal hernia repair was performed by using the Single-Site(c) Da Vinci Surgical Access Platform to the abdominal cavity and the placement of clamps. Results: This technique proved to be effective for inguinal hernia and have more aesthetic result when compared to other techniques. Conclusions: Inguinal hernia repair robot-assisted with single-trocar is feasible and effective. However, still has higher costs needing surgical team special training. PMID:27438038

  12. Laparoscopic mesh repair of parahiatal hernia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lew, Pei Shi; Wong, Andrew Siang Yih

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of a primary parahiatal hernia that was repaired laparoscopically with a composite mesh. A 51-year-old woman presented with vomiting and epigastric pain. CT scan showed a giant paraesophageal hernia with intrathoracic gastric volvulus. Intraoperatively, a diaphragmatic muscular defect was found lateral to an attenuated left crus of the diaphragm, distinct from the normal esophageal hiatus. The defect ring was fibrotic, making a tension-free primary repair difficult. A laparoscopic mesh repair was performed with a composite mesh, which was covered with the hernia sac to prevent potential erosion into the esophagus or stomach. Recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the 5 days postoperatively. She remained asymptomatic at subsequent follow-up. Laparoscopic repair of parahiatal hernia can be safely performed. In circumstances where a large or fibrotic defect prevents a tension-free primary repair, the use of a composite mesh can provide effective repair of the hernia. PMID:23879418

  13. A Traumatic Abdominal Wall Hernia Repair: A Laparoscopic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kenneth L.; Rosser, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Traumatic abdominal wall hernias from blunt trauma usually occur as a consequence of motor vehicle collisions where the force is tangential, sudden, and severe. Although rare, these hernias can go undetected due to preservation of the skin overlying the hernia defect. Open repairs can be challenging and unsuccessful due to avulsion of muscle directly from the iliac crest, with or without bone loss. A laparoscopic approach to traumatic abdominal wall hernia can aid in the delineation of the hernia and allow for a safe and effective repair. Case Description: A 36-year-old female was admitted to our Level 1 trauma center with a traumatic abdominal wall hernia located in the right flank near the iliac crest after being involved in a high-impact motor vehicle collision. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen revealed the presence of an abdominal wall defect that was unapparent on physical examination. The traumatic abdominal wall hernia in the right flank was successfully repaired laparoscopically. One-year follow-up has shown no sign of recurrence. Discussion: A traumatic abdominal wall hernia rarely presents following blunt trauma, but should be suspected following a high-impact motor vehicle collision. Frequently, repair is complicated by the need to have fixation of mesh to bony landmarks (eg, iliac crest). In spite of this challenge, the laparoscopic approach with tension-free mesh repair of a traumatic abdominal wall hernia can be accomplished successfully using an approach similar to that taken for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. PMID:23477181

  14. [Is the presence of an asymptomatic inguinal hernia enough to justify repair?].

    PubMed

    Metzger, Jürg

    2015-11-11

    The risk of strangulation in case of a inguinal hernia is low. Patients with a symptomatic inguinal hernia should undergo an operation. Morbidity and mortality in inguinal hernia surgery are very rare. There is also non-conservative treatment of inguinal hernias. Trusses should no longer be recommended. Watchful waiting is an option for men with minimally symptomatic or asymptomatic inguinal hernias. But patients must be informed that there is a high risk of becoming symptomatic. PMID:26558931

  15. Incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia--differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Bukvić, Nado; Versić, Ana Bosak; Bacić, Giordano; Gusić, Nadomir; Nikolić, Harry; Bukvić, Frane

    2014-12-01

    The incarceration of diaphragmatic hernia is very rare. We present a case of a four-year-old girl who developed the incarceration of left-sided diaphragmatic hernia, who, until then, was completely asymptomatic. This incarceration of the hernia represented a surgical emergency presenting as obstructive ileus and a severe respiratory distress which developed from what appeared to be full health. During a brief pre-operative examination a number of differential diagnoses were suggested. Along with the laboratory blood analysis (complete blood count and acid-base balance) a plain thoracic and abdominal radiography was done (babygram). After that, through an inserted nasal-gastric tube, barium meal of the upper gastrointestinal tract was done, showing abdominal organs in the left half of the thorax and a significant shift of the mediastinum to the right. With an urgent upper medial laparotomy we accessed the abdominal cavity and made the correct diagnosis. An opening was shown in the rear part of the left hemi-diaphragm with thickened and edematous edges, approx. 6 cm in diameter with incarcerated content. The incarcerated abdominal organs (stomach, transversal colon, small intestine and spleen) gradually moved into the abdominal cavity. The opening was closed with nonresorptive sutures (TiCron) size 2-0 with aprevious control and ventilated expansion of the well-developed left lung. In postoperative course the acid-base balance quickly recovered, as well as the general state of the patient and radiography showed a good expansion and lucency of the lung parenchyma and a return of the mediastinum into the middle part of the thorax. PMID:25842758

  16. Genetic causes of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Julia; Yu, Lan; Chung, Wendy K.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a moderately prevalent birth defect that, despite advances in neonatal care, is still a significant cause of infant death, and surviving patients have significant morbidity. The goal of ongoing research to elucidate the genetic causes of CDH is to develop better treatment and ultimately prevention. CDH is a complex developmental defect that is etiologically heterogeneous. This review summarizes the recurrent genetic causes of CDH including aneuploidies, chromosome copy number variants, and single gene mutations. It also discusses strategies for genetic evaluation and genetic counseling in an era of rapidly evolving technologies in clinical genetic diagnostics. PMID:25447988

  17. Genetic aspects of human congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pober, BR

    2010-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common major malformation affecting 1/3000–1/4000 births, which continues to be associated with significant perinatal mortality. Much current research is focused on elucidating the genetics and pathophysiology contributing to CDH to develop more effective therapies. The latest data suggest that many cases of CDH are genetically determined and also indicate that CDH is etiologically heterogeneous. The present review will provide a brief summary of diaphragm development and model organism work most relevant to human CDH and will primarily describe important human phenotypes associated with CDH and also provide recommendations for diagnostic evaluation of a fetus or infant with CDH. PMID:18510546

  18. Sportsman’s hernia? An ambiguous term

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrakopoulou, Alexandra; Schilders, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is common in athletes. Yet, there is disagreement on aetiology, pathomechanics and terminology. A plethora of terms have been employed to explain inguinal-related groin pain in athletes. Recently, at the British Hernia Society in Manchester 2012, a consensus was reached to use the term inguinal disruption based on the pathophysiology while lately the Doha agreement in 2014 defined it as inguinal-related groin pain, a clinically based taxonomy. This review article emphasizes the anatomy, pathogenesis, standard clinical assessment and imaging, and highlights the treatment options for inguinal disruption. PMID:27026822

  19. Return to Play After Sports Hernia Surgery.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ho-Rim; Elattar, Osama; Dills, Vickie D; Busconi, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Sports hernia is a condition that causes acute/chronic pain of low abdominal, groin, or adductor area in athletes. It is considered a weakness in the rectus abdominis insertion or posterior inguinal wall of lower abdomen caused by acute or repetitive injury of the structure. It is most commonly seen in soccer, ice hockey, and martial arts players who require acute cutting, pivoting, or kicking. A variety of surgical options have been reported with successful outcome and with high rates of return to the sports in a majority of cases. PMID:27543403

  20. Retroperitoneal vascular malformation mimicking incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Indu Bhushan; Sharma, Anuj; Singh, Ajay Kumar; Mohanty, Debajyoti

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old man presented to the Department of Surgery with a painful groin swelling on right side. Exploration revealed a reddish-blue hemangiomatous mass in the scrotum extending through inguinal canal into the retroperitoneum. On further dissection swelling was found to be originating from right external iliac vein. The swelling was excised after ligating all vascular connections. The histopathological examination of excised mass confirmed the diagnosis of venous variety of vascular malformation. This is the first reported case of vascular malformation arising from retroperitoneum and extending into inguinoscrotal region, presenting as incarcerated inguinal hernia. PMID:21633582

  1. Umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis: A surgical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Julio C U; Claus, Christiano M P; Campos, Antonio C L; Costa, Marco A R; Blum, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical hernia occurs in 20% of the patients with liver cirrhosis complicated with ascites. Due to the enormous intraabdominal pressure secondary to the ascites, umbilical hernia in these patients has a tendency to enlarge rapidly and to complicate. The treatment of umbilical hernia in these patients is a surgical challenge. Ascites control is the mainstay to reduce hernia recurrence and postoperative complications, such as wound infection, evisceration, ascites drainage, and peritonitis. Intermittent paracentesis, temporary peritoneal dialysis catheter or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may be necessary to control ascites. Hernia repair is indicated in patients in whom medical treatment is effective in controlling ascites. Patients who have a good perspective to be transplanted within 3-6 mo, herniorrhaphy should be performed during transplantation. Hernia repair with mesh is associated with lower recurrence rate, but with higher surgical site infection when compared to hernia correction with conventional fascial suture. There is no consensus on the best abdominal wall layer in which the mesh should be placed: Onlay, sublay, or underlay. Many studies have demonstrated several advantages of the laparoscopic umbilical herniorrhaphy in cirrhotic patients compared with open surgical treatment. PMID:27462389

  2. A prospective study of bilateral inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed Central

    Serpell, J. W.; Johnson, C. D.; Jarrett, P. E.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study of outcome after inguinal hernia repair in patients undergoing simultaneous repair of bilateral hernias (n = 31), sequential repair of bilateral hernias (n = 5), and unilateral hernia repair (n = 75) is reported. There were no differences in wound complications, post-operative respiratory complications, or other adverse effects in the three groups. Operating time was similar in the unilateral and bilateral simultaneous repairs (median 55 min), but was longer (100 min) for the combination of two sequential repairs. Hospital stay was shortest for patients undergoing unilateral repair (2 days) but was less with bilateral simultaneous repair (4 days) than after two sequential repairs (total of 6 days). There were 12 (11%) wound complications of which five (5%) were infections. There was no difference in complication rate between unilateral and bilateral hernia repair. Postoperative recovery was assessed prospectively and was recorded at 1 month. There was no difference between unilateral and bilateral simultaneous repairs in the number of days before the patient was able to climb stairs easily, drive a car or return to work. The duration of the requirement for analgesia was similar in each group. We conclude that bilateral simultaneous hernia repair can be carried out with no greater morbidity than a unilateral repair, and the return to normal activity is as rapid. Bilateral hernias should be repaired simultaneously rather than sequentially. PMID:2221764

  3. Umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis: A surgical challenge.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Julio C U; Claus, Christiano M P; Campos, Antonio C L; Costa, Marco A R; Blum, Caroline

    2016-07-27

    Umbilical hernia occurs in 20% of the patients with liver cirrhosis complicated with ascites. Due to the enormous intraabdominal pressure secondary to the ascites, umbilical hernia in these patients has a tendency to enlarge rapidly and to complicate. The treatment of umbilical hernia in these patients is a surgical challenge. Ascites control is the mainstay to reduce hernia recurrence and postoperative complications, such as wound infection, evisceration, ascites drainage, and peritonitis. Intermittent paracentesis, temporary peritoneal dialysis catheter or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may be necessary to control ascites. Hernia repair is indicated in patients in whom medical treatment is effective in controlling ascites. Patients who have a good perspective to be transplanted within 3-6 mo, herniorrhaphy should be performed during transplantation. Hernia repair with mesh is associated with lower recurrence rate, but with higher surgical site infection when compared to hernia correction with conventional fascial suture. There is no consensus on the best abdominal wall layer in which the mesh should be placed: Onlay, sublay, or underlay. Many studies have demonstrated several advantages of the laparoscopic umbilical herniorrhaphy in cirrhotic patients compared with open surgical treatment. PMID:27462389

  4. [CLINICO-EXPERIMENTAL SUBSTANTIATION OF INTRAABDOMINAL PLASTY FOR UMBILICAL HERNIAS].

    PubMed

    Joffe, O Yu; Shvets, I M; Tarasyuk, T V; Stetsenko, O P; Tsyura, Yu P

    2015-04-01

    The impact of various methods of plasty, using net implants, on results of umbilical hernias treatment was studied in experimental and clinical investigation. The umbilical hernias plasty was performed in accordance to the IPOM (intraperitoneal on lay mesh) method, application of which have permitted to reduce a hospital stay of the patients as well as their period of social rehabilitation, and to guarantee the best cosmetic effect in comparison with such while making umbilical hernias plasty in accordance to a sub lay method. PMID:26263641

  5. A rare case of appendicitis incarcerated in an inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Smith-Singares, Eduardo; Boachie, Joseph Adjei; Iglesias, Izaskun Melania

    2016-01-01

    Amyand's hernia was coined after Claudius Amyand (1660-1740), who was the first to describe the presence of a perforated appendix in a hernial sac and also was the first to perform a successful appendectomy in 1735. It is an exceptionally rare condition in which the hernia itself contains the appendix, which may not necessarily be inflamed. The presence of an inflamed appendix further contributes to the rarity of this case. We report a case of acute appendicitis brought on by its incarceration in the inguinal hernia. PMID:27273683

  6. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman’s active sports life. Sportsman’s hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman’s hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman’s hernia at our hospital between 2011–2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  7. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman's active sports life. Sportsman's hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman's hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman's hernia at our hospital between 2011-2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  8. A rare case of appendicitis incarcerated in an inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Singares, Eduardo; Boachie, Joseph Adjei; Iglesias, Izaskun Melania

    2016-01-01

    Amyand's hernia was coined after Claudius Amyand (1660–1740), who was the first to describe the presence of a perforated appendix in a hernial sac and also was the first to perform a successful appendectomy in 1735. It is an exceptionally rare condition in which the hernia itself contains the appendix, which may not necessarily be inflamed. The presence of an inflamed appendix further contributes to the rarity of this case. We report a case of acute appendicitis brought on by its incarceration in the inguinal hernia. PMID:27273683

  9. Chest wall reconstruction after resection using hernia repair piece

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yimin; Zhang, Guofei; Zhu, Zhouyu

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of chest wall tumor is very important link of chest wall tumor resection. Many implants have been reported to be used to reconstruct the chest wall, such as steelwire, titanium mesh and polypropylene mesh. It is really hard for clinicians to decide which implant is the best one to replace the chest wall. We herein report a 68-year-old man who had underwent a chest wall reconstruction with a hernia repair piece and a Dacron hernia repair piece. The patient has maintained an excellent cosmetic and functional outcome since surgery, which proves that the hernia piece still has its place in reconstruction of chest wall. PMID:27293859

  10. Transverse testicular ectopia: a rare association with inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Prakash; Koirala, Rabin; Subedi, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Transverse testicular ectopia (TTE) is a rare anomaly that is commonly associated with inguinal hernia. Most of the reported cases are in children with very few reported cases in adults. We report a case of 42 years, fertile male, who presented with left reducible inguinal hernia. During surgery, he was found to have a left indirect inguinal hernia with TTE with both testes on the left side. Hernioplasty and bilateral orchidopexy were performed. He had an uneventful recovery. Most of these cases are diagnosed intraoperatively, but imaging (ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging) has emerged as a promising tool for preoperative diagnosis although ultrasound missed it in this case. PMID:25287117

  11. Age and sex-based distribution of lumbar multifidus muscle atrophy and coexistence of disc hernia: an MRI study of 2028 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ekin, Elif Evrim; Yıldız, Hülya Kurtul; Mutlu, Harun

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to investigate the prevalence of lumbar multifidus muscle (LMM) atrophy in patients having mechanical low back pain with and without disc hernia. METHODS In total, 2028 lumbar magnetic resonance imaging scans of low back pain patients (age range, 18–88 years) were re-evaluated retrospectively. LMM atrophy was visually assessed in axial sections of L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels. RESULTS LMM atrophy prevalence at both levels was significantly higher in subjects ≥40 years compared with younger adults (P < 0.001). LMM atrophy was significantly more frequent in women than in men (P < 0.001). Among patients with low back pain without hernia, LMM atrophy was significantly more frequent than normal muscle (n=559 vs. n=392; P < 0.001). Frequency of LMM atrophy in low back pain patients without disc hernia was 13%. Hernia was more frequent in patients with LMM atrophy compared with patients without atrophy (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION LMM atrophy is more common in women; its prevalence and severity are observed to increase with advancing age, and disc hernia is found more frequently in individuals with LMM atrophy. PMID:27035591

  12. [Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernias].

    PubMed

    Bezsilla, János

    2010-10-01

    Repair of abdominal wall defects is a challenge for all general surgeons and a variety of methods have been described in the past. Traditionally, primary suture repair was shown to have a high recurrence rate in long-term follow-up studies. Herniorrhaphies that apply a large prosthetic mesh are appear to have a lower failure rate, but extensive dissection of soft tissue contributes to an increased incidence of wound infections and wound-related complications. The method of laparoscopic incisional hernia repair was developed in the early 1990s. This technique is based on the same physical and surgical principles as the open underlay procedure. The laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) technique and mesh materials were developed further in subsequent years, and there have been numerous reports on successful use of the IPOM technique even for extremely large hernia openings in obese and elderly patients. Reduced surgical trauma and lower infection and recurrence rates are key advantages of the minimally invasive repair. Therefore, this operation has increased in popularity promising shorter hospital stay, improved outcome, and fewer complications than traditional open procedures. PMID:20965866

  13. Amyand’s Hernia: Case Report -Current Dilemma in Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Vasanth Mark; Kodiatte, Thomas; Gaikwad, Pranay

    2015-01-01

    Amyand’s hernia is an extremely rare condition, often misdiagnosed as a strangulated inguinal hernia, in which the inguinal hernial sac contains the vermiform appendix. It is often a surgical surprise. The reported incidence is approximately 1% of all adult inguinal hernia cases. Acute appendicitis in the Amyand’s hernia is even less common. We report a rare presentation of acute appendicitis associated with Amyand’s hernia managed by en masse reduction of the hernia followed by laparoscopic appendicectomy and open Lichtenstein’s tension free inguinal hernioplasty. PMID:25859489

  14. Hiatus/paraesophageal hernias in neonatal Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parida, S K; Kriss, V M; Hall, B D

    1997-10-17

    We report on an infant with neonatal Marfan syndrome (NMS) and hiatus/paraesophageal hernia who presented to a university hospital with an unusual early complication of this connective tissue disorder. An abnormal course of the nasogastric tube was noted on the first day of life by a radiograph of the chest and abdomen performed for bloody gastric drainage. The question of esophageal perforation was raised. Subsequent contrast study demonstrated a large hiatus/paraesophageal hernia with pronounced gastroesophageal reflux (GER). A part of the hernia was positioned posterior and to the right of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), presumably the location of the nasogastric tube as noted on the initial films. Although characterized by cardiac/aortic abnormalities, NMS can be a difficult diagnosis and should be considered in any infant with hiatus/ paraesophageal hernia with or without GER. PMID:9382135

  15. Transmesenteric hernia: A rare cause of bowel ischaemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, J.; Cross, Trent; Butterworth, William; Mousa, Paul; Thomas, S.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Transmesenteric herniae are a rare cause of bowel ischaemia in adults with few reported cases in published literature. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a rare case of a 26-year-old female with spontaneous transmesenteric hernia of jejunum and proximal ileum due to a congenital mesenteric defect resulting in bowel gangrene, presenting initially with no haemodynamic or biochemical abnormalities. The hernia was reduced, small bowel resected and primary side to side anastomosis performed, following which the patient made a good recovery and was discharged 5 days later. DISCUSSION The insidious onset of transmesenteric herniae and lack of specific radiological or laboratory investigations reaffirms the importance of surgeons maintaining a high index of suspicion for this critical surgical emergency. CONCLUSION Close monitoring of the patient's general condition in cases of non-specific abdominal pain is essential to identify the rare deteriorating patient for early surgical intervention and optimal outcome. PMID:23685474

  16. Surgical mesh for ventral incisional hernia repairs: Understanding mesh design.

    PubMed

    Rastegarpour, Ali; Cheung, Michael; Vardhan, Madhurima; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Butler, Charles E; Levinson, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Surgical mesh has become an indispensable tool in hernia repair to improve outcomes and reduce costs; however, efforts are constantly being undertaken in mesh development to overcome postoperative complications. Common complications include infection, pain, adhesions, mesh extrusion and hernia recurrence. Reducing the complications of mesh implantation is of utmost importance given that hernias occur in hundreds of thousands of patients per year in the United States. In the present review, the authors present the different types of hernia meshes, discuss the key properties of mesh design, and demonstrate how each design element affects performance and complications. The present article will provide a basis for surgeons to understand which mesh to choose for patient care and why, and will explain the important technological aspects that will continue to evolve over the ensuing years. PMID:27054138

  17. The maneuver to release an incarcerated obturator hernia.

    PubMed

    Shigemitsu, Y; Akagi, T; Morimoto, A; Ishio, T; Shiraishi, N; Kitano, S

    2012-12-01

    An obturator hernia occurs through the pelvic obturator canal, a rigid ring made up of the underside of the superior pubic ramus and the obturator fascia. Obturator hernias have been associated with a high mortality due to the difficulty in diagnosis and the population in which it occurs. We examined four patients diagnosed with incarcerated obturator hernia, and showed that the strangulated intestine was not necrotic. We flexed the diseased leg calmly and repeatedly with slight rotation toward the outside and slight adduction toward the inside at supine position. The pain vanished suddenly during this maneuver. After this maneuver, the patients were able to undergo elective surgery after a certain interval. We discuss the possible use of this maneuver to release an incarcerated obturator hernia. PMID:21369820

  18. Parastomal hernia: a growing problem with new solutions.

    PubMed

    Aquina, Christopher T; Iannuzzi, James C; Probst, Christian P; Kelly, Kristin N; Noyes, Katia; Fleming, Fergal J; Monson, John R T

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the most common complications following stoma creation and its prevalence is only expected to increase. It often leads to a decrease in the quality of life for patients due to discomfort, pain, frequent ostomy appliance leakage, or peristomal skin irritation and can result in significantly increased healthcare costs. Surgical technique for parastomal hernia repair has evolved significantly over the past two decades with the introduction of new types of mesh and laparoscopic procedures. The use of prophylactic mesh in high-risk patients at the time of stoma creation has gained attention in lieu of several promising studies that have emerged in the recent days. This review will attempt to demonstrate the burden that parastomal hernias present to patients, surgeons, and the healthcare system and also provide an overview of the current management and surgical techniques at both preventing and treating parastomal hernias. PMID:25531238

  19. Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia in children: Diagnostic difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Ndour, O.; Mustapha, H.; Ndoye, N. A.; Faye Fall, A. L.; Ngom, G.; Ndoye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia is rare in children. Its diagnosis can be difficult in the acute phase of trauma because its signs are not specific, especially in a poly trauma context. We report two cases of traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia following a blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma, highlighting some difficulties in establishing an early diagnosis and the need for a high index of suspicion. PMID:25659563

  20. Beware of spontaneous reduction "en masse" of inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Berney, C R

    2015-12-01

    Reduction 'en masse' of inguinal hernia is a rare entity defined as manual reduction of an external hernia sac back through the abdominal wall but where its content still remains incarcerated or strangulated into a displaced position, most often in the pre-peritoneal space. Small bowel obstruction habitually follows requiring urgent repair, preferentially via a trans-abdominal approach. Pre-operative clinical diagnosis is difficult and abdominal CT-scan imaging is the investigation of choice. PMID:24430579

  1. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Harihar, Vivek; Kothudum, Ashwini Rajareddy; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism. PMID:27579208

  2. Laparoscopic Repair of Sportman's Hernia - The Trinidad Experience.

    PubMed

    Gopeesingh, Anyl; Dan, Dilip; Naraynsingh, Vijay; Hariharan, Seetharaman; Seetahal, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    Sportman's hernia: (Athletic pubalgia) is an uncommon and poorly understood condition afflicting athletic individuals. Sufferers complain of chronic groin pain and often present diagnostic dilemmas to physicians and physiotherapists. We present a series of cases illustrating the varying presentations of sportman's hernia and diagnostic approaches that can be utilized to exclude common differentials. We also describe laparoscopic mesh repair as an effective treatment option for this condition. PMID:26744116

  3. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism. PMID:27579208

  4. Internal hernia associated with colostomy after laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hajime; Hoshino, Isamu; Sugamoto, Yuji; Fukunaga, Toru; Fujimoto, Hajime; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Uno, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We herein describe a case with an internal hernia that developed after laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer. The small intestine passed through the space between the sigmoid colon loop of the stoma and the abdominal wall. Internal hernias associated with colostomy are rare; however, the condition is an important complication, because it causes ischemia in both the herniated intestine and the sigmoid colon pulled through the abdominal wall as a stoma. PMID:23601774

  5. WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Emergency repair of complicated abdominal hernias is associated with poor prognosis and a high rate of post-operative complications. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference was held in Bergamo in July 2013, during the 2nd Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery with the goal of defining recommendations for emergency repair of abdominal wall hernias in adults. This document represents the executive summary of the consensus conference approved by a WSES expert panel. PMID:24289453

  6. Unusual perforated appendicitis within umbilical hernia: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz, J; Ortiz, A; Marco de Lucas, E; Piedra, T; Jordá, J; Arnáiz, A M; Pagola, M A

    2006-01-01

    We present the first imaging report of perforated appendicitis in an umbilical hernia. Computed tomography demonstrated a gas-forming abscess within an umbilical hernia and the cecum was found inside the hernial sac, with an inner relation to the abscess. Computed tomographic findings suggested appendicitis as possible diagnosis, which was confirmed at surgery. Physicians must consider appendicitis within the differential diagnosis of an abdominal abscess located near to the cecum, even at an unexpected location. PMID:16465570

  7. Personalized identification of abdominal wall hernia meshes on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tuan D; Le, Dinh T P; Xu, Jinwei; Nguyen, Duc T; Martindale, Robert G; Deveney, Clifford W

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal wall hernia is a protrusion of the intestine through an opening or area of weakness in the abdominal wall. Correct pre-operative identification of abdominal wall hernia meshes could help surgeons adjust the surgical plan to meet the expected difficulty and morbidity of operating through or removing the previous mesh. First, we present herein for the first time the application of image analysis for automated identification of hernia meshes. Second, we discuss the novel development of a new entropy-based image texture feature using geostatistics and indicator kriging. Third, we seek to enhance the hernia mesh identification by combining the new texture feature with the gray-level co-occurrence matrix feature of the image. The two features can characterize complementary information of anatomic details of the abdominal hernia wall and its mesh on computed tomography. Experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed study. The new computational tool has potential for personalized mesh identification which can assist surgeons in the diagnosis and repair of complex abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24184112

  8. Laparoscopic Treatment of Subxiphoid Incisional Hernias in Cardiac Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Wanda M.; Duffy, Andrew J.; Bell, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic subxiphoid incisional hernias present difficult surgical problems, especially in immuno-suppressed cardiac transplant patients. Here, we describe the laparoscopic repair of subxiphoid incisional hernias in patients with a history of cardiac transplantation. Methods: Four patients with subxiphoid hernias who had previously undergone heart transplantation were identified from a prospective database. Each underwent a laparoscopic repair with mesh implantation. Results: Three patients had a previous open repair. The mean age was 62.5 years, an average of 64.3 months after transplantation. At the time of surgery, all patients were immunosuppressed, and each had a subxiphoid, poststernotomy incisional hernia. Gore dual mesh was used in 2 patients, while Parietex mesh was used in 2. Mean operative time was 122 minutes, and all were completed laparoscopically. The mean length of stay was 6.5 days, and the mean defect size was 286.25 cm2. There was a significant correlation between hernia size and length of stay (P=0.037). Postoperatively, one patient (25%) developed pulmonary edema, and 1 patient (25%) had a prolonged ileus. Conclusion: Symptomatic subxiphoid incisional hernias are a challenging surgical problem in patients with a history of sternotomy. Laparoscopic repair is safe and effective in immunosuppressed patients who have previously undergone cardiac transplantation. PMID:18765049

  9. Hybrid technique for postoperative ventral hernias – own experience

    PubMed Central

    Okniński, Tomasz; Pawlak, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There are many techniques which may be involved in abdominal hernia repair, from classical to tension-free. Treatment of complicated hernias has undergone evolution. Many surgeons consider the laparoscopic method as a method of choice for incisional hernia repair. Sometimes miniinvasive repair of complicated hernia is not so easy to perform. We are convinced that selected patients may benefit from combined open and laparoscopic techniques. Aim To present the operating technique and early results of treatment of 15 patients operated on using the 3 hybrid technique. Material and methods Fifteen patients suffering from recurrent incisional hernias underwent the hybrid technique for their repair between June 2012 and April 2015. The hybrid technique was performed using synthetic meshes in 14 cases and a biological implant in 1 case. Results The early postoperative period was uncomplicated in all cases. Within a maximum follow-up period of 32 months, two deep wound infections were observed. Conclusions The hybrid technique may be used in patients with recurrent incisional hernias. PMID:26865889

  10. Amyand's hernia in elderly patients: diagnostic, anesthetic, and perioperative considerations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiping; Tao, Zongyuan; Chen, Hao; Li, Qinyu; Chu, Peiguo G; Yen, Yun; Qiu, Weihua

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a vermiform appendix in an inguinal hernia sac is termed as Amyand's hernia. Although rare, mistakes in diagnosis and treatment can cause catastrophic results. Charts of patients with inguinal hernia were reviewed, and four cases of Amyand's hernia were confirmed. The clinical presentation, anesthetic, and perioperative management of Amyand's hernia were further analyzed. The mean age of patients was over 70 years, and all were males. None of the patients were diagnosed preoperatively. All the patients had little abdominal complaint only with a right inguinal mass and dragging sensation for several hours. Due to the short time after incarceration and significant cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbidities, manual reduction was attempted first in three patients. With complete preoperative evaluation and careful perioperative support, all patients underwent appendectomy and Bassini's hernia repair through a groin incision. Based on age-related organ failure and associated chronic medical illnesses of geriatric patients, the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment are also summarized and analyzed. PMID:20001812

  11. Incarceration of Meckel's diverticulum in a left paraduodenal Treitz' hernia.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Christoph; Akkermann, Oke; Krüger, Volker; Gerdes, Anna; Gerdes, Berthold

    2015-08-16

    Meckel's diverticula incarcerated in a hernia were first described anecdotally by Littré, a French surgeon, in 1700. Meckel, a German anatomist and surgeon, explained the pathophysiology of this disease 100 years later. In addition, a congenital paraduodenal mesocolic hernia, known as a Treitz hernia, is a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. These hernias are caused by an abnormal rotation of the primitive midgut, resulting in a right or left paraduodenal hernia. We treated a patient presenting with pain and diagnosed extraluminal air in the abdomen after a computed tomography examination. We performed a laparotomy and found a combination of these two seldomly occurring congenital diseases, incarceration and perforation of Meckel's diverticulum in a left paraduodenal hernia. We performed a thorough review of the literature, and this report is the first to describe a patient with a combination of these two rare conditions. We considered the case regarding the variety of terminology as well as the treatment options of these conditions. PMID:26301234

  12. Current Status of Hernia Centres Around the Globe.

    PubMed

    Kulacoglu, Hakan; Oztuna, Derya

    2015-12-01

    Institutions specifically dedicated to treatment of abdominal wall hernias have gained popularity over the last years. This study aimed to determine the current situation of hernia centres worldwide. A web-based search was conducted using the common search engines Google and PubMed. The details recorded were as follows: name of the centre, country, establishment year, administrative structure (hospital affiliated, private practice group, or independent solo practice), whether or not the centre has its own operation room, the number of employed surgeons, preferred anaesthesia type, preferred repair type, laparoscopic technique option, case volume per year, and the number of scientific publications. A total of 182 centres were found in 30 different countries. Eighty-one (44.5 %) centres provide services as part of an affiliation within a general hospital (18 in university hospitals). Only 28 (15.5 %) of the centres have published a paper on abdominal wall hernias indexed by PubMed. The total number of papers in PubMed by 182 centres is 354. We observed that clinical outcomes in hernia centres are not shared globally by publishing them in scientific journals, and whether specific hernia surgeons and centres provide better outcomes in treating abdominal wall hernias, compared to general surgeons who deal with all kinds of surgical procedures, remains unclear. PMID:27011503

  13. [Abdominal wall closure by incisional hernia and herniation after laparostoma].

    PubMed

    Mischinger, H-J; Kornprat, P; Werkgartner, G; El Shabrawi, A; Spendel, S

    2010-03-01

    As hernias and abdominal wall defects have a variety of etiologies each with its own complications and comorbidities in various constellations, efficient treatment requires patient-oriented management. There is no recommended standard treatment and the very different clinical pictures demand an individualized interdisciplinary approach. Particularly in the case of complicated hernias, the planning of the operation should focus on the problems posed by the individual patient. Treatment mainly depends on the etiology of the hernia, immediate or long-term complications and the efficiency of individual repair techniques. Abdominal wall repair for recurrent herniation requires direct closure of the fascia generally using the sublay technique with a lightweight mesh. It is still unclear whether persistent inflammation, mesh dislocation, fistula formation or other long-term complications are due to certain materials or to the surgical technique. With mesh infections it has been shown to be advantageous to remove a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mesh, while the combination of systemic and local treatment appears to suffice for a polypropylene or polyester mesh. Heavier meshes in the sublay position or plastic reconstruction with autologous tissue are indicated as substitutes for the abdominal wall for giant hernias, repeated recurrences and large abdominal wall defects. A laparostoma is increasingly more often created to treat septic intra-abdominal processes but is very often responsible for a complicated hernia. If primary repair of the abdominal wall is not an option, resorbable material or split skin is used for coverage under the auspices of a planned hernia repair. PMID:20145901

  14. Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair Using Memory-Ring Mesh: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Akihisa; Takao, Yoshimune

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair using a memory-ring patch (Polysoft™ mesh). Patients and Methods. Between April 2010 and March 2013, a total of 76 inguinal hernias underwent TAPP repair using Polysoft mesh in 67 adults under general anesthesia. Three different senior resident surgeons performed TAPP repair under the instruction of a specialist surgeon. Nine patients had bilateral hernias. The 76 hernias included 37 indirect inguinal hernias, 29 direct hernias, 1 femoral hernia, 1 pantaloon hernia (combined direct/indirect inguinal hernia), and 8 recurrent hernias after open anterior hernia repair. The immediate postoperative outcomes as well as the short-term outcomes (mainly recurrence and incidence of chronic pain) were studied. Results. There was no conversion from TAPP repair to anterior open repair. The mean operation time was 109 minutes (range, 40–132) for unilateral hernia repair. Scrotal seroma was diagnosed at the operation site in 5 patients. No patient had operation-related orchitis, testicle edema, trocar site infection, or chronic pain during follow-up. Conclusions. The use of Polysoft mesh for TAPP inguinal hernia repair does not seem to adversely affect the quality of repair. The use of this mesh is therefore feasible and safe and may reduce postoperative pain.

  15. Genetic Factors in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Holder, A. M.; Klaassens, M.; Tibboel, D.; de Klein, A.; Lee, B.; Scott, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a relatively common birth defect associated with high mortality and morbidity. Although the exact etiology of most cases of CDH remains unknown, there is a growing body of evidence that genetic factors play an important role in the development of CDH. In this review, we examine key findings that are likely to form the basis for future research in this field. Specific topics include a short overview of normal and abnormal diaphragm development, a discussion of syndromic forms of CDH, a detailed review of chromosomal regions recurrently altered in CDH, a description of the retinoid hypothesis of CDH, and evidence of the roles of specific genes in the development of CDH. PMID:17436238

  16. Umbilical hernia simulating recurrent carcinoid on octreoscan.

    PubMed

    Hirschl, David A; Li, Yi; Chun, K J; Freeman, Leonard M

    2011-07-01

    Physiologic bowel activity on In-111 octreotide imaging is commonly seen. However, on occasion, normal bowel activity may mimic lesions in the abdomen, which can be very difficult to differentiate, particularly after surgical intervention. We report a case of focal bowel activity simulating a lesion in a patient who had an In-111 octreotide scan (Octreoscan), postoperatively, looking for recurrent carcinoid. SPECT/CT demonstrated that the uptake was localized in the anterior abdomen, and corresponded to a loop of bowel within a ventral hernia at the site of surgical incision. The correlation with CT as well as the precise localization made possible by the fusion images helped avoid misinterpretation of this finding as possible recurrent carcinoid. PMID:21637071

  17. [Technical principles of incisional hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Dietz, U A; Muysoms, F E; Germer, C T; Wiegering, A

    2016-04-01

    Many publications are available on the best surgical techniques and treatment of incisional hernias with reports of experiences and randomized clinical studies at the two extremes of the evidence scale. The ultimate proof of the best operative technique has, however, not yet been achieved. In practically no other field of surgery are the variability and the resulting potential aims of surgery so great. The aim of surgery is to provide patients with the optimal recommendation out of a catalogue of possibilities from a holistic perspective. This article describes the surgical techniques using meshes for strengthening (in combination with an anatomical reconstruction) and for replacement of the abdominal wall (with bridging of the defect). PMID:26943166

  18. Gallstone ileus obstructing within an incarcerated lumbar hernia: an unusual presentation of a rare diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ziesmann, Markus Tyler; Alotaiby, Nouf; Al Abbasi, Thamer; Rezende-Neto, Joao B

    2014-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with signs and symptoms of small-bowel obstruction and a clinically appreciable, irreducible, left-sided lumbar hernia associated with previous iliac crest bone graft harvesting. Palpation of the hernia demonstrated a small, firm mass within the loops of herniated bowel. CT scanning recognised an intraluminal gallstone at the transition point, establishing the diagnosis of gallstone ileus within an incarcerated lumbar hernia. The proposed explanatory mechanism is that of a gallstone migrating into an easily reducible hernia containing small bowel causing obstruction at the hernia neck by a ball-valve mechanism, resulting in proximal bowel dilation and thus hernia incarceration; it remains unclear when the stone entered the hernia, and whether it enlarged in situ or prior to entering the enteral tract. This is only the second reported instance in the literature of an intraluminal gallstone causing hernia incarceration. PMID:25471112

  19. Genetics Home Reference: short stature, hyperextensibility, hernia, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly, and teething ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions SHORT syndrome short stature, hyperextensibility, hernia, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly, and teething delay Enable Javascript to ... Close All Description Short stature, hyperextensibility, hernia, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly, and teething delay , commonly known by ...

