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Sample records for hiatal hernia subjects

  1. Hiatal hernia

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment can relieve most symptoms of hiatal hernia. ... may include: Pulmonary (lung) aspiration Slow bleeding and iron deficiency anemia (due to a large hernia) Strangulation (closing off) of the hernia

  2. Hiatal hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chest pain Heartburn , worse when bending over or lying down Swallowing difficulty A hiatal hernia by itself ... symptoms include: Avoiding large or heavy meals Not lying down or bending over right after a meal ...

  3. Large Hiatal Hernia Compressing the Heart.

    PubMed

    Matar, Andrew; Mroue, Jad; Camporesi, Enrico; Mangar, Devanand; Albrink, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We describe a 41-year-old man with De Mosier's syndrome who presented with exercise intolerance and dyspnea on exertion caused by a giant hiatal hernia compressing the heart with relief by surgical treatment. PMID:26704030

  4. Do large hiatal hernias affect esophageal peristalsis?

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J; Kia, Leila; Luger, Daniel; Soper, Nathaniel; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aim Large hiatal hernias can be associated with a shortened or tortuous esophagus. We hypothesized that these anatomic changes may alter esophageal pressure topography (EPT) measurements made during high-resolution manometry (HRM). Our aim was to compare EPT measures of esophageal motility in patients with large hiatal hernias to those of patients without hernia. Methods Among 2000 consecutive clinical EPT, we identified 90 patients with large (>5 cm) hiatal hernias on endoscopy and at least 7 evaluable swallows on EPT. Within the same database a control group without hernia was selected. EPT was analyzed for lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, Distal Contractile Integral (DCI), contraction amplitude, Contractile Front Velocity (CFV) and Distal Latency time (DL). Esophageal length was measured on EPT from the distal border of upper esophageal sphincter to the proximal border of the LES. EPT diagnosis was based on the Chicago Classification. Results The manometry catheter was coiled in the hernia and did not traverse the crural diaphragm in 44 patients (49%) with large hernia. Patients with large hernias had lower average LES pressures, lower DCI, slower CFV and shorter DL than patients without hernia. They also exhibited a shorter mean esophageal length. However, the distribution of peristaltic abnormalities was not different in patients with and without large hernia. Conclusions Patients with large hernias had an alteration of EPT measurements as a consequence of the associated shortened esophagus. However, the distribution of peristaltic disorders was unaffected by the presence of hernia. PMID:22508779

  5. [Diagnosis and surgical therapy of hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Koch, O O; Köhler, G; Antoniou, S A; Pointner, R

    2014-08-01

    Using the usual diagnostic tools like barium swallow examination, endoscopy, and manometry, we are able to diagnose a hiatal hernia, but it is not possible to predict the size of the hernia opening or, respectively, the size of the hiatal defect. At least a correlation can be expected if the gastroesophageal junction is endoscopically assessed in a retroflexed position, and graded according to Hill. So far, it is not possible to come to a clear conclusion how the hiatal closure during hiatal hernia repair should be performed. There is no consensus on using a mesh, and when using a mesh which type or shape should be used. Further studies including long-term results on this issue are necessary. However, it seems obvious to make the decision depending on certain conditions found during operation, and not on preoperative findings. PMID:24647816

  6. Hiatal hernia repair with biologic mesh reinforcement reduces recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E; Shaligram, A; Reynoso, J F; Kothari, V; Oleynikov, D

    2014-01-01

    The utility of mesh reinforcement for small hiatal hernia found especially during antireflux surgery is unknown. Initial reports for the use of biological mesh for crural reinforcement during repair for defects greater than 5 cm have been shown to decrease recurrence rates. This study compares patients with small hiatal hernias who underwent onlay biologic mesh buttress repair versus those with suture cruroplasty alone. This is a single-institution retrospective review of all patients undergoing repair of hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm between 2002 and 2009. The patients were evaluated based on surgical repair: one group undergoing crural reinforcement with onlay biologic mesh and other group with suture cruroplasty only. Seventy patients with hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm were identified. Thirty-eight patients had hernia repair with biologic mesh, and 32 patients had repair with suture cruroplasty only. Recurrence rate at 1 year was 16% (5/32) in patients who had suture cruroplasty only and 0% (0/38) in the group with crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh (statistically significant, P = 0.017). Suture cruroplasty alone appears to be inadequate for hiatal hernias measuring 1-5 cm with significant recurrence rate and failure of antireflux surgery. Crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh may reduce hiatal hernia recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias. PMID:23441634

  7. Current readings: Failed hiatal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sumeet K; Shah, Parth

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent hiatal hernia is noted in up to 70% of patients undergoing reoperative antireflux procedure. Role of short esophagus vis-à-vis a need for Collis gastroplasty, mesh reinforcement of hiatus, and access of surgery (thoracotomy vs laparotomy) have been debated. The aim of this article is to review selected recent publications that address these issues. PMID:25837548

  8. Hiatal Hernia Repair with Novel Biological Graft Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Sasse, Kent C.; Ackerman, Ellen; Brandt, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hiatal hernias are repaired laparoscopically with increasing use of reinforcement material. Both synthetic and biologically derived materials reduce the recurrence rate compared to primary crural repair. Synthetic mesh introduces complications, such as mesh erosion, fibrosis, and infection. Urinary bladder matrix (UBM) represents a biologically derived material for use in hiatal hernia repair reinforcement with the potential to improve durability of repair without incurring the risks of other reinforcement materials. Methods: The 15 cases presented involved hiatal hernia repair with primary crural repair with UBM reinforcement and fundoplication. Patients were followed for an average of 3 years, and were assessed with upper gastrointestinal (GI) series, endoscopy, and assessments of subjective symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Results: Hernia diameters averaged 6 cm. Each repair was successful and completed laparoscopically. UBM exhibited favorable handling characteristics when placed as a horseshoe-type graft sutured to the crura. One patient underwent endoscopic balloon dilatation of a mild postoperative stenosis that resolved. No other complications occurred. In more than 3 years of follow-up, there have been no recurrences or long-term complications. GERD-health-related quality of life (HRQL) scores averaged 6 (range, 0–12, of a possible 50), indicating little reflux symptomatology. Follow-up upper GI series were obtained in 9 cases and showed intact repairs. An upper endoscopy was performed in 8 patients and showed no recurrences. Conclusion: Surgeons may safely use laparoscopic fundoplication with UBM reinforcement for successful repair of hiatal hernias. In this series, repairs with UBM grafts have been durable at 3 years of follow-up and may serve as an alternative to synthetic mesh reinforcement of hiatal hernia repairs. PMID:27186066

  9. Hiatal Hernia as a Total Gastrectomy Complication

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Bruna do Nascimento; de Oliveira, Marcos Belotto; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer, gastric cancer is the third leading cause of death among men and the fifth among women in Brazil. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment. The most serious complications associated with surgery are fistulas and dehiscence of the jejunal-esophageal anastomosis. Hiatal hernia refers to herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm, though this occurrence is rarely reported as a complication in gastrectomy. Case Report A 76-year-old man was diagnosed with intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. He underwent a total laparoscopic-assisted gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy on May 19, 2015. The pathology revealed a pT4pN3 gastric adenocarcinoma. The patient became clinically stable and was discharged 10 days after surgery. He was subsequently started on adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy; however, 9 days after the second cycle, he was brought to the emergency room with nausea and severe epigastric pain. A CT scan revealed a hiatal hernia with signs of strangulation. The patient underwent emergent repair of the hernia and suffered no postoperative complications. He was discharged from the hospital 9 days after surgery. Conclusion Hiatal hernia is not well documented, and its occurrence in the context of gastrectomy is an infrequent complication.

  10. Electrocardiographic changes in hiatal hernia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Seresini, Giuseppe; Racheli, Marco; Bortolotti, Monica; Virgillo, Adriana; Novali, Adriana; Benetello, Claudia; Pasini, Gian Franco

    2009-01-01

    We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman admitted to our department for suspected silent myocardial ischaemia with the evidence of T wave inversion in anterior lead. All the instrumental exams excluded inducible myocardial ischaemia. A gastroscopy showed a moderate hiatal hernia. We postulate that electrocardiogram modification could be attributed to hiatal hernia. PMID:19918411

  11. Prosthetic Bioabsorbable Mesh for Hiatal Hernia Repair During Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has become a valuable primary bariatric operation. It has an acceptable complication profile and amount of weight loss. However, one of the most distressing complications to the patient is reflux postoperatively. There is thought to be a relationship between a hiatal hernia and postoperative reflux. There is disagreement on how to address a hiatal hernia intraoperatively, and the use of mesh is controversial. Our objectives were to examine the use of a prosthetic bioabsorbable mesh for repair of a large hiatal hernia during a sleeve gastrectomy and to examine the incidence of reflux and mesh-related complications in the near term. Methods: This is a case series of patients with hiatal hernia undergoing a primary sleeve gastrectomy. None of the patients had a previous hiatal hernia repair. Three patients with large hiatal hernias diagnosed preoperatively or intraoperatively were included. The hiatus of the diaphragm was repaired with a posterior crural closure, and a piece of prosthetic bioabsorbable mesh was placed posteriorly to reinforce the repair. Results: There were 3 patients. The mean follow-up period was 12 months. There were no mesh-related complications. One of the patients needed to resume proton pump inhibitors to control reflux. Conclusion: The use of a prosthetic bioabsorbable mesh to repair a hiatal hernia simultaneously with a sleeve gastrectomy is safe. There were no mesh-related complications at 1 year. PMID:24398209

  12. Hiatal hernia in a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pup.

    PubMed

    Biancani, Barbara; Field, Cara L; Dennison, Sophie; Pulver, Robert; Tuttle, Allison D

    2012-06-01

    A 2-wk-old stranded harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) rescued by Mystic Aquarium showed signs of the presence of a hiatal hernia during rehabilitation. Contrast radiographs of esophagus and stomach revealed an intrathoracic radiodensity that contains filling defects typical of stomach, consistent with gastric rugal folds. Mural thickening was observed at the level of the cardia consistent with a diagnosis of a hiatal hernia. Although clinical improvement was noted with medical therapy and tube feeding, surgical correction of the hiatal hernia was considered necessary for full resolution. However, owing to the animal's low body weight, the corrective hernia surgery was postponed until the body condition improved. The seal needed to be surgically treated for a corneal ulcer, and while anesthetized with isoflurane, the seal became dyspneic and developed cardiac arrhythmias; ultimately cardiac arrest ensued. Resuscitation was unsuccessfully attempted and the seal was euthanized. Necropsy confirmed the radiographic diagnosis and further characterized a paraesophageal hiatal hernia. PMID:22779241

  13. Laparoscopic Hiatal Hernia Repair in 221 Patients: Outcomes and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Thackeray, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hiatal hernia is a common condition often associated with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The objectives of this study were to examine the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair (LHHR) with biologic mesh to reduce and/or alleviate GERD symptoms and associated hiatal hernia recurrence. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed consecutive LHHR procedures with biologic mesh performed by a single surgeon from July 2009 to October 2014. The primary efficacy outcome measures were relief from GERD symptoms, as measured according to the GERD–health-related quality-of-life (GERD-HRQL) scale and hiatal hernia recurrence. A secondary outcome measure was overall safety of the procedure. Results: A total of 221 patients underwent LHHR with biologic mesh during the study period, and pre- and postoperative GERD-HRQL studies were available for 172 of them. At baseline (preoperative), the mean GERD-HRQL score for all procedures was 18.5 ± 14.4. At follow-up (mean, 14.5 ± 11.0 months [range, 2.0–56.0]), the score showed a statistically significant decline to a mean of 4.4 ± 7.5 (P < .0001). To date, 8 patients (3.6%, 8/221) have had a documented anatomic hiatal hernia recurrence. However, a secondary hiatal hernia repair reoperation was necessary in only 1 patient. Most complications were minor (dysphagia, nausea and vomiting). However, there was 1 death caused by a hemorrhage that occurred 1 week after surgery. Conclusions: Laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair using biologic mesh, both with and without a simultaneous bariatric or antireflux procedure, is an efficacious and safe therapeutic option for management of hiatal hernia, prevention of recurrence, and relief of symptomatic GERD. PMID:26884676

  14. Resorbable biosynthetic mesh for crural reinforcement during hiatal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Alicuben, Evan T; Worrell, Stephanie G; DeMeester, Steven R

    2014-10-01

    The use of mesh to reinforce crural closure during hiatal hernia repair is controversial. Although some studies suggest that using synthetic mesh can reduce recurrence, synthetic mesh can erode into the esophagus and in our opinion should be avoided. Studies with absorbable or biologic mesh have not proven to be of benefit for recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of hiatal hernia repair with modern resorbable biosynthetic mesh in combination with adjunct tension reduction techniques. We retrospectively analyzed all patients who had crural reinforcement during repair of a sliding or paraesophageal hiatal hernia with Gore BioA resorbable mesh. Objective follow-up was by videoesophagram and/or esophagogastroduodenoscopy. There were 114 patients. The majority of operations (72%) were laparoscopic primary repairs with all patients receiving a fundoplication. The crura were closed primarily in all patients and reinforced with a BioA mesh patch. Excessive tension prompted a crural relaxing incision in four per cent and a Collis gastroplasty in 39 per cent of patients. Perioperative morbidity was minor and unrelated to the mesh. Median objective follow-up was one year, but 18 patients have objective follow-up at two or more years. A recurrent hernia was found in one patient (0.9%) three years after repair. The use of crural relaxing incisions and Collis gastroplasty in combination with crural reinforcement with resorbable biosynthetic mesh is associated with a low early hernia recurrence rate and no mesh-related complications. Long-term follow-up will define the role of these techniques for hiatal hernia repair. PMID:25264654

  15. Initial outcomes of laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair with mesh.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, Alana; Vu, Steven; Armstrong, Chris; Smith, Brian R; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2013-10-01

    The use of mesh in laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair (LHR) may reduce the risk of late hernia recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate initial outcomes and recurrence rate of 92 patients who underwent LHR reinforced with a synthetic bioabsorbable mesh. Surgical approaches included LHR and Nissen fundoplication (n = 64), LHR without fundoplication (n = 10), reoperative LHR (n = 9), LHR with a bariatric operation (n = 6), and emergent LHR (n = 3). The mean length of hospital stay was 2 ± 3 days (range, 1 to 30 days). There were no conversions to open laparotomy and no intraoperative complications. One of 92 patients (1.1%) required intensive care unit stay. The 90-day mortality was zero. Minor complications occurred in 3.3 per cent, major complications in 2.2 per cent, and late complications in 5.5 per cent of patients. There were no perforations or early hernia recurrence. The 30-day reoperation rate was 1.1 per cent. For patients with available 1-year follow-up, the overall recurrence rate was 18.5 per cent with a mean follow-up of 30 months (range, 12 to 51 months). LHR repair with mesh is associated with low perioperative morbidity and no mortality. The use of bioabsorbable mesh appears to be safe with no early hiatal hernia recurrence or late mesh erosion. Longer follow-up is needed to determine the long-term rate of hernia recurrence associated with LHR with mesh. PMID:24160791

  16. V/Q Matched Defect Larger than Hiatal Hernia Itself.

    PubMed

    Wachsmann, Jason W; Kim, Chun K

    2015-01-01

    We present the case report of a patient 83 year old female who developed progressive shortness of breath and subsequently underwent scintigraphic evaluation of her symptoms with a ventilation/perfusion scintigraphic exam. A matched perfusion defect was seen involving the basal segments of the left lower lobe. Following this, the patient was examined with a contrast enhanced CT of the chest to further investigate the defect, which revealed compression of the bronchi and vasculature of the left lower lobe basal segments by the hernia larger than the actual hernia. To our knowledge there has not been a case report of a large hiatal hernia as a cause of matched lower lobe defect. PMID:26420992

  17. Transesophageal two-dimensional echocardiographic identification of hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Frans, Ebenezer E; Nanda, Navin C; Patel, Vinod; Vengala, Srinivas; Mehmood, Farhat; Fonbah, William S; Bodiwala, Kunal

    2005-07-01

    We report a case of a middle-aged woman in whom a transesophageal echocardiogram showed a mass-like lesion posteriorly near the descending thoracic aorta. We were able to make a definitive diagnosis of this mass as a hiatal hernia because of a thick inner lining measuring 6-9 mm in thickness similar to the stomach mucosa, and the presence of a few microbubbles within the mass. In addition, the microbubbles increased considerably after 10 cc of agitated normal saline flush via a nasogastric tube. PMID:15966940

  18. Treatment of giant hiatal hernia by laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Duinhouwer, Lucia E.; Biter, L. Ulas; Wijnhoven, Bas P.; Mannaerts, Guido H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a risk factor for hiatal hernia. In addition, much higher recurrence rates are reported after standard surgical treatment of hiatal hernia in morbidly obese patients. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is an effective surgical treatment for morbid obesity and is known to effectively control symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD). Case presentation Two patients suffering from giant hiatal hernias where a combined LRYGB and hiatal hernia repair (HHR) with mesh was performed are presented in this paper. There were no postoperative complications and at 1 year follow-up, there was no sign of recurrence of the hernia. Discussion The gold standard for all symptomatic reflux patients is still surgical correction of the paraesophageal hernia, including complete reduction of the hernia sac, resection of the sac, hiatal closure and fundoplication. However, HHR outcome is adversely affected by higher BMI levels, leading to increased HH recurrence rates in the obese. Conclusion Concomitant giant hiatal hernia repair with LRYGB appears to be safe and feasible. Moreover, LRYGB plus HHR appears to be a good alternative for HH patients suffering from morbid obesity as well than antireflux surgery alone because of the additional benefit of significant weight loss and improvement of obesity related co-morbidity. PMID:25723747

  19. Esophageal hiatal hernia in three exotic felines--Lynx lynx, Puma concolore, Panthera leo.

    PubMed

    Hettlich, Bianca F; Hobson, H Phil; Ducoté, Julie; Fossum, Theresa W; Johnson, James H

    2010-03-01

    Hiatal hernia was diagnosed in three exotic felines-lynx (Lynx lynx), cougar (Puma concolore), and lion (Panthera leo). All cats had a history of anorexia. Thoracic and abdominal radiographs showed evidence of a soft tissue mass within the caudal mediastinum suggestive of a hiatal hernia in all animals. A barium esophagram was performed in one case. All animals underwent thoracic or abdominal surgery for hernia reduction. Surgical procedures included: intercostal thoracotomy with herniorrhaphy and esophagopexy (lynx and cougar), and incisional gastropexy (lion). Concurrent surgical procedures performed were gastrotomy for gastric foreign body removal and jejunostomy tube placement. Clinical signs related to the hiatal hernia disappeared after surgery and recurrence of signs was not reported for the time of follow-up. PMID:20722259

  20. Hiatal hernia in pediatric patients: laparoscopic versus open approaches

    PubMed Central

    Namgoong, Jung-Man; Kim, Seong-Chul; Hwang, Ji-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of laparoscopic approach for hiatal hernia (HH) in pediatric patients. Methods This was a retrospective study of 33 patients younger than 18 years who underwent an operation for HH between January 1999 and December 2012. Results The HH symptoms were various and included regurgitation, vomiting, weight loss, cough, hoarseness, and cyanosis. Among the 33 patients, there were 25 sliding types, 1 paraesophageal type, and 7 mixed types. Open surgery (OS) and laparoscopic surgery (LS) were used in 16 and 17 patients, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in sex, age, or body weight between the groups. The median operating time was longer in the LS group (150 minutes; range, 90-250 minutes vs. 125 minutes; range, 66-194 minutes; P = 0.028). Time to oral intake was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (1 day; range, 1-3 days vs. 2 days; range, 1-7 days; P = 0.001) and time to full feeding was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (6 days; range, 3-16 days vs. 10 days; range, 3-33 days; P = 0.048). There were no differences in length of hospital stay and complications between the two groups. There was no perioperative mortality or recurrence of HH. Conclusion A good surgical outcome for laparoscopic correction of HH was seen in pediatric patients. PMID:24851228

  1. Laparoscopic treatment of type III and IV hiatal hernia – authors’ experience

    PubMed Central

    Grzesiak-Kuik, Agata; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There are four types of hiatal hernias, and diagnosis is established on the basis of gastroscopy in the majority of cases. Type III represents a mixed type in which the abdominal esophagus as well as the gastric cardia and fundus protrude into the thorax through the pathologically widened esophageal hiatus. Type IV, the so-called upside down stomach, can be considered an evolutionary form of type III, and refers to herniation of nearly the whole stomach (except for the cardia and pylorus) into the thorax. Types III and IV of hiatal hernias represent a group of rare diaphragmatic defects; thus, most centers do not possess considerable experience in their treatment. Frequently, laparoscopic treatment is implemented, although, according to some authors, conversion to laparotomy, thoracotomy, or thoracolaparotomy is necessary in selected cases. Aim To analyze the outcomes of laparoscopic treatment of the largest hiatal hernias, i.e. type III and IV hernias. Material and methods A total of 25 patients diagnosed with type III and IV hiatal hernia were included in further analysis. Results As many as 19 out of 25 patients (76%) assessed the outcome of the surgery as evidently positive and reported marked improvement in the quality of life. Conclusions The laparoscopic technique constitutes an excellent and safe method of repair of even the most complex defects in the esophageal hiatus. Therefore, the minimally invasive technique combined with an anti-reflux procedure should be the method of choice in patients with type III and IV hernia. PMID:25097681

  2. A case of ultrasound diagnosis of fetal hiatal hernia in late third trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Stefania; Lanna, Mariano Matteo; Napolitano, Marcello; Maestri, Luciano; Faiola, Stefano; Rustico, Mariangela; Ferrazzi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hiatal hernia is a condition characterized by herniation of the abdominal organs, most commonly the stomach, through a physiological but overlax esophageal hiatus into the thoracic cavity. Prenatal diagnosis of this anomaly is unusual and only eight cases have been reported in the literature. In this paper we describe a case of congenital hiatal hernia that was suspected at ultrasound at 39 weeks' gestation, on the basis of a cystic mass in the posterior mediastinum, juxtaposed to the vertebral body. Postnatal upper gastrointestinal tract series confirmed the prenatal diagnosis. Postnatal management was planned with no urgency. Hiatal hernia is not commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of fetal cystic chest anomalies. This rare case documents the importance of prenatal diagnosis of this anomaly for prenatal counseling and postnatal management. PMID:25984374

  3. Hiatal Hernia Repair with Gore Bio-A Tissue Reinforcement: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Antonino, Agrusa; Giorgio, Romano; Giuseppe, Frazzetta; Giovanni, De Vita; Silvia, Di Giovanni; Daniela, Chianetta; Giuseppe, Di Buono; Vincenzo, Sorce; Gaspare, Gulotta

    2014-01-01

    Type I hiatal hernia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in 50–90% of cases. Several trials strongly support surgery as an effective alternative to medical therapy. Today, laparoscopic fundoplication is considered as the procedure of choice. However, primary laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair is associated with upto 42% recurrence rate. Mesh reinforcement of the crural closure decreases the recurrence but can lead to complications, above all nonabsorbable ones. We experiment a new totally absorbable mesh by Gore. Case. We present a case of a 65-year-old female patient with a 6-year classic history of GERD. Endoscopy revealed a large hiatal hernia and esophagitis. pH study was positive for acid reflux; esophageal manometry revealed LES intrathoracic dislocation. With laparoscopic approach, the hiatal hernia defect was identified and primarily repaired, by crural closure. Gore Bio-A Tissue Reinforcement was trimmed to fit the defect accommodating the esophagus. Nissen fundoplication was performed. Result. Bio-A mesh was easily placed laparoscopically. It has good handling and could be cut and tailored intraoperatively for optimal adaptation. There were no short-term complications. Conclusion. Crural closure reinforcement can be done readily with this new totally absorbable mesh replaced by soft tissue over six months. However, further data and studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. PMID:24864221

  4. Hiatal hernia repair with gore bio-a tissue reinforcement: our experience.

    PubMed

    Antonino, Agrusa; Giorgio, Romano; Giuseppe, Frazzetta; Giovanni, De Vita; Silvia, Di Giovanni; Daniela, Chianetta; Giuseppe, Di Buono; Vincenzo, Sorce; Gaspare, Gulotta

    2014-01-01

    Type I hiatal hernia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in 50-90% of cases. Several trials strongly support surgery as an effective alternative to medical therapy. Today, laparoscopic fundoplication is considered as the procedure of choice. However, primary laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair is associated with upto 42% recurrence rate. Mesh reinforcement of the crural closure decreases the recurrence but can lead to complications, above all nonabsorbable ones. We experiment a new totally absorbable mesh by Gore. Case. We present a case of a 65-year-old female patient with a 6-year classic history of GERD. Endoscopy revealed a large hiatal hernia and esophagitis. pH study was positive for acid reflux; esophageal manometry revealed LES intrathoracic dislocation. With laparoscopic approach, the hiatal hernia defect was identified and primarily repaired, by crural closure. Gore Bio-A Tissue Reinforcement was trimmed to fit the defect accommodating the esophagus. Nissen fundoplication was performed. Result. Bio-A mesh was easily placed laparoscopically. It has good handling and could be cut and tailored intraoperatively for optimal adaptation. There were no short-term complications. Conclusion. Crural closure reinforcement can be done readily with this new totally absorbable mesh replaced by soft tissue over six months. However, further data and studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. PMID:24864221

  5. LAPAROSCOPIC GASTROPEXY FOR CORRECTION OF A HIATAL HERNIA IN A NORTHERN ELEPHANT SEAL (MIROUNGA ANGUSTIROSTRIS).

    PubMed

    Greene, Rebecca; Van Bonn, William G; Dennison, Sophie E; Greig, Denise J; Gulland, Frances M D

    2015-06-01

    A female northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) weaned pup presented with malnutrition. During rehabilitation, the seal developed regurgitation and reduced lung sounds on auscultation. Radiographs and endoscopy performed under sedation suggested a diaphragmatic hernia. A Type I (or sliding) hiatal hernia was confirmed with a positive contrast upper gastrointestinal study, revealing varying degrees of herniation of the gastric fundus through the diaphragm into the caudal thorax as well as esophageal reflux. The animal was treated preoperatively with an H2 antagonist and antinausea medication. A laparoscopic gastropexy was performed under general anesthesia. The animal recovered well postoperatively and resolution of clinical signs was achieved. The animal was released back into the wild 21 kg above admit weight. To our knowledge, we report here the first surgical correction of a hiatal hernia in a marine mammal. PMID:26056907

  6. Gastric dilatation and volvulus in a brachycephalic dog with hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Aslanian, M E; Sharp, C R; Garneau, M S

    2014-10-01

    A brachycephalic dog was presented with an acute onset of retching and abdominal discomfort. The dog had a chronic history of stertor and exercise intolerance suggestive of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome. Radiographs were consistent with a Type II hiatal hernia. The dog was referred and within hours of admission became acutely painful and developed tympanic abdominal distension. A right lateral abdominal radiograph confirmed gastric dilatation and volvulus with herniation of the pylorus through the hiatus. An emergency exploratory coeliotomy was performed, during which the stomach was derotated, and an incisional gastropexy, herniorrhaphy and splenectomy were performed. A staphylectomy was performed immediately following the exploratory coeliotomy. The dog recovered uneventfully. Gastric dilatation and volvulus is a potentially life-threatening complication that can occur in dogs with Type II hiatal hernia and should be considered a surgical emergency. PMID:24871205

  7. [Anisakiasis in a patient with a small hiatal hernia. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Mercado P, Rubén; Torres H, Patricio; Gil L, Luis Carlos; Goldin G, Luis

    2006-12-01

    We describe the presence of anisakiasis in a patient who had a small hiatal hernia. A 60 year-old women presented general malaise, burning pain, flatulence, persistent nausea and abdominal distension during five days before consulting. She referred that she ate a dish of marinated raw fish with lemon and pepper ("cebiche") and after a few hours the symptoms began. An esophagogastroscopy showed a white colour larva of approximately three cm with the cephalic end partially adhered and localized in the mucosa of the hiatal hernia. During the procedure the worm was easily extracted. The morphologic study of the specimen identified it as a stage IV larva of Pseudoterranova sp. The clinical condition of the patient improved after the extraction of the parasite. PMID:17277874

  8. Incidence of hiatal hernia in service members, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Francis L; Taubman, Stephen B

    2016-08-01

    From 2005 through 2014, a total of 27,276 active component service members had incident diagnoses of hiatal hernia documented in their medical records. The overall incidence rate was 19.7 cases per 10,000 person-years (p-yrs); annual incidence rates ranged from 16.5 to 22.2 cases per 10,000 p-yrs. Rates overall increased monotonically with increasing age and were higher among Air Force and Army members, officers, and healthcare workers than their respective counterparts. During the surveillance period, the 27,276 service members who had incident diagnoses of hiatal hernia accounted for 44,092 hiatal hernia-related encounters overall (1.6 encounters per case). Among all incident cases, 235 (0.86%) had surgical repairs documented during the period. The frequency of surgical treatment of hiatal hernias among military members mirrored the low frequency in U.S. civilian practice. During 2010-2014, most surgical procedures (79%) were accomplished via laparoscopic approaches. The incidence rates of hiatal hernia diagnoses reported here likely greatly underestimate the true incidence in U.S. military populations. Reasons for the underestimates and comparisons with other populations are discussed. PMID:27602798

  9. Biomechanical analyses of prosthetic mesh repair in a hiatal hernia model.

    PubMed

    Alizai, Patrick Hamid; Schmid, Sofie; Otto, Jens; Klink, Christian Daniel; Roeth, Anjali; Nolting, Jochen; Neumann, Ulf Peter; Klinge, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    Recurrence rate of hiatal hernia can be reduced with prosthetic mesh repair; however, type and shape of the mesh are still a matter of controversy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical properties of four conventional meshes: pure polypropylene mesh (PP-P), polypropylene/poliglecaprone mesh (PP-U), polyvinylidenefluoride/polypropylene mesh (PVDF-I), and pure polyvinylidenefluoride mesh (PVDF-S). Meshes were tested either in warp direction (parallel to production direction) or perpendicular to the warp direction. A Zwick testing machine was used to measure elasticity and effective porosity of the textile probes. Stretching of the meshes in warp direction required forces that were up to 85-fold higher than the same elongation in perpendicular direction. Stretch stress led to loss of effective porosity in most meshes, except for PVDF-S. Biomechanical impact of the mesh was additionally evaluated in a hiatal hernia model. The different meshes were used either as rectangular patches or as circular meshes. Circular meshes led to a significant reinforcement of the hiatus, largely unaffected by the orientation of the warp fibers. In contrast, rectangular meshes provided a significant reinforcement only when warp fibers ran perpendicular to the crura. Anisotropic elasticity of prosthetic meshes should therefore be considered in hiatal closure with rectangular patches. PMID:24599834

  10. Resorbable synthetic mesh supported with omentum flap in the treatment of giant hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Pérez Lara, F J; Marín, R; del Rey, A; Oliva, H

    2014-01-01

    Covering a large hiatal hernia with a mesh has become a basic procedure in the last few years. However, mesh implants are associated with high complication rates (esophageal erosion, perforation, fistula, etc.). We propose using a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap as a possible solution to this problem. A 54-year-old female patient with a large hiatal defect (9 cm) was laparoscopically implanted with a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap. The surgical procedure was successful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. On a follow-up examination 6 months after surgery, she remained free of relapse or complication signs. Supporting an implanted resorbable mesh with an omental flap may be a solution to the problems posed by large esophageal hiatus defects. However, more studies based on larger patient samples and longer follow-up periods are necessary. PMID:25216419

  11. Resorbable Synthetic Mesh Supported With Omentum Flap in the Treatment of Giant Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Lara, F. J.; Marín, R.; del Rey, A.; Oliva, H.