  20. [Morgagni-Larrey hernia: surgical treatment with Marlex. A case report].

    PubMed

    Caracò, C; Candela, G; Pezzullo, L; Santini, L

    1997-01-01

    The authors described a case of hernia of Morgagni-Larrey in aged patients with an acute sub-occlusive symptomatology. This type of diaphragmatic hernia is uncommon and characterized by an aspecific symptomatology which realize different problems in children and adult patients, in whom diagnosis can be made incidentally, executing analysis for other pathologies. Using Marlex mesh to repair hernia represents an improvement of surgery, because it enables to repair a great hernia with a better result, and no recurrence. PMID:9102595

  1. Bilateral Inguinal Hernia Containing Urinary Bladder as Sole Content With "Pelvic Mickey Mouse Sign".

    PubMed

    Indiran, Venkatraman

    2016-04-01

    Inguinal hernias may contain urinary bladder as one of its contents, but very rarely have it as sole content. Inguinal vesical hernias may be unilateral or bilateral. When bilateral, inguinal vesical hernia may produce "pelvic Mickey mouse sign." This case reinforces the "pelvic Mickey mouse sign" in bilateral inguinal hernia containing only urinary bladder as content, which has been described only once before. PMID:26775075

  2. Colonic carcinoma presenting as strangulated inguinal hernia: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Slater, R; Amatya, U; Shorthouse, A J

    2008-09-01

    Inguinal hernia and colonic carcinoma are common surgical conditions, yet carcinoma of the colon occurring within an inguinal hernia sac is rare. Of 25 reported cases, only one was a perforated sigmoid colon carcinoma in an inguinal hernia. We report two cases of sigmoid colon carcinoma, one of which had locally perforated. Each presented within a strangulated inguinal hernia. Oncologically correct surgery in these patients presents a technical challenge. PMID:18798013

  3. Discal hernia in children and teenagers: medical, surgical and recovery treatment.

    PubMed

    Burnei, G; Gavriliu, S; Vlad, C; Georgescu, Ileana; Hurmuz, Lucia; Hodorogea, D

    2006-01-01

    Lumbar disc hernia represents a rare situation for the physician. The first intervention in disc hernia was performed during the '40. The rate of surgery needing lumbar hernia is about 1-2%. Lumbar disc hernia in children and teenagers has 4 main causes: familial history, trauma, congenital malformation of the spine and disc degeneration. The symptoms in young patients are dominated by local or ischiadic irradiated pain, but neurological discrepancies rarely occur. PMID:18386625

  4. Quality of life in patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, K.; McWhinnie, D.; Jenkinson, C.; Coulter, A.

    1997-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common surgical procedures undertaken in the NHS. Despite this, no previous work has examined quality of life in this patient group. This study examines quality of life preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months postoperatively in 140 patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair in the context of a randomised controlled trial of laparoscopic versus open hernia repair. Surgery was undertaken on a day case basis, and quality of life was assessed using the Short Form 36 (SF36). In the initial phase of the study, 57% of those screened for suitability met the study inclusion criteria and were randomised. No significant differences were found between laparoscopic and open hernia repair in terms of quality of life at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. No difference was found between 3 and 6 month scores, suggesting that patients had already made a good recovery by 3 months. A significant improvement was found between preoperative and postoperative scores, with the greatest change arising on dimensions assessing pain, physical function, and role limitation owing to physical restriction. After standardising for age, sex, and social class, a comparison of the hernia patients to population norms for the SF36 was consistent with improvement from preoperative to postoperative assessment. This study has demonstrated the improvement in quality of life in patients undergoing elective inguinal hernia repair by experienced surgeons on a day case basis. It has also demonstrated the feasibility of assessing quality of life using generic measures in this patient group. Further work in this area is required. Ultimately, the priority given to elective inguinal hernia repair will depend on how the demonstrated benefits compare with those derived from other elective surgical procedures. PMID:9038494

  5. An Atypical Case of Right-Sided Bochdalek Hernia in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Syed A.; Jawad, Sami Abdul; Dieguez, Javier; Doraiswamy, Vikram; Kam, Jennifer; Shaaban, Hamid; Miller, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Bochdalek hernias are usually congenital in nature and normally present after birth. However, in rare cases, these hernias are present in adulthood. We report an unusual case of a posttraumatic right-sided Bochdalek hernia found incidentally in an adult and treated successfully with conservative management. PMID:25657968

  6. Local anesthetic infusion pumps improve postoperative pain after inguinal hernia repair: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Barry; Waxman, Kenneth; Tatevossian, Raymond; Gamberdella, Marla; Read, Bruce

    2004-11-01

    Pain after an open inguinal hernia repair may be significant. In fact, some surgeons feel that the pain after open repair justifies a laparoscopic approach. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of local anesthetic infusion pumps would reduce postoperative pain after open inguinal hernia repair. We performed a prospective, double-blind randomized study of 45 open plug and patch inguinal hernia repairs. Patients were randomized to receive either 0.25 per cent bupivicaine or saline solution via an elastomeric infusion pump (ON-Q) for 48 hours, at 2 cc/h. The catheters were placed in the subcutaneous tissue and removed on postoperative day 3. Both groups were prescribed hydrocodone to use in the postoperative period at the prescribed dosage as needed for pain. Interviews were conducted on postoperative days 3 and 7, and patient's questionnaires, including pain scores, amount of pain medicine used, and any complications, were collected accordingly. During the first 5 postoperative days, postoperative pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Twenty-three repairs were randomized to the bupivicaine group and 22 repairs randomized to the placebo group. In the bupivicaine group, there was a significant decrease in postoperative pain on postoperative days 2 through 5 with P values <0.05. This significant difference continued through postoperative day 5, 2 days after the infusion pumps were removed. Patients who had bupivicaine instilled in their infusion pump had statistically significant lower subjective pain scores on postoperative days 2 through 5. This significant difference continued even after the infusion pumps were removed. Local anesthetic infusion pumps significantly decreased the amount of early postoperative pain. Pain relief persisted for 2 days after catheter and pump removal. PMID:15586515

  7. Clinical presentation and operative repair of Morgagni hernia

    PubMed Central

    Aghajanzadeh, Manouchehr; Khadem, Shahram; Khajeh Jahromi, Sina; Gorabi, Hamed Esmaili; Ebrahimi, Hannan; Maafi, Alireza Amir

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Morgagni hernia (MH) is an uncommon type of diaphragmatic hernia. This study aimed to summarize clinically relevant data with respect to MHs in adults. METHODS We performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent surgical repair of foramen due to MH at our hospitals between 1996 and 2010. Data were collected on patient demographics, presenting symptoms, modes of diagnosis, surgical procedures, surgery outcomes, recurrence of hernia and follow-up of the patients. RESULTS We included 36 patients with the mean age of 50.2 years. Of these 66.7% (n = 24) were female. Thirty-one patients had MH on the right side and 1 patient had bilateral MH. Most of the patients experienced abdominal symptoms. 72.2% of patients underwent laparotomy (n = 26, 72.2%), (n = 6, 16.7%) thoracotomy (n = 6, 16.7%), and a thoraco-abdominal approach (n = 4, 11.1%). Resection of the hernia sac and insertion of a mesh were not done in any patients. No recurrence occurred. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that preoperative diagnosis and early diagnosis of MH by using laparotomy and thoracotomy is useful for safe and effective repair. Also we suggest that resection of the hernia sac and insertion of a mesh are not necessary. PMID:22778140

  8. Groin hernia repair by laparoscopic techniques: current status and controversies.

    PubMed

    Arregui, Maurice E; Young, Susan B

    2005-08-01

    Laparoscopic hernia repair remains controversial, and its position in current hernia surgery remains in flux. In this article we attempt to put the laparoscopic approach in perspective by describing the rationale for its development. We summarize studies comparing it with open repairs, including recent publications, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews; and we then contrast the data with recent findings of the United States Veterans Affairs Cooperative study 456. We discuss the current and future status of the laparoscopic approach to inguinal hernia repair and present an update of our own laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal technique without mesh fixation. From 1994 to 2004 we performed 314 hernia repairs on 224 patients with no intraoperative complications, no conversions to an open procedure, and no mortality. Thirty (14%) minor postoperative complications occurred. There were three herniated lipomas (preperitoneal fat) but no true peritoneal reherniations. We evaluate critical points of laparoscopic hernia repair including extensive preperitoneal dissection, mesh configuration, size and fixation, cost reduction, and the learning curve. PMID:15983713

  9. Unexpected fatal outcome of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Ginelliová, Alžbeta; Farkaš, Daniel; Farkašová Iannaccone, Silvia; Vyhnálková, Vlasta

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we report the autopsy findings of a long-term warfarinized 60-year-old man who died unexpectedly 2 days after undergoing laparoscopic transabdominal pre-peritoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair. In his medical records it was stated that the perioperative and postoperative period was uneventful with no sign of bleeding and he was discharged the day after surgery. Autopsy revealed massive bleeding in the pre-peritoneal space at the surgery site and a massive left inguinal canal hematoma spreading through the spermatic cord to the left scrotum. There was no evidence of retroperitoneal bleeding. No sign of traumatic injury to the abdominal wall, major abdominal and pelvic vessels was revealed. The cause of death was hemorrhagic shock. We believe that this is the first documented case of fatal outcome after TAPP inguinal hernia repair in Slovakia. Inguinal hernias account for approximately two-thirds of all abdominal wall hernias. The reported case demonstrates that routine procedures such as TAPP hernia repair can have a fatal outcome, not due to any surgical mishap but because of the altered health status of the patient. PMID:27076122

  10. Retroperitoneal mass presenting as recurrent inguinal hernia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tardu, Ali; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Karagul, Servet; Ertugrul, Ismail; Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Retroperitoneal masses presenting as an inguinal hernia are rare conditions. Presentation of case A 53 year old male admitted with the symptoms of weight loss, abdominal discomfort and left sided recurrent inguinal hernia. Physical examination demonstrated an abdominal mass in the left flank and an irreducible, painless scrotal mass. He had a history of left sided inguinal hernia surgery six years ago. Computed tomography revealed a large enhancing left sided retroperitoneal mass invading the colon, pancreas and kidney and it was going down towards the left scrotum. Unblock tumor resection including the neighboring organs (left kidney, left colon, distal pancreas with spleen) was performed. Scrotal extension of the tumor was also excised and the inguinal canal was repaired primarily. Histopathology of the mass was myxoid-liposarcoma. The patient has disease free, without hernia recurrence but poor in renal function after twenty months follow-up. Discussion Large retroperitoneal tumors may grow towards the inguinal region and they can mimic an inguinal hernia. An irreducible, painless and hard scrotal mass should be considered from this perspective. PMID:26812669

  11. Amyand's Hernia: Rare Presentation of a Common Ailment

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sanjeev; Singhal, Anu; Negi, Sanjay Singh; Tugnait, Rahul; Arora, Pankaj Kumar; Tiwari, Bishwanath; Malik, Pawan; Gupta, Lav; Bimal, Amit; Gupta, Abhishek; Gupta, Rahul; Chouhan, Pushkar; Singh, ChandraKant

    2015-01-01

    Inguinal hernia with vermiform appendix as content is known as Amyand's hernia. It is a rare entity but we encountered four cases within six months. A 52-year-old female had high grade fever and evidence of inflammatory pathology involving the ileocaecal region. She was initially managed conservatively and subsequently underwent exploratory laparatomy. The appendix was perforated and herniating in the inguinal canal. Appendectomy was done with herniorrhaphy without mesh placement. A 74-year-old male with bilateral inguinal hernia, of which, the right side was more symptomatic, underwent open exploration. Operative findings revealed a lipoma of the sac and a normal appearing appendix as content. Contents were reduced without appendectomy and mesh hernioplasty was performed. A 63-year-old male with an obstructed right sided hernia underwent emergency inguinal exploration which revealed edematous caecum and appendix as content without any inflammation. Contents were reduced without any resection. Herniorrhaphy was performed without mesh placement. A 66-year-old male with an uncomplicated right inguinal hernia underwent elective surgery. The sac revealed an appendix with adhesions at the neck. Contents were reduced after adhesiolysis and hernioplasty was performed with mesh placement. Emphasis is made to the rarity of disease, variation in presentation, and difference in treatment modalities depending upon the state of appendix. PMID:26576304

  12. Amyand's Hernia with Appendicitis: A Case Report and Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa Cavalcante, Jéssica; Melo Teixeira Batista, Hermes; Cavalcante Pita Neto, Ivo; Fernandes Frutuoso, Jairo; Rodrigues Pinheiro, Woneska; Maria Pinheiro Bezerra, Italla; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; de Menezes Silveira, Gylmara Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Inguinal hernia is a common disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1.2% of the entire population and it is 12 times more common in males. Objective. To describe a case of appendix with signs of inflammation in the hernia sac, condition that is rare and difficult to diagnose, and to perform literature review, describing the most relevant aspects and the main controversies. Method. Report of a case and search in PubMed on June 1, 2015, using the terms “Appendix” [MeSH term] AND “hernia, inguinal” [MeSH term]. Results. The search resulted in 38 articles in total, and after deleting the articles that were not part of the inclusion criteria, there were 26 case reports remaining. Discussion. The search resulted in a total of 38 articles and after deleting the articles that were not part of the inclusion criteria, there were 26 case reports remaining. Conclusion. Amyand's hernia is a rare and difficult to diagnose condition, being commonly found occasionally in surgical procedures. It should be remembered in the presence of cases of incarcerated hernia, due to its possible complications if not diagnosed. PMID:26640737

  13. Outcome of abdominal wall hernia repair with Permacol™ biologic mesh.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Amy W; Abbas, Maher A; Tejirian, Talar

    2013-10-01

    The use of biologic mesh in abdominal wall operations has gained popularity despite a paucity of outcome data. We aimed to review the experience of a large healthcare organization with Permacol™. A retrospective study was conducted of patients who underwent abdominal hernia repair with Permacol™ in 14 Southern California hospitals. One hundred ninety-five patients were analyzed over a 4-year period. Operations included ventral/incisional hernia repairs, ostomy closures, parastomal hernia repairs, and inguinal hernia repairs. In 50 per cent of the patients, Permacol™ was used to reinforce a primary fascial repair and in 50 per cent as a fascial bridge. The overall complication rate was 39.5 per cent. The complication rate was higher in patients with infected versus clean wounds, body mass index (BMI) 40 kg/m(2) or greater versus BMI less than 40 kg/m(2), in patients with prior mesh repair, and when mesh was used as a fascial bridge. With a mean follow-up of 2.1 years, morbid obesity was associated with a higher recurrence. To date this is the largest study on the use of Permacol™ in abdominal wall hernia repair. In our patient population undergoing heterogeneous operations with a majority of wounds as Class II or higher, use of Permacol™ did not eliminate wound morbidity or prevent recurrence, especially in morbidly obese patients. PMID:24160785

  14. [A brief history of the inguinal hernia operation in adults].

    PubMed

    Bekker, J; Keeman, J N; Simons, M P; Aufenacker, Th J

    2007-04-21

    Late into the 19th century, treatment for inguinal hernias consisted of repositioning the hernia with trusses or using 'softening agents' such as warm herbal baths and moist bandages. Surgical resection or cauterisation, often combined with hemicastration, was only considered for cases ofstrangulated hernia that could not be repositioned. Bassini (1844-1924) is credited with developing the precursor to the modern inguinal hernia operation at the end of the 19th century. Bassini's essential discovery was that the transverse fascia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of inguinal hernias. Bassini's operation, consisting of complete incision of the transverse fascia and reconstruction of the inguinal floor, was considered the gold standard for nearly a century. One problem with the conventional Bassini operation was the tension applied to tissues, which led to a high rate of recurrence. Although Bassini's operation has now become obsolete, current surgical approaches still centre on fortification of the inguinal floor. This tension-free repair now uses synthetic mesh that is positioned using an open anterior approach, laparoscopic surgery, or a preperitoneal technique. PMID:17500346

  15. Does inguinal hernia repair have an effect on sexual functions?

    PubMed Central

    Sonbahar, Bilgehan Çağdaş; Bora, Gül; Özalp, Necdet; Kara, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to evaluate sexual functions which are affected by inguinal hernias and may change after hernia repair surgery. Material and methods A total of 47 patients who underwent Lichtenstein tension-free anterior repair and inguinal hernia surgery were evaluated in terms of erectile function, intercourse function, sexual desire, overall satisfaction and orgasm satisfaction using the International Index of Erectile function questionnaire (IIEF) scoring system before surgery and in the first and sixth months after surgery. Parameters evaluated with the IIEF score before the surgery and in the first and sixth months after surgery were compared statistically using the Wilcoxon test. Results The average age of patients was 46.2 ±11.2 years (range: 22–67). It was determined that all scores, apart from sexual desire (p = 0.08), significantly increased in the postoperative first and sixth months compared to the preoperative period. It was measured that the preoperative sexual desire score increased significantly in the postoperative sixth month (p <0.001). A significant score was also detected when all scores in the postoperative sixth month were compared to the postoperative first month. Conclusions Inguinal hernia surgery positively affects sexual functions compared to the preoperative period. The improvement in sexual parameters in addition to the benefits of hernia removal and presence of no significant postoperative complications indicates that this surgery is useful and safe. PMID:27551560

  16. Emergency repair of Morgagni hernia with partial gastric volvulus: our approach.

    PubMed

    Razi, Kasra; Light, Duncan; Horgan, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernias are a rare form of congenital diaphragmatic hernias, thus there is paucity in literature about the diagnosis and management of the condition. We report an 83-year-old woman who presented with vomiting and a metabolic acidosis with a previous computed tomography diagnosis of Bochdalek's hernia. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed a Morgagni hernia containing transverse colon, greater curvature of the stomach and a partial gastric volvulus. The hernia was reduced with the sac untouched, and the defect was closed with a composite mesh using tac fixation. The operation was done successfully in 45 minutes with no complications. PMID:27605660

  17. Perforation of a congenital umbilical hernia in a patient with Hurler's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hulsebos, R G; Zeebregts, C J; de Langen, Z J

    2004-09-01

    Congenital umbilical hernias in Hurler's syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis I) are generally treated conservatively, because complications such as incarceration are, rare, and risks involved in surgical correction are high. This case report describes the surgical management of a ruptured umbilical hernia in a 3-year-old child with Hurler's syndrome. Emergency repair of the hernia was performed with primary closure of the fascia; hernia recurrence 6 months later was treated laparoscopically using a PTFE mesh graft with no evidence of re-recurrence. In selected cases of Hurler's syndrome (warning signs of rupture) elective surgical hernia repair may be indicated. PMID:15359406

  18. [Controversies in the current management of traumatic abdominal wall hernias].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Egea, Alfredo; Girela, Enrique; Parlorio, Elena; Aguayo-Albasini, José Luis

    2007-11-01

    The management of traumatic abdominal wall hernias is controversial. We performed a MEDLINE search and report a personal series of 10 patients. Cases were classified according to the cause of injury. Fifty-six percent were caused by car accidents and 14% by bicycle accidents. Diagnosis was clinical in 22% and surgical in 13% and intra-abdominal lesions were found in 67%. Treatment was delayed in 12%. In our series, 55% were lumbar hernias due to traffic accidents and all were associated with pelvic fracture. Treatment was delayed in 50%, including laparoscopic surgery with good results. In conclusion, traumatic hernias due to road traffic accidents are frequently associated with intra-abdominal lesions. The diagnostic technique of choice is computed tomography and delayed surgery (laparoscopy) is an effective option. PMID:18021624

  19. Pulmonary hernia in a two-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Fine, Jenna; Walters, Bryan S; Agnoni, Alysia A; Coppola, Christopher P; Scorpio, Ronald J; Kennedy, Alfred P

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hernia, also known as lung herniation or intercostal herniation, is best explained as the lung parenchyma protruding beyond the confines of the thoracic wall. This rare finding can be classified as congenital or acquired. Acquired pulmonary herniations are often the complication of blunt or penetrating trauma to the chest wall. This report describes a two-year-old male who fell onto a rigid post, striking his left lower chest. Imaging studies demonstrated a small pneumothorax as well as pulmonary herniation. The patient underwent a diagnostic thoracoscopy and repair of a pulmonary hernia within the 7th intercostal space without complication. In this case report, we aim to add to the limited body of existing literature on the surgical management of pulmonary hernias. PMID:25328752

  20. Pulmonary Hernia in a Two-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Bryan S.; Agnoni, Alysia A.; Coppola, Christopher P.; Scorpio, Ronald J.; Kennedy, Alfred P.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hernia, also known as lung herniation or intercostal herniation, is best explained as the lung parenchyma protruding beyond the confines of the thoracic wall. This rare finding can be classified as congenital or acquired. Acquired pulmonary herniations are often the complication of blunt or penetrating trauma to the chest wall. This report describes a two-year-old male who fell onto a rigid post, striking his left lower chest. Imaging studies demonstrated a small pneumothorax as well as pulmonary herniation. The patient underwent a diagnostic thoracoscopy and repair of a pulmonary hernia within the 7th intercostal space without complication. In this case report, we aim to add to the limited body of existing literature on the surgical management of pulmonary hernias. PMID:25328752

  1. Combined epigastric hernia repair and mini-abdominoplasty. Case report

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Grella; Sergio, Razzano; Rossella, Lamberti; Biagio, Trojaniello; Francesco, D’Andrea; Francesco, Nicoletti Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of abdominal hernia repair are to restore the structural integrity of the abdominal wall. Current techniques include primary closure, staged repair and the use of prosthetic materials. Techniques for mini-abdominoplasty include the use of the transverse lower abdominal incision and the resection of excess skin. We report a case of epigastric hernia repair through a transverse lower abdominal incision with the resection of excess of skin. Our purpose is to evaluate the results of the procedure by incorporating these aspects into an epigastric hernia repair, we found out that the procedures are made safer and the results are improved. Proper indication and details of the technique are described. PMID:25667986

  2. Fournier's Gangrene as a Postoperative Complication of Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Tolga; Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Sozen, Isa; Yildiz, Baris Dogu; Coskun, Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Fournier's gangrene is the necrotizing fasciitis of perianal, genitourinary, and perineal regions. Herein, we present a case of scrotal Fournier's gangrene as a postoperative complication of inguinal hernia repair. A 51-year-old male with giant indirect hernia is presented. Patient underwent inguinal hernia repair, and after an unproblematic recovery period, he was discharged. He applied to our outpatient clinic on the fifth day with swollen and painful scrotum and it turned out to be Fournier's gangrene. Polypropylene mesh was not infected. Patient recovered and was discharged after repeated debridements. Basic principles in treatment of Fournier's gangrene are comprised of initial resuscitation, broad-spectrum antibiotics therapy, and early aggressive debridement. In the management of presented case, aggressive debridement was made right after diagnosis and broad-spectrum antibiotics were given to the hemodynamically stable patient. In these circumstances, the important question is whether we could prevent occurrence of Fournier's gangrene. PMID:25506030

  3. Recurrent Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, I.C.; Ko, S.F.; Shieh, C.S.; Huang, C.F.; Chien, S.J.; Liang, C.D.

    2006-10-15

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) includes a group of connective tissue disorders with abnormal collagen metabolism and a diverse clinical spectrum. We report two siblings with EDS who both presented with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The elder sister suffered from recurrent diaphragmatic hernia twice and EDS was overlooked initially. Echocardiography as well as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed dilatation of the pulmonary artery, and marked elongation and tortuosity of the aorta and its branches. A diagnosis of EDS was eventually established when these findings were coupled with the clinical features of hyperelastic skin. Her younger brother also had similar features. This report emphasizes that EDS may present as CDH in a small child which could easily be overlooked. Without appropriate surgery, diaphragmatic hernia might occur. Echocardiographic screening is recommended in patients with CDH. Contrast-enhanced MRA can be helpful in delineation of abnormally tortuous aortic great vessels that are an important clue to the early diagnosis of EDS.

  4. Is the severity of gastroesophageal reflux dependent on hiatus hernia size?

    PubMed Central

    Franzén, Thomas; Tibbling, Lita

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine if the severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease is dependent on the size of a hiatus hernia. METHODS: Seventy-five patients with either a small (n = 25), medium (n = 25) or large (n = 25) hiatus hernia (assessed by high resolution esophageal manometry) were investigated using 24-h esophageal monitoring and a self-assessed symptom questionnaire. The questionnaire comprised the following items, each graded from 0 to 3 according to severity: heartburn; pharyngeal burning sensation; acid regurgitation; and chest pain. RESULTS: The percentage total reflux time was significantly longer in the group with hernia of 5 cm or more compared with the group with a hernia of < 3 cm (P < 0.002), and the group with a hernia of 3 to < 5 cm (P < 0.04). Pharyngeal burning sensation, heartburn and acid regurgitation were more common with large hernias than small hernias, but the frequency of chest pain was similar in all three hernia groups. CONCLUSION: Patients with a large hiatus hernia are more prone to have pathological gastroesophageal reflux and to have more acid symptoms than patients with a small hiatus hernia. However, it is unlikely that patients with an absence of acid symptoms will have pathological reflux regardless of hernia size. PMID:24587634

  5. Management of Giant Ventral Hernia by Polypropylene Mesh and Host Tissue Barrier: Trial of Simplification

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Samir A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Surgical management of giant ventral hernias is a surgical challenge due to limited abdominal cavity. This study evaluates management of giant ventral hernias using polypropylene mesh and host tissue barrier after suitable preoperative preparation. Methods In the period from January 2005 and January 2007, 35 patients with giant ventral hernias underwent hernia repair. After careful preoperative preparation, repair was done using polypropylene mesh. The mesh was separated from the viscera by a small part of the hernia sac and the greater omentum. Results The average age of the patients was 52. Twenty patients had post-operative incisional and 15 had para-umbilical hernias. The mean hernia defect size was 16.8 cm. Mean body mass index was 33. Follow up ranged from 18-36 months. No patient required ventilation after operation. Recurrent seroma, which responded to repeated aspiration, was experienced in 4 patients. Minor wound infection was observed in 5 patients. Small hernia recurrence occurred in one patient. Conclusion The use of polypropylene and host tissue barrier after suitable preoperative preparation is relatively simple, safe, and reliable surgical solution to the problem of giant ventral hernia. Keywords Hernia repair; Giant ventral hernia; Polypropylene mesh PMID:22461873

  6. Light weight meshes in incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Schumpelick, Volker; Klinge, Uwe; Rosch, Raphael; Junge, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    Incisional hernias remain one of the most common surgical complications with a long-term incidence of 10–20%. Increasing evidence of impaired wound healing in these patients supports routine use of an open prefascial, retromuscular mesh repair. Basic pathophysiologic principles dictate that for a successful long-term outcome and prevention of recurrence, a wide overlap underneath healthy tissue is required. Particularly in the neighborhood of osseous structures, only retromuscular placement allows sufficient subduction of the mesh by healthy tissue of at least 5 cm in all directions. Preparation must take into account the special anatomic features of the abdominal wall, especially in the area of the Linea alba and Linea semilunaris. Polypropylene is the material widely used for open mesh repair. New developments have led to low-weight, large-pore polypropylene prostheses, which are adjusted to the physiological requirements of the abdominal wall and permit proper tissue integration. These meshes provide the possibility of forming a scar net instead of a stiff scar plate and therefore help to avoid former known mesh complications. PMID:21187980

  7. Proficiency of Surgeons in Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Neumayer, Leigh A.; Gawande, Atul A.; Wang, Jia; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Itani, Kamal M. F.; Fitzgibbons, Robert J.; Reda, Domenic; Jonasson, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the influence of surgeon age and other factors on proficiency in laparoscopic or open hernia repair. Summary Background Data: In a multicenter, randomized trial comparing open and laparoscopic herniorrhaphies, conducted in Veterans Administration hospitals (CSP 456), we reported significant differences in recurrence rates (RR) for the laparoscopic procedure as a result of surgeons’ experience. We have also reported significant differences in RR for the open procedure related to resident postgraduate year (PGY) level. Methods: We analyzed data from unilateral laparoscopic and open herniorrhaphies from CSP 456 (n = 1629). Surgeon's experience (experienced ≥250 procedures; inexperienced <250), surgeon's age, median PGY level of the participating resident, operation time, and hospital observed-to-expected (O/E) ratios for mortality were potential independent predictors of RR. Results: Age was dichotomized into older (≥45 years) and younger (<45 years). Surgeon's inexperience and older age were significant predictors of recurrence in laparoscopic herniorrhaphy. The odds of recurrence for an inexperienced surgeon aged 45 years or older was 1.72 times that of a younger inexperienced surgeon. For open repairs, although surgeon's age and operation time appeared to be related to recurrence, only median PGY level of <3 was a significant independent predictor. Conclusion: This analysis demonstrates that surgeon's age of 45 years and older, when combined with inexperience in laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphies, increases risk of recurrence. For open repairs, only a median PGY level of <3 was a significant risk factor. PMID:16135920

  8. Incisional Hernia Classification Predicts Wound Complications Two Years after Repair.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Rebeccah B; Ousley, Jenny M; Oyefule, Omobolanle O; Stewart, Melissa K; Holzman, Michael D; Sharp, Kenneth W; Poulose, Benjamin K

    2015-07-01

    Classification of ventral hernias (VHs) into categories that impact surgical outcome is not well defined. The European Hernia Society (EHS) classification divides ventral incisional hernias by midline or lateral location. This study aimed to determine whether EHS classification is associated with wound complications after VH repair, indicated by surgical site occurrences (SSOs). A retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent VH repair at a tertiary referral center between July 1, 2005 and May 30, 2012, was performed. EHS classification, comorbidities, and operative details were determined. Primary outcome was SSO within two years, defined as an infection, wound dehiscence, seroma, or enterocutaneous fistula. There were 538 patients included, and 51.5 per cent were female, with a mean age of 54.2 ± 12.4 years and a mean body mass index of 32.4 ± 8.6 kg/m(2). Most patients had midline hernias (87.0%, n = 468). There were 47 patients (8.7%) who had a lateral hernia, and 23 patients (4.3%) whose repair included both midline and lateral components. Overall rate of SSO was 39 per cent (n = 211) within two years. The rate of SSO by VH location was: 39 per cent (n = 183) for midline, 23 per cent (n = 11) for lateral, and 74 per cent (n = 17) for VHs with midline and lateral components (P = <0.001). Patients whose midline hernia spanned more than one EHS category also had a higher rate of SSOs (P = 0.001). VHs are often described by transverse dimension alone, but a more descriptive classification system offers a richness that correlates with outcomes. PMID:26140887

  9. Congenital asymptomatic diaphragmatic hernias in adults: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a major malformation occasionally found in newborns and babies. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often to the left and posterolateral, that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The aim of this case series is to provide information on the presentation, diagnosis and outcome of three patients with late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernias. The diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia is based on clinical investigation and is confirmed by plain X-ray films and computed tomography scans. Case presentations In the present report three cases of asymptomatic abdominal viscera herniation within the thorax are described. The first case concerns herniation of some loops of the large intestine into the left hemi-thorax in a 75-year-old Caucasian Italian woman. The second case concerns a rare type of herniation in the right side of the thorax of the right kidney with a part of the liver parenchyma in a 57-year-old Caucasian Italian woman. The third case concerns herniation of the stomach and bowel into the left side of the chest with compression of the left lung in a 32-year-old Caucasian Italian man. This type of hernia may appear later in life, because of concomitant respiratory or gastrointestinal disease, or it may be an incidental finding in asymptomatic adults, such as in the three cases featured here. Conclusions Patients who present with late diaphragmatic hernias complain of a wide variety of symptoms, and diagnosis may be difficult. Additional investigation and research appear necessary to better explain the development and progression of this type of disease. PMID:23668793

  10. Laparoscopic repair of a Bochdalek hernia in an adult woman.

    PubMed

    Sutedja, Barlian; Muliani, Yenny

    2015-08-01

    Bochdalek hernia (BH) is a congenital defect of the diaphragm that usually presents in the neonatal period with life threatening cardiorespiratory distress. It is rare for BH to remain silent until adulthood. A 51-year-old woman presented with progressive dyspnea and abdominal symptoms, but without a history of trauma. The diagnosis of BH was made based on chest X-ray and CT. The hernia was repaired by the laparoscopic technique, and the patient made an uneventful recovery. This report validates the feasibility of laparoscopic repair of BH in an adult, which should be within the capability of an advanced laparoscopic surgeon. PMID:26303737

  11. Clinical Conundrum: Killian-Jamieson Diverticulum with Paraesophageal Hernia.

    PubMed

    Bock, Jonathan M; Knabel, Michael J; Lew, Daniel A; Knechtges, Paul M; Gould, Jon C; Massey, Benson T

    2016-08-01

    Killian-Jamieson diverticulum is a outpouching of the lateral cervical esophageal wall adjacent to the insertion of the recurrent laryngeal to the larynx and is much less common in clinical practice than Zenkers Diverticulum. Surgical management of Killian-Jamieson diverticulum requires open transcervical diverticulectomy due to the proximity of the recurrent laryngeal nerve to the base of the pouch. We present a case of a Killian-Jamieson diverticulum associated with a concurrent large type III paraesophageal hernia causing significant solid-food dysphagia, post-prandial regurgitation of solid foods, and chronic cough managed with open transcervical diverticulectomy and laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair with Nissen fundoplication. PMID:26753928

  12. Anatomy, pathology, and MRI findings in the sports hernia.

    PubMed

    Shortt, Conor P; Zoga, Adam C; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Meyers, William C

    2008-03-01

    "Sports hernia" is a frequently used term on athletic injury reports and in the sportscasting media, but its true definition remains elusive in the medical literature. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful tool in the evaluation of clinical athletic pubalgia, yet specific pathologies associated with this commonly encountered syndrome are poorly described in the imaging literature. In this article we review the musculoskeletal anatomy of the pubic region as well as several reproducible patterns of pathology on MRI we have encountered in patients with a clinical diagnosis of sports hernia. PMID:18382944

  13. [Vena cava agenesia presented as incarcerated groin hernia].

    PubMed

    Safir-Hansen, Kristina; Achiam, Michael Patrick

    2014-12-15

    The case describes a 45-year-old man with a rare finding of vena cava agenesia presented as incarcerated groin hernia. From childhood the patient had developed dilatation of subcutaneous veins with establishment of aneurismal dilatation in the lower right side of the abdomen and groin. The patient was submitted with severe abdominal pain in the lower right side. The case describes the difficulties of an initially incorrect radiological diagnosis of incarcerated groin hernia and the discrepancy of the clinical findings. The case stresses the importance of a thorough evaluation of each patient. PMID:25497657

  14. Synchronous ipsilateral Bochdalek and Morgagni diaphragmatic hernias: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jelin, Eric B; Kim, Tyson N; Nathan, Nirmal; Miniati, Doug

    2011-12-01

    The etiology of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is unknown. Phenotypic patterns of CDH defects provide clues about normal diaphragm development and the pathophysiology of CDH. We report a case of a patient who was diagnosed with CDH postnatally and was found on imaging to have simultaneous Bochdalek and Morgagni hernias on the right side. During the operative repair of these defects, an additional left-sided Morgagni-type defect was also found. To the best of our knowledge, this form of CDH has not been previously reported. PMID:22152887

  15. Prevascular femoral hernia and its relation with inferior epigastric vessels: a rare presentation of the femoral hernia sac.