    2014-01-01

    Covering a large hiatal hernia with a mesh has become a basic procedure in the last few years. However, mesh implants are associated with high complication rates (esophageal erosion, perforation, fistula, etc.). We propose using a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap as a possible solution to this problem. A 54-year-old female patient with a large hiatal defect (9 cm) was laparoscopically implanted with a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap. The surgical procedure was successful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. On a follow-up examination 6 months after surgery, she remained free of relapse or complication signs. Supporting an implanted resorbable mesh with an omental flap may be a solution to the problems posed by large esophageal hiatus defects. However, more studies based on larger patient samples and longer follow-up periods are necessary. PMID:25216419

  12. Management of large para-esophageal hiatal hernias.

    PubMed

    Collet, D; Luc, G; Chiche, L

    2013-12-01

    Para-esophageal hernias are relatively rare and typically occur in elderly patients. The various presenting symptoms are non-specific and often occur in combination. These include symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux (GERD) in 26 to 70% of cases, microcytic anemia in 17 to 47%, and respiratory symptoms in 9 to 59%. Respiratory symptoms are not completely resolved by surgical intervention. Acute complications such as gastric volvulus with incarceration or strangulation are rare (estimated incidence of 1.2% per patient per year) but gastric ischemia leading to perforation is the main cause of mortality. Only patients with symptomatic hernias should undergo surgery. Prophylactic repair to prevent acute incarceration should only be undertaken in patients younger than 75 in good condition; surgical indications must be discussed individually beyond this age. The laparoscopic approach is now generally accepted. Resection of the hernia sac is associated with a lower incidence of recurrence. Repair of the hiatus can be reinforced with prosthetic material (either synthetic or biologic), but the benefit of prosthetic repair has not been clearly shown. Results of prosthetic reinforcement vary in different studies; it has been variably associated with four times fewer recurrences or with no measurable difference. A Collis type gastroplasty may be useful to lengthen a foreshortened esophagus, but no objective criteria have been defined to support this approach. The anatomic recurrence rate can be as high as 60% at 12years. But most recurrences are asymptomatic and do not affect the quality of life index. It therefore seems more appropriate to evaluate functional results and quality of life measures rather than to gauge success by a strict evaluation of anatomic hernia reduction. PMID:24060742

  13. Acute gastric volvulus: a deadly but commonly forgotten complication of hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Brandon; Vincentelli, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare condition resulting from rotation of the stomach beyond 180 degrees. It is a difficult condition to diagnose, mostly because it is rarely considered. Furthermore, the imaging findings are often subtle resulting in many cases being diagnosed at the time of surgery or, as in our case, at autopsy. We present the case of a 76-year-old man with an extensive medical history, including coronary artery disease with multiple bypass grafts, who became diaphoretic and nauseated while eating. His presumptive diagnosis at arrival to the hospital was an acute coronary event; however, his initial cardiac work-up was negative. A computed tomography scan revealed a type III hiatal hernia. The following day, after consistent complaints of nausea and episodes of nonbloody emesis, he suddenly became hypotensive, tachycardic and had an episode of coffee-ground emesis. Subsequently, the patient's condition suddenly deteriorated and resuscitation attempts were unsuccessful. The autopsy revealed a partially sliding hiatal hernia, which was consistent with the radiologic impression. Additionally, a gastric volvulus was present with extensive, focally transmural necrosis involving the body/fundus. Gastric volvulus is a rare entity with variable, nonspecific clinical presentations, which requires a high level of suspicion for radiologic diagnosis. Acute cases have a high mortality rate and require emergency surgery. This case highlights the value of autopsy in the diagnosis of unsuspected cases of gastric volvulus when death occurs prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284537

  14. Hill classification is superior to the axial length of a hiatal hernia for assessment of the mechanical anti-reflux barrier at the gastroesophageal junction

    PubMed Central

    Hansdotter, Ida; Björ, Ove; Andreasson, Anna; Agreus, Lars; Hellström, Per; Forsberg, Anna; Talley, Nicholas J.; Vieth, Michael; Wallner, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is multifactorial, including the mechanical anti-reflux barrier of the gastroesophageal junction. This barrier can be evaluated endoscopically in two ways: by measuring the axial length of any hiatal hernia present or by assessing the gastroesophageal flap valve. The endoscopic measurement of axial length is troublesome because of the physiological dynamics in the area. Grading the gastroesophageal flap valve is easier and has proven reproducible. The aim of the present study was to compare the two endoscopic grading methods with regard to associations with GERD. Patients and methods: Population-based subjects underwent endoscopic examination assessing the axial length of hiatus hernia, the gastroesophageal flap valve using the Hill classification, esophagitis using the Los Angeles (LA) classification, and columnar metaplasia using the Z-line appearance (ZAP) classification. Biopsies were taken from the squamocolumnar junction to assess the presence of intestinal metaplasia. Symptoms were recorded with the validated Abdominal Symptom Questionnaire. GERD was defined according to the Montreal definition. Results: In total, 334 subjects were included in the study and underwent endoscopy; 86 subjects suffered from GERD and 211 presented no symptoms or signs of GERD. Based on logistic regression, the estimated area under the curve statistic (AUC) for Hill (0.65 [95 %CI 0.59 – 0.72]) was higher than the corresponding estimate for the axial length of a hiatal hernia (0.61 [95 %CI 0.54 – 0.68]), although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.225). Conclusion: From our data, and in terms of association with GERD, the Hill classification was slightly stronger compared to the axial length of a hiatal hernia, but we could not verify that the Hill classification was superior as a predictor. The Hill classification may replace the axial length of a hiatal

  15. Cardiac complications after laparoscopic large hiatal hernia repair. Is it related with staple fixation of the mesh? -Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Maria del Carmen; Diaz, María; López, Fernando; Martí-Obiol, Roberto; Ortega, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic Nissen operation with mesh reinforcement remains being the most popular operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Complications related to mesh placement have been widely described. Cardiac complications are rare, but have a fatal outcome if they are misdiagnosed. Presentation of cases We sought to outline our institutional experience of three patients who developed cardiac complications following a laparoscopic Nissen operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Discussion Laparoscopic hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication are safe and effective procedures for the hiatal hernia repair, but they are not exempt from complications. Fixation technique and material used must be taken into account. We have conducted a review of the literature on complications related to these procedures. Conclusion In the differential diagnosis of hemodynamic instability after laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair, cardiac tamponade and other cardiac complications should be considered. PMID:26635954

  16. The laparoscopic hiatoplasty with antireflux surgery is a safe and effective procedure to repair giant hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although minimally invasive repair of giant hiatal hernias is a very surgical challenge which requires advanced laparoscopic learning curve, several reports showed that is a safe and effective procedure, with lower morbidity than open approach. In the present study we show the outcomes of 13 patients who underwent a laparoscopic repair of giant hiatal hernia. Methods A total of 13 patients underwent laparoscopic posterior hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication. Follow-up evaluation was done clinically at intervals of 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery using the Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Health-Related Quality of Life scale, a barium swallow study, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, an oesophageal manometry, a combined ambulatory 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring. Anatomic recurrence was defined as any evidence of gastric herniation above the diaphragmatic edge. Results There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open technique. Symptomatic GORD-HQL outcomes demonstrated a statistical significant decrease of mean value equal to 3.2 compare to 37.4 of preoperative assessment (p < 0.0001). Combined 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring after 12 months did not show any evidence of pathological acid or non acid reflux. Conclusion All patients were satisfied of procedure and no hernia recurrence was recorded in the study group, treated respecting several crucial surgical principles, e.g., complete sac excision, appropriate crural closure, also with direct hiatal defect where possible, and routine use of antireflux procedure. PMID:24401085

  17. Evaluation of conventional laparoscopic versus robot-assisted laparoscopic redo hiatal hernia and antireflux surgery: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tolboom, Robert C; Draaisma, Werner A; Broeders, Ivo A M J

    2016-03-01

    Surgery for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia leads to recurrence or persisting dysphagia in a minority of patients. Redo antireflux surgery in GERD and hiatal hernia is known for higher morbidity and mortality. This study aims to evaluate conventional versus robot-assisted laparoscopic redo antireflux surgery, with the objective to detect possible advantages for the robot-assisted approach. A single institute cohort of 75 patients who underwent either conventional laparoscopic or robot-assisted laparoscopic redo surgery for recurrent GERD or severe dysphagia between 2008 and 2013 were included in the study. Baseline characteristics, symptoms, medical history, procedural data, hospital stay, complications and outcome were prospectively gathered. The main indications for redo surgery were dysphagia, pyrosis or a combination of both in combination with a proven anatomic abnormality. The mean time to redo surgery was 1.9 and 2.0 years after primary surgery for the conventional and robot-assisted groups, respectively. The number of conversions was lower in the robot-assisted group compared to conventional laparoscopy (1/45 vs. 5/30, p = 0.035) despite a higher proportion of patients with previous surgery by laparotomy (9/45 vs. 1/30, p = 0.038). Median hospital stay was reduced by 1 day (3 vs. 4, p = 0.042). There were no differences in mortality, complications or outcome. Robotic support, when available, can be regarded beneficial in redo surgery for GERD and hiatal hernia. Results of this observational study suggest technical feasibility for minimal-invasive robot-assisted redo surgery after open primary antireflux surgery, a reduced number of conversions and shorter hospital stay. PMID:26809755

  18. Hiatal Hernia After Open versus Minimally Invasive Esophagectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Oor, J E; Wiezer, M J; Hazebroek, E J

    2016-08-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is an infrequent yet potentially life-threatening complication after esophagectomy. Several studies have reported the incidence of this complication after both open and minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE). This meta-analysis aimed to determine the pooled incidence of HH after both types of esophagectomy and, importantly, to provide insight in the outcome of subsequent HH repair. A systematic search was performed of the PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases. Article selection was performed using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) criteria. Articles describing the incidence of HH after different open and minimally invasive techniques were included. Only when five or more comparable studies reported on the same outcome were data pooled. The incidence of postoperative HH and the outcome of HH repair were analyzed. Twenty-six studies published between 1985 and 2015 were included, describing a total of 6058 patients who underwent esophagectomy, of whom 240 were diagnosed with a postoperative HH. The pooled incidence of symptomatic HH after MIE was 4.5 %, compared to a pooled incidence of 1.0 % after open esophagectomy. 11 studies reported on the outcome of HH repair in 125 patients. A pooled morbidity rate after HH repair of 25 % was found. During follow-up, a pooled recurrence rate of 14 % was reported in 11 of the included studies. The pooled incidence of HH after MIE is higher compared to open esophagectomy. Most importantly, surgical repair of these HHs is associated with a high morbidity rate. Both radiologists and surgeons should be aware of this rare yet potentially life-threatening complication. PMID:26926480

  19. Transmural gastric migration of dual-sided PTFE/ePTFEE mesh after laparoscopic surgery for a recurrent hiatal hernia with dysphagia: case report.

    PubMed

    Acin-Gandara, D; Miliani-Molina, C; Carneros-Martin, Ja; Martinez-Pineiro, J; Vega, M De; Pereira-Perez, F

    2014-01-01

    Several series have shown that laparoscopic fundoplication is feasible and safe for the treatment of hiatal hernia, although a high recurrence rate of 42% has been published. The use of mesh repair in these hernias has shown fewer recurrences than primary suture with small number of complications reported.Some of these are severe fibrosis within the hiatus, mesh erosion of the intestinal wall, esophageal strictures, mesh migration into the upper gastrointestinal tract and esophageal perforations. We present a case with late erosion and complete transmural gastric migration of the mesh after surgery. In these cases, the patients may require complex surgical intervention.That was not the case in our patient, who did not require further surgery because the mesh migrated completely. It is therefore advisable to use a mesh very selectively for the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernias, taking into account the surgeon's experience, the anatomy of the hiatus and the symptoms of the patient. PMID:25149620

  20. Reversibility of cardiopulmonary impairment after laparoscopic repair of large hiatal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Asti, Emanuele; Bonavina, Luigi; Lombardi, Massimo; Bandera, Francesco; Secchi, Francesco; Guazzi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Giant hiatus hernia with or without intrathoracic gastric volvulus often presents with symptoms suggestive of both cardiac and pulmonary compression. Cardiopulmonary impairment may be reversible in these patients by laparoscopic crural repair and fundoplication as shown in this case report. Cardiac magnetic resonance and the cardiopulmonary exercise test may help selecting patients for surgery. These preliminary findings led us to start a prospective study using this multimodality diagnostic approach. PMID:26210719

  1. Cameron Lesions in Patients with Hiatal Hernias: Prevalence, Presentation, and Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Darrell M.; Kushnir, Vladimir; Kalra, Gorav; Rosenstock, Aron; Alsakka, Mohammed A.; Patel, Amit; Sayuk, Gregory; Gyawali, C. Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aims Cameron lesions, as defined by erosions and ulcerations at the diaphragmatic hiatus, are found in the setting of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in patients with a hiatus hernia (HH). The study aim was to determine the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of Cameron lesions. Patients and methods This is a retrospective cohort study evaluating consecutive patients undergoing upper endoscopy over a two year period. Endoscopy reports were systematically reviewed to determine presence or absence of Cameron lesions and hiatus hernia. Inpatient and outpatient records were reviewed to determine prevalence, risk factors, and outcome of medical treatment of Cameron lesions. Results Of 8260 upper endoscopic examinations, 1306 (20.2%) reported a HH. When categorized by size, 65.6% of HH were small (<3 cm), 23.0% moderate (3-4.9 cm) and 11.4% were large (≥5 cm). Of these, 43 patients (mean age 65.2 years, 49% female) had Cameron lesions, with a prevalence of 3.3% in the presence of HH. Prevalence was highest with large HH (12.8%). On univariate analysis, large HH, frequent NSAID use, GI bleeding (both occult and overt) and nadir hemoglobin level were significantly greater with Cameron lesions compared to HH without Cameron lesions (p≤0.03). Large HH size and NSAID use were identified as independent risk factors for Cameron lesions on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions Cameron lesions are more prevalent in the setting of large HH and NSAID use, can be associated with GI bleeding, and can respond to medical management. PMID:24758713

  2. Impact of hiatal hernia on histological pattern of non-erosive reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Hiatus hernia (HH) has major pathophysiological effects favoring gastroesophageal reflux and hence contributing to esophageal mucosa injury, especially in patients with severe gastroesophageal disease. However, prospective studies investigating the impact of HH on the esophageal mucosa in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) are lacking. This study evaluated the association between the presence of (HH) and the histological findings in symptomatic patients with NERD. Methods Fifty consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were enrolled. After conventional endoscopy, Lugol solution was applied and biopsy specimens were obtained. Histological parameters including basal zone hyperplasia, papillary length and cellular infiltration were evaluated. The chi-square test with Yates' correlation was used for comparing discrete parameters between groups. However, Fisher's exact probability test was used where the expected frequencies were lower than 5. Wilcoxon's test for unpaired samples was preferred in cases of semi-quantitative parameters. Results The presence of HH along with more severe findings (0.01

  3. Mechanisms of Barrett’s esophagus (clinical): LES dysfunction, hiatal hernia, peristaltic defects

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Barrett’s esophagus, with the potential to develop into esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), is a major complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, about 50% of patients developing EAC had no known GERD beforehand. Hence, while GERD symptoms, esophagitis, and Barrett’s have a number of common determinants (esophagogastric junction (EGJ) incompetence, impaired esophageal clearance mechanisms, hiatus hernia) they also have some independent determinants. Further, although excess esophageal acid exposure plays a major role in the genesis of long-segment Barrett’s esophagus there is minimal evidence supporting this for short-segment Barrett’s. Hence, these may have unique pathophysiological features as well. Long-segment Barrett’s seems to share most, if not all, of the risk factors for esophagitis, particularly high-grade esophagitis. However, it is uncertain if EGJ function and acid clearance are more severely impaired in patients with long-segment Barrett’s compared to patients with high-grade esophagitis. With respect to short-segment Barrett’s, the acid pocket may play an important pathogenic role. Conceptually, extension of the acid pocket into the distal esophagus, also known as intra-sphincteric reflux, provides a mechanism or acid exposure of the distal esophageal mucosa without the occurrence of discrete reflux events, which are more likely to prompt reflux symptoms and lead to the development of esophagitis. Hence, intra-sphincteric reflux related to extension of the acid/no acid interface at the proximal margin of the acid pocket may be key in the development of short segment Barrett’s. However, currently this is still somewhat speculative and further studies are required to confirm this. PMID:25743453

  4. Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... surrounds the muscle. This layer is called the fascia. Which type of hernia you have depends on ... problems. Surgery repairs the weakened abdominal wall tissue (fascia) and closes any holes. Most hernias are closed ...

  5. Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a hernia. Sometimes, hernias occur with: Heavy lifting Straining while using the toilet Any activity that ... Extra weight Fluid in the abdomen ( ascites ) Heavy lifting Peritoneal dialysis Poor nutrition Smoking Overexertion Undescended testicles

  6. [Perineal hernia].

    PubMed

    Mandarano, R; Giorgi, G; Venturini, N; Mancini, E; Natale, A; Tiburzi, C

    1999-01-01

    The authors base this study on a case of perineal hernia referred to their attention. In the light of the scant international literature on this subject, they focus on the topographical anatomy of the pelvic floor in order to gain a clearer understanding of this pathology, as well as their classification into median, lateral, anterior and posterior forms. Above all, the authors draw attention to the importance of the differential diagnosis of perineal hernia from Bartholin cysts or vulvar tumours in relation to anterior perineal hernia, and perianal abscesses in relation to posterior hernia. They underline the value of ultrasonography or TAC during the diagnostic procedure. Lastly, they examine the channels of aggression for this type of hernia which may be abdominal, perianal or combined (abdominal and peri-anal), as well as the repair techniques used, varying from direct suture with non-absorbable material to the use of prolene mesh or flaps if the hernia breech is very large. PMID:10528488

  7. Fibrin Sealant: A Review of the History, Biomechanics, and Current Applications for Prosthetic Fixation in Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jefferson Tyler; Webb, David L; Stoikes, Nathaniel F N; Voeller, Guy R

    2015-11-01

    The role of surgical adhesives in hernia repair has continued to evolve. The purpose of this chapter is to review the role of fibrin sealant and its application in general surgery for mesh fixation, specifically the history, biomechanics, and clinical utilization. The utilization of fibrin sealant for repair of groin hernias, both open and laparoscopic, ventral hernias, and hiatal hernias will be discussed. PMID:26696538

  8. Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair: current controversies.

    PubMed

    Soper, Nathaniel J; Teitelbaum, Ezra N

    2013-10-01

    The advent of laparoscopy has significantly improved postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing surgical repair of a paraesophageal hernia. Although this minimally invasive approach considerably reduces postoperative pain and recovery times, and may improve physiologic outcomes, laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair remains a complex operation requiring advanced laparoscopic skills and experience with the anatomy of the gastroesophageal junction and diaphragmatic hiatus. In this article, we describe our approach to patient selection, preoperative evaluation, operative technique, and postoperative management. Specific attention is paid to performing an adequate hiatal dissection and esophageal mobilization, the decision of whether to use a mesh to reinforce the crural repair, and construction of an adequate antireflux barrier (ie, fundoplication). PMID:24105282

  9. Laparoscopic Repair of Paraesophageal Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Borao, Frank; Squillaro, Anthony; Mansson, Jonas; Barker, William; Baker, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopy has quickly become the standard surgical approach to repair paraesophageal hernias. Although many centers routinely perform this procedure, relatively high recurrence rates have led many surgeons to question this approach. We sought to evaluate outcomes in our cohort of patients with an emphasis on recurrence rates and symptom improvement and their correlation with true radiologic recurrence seen on contrast imaging. Methods: We retrospectively identified 126 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic repair of a large paraesophageal hernia between 2000 and 2010. Clinical outcomes were reviewed, and data were collected regarding operative details, perioperative and postoperative complications, symptoms, and follow-up imaging. Radiologic evidence of any size hiatal hernia was considered to indicate a recurrence. Results: There were 95 female and 31 male patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 71 ± 14 years. Laparoscopic repair was completed successfully in 120 of 126 patients, with 6 operations converted to open procedures. Crural reinforcement with mesh was performed in 79% of patients, and 11% underwent a Collis gastroplasty. Fundoplications were performed in 90% of patients: Nissen (112), Dor (1), and Toupet (1). Radiographic surveillance, obtained at a mean time interval of 23 months postoperatively, was available in 89 of 126 patients (71%). Radiographic evidence of a recurrence was present in 19 patients (21%). Reoperation was necessary in 6 patients (5%): 5 for symptomatic recurrence (4%) and 1 for dysphagia (1%). The median length of stay was 4 days. Conclusion: Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair results in an excellent outcome with a short length of stay when performed at an experienced center. Radiologic recurrence is observed relatively frequently with routine surveillance; however, many of these recurrences are small, and few patients require correction of the recurrence. Furthermore, these

  10. The role of hiatus hernia in GERD.

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Increased esophageal acid exposure in gastroesophageal reflux disease has several potential causes, some related primarily to physiological dysfunction of the LES and others related to anatomic distortion of the gastroesophageal junction as occurs with hiatus hernia. One attractive feature of implicating hiatal hernias in the pathogenesis of reflux disease is that, like reflux disease, axial hernias become more common with age and obesity. However, the importance of hiatus hernia is obscured by imprecise definition and an all-or-none conceptualization that has led to wide variation in estimates of prevalence among normal or diseased populations. There are at least three potentially significant radiographic features of a hiatus hernia: axial length during distention, axial length at rest, and competence of the diaphragmatic hiatus. Although any or all of these features may be abnormal in a particular instance of hiatus hernia, each is of different functional significance. Grouping all abnormalities of the gastroesophageal junction as "hiatus hernia" without detailing the specifics of each case defies logic. Mechanistically, the gastroesophageal junction must protect against reflux both in static and dynamic conditions. During abrupt increases in intra-abdominal pressure, the crural diaphragm normally serves as a "second sphincter," and this mechanism is substantially impaired in individuals with a gaping hiatus. Large, non-reducing hernias also impair the process of esophageal emptying, thereby prolonging acid clearance time following a reflux event (especially while in the supine posture). These anatomically-determined functional impairments of the gastroesophageal junction lead to increased esophageal acid exposure. Thus, although hiatus hernia may or may not be an initiating factor at the inception of reflux disease, it clearly can act as a sustaining factor accounting for the frequently observed chronicity of the disease. PMID:10780571

  11. Umbilical hernia

    MedlinePlus

    An umbilical hernia is an outward bulging (protrusion) of the lining of the abdomen or part of the abdominal ... An umbilical hernia in an infant occurs when the muscle through which the umbilical cord passes does not close ...

  12. [Lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Teiblum, Sandra Sofie; Hjørne, Flemming Pii; Bisgaard, Thue

    2010-03-22

    Lumbar hernia is a rare condition. Lumbar hernia should be considered a rare differential diagnosis to unexplained back pain. Symptoms are scarce and diffuse and can vary with the size and content of the hernia. As there is a 25% risk of incarceration, operation is indicated even in asymptomatic hernias. We report a case of lumbar hernia in a woman with a slow growing mass in the lumbar region. She presented with pain and a computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. She underwent open surgery and fully recovered with recurrence within the first half year. PMID:20334799

  13. Esophagogastric junction distensibility in hiatus hernia.

    PubMed

    Lottrup, C; McMahon, B P; Ejstrud, P; Ostapiuk, M A; Funch-Jensen, P; Drewes, A M

    2016-07-01

    Hiatus hernia is known to be an important risk factor for developing gastroesophageal reflux disease. We aimed to use the endoscopic functional lumen imaging probe (EndoFLIP) to evaluate the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. EndoFLIP assessments were made in 30 patients with hiatus hernia and Barrett's esophagus, and in 14 healthy controls. The EndoFLIP was placed straddling the esophagogastric junction and the bag distended stepwise to 50 mL. Cross-sectional areas of the bag and intra-bag pressures were recorded continuously. Measurements were made in the separate sphincter components and hiatus hernia cavity. EndoFLIP measured functional aspects such as sphincter distensibility and pressure of all esophagogastric junction components and visualized all hiatus hernia present at endoscopy. The lower esophageal sphincter in hiatus hernia patients had a lower pressure (e.g. 47.7 ± 13.0 vs. 61.4 ± 19.2 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the common esophagogastric junction in controls. In hiatus hernia patients, the crural diaphragm had a lower pressure (e.g. 29.6 ± 10.1 vs. 47.7 ± 13.0 mm Hg at 50-mL distension volume) and was more distensible (all P < 0.001) than the lower esophageal sphincter. There was a significant association between symptom scores in patients and EndoFLIP assessment. Conclusively, EndoFLIP was a useful tool. To evaluate the presence of a hiatus hernia and to measure the functional properties of the esophagogastric junction. Furthermore, EndoFLIP distinguished the separate esophagogastric junction components in hiatus hernia patients, and may help us understand the biomechanics of the esophagogastric junction and the mechanisms behind hiatal herniation. PMID:25789842

  14. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  15. Umbilical hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    Umbilical hernia repair is surgery to repair an umbilical hernia . An umbilical hernia is a sac (pouch) formed from the ... the hole or weak spot caused by the umbilical hernia. Your surgeon may also lay a piece ...

  16. Transthoracic Collis-Nissen repair for massive type IV paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed

    Itano, Hideki; Okamoto, Shiroh; Kodama, Kanji; Horita, Naokatsu

    2008-09-01

    An 80-year-old woman presented with type IV massive hiatal hernia with intrathoracic upside-down stomach and transverse colon. She was dyspneic and vomited upon consuming food or water. Consequently, she developed aspiration pneumonia. Both esophagoscopy and upper gastrointestinal series demonstrated significant cephalad displacement of the gastroesophageal junction. A Collis-Nissen hernial repair by muscle-sparing mini-thoracotomy was performed successfully. To date, 3 years after surgery, the patient is enjoying normal oral intake, has an excellent activities of daily living level, and there is no hernia recurrence. Cases of massive paraesophageal hernia are frequently associated with esophageal shortening that causes tension on the repairs and late failure. Advantages of the transthoracic approach in such cases include feasibility of direct esophageal mobilization, accurate assessment of esophageal tension, and facilitation of Collis gastroplasty. The true indication for transthoracic Collis-Nissen repair among cases of paraesophageal hiatal hernia with a short esophagus should be acknowledged more in the era of laparoscopy. PMID:18791669

  17. Correlations of third-trimester hiatal biometry obtained using four-dimensional translabial ultrasonography with the delivery route in nulliparous pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate normal hiatal dimensions in the third trimester in nulliparous Thai pregnant women and to establish which biometric factors were associated with various pregnancy outcomes. Methods: Fifty-seven consecutive nulliparous pregnant Thai women in their third trimester were recruited on a voluntary basis from April to October 2014. All subjects underwent four-dimensional (4D) translabial ultrasonography. Hiatal biometric parameters were measured at rest, while performing a Valsalva maneuver, and during contraction. Information about the patients’ eventual deliveries was obtained from their medical records. Results: The mean values of the patients’ age, body mass index, and gestational age at the time of examination were 27.4±5.47 years, 26.7±3.48 kg/m2, and 36.6±1.49 weeks, respectively. No subjects had vaginal lumps or experienced prolapse greater than stage 1 of the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system. Ultrasonography showed that the mean values of the hiatal area at rest, while performing a Valsalva maneuver, and during contraction were 13.10±2.92 cm2, 17.50±4.81 cm2, and 9.69±2.09 cm2, respectively. The hiatal area at rest, the axial measurement at rest, and the axial measurement while performing a Valsalva maneuver were significantly associated with the route of delivery (P=0.02, P=0.04, and P=0.03, respectively). Conclusion: The route of delivery was associated with hiatal biometric values measured using 4D translabial ultrasonography, based on the results of nulliparous Thai women in the third trimester. PMID:26403960

  18. Paraesophageal Hernia Repair With Partial Longitudinal Gastrectomy in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, John; El-Hayek, Kevin; Brethauer, Stacy; Schauer, Philip; Zelisko, Andrea; Chand, Bipan; O'Rourke, Colin; Kroh, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with hiatal hernia in obese patients has proven difficult, as studies demonstrate poor symptom control and high failure rates in this patient population. Recent data have shown that incorporating weight loss procedures into the treatment of reflux may improve overall outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 28 obese and morbidly obese patients who presented from December 2007 through July 2013 with large or recurrent type 3 or 4 paraesophageal hernia. All of the patients underwent combined paraesophageal hernia repair and partial longitudinal gastrectomy. Charts were retrospectively reviewed, and the patients were contacted to determine symptomatic relief. Results: Mean preoperative body mass index was 38.1 ± 4.9 kg/m2. Anatomic failure of prior fundoplication occurred in 7 patients (25%). The remaining 21 had primary paraesophageal hernia, 3 of which were type 4. Postoperative complications included pulmonary embolism (n = 1), pulmonary decompensation (n = 2), and wound infection (n = 1). Mean hospital stay was 5 ± 3 days. Upper gastrointestinal esophagogram was performed in 21 patients with no immediate recurrence or staple line dehiscence. Mean excess weight loss was 44 ± 25%. All of the patients surveyed experienced near to total resolution of their preoperative symptoms within the first month. At 1 year, symptom scores decreased significantly. At 27 months, however, there was a mild increase in the scores. Return of severe symptoms occurred in 2 patients, both of whom underwent conversion to gastric bypass. Conclusions: Combined laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair with longitudinal partial gastrectomy offers a safe, feasible approach to the management of large or recurrent paraesophageal hernia in well-selected obese and morbidly obese patients. Short-term results were promising; however, intermediate results showed increasing rates of reflux symptoms that required

  19. Hernias (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with them. Hernias in kids can be treated (hernia repair is the one of the most common surgeries ... intestine that is caught and squeezed in the groin area may block the passage of food though ...

  20. Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... the likelihood of a hernia including persistent coughing, difficulty with bowel movements or urination, or frequent need for straining. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair? Keep reading... Page 1 of 2 1 2 » Brought to ...

  1. Robotic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Escobar Dominguez, Jose E; Gonzalez, Anthony; Donkor, Charan

    2015-09-01

    Inguinal hernias have been described throughout the history of medicine with many efforts to achieve the cure. Currently, with the advantages of minimally invasive surgery, new questions arise: what is going to be the best approach for inguinal hernia repair? Is there a real benefit with the robotic approach? Should minimally invasive hernia surgery be the standard of care? In this report we address these questions by describing our experience with robotic inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26153353

  2. Incarcerated recurrent Amyand's hernia

    PubMed Central

    Quartey, Benjamin; Ugochukwu, Obinna; Kuehn, Reed; Ospina, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Amyand's hernia is a rarity and a recurrent case is extremely rare. A 71-year-old male with a previous history of right inguinal hernia repair presented to the emergency department with a 1-day history of pain in the right groin. A physical examination revealed a nonreducible right inguinal hernia. A computed tomography scan showed a 1.3-cm appendix with surrounding inflammation within a right inguinal hernia. An emergent right groin exploration revealed an incarcerated and injected non-perforated appendix and an indirect hernia. Appendectomy was performed through the groin incision, and the indirect hernia defect was repaired with a biological mesh (Flex-HD). We hereby present this unique case – the first reported case of recurrent Amyand's hernia and a literature review of this anatomical curiosity. PMID:23248506

  3. Two Ports Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Medhat M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Several laparoscopic treatment techniques were designed for improving the outcome over the last decade. The various techniques differ in their approach to the inguinal internal ring, suturing and knotting techniques, number of ports used in the procedures, and mode of dissection of the hernia sac. Patients and Surgical Technique. 90 children were subjected to surgery and they undergone two-port laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia in children. Technique feasibility in relation to other modalities of repair was the aim of this work. 90 children including 75 males and 15 females underwent surgery. Hernia in 55 cases was right-sided and in 15 left-sided. Two patients had recurrent hernia following open hernia repair. 70 (77.7%) cases were suffering unilateral hernia and 20 (22.2%) patients had bilateral hernia. Out of the 20 cases 5 cases were diagnosed by laparoscope (25%). The patients' median age was 18 months. The mean operative time for unilateral repairs was 15 to 20 minutes and bilateral was 21 to 30 minutes. There was no conversion. The complications were as follows: one case was recurrent right inguinal hernia and the second was stitch sinus. Discussion. The results confirm the safety and efficacy of two ports laparoscopic hernia repair in congenital inguinal hernia in relation to other modalities of treatment. PMID:25785196

  4. JAMA Patient Page: Abdominal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an operation. Umbilical hernia Abdominal wall Intestinal loop Peritoneum Skin Peritoneum Umbilical annulus SYMPTOMS The first symptom of a ... vomiting, or constipation. Inguinal hernia Indirect inguinal hernia Peritoneum Deep inguinal ring Inguinal canal Superficial inguinal ring ...