    PubMed

    Boshnaq, Mohamed; Phan, Yih Chyn; Akhtar, Mansoor; Hamade, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old man presented to the emergency department, with a 2-week history of a painful lump on his right groin. A diagnosis of an irreducible right femoral hernia was made. As such, an urgent operation was carried out on the same day, and the patient was found to have a rare prevascular femoral hernia in which the sac was lying over the femoral vessels and split by the inferior epigastric vessels into 2 components resembling 2 trouser limbs. The hernia sac presented in a different and challenging way that necessitated meticulous dissection and full orientation of the anatomy of the femoral triangle. Complete dissection and control of the inferior epigastric vessels, and complete reduction of the sac followed by repair with a prosthetic mesh plug were performed successfully. The patient was discharged home the next day. PMID:27090547

  16. Recurrence of inguinal hernias repaired in a large hernia surgical specialty hospital and general hospitals in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Atiqa; Bell, Chaim M.; Stukel, Thérèse A.; Urbach, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of hospital specialization on the risk of hernia recurrence after inguinal hernia repair is not well described. Methods We studied Ontario residents who had primary elective inguinal hernia repair at an Ontario hospital between 1993 and 2007 using population-based, administrative health data. We compared patients from a large hernia specialty hospital (Shouldice Hospital) with those from general hospitals to determine the risk of recurrence. Results We studied 235 192 patients, 27.7% of whom had surgery at Shouldice hospital. The age-standardized proportion of patients who had a recurrence ranged from 5.21% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.94%–5.49%) among patients who had surgery at the lowest volume general hospitals to 4.79% (95% CI 4.54%–5.04%) who had surgery at the highest volume general hospitals. In contrast, patients who had surgery at the Shouldice Hospital had an age-standardized recurrence risk of 1.15% (95% CI 1.05%–1.25%). Compared with patients who had surgery at the lowest volume hospitals, hernia recurrence among those treated at the Shouldice Hospital was significantly lower after adjustment for the effects of age, sex, comorbidity and income level (adjusted hazard ratio 0.21, 95% CI 0.19–0.23, p < 0.001). Conclusion Inguinal hernia repair at Shouldice Hospital was associated with a significantly lower risk of subsequent surgery for recurrence than repair at a general hospital. While specialty hospitals may have better outcomes for treatment of common surgical conditions than general hospitals, these benefits must be weighed against potential negative impacts on clinical care and the financial sustainability of general hospitals. PMID:26574701

  17. Delayed presentation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Numanoglu, A; Steiner, Z; Millar, A; Cywes, S

    1997-05-01

    Patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH) usually present soon after birth with respiratory distress. Occasionally presentation is delayed. Twelve patients with delayed presentation (outside the neonatal period) of a total of 91 with CHD were seen over 17 years (1977-1994). Case records were reviewed to identify reasons for late presentation, evidence of morbidity, treatment and outcome. Age at presentation ranged from 6 weeks to 30 months (mean 8 months). Ten patients were aged 6 months or younger and there was an equal number of boys and girls. Seven cases were left-sided, 4 right-sided and 1 was anteriorly placed and bilateral. Ten patients presented acutely, 5 with small-bowel obstruction and 5 with respiratory distress, but all of the latter had a history of previous recurrent chest infection. Diagnosis was confirmed by radiographic examination of the chest in 10, barium meal in 1 and a 5-month-old patient had an inappropriate laparotomy and gastrojejunostomy for duodenal obstruction at an outlying hospital. Two had documented normal chest radiographs 3 and 6 months prior to diagnosis. Patients who presented with gastro-intestinal symptoms were older (mean age 1 year) compared with those with predominantly respiratory symptoms (mean age 19 weeks). None had any evidence of bowel strangulation. All were repaired via an abdominal approach. A hernial sac was found in half the cases (4/7 left and 2/5 right). Five had non-rotation of bowel. Primary repair without patch was carried out in all. One child with lung hypoplasia and multiple cardiac abnormalities died; the others recovered well. Delay in presentation of CDH is not uncommon (14% in this series). Most patients will have respiratory symptoms. A normal previous chest radiograph does not exclude the diagnosis. All patients with recurrent chest infection should have a contrast meal investigation early on. Long-term prognosis is favourable and postoperative morbidity is minimal, despite late

  18. Inguinal Hernia and Airport Scanners: An Emerging Indication for Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O.; Maharaj, Ravi; Dan, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The use of advanced imaging technology at international airports is increasing in popularity as a corollary to heightened security concerns across the globe. Operators of airport scanners should be educated about common medical disorders such as inguinal herniae in order to avoid unnecessary harassment of travelers since they will encounter these with increasing frequency. PMID:24368923

  19. Outside-the-ribcage thoracic migration of a spigelian hernia.

    PubMed

    Cano-Maldonado, A J; Alcázar-Montero, J A; González-Fernández, J M; Adrio-Díaz, G

    2009-02-01

    Lung and spigelian hernia are both extremely rare diseases, and their combined and simultaneous appearance in the same patient, causing the small bowel to shift from the abdomen towards the thorax external to the ribcage is even more unusual. Here, we report such a case, supported by comprehensive iconography and a detailed discussion of the hypothetical pathogenesis. PMID:18584281

  20. Concomitant sublay mesh repair of umbilical hernia and abdominoplasty

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Catherine L; Fowler, James L; Cobb, William S; Smith, Dane E; Carbonell, Alfredo M

    2012-01-01

    Concomitant mesh repair of large umbilical hernias and abdominoplasty pose a serious risk of devascularizing the umbilical stalk. A technique of placing mesh in a sublay manner, deep to the fascial defect, for an umbilical herniorrhaphy to avoid damage to the deep umbilical perforators during an abdominoplasty is described. PMID:24294023

  1. [Spiegelian hernia. Apropos of a series of 31 cases].

    PubMed

    Ondo N'Dong, F; Lorofi, R; Comes, G; Bellamy, J; Diané, C

    1992-04-01

    31 cases of spiegelian hernias are reported. It is one of the world biggest statistics of this affection. The patients were divided in 18 women and 13 men, with an average of 45 years old. The hernia was located on the right side of the abdomen in 16 cases and on the left side in 13 cases. In two cases, the affection was bilateral. In 14 cases, there was an incarceration. No strangulation was observed. The rare forms can be divided in massive form, tumoral, crawling (in the old man), spread (in the infant and the woman). The spiegelian hernia can be associated with one or more other kinds of hernias. 27 patients underwent an operation. In all the cases, an direct approach was used. There was no post operative complications. We want to emphazise the high frequence of this affection in Gabon, and the fact that most of the cases have been observed within the same area, in the south of the country. A study researching predictive factors could be interesting to be realised in this area. PMID:1527192

  2. Sampson's Artery Hemorrhage after Inguinal Hernia Repair: Second Case Reported

    PubMed Central

    Adjei Boachie, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Sampson artery is normally obliterated in postembryonic development. In rare cases it can remain patent and complicate a routine outpatient herniorrhaphy when severed. This is the second reported case in the available English literature of hemoperitoneum due to bleeding from a patent Sampson's artery following an open inguinal hernia repair. PMID:27247822

  3. Sampson's Artery Hemorrhage after Inguinal Hernia Repair: Second Case Reported.

    PubMed

    Adjei Boachie, Joseph; Smith-Singares, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Sampson artery is normally obliterated in postembryonic development. In rare cases it can remain patent and complicate a routine outpatient herniorrhaphy when severed. This is the second reported case in the available English literature of hemoperitoneum due to bleeding from a patent Sampson's artery following an open inguinal hernia repair. PMID:27247822

  4. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Occupational Therapy: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Angela C.

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes occupational therapy (OT) intervention in an outpatient setting and outcomes for a child diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) from 4 to 28 months of age. There is little information on therapy intervention and outcomes of children who have survived. The patient is a white male, born at 35 weeks gestation…

  5. Prevention of perineal hernia after laparoscopic and robotic abdominoperineal resection: review with illustrative case series of internal hernia through pelvic mesh

    PubMed Central

    Melich, George; Lim, Dae Ro; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Arena, Goffredo O.; Gordon, Philip H.; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2016-01-01

    This review is intended to raise awareness of placing a pelvic mesh to prevent perineal hernias in cases of minimally invasive (MIS) abdominoperineal resections (APR) and, in doing so, causing internal hernias through the mesh. In this article, we review the published literature and present an illustrative series of 4 consecutive cases of early internal hernia through a pelvic mesh defect. These meshes were placed to prevent perineal hernias after laparoscopic or robotic APRs. The discussion centres on 3 key questions: Should one be placing a pelvic mesh following an APR? What are some of the technical details pertaining to the initial mesh placement? What are the management options related to internal hernias through such a mesh? PMID:26812410

  6. Thoracoscopic repair of a large neonatal congenital diaphragmatic hernia using Gerota's fascia.

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, Hiroaki; Tamaki, Akihiko; Takemoto, Jyunkichi; Morita, Keiichi; Endo, Kosuke; Iwade, Tamaki; Yuichi, Okata; Bitoh, Yuko; Yokoi, Akiko; Maeda, Kosaku

    2015-05-01

    A large congenital diaphragmatic hernia needing patch repair has a high risk of recurrence. Thus, managing these large congenital diaphragmatic hernias under thoracoscopy has become a problem. Here, a large congenital diaphragmatic hernia that was repaired using Gerota's fascia under thoracoscopy is reported. In the present case, it was impossible to close the hernia directly under thoracoscopy because the hernia was too large. Gerota's fascia was raised up by the left kidney and used for the repair. The left colon adhering to Gerota's fascia was mobilized, and a large space was made under thoracoscopy. Gerota's fascia was fixed to the diaphragmatic defect. The patient's postoperative course was good, and there was no recurrence. This technique could be one option for repairing a large hernia under thoracoscopy. PMID:25913592

  7. Elective laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon carcinoma incarcerated within an inguinal hernia: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kanemura, Takashi; Takeno, Atsushi; Tamura, Shigeyuki; Okishiro, Masatsugu; Nakahira, Shin; Suzuki, Rei; Nakata, Ken; Egawa, Chiyomi; Miki, Hirohumi; Takeda, Yutaka; Kato, Takeshi

    2014-07-01

    Primary colon carcinoma within an inguinal hernia sac is very rare and most reported cases were found at emergency open surgery for an incarcerated hernia. We report a case of incarcerated sigmoid colon carcinoma diagnosed preoperatively and treated with elective laparoscopic surgery. A 67-year-old man with a 2-year history of swelling of the scrotum and a breast lump was referred to us for surgical treatment of an irreducible left inguinal hernia and a right breast tumor. Blood examination results showed severe anemia. Computed tomography scan and endoscopic biopsy confirmed sigmoid colon carcinoma incarcerated in the left inguinal hernia. Thus, we performed definitive laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and conventional hernia repair for preoperatively diagnosed sigmoid colon carcinoma within an inguinal hernia. PMID:23846798

  8. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of preoperatively diagnosed bilateral obturator and incidental bilateral femoral herniae.

    PubMed

    Malik, Muhammad Usman; Connelly, Tara M; Hamid, Mustafa; Pretorius, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Obturator hernia (OH), a rare type of hernia, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is often delayed as clinical symptoms are typically non-specific. OH is frequently associated with other occult inguinopelvic herniae. Early diagnosis is vital to decrease morbidity and mortality. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman who presented to the surgical outpatients' department with non-specific bilateral groin pain radiating to the thighs. CT of the pelvis demonstrated bilateral OH with no radiological evidence of bowel obstruction. Semiurgent elective laparoscopic total extraperitoneal mesh repair was performed. Intraoperative findings confirmed bilateral obturator herniae as well as incidental bilateral femoral herniae. This case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for such concomitant hernias that, in the presence of OH, may only be identified intraoperatively. PMID:27113790

  9. Incidental De Garengeot’s hernia: A case report of dual pathology to remember

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead-Clarke, Thomas; Parampalli, Umesh; Bhardwaj, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A De Garengeot’s hernia is the very rare dual pathology of a vermiform appendix within a femoral hernia. Presentation of case We discuss the rare case of a 62 year old female who presented as an emergency with a strangulated femoral hernia. Within the hernia sac a partly necrotic vermiform appendix was discovered. The patient successfully underwent an appendicectomy and repair of her femoral hernia. The post-operative period was uneventful, with no further issues at follow-up. Discussion Our case report displays the successful treatment of a De Garengeot's hernia as an emergency admission, with a shorter than average admission time, and no post-operative complications. Conclusion This is a rare case of dual pathology, of which we believe there are few published cases. PMID:26520035

  10. Contraction of Abdominal Wall Muscles Influences Incisional Hernia Occurrence and Size

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Samuel C.; Hu, Yaxi; Wollstein, Adi; Franz, Michael G.; Patel, Shaun P.; Kuzon, William M.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Incisional hernias are a complication in 10% of all open abdominal operations and can result in significant morbidity. The purpose of this study is to determine if inhibiting abdominal muscle contraction influences incisional hernia formation during laparotomy healing. We hypothesize that reducing abdominal musculature deformation reduces incisional hernia occurrence and size. Study Design Using an established rat model for incisional hernia, a laparotomy through the linea alba was closed with one mid-incision, fast-absorbing suture. Three groups were compared: a SHAM group (SHAM; n = 6) received no laparotomies while the Saline Hernia (SH; n = 6) and Botox Hernia (BH; n = 6) groups were treated once with equal volume saline or Botulinum Toxin (Botox®, Allergan) before the incomplete laparotomy closure. On post-operative day 14, the abdominal wall was examined for herniation and adhesions and contractile forces were measured for abdominal wall muscles. Results No hernias developed in SHAM rats. Rostral hernias developed in all SH and BH rats. Caudal hernias developed in all SH rats, but in only 50% of the BH rats. Rostral hernias in the BH group were 35% shorter and 43% narrower compared to those in the SH group (p < 0.05). The BH group had weaker abdominal muscles compared to the SHAM and SH groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions In our rat model, partial paralysis of abdominal muscles reduces the number and size of incisional hernias. These results confirm abdominal wall muscle contractions play a significant role in the pathophysiology of incisional hernia formation. PMID:25817097

  11. Anterior preperitoneal repair of extremely large inguinal hernias: An alternative technique☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Koning, Giel G.; Vriens, Patrick W.H.E.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Standard open anterior inguinal hernia repair is nowadays performed using a soft mesh to prevent recurrence and to minimalize postoperative chronic pain. To further reduce postoperative chronic pain, the use of a preperitoneal placed mesh has been suggested. In extremely large hernias, the lateral side of the mesh can be insufficient to fully embrace the hernial sac. We describe the use of two preperitoneal placed meshes to repair extremely large hernias. This ‘Butterfly Technique’ has proven to be useful. Hernias were classified according to hernia classification of the European Hernia Society (EHS) during operation. Extremely large indirect hernias were repaired by using two inverted meshes to cover the deep inguinal ring both medial and lateral. Follow up was at least 6 months. VAS pain score was assessed in all patients during follow up. Outcomes of these Butterfly repairs were evaluated. Medical drawings were made to illustrate this technique. A Total of 689 patients underwent anterior hernia repair 2006–2008. PRESENTATION OF CASE Seven male patients (1%) presented with extremely large hernial sacs. All these patients were men. Mean age 69.9 years (range: 63–76), EHS classifications of hernias were all unilateral. Follow up was at least 6 months. Recurrence did not occur after repair. Chronic pain was not reported. Discussion Open preperitoneal hernia repair of extremely large hernias has not been described. The seven patients were trated with this technique uneventfully. No chronic pain occurred. CONCLUSION The Butterfly Technique is an easy and safe alternative in anterior preperitoneal repair of extremely large inguinal hernias. PMID:22288042

  12. Appendicitis in a Spigelian hernia: an unusual cause for a tender right iliac fossa mass.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M P; Avula, S K; England, R; Stevenson, L

    2013-05-01

    Spigelian hernias are a rare type of hernia through the Spigelian aponeurosis, whose contents commonly include omentum or small bowel. In the absence of incarceration or strangulation, they can be difficult to diagnose clinically. In the emergency setting, they can present rarely as a painful abdominal mass and computed tomography provides a reliable diagnostic imaging modality. We report an emergency presentation of a Spigelian hernia containing the appendix. PMID:23676802

  13. Laparoscopic Repair of Ileal Conduit Parastomal Hernia Using the Sling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Bipan

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic parastomal hernia repair has become a viable option to overcome the challenges that face the hernia surgeon. Multiple techniques have been described over the last 5 years, one of which is the lateralizing “sling” technique, first described by Sugarbaker in1980. In this study, we report the technique and our early results with the laparoscopic modified Sugarbaker repair of parastomal hernias after ileal conduit. PMID:18435893

  14. Repair of subxiphoid incisional hernias with Marlex mesh after median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M J; Starling, J R

    1985-11-01

    Median sternotomy is sometimes complicated by a bifid xiphoid process and an incisional (ventral) hernia in the subxiphoid region. Such hernias often recur after primary suture repair. We recently initiated the use of a polypropylene prosthetic mesh to primarily repair subxiphoid incisional hernias. This report details the results of using this material in 14 patients between January 1980 and December 1983. We also discuss the complex anatomy of the xiphoid region. PMID:4051732

  15. Clinical significance of de Garengeot's hernia: A case of acute appendicitis and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Piperos, Theodoros; Kalles, Vasileios; Al Ahwal, Yousef; Konstantinou, Evangelos; Skarpas, George; Mariolis-Sapsakos, Theodoros

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The presence of the appendix in a femoral hernia sac is known as de Garengeot's hernia. We report a rare case of an elderly woman with femoral hernia appendicitis and discuss the surgical pitfalls and considerations through a literature review. Presentation of case An 83-year-old woman presented with fever and right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Clinical examination revealed a femoral hernia. Ultrasonography confirmed bowel was present in the hernia sac. In the operation room, an acutely inflamed appendix was recognized within the sac. The patient underwent appendectomy and hernia repair with sutures. Discussion Acute appendicitis within a femoral hernia is rare and multiple dilemmas exist regarding its treatment. An incision below the inguinal ligament is a reasonable choice in order to access the hernia sac. A mesh should be placed in non-infectious appendectomy while herniorrhaphy is preferred in cases of appendicitis. Conclusion The presence of the vermiform appendix in a femoral hernia sac is rare but the surgeon should be aware of this clinical entity. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate surgical treatment is the key to avoid complications. PMID:22288062

  16. Incisional hernia after open resections for colorectal liver metastases – incidence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Jan H.; Strandberg Holka, Peter; Sturesson, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Incisional hernia is one of the most common complications after laparotomy. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate incidence, location and risk factors for incisional hernia after open resection for colorectal liver metastases including the use of perioperative chemotherapy and targeted therapy evaluated by computed tomography. Methods Patients operated for colorectal liver metastases between 2010 and 2013 were included. Incisional hernia was defined as a discontinuity in the abdominal fascia observed on computed tomography. Results A total of 256 patients were analyzed in regard to incisional hernia. Seventy-eight patients (30.5%) developed incisional hernia. Hernia locations were midline alone in 66 patients (84.6%) and involving the midline in another 8 patients (10.3%). In multivariate analysis, preoperative chemotherapy >6 cycles (hazard ratio 2.12, 95% confidence interval 1.14–3.94), preoperative bevacizumab (hazard ratio 3.63, 95% confidence interval 1.86–7.08) and incisional hernia from previous surgery (hazard ratio 3.50, 95% confidence interval 1.98–6.18) were found to be independent risk factors. Conclusions Prolonged preoperative chemotherapy and also preoperative bevacizumab were strong predictors for developing an incisional hernia. After an extended right subcostal incision, the hernia location was almost exclusively in the midline. PMID:27154807

  17. Autopsy features in a newborn baby affected by a central congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Bolino, Giorgio; Gitto, Lorenzo; Serinelli, Serenella; Maiese, Aniello

    2015-03-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a congenital malformation of the diaphragm, resulting in the herniation of the abdominal organs into the thoracic cavity. The most common types of congenital diaphragmatic hernia are Bochdalek hernia (postero-lateral hernia), Morgagni hernia (anterior defect), and diaphragm eventration (abnormal displacement of part or all of an otherwise intact diaphragm into the chest cavity). Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a life-threatening pathology in infants, and a major cause of death due to pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. We present a fatal case of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a newborn. At the autopsy, a central defect of the diaphragm was found, 8 × 5 cm in size, that led to a herniation of the small intestine, the right lobe of the liver, and the right adrenal gland into the thorax. An esophageal atresia was associated with the congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The lungs showed severe hypoplasia and atelectasia. Physicians should pay attention to a prenatal diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in order to prevent newborn fatalities. PMID:25573226

  18. A Rare Cause of Haemorrhage in the Upper Gastrointestinal System: Bochdalek Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cevizci, MN; Erdemir, G; Cayir, A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Diaphragmatic hernia originates from insufficient closure of the pericardioperitoneal canals and pleuroperitoneal membranes. It is seen in one in every 4000 births. The general finding in the newborn period is respiratory difficulty. Mortality is 40–50%. There may be other accompanying organ anomalies. Congenital diaphragmatic hernias diagnosed after the newborn period are known as late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernias. This group is seen at a level of 5–20% and poses difficulty in diagnosis. This report describes a case under observation and receiving treatment for gastrointestinal haemorrhage, diagnosed as Bochdalek hernia. PMID:26360672

  19. Apoptosis-Like Cell Death Induction and Aberrant Fibroblast Properties in Human Incisional Hernia Fascia

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Ramon; Quiles, Maria T.; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Lopez-Cano, Manuel; Huguet, Pere; Ramon-y-Cajal, Santiago; Reventos, Jaume; Armengol, Manel; Arbos, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Incisional hernia often occurs following laparotomy and can be a source of serious problems. Although there is evidence that a biological cause may underlie its development, the mechanistic link between the local tissue microenvironment and tissue rupture is lacking. In this study, we used matched tissue-based and in vitro primary cell culture systems to examine the possible involvement of fascia fibroblasts in incisional hernia pathogenesis. Fascia biopsies were collected at surgery from incisional hernia patients and non-incisional hernia controls. Tissue samples were analyzed by histology and immunoblotting methods. Fascia primary fibroblast cultures were assessed at morphological, ultrastructural, and functional levels. We document tissue and fibroblast loss coupled to caspase-3 activation and induction of apoptosis-like cell-death mechanisms in incisional hernia fascia. Alterations in cytoskeleton organization and solubility were also observed. Incisional hernia fibroblasts showed a consistent phenotype throughout early passages in vitro, which was characterized by significantly enhanced cell proliferation and migration, reduced adhesion, and altered cytoskeleton properties, as compared to non-incisional hernia fibroblasts. Moreover, incisional hernia fibroblasts displayed morphological and ultrastructural alterations compatible with autophagic processes or lysosomal dysfunction, together with enhanced sensitivity to proapoptotic challenges. Overall, these data suggest an ongoing complex interplay of cell death induction, aberrant fibroblast function, and tissue loss in incisional hernia fascia, which may significantly contribute to altered matrix maintenance and tissue rupture in vivo. PMID:21641387

  20. Recurrence and pseudorecurrence after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: predictors and patient-focused outcomes.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stacey A; Hicks, Stephanie C; Brahmbhatt, Reshma; Liang, Mike K

    2014-02-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) is gaining popularity as an option to repair abdominal wall hernias. Bulging after repair remains common after this technique. This study evaluates the incidence and factors associated with bulging after LVHR. Between 2000 and 2010, 201 patients underwent LVHR at two affiliated institutions. Patients who developed recurrence or pseudorecurrence (seroma or eventration) were analyzed with univariate and multivariate analyses to identify predictors of these complications. Of the 201 patients who underwent LVHR, 40 (19.9%) patients developed a seroma, 63 (31.3%) patients had radiographically proven eventration, and 25 (12.4%) patients had a hernia recurrence. On multivariate analysis, seromas were associated with number of prior ventral hernia repairs, surgical site infections, and prostate disease. Mesh eventration was associated with hernia size and surgical technique. Tissue eventration was associated with primary hernias and surgical technique. Hernia recurrence was associated with incisional hernias and mesh type used. Recurrence and pseudorecurrence are important complications after LVHR. Large hernia size, infections, and surgical technique are important clinical factors that affect outcomes after LVHR. PMID:24480213

  1. Open preperitoneal versus anterior approach for recurrent inguinal hernia: a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inguinal herniorrhaphy remains one of the most common general surgical operations, with approximately 15% performed for recurrence. The repair of the resulting recurrent hernia is a daunting task because of already weakened tissues and obscured and distorted anatomy. The aim of this study is to compare the posterior preperitoneal versus anterior tension-free approach for repair of unilateral recurrent inguinal hernia regarding complications and early recurrence. Methods 120 Patients in this study were divided randomly into 2 main groups; Group A patients were subjected to posterior preperitoneal approach and those of group B were subjected to conventional anterior tension-free repair. The primary end point was recurrence and the secondary end points were time off from work, postoperative pain, scrotal swelling and wound infections. Results The mean hospital stay was 1.2 days and 4.7, the mean time to return work was 8.2 and 11.2 days and the mean time off from work was 9.4 and 15.9 days in group A and B respectively. The maximum follow-up period was 48 months and the minimum was 14 months with a mean value as 37.11 ± 5.14 months. Only 2 recurrences (3.3%) in group A and 4 cases (6.25%) in group B were seen. The final pain score per patient and the overall complication rate were higher in group B. Conclusions The open preperitoneal repair offers the advantages of low recurrence rate and allows covering all potential defects with one piece of mesh and is far superior to the anterior approach. Trial Registration ACTRN12611000337976 PMID:23110701

  2. A new approach to congenital posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Collins, D L; Pomerance, J J; Travis, K W; Turner, S W; Pappelbaum, S J

    1977-04-01

    The theory is advanced that increased pulmonary vascular resistance, resulting in a state of fetal circulation, with right-to-left shunting through the ductus arteriosus, is the main reason that many patients do not survive after repair of a diaphragmatic hernia. Three patients are presented (who, by Raphaely's criteria, were destined for a fatal outcome) in whom the ductus was ligated, and vasodilator drugs were infused into the pulmonary artery. All three demonstrated definite improvement in oxygenation. Two expired after 6 days, one of whom was found at autopsy to have intestinal volvulus and gangrene, and the other multiple plumonary emboli. One case, so managed, survived. The suggestion is made that pulmonary hypoplasia is not the main reason for the high mortality rate after diaphragmatic hernia repair, and that additional laboratory and clinical investigation of the pulmonary circulation may lead to significant improvement in results. PMID:845759

  3. A rare cause of inguinal hernia: scrotal cystocele

    PubMed Central

    Zihni, İsmail; Duran, Ali; Soysal, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Herniation of the urinary bladder into the inguinal canal is rare. It constitutes 1–3% of all inguinal hernias. Bladder herniation is usually asymptomatic, and it is usually diagnosed during surgery or as a result of intra-operative bladder injury. Male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms or with a history of previous hernia surgery are at increased risk of bladder herniation. Typically, patients complain of inguinal or scrotal swelling, dysuria and shrinkage of scrotal swelling after voiding. Early diagnosis with radiological imaging is important to prevent complications during surgery. Intravenous pyelography, retrograde cystography, pelvic ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can be used for preoperative diagnosis. In this report, a patient is presented who presented to our clinic with scrotal swelling and was diagnosed with scrotal bladder herniation by retrograde cystography, taken due to clinical suspicion based on his history.

  4. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a post-partum woman.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, M

    2003-03-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is rare in adults. We report a 24 year old woman presenting with shortness of breath, chest pain and nausea after the birth of her first baby. Clinical examination, plain radiography and a CT scan revealed herniation of abdominal contents into her left chest. Via a midline laparotomy, the contents were reduced and the defect repaired, using a mesh. She remains symptom-free three years since her surgery and even after a second childbirth. A brief review of the literature reporting adult diaphragmatic hernia of congenital origin accompanies this case report. We conclude that symptomatic CDH in adults usually presents as an emergency with gastrointestinal and occasionally respiratory complications. Early diagnosis and repair is essential to avoid subsequent morbidity and mortality. PMID:14556332

  5. Clinical presentation and operative repair of hernia of Morgagni

    PubMed Central

    Loong, T; Kocher, H

    2005-01-01

    A 77 year old woman who presented with an incarcerated hernia of Morgagni was successfully treated without complications. A Medline search (1996 to date) along with cross referencing was done to quantify the number of acute presentations in adults compared to children. Different investigating modalities—for example, lateral chest and abdominal radiography, contrast studies or, in difficult cases, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging—can be used to diagnose hernia of Morgagni. The favoured method of repair—laparotomy or laparoscopy—is also discussed. A total of 47 case reports on children and 93 case reports on adults were found. Fourteen percent of children (seven out of 47) presented acutely compared with 12% of adults (12 out of 93). Repair at laparotomy was the method of choice but if uncertain, laparoscopy would be a useful diagnostic tool before attempted repair. Laparoscopic repair was favoured in adults especially in non-acute cases. PMID:15640427

  6. ["Sports hernia" and osteitis pubis in an athlete].

    PubMed

    Paajanen, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pain in the groin does not always present itself with a clear-cut cause such as muscle tear, inguinal hernia or a disorder of the hip, pelvis, bowel or urinary organs. In such cases a "sports hernia" can be suspected, i.e. muscular injury due to overexertion of the inguinal region. Accordingly, a hernial protrusion is not in question. In addition, if the pubic bone is tender and inflammatory exudate is seen in the magnetic resonance image, the patient has osteitis pubis, i.e. inflammation of the pubic bone. In the initial stage, methods of treatment comprise rest, stretching, anti-inflammatory medication, injections of local anesthetics and corticosteroids, physical therapy and, in the most difficult cases, surgical operation. PMID:19341038

  7. Large bowel obstruction complicating a posttraumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Umer Hasan; Dawani, Surrendar

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic diaphragmatic hernia is a rare cause of large bowel obstruction, and can present weeks or years after the initial trauma. Herein, we report the case of a 28-year-old man who presented with signs and symptoms of bowel obstruction nine months after he had a stab wound to his left chest. Chest radiography showed multiple air-fluid levels in the right upper quadrant, an air-fluid level in the left thoracic cavity and significant free air under the diaphragm. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a contaminated abdomen with perforations in the caecum and proximal transverse colon, and a 4 cm × 4 cm defect in the left posterolateral (septal) aspect of the diaphragm, which was closed with a nonabsorbable suture. Posttraumatic diaphragmatic hernias should be part of the differential diagnosis for patients with bowel obstruction, especially if there is a history of trauma. Radiography is useful in facilitating a quick diagnosis. PMID:25917476

  8. The sports hernia: a cause of chronic groin pain.

    PubMed Central

    Hackney, R G

    1993-01-01

    The management of chronic pain in sportsmen and women requires consideration of a wide differential diagnosis. A syndrome caused by a distension of the posterior inguinal wall is described, effectively an early direct inguinal hernia. The diagnosis can be made from certain aspects of the history and examination, which are described. The results of surgical repair to the posterior inguinal wall are excellent. The procedure was carried out on 14 sportsmen and one woman. There is an 87% return to full sporting activity, with a follow-up of 18 months to 5 years. The remaining 13% were improved by the repair. Many of the athletes had received other treatments without success. The sports hernia should be high on the list of differential diagnoses in chronic groin pain. PMID:8457816

  9. Laparoscopic management of foramen of Winslow incarcerated hernia.

    PubMed

    Daher, Ronald; Montana, Laura; Abdullah, Jarrah; d'Alessandro, Antonio; Chouillard, Elie

    2016-12-01

    Foramen of Winslow hernia (FWH) is a rare and often overlooked diagnosis with a high mortality rate. Widespread availability of cross-sectional imaging allows early diagnosis and prompt management. In this setting, before ischemia occurs, explorative laparoscopy would be the most suitable approach. Experience, however, remains sparse, and technical difficulties may be encountered. This is the case of a 38-year-old Caucasian woman who presented to the emergency department for a sudden epigastric pain. Physical exam was unremarkable, and routine blood tests were within normal range. An abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the diagnosis of ileocaecal herniation through the foramen of Winslow. Under urgent laparoscopy, the caecum appeared viable but incarcerated in the lesser sac. Caecal puncture was the key to achieving atraumatic reduction of the hernia and bowel salvage. PMID:26943685

  10. Anesthesia for Traumatic Diaphragmatic Hernia Associated with Corneal Laceration.

    PubMed

    Safaeian, Reza; Hassani, Valiollah; Faiz, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diaphragmatic rupture can be seen in up to 5% of car accidents, and 80%-100% of diaphragmatic hernias are associated with other vital organ injuries. Brain, pelvis, long bones, liver, spleen, and aorta are some other organs that can be severely damaged and need different anesthetic managements. CASE REPORT A 37-year-old male victim of a head-on collision who was suffering diaphragmatic rupture and corneal laceration was prepared for an emergency operation 11 hours after the car accident. Gastric decompression, pre-oxygenation, rapid sequence induction with succinylcholine, immediate use of non-depolarizing muscle relaxant, and mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume after intubation were used in anesthetic management of the patient. CONCLUSIONS Because of the high prevalence of coexisting pathologies with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia, anesthetic management must be tailored to the associated pathologies. PMID:27595907

  11. Oral, intestinal, and skin bacteria in ventral hernia mesh implants

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Kristoffersen, Anne Karin; Abesha-Belay, Emnet; Enersen, Morten; Røkke, Ola; Olsen, Ingar

    2016-01-01

    Background In ventral hernia surgery, mesh implants are used to reduce recurrence. Infection after mesh implantation can be a problem and rates around 6–10% have been reported. Bacterial colonization of mesh implants in patients without clinical signs of infection has not been thoroughly investigated. Molecular techniques have proven effective in demonstrating bacterial diversity in various environments and are able to identify bacteria on a gene-specific level. Objective The purpose of this study was to detect bacterial biofilm in mesh implants, analyze its bacterial diversity, and look for possible resemblance with bacterial biofilm from the periodontal pocket. Methods Thirty patients referred to our hospital for recurrence after former ventral hernia mesh repair, were examined for periodontitis in advance of new surgical hernia repair. Oral examination included periapical radiographs, periodontal probing, and subgingival plaque collection. A piece of mesh (1×1 cm) from the abdominal wall was harvested during the new surgical hernia repair and analyzed for bacteria by PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. From patients with positive PCR mesh samples, subgingival plaque samples were analyzed with the same techniques. Results A great variety of taxa were detected in 20 (66.7%) mesh samples, including typical oral commensals and periodontopathogens, enterics, and skin bacteria. Mesh and periodontal bacteria were further analyzed for similarity in 16S rRNA gene sequences. In 17 sequences, the level of resemblance between mesh and subgingival bacterial colonization was 98–100% suggesting, but not proving, a transfer of oral bacteria to the mesh. Conclusion The results show great bacterial diversity on mesh implants from the anterior abdominal wall including oral commensals and periodontopathogens. Mesh can be reached by bacteria in several ways including hematogenous spread from an oral site. However, other sites such as gut and skin may also serve as sources for the

  12. [Modern methods of treatment of Morgagni-Larrey hernia].