  5. Toxoplasma gondii infection and abdominal hernia: evidence of a new association

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We performed a retrospective, observational study in 1156 adult subjects from the general population of Durango City, Mexico, Fifty five subjects with a history of abdominal hernia repair and 1101 subjects without hernia were examined with enzyme-linked immunoassays for the presence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies. Results The seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies and IgG titers was significantly higher in subjects with abdominal hernia repair than those without hernia. There was a tendency for subjects with hernia repair to have a higher seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgM antibodies than subjects without hernia. The seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies in subjects with hernia repair was significantly higher in subjects ≥ 50 years old than those < 50 years old. Further analysis in subjects aged ≥ 50 years showed that the seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies was also significantly higher in individuals with hernia repair than those without hernia (OR = 2.72; 95% CI: 1.10-6.57). Matching by age and sex further showed that the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma infection was significantly higher in patients with hernia repair than those without hernia (OR: 4.50; 95% CI: 1.22-17.33). Conclusions Results indicate that infection with Toxoplasma is associated with abdominal hernia. The contributing role of infection with Toxoplasma in abdominal hernia was observed mainly in subjects aged ≥ 50 years old. Our results might have clinical, prevention and treatment implications and warrant for further investigation. PMID:21682896

  6. Inguinal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips for applicants; human subjects research information; grant review and management resources; and commonly used funding mechanisms, including diversity and small business programs Research Programs & Contacts Research program and staff ...

  7. Athletic pubalgia (sports hernia).

    PubMed

    Litwin, Demetrius E M; Sneider, Erica B; McEnaney, Patrick M; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    Athletic pubalgia or sports hernia is a syndrome of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain that may occur in athletes and nonathletes. Because the differential diagnosis of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain is so broad, only a small number of patients with chronic lower abdomen and groin pain fulfill the diagnostic criteria of athletic pubalgia (sports hernia). The literature published to date regarding the cause, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of sports hernias is confusing. This article summarizes the current information and our present approach to this chronic lower abdomen and groin pain syndrome. PMID:21419964

  8. Association Between Thoracic Aortic Disease and Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Christian; Eriksson, Per; Franco‐Cereceda, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background The study hypothesis was that thoracic aortic disease (TAD) is associated with a higher‐than‐expected prevalence of inguinal hernia. Such an association has been reported for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and hernia. Unlike AAA, TAD is not necessarily detectable with clinical examination or ultrasound, and there are no population‐based screening programs for TAD. Therefore, conditions associated with TAD, such as inguinal hernia, are of particular clinical relevance. Methods and Results The prevalence of inguinal hernia in subjects with TAD was determined from nation‐wide register data and compared to a non‐TAD group (patients with isolated aortic stenosis). Groups were balanced using propensity score matching. Multivariable statistical analysis (logistic regression) was performed to identify variables independently associated with hernia. Hernia prevalence was 110 of 750 (15%) in subjects with TAD versus 29 of 301 (9.6%) in non‐TAD, P=0.03. This statistically significant difference remained after propensity score matching: 21 of 159 (13%) in TAD versus 14 of 159 (8.9%) in non‐TAD, P<0.001. Variables independently associated with hernia in multivariable analysis were male sex (odds ratio [OR] with 95% confidence interval [95% CI]) 3.4 (2.1 to 5.4), P<0.001; increased age, OR 1.02/year (1.004 to 1.04), P=0.014; and TAD, OR 1.8 (1.1 to 2.8), P=0.015. Conclusions The prevalence of inguinal hernia (15%) in TAD is higher than expected in a general population and higher in TAD, compared to non‐TAD. TAD is independently associated with hernia in multivariable analysis. Presence or history of hernia may be of importance in detecting TAD, and the association warrants further study. PMID:25146705

  9. Hernias: inguinal and incisional.

    PubMed

    Kingsnorth, Andrew; LeBlanc, Karl

    2003-11-01

    In the past decade hernia surgery has been challenged by two new technologies: by laparoscopy, which has attempted to change the traditional open operative techniques, and by prosthetic mesh, which has achieved much lower recurrence rates. The demand by health care providers for increasingly efficient and cost-effective surgery has resulted in modifications to pathways of care to encourage more widespread adoption of day case, outpatient surgery, and local anaesthesia. In addition, the UK National Institute for Clinical Excellence has recommended strategies for bilateral and recurrent hernias. Here, we discuss these strategies and review some neglected aspects of hernia management such as trusses, antibiotic cover, return to work and activity, and emergency surgery. Many of the principles of management apply equally to inguinal and incisional hernias. We recommend that the more difficult and complex of the procedures be referred to specialists. PMID:14615114

  10. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some hernia repairs are performed using a small telescope known as a laparoscope. If your surgeon has ... in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). Laparoscopic repair offers a ...

  11. Handlebar hernia in children.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P J; Green, M; Ramesh, A N

    2011-05-01

    Handlebar hernia is a rare form of traumatic abdominal wall hernia usually occurring in children. As the name suggests, it results from the blunt impact of a handlebar after a fall from a bicycle. A classic case is described of such a hernia occurring in a 14-year-old boy who presented with minimal external signs of injury, but was found to have significant traumatic disruption to the abdominal wall musculature and peritoneum, requiring surgical repair. A review of the English literature found only 25 cases of handlebar hernias in children less than 16 years of age. The average age is 9 years, and two-thirds of cases occur in boys. The frequency of associated visceral injury is low. The majority of reported cases were managed with surgical exploration and simple suture repair. Despite minimal signs on examination, the history should raise suspicion of significant underlying muscular disruption. PMID:21098798

  12. Diaphragmatic hernia following oesophagectomy for oesophageal cancer – Are we too radical?

    PubMed Central

    Argenti, F.; Luhmann, A.; Dolan, R.; Wilson, M.; Podda, M.; Patil, P.; Shimi, S.; Alijani, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diaphragmatic herniation (DH) of abdominal contents into the thorax after oesophageal resection is a recognised and serious complication of surgery. While differences in pressure between the abdominal and thoracic cavities are important, the size of the hiatal defect is something that can be influenced surgically. As with all oncological surgery, safe resection margins are essential without adversely affecting necessary anatomical structure and function. However very little has been published looking at the extent of the hiatal resection. We aim to present a case series of patients who developed DH herniation post operatively in order to raise discussion about the ideal extent of surgical resection required. Methods We present a series of cases of two male and one female who had oesophagectomies for moderately and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the lower oesophagus who developed post-operative DH. We then conducted a detailed literature review using Medline, Pubmed and Google Scholar to identify existing guidance to avoid this complication with particular emphasis on the extent of hiatal resection. Discussion Extended incision and partial resection of the diaphragm are associated with an increased risk of postoperative DH formation. However, these more extensive excisions can ensure clear surgical margins. Post-operative herniation can be an early or late complication of surgery and despite the clear importance of hiatal resection only one paper has been published on this subject which recommends a more limited resection than was carried out in our cases. Conclusion This case series investigated the recommended extent of hiatal dissection in oesophageal surgery. Currently there is no clear guidance available on this subject and further studies are needed to ascertain the optimum resection margin that results in the best balance of oncological parameters vs. post operative morbidity. PMID:27158485

  13. Umbilical hernia repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Umbilical hernias are fairly common. They are obvious at birth and are caused by a small defect ... surgically. In most cases, by age 3 the umbilical hernia shrinks and closes without treatment. The indications ...

  14. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  15. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  16. Laparoscopic hernia repair--when is a hernia not a hernia?

    PubMed

    Bunting, David; Szczebiot, Lukasz; Cota, Alwyn

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of diagnoses can present as inguinal hernia. Laparoscopic techniques are being increasingly used in the repair of inguinal hernias and offer the potential benefit of identifying additional pathology. The authors present the first reported case of a hydrocele of the canal of Nuck diagnosed laparoscopically. We review the incidence of identifying additional pathology through laparoscopy for inguinal hernia repair. We suggest that in patients with atypical presenting features of a hernia, the transabdominal preperitoneal, rather than a totally extraperitoneal, approach to groin hernia repair should be considered because of its greater diagnostic potential. PMID:24398212

  17. Laparoscopic Hernia Repair—When Is a Hernia Not a Hernia?

    PubMed Central

    Szczebiot, Lukasz; Cota, Alwyn

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of diagnoses can present as inguinal hernia. Laparoscopic techniques are being increasingly used in the repair of inguinal hernias and offer the potential benefit of identifying additional pathology. The authors present the first reported case of a hydrocele of the canal of Nuck diagnosed laparoscopically. We review the incidence of identifying additional pathology through laparoscopy for inguinal hernia repair. We suggest that in patients with atypical presenting features of a hernia, the transabdominal preperitoneal, rather than a totally extraperitoneal, approach to groin hernia repair should be considered because of its greater diagnostic potential. PMID:24398212

  18. Inguinal hernia - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You or your child had surgery to repair an inguinal hernia caused by a weakness in the abdominal wall in your groin area. You or your child probably had general (asleep and pain-free) or spinal or epidural (numb from the waist down) anesthesia. If ...

  19. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... bulges out of a weak spot in the groin. Usually this tissue is part of the intestine. ... Your surgeon makes a cut (incision) in your groin area. The hernia is ... wall. This repairs the weakness in the wall. At the end ...

  20. Ventral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    You will probably receive general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free) for this surgery. If your hernia is small, you may receive a spinal or epidural block and medicine to relax you. You will be awake, but pain-free. Your surgeon will make a surgical cut in ...

  1. Sports Hernia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The minimal repair technique for sports hernias repairs only the weak area of the posterior abdominal wall along with decompressing the genitofemoral nerve. This technique has been shown to return athletes to competition rapidly. This study compares the clinical outcomes of the minimal repair technique with the traditional modified Bassini repair. Hypothesis: Athletes undergoing the minimal repair technique for a sports hernia would return to play more rapidly compared with athletes undergoing the traditional modified Bassini repair. Methods: A retrospective study of 28 patients who underwent sports hernia repair at the authors’ institution was performed. Fourteen patients underwent the modified Bassini repair, and a second group of 14 patients underwent the minimal repair technique. The 2 groups were compared with respect to time to return to sport, return to original level of competition, and clinical outcomes. Results: Patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at a median of 5.6 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks), which was significantly faster compared with the modified Bassini repair group, with a median return of 25.8 weeks (range, 4-112 weeks; P = 0.002). Thirteen of 14 patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at their previous level, while 9 of 14 patients in the Bassini group were able to return to their previous level of sport (P = 0.01). Two patients in each group had recurrent groin pain. One patient in the minimal repair group underwent revision hernia surgery for recurrent pain, while 1 patient in the Bassini group underwent hip arthroscopy for symptomatic hip pain. Conclusion: The minimal repair technique allows athletes with sports hernias to return to play faster than patients treated with the modified Bassini. PMID:24427419

  2. Terminal ileum gangrene secondary to a type IV paraesophageal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ching Tsai; Hsiao, Po Jen; Chiu, Chih Chien; Chan, Jenq Shyong; Lin, Yee Fung; Lo, Yuan Hung; Hsiao, Chia Jen

    2016-01-01

    Type IV paraesophageal hernia (PEH) is very rare, and is characterized by the intrathoracic herniation of the abdominal viscera other than the stomach into the chest. We describe a 78-year-old woman who presented at our emergency department because of epigastric pain that she had experienced over the past 24 h. On the day after admission, her pain became severe and was accompanied by right chest pain and dyspnea. Chest radiography revealed an intrathoracic intestinal gas bubble occupying the right lower lung field. Emergency explorative laparotomy identified a type IV PEH with herniation of only the terminal ileum through a hiatal defect into the right thoracic cavity. In this report, we also present a review of similar cases in the literature published between 1980 and 2015 in PubMed. There were four published cases of small bowel herniation into the thoracic cavity during this period. Our patient represents a rare case of an individual diagnosed with type IV PEH with incarceration of only the terminal ileum. PMID:26937153

  3. Unusual Complications of Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Emegoakor, CD; Dike, EI; Emegoakor, FC

    2014-01-01

    Incisional hernia represents a breakdown or loss of continuity of a fascial closure. These hernias are of particular concern not only for the high recurrence rates among them but also for the challenges that follow their repair. It is known to occur in 11-23% of laparotomies. This paper presents two unusual complications of incisional hernia managed by the authors. One ruptured incisional hernia with evisceration of gut and a case of incarcerated gravid uterus in a woman in labour. The case records of the two patients with unusual complications of incisional hernia were pooled and presented to highlight the clinical presentation and management options of this condition. The patient with ruptured hernia and eviscerated gut presented immediately and was resuscitated and the hernia repaired with polypropylene mesh. The patient with incarcerated uterus had caesarean section and mesh repair of the hernia. Incisional hernia can present with unusual complications. The management is very challenging. Good knowledge and skills are required to deal with this condition. PMID:25506498

  4. Unusual complications of incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Emegoakor, Cd; Dike, Ei; Emegoakor, Fc

    2014-11-01

    Incisional hernia represents a breakdown or loss of continuity of a fascial closure. These hernias are of particular concern not only for the high recurrence rates among them but also for the challenges that follow their repair. It is known to occur in 11-23% of laparotomies. This paper presents two unusual complications of incisional hernia managed by the authors. One ruptured incisional hernia with evisceration of gut and a case of incarcerated gravid uterus in a woman in labour. The case records of the two patients with unusual complications of incisional hernia were pooled and presented to highlight the clinical presentation and management options of this condition. The patient with ruptured hernia and eviscerated gut presented immediately and was resuscitated and the hernia repaired with polypropylene mesh. The patient with incarcerated uterus had caesarean section and mesh repair of the hernia. Incisional hernia can present with unusual complications. The management is very challenging. Good knowledge and skills are required to deal with this condition. PMID:25506498

  5. Pelvic Floor Ultrasound Imaging: Are Physiotherapists Interchangeable in the Assessment of Levator Hiatal Biometry?

    PubMed Central

    Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; Auchincloss, Cindy; McLean, Linda

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate inter-examiner reliability in the ultrasound (US) assessment of levator hiatal dimensions when different physiotherapists perform independent data acquisition and analysis. Methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, 14 asymptomatic nulliparous women were imaged at rest, during pelvic floor muscle contraction, and during Valsalva manoeuvre by two physiotherapists using three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) transperineal US. Examiners each measured the dimensions of the levator hiatus (area and antero-posterior and transverse diameters) from the US volumes they respectively acquired. Inter-examiner reliability was determined using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs), and inter-examiner agreement was determined using Bland–Altman analyses. Results: The ICC results demonstrated very good inter-examiner reliability (ICC=0.84–0.98); Bland–Altman results showed high inter-examiner agreement across all measurements. Conclusions: Trained examiners may be considered interchangeable in the US assessment of levator hiatal biometry. Overall, trained physiotherapists using transperineal US imaging to assess levator hiatal biometry can be confident when comparing their own clinical findings to those of their colleagues and to findings published in the literature. PMID:25922555

  6. Transient left paraduodenal hernia.

    PubMed

    Ovali, Gulgun Yilmaz; Orguc, Sebnem; Unlu, Murat; Pabuscu, Yuksel

    2005-09-01

    A 52-year-old woman with acute deterioration of recurrent abdominal pain was admitted to the hospital. Spiral computed tomography (CT) of abdomen was performed. A left paraduodenal hernia was identified on CT. There was no clinical sign or imaging finding suggesting intestinal obstruction or mesenteric ischemia. She refused surgical intervention since her pain was intermittant and decreasing. On the fifth day of hospitalization the patient's pain resolved completely and the follow-up CT demonstrated regression of the herniation. PMID:15994059

  7. [Congenital lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Peláez Mata, D J; Alvarez Muñoz, V; Fernández Jiménez, I; García Crespo, J M; Teixidor de Otto, J L

    1998-07-01

    Hernias in the lumbar region are abdominal wall defects that appear in two possible locations: the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft and the inferior lumbar triangle of Petit. There are 40 cases reported in the pediatric literature, and only 16 are considered congenital, associated with the lumbocostovertebral syndrome and/or meningomyelocele. A new case is presented. A premature newborn with a mass in the left flank that increases when the patient cries and reduces easily. The complementary studies confirm the diagnosis of lumbar hernia and reveal the presence of lumbocostovertebral syndrome associated. At the time of operation a well defined fascial defect at the superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt-Lesshaft is primarily closed. The diagnosis of lumbar hernia is not difficult to establish but it is necessary the screening of the lumbocostovertebral syndrome. We recommend the surgical treatment before 12 months of age; the objective is to close the defect primarily or to use prosthetic material if necessary. PMID:12602034