    PubMed

    Grubnik, V V; Boĭchuk, A A; Vorotyntseva, K O

    2012-09-01

    In the clinic 3 patients were treated for inborn diaphragmatic Morgagni-Larrey hernia. The modern videoendoscopic methods application, including laparoscopy, have permitted to improve significantly the operation results and security, to reduce the patients stationary treatment duration. Since the disease is diagnosed it is necessary to perform operative intervention for the severe complications prophylaxis. Further studying of the disease is expedient for surgical technique and the treatment results improvement. PMID:23285649

  13. Acute Osteomyelitis of the Symphysis Pubis after Inguinal Hernia Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Recep; Ceylan Tekin, Rojbin; Ceylan Cevik, Figen; Cevik, Remzi

    2015-01-01

    Osteomyelitis of pubic symphysis is infectious inflammatory condition of the symphysis pubis and rare complication of surgery around inguinal and groin region. It should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lower pelvic pain and should be sought in cases of pelvic insufficiency fractures. Herein, we present a case of a 55-year-old man with osteomyelitis of the symphysis pubis following inguinal hernia surgery for diagnosis and management of this rare condition. PMID:25973280

  14. Parastomal Hernia: Avoidance and Treatment in the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Sean C; Dharmarajan, Sekhar

    2016-09-01

    Despite medical and surgical advances leading to increased ability to restore or preserve gastrointestinal continuity, creation of stomas remains a common surgical procedure. Every ostomy results in a risk for subsequent parastomal herniation, which in turn may reduce quality of life and increase health care expenditures. Recent evidence-supported practices such as utilization of prophylactic reinforcement, attention to stoma placement, and laparoscopic-based stoma repairs with mesh provide opportunities to both prevent and successfully treat parastomal hernias. PMID:27582655

  15. The vermiform appendix presenting in a laparoscopic port site hernia

    PubMed Central

    Latyf, Rafiq; Slater, Richard; Garner, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic port site hernias (PSHs) are uncommon but present a potential source of morbidity due to incarceration of the hernial contents which is usually omental fat or small bowel. We report only the third case of the vermiform appendix presenting in a symptomatic PSH; we discuss the appropriate management of this condition as well as ways in which the incidence of PSHs may be reduced. PMID:22022101

  16. Outcome of four years experience in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dileep; Khan, Hina; Qureshi, Muhammad Shamim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To find out the short term outcomes of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) during the last four years. Methods: It was a descriptive and prospective case series of 53 consecutive patients out of 107 at Department of General Surgery, Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Center, Unit II, Karachi, from January 2009 to December 2012. These patients were admitted through out patient department with complain of lump, pain and discomfort. Most of the patients were obese. All patients were clinically examined and baseline investigations done. Fifty three (49.5%) patients underwent laparoscopic repair with mesh placement and remaining 54 by open surgical repair. Results: Among 53 patients, mean age was 46 years range (30 - 55). While females were 33(62.2%) and males 20(37.7%). We observed variety of hernias, in which midline and epigastric hernia were predominant. The commonest symptom was lump and dragging sensation. The duration of symptoms ranged between 6 months to one year. About 53 patients (49.5%) had laparoscopic repair with mesh placement. Average hospital stay was two days. Out of 53 patients, 4 (7.5%) had cellulitis at trocar site, seroma in 2(3.7%), 2(3.7%) patient complained of persistent pain postoperatively, port site minor infection was in 2(3.7%) patients, while conversion to open approach was done in 2 (3.7%), postoperative ileus was observed in one (1.8%) patients. Conclusions: This study provides the evidence that, laparoscopic repair with mesh placement in ventral hernia is safe and effective approach compared to open surgical procedure. It has a low complication rate, less hospital stay and low recurrence. PMID:26430444

  17. FIXING JEJUNAL MANEUVER TO PREVENT PETERSEN HERNIA IN GASTRIC BYPASS

    PubMed Central

    MURAD-JUNIOR, Abdon José; SCHEIBE, Christian Lamar; CAMPELO, Giuliano Peixoto; de LIMA, Roclides Castro; MURAD, Lucianne Maria Moraes Rêgo Pereira; dos SANTOS, Eduardo Pachu Raia; RAMOS, Almino Cardoso; VALADÃO, José Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Background : Among Roux-en-Y gastric bypass complications is the occurrence of intestinal obstruction by the appearance of internal hernias, which may occur in Petersen space or the opening in mesenteric enteroenteroanastomosis. Aim : To evaluate the efficiency and safety in performing a fixing jejunal maneuver in the transverse mesocolon to prevent internal hernia formation in Petersen space. Method : Two surgical points between the jejunum and the transverse mesocolon, being 5 cm and 10 cm from duodenojejunal angle are made. In all patients was left Petersen space open and closing the opening of the mesenteric enteroenteroanastomosis. Results : Among 52 operated patients, 35 were women (67.3%). The age ranged 18-63 years, mean 39.2 years. BMI ranged from 35 to 56 kg/m2 (mean 40.5 kg/m2). Mean follow-up was 15.1 months (12-18 months). The operative time ranged from 68-138 min. There were no intraoperative complications, and there were no major postoperative complications and no reoperations. The hospital stay ranged from 2-3 days. During the follow-up, no one patient developed suspect clinical presentation of internal hernia. Follow-up in nine patients (17.3%) showed asymptomatic cholelithiasis and underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. During these procedures were verified the Petersen space and jejunal fixation. In all nine, there was no herniation of the jejunum to the right side in Petersen space. Conclusion : The fixation of the first part of the jejunum to left side of the transverse mesocolon is safe and effective to prevent internal Petersen hernia in RYGB postoperatively in the short and medium term. It may be interesting alternative to closing the Petersen space. PMID:26537279

  18. Morgagni hernia: A rare case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Pattnaik, Manoj Kumar; Sahoo, Sarada Prasanna; Panigrahy, Sameer Kumar; Nayak, Kalyani Bala

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernias (MHs) are rare and constitute about 2% of all diaphragmatic hernias. Although uncommon, it has potential for considerable morbidity if the diagnosis is missed. An elderly woman with known history of chronic asthma and constipation presented to us with vague right-sided chest pain. General physical examination was unremarkable and coincidentally diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus. Chest roentgenogram posteroanterior view revealed a right paracardiac opacity and right lateral view showed the opacity in the peridiaphragmatic area of anterior mediastinum. Computed tomographic scan of the chest and abdomen revealed a right-sided MH containing omental fat. Standard right posterolateral thoracotomy was done, and there was a rent at the medial end of the xiphoid process with hernia sac containing the omentum, which was compressing adjacent lungs and heart. The sac was opened; redundant omentum was resected, and rent closed with intercostal muscle with prolene. MH being rare must be addressed with appropriate investigation to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. PMID:27578938

  19. Parastomal hernias after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia, defined as an "incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma", is a frequent complication after conduit urinary diversion that can negatively impact quality of life and present a clinically significant problem for many patients. Parastomal hernia (PH) rates may be as high as 65% and while many patients are asymptomatic, in some series up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to pain, leakage, ostomy appliance problems, urinary obstruction, and rarely bowel obstruction or strangulation. Local tissue repair, stoma relocation, and mesh repairs have been performed to correct PH, however, long-term results have been disappointing with recurrence rates of 30%–76% reported after these techniques. Due to high recurrence rates and the potential morbidity of PH repair, efforts have been made to prevent PH development at the time of the initial surgery. Randomized trials of circumstomal prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have shown significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication profiles. We have placed prophylactic mesh at the time of ileal conduit creation in patients at high risk for PH development and found it to be safe and effective in reducing the PH rates over the short-term. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors associated with its development, and the use of prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion with the intent of reducing PH rates. PMID:27437533

  20. Increased nuchal translucency and diaphragmatic hernia. A case report.

    PubMed

    Daniilidis, A; Balaouras, D; Psarra, N; Chitzios, D; Tzafettas, M; Balaouras, G; Vrachnis, N

    2015-01-01

    Increased nuchal translucency (NT) thickness is present in 40% of fetuses with diaphragmatic hernia, including 80% of those that result in neonatal death and in 20% of the survivors. A 33-year-old nulliparous woman had first trimester scan at 12 weeks. The fetus had a NT of 2.3 mm, normal ductus venosus (DV), and tricuspid doppler and present nasal bone. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) was 0.59 MoM and beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (b-hCG) 2.56 MoM. The couple did not opt for chorionic villous sampling (CVS) and repeat ultrasound examination was advised. At 18 weeks, ultrasound revealed left sided diaphragmatic hernia. The couple consented for termination of the pregnancy. The molecular test showed normal karyotype and male gender. In such cases with intrathoracic herniation of abdominal viscera, the increased NT may be the consequence of venous congestion due to mediastinal compression. The prolonged compression of the lungs causes pulmonary hypoplasia. Increased NT with normal fetal karyotype is associated with structural fetal anomalies like diaphragmatic hernia and screening at 16-18 weeks is imperative. PMID:26054128

  1. Morgagni hernia: A rare case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Pattnaik, Manoj Kumar; Sahoo, Sarada Prasanna; Panigrahy, Sameer Kumar; Nayak, Kalyani Bala

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernias (MHs) are rare and constitute about 2% of all diaphragmatic hernias. Although uncommon, it has potential for considerable morbidity if the diagnosis is missed. An elderly woman with known history of chronic asthma and constipation presented to us with vague right-sided chest pain. General physical examination was unremarkable and coincidentally diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus. Chest roentgenogram posteroanterior view revealed a right paracardiac opacity and right lateral view showed the opacity in the peridiaphragmatic area of anterior mediastinum. Computed tomographic scan of the chest and abdomen revealed a right-sided MH containing omental fat. Standard right posterolateral thoracotomy was done, and there was a rent at the medial end of the xiphoid process with hernia sac containing the omentum, which was compressing adjacent lungs and heart. The sac was opened; redundant omentum was resected, and rent closed with intercostal muscle with prolene. MH being rare must be addressed with appropriate investigation to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. PMID:27578938

  2. Parastomal hernias after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Timothy F; Bochner, Bernard H

    2016-07-01

    Parastomal hernia, defined as an "incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma", is a frequent complication after conduit urinary diversion that can negatively impact quality of life and present a clinically significant problem for many patients. Parastomal hernia (PH) rates may be as high as 65% and while many patients are asymptomatic, in some series up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to pain, leakage, ostomy appliance problems, urinary obstruction, and rarely bowel obstruction or strangulation. Local tissue repair, stoma relocation, and mesh repairs have been performed to correct PH, however, long-term results have been disappointing with recurrence rates of 30%-76% reported after these techniques. Due to high recurrence rates and the potential morbidity of PH repair, efforts have been made to prevent PH development at the time of the initial surgery. Randomized trials of circumstomal prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have shown significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication profiles. We have placed prophylactic mesh at the time of ileal conduit creation in patients at high risk for PH development and found it to be safe and effective in reducing the PH rates over the short-term. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors associated with its development, and the use of prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion with the intent of reducing PH rates. PMID:27437533

  3. Early clinical outcomes following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Tolver, Mette Astrup

    2013-07-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (TAPP) has gained increasing popularity because of less post-operative pain and a shorter duration of convalescence compared with open hernia repair technique (Lichtenstein). However, investigation of duration of convalescence with non-restrictive recommendations, and a procedure-specific characterization of the early clinical outcomes after TAPP was lacking. Furthermore, optimization of the post-operative period with fibrin sealant versus tacks for fixation of mesh, and the glucocorticoid dexamethasone versus placebo needed to be investigated in randomized clinical trials. The objective of this PhD thesis was to characterize the early clinical outcomes after TAPP and optimize the post-operative period. The four studies included in this thesis have investigated duration of convalescence and procedure-specific post-operative pain and other early clinical outcomes after TAPP. Furthermore, it has been shown that fibrin sealant can improve the early post-operative period compared with tacks, while dexamethasone showed no advantages apart from reduced use of antiemetics compared with placebo. Based on these findings, and the existing knowledge, 3-5 days of convalescence should be expected when 1 day of convalescence is recommended and future studies should focus on reducing intraabdominal pain after TAPP. Fibrin sealant can optimize the early clinical outcomes but the risk of hernia recurrence and chronic pain needs to be evaluated. Dexamethasone should be investigated in higher doses. PMID:23809977

  4. Emergency and elective laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias: two case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Leff, Daniel Richard; Hassell, Jane; Sufi, Pratik; Heath, Dugal

    2009-08-01

    Diagnosing spigelian hernias through physical examination can be particularly challenging. Increasingly, laparoscopy is being used to both confirm the diagnosis and carry out therapeutic repair. Here, we describe 2 cases of successful laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias using an Endocatch assisted sutured technique. A review of the literature describing the role of laparoscopy in the management of spigelian hernia is also provided. PMID:19692870

  5. ULTRAPRO Hernia System versus lichtenstein repair in treatment of primary inguinal hernias: a prospective randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Menekse, Ebru; Özdogan, Hatice; Kunt, Mevlüt; Bozkurt, Hilmi; Bali, İlhan; Özdogan, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The Lichtenstein repair has been recommended as the gold standard for inguinal hernia repair. However, postoperative discomfort still constitutes a concern and an area for improvement. New mesh materials have been continuously introduced to achieve this goal. The goal of the present study was to investigate the outcomes of ULTRAPRO Hernia System (UHS) compared with Lichtenstein mesh repair. A total of 99 male patients with primary unilateral inguinal hernia were included in the study during the period of September 2010-January 2012. Patients with body mass index>30, comorbid diseases, and anesthetic risk of ASA-III and ASA-IV were excluded. The patients were randomly allocated to operation with the Lichtenstein technique (group L) or UHS. Demographics, operative and postoperative/recovery data, and short- and medium-term outcomes of the patients were recorded. A total of 50 patients in group L and 49 patients in group UHS were analyzed. The median follow-up time for the study was 33 months. There were no significant differences regarding demographics, complications, and rehabilitation between the groups. Overall, there was a prolonged operation time in the UHS group compared with the L group (UHS: 53.7±5.7 minutes; L: 44.5±5.5 minutes; P<0.001). UHS may provide results similar to those for the Lichtenstein technique in open repair of inguinal hernias regarding perioperative course, complications, recovery, and recurrence rates. However, because of reduced costs and the lack of need for the exploration of the preperitoneal space, we conclude that the Lichtenstein technique should be recommended as the first choice. PMID:25058771

  6. Laparoscopic Repair of Bochdalek Diaphragmatic Hernia in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman Oneil

    2016-01-01

    Bochdalek hernia (BH) is an uncommon form of diaphragmatic hernia. The rarity of this hernia and its nonspecific presentation leads to delay in the diagnosis, with the potential risk of complications. This review summarizes the relevant aspects of its presentation and management, based on the present evidence in the literature. A literature search was performed on PubMed, Google Scholar, and EMBASE for articles in English on BH in adults. All case reports and series from the period after 1955 till January 2015 were included. A total of 180 articles comprising 368 cases were studied. The mean age of these patients was 51 years (range 15-90 years) with a male preponderance of 57% (211/368). Significantly, 6.5% of patients were above 70 years, with 3.5% of these being above 80 years. The majority of the hernias were on the left side (63%), with right-sided hernias and bilateral occurring in 27% and 10%, respectively. Precipitating factors were noted in 24%, with 5.3% of them being pregnant. Congenital anomalies were seen in 11%. The presenting symptoms included abdominal (62%), respiratory (40%), obstructive (vomiting/abdominal distension; 36%), strangulation (26%); 14% of them were asymptomatic (detected incidentally). In the 184 patients who underwent surgical intervention, the surgical approach involved laparotomy in 74 (40.27%), thoracotomy in 50 (27.7%), combined thoracoabdominal approach in 27 (14.6%), laparoscopy in 23 (12.5%), and thoracoscopic repair in 9 (4.89%). An overall recurrence rate of 1.6% was noted. Among these patients who underwent laparoscopic repair, 82% underwent elective procedure; 66% underwent primary repair, with 61% requiring interposition of mesh or reenforcement with or without primary repair. The overall mortality was 2.7%. Therefore, BH should form one of the differential diagnoses in patients who present with simultaneous abdominal and chest symptoms. Minimal access surgery offers a good alternative with short hospital stay and is

  7. Planned laparoscopic repair of a spigelian hernia using a composite prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Barie, P S; Thompson, W A; Mack, C A

    1994-10-01

    A planned elective repair, via the laparoscope, of a spigelian hernia is described. The repair was performed using a composite mesh prosthesis consisting of a sandwich of polyester fiber mesh and polyglactin 910 mesh, sutured together with polyglactin 910 suture at the operating table before introduction. The technique is applicable to other hernias of the anterior abdominal wall. PMID:7833523

  8. A fatal case of complicated congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Keltie A.; Britton, Ann P.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia is a rare condition most commonly reported in cats and dogs. A 6-week-old Holstein heifer calf with a congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia complicated by a perforated abomasal ulcer is described. The clinical signs and pathological findings are compared with those reported in other species. PMID:24155464

  9. The “Inside-out” Technique for Hernia Repair with Mesh Underlay

    PubMed Central

    Berhanu, Aaron E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: An improved method for mesh repair of ventral/incisional hernias after component separation is presented. The use of a Carter-Thomason suture passer (Cooper Surgical, http://www.coopersurgical.com) allows for safe passage of preplaced sutures on the mesh from within the abdominal cavity through the anterior rectus sheath. This “inside-out” method makes the underlay of mesh fast and easy by improving visualization and control of sharp instruments as they are passed through the abdominal cavity. Preplacement of sutures circumferentially on the mesh also improves the distribution of tension around the repair, which may ultimately reduce the risk of hernia recurrence. Methods: The “inside-out” technique was performed on 23 patients at a single tertiary academic medical center from November 2011 to February 2014. We have followed these patients for a median of 24.5 months to assess for postoperative complications and hernia recurrence. Results: We report an acceptable hernia recurrence rate (2 of 23 = 8.7%). One recurrence was observed in a patient who underwent repair of a recurrent ventral hernia and the other had significant loss of domain requiring an inlay mesh. Conclusions: The “inside-out” technique for ventral hernia repair with a mesh underlay after component separation using a Carter-Thomason suture passer is easy, safe, and reliable. We have observed no hernia recurrence in patients who underwent repair for a primary ventral hernia with an underlay technique. PMID:26180723

  10. Mechanisms of hernia recurrence after preperitoneal mesh repair. Traditional and laparoscopic.

    PubMed Central

    Lowham, A S; Filipi, C J; Fitzgibbons, R J; Stoppa, R; Wantz, G E; Felix, E L; Crafton, W B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors provide an assessment of mechanisms leading to hernia recurrence after laparoscopic and traditional preperitoneal herniorrhaphy to allow surgeons using either technique to achieve better results. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The laparoscopic and traditional preperitoneal approaches to hernia repair are analogous in principle and outcome and have experienced a similar evolution over different time frames. The recurrence rate after preperitoneal herniorrhaphy should be low (< 2%) to be considered a viable alternative to the most successful methods of conventional herniorrhaphy. METHODS: Experienced surgeons supply specifics regarding the mechanisms of recurrence and technical measures to avoid hernia recurrence when using the preperitoneal prosthetic repair. Videotapes of laparoscopic herniorrhaphy in 13 patients who subsequently experienced a recurrence also are used to determine technical causes of recurrence. RESULTS: Factors leading to recurrence include surgeon inexperience, inadequate dissection, insufficient prosthesis size, insufficient prosthesis overlap of hernia defects, improper fixation, prosthesis folding or twisting, missed hernias, or mesh lifting secondary to hematoma formation. CONCLUSIONS: The predominant factor in successful preperitoneal hernia repair is adequate dissection with complete exposure and coverage of all potential groin hernia sites. Hematoma mesh lifting and inadequate lateral inferior and medial inferior mesh fixation represent the most common causes of recurrence for surgeons experienced in traditional or laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia repair. PMID:9114802

  11. Use of a truss to maintain inguinal hernia reduction in a very low birth weight infant.

    PubMed

    Ruderman, J W; Schick, J B; Sherman, M; Reagan, Y; Hanks, G; Weitzman, J J

    1995-01-01

    Trusses are not usually used in management of inguinal hernia of the very low birth weight infant. A potential benefit of this therapy is maintenance of hernia reduction, thus delaying operative repair until the infant is larger and healthier. We designed a safe and effective truss with supplies found in most neonatal intensive care units. PMID:7595774

  12. Morgagni hernia presenting as gastric outlet obstruction in an elderly male.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Bhandari, R S

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernia is the rarest of all congenital diaphragmatic hernias, first described in 1769. It is rarely symptomatic and found on routine radiological examinations for other conditions. Gastric outlet obstruction in adults with Morgagni Hernia is exceedingly rare. An 80-year-old man was taken to the operating room with a diagnosis of Morgagni hernia with gastric outlet obstruction. An upper midline laparotomy was performed, and the incarcerated pylorus and antrum of the stomach reduced with primary closure of the defect. Postoperative period was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day. Morgagni hernia is exceedingly rare in adults and may present with gastric outlet obstruction in the emergency room. This clinical entity should be kept in mind while evaluating the patient, and early surgical intervention should be initiated. PMID:27432902

  13. De Garengeot's hernia in an 82-year-old man: a case report and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Leite, Túlio F; Chagas, Carlos A A; Pires, Lucas A S; Cisne, Rafael; Babinski, Márcio A

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the appendix within a femoral hernia (FH) sac is known as Garengeot's hernia (GH). We report on current study a rare case of an elderly man with a combined inguinal and Garengeot's hernia and discuss the clinical aspects. An 82-year-old man clinically stable, presented history of pain at the right inguinal region for over a week, without vomit, nausea, fever or any alteration of intestinal or urinary eliminations. Clinical examination revealed a FH and the ultrasonography confirmed the hernia sac. During the surgery, the appendix was recognized within the sac, and then, the patient underwent appendectomy and hernia repair. In conclusion, the presence of the vermiform appendix in a FH sac is rare, thus, requiring knowledge of the surgeon regarding this clinical entity. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate surgical treatment is the key to avoid complications. PMID:27381019

  14. Gangrenous Appendicitis: A Rare Presentation of Pericecal Hernia; Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shailesh; Dikshit, Priyadarshi; Bhaduri, Shubhendu; Sattavan, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal Hernias are rare conditions usually secondary to congenital defects, with pericecal hernias accounting for a minority of them. They can be difficult to diagnose due to non-specific presentations but may lead to strangulation and thus require early management. We herein report a rare case of pericecal hernia with gangrenous appendicitis in an 88 year-old lady presenting with features of acute intestinal obstruction and right iliac fossa lump, which on exploration was found to be a pericecal hernia with knotting, strangulation, and gangrenous changes of appendix. This case highlights the need of a high index of suspicion for internal hernias and that of prompt operative intervention to avoid enterectomies and to improve outcome. PMID:27162920

  15. Morgagni hernia presenting as gastric outlet obstruction in an elderly male

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A.; Bhandari, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernia is the rarest of all congenital diaphragmatic hernias, first described in 1769. It is rarely symptomatic and found on routine radiological examinations for other conditions. Gastric outlet obstruction in adults with Morgagni Hernia is exceedingly rare. An 80-year-old man was taken to the operating room with a diagnosis of Morgagni hernia with gastric outlet obstruction. An upper midline laparotomy was performed, and the incarcerated pylorus and antrum of the stomach reduced with primary closure of the defect. Postoperative period was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day. Morgagni hernia is exceedingly rare in adults and may present with gastric outlet obstruction in the emergency room. This clinical entity should be kept in mind while evaluating the patient, and early surgical intervention should be initiated. PMID:27432902

  16. 5-millimeter Trocar-site Hernias After Laparoscopy Requiring Surgical Repair.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nigel; Hutchinson, Anne P; Irani, Mohamad; Chung, Eric R; Lekovich, Jovana P; Chung, Pak H; Zarnegar, Rasa; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2016-01-01

    Trocar-site hernias are rare complications of laparoscopic surgery. Although trocar-site hernias occur more often at >10-mm sites, hernias can still develop at 5-mm sites after laparoscopy and can lead to serious complications. The primary objective of this review is to summarize the current medical literature pertaining to the clinical presentation and predisposing risk factors of trocar-site hernias at 5-mm sites after laparoscopy. A total of 295 publications were identified, 17 (5.76%) of which met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-seven patients with trocar-site hernias were identified after laparoscopic cases. The median age (interquartile range) for all adult patients with trocar-site hernias was 63 years (interquartile range, 39.5-66.5 years). Eight of the 18 patients (44.4%) undergoing gynecologic laparoscopy were parous although details of parity were not reported in most publications. Simple manual reduction or laparoscopic reduction with fascial closure (21 patients [84%]) was used more often compared with exploratory laparotomy (4 patients [16%], p < .001) to manage trocar-site hernias. There was no statistical difference in the location of trocar-site hernias (i.e., umbilical [14 patients, 56%] vs nonumbilical/lateral [11 patients, 44%], p = .12). Findings of this review suggest that increased operative times and excessive manipulation can extend 5-mm fascial incisions, thereby increasing the risk of trocar-site hernias. Parous women older than 60 years may have unrecognized fascial defects, which confer a higher risk of trocar-site hernias after laparoscopic surgery, even in the absence of incision manipulation or prolonged surgical duration. Such patients may benefit from closure of 5-mm fascial incisions although prospective data are required to validate the overall generalizability of this management strategy. PMID:26973139

  17. Comparison of the outcomes between laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair and prolene hernia system for inguinal hernia; review of one surgeon's experience

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Young; Han, Sun Wook; Bae, Sang Ho; Kim, Sung Yong; Hur, Kyung Yul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes between laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) repair and prolene hernia system (PHS) repair for inguinal hernia. Methods A retrospective analysis of 237 patients scheduled for laparoscopic TEP or PHS repair of groin hernia from 2005 to 2009 was performed. Results The mean age was 52.3 years in TEP group and 55.7 years in PHS group. Of 119 TEP cases, 98 were indirect inguinal hernia, 15 direct type, 5 femoral hernia and 1 complex hernia; Of 118 PHS cases, 100 indirect, 18 direct type. All in TEP group were performed under general anesthesia and 64% of PHS group were performed under spinal or epidural anesthesia. Preoperatively, 10 cases of recurrent inguinal hernia were involved in our study (4 in TEP, 6 in PHS group). The mean operative time was similar in both groups (74.8 in TEP, 71.2 in PHS group), however mean hospital stay (1.6 days in TEP, 3.2 days in PHS group, P = 0.018) and mean usage of analgesics (0.54 times in TEP, 2.03 times in PHS group, P < 0.01), complications (36 cases in TEP, 6 cases in PHS group, P < 0.01) showed statistical differences. There is only 1 case of postoperative recurrence inguinal hernia in PHS group but it has no statistical significance (P = 0.314). Conclusion Compared to PHS repair, laparoscopic TEP repair has some advantages; shorter hospital stay, less frequent need of analgesics; as well as more postoperative complications such as hematoma, seroma, scrotal swelling. PMID:22324045

  18. A comparative study on trans-umbilical single-port laparoscopic approach versus conventional repair for incarcerated inguinal hernia in children

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Zhang; Juntao, Ge; Shuli, Liu; Li, Long

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to determine whether singleport laparoscopic repair (SLR) for incarcerated inguinal hernia in children is superior toconventional repair (CR) approaches. METHOD: Between March 2013 and September 2013, 126 infants and children treatedwere retrospectively reviewed. All the patients were divided into three groups. Group A (48 patients) underwent trans-umbilical SLR, group B (36 patients) was subjected to trans-umbilical conventional two-port laparoscopic repair (TLR) while the conventional open surgery repair (COR) was performed in group C (42 patients). Data regarding the operating time, bleeding volume, post-operative hydrocele formation, testicular atrophy, cosmetic results, recurrence rate, and duration of hospital stay of the patients were collected. RESULT: All the cases were completed successfully without conversion. The mean operative time for group A was 15 ± 3.9 min and 24 ± 7.2 min for unilateral hernia and bilateral hernia respectively, whereas for group B, it was 13 ± 6.7 min and 23 ± 9.2 min. The mean duration of surgery in group C was 35 ± 5.2 min for unilateral hernia. The recurrence rate was 0% in all the three groups. There were statistically significant differences in theoperating time, bleeding volume, post-operative hydrocele formation, cosmetic results and duration hospital stay between the three groups (P < 0.001). No statistically significant differences between SLR and TLR were observed except the more cosmetic result in SLR. CONCLUSION: SLR is safe and effective, minimally invasive, and is a new technology worth promoting. PMID:27073306

  19. Surgical Site Occurrences of Simultaneous Panniculectomy and Incisional Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy A; Epps, Matthew; Debrux, Cart; Fowler, James L; Ewing, Joseph A; Cobb, William S; Carbonell, Alfredo M

    2015-08-01

    Horizontal panniculectomy (PAN) offers the advantage of wide exposure for hernia repair with elimination of excess skin and adiposity, at the expense of massive subcutaneous flap creation and its attendant risks. We report our experience with ventral hernia repair (VHR) with PAN compared with patients with hernia repair alone. A prospective database was reviewed retrospectively for all patients undergoing open VHR + PAN. A matched cohort of patients without PAN was used for comparison, resulting in 43 study and 43 control patients. Incidence of surgical site occurrences (SSO), surgical site infection (SSI), and recurrence were analyzed. A total of 43 patients underwent PAN + VHR with mesh. Mean body mass index was 34.3 kg/m(2), with 35 per cent having undergone prior bariatric surgery. Repair techniques included retromuscular (74.4%), preperitoneal (11.6%), intraperitoneal (6.9%), onlay (4.6%), and suture (2.3%). Mesh used was polypropylene (76.7%), polyester (18.6%), bioabsorbable (2.3%), and polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) (2.3%). Component separation was performed in 44.2 per cent of patients. There was a significant difference in total SSO between PAN + VHR and VHR alone (46.5% vs 27.9%; P < 0.001), though the difference for individual SSOs was not significant. There was no difference in SSI between groups (16.3% vs 20.9%; P = 0.776). Mean follow-up was 11.4 months, with recurrence rate of 11.6 per cent in the PAN group and 9.3 per cent in the control group (P = 0.725). Panniculectomy at the time of VHR does not increase the incidence of SSI, though higher rates of skin necrosis and cellulitis were seen. There is no difference in recurrence. This approach is a valid option for patients with excessive abdominal panniculus requiring VHR. PMID:26215237

  20. Inguinodynia following Lichtenstein tension-free hernia repair: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hakeem, Abdul; Shanmugam, Venkatesh

    2011-01-01

    Chronic Groin Pain (Inguinodynia) following inguinal hernia repair is a significant, though under-reported problem. Mild pain lasting for a few days is common following mesh inguinal hernia repair. However, moderate to severe pain persisting more than 3 mo after inguinal herniorrhaphy should be considered as pathological. The major reasons for chronic groin pain have been identified as neuropathic cause due to inguinal nerve(s) damage or non-neuropathic cause due to mesh or other related factors. The symptom complex of chronic groin pain varies from a dull ache to sharp shooting pain along the distribution of inguinal nerves. Thorough history and meticulous clinical examination should be performed to identify the exact cause of chronic groin pain, as there is no single test to confirm the aetiology behind the pain or to point out the exact nerve involved. Various studies have been performed to look at the difference in chronic groin pain rates with the use of mesh vs non-mesh repair, use of heavyweight vs lightweight mesh and mesh fixation with sutures vs glue. Though there is no convincing evidence favouring one over the other, lightweight meshes are generally preferred because of their lesser foreign body reaction and better tolerance by the patients. Identification of all three nerves has been shown to be an important factor in reducing chronic groin pain, though there are no well conducted randomised studies to recommend the benefits of nerve excision vs preservation. Both non-surgical and surgical options have been tried for chronic groin pain, with their consequent risks of analgesic side-effects, recurrent pain, recurrent hernia and significant sensory loss. By far the best treatment for chronic groin pain is to avoid bestowing this on the patient by careful intra-operative handling of inguinal structures and better patient counselling pre- and post-herniorraphy. PMID:21528050

  1. Strangulated Groin Hernia Repair: A New Approach for All

    PubMed Central

    Goud, Vallabhdas Srinivas; Kumar, Dodda Ramesh; Reddy, Bande Karunakar; Boda, Kumara Swamy; Madipeddi, Venkanna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The available classical approaches for Groin hernia are multiple. The change of approach with change of incision is needed with these approaches when the bowel is gangrenous. Aim To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new approach for all strangulated groin hernias (inguinal, femoral and obturator), in terms of change of approach/complications. Materials and Methods It was conducted in surgical unit-2 of MGM Hospital, Kakatiya Medical College Warangal, Telangana State, India, from Nov 2000 to Oct 2010. Total 52 patients operated with classical approach were compared with 52 patients operated present new approach. All the cases (52+52) were with gangrenous bowel which required resection and end to end anastomosis of bowel. All the cases (52+52) were managed with mesh repair and the results were analysed. Results In classical approach: Three cases required laparotomy (5.7%). Twelve cases required change of approach with change of incision (23%). Eight cases developed wound infection after mesh repair (15%). Four cases required removal of mesh (7.6%). Two Cases developed recurrence (3.8%). In present new approach: No laparotomy (0%), no change of incision (0%), no removal of mesh (0%) and no recurrence(0%). Only 2 cases (3.8%) developed wound infection at lateral part of incision ie. p<0.05. Conclusion This new approach for all - gives a best approach for strangulated groin hernias as it is easy to follow. It obviates the change of incision and need for a laparotomy. It further retains normal anatomy, prevents contamination of the inguinal canal and permits a mesh repair leading to decreasing the chances of recurrence. PMID:27190878

  2. NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT OF A PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY PLAYER WITH THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF SPORTS HERNIA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, J. Scott; Parker, Andrew; MacDonald, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report Background: Injury or weakness of lower abdominal attachments and the posterior inguinal wall can be symptoms of a “sports hernia” and an underlying source of groin pain. Although several authors note conservative treatment as the initial step in the management of this condition, very little has been written on the specific description of non-surgical measures. Most published articles favoring operative care describe poor results related to conservative management; however they fail to report what treatment techniques comprise non-operative management. Case Presentation: The subject of this case report is a professional ice hockey player who sustained an abdominal injury in a game, which was diagnosed as a sports hernia. Following the injury, structured conservative treatment emphasized core control and stability with progressive peripheral demand challenges. Intrinsic core control emphasis continued throughout the treatment progression and during the functional training prior to return to sport. Outcome: The player completed his recovery with return to full competition seven weeks post injury, and continues to compete in the NHL seven years later. Discussion: Surgical intervention has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the “sports hernia.” However it is the authors' opinion that conservative care emphasizing evaluation of intrinsic core muscular deficits and rehabilitation directed at addressing these deficits is an appropriate option, and should be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22319682

  3. Hypersplenism Associated With Late-Presenting Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xue-Xin; Shen, Zhen; Dong, Kui-Ran; Zheng, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare developmental anomaly of the diaphragm that mainly presents mainly in newborns. Even less common is late-onset CDH associated with hypersplenism. We report a 10-year-old male who presented with coughing, blood-stained sputum, and fever. He was diagnosed with CDH complicating hypersplenism after computed tomography was done. The patient was treated by CDH repair and splenectomy, and remained asymptomatic at 6-month follow-up. Computed tomography can be an important diagnostic option in this rare combination of CDH and hypersplenism, and surgical intervention is strongly recommended. PMID:27227931

  4. Late onset mesh infection following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Samee, Abdus; Adjepong, Samuel; Pattar, Jay

    2011-01-01

    In our series of 710 consecutive laparoscopic total-extra-peritoneal hernia repairs over a period of 10 years (2001–2010), the authors report a rare case of delayed mesh infection developing 7 years postoperatively. A 56-year-old patient presented with diarrhoea and fullness in right iliac fossa region. Radiological imaging confirmed a floating mesh in a fluid-containing cavity. Subsequent exploration revealed a large preperitoneal cavity containing 550 ml of pus with a floating mesh in it. The mesh was removed and the patient was discharged after making a good recovery. PMID:22674603

  5. [Left internal paraduodenal hernia: a case in a young adult].

    PubMed

    Maillet, B; Le Treut, Y P; Boutboul, R; Devred, P; Maurin, B; Bricot, R

    1984-12-01

    The authors report the case of a left paraduodenal hernia which involved almost the entire small intestine in a 15 year old girl who presented with recurrence episodes of acute abdominal pain associated with König's syndrome. Radiologic examination (plain film of the abdomen and upper GI series with small bowel follow-through) was suspicious, but did not establish the diagnosis due to unfamiliarity with the radiologic appearance of the condition. The roentgenograms are shown as well as the intraoperative findings. Anatomic, pathophysiologic, clinical, and radiologic characteristics are reviewed. PMID:6532308

  6. Jarcho-Levin syndrome presenting with diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Onay, O S; Kinik, S T; Otgün, Y; Arda, I S; Varan, B

    2008-08-01

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome (spondylothoracic or spondylocostal dysostosis) is an eponym that is used to define individuals with a short neck, short trunk, and short stature and multiple vertebral anomalies. The prognosis is directly related to respiratory complications. Reported findings associated with Jarcho-Levin syndrome include congenital heart defects, abdominal wall malformations, genitourinary malformations, upper limb anomalies, and neural tube defects. We report on a 6-day-old girl who presented with an incomplete form of Jarcho-Levin syndrome with late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia and congenital heart disease. PMID:18629769

  7. Current options in umbilical hernia repair in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Kulaçoğlu, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical hernia is a rather common surgical problem. Elective repair after diagnosis is advised. Suture repairs have high recurrence rates; therefore, mesh reinforcement is recommended. Mesh can be placed through either an open or laparoscopic approach with good clinical results. Standard polypropylene mesh is suitable for the open onlay technique; however, composite meshes are required for laparoscopic repairs. Large seromas and surgical site infection are rather common complications that may result in recurrence. Obesity, ascites, and excessive weight gain following repair are obviously potential risk factors. Moreover, smoking may create a risk for recurrence. PMID:26504420

  8. Advances in prenatal diagnosis and treatment of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Shue, Eveline H; Miniati, Doug; Lee, Hanmin

    2012-06-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common birth anomaly. Absence or presence of liver herniation and determination of lung-to-head ratio are the most accurate predictors of prognosis for fetuses with CDH. Though open fetal CDH repair has been abandoned, fetal endoscopic balloon tracheal occlusion promotes lung growth in fetuses with severe CDH. Although significant improvements in lung function have not yet been shown in humans, reversible or dynamic tracheal occlusion is promising for select fetuses with severe CDH. This article reviews advances in prenatal diagnosis of CDH, the experimental basis for tracheal occlusion, and its translation into human clinical trials. PMID:22682380

  9. Simultaneous Extraperitoneal Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy and Intraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair With Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Abraham; Teixeira, Julio A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This report depicts the feasibility of the concomitant repair of a large direct inguinal hernia with mesh by using the intraperitoneal onlay approach after extra-peritoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Methods: A 66-year-old man with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate was referred for laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The patient also had a 4-cm right, direct inguinal hernia, found on physical examination. To minimize the risk of infection of the mesh, an extraperitoneal laparoscopic prostatectomy was performed in the standard fashion after which transperitoneal access was obtained for the hernia repair. The hernia repair was completed by reduction of the hernia sac, followed by prosthetic mesh onlay. In this fashion, the peritoneum separated the prostatectomy space from the mesh. A single preoperative and postoperative dose of cefazolin was administered. Results: The procedure was completed with no difficulty. Total operative time was 4.5 hours with an estimated blood loss of 450 mL. The final pathology revealed pT2cN0M0 prostate cancer with negative margins. No infectious or bowel complications occurred. At 10-month follow-up, no evidence existed of recurrence of prostate cancer or the hernia. Conclusion: Concomitant intraperitoneal laparoscopic mesh hernia repair and extraperitoneal laparoscopic prostatectomy are feasible. This can decrease the risk of potential infectious complications by separating the mesh from the space of Retzius where the prostatectomy is performed and the lower urinary tract is opened. PMID:15984719

  10. Vesical calculus formation on non-absorbable sutures used for open inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Almarzouq, Ahmad; Mahmoud, Akram H.; Ashebu, Samuel D.; Kehinde, Elijah O.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Iatrogenic injuries to the urogenital tract are rare, with the bladder being the organ most affected. We describe a case of a vesical calculus that formed on non-absorbable sutures that were used to repair an inguinal hernia. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 45-year-old male presented with frank haematuria and dysuria 2 years following an open left inguinal hernia repair. A CT urography showed a vesical calculus adherent to the left anterio-lateral wall of the bladder. Cystoscopy revealed that the calculus formed on non-absorbable sutures. Cystolapaxy was performed followed by cystoscopic excision of the sutures. The patient's post-operative course was uneventful. DISCUSSION Foreign bodies in the urinary bladder always act as a nidus for formation of a calculus. Iatrogenic bladder injuries are common during hernia repair. It is however rare for sutures used to repair an inguinal hernia to involve the urinary bladder wall. The patient most likely had a full bladder at the time of hernia repair or the bladder was part of the contents of the hernia sac. CONCLUSION This case illustrates the need to ensure that the bladder is empty prior to pelvic surgery and for surgeons to have a good understanding of inguinal anatomy to avoid injuring the contents of the hernia sac. PMID:25308188

  11. Laparoscopic Repair of Inguinal Hernia Using Surgisis Mesh and Fibrin Sealant

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant is an effective long-term treatment for repair of inguinal hernia. This case series involved 38 adult patients with 51 inguinal hernias treated in a primary care center. Methods: Between December 2002 and May 2005, 38 patients with 45 primary and 6 recurrent inguinal hernias were treated with laparoscopic repair by the total extra-peritoneal mesh placement (TEP) technique using Surgisis mesh secured into place with fibrin sealant. Postoperative complications, incidence of pain, and recurrence were recorded, as evaluated at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 1 year, and with a follow-up questionnaire and telephone interview conducted in May and June 2005. Results: The operations were successfully performed on all patients with no complications or revisions to an open procedure. Average follow-up was 13 months (range, 1 to 30). One hernia recurred (second recurrence of unilateral direct hernia), indicating a 2% recurrence rate. Conclusions: Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant can be effectively used to treat primary, recurrent, direct, indirect, and bilateral inguinal hernias in adults without complications and minimal recurrence within 1-year of follow-up. PMID:17575758

  12. [Strangulated umbilical hernia in children (Burkina Faso): differences with developed countries].

    PubMed

    Bandré, E; Kaboré, R A F; Sanou, A; Ouédraogo, I; Soré, O; Tapsoba, T; Nébié, B; Wandaogo, A; Bachy, B

    2010-05-01

    Umbilical hernias occur frequently in children but complications are rarely reported. This study assesses the incidence of complicated umbilical hernias in our patients, evaluates data for risk factors, and shows dissimilarities with those encountered in developed countries. This study reports all children operated for complications due to strangulated umbilical hernia over a period of 3 years. On the whole, 162 children had umbilical hernias treated during this period. Thirty (18.5%) of these had complicated hernias. The average age of the complicated group was 3(1/2) years. Twenty-nine cases had a painful irreducible umbilical mass. Twenty-four children had bowel obstruction, while stercoral fistula occurred in one child. The average diameter of the hernia ranged between 1 and 1.5 cm. Five patients had ischemic intestine that required resection. One patient died. When active observation and follow-up after 1 year is difficult or not feasible when the wall defect diameter is 1.5 cm or less, and in suspicion of incarceration (unexplained abdominal pain, and irreducibility), umbilical hernia should be operated. PMID:20182838

  13. Single incision laparoscopic spigelian hernia repair--an approach with standard instrumentarium.

    PubMed

    Peterko, Ana Car; Kirac, Iva; Cugura, Jaksa Filipović; Bekavac-Beslin, Miroslav

    2013-09-01

    Spigelian hernia is a rare type of abdominal wall ventral hernia caused by defect in the spigelian fascia and presented with pain and/or palpable mass. This diagnosis is an indication for surgical procedure due to the high risk of incarceration. There are two surgical approaches (open and laparoscopic), both using two methods of repair (mesh-free primary closure and tension-free mesh repair), depending on the hernia ring size. We present a case of a 62-year-old woman with a palpable mass localized in the left spigelian hernia belt, verified by ultrasonography as a spigelian hernia. A single incision intra-abdominal laparoscopic approach with a tension-free underlay mesh-repair technique was used to treat the condition. Operating time was 40 minutes and the procedure was completed without complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful as well as 1-week and 2-month follow up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spigelian hernia repair by single incision laparoscopic surgery. Although this approach is more demanding in comparison to multiport laparoscopy, it proved to be safe and feasible for experienced laparoscopic team. Besides cosmetic improvement, the single incision approach reduces to minimum the risk of bleeding, organ injury and incisional postoperative hernia. To determine optimal indications and limits of this approach, further data collection and follow up are required. PMID:24558773

  14. Long-term recurrence and complication rates after incisional hernia repair with the open onlay technique

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Background Incisional hernia after abdominal surgery is a well-known complication. Controversy still exists with respect to the choice of hernia repair technique. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term recurrence rate as well as surgical complications in a consecutive group of patients undergoing open repair using an onlay mesh technique. Methods Consecutive patients undergoing open incisional hernia repair with onlay-technique between 01/05/1995 and 01/09/2007 at a single institution were included in the study. For follow-up patients were contacted by telephone, and answered a questionnaire containing questions related to the primary operation, the hernia and general risk factors. Patients were examined by a consultant surgeon in the outpatient clinic or in the patient's home if there was suspicion of an incisional hernia recurrence. Results The study included 56 patients with 100% follow-up. The median follow-up was 35 months (range 4–151). Recurrent incisional hernia was found in 8 of 56 patients (15%, 95% CI: 6–24). The overall complication rate was 13% (95% CI, 4–22). All complications were minor and needed no hospital admission. Conclusion This study with a long follow-up showed low recurrence and complication rates in patients undergoing incisional hernia repair with the open onlay technique. PMID:19400934

  15. Five-Year Follow-Up of Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic or Open Groin Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wright, David; Paterson, Caron; Scott, Neil; Hair, Alan; O’Dwyer, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To compare laparoscopic with open hernia repair in a randomized clinical trial at a median follow-up of 5 years. Summary Background Data Follow-up of patients in clinical trials evaluating laparoscopic hernia repair has been short. Methods Of 379 consecutive patients admitted for surgery under the care of one surgeon, 300 were randomized to totally extraperitoneal hernia repair or open repair, with the open operation individualized to the patient’s age and hernia type. All patients, both randomized and nonrandomized, were followed up by clinical examination annually by an independent observer. Results Recurrence rates were similar for both randomized groups. In 1 of the 79 nonrandomized patients, a recurrent hernia developed. Groin or testicular pain was the most common symptom on follow-up of randomized patients. The most common reason for reoperation was development of a contralateral hernia, which was noted in 9% of patients; 11% of all patients died on follow-up, mainly as a result of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Conclusions These data show a similar outcome for laparoscopic and open hernia repair, and both procedures have a place in managing this common problem. PMID:11882754

  16. The repair of umbilical hernia in cirrhotic patients: 18 consecutive case series in a single institute

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Byung Chul; Lee, Giljae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, the surgical repair of umbilical hernia in cirrhotic patients with ascites is avoided because of a significant recurrence rate and perioperative morbidity/mortality. However, recent reports recommend early elective surgery in these patients because surgery-related complications can be reduced with minimally invasive surgery and development of perioperative patient care. The current study was conducted to analyze safety and feasibility of umbilical hernia repairs performed in a single institute. Methods A single center retrospective analysis of patients' data was conducted. Eighteen patients with umbilical hernia accompanied by liver cirrhosis underwent hernia repair in the period between 2005 and 2012. The charts of these patients were reviewed and demographic data, postoperative complications, and recurrence were recorded. Results Eleven males and seven females with a mean age of 62.9 years were analyzed. Two of the patients were classified as Child's class A, 11 as Child's class B, and five as Child's class C. Four patients underwent emergency surgery because of perforations in the hernia sac in two cases and incarcerated hernias in the other two cases. Of the 18 patients who underwent surgery, four (22%) experienced a recurrence, three (17%) developed edema at the surgical sites, one (5%) experienced hepatic coma, and one (5%) showed postoperative variceal hemorrhage. All of these events occurred after emergency surgery. Conclusion In contrast to traditional concepts, early and elective repair of umbilical hernia can be performed easily and safely in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26236698

  17. Preperitoneal Surgery Using a Self-Adhesive Mesh for Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Oguntodu, Olakunle F.; Rodriguez, Francisco; Rassadi, Roozbeh; Haley, Michael; Shively, Cynthia J.; Dzandu, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia repair with mesh has been reported to result in improved patient outcomes. However, there are few published data on the use of a totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach. The purpose of this study was to present our experience and evaluate early outcomes of TEP inguinal hernia repair with self-adhesive mesh. Methods: This cohort study was a retrospective review of patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernial repair from April 4, 2010, through July 22, 2014. Data assessed were age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hernia repair indications, hernia type, pain, paresthesia, occurrence (bilateral or unilateral), recurrence, and patient satisfaction. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Results: Six hundred forty patients underwent laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia surgery with self-adhesive mesh. The average age was 56 years, nearly all were men (95.8%), and the mean BMI was 26.2 kg/m2. Cases involved primary hernia more frequently than recurrent hernia (94% vs 6%; P < .05). After surgery, 92% of the patients reported no more than minimal pain, <1% reported paresthesia, and 0.2% had early recurrence. There were 7 conversions to an open procedure. The patients had no adverse reactions to anesthesia and no bladder injury. Postoperative acute pain or recurrence was not explained by demographics, BMI, or preoperative pain. There were significant associations of hernia side, recurrence, occurrence, and sex with composite end points. Nearly all patients (98%) were satisfied with the outcome. Conclusion: The use of self-adhesive, Velcro-type mesh in laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair is associated with reduced pain; low rates of early recurrence, infection, and hematoma; and improved patient satisfaction. PMID:25587212

  18. Peritoneography (Herniography) for Detecting Occult Inguinal Hernia in Patients with Inguinodynia

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Charles P.; Sproat, Ian A.; Starling, James R.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usefulness of peritoneography in patients referred with inguinal pain (inguinodynia) and clinically absent inguinal hernia on physical examination. Summary Background Data In patients with chronic groin pain, peritoneography is a seldom-used yet available technique that can detect an occult inguinal hernia. The value of peritoneography in the diagnosis of occult inguinal hernia has been previously shown. Methods During a 60-month period, 80 consecutive patients with complaints of persistent inguinal pain (inguinodynia) without evidence of hernia on clinical examination were referred for outpatient evaluation by peritoneography. Twenty-nine patients had prior inguinal surgery in the region of their current pain. Peritoneography was performed using a midline or paraumbilical approach. Radiographs were obtained with patients in prone and prone oblique positions with the head elevated 20° to 25°, both with and without provocative maneuvers. All available records were retrospectively reviewed for radiographic findings and outcome. Results Of the 80 patients undergoing peritoneography, 36 (45%) were diagnosed radiographically to have inguinal hernias that were not detectable clinically. Twenty-seven of these patients subsequently underwent inguinal exploration, and a hernia was confirmed in 24 (89%). Of the patients having prior inguinal surgery in the region of their pain, 12/29 (41%) were diagnosed by peritoneography with a hernia. Two complications (2.5%), both colon perforations that did not require significant intervention, occurred as a result of peritoneography. Conclusions Peritoneography is highly reliable for detecting clinically occult inguinal hernia and has a low complication rate. Its usefulness is shown in a prospective consecutive series for detection of occult hernias in patients with chronic inguinal pain. The authors conclude that peritoneography is a safe and useful diagnostic test in the setting of persistent inguinal pain

  19. [Giant hernias with loss of domain: what is the best way to prepare patients?].

    PubMed

    Balaphas, Alexandre; Morel, Philippe; Breguet, Romain; Assalino, Michela

    2016-06-15

    Giant hernias with loss of domain induce physiological modifications that impair quality of life and make more complex their surgical management. A good preparation of patients before surgery is the key to an eventless postoperative course. The progressive pre-operative pneumoperitoneum (PPP) is one of the described abdominal augmentation protocols which can help patients to tolerate hernia content reintegration and avoid components separation technique during hernia repair. This article describes the management of these complex patients. We also report the case of a patient who follows successfully a PPP protocol. PMID:27487621

  20. Round Ligament Leiomyoma Presenting as an Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are common benign gynecologic tumors occurring in up to 30% of women. Round ligament leiomyomas however are very rare and, if symptomatic, can present as an inguinal hernia. We report the case of a 47-year-old woman who presented with an irreducible inguinal mass consistent with an incarcerated hernia. Intraoperatively, the mass was found to be a round ligament leiomyoma, a diagnosis that was confirmed by histopathology following excision of the mass. Although rare, round ligament leiomyomas should be part of the differential diagnosis of an inguinal hernia in females. PMID:27144048

  1. The Earliest Presenting Umbilical Port Site Hernia Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajeev; Goyal, Manav; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Port site hernia after laparoscopic surgery is a rare complication. Here we present a case of a 55-year-old female, diagnosed with an anterior abdominal wall hernia through the 10mm umbilical port, just two days after her laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The uniqueness of this case is its extremely early presentation. Patient presented with features of acute intestinal obstruction and due to prompt diagnosis and timely intervention, she underwent a successful reduction of hernia and an anatomical repair of the fascial and peritoneal defect through the midline laparotomy incision.

  2. Left paraduodenal hernia: A rare cause of acute abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Karim Ibn Majdoub; Aggouri, Younes; laalim, Said Ait; Toughrai, Imane; Mazaz, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Paraduodenal hernia is a rare congenital anomaly that arises from an error of rotation of the midgut. The duodenum and the small intestine become trapped in a sac which is lined by the peritoneum, behind the mesentery of the colon, either to the right or left of the midline. It is therfore a rare and potentially life-threatening condition that can cause intestinal obstruction progressing to strangulation and perforation. We report a case of a 55-year-old patient presenting a left paraduodenal hernia diagnosed intraoperatively after being operated on in the emergency setting for acute abdomen. The small bowel was twisted upon its mesentery and was entrapped in a large left paraduodenal space. Fortunately, once the bowel was reduced from the paraduodenal space, the blood flow was reestablished and the small bowel resumed a proper functioning. The mouth of the sac was obliterated by suture opposition to the posterior wall. The patient's subsequent hospital course was uneventful, and he was discharged in satisfactory condition 4 days postoperatively. PMID:25170374

  3. Mesh fixation alternatives in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Muysoms, Filip E; Novik, Bengt; Kyle-Leinhase, Iris; Berrevoet, Frederik

    2012-12-01

    Since the introduction of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair, there has been an ongoing dispute over the optimal method of fixating the mesh against the abdominal wall. In general, one could say that the more penetrating the fixation used, the stronger the fixation, but at the cost of increased acute postoperative pain. The occurrence of chronic pain in some patients has led to the search for less permanent penetrating fixation, but without risking a less stable mesh fixation and increased recurrences due to shift or shrinkage of the mesh. Avoiding transfascial sutures by using a double crown of staples has been proposed and recently absorbable fixation devices have been developed. Some surgeons have proposed fixation with glue to reduce the number of staples, or even eliminate them entirely. The continuously increasing multitude of marketed meshes and fixating devices leads to unlimited options in mesh fixation combination and geometry. Therefore, we will never be able to get a clear view on the benefits and pitfalls of every specific combination. Clearance of the anterior abdominal wall from peritoneal fatty tissue and correct positioning of the mesh with ample overlap of the hernia defect are possibly as important as the choice of mesh and fixation. Other topics that are involved in successful outcomes but not addressed in this article are adequate training in the procedure, appropriate selection of patients, and careful adhesiolysis to minimize accidental visceral injuries. PMID:23225589

  4. Successful surgical management of ruptured umbilical hernias in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Chatzizacharias, Nikolaos A; Bradley, J Andrew; Harper, Simon; Butler, Andrew; Jah, Asif; Huguet, Emmanuel; Praseedom, Raaj K; Allison, Michael; Gibbs, Paul

    2015-03-14

    Acute umbilical hernia rupture in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and ascites is an unusual, but potentially life-threatening complication, with postoperative morbidity about 70% and mortality between 60%-80% after supportive care and 6%-20% after urgent surgical repair. Management options include primary surgical repair with or without concomitant portal venous system decompression for the control of the ascites. We present a retrospective analysis of our centre's experience over the last 6 years. Our cohort consisted of 11 consecutive patients (median age: 53 years, range: 36-63 years) with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites. Appropriate patient resuscitation and optimisation with intravenous fluids, prophylactic antibiotics and local measures was instituted. One failed attempt for conservative management was followed by a successful primary repair. In all cases, with one exception, a primary repair with non-absorbable Nylon, interrupted sutures, without mesh, was performed. The perioperative complication rate was 25% and the recurrence rate 8.3%. No mortality was recorded. Median length of hospital stay was 14 d (range: 4-31 d). Based on our experience, the management of ruptured umbilical hernias in patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis and refractory ascites is feasible without the use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt routinely in the preoperative period, provided that meticulous patient optimisation is performed. PMID:25780312

  5. Bilateral congenital lumbar hernias in a patient with central core disease--A case report.

    PubMed

    Lazier, Joanna; Mah, Jean K; Nikolic, Ana; Wei, Xing-Chang; Samedi, Veronica; Fajardo, Carlos; Brindle, Mary; Perrier, Renee; Thomas, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lumbar hernias are rare malformations caused by defects in the development of the posterior abdominal wall. A known association exists with lumbocostovertebral syndrome; however other associated anomalies, including one case with arthrogryposis, have been previously reported. We present an infant girl with bilateral congenital lumbar hernias, multiple joint contractures, decreased muscle bulk and symptoms of malignant hyperthermia. Molecular testing revealed an R4861C mutation in the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) gene, known to be associated with central core disease. This is the first reported case of the co-occurrence of congenital lumbar hernias and central core disease. We hypothesize that ryanodine receptor 1 mutations may interrupt muscle differentiation and development. Further, this case suggests an expansion of the ryanodine receptor 1-related myopathy phenotype to include congenital lumbar hernias. PMID:26684984

  6. [Amyand's hernia--case presentation and a discussion about diagnosis problems and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Suliman, E; Popa, D; Palade, R; Simion, G

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 62 years old patient, with multiple associated tares, which was operated in emergency for an Amyand's hernia. The appendix was perforated and generated a big pussy collection (aprox. 200 ml) in the hernia sac. The impossibility of mobilization of the appendix, which was just 2/3 in the hernia sac, made us perform a median laparotomy for safety reasons. The position and fixation of the cecum made impossible the exteriorization of the appendix in the hernia sac. The postoperative evolution, under a complex supervision, was favorable. Due to the rarity of the clinical entity, of the specific issues and of the literature review, we decided to communicate the clinical observation. PMID:22844840

  7. MANAGEMENT OF OMPHALOPHLEBITIS AND UMBILICAL HERNIA IN THREE NEONATAL GIRAFFE (GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS).

    PubMed

    Selig, Michael; Lewandowski, Albert; Burton, Michael S; Ball, Ray L

    2015-12-01

    Umbilical disorders, including omphalophlebitis, omphaloarteritis, external umbilical abscesses, urachal abscesses, patent urachus, and umbilical hernias, represent a significant challenge to the health and well-being of a neonate. The three neonatal giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) in this report were evaluated for umbilical swellings. Two developed omphalophlebitis, and one had an uncomplicated umbilical hernia. Omphalophlebitis is an inflammation and/or infection of the umbilical vein. Giraffe calves with a failure of passive transfer may be predisposed and should be thoroughly evaluated for the condition. Umbilical hernias result from a failure of the umbilical ring to close after parturition or from malformation of the umbilical ring during embryogenesis. These problems were surgically corrected for all three individuals, although one died due to postsurgical complications. The risks involved include anesthetic complications, surgical dehiscence, and maternal rejection. Early detection and surgical intervention are recommended for the correction of omphalophlebitis and umbilical hernias in neonatal giraffe. PMID:26667556

  8. Right Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Associated With Hepatic Pulmonary Fusion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Laamiri, Rachida; Belhassen, Samia; Ksia, Amine; Ben Salem, Amina; Kechiche, Nahla; Mosbahi, Sana; Sahnoun, Lassaad; Mekki, Mongi; Belghith, Mohsen; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of male newborn presented with respiratory distress at 21 hours of life. The patient was operated for right congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Hepatic pulmonary fusion (HPF) was found at surgery. PMID:27433453

  9. Congenital Right Morgagni Hernia Presenting in an Adult-a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Sastha Ahanatha; Chinnappan, Santhanakrishnan

    2016-06-01

    Patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH) usually present in the neonatal period with respiratory distress. Delayed presentation of CDH in adults is rare and difficult to diagnose. We present a 42-year-old female patient who came with complaints of epigastric pain and breathlessness on exertion. X-ray and CT scan of the chest revealed a right-sided Morgagni hernia. The contents of the hernia were reduced and a primary tension free repair of the hernia defect was done through laparotomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. A strong clinical suspicion and good interpretation of radiological images help diagnose CDH which present late. Prompt surgical repair is mandatory and the outcomes are usually favorable. Primary repair is usually successful; however, mesh repair may be required for larger defects. PMID:27358522

  10. Inguinal hernia containing bladder and ureteroneocystostomy: a rare cause for acute renal graft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Hugo; Nunes, Pedro; Canhoto, Carolina; Temido, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old man presented with acute graft dysfunction 25 years after a renal transplant in the left iliac fossa. He also had an asymptomatic left inguinal hernia. Renal ultrasound showed a significant pyelocalicial dilation of the kidney graft and the patient was submitted to a percutaneous nephrostomy. An antegrade nephrostogram was performed, which showed a dilated ureter and the bladder included in the left inguinal hernia that caused the obstructive uropathy. Concomitant retrograde cystography also showed a significant portion of the bladder in the hernia sac. The patient was submitted to inguinal hernia repair, which resolved the obstruction. We present a rare and potentially curable cause of obstructive uropathy in a transplant recipient; it is possible to revert graft dysfunction and prevent graft loss if the condition is recognised early. PMID:26912768

  11. Parastomal hernia: an exploration of the risk factors and the implications.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Anthony; Porrett, Theresa; Heyman, Bob

    Risk may be defined as 'the chance that something may happen to cause loss or an adverse effect' (Concise Oxford Medical Dictionary, 2003). Patients undergoing stoma formation are at risk of developing a wide range of complications following surgery. A parastomal hernia is an adverse effect that can contribute to postoperative morbidity. The risk of developing a parastomal hernia is dependent upon a number of variables, and stoma care nurses need to be aware of these to plan the appropriate care for patients undergoing stoma formation. This article discusses the issues surrounding the development of parastomal hernias and also looks at ways in which the risk factors associated with the development of a parastomal hernia may be minimized. PMID:16628167

  12. Abdominal ventral hernia repair with current biological prostheses: an experimental large animal model.

    PubMed

    Stanwix, Matthew G; Nam, Arthur J; Hui-Chou, Helen G; Ferrari, Jonathan P; Aberman, Harold M; Hawes, Michael L; Keledjian, Kaspar M; Jones, Luke S; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2011-04-01

    Biologic prostheses have emerged to address the limitations of synthetic materials for ventral hernia repairs; however, they lack experimental comparative data. Fifteen swine were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 bioprosthetic groups (DermaMatrix, AlloDerm, and Permacol) after creation of a full thickness ventral fascial defect. At 15 weeks, host incorporation, hernia recurrence, adhesion formation, neovascularization, inflammation, and biomechanical properties were assessed. No animals had hernia recurrence or eventration. DermaMatrix and Alloderm implants demonstrated more adhesions, greater inflammatory infiltration, and more longitudinal laxity, but near identical neovascularization and tensile strength to Permacol. We found that porcine acellular dermal products (Permacol) contain following essential properties of an ideal ventral hernia repair material: low inflammation, less elastin and stretch, lower adhesion rates and cost, and more contracture. The addition of lower cost xenogeneic acellular dermal products to the repertoire of available acellular dermal products demonstrates promise, but requires long-term clinical studies to verify advantages and efficacy. PMID:21042180

  13. Richter’s Hernia and Sir Frederick Treves: An Original Clinical Experience, Review, and Historical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, Wolfgang; Zellweger, René

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical recognition, pathology, and management of Richter’s hernia and to review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Summary Background Data The earliest known reported case of Richter’s hernia occurred in 1598 and was described by Fabricius Hildanus. The first scientific description of this particular hernia was given by August Gottlob Richter in 1778, who presented it as “the small rupture.” In 1887, Sir Frederick Treves gave an excellent overview on the topic and proposed the title “Richter’s hernia.” To his work—a cornerstone to modern understanding—hardly any new aspects can be added today. Since then, only occasional case reports or small series of retrospectively collected Richter’s hernias have been published. Methods The authors draw on their experience with 18 prospectively collected cases treated in the ICRC Lopiding Hospital for War Surgery in northern Kenya between February and December 1998 and review the relevant literature of the past 400 years. Results The classic features of Richter’s hernia were confirmed in all case studies of patients: only part of the circumference of the bowel is entrapped and strangulated in the hernial orifice. The involved segment may rapidly pass into gangrene, yet signs of intestinal obstruction are often absent. The death rate in the authors’ collective was 17%. Conclusion Richter’s hernia is a deceptive entity whose high death rate can be reduced by accurate diagnosis and early surgery. Considering the increasing incidence at laparoscope insertion sites, awareness of this special type of hernia with its misleading clinical appearance is important and of general interest. PMID:11066144

  14. Vascular diaphragmatic hernia in a patient with cirrhosis first case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of an adult patient recently diagnosed with cirrhosis. The ultrasound evaluation described a multinodular inhomogeneous liver, requiring a magnetic resonance imaging scan for further characterization. The performed magnetic resonance imaging examination confirmed the diagnosis of cirrhosis associated with portal hypertension and detected a vascular left transdiaphragmatic hernia. Although various types of diaphragmatic hernias have been described - congenital or acquired - to the best of our knowledge, this type of pathology has never been reported. PMID:22697282

  15. Incidence of Incisional Hernia after Cesarean Delivery: A Register-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Aabakke, Anna J. M.; Krebs, Lone; Ladelund, Steen; Secher, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of incisional hernias requiring surgical repair after cesarean delivery over a 10-year period. Methods This population- and register-based cohort study identified all women in Denmark with no history of previous abdominal surgery who had a cesarean delivery between 1991 and 2000. The cohort was followed from their first until 10 years after their last cesarean delivery within the inclusion period or until the first of the following events: hernia repair, death, emigration, abdominal surgery, or cesarean delivery after the inclusion period. For women who had a hernia repair, hospital records regarding the surgery and previous cesarean deliveries were tracked and manually analyzed to validate the relationship between hernia repair and cesarean delivery. Data were analyzed with a competing risk analysis that included each cesarean delivery. Results We identified 57,564 women who had had 68,271 cesarean deliveries during the inclusion period. During follow-up, 134 of these women had a hernia requiring repair. Of these 68 (51% [95% CI 42–60%]) were in a midline incision although the transverse incision was the primary approach at cesarean delivery during the inclusion period. The cumulated incidence of a hernia repair within 10 years after a cesarean delivery was 0.197% (95% CI 0.164–0.234%). The risk of a hernia repair was higher during the first 3 years after a cesarean delivery, with an incidence after 3 years of 0.157% (95% CI 0.127–0.187%). Conclusions The overall risk of an incisional hernia requiring surgical repair within 10 years after a cesarean delivery was 2 per 1000 deliveries in a population in which the transverse incision was the primary approach at cesarean delivery. PMID:25268746

  16. Evaluation and Treatment of a Ureterosciatic Hernia Causing Hydronephrosis and Renal Colic

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Keyan; Yura, Emily M.; Harisinghani, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An 87-year-old female presented with complaints of intermittent severe right renal colic. CT imaging demonstrated a ureterosciatic hernia and moderate hydronephrosis proximal to the portion of the ureter that was herniated through the sciatic foramen. A retrograde pyelogram demonstrated a transition point in the ureter at the location of the hernia. A ureteral stent was placed resulting in straightening of the ureter, resolution of hydronephrosis, and complete resolution of the patient's symptoms.

  17. Non-intubated laparoscopic repair of giant Morgagni’s hernia for a young man

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Heng; Liu, Dong; Pan, Xuefeng; Wu, Wenbin; Hu, Zhengqun

    2016-01-01

    An asymptomatic patient was admitted as his chest photograph and computed tomography scans showed a giant Morgagni’s hernia (MH). And it was repaired by laparoscopic approach under epidural anesthesia without endotracheal intubation. The hernia content of omentum was repositioned back into the abdominal cavity, and the diaphragmatic defect was repaired with composite mesh. Which indicated that non-intubated laparoscopic mesh repair via epidural anesthesia is reliable and satisfactory for MH.

  18. Non-intubated laparoscopic repair of giant Morgagni's hernia for a young man.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Heng; Liu, Dong; Pan, Xuefeng; Wu, Wenbin; Hu, Zhengqun; Zhang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    An asymptomatic patient was admitted as his chest photograph and computed tomography scans showed a giant Morgagni's hernia (MH). And it was repaired by laparoscopic approach under epidural anesthesia without endotracheal intubation. The hernia content of omentum was repositioned back into the abdominal cavity, and the diaphragmatic defect was repaired with composite mesh. Which indicated that non-intubated laparoscopic mesh repair via epidural anesthesia is reliable and satisfactory for MH. PMID:27621903

  19. [The characteristics of epidural analgesia during the removal of lumbar intervertebral disk hernias].

    PubMed

    Arestov, O G; Solenkova, A V; Lubnin, A Iu; Shevelev, I N; Konovalov, N A

    2000-01-01

    Epidural analgesia (EA) was used in 29 patients undergoing surgical removal of lumbar discal hernia. Marcain EA with controlled medicinal sleep and non-assisted breathing allowed to perform the whole operation in 27 patients. EA may be ineffective in combination of sequestrated disk hernia with scarry adhesive process. The technique of the operation demands a single use of the anesthetic drug which is potent enough to make blockade throughout the operation up to the end. PMID:10738758

  20. [Influence of laser -- infrared irradiation on local complications of early postoperative period in hernias of anterior abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Gasymov, E M

    2005-01-01

    Results of laser-infrared irradiation (LIRI) of postoperative wound after surgical treatment of recurrent hernias of anterior abdominal wall were analyzed. LIRI decreased number of local complications in early postoperative period in patients both with recurrent and primary hernias. The method was more effective for the treatment of local complication in patients with recurrent hernia that is confirmed by reduced of frequency of infiltrates, seromas and suppurations. PMID:16247383

  1. Recurrence after composite repair of a giant hiatus hernia: 'the golf club' deformity is a distinctive clinical and radiological picture.

    PubMed

    Furtado, R V; Falk, G L; Vivian, S J

    2016-07-01

    Background Recurrence of a hiatus hernia after cardiopexy repair can obstruct the lower oesophagus but also provide characteristic radiographic images after a barium meal. Case History Two patients with recurrence of a hiatus hernia underwent repeat surgery. Here, we provide and discuss diagnostic imaging, surgical findings and outcome for these male and female patients. Conclusions Repeat surgery is indicated in patients with recurrence of a hiatus hernia after repair. PMID:27241603

  2. Grynfelt-Lesshaft hernia a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ploneda-Valencia, C.F.; Cordero-Estrada, E.; Castañeda-González, L.G.; Sainz-Escarrega, V.H.; Varela-Muñoz, O.; De la Cerda-Trujillo, L.F.; Bautista-López, C.A.; López-Lizarraga, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar hernia account for less than 2% of al abdominal hernias, been the Grynfelt-Lesshaft's hernia (GLH) more frequent than the others. With approximately 300 cases published in the literature, the general surgeon may have the chance of treat it ones in their professional life. Case report A 42-years old male with human immunodeficiency virus and Diabetes Mellitus presented to the outpatient clinic with a GLH. Preoperative classified as a type “A” lumbar hernia an open approach was scheduled. We performed a Sandwich technique with a sublay and onlay ULTRAPRO® mesh fixed with PDS® II suture without complications and discharged the patient 24-h after. After six months, the patient denied any complication. Discussion Primary (spontaneous) lumbar hernias represent 50–60% of all GLH. The preoperative classification of a lumbar hernia is mandatory to propose the best surgical approach. According to the classification of Moreno-Egea A et al., the best technique for our patient was an open approach. The Sandwich technique has demonstrated good outcomes in the management of the GLH. Conclusion The surgical approach should be according to the classification proposed and to the experience of the surgeon. The Sandwich technique has good outcomes. PMID:27144007

  3. Two port laparoscopic ventral hernia mesh repair: an innovative technical advancement.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Prateek K; Ramachandran, C S; Arora, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    Ventral hernia is a common surgical problem. The traditional open surgical repair has the disadvantage of excessive morbidity, long hospital stay and high recurrence rates. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) is gaining acceptance but there is no standardized technique for the repair of these hernias. We have introduced an innovative technique of 2-port laparoscopic mesh repair for ventral and incisional hernias. Between January 2002 and September 2008, 168 patients underwent the 2-port repair of ventral hernias at our institution, with Bard polypropylene mesh in 162 cases and Gore-tex expanded polytetrafloroethylene mesh in 6 patients. The average size of the defects was 10.2 cm (6.6-24.8 cm). Mean operating time was 61.4 min (48-102 min). The mean post-operative hospital stay was 1.2 days. Prolonged ileus over one day occurred in 22 patients while 6 patients had urinary retention in the post-operative period. There were 6 recurrences (3.94%) in the mean follow up period of 42 months (6-62 months). Seroma formation occurred in 5.3% cases but all of them subsided within 6 weeks without any active intervention. In conclusion we recommend that the 2-port LVHR is a technically sound procedure which is less invasive and with comparable complication rates to the 3 or 4 port hernia repair. PMID:20934544

  4. Strangulated internal hernia by giant Meckel diverticulum presented as acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Diaz, Jhonny Mauricio; Trujillo-Vasquez, Camilo Andrés; Parra-Vargas, Ana María; Rovira-Chaves, Andrea Sofía; Tinoco-Guzman, Laura Viviana; Garcia-Garcia, Johana Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Internal hernia due to a Meckel diverticulum is a common presentation of bowel obstruction mostly seen in pediatric population. However, it has been stated that among 5% of the patients had a giant Meckel diverticulum (defined as a Meckel diverticulum with increased dimensions than the ones commonly found), being this condition very unusual. Presentation of case We presented a 19 year old male with acute abdominal pain suggestive of appendicitis. During appendectomy we discovered ischemic and necrotic signs in a bowel segment, leading us to perform a laparotomy that revealed a portion of ischemic and necrotic jejunum, and another bowel segment with a strong adherence to the mesentery root that created an internal hernia. The internal hernia was reduced and the injured bowel portions were resected. Necrotic bowel samples were sent to the pathology department who posteriorly reported a giant Meckel diverticulum. The patient had an excellent recovery after procedure. Discussion After searching in PubMed for a similar association between Meckel diverticulum and internal hernia, we found few cases that reported a giant Meckel diverticulum and a low occurrence with internal hernias making our case not so common to find. Conclusion We concluded that a giant Meckel diverticulum in association with mesenteric defects producing internal hernias are not common pathologies to find together in a patient as our research and case suggest. PMID:26117448

  5. [Design and Fabrication of a Device for Intraperitoneal Treatment of Pediatric Hernia].

    PubMed

    Lei, Zehua; Gao, Fengwei; Bao, Pingqian; Wang, Zhixu; Zhang, Ji

    2015-06-01

    For treatment of pediatric inguinal hernia, we fabricated a device, i.e. so called "filling type pediatric hernia sac", which treats the problem from the abdominal cavity, through the abdominal and is a self-adaptive closer, using synthetic material. The device includes filling rack, self-adaptive umbrella support bar, bottom piece, outside pulling line and device fixing lines. The filling rack is composed of 2 concentric circles of 3.0 cm diameter with peripherally fixed together and can be pulled into the shapes of a ball or an olive. The supporting bar is structured of 3 pieces with 0.5 cm wide, 4.0 cm long, cross-fixed on top of the filling rack. The bottom piece is in a circular structure with a diameter of 3.0 cm, and it is connected to the filling rack bottom. Adjust positioning stay outside the fixed on the top of the device are connected at one end, and the other end free through filling the top frame connected with the bottom slice of central fixation. By using this device, we treated 37 pediatric inguinal hernia cases with 38 side-inguinal hernia successfully. The mean duration of post-operation follow-ups was 14.6 ± 5.89 months, without hernia recurrence, obvious scar and hard sections of inguinal region. This device could provide a convenient, safe and effective plugging technology for children's pediatric hernia. PMID:26485998

  6. Right sided transmesentric hernia: A rare cause of acute abdomen in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bharatam, Kaundinya Kiran; Kaliyappa, C.; Reddy, Raja Raghavendra

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Transmesenteric mesocolic hernias are a rare cause of acute abdomen in adults with few reported cases in published literature. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a rare case of a 30-year-old male with right-sided transmesenteric hernia of ileum due to a congenital mesocolic defect resulting in acute abdomen, presenting as acute abdomen. The hernia was reduced, small bowel inspected for gangrene and mesenteric hernia repaired, following which the patient made a good recovery and was discharged 5 days later. DISCUSSION The insidious onset of transmesenteric herniae and lack of specific radiological or laboratory investigations reaffirms the importance of surgeons maintaining a high index of suspicion for this surgical emergency. CONCLUSION Transmesentric hernia though rare can present as a case of acute abdomen in an emergency. The diagnosis is purely by a CT scan and close monitoring of the patient's general condition in cases of non-specific abdominal pain is essential to identify the rare deteriorating patient for early surgical intervention and optimal outcome. PMID:25437662

  7. Tailored approach in inguinal hernia repair - decision tree based on the guidelines.

    PubMed

    Köckerling, Ferdinand; Schug-Pass, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The endoscopic procedures TEP and TAPP and the open techniques Lichtenstein, Plug and Patch, and PHS currently represent the gold standard in inguinal hernia repair recommended in the guidelines of the European Hernia Society, the International Endohernia Society, and the European Association of Endoscopic Surgery. Eighty-two percent of experienced hernia surgeons use the "tailored approach," the differentiated use of the several inguinal hernia repair techniques depending on the findings of the patient, trying to minimize the risks. The following differential therapeutic situations must be distinguished in inguinal hernia repair: unilateral in men, unilateral in women, bilateral, scrotal, after previous pelvic and lower abdominal surgery, no general anesthesia possible, recurrence, and emergency surgery. Evidence-based guidelines and consensus conferences of experts give recommendations for the best approach in the individual situation of a patient. This review tries to summarize the recommendations of the various guidelines and to transfer them into a practical decision tree for the daily work of surgeons performing inguinal hernia repair. PMID:25593944

  8. Components separation in complex ventral hernia repair: surgical technique and post-operative outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ross, Samuel W; Oommen, Bindhu; Heniford, B Todd; Augenstein, Vedra A

    2014-03-01

    There are over 350,000 ventral hernia repairs (VHR) performed in the United States annually and a variety of laparoscopic and open surgical techniques are described and utilized. Complex ventral hernias such as recurrent hernias, those with infected mesh, open wounds, coexisting enteric fistulas, parastomal hernias, and massive hernias-especially those with loss of abdominal domain-require sophisticated repair techniques. Many of these repairs are performed via an open approach. Ideally, the aim is to place mesh under the fascia with a large overlap of the defect and obtain primary fascial closure. However, it is often impossible to bring together fascial edges in very large hernias. Component separation is an excellent surgical technique in selected patients which involves release of the different layers of the abdominal wall and in turn helps accomplish primary fascial approximation. The posterior rectus sheath, external oblique or the transverse abdominis fascia can be cut and allows for closure of fascia in a tension free manner in a majority of patients. In this chapter we describe the various techniques for component separation, indications for use, how to select an appropriate type of release and post-operative outcomes. PMID:24700223

  9. Abdominal musculature abnormalities as a cause of groin pain in athletes. Inguinal hernias and pubalgia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D C; Meyers, W C; Moylan, J A; Lohnes, J; Bassett, F H; Garrett, W E

    1991-01-01

    There has been increasing interest within the European sports medicine community regarding the etiology and treatment of groin pain in the athlete. Groin pain is most commonly caused by musculotendinous strains of the adductors and other muscles crossing the hip joint, but may also be related to abdominal wall abnormalities. Cases may be termed "pubalgia" if physical examination does not reveal inguinal hernia and there is an absence of other etiology for groin pain. We present nine cases of patients who underwent herniorrhaphies for groin pain. Two patients had groin pain without evidence of a hernia preoperatively (pubalgia). In the remaining seven patients we determined the presence of a hernia by physical examination. At operation, eight patients were found to have inguinal hernias. One patient had no hernia but had partial avulsion of the internal oblique fibers from their insertion at the public tubercle. The average interval from operation to return to full activity was 11 weeks. All patients returned to full activity within 3 months of surgery. One patient had persistent symptoms of mild incisional tenderness, but otherwise there were no recurrences, complications, or persistence of symptoms. Abnormalities of the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernias and microscopic tears or avulsions of the internal oblique muscle, can be an overlooked source of groin pain in the athlete. Operative treatment of this condition with herniorrhaphy can return the athlete to his sport within 3 months. PMID:1831010