  8. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  9. Prosthetic Mesh Repair for Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Tatar, Cihad; Tüzün, İshak Sefa; Karşıdağ, Tamer; Kızılkaya, Mehmet Celal; Yılmaz, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Incarcerated inguinal hernia is a commonly encountered urgent surgical condition, and tension-free repair is a well-established method for the treatment of non-complicated cases. However, due to the risk of prosthetic material-related infections, the use of mesh in the repair of strangulated or incarcerated hernia has often been subject to debate. Recent studies have demonstrated that biomaterials represent suitable materials for performing urgent hernia repair. Certain studies recommend mesh repair only for cases where no bowel resection is required; other studies, however, recommend mesh repair for patients requiring bowel resection as well. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of different surgical techniques performed for strangulated hernia, and to evaluate the effect of mesh use on postoperative complications. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 151 patients who had been admitted to our hospital’s emergency department to undergo surgery for a diagnosis of incarcerated inguinal hernia. The patients were divided into two groups based on the applied surgical technique. Group 1 consisted of 112 patients treated with mesh-based repair techniques, while Group 2 consisted of 39 patients treated with tissue repair techniques. Patients in Group 1 were further divided into two sub-groups: one consisting of patients undergoing bowel resection (Group 3), and the other consisting of patients not undergoing bowel resection (Group 4). Results: In Group 1, it was observed that eight (7.14%) of the patients had wound infections, while two (1.78%) had hematomas, four (3.57%) had seromas, and one (0.89%) had relapse. In Group 2, one (2.56%) of the patients had a wound infection, while three (7.69%) had hematomas, one (2.56%) had seroma, and none had relapses. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to wound infection, seroma

  10. Laparoscopic paracolostomy hernia mesh repair.

    PubMed

    Virzí, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Virzí; Scaravilli, Francesco; Francesco, Scaravilli; Ragazzi, Salvatore; Salvatore, Ragazzi; Piazza, Diego; Diego, Piazza

    2007-12-01

    Paracolostomy hernia is a common occurrence, representing a late complication of stoma surgery. Different surgical techniques have been proposed to repair the wall defect, but the lowest recurrence rates are associated with the use of mesh. We present the case report of a patient in which laparoscopic paracolostomy hernia mesh repair has been successfully performed. PMID:18097321

  11. Vesicocutaneous fistula after sliding hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Varun; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sureka, Sanjoy

    2016-01-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias are usually direct inguinal hernias containing various abdominal viscera. The incidence of bladder forming a part of an inguinal hernia, called as “scrotal cystocele,” is 1–4%. The risk of bladder injury is as high as 12% when repairing this type of hernia. This case report emphasizes this aspect in a 65-year-old man who presented with urinary leak through the scrotal wound following right inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26941501

  12. CONGENITAL DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Burton E.

    1954-01-01

    Treatment of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in infants is a matter of semi-emergency and should be done as soon as adequate preparations can be made because sometimes fatal complications develop swiftly. In preoperative preparation there is great advantage in thorough decompression of the abdominal viscera, stomach, bowel and bladder. As to operation, the author believes the abdominal approach has most to recommend it. In the postoperative period, continued gastric suction for a brief time, parenteral administration of fluids and use of a Mistogen tent with a high moist oxygen content will facilitate rapid recovery. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:13209363

  13. Delayed Presentation of Traumatic Right-Sided Diaphragmatic Hernia after Abdominoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jadlowiec, Caroline C.; Sakorafas, Lois U.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are rare and challenging to diagnose. Following trauma, diagnosis may occur immediately or in a delayed fashion. It is believed that left traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are more common as a result of the protective right-sided anatomic lie of the liver. If unrecognized, traumatic diaphragmatic injuries are subject to enlarge over time as a result of the normal pressure changes observed between the thoracic and abdominal cavities. Additionally, abrupt changes to the pressure gradients, such as those which occur with positive pressure ventilation or surgical manipulation of the abdominal wall, can act as a nidus for making an asymptomatic hernia symptomatic. We report our experience with a delayed traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia presenting with large bowel incarceration two months after abdominoplasty. In our review of the literature, we were unable to find any reports of delayed presentation of a traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia occurring acutely following abdominoplasty. PMID:24900935

  14. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  15. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Juan A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  16. Sports Hernia: Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manipulative Treatment Becoming a DO Video Library Misdiagnosed Muscle Strain Can Be A Pain Page Content If ... speeds, sports hernias are frequently confused with common muscle strain ,” says Michael Sampson, DO, who practices in ...

  17. A technique for the laparoscopic repair of paraoesophageal hernia without mesh.

    PubMed

    D'Netto, Trevor J; Falk, Gregory L

    2014-04-01

    Laparoscopic paraoesophageal hernia repair is a challenging procedure, both in surgical technical difficulty and in prevention of recurrence, in the setting of operating on an older patient cohort with associated co-morbidities. However, modifications based on sound surgical principles can lead to better outcomes. This article describes and illustrates in detail the technique for the laparoscopic repair of paraoesophageal hernia without mesh with cardio-oesophageal junction fixation. The data and results of the study supporting this technique have been published previously by Gibson et al. (Surgical Endoscopy 27: 618-623, 2013). The previously published article has reported on the numbers of patients, mean age, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification System, body mass index, duration of follow-up, complications, Visick scores and quality of life pre- and post-operatively. The principles of complete reduction of the hernia sac, preservation of both crura, mobilisation of the phreno-oesophageal ligament and phreno-gastric attachments, adequate mediastinal mobilisation of the oesophagus and the cardio-oesophageal junction into the abdomen without tension, preservation of both vagi, a tension-free crural repair including the fascial aspects adjacent to the diaphragm, an anterior hiatal repair in combination with the recognised posterior approximation, a loose fundoplication and a secure cardiopexy to the median arcuate ligament and multiple points of attachment; we have found leads to good operative results(Gibson et. al.) without the need for mesh. This article outlines in detail the operative technique guided by these principles with annotated intra-operative photographs illustrating the anatomy and procedure. The technique used by our team since March 2009 for the last 154 cases, based on the experience of an aggregate of 544 cases since 1999, we believe results in an acceptable level of symptomatic and anatomic recurrence without using

  18. A genome-wide association study identifies four novel susceptibility loci underlying inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Eric; Makki, Nadja; Shen, Ling; Chen, David C.; Tian, Chao; Eckalbar, Walter L.; Hinds, David; Ahituv, Nadav; Avins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most commonly performed operations in the world, yet little is known about the genetic mechanisms that predispose individuals to develop inguinal hernias. We perform a genome-wide association analysis of surgically confirmed inguinal hernias in 72,805 subjects (5,295 cases and 67,510 controls) and confirm top associations in an independent cohort of 92,444 subjects with self-reported hernia repair surgeries (9,701 cases and 82,743 controls). We identify four novel inguinal hernia susceptibility loci in the regions of EFEMP1, WT1, EBF2 and ADAMTS6. Moreover, we observe expression of all four genes in mouse connective tissue and network analyses show an important role for two of these genes (EFEMP1 and WT1) in connective tissue maintenance/homoeostasis. Our findings provide insight into the aetiology of hernia development and highlight genetic pathways for studies of hernia development and its treatment. PMID:26686553

  19. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A hernia... contents. This generic type of device includes the umbilical truss. (b) Classification. Class I...

  20. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A hernia... contents. This generic type of device includes the umbilical truss. (b) Classification. Class I...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A hernia... contents. This generic type of device includes the umbilical truss. (b) Classification. Class I...

  2. Abdominal wall herniae and their underlying pathology

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, Emma; Al-Akash, Musallam

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of pseudomyxoma peritonei presenting as a strangulated inguinal hernia. We review the current literature regarding the incidence of underlying pathology in patients presenting with abdominal wall herniae and discuss the need for histological assessment of the hernia sac in selected patients. We highlight the importance of assessing for and being aware of significant underlying pathology in certain patients. PMID:26855074

  3. [Congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis].

    PubMed

    Barrero Candau, R; Garrido Morales, M

    2007-04-01

    We report a new case of congenital lumbar hernia. This is first case reported of congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis. We review literature and describe associated malformations reported that would be role out in every case of congenital lumbar hernia. PMID:17650728

  4. A case of de Garengeot hernia: the feasibility of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Al-Subaie, Saud; Mustafa, Hatem; Al-Sharqawi, Noura; Al-Haddad, Mohanned; Othman, Feras

    2015-01-01

    Introduction de Garengeot hernia is described as the presence of an appendix in a femoral hernia. This rare hernia usually presents with both diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. Presentation of case We report a case of a 59 year-old woman with a one-year history of a right irreducible femoral hernia. She underwent diagnostic laparoscopy with an intraoperative diagnosis of de Garengeot hernia. This was followed by a laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach for hernia repair. Discussion The long-standing presentation of de Garengeot hernia is seldomly reported in literature. There has been no standard approach of treatment for de Garengeot hernias described, possibly due to the rarity of this condition. The unusual presentation of the hernia prompted us to undergo a diagnostic laparoscopy first, during which the appendix was seen incarcerated in a femoral hernia sac. We were easily able to proceed for a laparoscopic TAPP approach for hernia repair without the need for conversion to an open repair. Conclusion We were able to obtain an accurate diagnosis of an appendix within a long-standing irreducible femoral hernia through diagnostic laparoscopy followed by transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach for hernia repair. We would like to underline the usefulness of laparoscopy as a valuable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of this unusual presentation of groin hernias. PMID:26432998

  5. The management of incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Kingsnorth, Andrew

    2006-05-01

    Many thousand laparotomy incisions are created each year and the failure rate for closure of these abdominal wounds is between 10-15%, creating a large problem of incisional hernia. In the past many of these hernias have been neglected and treated with abdominal trusses or inadequately managed with high failure rates. The introduction of mesh has not had a significant impact because surgeons are not aware of modern effective techniques which may be used to reconstruct defects of the abdominal wall. This review will cover recent advances in incisional hernia surgery which affect the general surgeon, and also briefly review advanced techniques employed by specialist surgeons in anterior abdominal wall surgery. PMID:16719992

  6. The Management of Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsnorth, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Many thousand laparotomy incisions are created each year and the failure rate for closure of these abdominal wounds is between 10–15%, creating a large problem of incisional hernia. In the past many of these hernias have been neglected and treated with abdominal trusses or inadequately managed with high failure rates. The introduction of mesh has not had a significant impact because surgeons are not aware of modern effective techniques which may be used to reconstruct defects of the abdominal wall. This review will cover recent advances in incisional hernia surgery which affect the general surgeon, and also briefly review advanced techniques employed by specialist surgeons in anterior abdominal wall surgery. PMID:16719992

  7. When is surgery necessary for a groin hernia?

    PubMed

    Berliner, S D

    1990-01-01

    Hernias are one of the most common causes of symptoms in the groin. Surgery is needed for all femoral and indirect inguinal hernias to prevent incarceration and strangulation. Asymptomatic direct hernias can be observed if they are not enlarging. Atypical symptoms in a patient with a hernia must be evaluated to exclude other disease. Fortunately, most groin hernias can be repaired electively. PMID:2296562

  8. [Management of umbilical hernia in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Loriau, J; Manaouil, D; Mauvais, F

    2002-06-01

    The treatment of umbilical hernia in the setting of cirrhosis poses unique and specific management problems due to the pathophysiology of cirrhotic ascites. The high intra-abdominal pressures generated by ascites when applied to areas of parietal weakness are the cause of hernia formation and enlargement. Successful surgical treatment depends on minimization or elimination of ascites. Umbilical rupture and hernia strangulation are the most life-threatening complications of umbilical hernia with ascites and they demand urgent surgical intervention. In non-emergency situations, medical therapy to control ascites should precede hernia repair. When ascites is refractory to medical therapy, treatment will vary depending on whether transplantation is an option. In liver transplantation candidates, hernia repair can be performed at the end of the transplantation procedure. If transplanation is not envisaged, concomitant treatment of both ascites and hernia is best achieved by placement of a peritoneo-venous shunt at the time of the parietal repair. PMID:12391663

  9. Laparoscopic Repair of Ventral Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Heniford, B Todd; Park, Adrian; Ramshaw, Bruce J.; Voeller, Guy

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic repair of ventral hernias. Summary Background Data: The recurrence rate after standard repair of ventral hernias may be as high as 12-52%, and the wide surgical dissection required often results in wound complications. Use of a laparoscopic approach may decrease rates of complications and recurrence after ventral hernia repair. Methods: Data on all patients who underwent laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) performed by 4 surgeons using a standardized procedure between November 1993 and October 2002 were collected prospectively (85% of patients) or retrospectively. Results: LVHR was completed in 819 of the 850 patients (422 men; 428 women) in whom it was attempted. Thirty-four percent of completed LVHRs were for recurrent hernias. The patient mean body mass index was 32; the mean defect size was 118 cm2. Mesh, averaging 344 cm2, was used in all cases. Mean operating time was 120 min, mean estimated blood loss was 49 mL, and hospital stay averaged 2.3 days. There were 128 complications in 112 patients (13.2%). One patient died of a myocardial infarction. The most common complications were ileus (3%) and prolonged seroma (2.6%). During a mean follow-up time of 20.2 months (range, 1-94 months), the hernia recurrence rate was 4.7%. Recurrence was associated with large defects, obesity, previous open repairs, and perioperative complications. Conclusion: In this large series, LVHR had a low rate of conversion to open surgery, a short hospital stay, a moderate complication rate, and a low risk of recurrence. PMID:14501505

  10. Intrathoracic Hernia after Total Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yoshihiko; Murakami, Masahiko; Otsuka, Koji; Saito, Kazuhiko; Saito, Akira; Motegi, Kentaro; Date, Hiromi; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ariyoshi, Tomotake; Goto, Satoru; Yamazaki, Kimiyasu; Fujimori, Akira; Watanabe, Makoto; Aoki, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic hernias after total gastrectomy are rare. We report the case of a 78-year-old man who underwent total gastrectomy with antecolic Roux-Y reconstruction for residual gastric cancer. He had alcoholic liver cirrhosis and received radical laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy for gastric cancer 3 years ago. Early gastric cancer in the remnant stomach was found by routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. We initially performed endoscopic submucosal dissection, but the vertical margin was positive in a pathological result. We performed total gastrectomy with antecolic Roux-Y reconstruction by laparotomy. For adhesion of the esophageal hiatus, the left chest was connected with the abdominal cavity. A pleural defect was not repaired. Two days after the operation, the patient was suspected of having intrathoracic hernia by chest X-rays. Computed tomography showed that the transverse colon and Roux limb were incarcerated in the left thoracic cavity. He was diagnosed with intrathoracic hernia, and emergency reduction and repair were performed. Operative findings showed that the Roux limb and transverse colon were incarcerated in the thoracic cavity. After reduction, the orifice of the hernia was closed by suturing the crus of the diaphragm with the ligament of the jejunum and omentum. After the second operation, he experienced anastomotic leakage and left pyothorax. Anastomotic leakage was improved with conservative therapy and he was discharged 76 days after the second operation.