  10. Grynfeltt Hernia: A Deceptive Lumbar Mass with a Lipoma-Like Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Zadeh, Jonathan R.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Patel, Chetan; Kozol, Robert; Lopez-Viego, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    The Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia is a rare posterior abdominal wall defect that allows for the herniation of retro- and intraperitoneal structures through the upper lumbar triangle. While this hernia may initially present as a small asymptomatic bulge, the defect typically enlarges over time and can become symptomatic with potentially serious complications. In order to avoid that outcome, it is advisable to electively repair Grynfeltt hernias in patients without significant contraindications to surgery. Due to the limited number of lumbar hernioplasties performed, there has not been a large study that definitively identifies the best repair technique. It is generally accepted that abdominal hernias such as these should be repaired by tension-free methods. Both laparoscopic and open techniques are described in modern literature with unique advantages and complications for each. We present the case of an unexpected Grynfeltt hernia diagnosed following an attempted lipoma resection. We chose to perform an open repair involving a combination of fascial approximation and dual-layer polypropylene mesh placement. The patient's recovery was uneventful and there has been no evidence of recurrence at over six months. Our goal herein is to increase awareness of upper lumbar hernias and to discuss approaches to their surgical management. PMID:26697256

  11. Grynfeltt Hernia: A Deceptive Lumbar Mass with a Lipoma-Like Presentation.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Jonathan R; Buicko, Jessica L; Patel, Chetan; Kozol, Robert; Lopez-Viego, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    The Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia is a rare posterior abdominal wall defect that allows for the herniation of retro- and intraperitoneal structures through the upper lumbar triangle. While this hernia may initially present as a small asymptomatic bulge, the defect typically enlarges over time and can become symptomatic with potentially serious complications. In order to avoid that outcome, it is advisable to electively repair Grynfeltt hernias in patients without significant contraindications to surgery. Due to the limited number of lumbar hernioplasties performed, there has not been a large study that definitively identifies the best repair technique. It is generally accepted that abdominal hernias such as these should be repaired by tension-free methods. Both laparoscopic and open techniques are described in modern literature with unique advantages and complications for each. We present the case of an unexpected Grynfeltt hernia diagnosed following an attempted lipoma resection. We chose to perform an open repair involving a combination of fascial approximation and dual-layer polypropylene mesh placement. The patient's recovery was uneventful and there has been no evidence of recurrence at over six months. Our goal herein is to increase awareness of upper lumbar hernias and to discuss approaches to their surgical management. PMID:26697256

  12. Repair of Concomitant Incisional and Parastomal Hernias Using a Hybrid Technique: A Series of 32 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinyong; Tian, Wen; Li, Jiye; Sun, Pengjun; Pei, Lijuan; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    Background Concomitant incisional and parastomal hernias is a challenging condition. We used a hybrid technique of sublay and onlay to treat patients with this condition. Material/Methods The clinical data of 32 consecutive patients treated from February 2008 to April 2014 for concomitant incisional and parastomal hernias were retrospectively reviewed. The mean diameter was 9 (range 4–13) cm of the incisional hernias, and 6 (range 4.5–8) cm of the parastomal hernias. Results The mean operative time was 247 (range 220–290) min. The mean hospital stay was 20 (range 14–27) days. All surgical wounds healed by primary intention. Seven patients had postoperative seroma and were well managed with puncture and compression. All 32 patients were followed up for a mean of 48 (range 5–68) months. Four patients recurred with parastomal hernias and were treated with secondary surgery. No further recurrence occurred until the last follow-up. Conclusions This hybrid technique of sublay and onlay is only suitable for the repair of complex incisional and parastomal hernias. PMID:26186130

  13. Prognosis elements in surgical treatment of complicated umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Banu, P; Popa, F; Constantin, VD; Bălălău, C; Nistor, M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The surgical treatment of umbilical hernia in cirrhosis patients raises special management challenges. The attitude upon the repair of these hernias varies from expectancy or elective treatment in early stages of the disease to the surgical treatment only if complications occur. Material and Method: We have assessed 22 consecutive cases of cirrhosis patients treated for complicated umbilical hernia in the Surgical Department of “Sf. Pantelimon" Emergency Hospital in Bucharest between January 2008 and December 2012. The patients’ stratification was done in stages of liver disease based upon Child-Pugh classification. Complications that required emergency repair were the following: strangulation, incarceration and hernia rupture. The postoperative complications were ordered in five grades of severity based upon Clavien classification. Results: The severity of the complications was higher in advanced stages of liver cirrhosis, Child B and C. There were 5 deaths representing 22,7%, four of them in patients with Child C disease stage. Conclusion: The incidence of morbidity and mortality after umbilical hernia repair in emergencies increases in advanced stages of liver cirrhosis. It is advisable to prevent complications occurrence and perform surgical repair of umbilical hernia in elective condition. PMID:24155783

  14. Incarcerated femoral hernia containing the right uterine tube. A pre-operative diagnosis is possible.

    PubMed

    Engin, Omer; Cicek, Ebru; Oner, Soner Recai; Yildirim, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    The incarcerated femoral hernia containing the right uterine tube is very rare to see. The case report is important to accumulate knowledge of very rare cases. The diagnosis of the case was established pre-operatively with abdominal computerized tomography (CT) On CT examination, the mass in the hernia sac was not connected with the intestines and a tubal structure on the right side of the uterus was shown to extend out of the abdomen. In the operation, the right uterine tube(RUT) was reduced into the abdomen after its blood supply was shown to be normal. A hernia repair was performed. Sometimes in obese patients, incarcerated femoral or inguinal hernias may not been noted. Ultrasonography, CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used frequently to diagnose abdominal wall hernias. The organs in the incarcerated sac must be examined carefully and the viability must be checked. The surgeon must decide whether or not to resect the organs. In our case, strangulation was not found and polypropylene mesh was not used for hernia repair due to a fear of infection of the prosthesis. Incarceration of the uterine tube in the sac is traumatic and this condition may lead to infection. Such conditions may lead to ectopic pregnancy. The patient must be informed about ectopic pregnancy due to a previous incarceration of the tube because ectopic pregnancy may be fatal. PMID:21988051

  15. Robot-assisted laparoscopic total extraperitoneal hernia repair during prostatectomy: technique and initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Hasan A.R.; Do, Minh; Rewhorn, Matthew; Häfner, Tim; Liatsikos, Evangelos; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Dietel, Anja; Stolzenburg, Jens Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To describe the technique of total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair performed during Robot-assisted Endoscopic Extraperitoneal Radical Prostatectomy (R-EERPE) and to present the initial outcomes. Material and methods 12 patients underwent inguinal hernia repair during 120 R-EERPEs performed between July 2011 and March 2012. All patients had a clinically palpable inguinal hernia preoperatively. The hernia was repaired using a Total Extraperitoneal Patch (TEP) at the end of the procedure. Results Sac dissection and mesh placement was simpler compared to conventional laparoscopy due to improved, magnified, 3-D vision along with 7° of movement, and better control of mesh placement. The median operating time was 185 minutes, with on average, an additional 12 minutes incurred per hernia repair. The median blood loss for the procedures was 250 ml, and the mean pathological prostate weight was 55 gm. No additional blood loss was noted and there were no postoperative complications. None of the patients had a recurrence at 12 months. We await long-term follow-up data. Conclusions Robot-assisted TEP is feasible and should be considered in patients with hernia at the time of R-EERPE. PMID:26251753

  16. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Femoral Hernia; Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Akrami, Majid; Karami, MohamamdYasin; Zangouri, Vahid; Deilami, Iman; Maalhagh, Mehrnoush

    2016-01-01

    Femoral hernias account for 2% to 4% of groin hernias, are more common in women, and are more appropriate to present with strangulation and require emergency surgery.This condition may lead to symptoms of bowel obstruction or strangulation and possible bowel resection-anastomosis. To the best of our knowledge, there is few reports of strangulated femoral hernia.We herein present an 82-year-old lady who presented with a 5-day history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On examination, the patient had a generalized tenderness and distention. The working diagnosis at this time was a bowel obstruction. A computed tomography scan revealed the hernia occurring medial to the femoral vessels and below the inguinal ligament .Laparotomy was performed and patient was treated successfully with surgical therapy.Herniawas repaired and a small bowel resection was performed with end to end anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was doing well at a 12-month follow-up visit. Obstructing femoral hernia of the small bowel is rare and the physician should suspect femoral hernia as a bowel obstruction cause. PMID:27162928

  17. Development of an Optimal Diaphragmatic Hernia Rabbit Model for Pediatric Thoracoscopic Training

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Merino, Eva M.; Usón-Casaús, Jesús M.; Zaragoza-Bayle, Concepción; Rivera-Barreno, Ramón; Rodríguez-Alarcón, Carlos A.; Palme, Rupert; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives were to standarize the procedure needed to reproduce a similar surgical scene which a pediatric surgeon would face on repairing a Bochdalek hernia in newborns and to define the optimal time period for hernia development that achieve a realistic surgical scenario with minimimal animal suffering. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits weighing 3–3.5 kg were divided into four groups depending on the time frame since hernia creation to thoracoscopic repair: 48 h, 72 h, 96 h and 30 days. Bochdalek trigono was identified and procedures for hernia creation and thoracoscopic repair were standarized. Blood was collected for hematology (red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, hemoglobin and hematocrit), biochemistry (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase) and gas analysis (arterial blood pH, partial pressure of oxygen, partial pressure of carbón dioxide, oxygen saturation and bicarbonate) at baseline and before the surgial repairment. Glucocorticoid metabolites concentration in faeces was measured. Thoracoscopy video recordings were evaluated by six pediatric surgeons and rated from 0 to 10 according to similarities with congenital diaphragmatic hernia in newborn and with its thoracoscopic approach. Statistical methods included the analysis of variance, and comparisons between groups were followed by a post-hoc Tukey’s test. Fourty -eight h showed to be the optimal time frame to obtain a diaphragmatic hernia similar to newborn scenario from a surgical point of view with minimal stress for the animals. PMID:24521868

  18. [Proposal for the use of preoperative pneumoperitoneum in the treatment of large bilateral inguinal-scrotal hernias].

    PubMed

    Ponzio, S; Tramontano, R; Ambu, W; Malandrino, G; Fraccalini, M

    1998-04-01

    The authors bring again their therapeutic behavior effected with the technique of the pneumoperitoneum preoperative for the resolution or a case of bilateral inguinal hernia. Having used a catheter of Tenckoff with external link to Y, in use beside the nephrologist, for peritoneal dialysis and has stayed positioned for percutaneous way into the peritoneal cavity. Has stayed insufflated increasing quantity of air in abdomen from 100 cc after the first day of treatment, to 1500 cc after the 15th day, to allow a sufficient increase of the ability or the peritoneal cavity and allow the reduction of the intestinal loops in abdomen. The patient has stayed subjected to F.K. Respiratory T. and constant control of the EGA for permitting the patient to have a hernioplasty with median navel-pubic access and positioning of preperitoneal prosthesis according to Stoppa in the best possible conditions. PMID:9701982

  19. Giant anterior urethral diverticulum with a calculus masquerading as left inguinal hernia: A missed diagnosis, a lesson to learn

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Renu; Goel, Prabudh; Kureel, Shiv Narain

    2013-01-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum is an infrequent but important cause of infravesical obstructive uropathy in children. Clinical spectrum usually includes obstructive or irritative urinary symptoms or penile ballooning during the act of micturition. We share our experience in a case of giant anterior urethral diverticulum with a contained calculus presenting as a huge inguino-scrotal swelling and masquerading as left inguinal hernia. The fluctuation in the size of the swelling related to the act of micturition was mistaken for cough impulse. He was subjected to a left inguinal herniotomy, following which he developed urine leak from the surgery wound and was subsequently referred to our centre for further management. The importance of a detailed history, meticulous physical examination, and diagnostic imaging has been stressed. The surgical approach in such cases has also been highlighted. PMID:24019642

  20. Durability of giant hiatus hernia repair in 455 patients over 20 years

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, R; Hayward, M; Law, S; Tan, A; Vivian, SJ; Van der Wall, H; Falk, GL

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The surgical management of symptomatic giant hiatus hernia (GHH) aims to improve quality of life (QoL) and reduce the risk of life threatening complications. Previous reports are predominantly those with small sample sizes and short follow-up periods. The present study sought to assess a large cohort of patients for recurrence and QoL over a longer time period. Methods This was a follow-up study of a prospectively collected database of 455 consecutive patients. Primary repair of GHH was evaluated by endoscopy/barium meal for recurrence and a standardised symptom questionnaire for QoL. Recurrence was assessed for size, elapsed time, oesophagitis and symptoms. Results Objective and subjective review was achieved in 91.9% and 68.6% of patients. The median age was 69 years (range: 15–93 years) and 64% were female. Laparoscopic repair was completed in 95% (mesh in 6% and Collis gastroplasty in 7%). The 30-day mortality rate was 0.9%. The proportion of patients alive at five and ten years were 90% and 75% respectively. Postoperative QoL scores improved from a mean of 95 to 111 (p<0.01) and were stable over time (112 at 10 years). The overall recurrence rate was 35.6% (149/418) at 42 months; this was 11.5% (48/418) for hernias >2cm and 24.2% (101/418) for <2cm. The rate of new recurrence at 0–1 years was 13.7% (>2cm = 3.4%, <2cm = 10.3%), at 1–5 years it was 30.8% (>2cm = 9.5%, <2cm = 21.3%), at 5–10 years it was 40.1% (>2cm = 13.8%, <2cm = 26.3%) and at over 10 years it was 50.0% (>2cm = 25.0%, <2cm = 25.0%). Recurrence was associated with oesophagitis but not decreased QoL. Revision surgery was required in 4.8% of cases (14.8% with recurrence). There were no interval major GHH complications. Conclusions Surgery has provided sustained QoL improvements irrespective of recurrence. Recurrence occurred progressively over ten years and may predispose to oesophagitis. PMID:26263802

  1. Management of giant inferior triangle lumbar hernia (Petit's triangle hernia): A rare complication following delayed breast reconstruction with extended latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap

    PubMed Central

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Arruda, Eduardo Gustavo; Sturtz, Gustavo; Gemperli, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Lumbar triangle hernia after breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi flap (LDMF) is a very rare complication and few cases were previously described. Muscle mobilization and iatrogenic fascia defect are related etiologic factors. PRESENTATION OF CASE The authors describe a rare case of lumbar hernia in a 58-year-old woman who underwent delayed left breast reconstruction with LDMF. Two months after surgery, a progressive symptomatic lower left lumbar bulge was observed. The CT scan confirmed the diagnosis and delineated an 18 cm lumbar defect filled with lower and large bowel. At operation, the defect was exposed and the hernia sac reduced. In order to obtain stability, the remained local muscle and fascia flaps were mobilized into the defect. Additional strength was achieved with a two-layer closure of prosthetic mesh (intra/extra peritoneal). The patient is currently in the 10th postoperative year of hernia repair and satisfactory lumbar wall contour was achieved. Neither the recurrence of lumbar hernia nor symptoms compliance was noted. DISCUSSION Lumbar hernia is an uncommon complication of LDMF harvest. Although it is a rare disease, general and plastic surgeons must be on alert to avoid complications and misdiagnosis. Seroma differential diagnosis is important in order to avoid bowel perforation due to aspiration. Defect reconstruction is necessary with a muscular and fascia flaps mobilization and synthetic mesh in order to obtain a stable repair. CONCLUSION The knowledge of this rare post-operative complication following delayed breast reconstruction is crucial to its surgical management. Early surgical intervention is warranted in order to avoid severe complications. PMID:24794025

  2. A new, simple operative approach for bilateral inguinal hernia repair in girls: A single transverse supra-pubic incision

    PubMed Central

    Zarroug, Abdalla E.; Alkhebel, Antar M.; Gibreel, Waleed O.; Almassry, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inguinal hernia repair remains one of the most common operations performed by pediatric surgeons. We described a new surgical approach for treating bilateral inguinal hernias in girls through a small single transverse supra-pubic incision. Materials and Methods: A new approach was performed on female children 12-years-old and younger with bilateral inguinal hernias between January 2005 and April 2012. Technique: A single transverse suprapubic incision (1-1.5 cm) was made. Using sharp and blunt dissection bilateral hernias were exposed and repaired using a standard high ligation. Results: Ninety-nine girls with a preoperative clinical diagnosis of bilateral inguinal hernia were included. Median age was 2 years (range: 1 month to 12 years). All patients underwent general anesthesia. Median operative time was 12 minutes (range 5-22). There were no intra-operative complications or misdiagnosis. Two patients had bilateral sliding hernias and the remainder had indirect hernias. Post-operatively two patients developed non-expanding small hematomas, both treated non-operatively without sequelae. There were zero hernia recurrence and median follow-up was 5 years (range: 1-8 years) on 99% of patients. Conclusion: We described a new, safe, simple, and rapid approach for bilateral inguinal hernia repair in female pediatric population. A single transverse suprapubic skin incision was adequate for exposing both inguinal regions with excellent postoperative results. PMID:26628807

  3. An atypical lateral hernia and concomitant inguinal and umbilical hernias in a patient with polycystic kidney disease and an intracranial aneurysm - a combined approach of clinical and radiological investigation, endoscopic hernia repair, and anatomical cadaver model documentation and a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Veréb-Amolini, László; Betschart, Thomas; Kiss, Emilia; Ullrich, Oliver; Wildi, Stefan; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hernias are difficult to diagnose due to their rarity and often unspecific symptoms. In the literature there exist hints to peri-inguinal hernias, i.e. direct lateral hernia, but most of them are forms of Spigelian hernias. Since the majority were described during the first half of the past century or even earlier, only very few cases have been documented using modern diagnostic techniques. We report a unique case of a 51 year old patient presenting with an atypical inguinal hernia with concomitant inguinal and umbilical hernias in combination with cystic kidney disease and intracranial aneurysm. The atypical position of the hernia was assumed from clinical inspection, ultrasound and CT scan and verified during pre-peritoneoscopy. Using an anatomical cadaver dissection approach, we followed the unusual position of the hernia through the abdominal wall below the aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. After a thorough literature search, we assume that the present hernia containing a hernial sac has not been documented before, especially not in such a multidisciplinary approach comprising radiological, surgical and anatomical localisation and endoscopic treatment in a patient with a clinical situation being aggravated by large cystic kidneys leading to dialysis-dependency. Rare hernias have been described as being often associated with concomitant inguinal or other hernias, a predisposition for the male gender and a pathogenic mechanism related to other soft tissue defects such as cystic kidney disease or cranial aneurysm. Thus, we consider this a unique case that has not been documented in this constellation previously, which may increase the awareness for these rare hernias. PMID:25763300

  4. Hernia repair and time off work in Oxford

    PubMed Central

    Semmence, A.; Kynch, Jocelyn

    1980-01-01

    The variation in time off work was investigated in 261 men aged between 18 and 65 years whose inguinal herniae were repaired in Oxford hospitals in 1971/72 and 1974/75. The average time off was 51 calendar days compared with 70 days nationally. Complications, a heavy job, low sick pay, and family worries were found to be the main factors associated with increased time off, although they accounted for only 42 per cent of the variance. Men stopping smoking at the surgeon's request had less time off, and so had men who had been given an estimate before their operation of their likely duration of absence, especially when the estimate was given by the surgeon. PMID:7373589

  5. Sudden unexpected death due to strangulated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Ritesh G; Padubidri, Jagadish Rao; Raghavendra Babu, Y P; Naik, Ramadas; Kanchan, Tanuj; Senthilkumaran, Subramanian; Chawla, Khushboo

    2016-06-01

    Sudden unwitnessed, unexpected deaths when the bodies are found in public places require a complete and meticulous medicolegal autopsy to ascertain the cause and manner of death to avoid further unnecessary investigations by the legal authorities. Such deaths attributed to gastrointestinal causes at autopsy are relatively uncommon. We report a case of sudden unexpected death due to strangulated inguinal hernia in a 60-year-old man. The body was discovered in a public area near a place of worship. The present case illustrates a potentially preventable sudden unexpected death due to a surgically correctable gastrointestinal condition. In the present case, the individual feared being hospitalised for treatment of his scrotal swelling with potential surgery and the eventual loss of daily income. In our opinion, such apprehensions may have delayed the potentially life-saving hospital surgical intervention in the individual. PMID:26837567

  6. Strangulated ileostomy evisceration following lateralizing mesh repair of parastomal hernia.

    PubMed

    Ramly, E P; Crosslin, T; Orkin, B; Popowich, D

    2016-04-01

    Parastomal hernia formation and ostomy prolapse are relatively common complications of intestinal ostomy construction. Underlay mesh placement with lateralization of the stoma limb appears to be the method of repair with the lowest recurrence rate. Prophylaxis of new stomas with mesh is advocated by many authors. We report the case of an 81-year-old man with chronic steroid-dependent COPD who presented to the emergency department with strangulated small bowel evisceration 9 days following completion abdominal colectomy, and creation of an end ileostomy reinforced with intraperitoneal mesh. This rare complication was related to this patient's risk factors for poor healing including poor nutrition, age, chronic COPD and coughing and steroid dependence with immunosuppression. PMID:24777430

  7. Congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a terrier dog

    PubMed Central

    Kheirandish, Reza; Saberi, Mehdi; Vosough, Dariush; Askari, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    A one-month-old male terrier dog was referred in shock status with a history of anorexia, tachypnea, abdominal distention and progressive weight loss. Auscultation of right side of the lungs found enhanced respiratory noises. The thorough auscultation of the opposite side of the chest revealed the presence of typical intestinal sounds. Cardiac auscultation revealed muffled heart sounds and a diminished palpable precordial cardiac impulse was evident. The radiograph showed the presence of gas within the bowel in abrupt contrast to the adjacent structures of soft tissue opacity. Conservative treatment was failed and the animal died. At necropsy, cranial displacement of abdominal viscera into the pericardial sac was seen. A definitive diagnosis of peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia was made. Although congenital pericardial diseases are rare in dogs, awareness of the clinical manifestation of these kinds of defects combined with early use of available imaging modalities can yield a preoperative diagnosis. PMID:25568711

  8. Congenital retrosternal hernias of Morgagni: Manifestation and treatment in children

    PubMed Central

    Slepov, Oleksii; Kurinnyi, Sergii; Ponomarenko, Oleksii; Migur, Mikhailo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to scarcity of congenital diaphragmatic hearnias of Morgagni (CDHM), non-specific clinical presentation in the pediatric age group, we aimed to investigate the incidence, clinical manifestations, anatomical characteristics, and develop diagnostic algorithm and treatment of CDHM in children. Materials and Methods: The patients’ records of children with CDHM treated in our hospital during past 20 years were retrospectively reviewed for the age at diagnosis, gender, clinical findings, anatomical features, operative details and outcome. Results: Since 1995 to 2014 we observed 6 (3 boys, 3 girls) patients with CDHM, that comprise 3.2% of all congenital diaphragmatic hernia cases (n = 185). Age at diagnosis varied from 3 mo. to 10y.o. Failure to thrive was main symptom in 4 patients, followed by recurrent respiratory infections (n = 3), dyspnea (n = 3), and gastrointestinal manifestations: constipation (n = 2), abdominal pain (n = 1). Work-up consisted of plain X-ray for all (n = 6), upper GI (n = 3), barium enema (n = 2), sonography (n = 6) and CT (n = 2). Abdominal approach used in 5 patients, and thoracotomy in one. Herniated contents were: liver lobes (n = 4), transverse colon (n = 3) and greater omentum (n = 1). 5 had right-sided lesion, 1- left-sided. Defect repaired using local tissues. Post-operative course was uneventful; all patients appeared well during follow-up. Conclusion: CDHM is very uncommon anomaly, very occasionally diagnosed at the early age. Failure to thrive and recurrent respiratory infections are most frequent clinical manifestations. In suspected CDHM we advocate the following work-up: plain chest and abdominal X-ray, contrast study (upper GI series or barium enema), ultrasonographic screen and CT scan. Surgical repair via abdominal approach, using local tissues and hernia sac removal is preferred. PMID:27251653

  9. Stratification of Surgical Site Infection by Operative Factors and Comparison of Infection Rates after Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Margaret A.; Nickel, Katelin B.; Wallace, Anna E.; Mines, Daniel; Fraser, Victoria J.; Warren, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The National Healthcare Safety Network does not risk adjust surgical site infection (SSI) rates after hernia repair by operative factors. We investigated whether operative factors are associated with risk of SSI after hernia repair. Design Retrospective cohort study. Patients Commercially-insured enrollees aged 6 months–64 years with ICD-9-CM procedure or CPT-4 codes for inguinal/femoral, umbilical, and incisional/ventral hernia repair procedures from 1/1/2004–12/31/2010. Methods SSIs within 90 days after hernia repair were identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare SSI incidence by operative factors. Results A total of 119,973 hernia repair procedures were included in the analysis. The incidence of SSI differed significantly by anatomic site, with rates of 0.45% (352/77,666) for inguinal/femoral, 1.16% (288/24,917) for umbilical, and 4.11% (715/17,390) for incisional/ventral hernia repair. Within anatomic sites, the incidence of SSI was significantly higher for open versus laparoscopic inguinal/femoral (0.48% [295/61,142] versus 0.34% [57/16,524], p=0.020) and incisional/ventral (4.20% [701/16,699] versus 2.03% [14/691], p=0.005) hernia repairs. The rate of SSI was higher following procedures with bowel obstruction/necrosis than procedures without obstruction/necrosis for open inguinal/femoral (0.89% [48/5,422] versus 0.44% [247/55,720], p<0.001) and umbilical (1.57% [131/8,355] versus 0.95% [157/16,562], p<0.001), but not incisional/ventral hernia repair (4.01% [224/5,585] versus 4.16% [491/11,805], p=0.645). Conclusions The incidence of SSI was highest after open procedures, incisional/ventral repairs, and hernia repairs with bowel obstruction/necrosis. Our findings suggest that stratification of hernia repair SSI rates by some operative factors may be important to facilitate accurate comparison of SSI rates between facilities. PMID:25695175

  10. A Complete Sutureless, Hernia Repair for Primary Inguinal Hernia The Trabucco Repair: A Tribute to Ermanno Trabucco.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Giampiero; Bruni, Piero Giovanni; Cavalli, Marta; Morlacchi, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Since 1989, the authors have been using the Trabucco tension-free and sutureless technique for the repair of primary groin hernia with a pre-shaped mesh in more than 8,000 surgical procedures for complex and "simple" abdominal and inguinal hernias; over 4,000 cases have been considered in this study. The great majority of these procedures were performed under local anaesthesia and with a complete and careful nerve sparing. Compared to the Lichtenstein's technique, which is currently the golden standard treatment worldwide, there are no significant differences in the observed recurrence rate (below 2%). For the Law of Pascal, the pre-shaped prosthesis developed by Trabucco remains stretched uniformly in the inguinal canal, without the need to be secured with sutures and without forming dead space, which is a cause of infections, pain, and recurrence. The main advantage of a tension-free and sutureless repair is given by the relevant reduction in postoperative chronic neuralgia, which is not an uncommon complication and, depending on its intensity, can also potentially jeopardize a patient's work and social activities. The identification and the sparing of the three nerves of the inguinal region is of crucial importance to reduce the rate of neuralgia in the short and long term. Furthermore, the use of a local anaesthesia imposes the surgeon to properly recognize those nerves and to respect them during the repair. It goes without saying that the complete exposition of the right anatomy of inguinal canal is mandatory. The intentional section of one or more nerves, when it is not technically possible to achieve a satisfactory nerve sparing, or special tricks to create proper fenestrations (small window) on the edge of the prosthesis to prevent the scar tissue to involve the spared nerves, ensures a further reduction of the rate of neuralgia and excellent patient outcomes. PMID:27175818

  11. The Use of Biological Meshes in Diaphragmatic Defects - An Evidence-Based Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Stavros A; Pointner, Rudolph; Granderath, Frank-Alexander; Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of meshes for hiatal hernia repair has emerged in the era of laparoscopic surgery, although sporadic cases of mesh augmentation of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture have been reported. The indications for biologic meshes in diaphragmatic repair are ill defined. This systematic review aims to investigate the available evidence on the role of biologic meshes in diaphragmatic rupture and hiatal hernia repair. Limited data from sporadic case reports and case series have demonstrated that repair of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture with biologic mesh is safe technique in both the acute or chronic setting. High level evidence demonstrates short-term benefits of biologic mesh augmentation in hiatal hernia repair over primary repair, although adequate long-term data are not currently available. Long-term follow-up data suggest no benefit of hiatal hernia repair using porcine small intestine submucosa over suture repair. The effectiveness of different biologic mesh materials on hernia recurrence requires further investigation. PMID:26539439

  12. The Use of Biological Meshes in Diaphragmatic Defects – An Evidence-Based Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Stavros A.; Pointner, Rudolph; Granderath, Frank-Alexander; Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of meshes for hiatal hernia repair has emerged in the era of laparoscopic surgery, although sporadic cases of mesh augmentation of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture have been reported. The indications for biologic meshes in diaphragmatic repair are ill defined. This systematic review aims to investigate the available evidence on the role of biologic meshes in diaphragmatic rupture and hiatal hernia repair. Limited data from sporadic case reports and case series have demonstrated that repair of traumatic diaphragmatic rupture with biologic mesh is safe technique in both the acute or chronic setting. High level evidence demonstrates short-term benefits of biologic mesh augmentation in hiatal hernia repair over primary repair, although adequate long-term data are not currently available. Long-term follow-up data suggest no benefit of hiatal hernia repair using porcine small intestine submucosa over suture repair. The effectiveness of different biologic mesh materials on hernia recurrence requires further investigation. PMID:26539439

  13. Shouldice inguinal hernia repair in the male adult: the gold standard? A multicenter controlled trial in 1578 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, J M; Boudet, M J; Fingerhut, A; Poucher, J; Hennet, H; Habib, E; Veyrières, M; Flamant, Y

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hernia repair is the second most frequently performed operation in France and in the United States, the prevalence being 36 for every 1000 males. Lowering the recurrence rate by 1% would mean 1000 fewer operations for hernia repair per year in France. METHODS: Between 1983 and 1989, 1578 adult males with a total of 1706 nonrecurrent inguinal hernias were prospectively and randomly allotted to undergo either a Bassini's repair, Cooper's ligament, or Shouldice repair with polypropylene or a Shouldice repair with stainless steel for determination of which technique was associated with the lowest recurrence rate. Fifty-nine hernia repairs were withdrawn after inclusion. Of the 1647 remaining hernias, 52.2% were indirect, 25.6% were direct, and 23.2% were combined. Patients were seen every 6 months for 3 years and then every year. Median follow-up was 5 years 8 months (range, 3 months-8.5 years). RESULTS: At 8.5 years, 5.6% of hernias were lost to follow-up. Ninety-seven hernia repairs failed, 50% during the first 2 years. The actuarial recurrence rate was 7.94% at 8.5 years. The Shouldice repair (stainless steel or polypropylene) was associated with fewer recurrences (6.1%) than either the Bassini's (8.6%) or Cooper's ligament repair (11.2%) technique (p < 0.001). This difference remained significant even when the maximal bias test was used. Fewer recurrences (5.9%) were observed with the stainless steel wire Shouldice repair than with polypropylene version (6.5%), but the difference was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Shouldice hernia repair provides the patient with the best chances of nonrecurrence regardless of the anatomical type of hernia. The Shouldice hernia repair should be the gold standard for inguinal hernia repair in men and serves as the basis for comparison with all other techniques, be they prosthetic or laparoscopic. PMID:8526578

  14. Laparoscopic Treatment of Ventral Abdominal Wall Hernias: Preliminary Results in 100 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Martín del Olmo, Juan Carlos; Blanco, Jose Ignacio; de la Cuesta, Carmen; Martín, Fernando; Toledano, Miguel; Perna, Christiam; Vaquero, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The laparoscopic treatment of eventrations and ventral hernias has been little used, although these hernias are well suited to a laparoscopic approach. The objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of a laparoscopic approach in the surgical treatment of ventral hernias. Methods: Between January 1994 and July 1998, a series of 100 patients suffering from major abdominal wall defects were operated on by means of laparoscopic techniques, with a mean postoperative follow-up of 30 months. The mean number of defects was 2.7 per patient, the wall defect was 93 cm2 on average. There were 10 minor hernias (<5 cm), 52 medium-size hernias (5-10 cm), and 38 large hernia (>10 cm). The origin of the wall defect was primary in 21 cases and postsurgical in 79. Three access ports were used, and the defects were covered with PTFE Dual Mesh measuring 19 × 15 cm in 54 cases, 10 x 15 cm in 36 cases, and 12 × 8 cm in 10 cases. An additional mesh had to be added in 21 cases. In the last 30 cases, PTFE Dual Mesh Plus with holes was employed. Results: Average surgery time was 62 minutes. One procedure was converted to open surgery, and only one patient required a second operation in the early postoperative period. Minor complications included 2 patients with abdominal wall edema, 10 seromas, and 3 subcutaneous hematomas. There were no trocar site infections. Two patients developed hernia relapse (2%) in the first month after surgery and were reoperated with a similar laparoscopic technique. Oral intake and mobilization began a few hours after surgery. The mean stay in hospital was 28 hours. Conclusions: Laparoscopic technique makes it possible to avoid large incisions, the placement of drains, and produces a lower number of seromas, infections and relapses. Laparoscopic access considerably shortens the time spent in the hospital. PMID:10917121

  15. An estimate of hernia prevalence in Sierra Leone from a nationwide community survey

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hiten D; Groen, Reinou S; Kamara, Thaim B; Samai, Mohamed; Farahzad, Mina M; Cassidy, Laura D; Kushner, Adam L; Wren, Sherry M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A large number of unrepaired inguinal hernias is expected in sub-Saharan Africa where late presentation often results in incarceration, strangulation, or giant scrotal hernias. However, no representative population-based data is available to quantify the prevalence of hernias. We present data on groin masses in Sierra Leone to estimate prevalence, barriers to care, and associated disability. Methods A cluster randomized, cross-sectional household survey of 75 clusters of 25 households with 2 respondents each was designed to calculate the prevalence of and disability caused by groin hernias in Sierra Leone using a verbal head-to-toe examination. Barriers to hernia repairs were assessed by asking participants the main reason for delay in surgical care. Results Information was obtained from 3645 respondents in 1843 households, of which 1669 (46%) were male and included in the study. In total, 117 males or 7.01% (95% CI 5.64-8.38) reported a soft or reducible swelling likely representing a hernia with four men having two masses. Of the 93.2% who indicated the need for health care, only 22.2% underwent a procedure, citing limited funds (59.0%) as the major barrier to care. On disability assessment, 20.2% were not able to work secondary to the groin swelling. Conclusions The results indicate groin masses represent a major burden for the male population in Sierra Leone. Improving access to surgical care for adult patients with hernias and early intervention for children will be vital to address the burden of disease and prevent complications or limitations of daily activity. PMID:24241327

  16. A Comparative Analysis Between Laparoscopic and Open Ventral Hernia Repair at a Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    DAVIES, STEPHEN W.; TURZA, KRISTIN C.; SAWYER, ROBERT G.; SCHIRMER, BRUCE D.; HALLOWELL, PETER T.