  11. Paraduodenal hernia and jejunal diverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Goodney, Philip P; Pindyck, Frank

    2004-02-01

    A case of left-sided paraduodenal hernia and jejunal diverticulosis is described in 75-year-old man who presented with chronic intermittent abdominal pain, weight loss, and anemia. A brief review of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical presentation displays the variety of symptoms associated with these rare conditions. PMID:14731138

  12. Management of voluminous abdominal incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, J-L; Poghosyan, T; Pogoshian, T; Corigliano, N; Canard, G; Veyrie, N

    2012-10-01

    Incisional hernia is one of the classic complications after abdominal surgery. The chronic, gradual increase in size of some of these hernias is such that the hernia ring widens to a point where there is a loss of substance in the abdominal wall, herniated organs can become incarcerated or strangulated while poor abdominal motility can alter respiratory function. The surgical treatment of small (<5 cm) incisional hernias is safe and straightforward, by either laparotomy or laparoscopy. For large hernias, surgical repair is often difficult. After reintegration of herniated viscera into the abdominal cavity, the abdominal wall defect must be closed anatomically in order to restore the function to the abdominal wall. Prosthetic reinforcement of the abdominal wall is mandatory for long-term successful repair. There are multiple techniques for prosthetic hernia repair, but placement of Dacron mesh in the retromuscular plane is our preference. PMID:23137643

  13. [Idiopathic Lumbar Hernia: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Takuya; Inamoto, Teruo; Matsunaga, Tomohisa; Uchimoto, Taizo; Saito, Kenkichi; Takai, Tomoaki; Minami, Koichiro; Takahara, Kiyoshi; Nomi, Hayahito; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old woman, complained of an indolent lump about 60 × 70 mm in size in the left lower back. We conducted a computed tomography scan, which exhibited a hernia of Gerota'sfascia-commonly called superior lumbar hernia. In the right lateral position, the hernia contents were observed to attenuate, hence only closure of the hernial orifice was conducted by using Kugel patch, without removal of the hernia sack. Six months after the surgery, she has had no relapse of the hernia. Superior lumbar hernia, which occurs in an anatomically brittle region in the lower back, is a rare and potentially serious disease. The urologic surgeon should bear in mind this rarely seen entity. PMID:26699890

  14. Uncommon content in congenial inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Harjai, Man Mohan

    2014-10-01

    Although sliding indirect inguinal hernias containing the ipsilateral ovary and fallopian tube are not uncommon in infant girls, sliding hernias containing uterus with both ovaries and fallopian tubes are extremely rare. At surgery, a 5-month-old infant girl was found to have an indirect hernia in which the uterus and fallopian tubes were sliding components with a wide deep inguinal ring. PMID:25336812

  15. Recurrent spigelian hernia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Losanoff, Julian E; Richman, Bruce W; Jones, James W

    2003-02-01

    Only seven cases of spigelian hernia recurrence have been previously reported. We report the case of a 75-year-old male patient who presented with extremely large hernia after four unsuccessful suture repairs over 12 years. The abdominal wall defect was repaired with Marlex mesh. The advantage of using prosthetic mesh in both primary and recurrent spigelian hernia is supported by recent clinical research data indicating a generalized collagen metabolism disorder in patients with primary and recurrent hernia. Mesh repair allows for tension-free anatomic restoration of distorted tissues associated with repair failures. PMID:12641349

  16. Current Trends in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Patapis, Paul; Zavras, Nick; Tzanetis, Panagiotis; Machairas, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical technique, postoperative complications, and possible recurrence after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) in comparison with open ventral hernia repair (OVHR), based on the international literature. Database: A Medline search of the current English literature was performed using the terms laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and incisional hernia repair. Conclusions: LVHR is a safe alternative to the open method, with the main advantages being minimal postoperative pain, shorter recovery, and decreased wound and mesh infections. Incidental enterotomy can be avoided by using a meticulous technique and sharp dissection to avoid thermal injury. PMID:26273186

  17. Obturator hernia of the fallopian tube.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Tassei; Tanaka, Nobutaka

    2013-06-01

    Obturator hernia of the fallopian tube is extremely rare. Multidetector computed tomography of a 43-year-old nulliparous woman with sudden onset lower right abdominal pain showed a low-density mass in the right obturator canal suspected of being an obturator hernia of the uterine adnexa. She was diagnosed as having an incarcerated obturator hernia of the fallopian tube at operation and treated with prosthetic mesh. Obturator hernia of the fallopian tube is very rare, and all cases reported in the literature were localized on the right side, perhaps due to the lesser mobility of the left than the right fallopian tube. PMID:22990633

  18. Hybrid Approaches for Complex Parastomal Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Xie, Jia-Ming; Miao, Jian-Qing; Wu, Hao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the major complications of colostomy with high occurrence. From October 2011 to November 2014, a retrospective study was conducted by analyzing and following up data of 16 patients suffering from parastomal hernia who underwent a hybrid technique repair. The safety and efficacy of the hybrid technique for parastomal hernia repair was investigated in terms of complications. All cases were operated successfully and had no major immediate postoperative complications other than mild abdominal pain in 5 cases. No long-term postoperative complications were reported in the follow-up. The authors found hybrid technique to be safe and effective for parastomal hernia repair with fewer complications. PMID:26787038

  19. Massive hiatus hernia complicated by jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Ruelan V.; D'Netto, Trevor J.; Hook, Henry C.; Falk, Gregory L.; Vivian, SarahJayne

    2015-01-01

    Giant para-oesophageal hernia may include pancreas with pancreatic complication and rarely jaundice. Repair is feasible and durable by laparoscopy. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is diagnostic. PMID:26246452

  20. ADULT ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA IN IBADAN

    PubMed Central

    Ayandipo, O.O; Afuwape, O.O; Irabor, D.O; Abdurrazzaaq, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal wall hernias are very common diseases encountered in surgical practice. Groin hernia is the commonest type of abdominal wall hernias. There are several methods of hernia repair but tension-free repair (usually with mesh) offers the least recurrent rate. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of anterior abdominal wall hernias and our experience in the surgical management of identified hernias Method: The project was a retrospective study of all patients with abdominal wall hernia presenting into surgical divisions of University College Hospital Ibadan during a 6 year period (January 2008 to December 2013). Relevant information was retrieved from their case notes and analysed. Results: The case records of 1215 (84.7%) patients out of 1435 were retrieved. Elective surgery was done in 981(80.7%) patients while 234 (19.3%) patients had emergency surgery. There were 922 (84.8%) groin hernias and post-operative incisional hernia accounted for 9.1% (111) of the patients. About half (49.1%) of those with incisional hernia were post obstetric and gynaecologic procedure followed by post laparotomy incisional hernias 16 (14%) and others (23.5%). The ratio of inguinal hernia to other types in this study is 3:1. Hollow viscus resection and emergency surgery were predictors of wound infection statistically significant in predicting wound infection (P < 0.001). Peri-operative morbidity/mortality at 28 days post operation was documented in 113 patients (12.1%). One year recurrence rate of groin hernia was 2.1%. Conclusion: The pattern of presentation and management of anterior wall hernias are still the same compared with the earlier study in this hospital. New modality of treatment should be adopted as the standard choice of care. Abdominal wall hernias are very common clinical presentation. Modified Bassini repair was the preferred method of repair due to its simplicity. Mesh repair is becoming more common in recent time but high cost and initial non

  1. Obturator hernia: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Tokushima, Midori; Aihara, Hidetoshi; Tago, Masaki; Tomonaga, Motosuke; Sakanishi, Yuta; Yoshioka, Tsuneaki; Hyakutake, Masaki; Kyoraku, Itaru; Sugioka, Takashi; Yamashita, Shu-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 90 Final Diagnosis: Obturator hernia Symptoms: Epigastric pain • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Obturator hernia (OH) can be difficult to diagnose because it shows only nonspecific signs and symptoms. Although pain in a lower limb caused by compression of the obturator nerve by the hernia in the obturator canal (Howship-Romberg sign) is a characteristic sign, its presence is rather rare. Case Report: We herein describe the case of a 90-year-old woman with an OH that was difficult to diagnose because of her slight abdominal signs and symptoms on admission and subtle abdominal computed tomography (CT) findings. Although the CT images revealed the presence of an OH, this finding was overlooked because it contained only a part of the small intestine wall, which is called the Richter type. Fortunately, her condition improved dramatically with only conservative treatment. Conclusions: Although early diagnosis is essential to reduce morbidity and mortality, OH can be a diagnostic challenge even with abdominal CT. PMID:25006359

  2. Laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Willekes, C L; Edoga, J K; Frezza, E E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this report is to describe the authors' technique for the laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias and the outcome in their series of patients. METHODS: Thirty patients underwent elective laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias. All were pure type II paraesophageal hernias as defined by upper gastrointestinal contrast studies. All operations were performed by a single surgeon (JKE) assisted by five different chief surgical residents. The authors have used various prototypes of a laparoscopic utility belt to reduce the physician requirement to the surgeon and a first assistant. The operative setup and specific techniques of the repair are described and illustrated. A concomitant anti-reflux procedure was performed in the last 23 patients. RESULTS: Satisfactory repair using video-laparoscopic techniques was achieved in all cases. There were no deaths. Complications occurred in 8 of 30 patients. Postoperative gastroesophageal reflux developed in three of the first seven patients in whom fundoplication was not performed. Three consecutive patients had left lower lobe atelectasis believed to be related to endotracheal tube displacement during the passage of the bougie. One patient had postoperative dysphagia. There was one case of major deep venous thrombosis with pulmonary embolism. Twenty-eight of 30 patients were discharged home by postoperative day 3. Twenty-four of 30 patients had returned to normal activity by the time of their first postoperative office visit 1 week after surgery. Images Figure 9. Figure 10. PMID:8998118

  3. National results after ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Helgstrand, Frederik

    2016-07-01

    Ventral hernia repairs are among the most frequently performed surgical procedures. The variations of repair techniques are multiple and outcome has been unacceptable. Despite the high volume, it has been difficult to obtain sufficient data to provide evidence for best practice. In order to monitor national surgical quality and provide the warranted high volume data, the first national ventral hernia register (The Danish Ventral Hernia Database) was established in 2007 in Denmark. The present study series show that data from a well-established database supported by clinical examinations, patient files, questionnaires, and administrative data makes it possible to obtain nationwide high volume data and to achieve evidence for better outcome in a complex surgical condition as ventral hernia. Due to the high volume and included variables on surgical technique, it is now possible to make analyses adjusting for a variety of surgical techniques and different hernia specifications. We documented high 30-day complications and recurrence rates for both primary and secondary ventral hernias in a nationwide cohort. Furthermore, recurrence found by clinical examination was shown to exceed the number of patients undergoing reoperation for recurrence by a factor 4-5. The nationwide adjusted analyses proved that open mesh and laparoscopic repair for umbilical and epigastric hernias does not differ in 30-day outcome or in risk of recurrence. There is a minor risk reduction in early complications after open sutured repairs. However, the risk for a later recurrence repair is significantly higher after sutured repairs compared with mesh repairs. The study series showed that large hernia defects and open re-pairs were independent predictors for 30-day complications after an incisional hernia repair. Open procedures and large hernia defects were independent risk factors for a later recurrence re-pair. However, patients with large defects (> 15 cm) seemed to benefit from an open mesh

  4. Laparoscopic repair of an incarcerated femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Yagan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A femoral hernia is a rare, acquired condition, which has been reported in less than 5% of all abdominal wall hernias, with a female to male ratio of 4:1. Presentation of case We report a case in a female patient who had a previous open inguinal herniorrhaphy three years previously. She presented with right sided groin pain of one month duration. Ultrasound gave a differential diagnosis of a recurrent inguinal hernia or a femoral hernia. A transabdominal preperitoneal repair was performed and the patient made an uneventful recovery. Discussion Laparoscopic repair of a femoral hernia is still in its infancy and even though the outcomes are superior to an open repair, open surgery remains the standard of care. The decision to perform a laparoscopic trans abdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair was facilitated by the patient having previous open hernia surgery. The learning curve for laparoscopic femoral hernia repair is steep and requires great commitment from the surgeon. Once the learning curve has been breached this is a feasible method of surgical repair. This is demonstrated by the fact that this case report is from a rural hospital in Canada. Conclusion Laparoscopic femoral hernia repair involves more time and specialized laparoscopic skills. The advantages are a lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of inguinodynia. PMID:26581083

  5. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A...

  6. [Neonatal occlusion due to a lumbar hernia].

    PubMed

    Hunald, F A; Ravololoniaina, T; Rajaonarivony, M F V; Rakotovao, M; Andriamanarivo, M L; Rakoto-Ratsimba, H

    2011-10-01

    A Petit lumbar hernia is an uncommon hernia. Congenital forms are seen in children. Incarceration may occur as an unreducible lumbar mass, associated with bilious vomiting and abdominal distention. Abdominal X-ray shows sided-wall bowel gas. In this case, reduction and primary closure must be performed as emergency repair. PMID:21868206

  7. 21 CFR 876.5970 - Hernia support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hernia support. 876.5970 Section 876.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5970 Hernia support. (a) Identification. A...

  8. Periappendicular Abscess Presenting within an Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Loberant, Norman; Bickel, Amitai

    2015-01-01

    The presence of the appendix within an inguinal hernia is a rare finding. We present the case of an elderly woman who developed appendicitis within an inguinal hernia, complicated by a supervening periappendicular abscess. She was successfully treated with a combination of antibiotics and percutaneous drainage. PMID:26605128

  9. Liver scan in traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Liver imaging was performed in two patients with traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia. It has elucidated the cause of obliteration of the right hemidiaphragmatic shadow on the chest x-ray. These cases are illustrative of the usefulness of liver imaging in the diagnosis of traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia as well as hepatic injury.

  10. Current trends in laparoscopic groin hernia repair: A review.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Harvinder Singh; Kumar, Awanish; Agarwal, Prerit; Agarwal, Akshay Anand

    2015-09-16

    Hernia is a common problem of the modern world with its incidence more in developing countries. Inguinal hernia is the most common groin hernia repaired worldwide. With advancement in technology operative techniques of repair have also evolved. A PubMed and COCHRANE database search was accomplished in this regard to establish the current status of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in view of recent published literature. Published literature support that laparoscopic hernia repair is best suited for recurrent and bilateral inguinal hernia although it may be offered for primary inguinal hernia if expertise is available. PMID:26380826

  11. Current trends in laparoscopic groin hernia repair: A review

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Harvinder Singh; Kumar, Awanish; Agarwal, Prerit; Agarwal, Akshay Anand

    2015-01-01

    Hernia is a common problem of the modern world with its incidence more in developing countries. Inguinal hernia is the most common groin hernia repaired worldwide. With advancement in technology operative techniques of repair have also evolved. A PubMed and COCHRANE database search was accomplished in this regard to establish the current status of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in view of recent published literature. Published literature support that laparoscopic hernia repair is best suited for recurrent and bilateral inguinal hernia although it may be offered for primary inguinal hernia if expertise is available. PMID:26380826

  12. Laparoscopic Repair of Left Lumbar Hernia After Laparoscopic Left Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Luca; Gumbs, Andrew; Turner, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar hernias, rarely seen in clinical practice, can be acquired after open or laparoscopic flank surgery. We describe a successful laparoscopic preperitoneal mesh repair of multiple trocar-site hernias after extraperitoneal nephrectomy. All the key steps including creating a peritoneal flap, reducing the hernia contents, and fixation of the mesh are described. A review of the literature on this infrequent operation is presented. Laparoscopic repair of lumbar hernias has all the advantages of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. PMID:21333197

  13. The management of abdominal wall hernias – in search of consensus

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Kamil; Śmietański, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic repair is becoming an increasingly popular alternative in the treatment of abdominal wall hernias. In spite of numerous studies evaluating this technique, indications for laparoscopic surgery have not been established. Similarly, implant selection and fixation techniques have not been unified and are the subject of scientific discussion. Aim To assess whether there is a consensus on the management of the most common ventral abdominal wall hernias among recognised experts. Material and methods Fourteen specialists representing the boards of European surgical societies were surveyed to determine their choice of surgical technique for nine typical primary ventral and incisional hernias. The access method, type of operation, mesh prosthesis and fixation method were evaluated. In addition to the laparoscopic procedures, the number of tackers and their arrangement were assessed. Results In none of the cases presented was a consensus of experts obtained. Laparoscopic and open techniques were used equally often. Especially in the group of large hernias, decisions on repair methods were characterised by high variability. The technique of laparoscopic mesh fixation was a subject of great variability in terms of both method selection and the numbers of tackers and sutures used. Conclusions Recognised experts have not reached a consensus on the management of abdominal wall hernias. Our survey results indicate the need for further research and the inclusion of large cohorts of patients in the dedicated registries to evaluate the results of different surgical methods, which would help in the development of treatment algorithms for surgical education in the future. PMID:25960793

  14. Sportsman's hernia? An ambiguous term.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulou, Alexandra; Schilders, Ernest

    2016-04-01

    Groin pain is common in athletes. Yet, there is disagreement on aetiology, pathomechanics and terminology. A plethora of terms have been employed to explain inguinal-related groin pain in athletes. Recently, at the British Hernia Society in Manchester 2012, a consensus was reached to use the term inguinal disruption based on the pathophysiology while lately the Doha agreement in 2014 defined it as inguinal-related groin pain, a clinically based taxonomy. This review article emphasizes the anatomy, pathogenesis, standard clinical assessment and imaging, and highlights the treatment options for inguinal disruption. PMID:27026822

  15. Laparoscopic Versus Open Umbilical Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Mason, Edward; Duncan, Titus; Wilson, Russell