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair reportedly yields lower postoperative complications than open repair. We hypothesized that patients undergoing laparoscopic repair would have lower postoperative infectious outcomes. Also, certain preoperative patient characteristics and preoperative hernia characteristics are hypothesized to increase complication risk in both groups. All ventral hernia repairs performed at University of Virginia from January 2004 to January 2006 were reviewed. Primary outcomes included wound healing complications and hernia recurrence. Categorical data were analyzed with χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests. Continuous variables were evaluated with independent t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests. Multivariable logistic regression was performed. A total of 268 repairs (110 open, 158 laparoscopic) were evaluated. Patient and hernia characteristics were similar between groups, though the percents of wound contamination (5.4% vs 0.6%; P = 0.02) and simultaneous surgery (7.2% vs 0%; P = 0.001) were greater in the open procedures. Univariate analysis also revealed that open cases had a greater incidence of postoperative superficial surgical site infection (SSI) (30.0% vs 10.7%; P < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that both diabetes and open repair were associated with an increased risk of superficial SSI (P = 0.019; odds ratio = 3.512; 95% confidence interval = 1.229–10.037 and P = 0.001; odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.9–11.2, respectively). Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair yielded lower rates of postoperative superficial SSI than open surgery. Other pre-operative patient characteristics and preoperative hernia characteristics, with the exception of diabetes, were not found to be associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications. PMID:22856497

  17. Cure of inguinal hernias with large preperitoneal prosthesis: Experience of 2,312 cases.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, J H; Bouillot, J L; Dupin, P; Aouad, K; Bethoux, J P

    2006-09-01

    It is clear that the recurrence rates after nonprosthetic methods for the repair of inguinal hernias, like McVay, Bassini or Shouldice techniques, are high (6-10%). Since 20 years, we are convinced, in the GREPA-EHS group, about the advantages of the use of a prosthetic mesh in majority of patients for repairs of primary or recurrent inguinal hernias and incisional hernias. We describe our typical technique for the cure of all inguinal hernias. We place a large supple mesh, by open inguinal route, posterior to the transversalis fascia and anterior to the peritoneum. We have made a double modification in the initial technique of Rives - the use of a very large unsplit prosthesis (15 × 17 cm) and the parietalization of the spermatic cord helped by a wide opening of the Fruchaud's orifice by diversion of the epigastric vessels. The positioning of the mesh is about the same as in the TEP technique but with the advantages of reduction in the vital laparoscopic risks and reinforcement of the wall by a short tension-free McVay technique.For this prospective study, we repaired 2,312 consecutive hernias in 1,828 patients, 284 of which were recurrent. We present our results in terms of quality of repairs, recurrence rates (0.4%), morbidity rate (8%), and mortality rate (0.8%).This technique involves the placement by an open incisional route of a large preperitoneal sheet of mesh for initial treatment of all inguinal hernias - including scrotal, giant or femoral - to ensure a definitive solid muscular wall, even for recurrent hernias. PMID:21187983

  18. MMPs/TIMPs and inflammatory signalling de-regulation in human incisional hernia tissues

    PubMed Central

    Guillen-Marti, Jordi; Diaz, Ramon; Quiles, Maria T; Lopez-Cano, Manuel; Vilallonga, Ramon; Huguet, Pere; Ramon-y-Cajal, Santiago; Sanchez-Niubo, Albert; Reventós, Jaume; Armengol, Manel; Arbos, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    Background: Incisional hernia is a common and important complication of laparotomies. Epidemiological studies allude to an underlying biological cause, at least in a subset of population. Interest has mainly focused on abnormal collagen metabolism. However, the role played by other determinants of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition is unknown. To date, there are few laboratory studies investigating the importance of biological factors contributing to incisional hernia development. We performed a descriptive tissue-based analysis to elucidate the possible relevance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) in association with local cytokine induction in human incisional hernia tissues. The expression profiles of MMPs, TIMPs and pro-inflammatory cytokine signalling were investigated in aponeurosis and skeletal muscle specimens taken intraoperatively from incisional hernia (n= 10) and control (n= 10) patients. Semiquantitative RT-PCR, zymography and immunoblotting analyses were done. Incisional hernia samples displayed alterations in the microstructure and loss of ECM, as assessed by histological analyses. Moreover, incisional hernia tissues showed increased MMP/TIMP ratios and de-regulated inflammatory signalling (tumor necrosis factor [TNFA] and interleukin [IL]-6 tended to increase, whereas aponeurosis TNFA receptors decreased). The changes were tissue-specific and were detectable at the mRNA and/or protein level. Statistical analyses showed several associations between individual MMPs, TIMPs, interstitial collagens and inflammatory markers. The increment of MMPs in the absence of a counterbalance by TIMPs, together with an ongoing de-regulated inflammatory signalling, may contribute in inducing a functional defect of the ECM network by post-translational mechanisms, which may trigger abdominal wall tissue loss and eventual rupture. The notable TIMP3 protein down-regulation in incisional hernia fascia may be of pathophysiological

  19. A Large Single-Center Experience of Open Lateral Abdominal Wall Hernia Repairs.

    PubMed

    Patel, Puraj P; Warren, Jeremy A; Mansour, Roozbeh; Cobb, William S; Carbonell, Alfredo M

    2016-07-01

    Lateral abdominal wall hernias may occur after a variety of procedures, including anterior spine exposure, urologic procedures, ostomy closures, or after trauma. Anatomically, these hernias are challenging and require a complete understanding of abdominal wall, interparietal and retroperitoneal, anatomy for successful repair. Mesh placement requires extensive dissection of often unfamiliar planes, and its fixation is difficult. We report our experience with open mesh repair of lateral abdominal wall hernias. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was performed to identify patients with a classification of lateral abdominal wall hernia who underwent an open repair. A total of 61 patients underwent open lateral hernia repairs. Mean patient age was 58 years (range 25-78), with a mean body mass index of 32 kg/m(2) (range 19.0-59.1). According to the European Hernia Society classification, defects were located subcostal (L1, 14 patients), flank (L2, 33 patients), iliac (L3, 11 patients), and lumber (L4, 3 patients). Mean defect size was 78.6 cm(2), with a mean greatest single dimension of 9.2 cm (range 2-25 cm). Retromuscular or interparietal repair was performed in 50.8 per cent, preperitoneal in 41.0 per cent, intraperitoneal in 6.6 per cent, and onlay in 1.6 per cent. The rate of surgical site occurrence was 49.2 per cent, primarily seroma and surgical site infection rate was 13.1 per cent. With a mean follow-up of 15.4 months, seven patients (11.5%) have documented recurrence. Synthetic mesh reconstruction of lateral wall hernias is challenging. Our experience demonstrates the safety and success of repair using synthetic mesh primarily in the retromuscular, interparietal, or preperitoneal planes. PMID:27457859

  20. A 5-year Review of Darning Technique of Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Olasehinde, Olalekan O; Adisa, Adewale O; Agbakwuru, Elugwaraonu A; Etonyeaku, Amarachukwu C; Kolawole, Oladapo A; Mosanya, Arinze O

    2015-01-01

    Context: The Darning technique of inguinal hernia repair is a tissue-based technique with documented low recurrence rate in some parts of the world. Though practiced in our setting, little is documented on its outcome. Aims: The aim was to review the outcome of Darning technique of inguinal hernia repair in our setting. Study Design: A descriptive retrospective study. Patients and Methods: Clinical records of all patients who had inguinal hernia repair using the Darning technique between January 2007 and December 2011 in our institution were obtained. Details of sociodemographic data, intraoperative findings and postoperative complications were reviewed. Statistical Analysis Used: simple frequencies, proportions and cross-tabulations. Results: A total of 132 patients whose ages ranged from 15 to 84 years (mean = 49.4 years) with a male: female ratio of 12:1 were studied. Majority of the hernias were right sided (68.9%), mostly indirect (81.8%). The procedures were for emergencies in 17 (12.9%) cases whereas the rest (87.1%) were done electively. Most procedures, 110 (83.3%) were performed under local anesthesia. Surgical site infection was the most common complication occurring in six patients (4.5%), while four patients (3%) had chronic groin pain. At a mean follow-up period of 15 months there were two recurrences (1.5%) both occurring in patients with bilateral hernias (P = 0.001). Conclusions: The Darning technique of inguinal hernia repair is a safe and effective method for inguinal hernia repair in our setting. PMID:25838768

  1. Components separation technique and laparoscopic approach: a review of two evolving strategies for ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Rehnke, Robert D; Ramaswamy, Archana; Smith, C Daniel; Clarke, John M; Ramshaw, Bruce J

    2005-07-01

    When faced with large ventral hernias, surgeons frequently must choose between higher incidence of recurrence after primary repair and higher incidence of wound complications after repair with mesh. The aim of this study is to compare early outcomes between laparoscopic repair (LR) and components separation technique (CST), two evolving strategies for the management of large ventral hernias. We reviewed 42 consecutive patients who underwent CST and 45 consecutive patients who underwent LR of ventral hernia defects of at least 12 cm2. Demographics, hernia characteristics, and short-term outcomes were compared between groups. Patients in the LR group were younger (53 +/- 2 vs 68 +/- 2 years, P < 0.0001), had greater body mass index (34 +/- 2 vs 29 +/- 1 kg/m2, P = 0.02), and had larger hernia defects (318 +/- 49 vs 101 +/- 16 cm2, P < 0.0001) than patients in the CST group. The LR resulted in shorter length of hospital stay (4.9 +/- 0.9 vs 9.6 +/- 1.8 days, P < 0.0001), lower incidence of ileus (7% vs 48%, P < 0.0001), and lower incidence of wound complications (2% vs 33%, P < 0.001) than the CST. Both techniques resulted in similar operative times, transfusion requirements, and mortality. Recurrences occurred in 7 per cent of patients at mean follow-up of 16 months in the CST group and 0 per cent at mean follow-up of 9 months after LR. The LR may have a short-term advantage over the CST in terms of incidence of ileus, wound complications, and hospital stay. Because of their unique advantage over traditional hernia repairs, both techniques may play a significant role in the future treatment of large ventral hernias. Adequate training will be essential for the safe and effective implementation of these techniques within the surgical community. PMID:16089127

  2. Risk of Incisional Hernia after Minimally Invasive and Open Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Sigrid V.; Ehdaie, Behfar; Atoria, Coral L.; Elkin, Elena B.; Eastham, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The number of radical prostatectomies has increased. Many urologists have shifted from the open surgical approach to minimally invasive techniques. It is not clear whether the risk of post-prostatectomy incisional hernia varies by surgical approach. Materials and Methods In the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare dataset we identified men age 66 and older who had minimally invasive (MIRP) or open radical prostatectomy (ORP) for prostate cancer diagnosed 2003–2007. The main outcome was incisional hernia repair identified in Medicare claims following prostatectomy. We also examined the frequency of umbilical, inguinal and other hernia repairs. Results We identified 3,199 patients who had MIRP and 6,795 who had open radical prostatectomy ORP. The frequency of incisional hernia repair was 5.3% (median follow-up 3.1 years) in the MIRP group and 1.9% (median follow-up 4.4 years) in the ORP group, corresponding to incidence rates of 16.1 and 4.5 per 1000 person-years for MIRP and ORP, respectively. Compared with ORP, MIRP was associated with a more than 3-fold increased risk of incisional hernia repair, controlling for patient and disease characteristics (adjusted hazard ratio 3.39, 95% CI, 2.63–4.38, p <0.0001). MIRP was associated with an attenuated but increased risk of any hernia repair compared with ORP (adjusted hazard ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.29–1.70, p <0.0001). Conclusions MIRP was associated with a significantly increased risk of incisional hernia compared with ORP. This is a potentially remediable complication of prostate cancer surgery that warrants increased vigilance with respect to surgical technique. PMID:23688847

  3. [A 77-year-old patient with suspected left atrial tumor].

    PubMed

    Bandorski, D; Hönscher, R; Ibing, R; Rieker, W

    2004-09-01

    A 77-year-old female presented with a suspected cardiac tumor and thrombosis of both legs diagnosed by phlebography with pulmonary embolism of both sides. In transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography, and CT no intracardial tumor was seen. There was a hiatal hernia which compressed the left atrium from outside. As echocardiographic criteria of hiatal hernia described by D'Cruz we found the left atrium filled with a solid mass and variation of compression of the left atrium depending on breathing. Because of the low incidence of cardiac tumors, differential diagnosis should be done if a cardiac tumor is suspected. A hiatal hernia should always be taken into consideration. PMID:15340697

  4. Is transverse abdominis plane block effective following local anesthetic infiltration in laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal hernia repair?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mun Gyu; Ok, Si Young; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Se-Jin; Park, Sun Young; Yoo, Jae-Hwa; Cho, Ana; Hur, Kyung Yul; Kim, Myung Jin

    2014-01-01

    Background Transverse abdominis plane (TAP) block can be recommended as a multimodal method to reduce postoperative pain in laparoscopic abdominal surgery. However, it is unclear whether TAP block following local anesthetic infiltration is effective. We planned this study to evaluate the effectiveness of the latter technique in laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal hernia repair (TEP). Methods We randomly divided patients into two groups: the control group (n = 37) and TAP group (n = 37). Following the induction of general anesthesia, as a preemptive method, all of the patients were subjected to local anesthetic infiltration at the trocar sites, and the TAP group was subjected to ultrasound-guided bilateral TAP block with 30 ml of 0.375% ropivacaine in addition before TEP. Pain was assessed in the recovery room and post-surgery at 4, 8, and 24 h. Additionally, during the postoperative 24 h, the total injected dose of analgesics and incidence of nausea were recorded. Results: On arrival in the recovery room, the pain score of the TAP group (4.33 ± 1.83) was found to be significantly lower than that of the control group (5.73 ± 2.04). However, the pain score was not significantly different between the TAP group and control group at 4, 8, and 24 h post-surgery. The total amounts of analgesics used in the TAP group were significantly less than in the control group. No significant difference was found in the incidence of nausea between the two groups. Conclusions TAP block following local infiltration had a clinical advantage only in the recovery room. PMID:25558340

  5. Obesity increases the odds of acquiring and incarcerating noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Lau, Briana; Kim, Hanjoo; Haigh, Philip I; Tejirian, Talar

    2012-10-01

    The current data available describing the relationship of obesity and abdominal wall hernias is sparse. The objective of this study was to investigate the current prevalence of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias and their correlation with body mass index (BMI) and other demographic risk factors. Patients with umbilical, incisional, ventral, epigastric, or Spigelian hernias with or without incarceration were identified using the regional database for 14 hospitals over a 3-year period. Patients were stratified based on their BMI. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to distinguish other significant risk factors associated with the hernias. Of 2,807,414 patients, 26,268 (0.9%) had one of the specified diagnoses. Average age of the patients was 52 years and 61 per cent were male. The majority of patients had nonincarcerated umbilical hernias (74%). Average BMI was 32 kg/m2. Compared with patients with a normal BMI, the odds of having a hernia increased with BMI: BMI of 25 to 29.9 kg/m2 odds ratio (OR) 1.63, BMI of 30 to 39.9 kg/m2 OR 2.62, BMI 40 to 49.9 kg/m2 OR 3.91, BMI 50 to 59.9 kg/m2 OR 4.85, and BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 OR 5.17 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years was associated with a higher risk for having a hernia (OR, 2.12; 95% [CI], 2.07 to 2.17), whereas female gender was associated with a lower risk (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.55). Those with incarcerated hernias had a higher average BMI (32 kg/m2 vs 35 kg/m2; P<0.0001). Overall, BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 showed an increased chance of incarceration, and a BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 had the highest chance of incarceration, OR 12.7 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years and female gender were also associated with a higher risk of incarceration (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.59 and OR, 1.80; CI, 1.45 to 2.24). Increasing BMI and increasing age are associated with a higher prevalence and an increased risk of incarceration of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias. PMID:23025954

  6. Prognostic Factors of Postoperative Morbidity and Mortality of Adult Strangulated Groin Hernia.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, Roger; Traoré, Mamadou; Anzoua, Kouakou Ibrahim; Kalou, Ismael Leh Bi; N'Dri, Ahou Bernadette; Aguia, Brice; Kakou, Aka Gérard; Diané, Bamourou

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work is provide the results of the surgical treatment of strangulated groin hernias and determine morbidity and mortality risk factors. It is a retrospective study related to the 288 records of patients aged 15 years and more, who underwent emergency surgery for strangulated groin hernia from January 2007 to December 2012. Postoperative evolution was assessed on the morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay. Mortality and morbidity risk factors were studied. The statistical analysis was conducted with the chi-square test and Fischer's exact test with a significance level of 5 %. Strangulated groin hernias account for 42.2 % of the overall groin hernia operations conducted during the study period (288/697). Necroses were present in 59 (20.5 %) patients. The mortality rate was 6.2 % (n = 18). Admission time superior or equal to 48 h (p = 0.002), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class superior or equal to III (p = 0.002), presence of preoperative strangulated groin hernia complication (peritonitis, occlusion, hernia abscesses) (p = 0.001), bowel necrosis (p = 0.000), and bowel resection (p = 0.000) were statistically related to a high risk of death. Forty-two (n = 42) postoperative complications were recorded in 34 (11.8 %) patients. These complications were outnumbered by postoperative parietal suppuration (n = 26) which led to three cases of evisceration. Bowel necrosis was related to a high risk of postoperative complications (p = 0.002). Reoperation was necessary for 13 patients. The length of stay in hospital was 4 days (range between 1 and 28 days). The average follow-up period was 7 months. No recurrence was noticed during this period. Delay in consultation, high ASA class, and moreover, bowel necrosis requiring bowel resection are the factors of unfavorable postoperative results. Groin hernias are an avoidable death cause provided that early treatment of strangulated hernias and

  7. A Low-Cost Teaching Model of Inguinal Canal: A Useful Method to Teach Surgical Concepts in Hernia Repair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansaloni, Luca; Catena, Fausto; Coccolini, Frederico; Ceresoli, Marco; Pinna, Antonio Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Inguinal canal anatomy and hernia repair is difficult for medical students and surgical residents to comprehend. Methods: Using low-cost material, a 3-dimensional inexpensive model of the inguinal canal was created to allow students to learn anatomical details and landmarks and to perform their own simulated hernia repair. In order to…

  8. Incisional Hernia in Women: Predisposing Factors and Management Where Mesh is not Readily Available

    PubMed Central

    Agbakwuru, EA; Olabanji, JK; Alatise, OI; Okwerekwu, RO; Esimai, OA

    2009-01-01

    Background / Aim: Incisional hernia is still relatively common in our practice. The aim of the study was to identify risk factors associated with incisional hernia in our region. The setting is the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria during a period when prosthetic mesh was not readily available. Patients and Methods: All the women who presented with incisional hernia between 1996 and 2005 were prospectively studied using a standard form to obtain information on pre-hernia (index) operations and possible predisposing factors. They all had open surgical repair and were followed up for 18–60 months. Results: Forty-four women were treated during study period. The index surgeries leading to the hernias were emergency caesarian section 26/44 (59.1%), emergency exploratory laparotomy 6/44 (13.6%), and elective surgeries 12/44 (27.3%). Major associated risk factors were the use of wrong suture materials for fascia repair, midline incisions, wound sepsis, and overweight. Conclusion: For elective surgeries, reduction of weight should be encouraged when appropriate, and transverse incisions are preferred. Absorbable sutures, especially chromic catgut, should be avoided in fascia closure. Antibiotics should be used for complicated obstetric cases. PMID:21483511

  9. Incidence of Port-Site Incisional Hernia After Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rainville, Harvey; Ikedilo, Ojinika; Vemulapali, Pratibha

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is gaining popularity among minimally invasive surgeons and is now being applied to a broad number of surgical procedures. Although this technique uses only 1 port, the diameter of the incision is larger than in standard laparoscopic surgery. The long-term incidence of port-site hernias after single-incision laparoscopic surgery has yet to be determined. Methods: All patients who underwent a single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedure from May 2008 through May 2009 were included in the study. Single-incision laparoscopic surgical operations were performed either by a multiport technique or with a 3-trocar single-incision laparoscopic surgery port. The patients were seen at 30 to 36 months' follow-up, at which time they were examined for any evidence of port-site incisional hernia. Patients found to have hernias on clinical examination underwent repairs with mesh. Results: A total of 211 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The types of operations included were cholecystectomy, appendectomy, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric banding, Nissen fundoplication, colectomy, and gastrojejunostomy. We found a port-site hernia rate of 2.9% at 30 to 36 months' follow-up. Conclusion: Port-site incisional hernia after single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedures remains a major setback for patients. The true incidence remains largely unknown because most patients are asymptomatic and therefore do not seek surgical aid. PMID:24960483

  10. Difficult diagnosis: strangulated obturator hernia in an 88-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Megan Kathleen; Yunaev, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The obturator hernia is a rare type of hernia that can present a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. We report a case of an 88-year-old woman who presented with a history of right iliac fossa pain, bilious vomiting and diarrhoea. Non-specific findings on examination and blood tests made the diagnosis difficult, however, a CT scan of her abdomen revealed the site of the obstruction and the patient was taken to theatre for emergency surgery. We review the literature with focus on the diagnosis of obturator hernias and the different surgical approaches used. The authors believe that this case is of educational value to healthcare professionals, particularly those working in general practice, emergency departments and on surgical teams. It highlights to doctors that patients with incarcerated obturator hernias can present with or without overt signs of intestinal obstruction and emphasises the fact that an obturator hernia can be an important cause of intestinal obstruction in a thin, elderly woman. PMID:27358098

  11. Giant Inguinoscrotal Hernia Repaired by Lichtensteins Technique Without Loss of Domain -A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HN, Dinesh; N, Shreyas

    2014-01-01

    Giant inguinal hernia is a formidable surgical problem. It is defined as inguinal hernia extending up to mid thigh or below in standing position. Giant inguinal hernia is usually associated with compromised quality of life due to sexual discomfort and constant weight bearing. It is a challenge for the operating surgeon since it is rare. It may require multistage repair with recurrence being common. A 45-year-old male patient presented with Giant inguinal hernia and compromised quality of life due to pain and sexual discomfort. Lichtenstein’s polypropylene mesh repair was done after reducing the sac contents (omentum and transverse colon) with partial omentectomy. There was no loss of intra-abdominal domain. Postoperative period was uneventful. In literature many techniques are available to increase the intra-abdominal cavity (a) Creating progressive preoperative pneumoperitoneum (b) Creation of ventral wall defect (c) surgical debulking of hernia contents. Recurrence is prevented by reconstruction of the abdominal wall using Marlex mesh and a Tensor fasciae lata flap. Laparoscopic repair is associated with more recurrence. Lichtenstein’s technique is one of the preferred treatments. PMID:25386483

  12. Tactical and surgical techniques issues in the surgical treatment of incisional hernias

    PubMed Central

    Gangură, AG; Palade, RŞ

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Within five years, between 2006 and 2011, a total of 368 incisional hernias have been operated in the Surgery Clinic 1, University Emergency Hospital Bucharest. The study followed the morphological and biological parameters, associated pathology, tactics and surgical technique used and postoperative morbidity. The average age of patients was 61.75 years, female sex was predominant (81.25%), and incisional hernias were large and giant in a percentage of 73.37%. Locations were predominantly median (83.42%). Recurrent incisional hernias and multiple relapsed hernias represented 25.54%. Associated pathology was dominated by obesity (51,09%) and cardiovascular disease (37,77%). We have used both methods of tissue procedures (22.83%), and the prosthetic procedures (77.17%). Prosthetic techniques, retro muscle fitting mesh in the rectus abdominis muscle sheath (Rives-Stoppa technique), fitting ov er the fascia and tissue replacement techniques were performed. Immediate postoperative morbidity was represented by seroma (14.13%), prolonged postoperative ileus (8.69%), prolonged hematic drainage (6.52%), and hematoma (1.9%). Late postoperative morbidity was given by granulomas (5.7%) and recurrence of incisional hernias (4.34%). Good and very good results were obtained in the 89.96% of the operated cases. PMID:25408770

  13. Loss of range of motion of the hip joint: a hypothesis for etiology of sports hernia

    PubMed Central

    Rambani, Rohit; Hackney, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: sports hernia is a well-recognized cause of groin pain in athletes involved in sports, especially football and rugby. Loss of range of motion of the hip joint is a possible contributory factor to stress across the symphysis pubis leading to the instability. Methods: twenty-five athletes presenting with sports hernia were matched to age, sex, physical/sports activity and co-morbidities with twenty-five athletes without sports hernia. The range of movement of both the hips was compared in athletes of both the groups. Results: there was marked restriction of internal rotation with the hip flexed to 90 degrees (average 17 degrees) and external rotation (average 26 degrees) in sports hernia group compared to the control group. Other movements of the hip were comparable in both the groups. Conclusion: the study highlights observation of limitation of hip rotation with the hip flexed to 90 degrees as a possible factor in the aetiology of sports hernia. There may be an association with other pathologies of the hip such as impingement that requires further investigation. Though this study has its limitation in being a small number and a case control study, it does helps in understanding the possible mechanism of development of this condition. PMID:25878984

  14. Telerobotic Laparoscopic Repair of Incisional Ventral Hernias Using Intraperitoneal Prosthetic Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Hourmont, Katherine; Wasielewski, Annette

    2003-01-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair shortens the length of hospital stay and achieves low rates of hernia recurrence. The inherent difficulties of performing advanced laparoscopy operations, however, have limited the adoption of this technique by many surgeons. We hypothesized that the virtual operative field and hand-like instruments of a telerobotic surgical system could overcome these limitations. We present herein the first 2 reported cases of telerobotic laparoscopic ventral hernia repair with mesh. The operations were accomplished with the da Vinci telerobotic surgical system. The hernia defects were repaired with dual-sided, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) mesh. The mesh was secured in place with 8 sutures that were passed through the abdominal wall, and 5-mm surgical tacks were placed around the circumference of the mesh. The 2 operations were accomplished with total operative times of 120 and 135 minutes and total operating room times of 166 and 180 minutes, respectively. The patients were discharged home on postoperative days 1 and 4. The surgeon sat in an ergonomically comfortable position at a computer console that was remote from the patient. Immersion of the surgeon within the 3-dimensional virtual operative field expedited each stage of these procedures. The articulation of the wristed telerobotic instruments greatly facilitated reaching the anterior abdominal cavity near the abdominal wall. This report indicates that telerobotic laparoscopic ventral hernia repair is feasible and suggests that telepresence technology facilitates this procedure. PMID:12722992

  15. Telerobotic laparoscopic repair of incisional ventral hernias using intraperitoneal prosthetic mesh.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Garth H; Hourmont, Katherine; Wasielewski, Annette

    2003-01-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair shortens the length of hospital stay and achieves low rates of hernia recurrence. The inherent difficulties of performing advanced laparoscopy operations, however, have limited the adoption of this technique by many surgeons. We hypothesized that the virtual operative field and hand-like instruments of a telerobotic surgical system could overcome these limitations. We present herein the first 2 reported cases of telerobotic laparoscopic ventral hernia repair with mesh. The operations were accomplished with the da Vinci telerobotic surgical system. The hernia defects were repaired with dual-sided, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) mesh. The mesh was secured in place with 8 sutures that were passed through the abdominal wall, and 5-mm surgical tacks were placed around the circumference of the mesh. The 2 operations were accomplished with total operative times of 120 and 135 minutes and total operating room times of 166 and 180 minutes, respectively. The patients were discharged home on postoperative days 1 and 4. The surgeon sat in an ergonomically comfortable position at a computer console that was remote from the patient. Immersion of the surgeon within the 3-dimensional virtual operative field expedited each stage of these procedures. The articulation of the wristed telerobotic instruments greatly facilitated reaching the anterior abdominal cavity near the abdominal wall. This report indicates that telerobotic laparoscopic ventral hernia repair is feasible and suggests that telepresence technology facilitates this procedure. PMID:12722992

  16. Muscle hernias of the leg: A case report and comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jesse T; Nguyen, Jenny L; Wheatley, Michael J; Nguyen, Tuan A

    2013-01-01

    A case involving a retired, elderly male war veteran with a symptomatic peroneus brevis muscle hernia causing superficial peroneal nerve compression with chosen surgical management is presented. Symptomatic muscle hernias of the extremities occur most commonly in the leg and are a rare cause of chronic leg pain. Historically, treating military surgeons pioneered the early documentation of leg hernias observed in active military recruits. A focal fascial defect can cause a muscle to herniate, forming a variable palpable subcutaneous mass, and causing pain and potentially neuropathic symptoms with nerve involvement. While the true incidence is not known, the etiology has been classified as secondary to a congenital (or constitutional) fascial weakness, or acquired fascial defect, usually secondary to direct or indirect trauma. The highest occurrence is believed to be in young, physically active males. Involvement of the tibialis anterior is most common, although other muscles have been reported. Dynamic ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging is often used to confirm diagnosis and guide treatment. Most symptomatic cases respond successfully to conservative treatment, with surgery reserved for refractory cases. A variety of surgical techniques have been described, ranging from fasciotomy to anatomical repair of the fascial defect, with no consensus on optimal treatment. Clinicians must remember to consider muscle hernias in their repertoire of differential diagnoses for chronic leg pain or neuropathy. A comprehensive review of muscle hernias of the leg is presented to highlight their history, occurrence, presentation, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24497767

  17. [Lumbar hernias in adults. Apropos of 4 cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Le Neel, J C; Sartre, J Y; Borde, L; Guiberteau, B; Bourseau, J C

    1993-10-01

    Lumbar hernias are rare (2% of abdominal wall hernias). Symptomatology consists frequently only of an arch formation seen best with the patient sitting and when coughing. In adults it is twice as frequent in women and on the left side. Acute events, dominated by incarceration of a digestive segment, particularly colic, often suggest the diagnosis (10% of cases). Diagnosis is simple when confronted with a large hernia, but difficulties arise with those less than 5 cm in diameter, often diagnosed as a lipoma or parietal tumor. Conventional radiographs and ultrasound images are usually sufficient to establish the correct diagnosis and to determine the content of the hernial sac, but computed tomography scans can provide data on the exact limits of the defect and allow evaluation of possible problems during surgical repair. Rarely congenital (10%), these hernias occur either secondary to a violent lumbo-abdomino-pelvic injury (25%) or following surgical intervention to the lumbar region (50% of cases). Small hernias can be repaired using the direct approach but larger deficits require the insertion of a reinforcing non absorbable prosthesis. Long term results, both for the 4 cases reported and those published in the literature, were assessed as satisfactory. PMID:8276908

  18. Repair of massive ventral hernias with the separation of parts technique: reversal of the 'lost domain'.

    PubMed

    Hadad, Ivan; Small, William; Dumanian, Gregory Ara

    2009-04-01

    Massive ventral hernia repairs are sometimes complicated by the "loss of domain". The separation of parts hernia repair reverses the loss of domain by increasing intra-abdominal volume, but not by elevating the hemidiaphragms into the thoracic cavity. Hernia repair in patients with a "loss of abdominal domain" is thought to be associated with postoperative pulmonary difficulties. A retrospective chart review was performed on 102 patients treated by a single surgeon. The 10 patients with matching preoperative and postoperative abdominal CT scans were computer-analyzed for intra-abdominal volume changes and diaphragm height measurements. Postoperative pulmonary complications in these 102 patients were recorded. Intra-abdominal volume increased after separation of parts hernia repair from 8600 +/- 2800 mL to 9700 +/- 2700 mL (P = 0.01). Diaphragm height did not statistically change. Two of the 102 patients had prolonged intubations, and seven other patients were ventilated briefly. The separation of parts technique is able to close large ventral hernias without a high incidence of pulmonary complications as a result of its ability to expand the abdominal domain without a change in diaphragmatic height. PMID:19385289

  19. Late-onset diaphragmatic hernia after percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomoyuki; Amano, Hironobu; Takechi, Hitomi; Fujikuni, Nobuaki; Sasada, Tatsunari; Yoshida, Makoto; Yamaki, Minoru; Nakahara, Masahiro; Noriyuki, Toshio

    2016-12-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is widely used as an effective treatment of liver tumors. Several reported complications associated with RFA are due to thermal damage of neighboring organs. The present report presents a case of diaphragmatic hernia associated with RFA and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A 72-year-old woman with S5 and S8 HCCs was treated repeatedly with RFA and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for 3 years. After the third course of RFA to target the recurring S5 HCC, acute abdominal pain and dyspnea suddenly occurred. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed intrusion of the transverse colon through the right diaphragmatic hernia. In addition, the colon was dilated and showed changes suggestive of ischemic conditions. An emergency surgery was performed to close the hernia by using non-absorbable sutures to preserve the colon. The patient was discharged without any complications 13 days after the surgery. The first-line treatment of this disease involves surgical intervention. Diaphragmatic hernia is a rare complication of RFA. The present case suggests that patients who undergo several rounds of RFA require surveillance for diaphragmatic hernias. PMID:26976615

  20. Unexplained groin pain: safety and reliability of herniography for the diagnosis of occult hernias

    PubMed Central

    Gwanmesia, I; Walsh, S; Bury, R; Bowyer, K; Walker, S

    2001-01-01

    A retrospective study of our initial experience of herniography in a district general hospital is presented. A total of 43 herniograms were performed in 41 patients (median age 57, range 16-77, 27 males, 14 females) over a two year period. Four herniograms were unsuccessful due to failed intraperitoneal contrast injection, of which two were repeated (success rate 90.5%). A total of 25 groin hernias were identified radiologically (two on the asymptomatic side). Twenty one patients underwent surgery and a hernia was confirmed in 19 (true positive rate 90.5%). Sixteen herniograms were considered negative and after a median follow up of 28 months (range 16-42 months), none of these patients have developed a hernia. There were no major complications. It is concluded that herniography is a safe and reliable method of determining or excluding the presence of an occult groin hernia.


Keywords: groin hernia; groin pain; herniography; herniogram PMID:11264488

  1. Bowel Obstruction and Peritoneal Dialysis: A Case Report of a Patient with Complications from a Broad Ligament Hernia.

    PubMed

    Otani-Takei, Naoko; Akimoto, Tetsu; Sadatomo, Ai; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal hernias are a common cause of bowel obstruction. The major types of abdominal hernias are external or abdominal wall hernias, which occur at areas of congenital or acquired weakness in the abdominal wall. An alternative entity is internal hernias, which are characterized by a protrusion of viscera through the peritoneum or mesentery. We herein present the case of a female peritoneal dialysis patient with bowel obstruction due to an internal hernia. Although an initial work-up did not lead to a correct diagnosis, an exploratory laparotomy revealed that she had intestinal herniation due to a defect in the broad ligament of the uterus, which was promptly corrected by surgery. The concerns about the perioperative dialytic management as well as the diagnostic problems regarding the disease that arose in our experience with the present patient are also discussed. PMID:27547042

  2. Bowel Obstruction and Peritoneal Dialysis: A Case Report of a Patient with Complications from a Broad Ligament Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Otani-Takei, Naoko; Akimoto, Tetsu; Sadatomo, Ai; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal hernias are a common cause of bowel obstruction. The major types of abdominal hernias are external or abdominal wall hernias, which occur at areas of congenital or acquired weakness in the abdominal wall. An alternative entity is internal hernias, which are characterized by a protrusion of viscera through the peritoneum or mesentery. We herein present the case of a female peritoneal dialysis patient with bowel obstruction due to an internal hernia. Although an initial work-up did not lead to a correct diagnosis, an exploratory laparotomy revealed that she had intestinal herniation due to a defect in the broad ligament of the uterus, which was promptly corrected by surgery. The concerns about the perioperative dialytic management as well as the diagnostic problems regarding the disease that arose in our experience with the present patient are also discussed. PMID:27547042

  3. Laparoscopic repair for a previously unreported form of ventral hernia on the right iliac fossa in an elderly emaciated woman.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, T; Kobayashi, A; Shimizu, A; Motoyama, H; Miyagawa, S

    2015-10-01

    An 81-year-old emaciated woman was admitted to our hospital with a one-year history of recurrent bilateral inguinal swellings. Palpable lumps were observed not only in bilateral groin areas, but also on the right iliac fossa (RIF) of her abdomen. During a planned transabdominal preperitoneal laparoscopic herniorrhaphy, a previously unreported form of ventral hernia was observed at a position lateral and cranial to the right internal inguinal ring, which probably corresponded to the palpable lump on the RIF. The hernia orifice was 2 cm in diameter, and a vascular structure ran through the orifice. The contents of the hernia consisted of fatty tissue arising from the retroperitoneal tissue. Routine exploration revealed orifices of the following hernias: left indirect, right direct, bilateral femoral, bilateral obturator, and right Spigelian hernia. Her postoperative course was uneventful and a mass on the right lower quadrant disappeared after operation. PMID:24218077

  4. Bone Anchor Fixation in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: A Useful Adjunct in Suprapubic and Para-iliac Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Blair, Laurel J; Cox, Tiffany C; Huntington, Ciara R; Ross, Samuel W; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Augenstein, Vedra A; Heniford, B Todd

    2015-07-01

    Suprapubic hernias, parailiac or flank hernias, and lumbar hernias are difficult to repair and are associated with high-recurrence rates owing to difficulty in obtaining substantive overlap and especially mesh fixation due to bone being a margin of the hernia. Orthopedic suture anchors used for ligament reconstruction have been used to attach prosthetic material to bony surfaces and can be used in the repair of these hernias where suture fixation was impossible. A prospective, single institution study of ventral hernia repairs involving bone anchor mesh fixation was performed. Demographics, operative details, and outcomes data were collected. Twenty patients were identified, with a mean age 53 (range: 35-70 years) and mean body mass index 28.4 kg/m(2) (range 21-38). Ten lumbar, seven suprapubic, and three parailiac hernias were studied. The majority were recurrent hernias (n = 13), with one to seven previously failed repairs. The mean hernia defect size was very large (270 cm(2); range: 56-832 cm(2)) with average mesh size of 1090 cm(2) (range 224-3640 cm(2)). Both Mitek GII (Depuy, Raynham, MA) and JuggerKnot 2.9-mm (Biomet, Biomedical Instruments, Warsaw, IN) anchors were used, with an average of four anchors/case (range: 1-16). Mean operative time was 218 minutes (120-495). There were three minor complications, no operative mortality, and no recurrences during an average follow-up of 24 months. Pelvic bone anchors permit mesh fixation in high-recurrence areas not amenable to traditional suture fixation. The ability to safely and effectively use bone anchor fixation is an essential tool in complex open ventral hernia repair. PMID:26140889

  5. [An adult case of Bochdalek hernia without an obvious cause; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Kondo, N; Sakai, T; Daitoku, K; Yamada, Y; Tsushima, T; Takaya, S

    2002-07-01

    A 72-year-old female was transported by ambulance to our department to undergo transthoracic surgery. She had previously undergone transabdominal surgery under a diagnosis of adult Bochdalek hernia, but the restoration was believed to have been incomplete. During the transthoracic procedure, a dorsolateral defect of the diaphragm was detected and reinforcement with a Gore-Tex patch was performed. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. Adult Bochdalek hernia is rare, but it requires immediate surgical intervention. Although transabdominal surgery is generally considered the first line treatment approach to restore Bochdalek hernia, restoration of the diaphragm is occasionally difficult. On the other hand, a transthoracic approach is thought to be effective as it allows for observation of the lung and diaphragm, and easy closure of the diaphragmatic defect. As complete restoration through early surgical intervention is important, a transthoracic approach in conjunction with transabdominal surgery should be considered whenever necessary. PMID:12136594

  6. A Rare Case Report of Inguinal Hernia with Persistent Mullerian Duct and Klinefelter Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dadheech, Darpan; Om, Prabha; Shridatt, Sharma Ankit; Patni, Ankur; Verma, Naveen

    2016-06-01

    Inguinal hernia in male is a common problem but having female reproductive organs in hernial sac is rare. It occur because of failure of mullerian duct to regress in a male fetus during embryonic development, result in a syndrome known as Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS), which is a rare entity of male pseudohermaphroditism. We hereby present a case of 21-year-old male patient reported with complains of cryptorchidism and inguinal hernia. Generally diagnosis of PMDS was established during investigation like ultrasonography, MRI for localization of undescended testis and during surgical exploration for inguinal hernia or cryptorchidism. Our patient was operated by bilateral inguinal incision; hernial sac contained adult size uterus fallopian tube and upper 2/3(rd) of vagina. On karyotyping it was found that he was a case of klinefelter syndrome also. Association of PMDS with klinefelter syndrome is very rare. PMID:27504355

  7. Experience with 300 laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs with up to 3 years follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, N. M.; Dunn, D. C.; Appleton, B.; Bevington, E.

    1995-01-01

    The long-term results of 300 laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs are reported with 11 cases followed up more than 3 years, 104 cases more than 2 years, and 225 cases more than 1 year. There were five early failures owing to the use of too small a piece of mesh. There have been no long-term recurrences. The results indicate that transabdominal preperitoneal laparoscopic mesh repair of hernias is a satisfactory technique with a low recurrence rate and a low major complication rate (4%). Patients have found the procedure to be remarkably pain free and 51% have taken no analgesics after discharge from hospital. Of the patients, 78% returned to work within 2 weeks of the operation. These results suggest that laparoscopic hernia repair can be performed safely with excellent long-term results. PMID:8540657

  8. Minimally invasive surgical technique integrating multiple procedures with large specimen extraction via inguinal hernia orifice

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Vishnu R.; Ahmed, Leaque

    2015-01-01

    While laparoscopic surgery can be performed using small skin incisions, any resected specimen must still be able to fit through these opening. For procedures, such as cholecystectomies and appendectomies, this is not usually a problem; however, for large specimens such as bowel or large tumors, this becomes problematic. Currently, the standard technique is to attempt piecemeal removal of the specimen or enlarge one of the laparoscopic incisions, effectively creating a mini laparotomy. Creating a larger incision adds many of the drawbacks of open laparotomy and should be avoided whenever possible. In this article, we present a new technique of combining the repair of an inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia with a duodenal tumor resection in order to extract the specimen through the inguinal hernia orifice. PMID:26703927

  9. Ileoileal Knot as a Content of Obstructed Hernia: What Are the Odds?

    PubMed Central

    Gopivallabh, Madhusudhan Madihalli; Jaganmaya, Kajekar; Hanumanthaiah, Kunthurdoddi Sanjeevaiah; Babannavar, Prashantha; Crithic, Vilas

    2016-01-01

    An obstructed inguinal hernia is a common surgical emergency, which presents with a variety of contents like the small intestine, omentum, and colon. Intestinal knotting is a rare entity encountered in surgical practice; it occurs when one coil of intestine wraps around the other and eventually leads to complications such as intestinal obstruction, ischemia, and gangrene. Both conditions are considered surgical emergencies and should be dealt with through appropriate surgical measures forthwith. We report the case of an obstructed inguinal hernia, which, on exploration, showed an ileoileal knot as its content. Ileoileal knotting is a very rare phenomenon and, to the best of our knowledge, such an ileoileal knot as a content of obstructed inguinal hernia has not been reported in the surgical literature so far. PMID:27175047

  10. [Secondary right-sided diaphragmatic hernia following neonatal group B Streptococcal septicaemia in a preterm infant].

    PubMed

    Vedel-Werts, F; Desandes, R; Rouabah, M; Bach, P; de Miscault, G; Hascoët, J-M; Hamon, I

    2007-07-01

    We report on a case of a secondary right-sided diaphragmatic hernia following group B streptococcal (GBS) septicaemia in a very low birth weight infant born at 30 weeks. After initial improvement, the diagnosis of a secondary right-sided diaphragmatic hernia was suspected with the persistent radiological pulmonary right-sided image on the chest x-ray and the clinical degradation. The diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasonography on day 43. The postoperative course was simple. Persistent respiratory distress in a neonate, after a GBS septicaemia associated with a right pulmonary opacity on the chest x-ray, should prompt a careful evaluation. A secondary right-sided diaphragmatic hernia should be considered. Treatment is surgery, the prognosis is good in the absence of pulmonary hypoplasia. PMID:17451917

  11. A Rare Case Report of Inguinal Hernia with Persistent Mullerian Duct and Klinefelter Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Om, Prabha; Shridatt, Sharma Ankit; Patni, Ankur; Verma, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Inguinal hernia in male is a common problem but having female reproductive organs in hernial sac is rare. It occur because of failure of mullerian duct to regress in a male fetus during embryonic development, result in a syndrome known as Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS), which is a rare entity of male pseudohermaphroditism. We hereby present a case of 21-year-old male patient reported with complains of cryptorchidism and inguinal hernia. Generally diagnosis of PMDS was established during investigation like ultrasonography, MRI for localization of undescended testis and during surgical exploration for inguinal hernia or cryptorchidism. Our patient was operated by bilateral inguinal incision; hernial sac contained adult size uterus fallopian tube and upper 2/3rd of vagina. On karyotyping it was found that he was a case of klinefelter syndrome also. Association of PMDS with klinefelter syndrome is very rare. PMID:27504355

  12. Laparoscopic intraperitoneal mesh fixation with fibrin sealant of a Spigelian hernia

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Nadine; Paschke, Stephan; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Brockschmidt, Claas

    2013-01-01

    Spigelian hernia is a rare clinical entity and has a subtle clinical presentation with vague abdominal pain, which can cause an important delay in diagnosis. Given the relatively high risk of incarceration the diagnosis of Spigelian hernia is an indication for surgical repair. Laparoscopic Spigelian mesh herniorraphy has gained recognition as an effective tension-free method and is associated with lower recurrence. Appropriate fixation techniques are however required to reduce complications such as nerve irritation, hematoma, and postoperative chronic pain. In this case report we describe a novel approach in laparoscopic mesh repair of Spigelian hernia, securing a lightweight composite mesh with fibrin sealant. This fixation seems to be a reasonable, feasible alternative to the standard tissue-penetrating mesh fixation. PMID:26504700

  13. A young man with concurrent acute appendicitis and incarcerated right indirect inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Ditsatham, Chagkrit; Somwangprasert, Areewan; Watcharachan, Kirati; Wongmaneerung, Phanchaporn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute appendicitis and incarcerated hernia rarely present in the same episode. Our study reports patient presentation, diagnosis method, and treatment of an unusual case at the Chiang Mai University Hospital. Method Case report. Result A 20-year-old man visited the Chiang Mai University Hospital with right lower quadrant pain and a right groin mass which could not be reduced. The computerized tomography scan showed acute appendicitis and omentum in the hernia sac. Operative treatment was an appendectomy and herniorrhaphy. The treatment was successful, and the patient was discharged from our hospital without any complications. Conclusion Concurrent acute appendicitis and incarcerated hernia are very rare, but should be kept in mind if a patient presents with right lower quadrant pain and a right groin mass. Further investigation may be helpful if the diagnosis is uncertain. Operative priority treatment depends on each individual case. PMID:26834499

  14. Amyand's hernia in a child with permanent neonatal diabetes due to pancreatic agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Alessandro; Campus, Riccardo; Muraca, Monica; Lucigrai, Giorgio; Michelazzi, Alberto; Eljerbi, Etayeb Mahmud; Lorini, Renata; d'Annunzio, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Acute or perforated appendicitis within inguinal hernia is rarely encountered and it is known as Amyand's hernia. We report on the first case occurring in a 4-year-old boy affected by permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus due to pancreatic agenesis, an extremely rare condition. The initial suspicion of inguinal hernia was confirmed by ultrasound examination of the right inguinal region which revealed omental layers inside a swollen inguinal canal; this finding and the clinical presentation allowed a prompt and appropriate surgical management. The careful evaluation of this patient and early recognition of this unique presentation of appendicitis allowed trans-hernial appendectomy and immediate herniorrhaphy. Ultrasonography played a pivotal role to reach the correct diagnosis and to start a prompt treatment. PMID:21589822

  15. A complication to remember: stitch sinus following laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Rabiu, Abdul-Rasheed; Tan, Lam Chin

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a diagnostic dilemma and what we believe to be a previously unreported case of a stitch sinus caused by the presence of a non-absorbable centring suture used during laparoscopic mesh repair of an umbilical hernia. Successful treatment was achieved through umbilical excision and removal of the offending suture; the patient's recovery thereafter was uneventful. Surgeons should be aware of this complication when consenting patients and should consider the use of absorbable sutures to minimize such risk in similar procedures. In addition, clinicians may add this to their list of differential diagnoses in a patient presenting with pain, discharge or what appears to be a recurrence of their hernia following laparoscopic mesh repair of an umbilical hernia. PMID:27572679

  16. Cholecystocutaneous fistula: an unusual complication of a para-umbilical hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Steven; Sharma, Mitesh; Holtham, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This case describes a 94-year-old woman who presented 2 years postsutured para-umbilical hernia repair with a painful black lump protruding through her scar with blood stained discharge. This was initially thought to be either ischaemic bowel secondary to strangulated incisional hernia or a large organised haematoma. An urgent CT scan was performed following which the patient passed two large calculi and bile-stained fluid spontaneously through the wound, making the diagnosis somewhat clearer. The scan revealed an incisional hernia containing the gallbladder and two large calculi at the skin surface and an incidental large caecal cancer with surrounding lymphadenopathy. Frail health and the incidental finding of a colon cancer rendered invasive surgical management inappropriate. Therefore, she was managed conservatively with antibiotics. A catheter was inserted into the fistula tract to allow free drainage and alleviate pressure-related symptoms. The patient was discharged following a multidisciplinary team discussion. PMID:24862413

  17. Parastomal Hernia Repair and Reinforcement: The Role of Biologic and Synthetic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gillern, Suzanne; Bleier, Joshua I. S.

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is a prevalent problem and treatment can pose difficulties due to significant rates of recurrence and morbidities of the repair. The current standard of care is to perform parastomal hernia repair with mesh whenever possible. There exist multiple options for mesh reinforcement (biologic and synthetic) as well as surgical techniques, to include type of repair (keyhole and Sugarbaker) and position of mesh placement (onlay, sublay, or intraperitoneal). The sublay and intraperitoneal positions have been shown to be superior with a lower incidence of recurrence. This procedure may be performed open or laparoscopically, both having similar recurrence and morbidity results. Prophylactic mesh placement at the time of stoma formation has been shown to significantly decrease the rates of parastomal hernia formation. PMID:25435825

  18. Repair of Postoperative Abdominal Hernia in a Child with Congenital Omphalocele Using Porcine Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, V; Mylona, E; Mouravas, V; Tsakalidis, C; Spyridakis, I; Mitsiakos, G; Karagianni, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Incisional hernias are a common complication appearing after abdominal wall defects reconstruction, with omphalocele and gastroschisis being the most common etiologies in children. Abdominal closure of these defects represents a real challenge for pediatric surgeons with many surgical techniques and various prosthetic materials being used for this purpose. Case Report. We present a case of repair of a postoperative ventral hernia occurring after congenital omphalocele reconstruction in a three-and-a-half-year-old child using an acellular, sterile, porcine dermal mesh. Conclusion. Non-cross-linked acellular porcine dermal matrix is an appropriate mesh used for the reconstruction of abdominal wall defects and their postoperative complications like large ventral hernias with success and preventing their recurrence. PMID:27110247

  19. Repair of Postoperative Abdominal Hernia in a Child with Congenital Omphalocele Using Porcine Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mylona, E.; Tsakalidis, C.; Spyridakis, I.; Mitsiakos, G.; Karagianni, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Incisional hernias are a common complication appearing after abdominal wall defects reconstruction, with omphalocele and gastroschisis being the most common etiologies in children. Abdominal closure of these defects represents a real challenge for pediatric surgeons with many surgical techniques and various prosthetic materials being used for this purpose. Case Report. We present a case of repair of a postoperative ventral hernia occurring after congenital omphalocele reconstruction in a three-and-a-half-year-old child using an acellular, sterile, porcine dermal mesh. Conclusion. Non-cross-linked acellular porcine dermal matrix is an appropriate mesh used for the reconstruction of abdominal wall defects and their postoperative complications like large ventral hernias with success and preventing their recurrence. PMID:27110247

  20. Adult Bochdalek hernia simulating left pleural effusion: a review and a case report.

    PubMed

    Novakov, Ivan P; Paskalev, Georgi

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a rare case of congenital diaphragmatic Bochdalek hernia in an adult stimulating left pleural effusion. The diagnosis of left pleural effusion was made on the basis of conventional chest X-ray and ultrasonography. The definitive diagnosis of Bochdalek hernia was made by left video-assisted thoracoscopy. The patient was successfully treated operatively by conventional surgery--a combination of left thoracotomy and median laparotomy. The reported case supported the view that Bochdalek hernia in adults presents usually with atypical chronic abdominal and respiratory symptoms. Surgical treatment should best be performed, according to the authors, by competent surgeons with good command of both the thoracic and abdominal approaches to the diaphragm. PMID:21462894

  1. Learning Curve in Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair: Experience at a Tertiary Care Centre.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Virinder Kumar; Krishna, Asuri; Misra, Mahesh C; Kumar, Subodh

    2016-06-01

    One of the major reasons for laparoscopy not having gained popularity for repair of groin hernia is the perceived steep learning curve. This study was conducted to assess the learning curve and to predict the number of cases required for a surgeon to become proficient in laparoscopic groin hernia repair, by comparing two laparoscopic surgeons. The learning curve evaluation parameters included operative time, conversions, intraoperative complications and postoperative complications, and these were compared between the senior and the junior surgeon. One hundred thirty-eight cases were performed by the senior surgeon, and 63 cases by the junior surgeon. Both were comparable in terms of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Using the moving average method, minimum of 13 laparoscopic hernia repairs are required to reach at par the operating time of an experienced surgeon. For total extraperitoneal (TEP) repair, the number of cases was 14; and for transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair, this number was 13. PMID:27358514

  2. Results of laparoscopic repair of primary and recurrent incisional hernias at a single UK institution.

    PubMed

    Sturt, N Julian H; Liao, Christopher C L; Engledow, Alec H; Menzies, Donald; Motson, Roger W

    2011-04-01

    In this study incisional hernia repairs at a single UK institution between 1994 and 2008 were analyzed with respect to short-term and long-term results. Prospectively collected data were analyzed retrospectively to ascertain outcomes, complications, and recurrences. Two hundred and twenty-seven operations were performed with 35% of the operations being for recurrent hernias. A self-centering suture technique was used. Median operating time was 55 minutes. There were 8 conversions and median hospital stay was 1 night. There were 52 complications (23%) including 3 postoperative bleeds, 3 mesh infections, and 4 small bowel obstructions. Median postoperative follow-up was 53 months. There were 25 recurrences (11%) being detected, a median of 17 months after initial operation. In this large series, laparoscopic incisional hernia repair is safe and is associated with a short hospital stay. Recurrences after repair remain a concern prompting the development of strategies to try and minimize the likelihood of this occurring. PMID:21471798

  3. Milestones in the history of hernia surgery: prosthetic repair.

    PubMed

    Read, Raymond C

    2004-02-01

    Billroth (1878) envisaged prostheses before Bassini's sutured cure (1887). Phelps (1894) reinforced with silver coils. Metals were replaced by plastic (Aquaviva 1944). Polypropylene (Usher 1962), resisting infection, became popular. Usher instituted tensionless, overlapping preperitoneal repair. Spermatic cord was parietalized, to obviate keyholing. Stoppa (1969) championed the sutureless Cheatle-Henry approach encasing the peritoneum. His technique, "La grande prosthese de renforcement du sac visceral" (GPRVS), was adopted by laparoscopists. Newman (1980) and Lichtenstein (1986) pioneered subaponeurotic positioning. Kelly (1898) inserted a plug into the femoral canal; Lichtenstein and Shore (1974) followed. Gilbert (1987) plugged the internal ring, and Robbins and Rutkow (1993) treated all groin herniae thus. Incisional herniation has been controlled by prefascial, retrorectus prosthetic placement (Rives-Flament 1973). ePTFE (Sher et al. 1980) is useful intraperitoneally, since it evokes few adhesions. Here, laparoscopy (Ger 1982) is competitive. Beginning in 1964 (Wirtschafter and Bentley), experimental and clinical studies have shown herniation may be associated with aging and genetic or acquired (smoking, etc.) systemic disease of connective tissue. These data, with prospective trials, all but mandate tensionless prosthetic repair. PMID:14586774

  4. Lung eicosanoids in perinatal rats with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Ijsselstijn, H.; Zijlstra, F. J.; Van Dijk, J. P. M.; De Jongste, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Abnormal levels of pulmonary eicosanoids have been reported in infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension (PPH) and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). We hypothesized that a dysbalance of vasoconstrictive and vasodilatory eicosanoids is involved in PPH in CDH patients. The levels of several eicosanoids in lung homogenates and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of controls and rats with CDH were measured after caesarean section or spontaneous birth. In controls the concentration of the stable metabolite of prostacyclin (6-keto-PGF1α), thromboxane A2 (TxB2), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) decreased after spontaneous birth. CDH pups showed respiratory insufficiency directly after birth. Their lungs had higher levels of 6- keto-PGF1α, reflecting the pulmonary vasodilator prostacyclin (PGI2), than those of controls. We conclude that in CDH abnormal lung eicosanoid levels are present perinatally. The elevated levels of 6-keto-PGF1α in CDH may reflect a compensation mechanism for increased vascular resistance. PMID:18472832

  5. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia candidate genes derived from embryonic transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Meaghan K.; Longoni, Mauro; Wells, Julie; Maalouf, Faouzi I.; Tracy, Adam A.; Loscertales, Maria; Ackerman, Kate G.; Pober, Barbara R.; Lage, Kasper; Bult, Carol J.; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common (1 in 3,000 live births) major congenital malformation that results in significant morbidity and mortality. The discovery of CDH loci using standard genetic approaches has been hindered by its genetic heterogeneity. We hypothesized that gene expression profiling of developing embryonic diaphragms would help identify genes likely to be associated with diaphragm defects. We generated a time series of whole-transcriptome expression profiles from laser captured embryonic mouse diaphragms at embryonic day (E)11.5 and E12.5 when experimental perturbations lead to CDH phenotypes, and E16.5 when the diaphragm is fully formed. Gene sets defining biologically relevant pathways and temporal expression trends were identified by using a series of bioinformatic algorithms. These developmental sets were then compared with a manually curated list of genes previously shown to cause diaphragm defects in humans and in mouse models. Our integrative filtering strategy identified 27 candidates for CDH. We examined the diaphragms of knockout mice for one of the candidate genes, pre–B-cell leukemia transcription factor 1 (Pbx1), and identified a range of previously undetected diaphragmatic defects. Our study demonstrates the utility of genetic characterization of normal development as an integral part of a disease gene identification and prioritization strategy for CDH, an approach that can be extended to other diseases and developmental anomalies. PMID:22315423

  6. Primary Hydatid Cyst of Umbilicus, Mimicking an Umbilical Hernia.

    PubMed

    Tarahomi, Mohammadreza; Alizadeh Otaghvar, Hamidreza; Ghavifekr, Nazila Hasanzadeh; Shojaei, Daryanaz; Goravanchi, Farhood; Molaei, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid cyst caused by Echinococcus granulosus demonstrates an endemic infection in several countries such as Middle Eastern countries. Liver is the most frequently involved organ, followed by the lung. The case we present is solitary primary localization of cyst in abdominal wall which is extremely rare. A 57-year-old woman presented with an abdominal wall lesion in umbilical area that had been evolving for about 2 years with recent complaint of pain and discomfort. We detected a midline abdominal mass 12⁎13 centimeters in diameter which was bulged out in umbilicus. Preoperative clinical diagnosis of incarcerated umbilical hernia was made due to its physical examination while surgical exploration disproved the primary diagnosis and we found cystic mass adherent to superficial fascia without any communication to peritoneal space. The cyst was excised completely without any injury or perforation of containing capsule. The diagnosis of hydatid cyst was confirmed by histopathological examination of specimen. The retrograde evaluation showed no involvement of other organs. The patient was followed for two years and no recurrence of hydatid disease has been observed. Hydatid cyst should be considered as a differential diagnosis of abdominal wall and umbilical lesions especially in endemic regions. PMID:27190669

  7. Primary Hydatid Cyst of Umbilicus, Mimicking an Umbilical Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Tarahomi, Mohammadreza; Alizadeh Otaghvar, Hamidreza; Ghavifekr, Nazila hasanzadeh; Shojaei, Daryanaz; Goravanchi, Farhood; Molaei, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid cyst caused by Echinococcus granulosus demonstrates an endemic infection in several countries such as Middle Eastern countries. Liver is the most frequently involved organ, followed by the lung. The case we present is solitary primary localization of cyst in abdominal wall which is extremely rare. A 57-year-old woman presented with an abdominal wall lesion in umbilical area that had been evolving for about 2 years with recent complaint of pain and discomfort. We detected a midline abdominal mass 12⁎13 centimeters in diameter which was bulged out in umbilicus. Preoperative clinical diagnosis of incarcerated umbilical hernia was made due to its physical examination while surgical exploration disproved the primary diagnosis and we found cystic mass adherent to superficial fascia without any communication to peritoneal space. The cyst was excised completely without any injury or perforation of containing capsule. The diagnosis of hydatid cyst was confirmed by histopathological examination of specimen. The retrograde evaluation showed no involvement of other organs. The patient was followed for two years and no recurrence of hydatid disease has been observed. Hydatid cyst should be considered as a differential diagnosis of abdominal wall and umbilical lesions especially in endemic regions. PMID:27190669

  8. Management of pulmonary hypertension in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Gien, J; Kinsella, J P

    2016-06-01

    In infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a posterolateral diaphragmatic defect results in herniation of abdominal contents into the chest and compression of the intrathoracic structures. In the most severe cases, hypoplasia of the ipsilateral and contralateral lungs, severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) and left ventricular (LV) hypoplasia/dysfunction all contribute to increased mortality. The management of PH in CDH is complicated by structural and functional changes in the heart, pulmonary vasculature, airways and lung parenchyma; consequently, determining optimal management strategies is challenging. Treatment of PH in patients with CDH changes as the underlying pathophysiology evolves in the days and weeks after birth. During the early transition, the use of pulmonary vasodilators is limited by LV structural and functional abnormalities, and pulmonary vasodilators such as inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) may have a limited role (for example, stabilization for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), treatment of marked preductal desaturation and treatment of PH as LV performance improves). In contrast, subacute treatment of PH in CDH with iNO has an important role in recurrent or persistent PH and potentially improves survival. Chronic PH and vascular abnormalities may persist into childhood in patients with CDH, contributing to late mortality. It is unclear how pulmonary vasodilator therapies, such as iNO, sildenafil and bosentan, will modulate late outcomes in CDH with late/chronic PH. PMID:27225962

  9. [BIOLOGICAL IMPLANTS IN ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA REPAIR (REVIEW)].

    PubMed

    Abatov, N; Badyrov, R; Abatova, A; Assamidanov, E; Kaukenov, B

    2016-02-01

    The use of synthetic meshes as a material for abdominal wall hernia repair does not always ensure a recurrence-free treatment outcome and full recovery of the abdominal wall functional activity. There are well-known disadvantages such as poor resistance to infection, the infiltrate formation in the place of implantation, expressed adhesive process in cases of introperitoneal fixation, to create certain restrictions on the using of these implants for abdominal wall reconstruction. The search for alternative materials that could minimize the risk of complications, has led to the study of biological grafts. It is known that various methods for the manufacturing biological implants determine endogenous properties for each material separately, and may be cause a variety of biological responses in vivo after implantation. The question has not been resolved, what the fresh raw material is better to use for derive biological implants. In this review we investigated the interaction of different types of biological implants between the abdominal wall and the organs of abdominal cavity of the recipient, their ability to resist infection and the development of relapses, as a leading indicator of the effectiveness of hernioplasty. PMID:27001778

  10. Octreotide for chylous effusions in congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Melissa W.; Butler, Dawn; Lim, Foong Yen; Keswani, Sundeep; Frischer, Jason; Haberman, Beth; Kingma, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose Chylothorax is a frequent complication in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) infants and is associated with significant morbidity. The optimal treatment strategy remains unclear. We hypothesize that octreotide decreases chylous effusions in infants with CDH. Methods This is a retrospective study of all infants with CDH admitted to our institution from October 2006 to October 2011. Results Eleven (12%) infants developed a chylothorax. Five infants were managed conservatively with thoracostomy and total parenteral nutrition. Six infants were started on octreotide therapy. None of the infants required surgical intervention to stop the effusion. There was no significant difference in survival to discharge, length of stay, or average daily chest tube output between groups. There appeared to be a temporally associated drop in chest tube output upon initiation of octreotide in two infants; however, the overall rate of decline in chest tube drainage was unchanged. In addition, there were infants in the conservative group who demonstrated a similar drop in daily chest tube output despite the absence of octreotide. Conclusions Our data suggest that the majority of chylous effusions in CDH infants resolve with conservative therapy alone. PMID:24210190

  11. COPAIBA OIL INFLUENCES VENTRAL HERNIA REPAIR WITH VICRYL® MESH?

    PubMed Central

    YASOJIMA, Edson Yuzur; TEIXEIRA, Renan Kleber Costa; HOUAT, Abdallah de Paula; COSTA, Felipe Lobato da Silva; YAMAKI, Vitor Nagai; FEITOSA-JUNIOR, Denilson José Silva; SILVA, Carlos Augusto Moreira; BRITO, Marcus Vinicius Henriques

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of meshes in hernia surgical repair promoted revolution in the surgical area; however, some difficulties had come, such as a large area of fibrosis, greater postoperative pain and risk of infection. The search for new substances that minimize these effects should be encouraged. Medicinal plants stand out due possible active ingredients that can act on these problems. Aim: To check the copaiba oil influence in the repair of abdominal defects in rats corrected with Vicryl(c) mesh. Method: Twenty-four Wistar rats were submitted to an abdominal defect and corrected with Vicryl(c) mesh. They were distributed into two groups: control and copaíba via gavage, administered for seven days after surgery. The analysis of the animals took place on 8, 15 and 22 postoperative days. It analyzed the amount of adhesions and microscopic analysis of the mesh. Results: There was no statistical difference regarding the amount of adhesions. All animals had signs of acute inflammation. In the control group, there were fewer macrophages in animals of the 8th compared to other days and greater amount of necrosis on day 8 than on day 22. In the copaiba group, the number of gigantocytes increased compared to the days analyzed. Conclusion: Copaiba oil showed an improvement in the inflammatory response accelerating its beginning; however, did not affect the amount of abdominal adhesions or collagen fibers. PMID:26537143

  12. Management Practice and Mortality for Infants with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Malowitz, Jonathan R.; Hornik, Christoph P.; Laughon, Matthew M.; Testoni, Daniela; Cotten, C. Michael; Clark, Reese H.; Smith, P. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is fatal in 20–40% of cases, largely due to pulmonary dysmaturity, lung hypoplasia, and persistent pulmonary hypertension. Evidence for survival benefit of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and other medical interventions targeting pulmonary hypertension is lacking. We assessed medical interventions and mortality over time in a large multicenter cohort of infants with CDH. Study Design We identified all infants ≥34 weeks gestation with CDH discharged from 29 neonatal intensive care units between 1999 and 2012 with an average of ≥2 CDH admissions per year. We examined mortality and the proportion of infants exposed to medical interventions, comparing 4 periods of time: 1999–2001, 2002–2004, 2005–2007, and 2008–2012. Results We identified 760 infants with CDH. From 1999–2001 to 2008–2012, use of iNO increased from 20% of infants to 50%, sildenafil use increased from 0% to 14%, and milrinone use increased from 0% to 22% (p<0.001). Overall mortality (28%) did not significantly change over time compared with the earliest time period. Conclusions Despite changing use of iNO, sildenafil, and milrinone, CDH mortality has not significantly decreased in this population of infants. PMID:25715314

  13. Pain and convalescence following laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-12-01

    Severe pain is usual after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR). Mesh fixation with titanium tacks may play a key role in the development of acute and chronic pain and alternative fixation methods should therefore be investigated. This PhD thesis was based on three studies and aimed too: 1) assess the intensity and impact of postoperative pain by detailed patient-reported description of pain and convalescence after LVHR (Study I), 2) evaluate the feasibility of fibrin sealant (FS) for mesh fixation in an experimental pig model (Study II), and 3) investigate FS vs. tacks for mesh fixation in LVHR in a randomised, double-blinded, clinical controlled study with acute postoperative pain as the primary outcome (Study III). In Study I - a prospective descriptive study - 35 patients were prospectively included and underwent LVHR. Scores of pain, quality of life, convalescence, fatigue, and general well-being were obtained from each patient. Follow-up was six months. Average pain from postoperative day (POD) 0-2 and POD 0-6 measured on a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) was 61 and 48, respectively. Pain scores reached preoperative values at POD 30. The incidence of severe chronic pain was 7%. No parameter predicted postoperative pain significantly. Significant correlations were found between pain, and general well-being (rS= -0.8, p < 0.001), satisfaction (rS= -0.67, p < quality of life score (rS= -0.63, p < 0.001) six months postoperatively. Patients resumed normal daily activity at POD 14. In Study II - a randomised experimental study in pigs - nine pigs were operated laparoscopically with insertion of two different meshes fixed with either FS or tacks. All pigs were euthanized on POD 30. The primary outcome parameter was strength of ingrowth between the mesh and the anterior abdominal wall. A mechanical peel test was performed for each tissue sample. The secondary outcome parameters were grade and strength of adhesions to the mesh, shrinkage and displacement

  14. Quantitative CT Imaging of Ventral Hernias: Preliminary Validation of an Anatomical Labeling Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We described and validated a quantitative anatomical labeling protocol for extracting clinically relevant quantitative parameters for ventral hernias (VH) from routine computed tomography (CT) scans. This information was then used to predict the need for mesh bridge closure during ventral hernia repair (VHR). Methods A detailed anatomical labeling protocol was proposed to enable quantitative description of VH including shape, location, and surrounding environment (61 scans). Intra- and inter-rater reproducibilities were calculated for labeling on 18 and 10 clinically acquired CT scans, respectively. Preliminary clinical validation was performed by correlating 20 quantitative parameters derived from anatomical labeling with the requirement for mesh bridge closure at surgery (26 scans). Prediction of this clinical endpoint was compared with similar models fit on metrics from the semi-quantitative European Hernia Society Classification for Ventral Hernia (EHSCVH). Results High labeling reproducibilities were achieved for abdominal walls (±2 mm in mean surface distance), key anatomical landmarks (±5 mm in point distance), and hernia volumes (0.8 in Cohen’s kappa). 9 out of 20 individual quantitative parameters of hernia properties were significantly different between patients who required mesh bridge closure versus those in whom fascial closure was achieved at the time of VHR (p<0.05). Regression models constructed by two to five metrics presented a prediction with 84.6% accuracy for bridge requirement with cross-validation; similar models constructed by EHSCVH variables yielded 76.9% accuracy. Significance Reproducibility was acceptable for this first formal presentation of a quantitative image labeling protocol for VH on abdominal CT. Labeling-derived metrics presented better prediction of the need for mesh bridge closure than the EHSCVH metrics. This effort is intended as the foundation for future outcomes studies attempting to optimize choice of

  15. Single-Port Onlay Mesh Repair of Recurrent Inguinal Hernias after Failed Anterior and Laparoscopic Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Despite the exponential increase in the use of laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy, overall recurrence rates have remained unchanged. Therefore, a growing number of patients are presenting with recurrent hernias after conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs have failed. This study reports our experience with single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair of these hernias. Methods: Patients referred with two or more recurrences of inguinal hernia underwent SIL-IPOM from November 1, 2009, to June 24, 2014. A 2.5-cm infraumbilical incision was made, and an SIL port was placed intraperitoneally. Modified dissection techniques were used: chopstick and inline dissection, 5.5-mm/52-cm/30° angled laparoscope, and conventional straight dissecting instruments. The peritoneum was incised above the pubic symphysis, and dissection was continued laterally and proximally, raising the inferior flap below the previous extraperitoneal mesh while reducing any direct, indirect, femoral, or cord lipoma before placement of antiadhesive mesh, which was fixed to the pubic ramus, as well as superiorly, with nonabsorbable tacks before the inferior border was fixed with fibrin sealant. The inferior peritoneal flap was then tacked back onto the mesh. Results: Nine male patients underwent SIL-IPOM. Their mean age was 53 years and mean body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2. Mean mesh size was 275 cm2. Mean operation time was 125 minutes, with a hospital stay of 1 day. The umbilical scar length was 23 mm at the 6-week follow-up. There were no intra-/postoperative complications, port-site hernias, chronic groin pain, or recurrence of the hernia during a mean follow-up of 24 months. Conclusion: Inguinal hernias recurring after two or more failed conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs can be safely and efficiently treated with SIL-IPOM. PMID:25848186

  16. New minimally invasive technique of parastomal hernia repair – methods and review

    PubMed Central

    Skoneczny, Paweł; Przywózka, Alicja; Czyżewski, Piotr; Bury, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Parastomal hernia is described as the most common complication in patients with ostomy. It is reported that its incidence varies from 3% to 39% for colostomies and 0 to 6% for ileostomies. Surgical repair remains the treatment of choice. There are three types of surgical treatment – fascial repair, stoma relocation and repair using prosthetic mesh via a laparoscopic or open approach. Recently there have been several meta-analyses and systematic reviews aiming to compare the results of surgical treatment, and the authors agreed that the quality of evidence precludes firm conclusions. Aim To describe the novel concept of parastomal hernia repair – HyPER/SPHR technique (hybrid parastomal endoscopic re-do/Szczepkowski parastomal hernia repair) and its early results in 12 consecutive cases. Material and methods Twelve consecutive patients were operated on due to parastomal hernia using the new HyPER hybrid technique between June 2013 and May 2014. The patients’ condition was evaluated during the perioperative period, 6 weeks and then every 3 months after surgery. Results After 6 weeks of follow-up we have not observed any mesh-related complications. All 12 patients were examined 3 months and 6 months after repair surgery for evaluation. No recurrence, stoma site infection or stoma-related problems were found. None of the patients complained of pain and none of them needed to be hospitalized again. Reported quality of life on a 0–10 scale after 6 weeks of follow-up was 8 (range: 7–10). Conclusions The HyPER procedure for treatment of parastomal hernias proposed by the authors is a safe and feasible surgical technique with a high patient satisfaction rate and a low number of complications. The hybrid procedure seems to be a promising method for parastomal hernia repair. PMID:25960785

  17. Development and Validation of a Risk Stratification Score for Ventral Incisional Hernia after Abdominal Surgery: Hernia Expectation Rates iN Intra-Abdominal Surgery (The HERNIA Project)

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Christopher J; Ko, Tien C; Kao, Lillian S; Nguyen, Mylan T; Holihan, Julie L; Alawadi, Zeinab; Nguyen, Duyen H; Gonzalez, Juan Ramon; Arita, Nestor T; Roth, J Scott; Liang, Mike K

    2015-01-01

    Background Ventral incisional hernias (VIH) develop in up to 20% of patients following abdominal surgery. No widely applicable pre-operative risk-assessment tool exists. We aim to develop and validate a risk-assessment tool to predict VIH following abdominal surgery. Study Design A prospective study of all patients undergoing abdominal surgery was conducted at a single institution from 2008-2010. Variables were defined in accordance with the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project. VIH was determined through clinical and radiographic evaluation. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was built from a development cohort (2008-2009) to identify predictors of VIH. The HERNIAscore was created by converting the hazards ratios (HR) to points. The predictive accuracy was assessed on the validation cohort (2010) using a receiver operator characteristic curve and calculating the area under the curve (AUC). Results Of 625 patients followed for a median of 41(0.3-64 months), 93(13.9%) developed a VIH. The training cohort (n=428, VIH=70,16.4%) identified four independent predictors: laparotomy (HR 4.77, 95%CI 2.61-8.70) or hand-assisted laparoscopy (HR=4.00, 95% CI 2.08-7.70), COPD (HR=2.35; 95%CI 1.44-3.83), and BMI≥25 (HR=1.74; 95% CI 1.04-2.91). Factors that were not predictive included age, gender, ASA score, albumin, immunosuppression, prior surgery, and suture material/technique. The predictive score had an AUC=0.77(95%CI0.68-0.86) using the validation cohort (n=197, VIH=23,11.6%). Using the HERNIAscore--HERNIAscore=4*Laparotomy+3*HAL+1*COPD+1* BMI≥25--three classes stratified the risk of VIH: Class I (0-3 points):5.2%, Class II (4-5 points):19.6%, and Class III (6 points):55.0%. Conclusions The HERNIAscore accurately identifies patients at increased risk for VIH. While external validation is needed, this provides a starting point to counsel patients and guide clinical decisions. Increasing the use of laparoscopy, weight-loss programs, community smoking

  18. Case-based discussion: an unusual manifestation of diaphragmatic hernia mimicking pneumothorax in an adult male.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pradeep Kumar; Godbole, Chintamani; Bindroo, Susheel Kumar; Mathur, Rajiv S; Akula, Bharathi; Doctor, Nilesh

    2016-12-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is an important cause of emergency hospital admission associated with significant morbidity. It usually results from congenital defect or rupture in the diaphragm due to trauma. Prompt and appropriate diagnosis is necessary in patients with this condition, as surgical intervention by either abdominal or thoracic approach may be necessary. Here, we report a case of left-sided diaphragmatic hernia presenting with sudden onset of breathlessness, respiratory distress and left-sided chest pain radiating to the abdomen, mimicking pneumothorax, treated successfully with surgical intervention. PMID:26924754

  19. Late post liver transplant protein losing enteropathy: Rare complication of incisional hernia

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jonathan D; Perera, M Thamara PR; Pal, CY; Neuberger, James; Mirza, Darius F

    2013-01-01

    Development of oedema and hypoproteinaemia in a liver transplant recipient may be the first signs of graft dysfunction and should prompt a full assessment. We report the novel case of a patient who, years after liver transplantation developed a functional blind loop in an incisional hernia, which manifested as oedema and hypoproteinaemia secondary to protein losing enteropathy. After numerous investigations, the diagnosis was made by flurodeoxyglucose positron emmision tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Surgical repair of the incisional hernia was followed several months later by resolution of the protein loss, and confirmed at a post operative FDG-PET scan at one year. PMID:23885154

  20. Unusual cause of pneumomediastinum in a laparoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Tze Yeong; Lau, Cheryl Chien-Li

    2014-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum is an extremely rare complication after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Very few cases have been reported in the surgical literature to date and most reports indicate pneumoperitoneum from the transabdominal preperitoneal approach as a causative factor. This case report describes a patient in whom an elective total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair was complicated by a pneumomediastinum without concomitant pneumoperitoneum, and identifies the tracking of air along the anterior extraperitoneal space and endothoracic fascia as a cause. Previous case reports were reviewed and possible etiologies are discussed. PMID:25348336