    2003-01-01

    Background: The use of prosthetic material for open umbilical hernia repair has been reported to reduce recurrence rates. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes after laparoscopic versus open umbilical hernia repair. Methods: We reviewed all umbilical hernia repairs performed from November 1995 to October 2000. Demographic data, hernia characteristics, and outcomes were compared. Results: Of the 76 patients identified, 32 underwent laparoscopic repair (LR), 24 primary suture repairs (PSR), and 20 open repairs with mesh (ORWM). Preoperative characteristics were similar between groups. Hernia size was similar between LR and ORWM groups, and both were larger than that in the PSR group. ORWM compared with the other techniques resulted in longer operating time, more frequent use of drains, higher complication rates, and prolonged return to normal activities (RTNA). The length of stay (LOS) was longer in the ORWM than in the PSR group. When compared with ORWM, LR resulted in lower recurrence rates. LR resulted in fewer recurrences in patients with previous repairs and hernias larger than 3 cm than in both open techniques. Conclusions: LR results in faster RTNA, and lower complication and recurrence rates compared with those in ORWM. Patients with larger hernias and previous repairs benefit from LR. PMID:14626398

  16. Endoscopic extraperitoneal repair of a Grynfeltt hernia.

    PubMed

    Postema, R R; Bonjer, H J

    2002-04-01

    There are three types of lumbar hernia: congenital, acquired, and incisional hernias. Acquired hernia can appear in two forms: the inferior (Petit) type and the superior type, first described by Grynfeltt in 1866. We report endoscopic extraperitoneal repair of a Grynfeltt hernia. A 46-year-old woman presented with a painful swelling in the left lumbar region that had caused her increasing discomfort. The diagnosis of Grynfeltt's hernia was made, and she underwent surgery. With the patient in a left-side decubitus position, access to the extraperitoneal space was gained by inserting a 10-mm inflatable balloon trocar just anteriorly to the midaxillary line between the 12th rib and the superior iliac crest through a muscle-splitting incision into the extraperitoneal space. After the balloon trocar had been removed a blunt-tip trocar was inserted. Using two 5-mm trocars, one above and another below the 10-mm port in the midaxillary line, the hernia could be reduced. A polypropylene mesh graft was introduced through the 10-mm trocar and tacked with spiral tackers. The patient could be discharged the next day after requiring only minimal analgesics. At this writing, 2 (1/2) years after the operation, there is no sign of recurrence. This Grynfeltt hernia could safely be treated using the extraperitoneal approach, which obviates opening and closing the peritoneum, thereby reducing operative time and possibly postoperative complications. PMID:11972231

  17. [Intervention-specific complications of hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Dietz, U A; Wiegering, A; Germer, C T

    2014-02-01

    Hernia surgery is generally a rewarding task, patient satisfaction is high and the long-term results are generally good. Incisional hernias are more heterogeneous and there is a higher variability of morphologies to be matched with the available therapeutic approaches but the majority of patients are also satisfied with the results. This positive scenario for hernia surgery can be largely attributable to careful preoperative planning, effective surgical techniques and a high degree of standardization. The picture is somewhat clouded by the complications associated with hernia surgery. If complications do arise, the outcome largely depends on how well the surgeon responds. For inguinal and femoral hernias, the risk profile of the patient is crucial to the surgical planning and the wrong operation on the wrong patient can be disastrous. Open procedures have complication risks in common but the question of how best to deal with the nerves has yet to be answered. Endoscopic procedures are an indispensable part of the hernia surgery repertoire and the hernia specialist should be proficient in TEP and TAPP techniques. Ventral and incisional hernias have higher complication rates and the treatment is similar despite differences in etiology and pathophysiology. Although open procedures are better for morphological reconstruction they are accompanied by a higher complication rate. Laparoscopic procedures had a severe complication profile early on but the situation has greatly improved today due to continued refinement of the learning curve. A critical approach to the application of methods and meshes, a deep knowledge of anatomical peculiarities and the careful planning of tactics for dealing with intraoperative problems are the hallmarks of today's good hernia surgeon. PMID:24435828

  18. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal approach for recurrent inguinal hernia: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Aly; Hokkam, Emad N.; Ellabban, Goda M.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The repair of the recurrent hernia is a daunting task because of already weakened tissues and distorted anatomy. Open posterior preperitoneal approach gives results far superior to those of the anterior approach. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair is an evolving technique associated with advantages of a minimally invasive approach. The present work aimed at comparing these three approaches for repair of recurrent inguinal hernia regarding complications and early recurrence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 180 patients were divided randomly into three equal groups: A, B, and C. Group A patients were subjected to open posterior preperitoneal approach , those of group B were subjected to transinguinal anterior tension-free repair and group C patients were subjected to TAPP. The primary end point was recurrence and the secondary end points were time off from work, postoperative pain, scrotal swelling, and wound infections. RESULTS: The mean hospital stay, the mean time to return to work and the mean time off from work were less in group C then A and B. Chronic postoperative pain was observed in eight patients in group A (13.33%), in 18 patients in group B (30%) and six patients in group C (10%). The overall complication rate was 19.7% in both groups A and C and 34.36% in group B. CONCLUSION: In recurrent inguinal hernia, the laparoscopic and open posterior approaches are equally effective in term of operative outcome. The open preperitoneal hernia repair is inexpensive, has a low recurrence rate. Postoperative recovery is short and postoperative pain is minimal. This approach gives results far superior to those of the commonly used anterior approach. However, while laparoscopic hernia repair requires a lengthy learning curve and is difficult to learn and perform, it has advantages of less post-operative pain, early recovery with minimal hospital stay, low post-operative complications and recurrence. Trial

  19. De Garengeot hernia: a forgotten rare entity?

    PubMed Central

    Madiha, Ahmedi; Rares, Hard; Abdus, Samee

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 79-year-old woman who presented with an increasingly painful lump in her right groin for 24 h. An incidental femoral hernia was detected on her CT scan nearly 8 months ago while investigating her medical conditions. However, its management was deferred on account of ongoing medical illness. Exploration of the lump revealed a gangrenous appendix strangulated within the femoral canal (de Garengeot hernia). The hernia was repaired primarily after appendicectomy. The patient was discharged after making an uneventful recovery. PMID:24722706

  20. Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of lumbar hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Man Sup; Lee, Hae Wan; Yu, Chang Hee

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar hernia is a rare surgical entity without a standard method of repair. With advancements in laparoscopic techniques, successful lumbar herniorrhaphy can be achieved by the creation of a completely extraperitoneal working space and secure fixation of a wide posterior mesh. We present a total extraperitoneal laparoendoscopic repair of lumbar hernia, which allowed for minimal invasiveness while providing excellent anatomical identification, easy mobilization of contents and wide secure mesh fixation. A total extraperitoneal method of lumbar hernia repair by laparoscopic approach is feasible and may be an ideal option. PMID:22111086

  1. [Pubic osteotomy in obturator gliding hernia].

    PubMed

    Fritz, T; Teklote, J; Kraus, T

    1997-12-01

    Hernias of the obturator foramen are rare. They are described mostly in elderly female patients in poor health. Often the correct diagnosis is stumbled upon as a result of surprising intraoperative findings. Surgical therapy is indicated often by the clinical symptoms of an incarcerated hernia. Herniation of the entire urinary bladder with hemorrhagic infarction has never been described before. For an anatomical reduction of the hernia it was necessary to resect the superior pubic ramus. For plastic reconstruction a marlex mesh was used. PMID:9483360

  2. [Traumatic Spigelian hernia. Elective extraperitoneal laparoscopic repair].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Egea, Alfredo; Campillo-Soto, Alvaro; Girela-Baena, Enrique; Torralba-Martínez, José Antonio; Corral de la Calle, Miquel; Aguayo-Albasini, José Luis

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic Spigelian hernia is rare. These hernias are usually treated in the same admission through open surgery. We present a case of Spigelian hernia in a high anatomical location following injury, with a cutaneous lesion and preperitoneal hematoma. Delayed parietal repair was performed through extraperitoneal laparoscopy. Elective laparoscopic repair in this case avoided surgery in an injured area, providing clear cosmetic advantages to the patient. We describe a modification to the classical approach to facilitate access to high-lying Spigelian defects. PMID:16426535

  3. Symptomatic Morgagni Hernia Misdiagnosed As Chilaiditi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, Phyllis A.

    2011-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome, symptomatic interposition of bowel beneath the right hemidiaphragm, is uncommon and usually managed without surgery. Morgagni hernia is an uncommon diaphragmatic hernia that generally requires surgery. In this case a patient with a longstanding diagnosis of bowel interposition (Chilaiditi sign) presented with presumed Chilaiditi syndrome. Abdominal computed tomography was performed and revealed no bowel interposition; instead, a Morgagni hernia was found and surgically repaired. Review of the literature did not reveal similar misdiagnosis or recommendations for advanced imaging in patients with Chilaiditi sign or syndrome to confirm the diagnosis or rule out other potential diagnoses. PMID:21691487

  4. [Anatomy and mechanism of inguinal hernias].

    PubMed

    Flament, J B; Avisse, C; Delattre, J F

    1997-02-01

    Anterior abdominal wall presents a weak point between the pelvic bone and the muscular arch of transverse and internal oblique muscles. This myo-pectineal orifice, crossed by the inguinal ligament is closed by the transversalis fascia. All groin hernias, inguinal directs, indirects or femoral, result from a defect of the transversalis fascia. They have two causes. Congenital hernias result from a persisting peritoneo-vaginal canal. Acquired hernias result from a progressive weakening of the transversalis fascia depending on connective tissue insufficiency and increase of intra-abdominal pressure. PMID:9122597

  5. Sports Hernia/Athletic Pubalgia

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports hernia/athletic pubalgia has received increasing attention as a source of disability and time lost from athletics. Studies are limited, however, lacking consistent objective criteria for making the diagnosis and assessing outcomes. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed database through January 2013 and hand searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Review article. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Nonsurgical outcomes have not been well reported. Various surgical approaches have return-to–athletic activity rates of >80% regardless of the approach. The variety of procedures and lack of outcomes measures in these studies make it difficult to compare one surgical approach to another. There is increasing evidence that there is an association between range of motion–limiting hip disorders (femoroacetabular impingement) and sports hernia/athletic pubalgia in a subset of athletes. This has added increased complexity to the decision-making process regarding treatment. Conclusion: An association between femoroacetabular impingement and athletic pubalgia has been recognized, with better outcomes reported when both are managed concurrently or in a staged manner. PMID:24587864

  6. Amyand's hernia: Our experience in the laparoscopic era.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Diwakar; Swain, Sudeepta; Wani, Majid; Reddy, Prasanna Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Amyand's hernia is a rare presentation of inguinal hernia, in which the appendix is present within the hernia sac. This entity is a diagnostic challenge due to its rarity and vague clinical presentation. A laparoscopic approach can confirm the diagnosis as well as serve as a therapeutic tool. When the appendix is not inflamed within the inguinal hernia sac, then appendicectomy is not always necessary. Our case series emphasize the same presumption as three patient of Amyand's hernia underwent laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernioplasty without appendicectomy. The aim of this paper is to review the literature with regards to Amyand's hernia and provide new insight in its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25883458

  7. Genetics Home Reference: congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center: Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia University of Michigan Health System These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the diagnosis and management of various health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy ...

  8. Delayed iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia after thoracoscopic lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sai-Bo; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Zhao, Bai-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia after thoracoscopic lobectomy is extremely rare. We present a 55-year-old female patient who developed an iatrogenic diaphragmatic hernia with gastric perforation several months after VATS (video-assisted thoracic surgery) left upper lobectomy with systematic lymphadenectomy. During the readmission, urgent laparotomy was performed. Intraoperatively, the choledochoscopy was introduced into left thoracic cavity through the diaphragmatic defect for dissecting the secondary inflammatory adhesions and achieving satisfactory hemostasis. It appears to be an efficient and feasible approach for the patients who have been diagnosed as delayed diaphragmatic hernia concomitant with remarkable intra-abdominal findings and have a history of thoracic surgery. We consider that delayed-onset diaphragmatic hernia should be suspected in patients complaining of nausea or vomiting after VATS procedure, although it is very rare. PMID:27293866

  9. [Historical evolution of inguinal hernia treatment].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ortega, M Fernando; Cárdenas-Martínez, Guadalupe; López-Castañeda, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    Hernia (know breuk in Dutch, rompure in French, keal in Greek and rupture in English) has plagued humans throughout recorded history and descriptions of hernia reduction date back to the Ebers papyrus in Egypt. In medicine it is difficult to find historical periods, but we found two eras of uneven time: pre-technique and technique. The first was distinguished by a blend of empiricism and magic, and the second for greater comprehension of the human body; however much of modern surgical techniques result from contributions of early surgeons. Nonetheless, it was not until the late 19th century that hernia surgeon Eduardo Bassini published his work Nuovo Metodo per la Cura Radiacale dell"Ernia Inguinale (in 1889). Among the most notable contemporany classic hernia repairs are the Bassini, Halsted, Shouldice, and Tension-free repair techniques. PMID:14617414

  10. [Inguino-crural hernia with neoplastic content].

    PubMed

    Ayala Espina, J M; Triviño López, A; Santonja Garriga, J L; Rubio Barbón, S

    1995-04-01

    We report a case of incarcerated crural hernia including omentum with metastases of pancreatic carcinoma. The scarce literature is reviewed. The possibility of mistaking an incarcerated crural hernia for an inguinal lymph node may result in a ganglionar biopsy ending up in a crural herniography under local anaesthesia. We recommend that all hernial sacs be examined, especially those of adult patients and, in such cases, a crural herniography with prolene should be made in view of its remarkably technical simplicity. PMID:7794644

  11. Anatomical repair of large incisional hernias.

    PubMed Central

    Loh, A.; Rajkumar, J. S.; South, L. M.

    1992-01-01

    We present a method of repair for large incisional hernias using lateral relieving incisions of the anterior rectus sheath. This is a modification of the methods previously described by Young (1), Hunter (2) and Maguire and Young (3). There were no recurrences in the 13 patients reviewed. Other methods of repair for large incisional hernias are discussed. Images Figure 2a,b Figure 3a,b Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1567126

  12. Inguinal hernia repair: toward Asian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lomanto, Davide; Cheah, Wei-Keat; Faylona, Jose Macario; Huang, Ching Shui; Lohsiriwat, Darin; Maleachi, Andy; Yang, George Pei Cheung; Li, Michael Ka-Wai; Tumtavitikul, Sathien; Sharma, Anil; Hartung, Rolf Ulrich; Choi, Young Bai; Sutedja, Barlian

    2015-02-01

    Groin hernias are very common, and surgical treatment is usually recommended. In fact, hernia repair is the most common surgical procedure performed worldwide. In countries such as the USA, China, and India, there may easily be over 1 million repairs every year. The need for this surgery has become an important socioeconomic problem and may affect health-care providers, especially in aging societies. Surgical repair using mesh is recommended and widely employed in Western countries, but in many developing countries, tissue-to-tissue repair is still the preferred surgical procedure due to economic constraints. For these reason, the development and implementation of guidelines, consensus, or recommendations may aim to clarify issues related to best practices in inguinal hernia repair in Asia. A group of Asian experts in hernia repair gathered together to debate inguinal hernia treatments in Asia in an attempt to reach some consensus or develop recommendations on best practices in the region. The need for recommendations or guidelines was unanimously confirmed to help overcome the discrepancy in clinical practice between countries; the experts decided to focus mainly on the technical aspects of open repair, which is the most common surgery for hernia in our region. After the identification of 12 main topics for discussion (indication, age, and sex; symptomatic and asymptomatic hernia: type of hernia; type of treatment; hospital admission; preoperative care; anesthesia; surgical technique; perioperative care; postoperative care; early complications; and long-term complications), a search of the literature was carried out according to the five levels of the Oxford Classification of Evidence and the four grades of recommendation. PMID:25598054

  13. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  14. Symposium on the management of inguinal hernias: 3. Laparoscopic groin hernia surgery: the TAPP procedure

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, Demetrius E.M.; Pham, Quynh N.; Oleniuk, Fredrick H.; Kluftinger, Andreas M.; Rossi, Ljubomir

    1997-01-01

    Objective To describe the technique and results of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernia repair. Design A case series, with a detailed description of the operative technique. Setting A university affiliated hospital. Patients A consecutive series of 554 patients (494 male, 60 female) who underwent laparoscopic hernia repair in a single institution. The mean follow-up was 14 months. Interventions Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair was performed in almost all patients. Simple closure was performed in a patient with a strangulated hernia, and a mesh-based repair was used in a patient with bilateral obturator hernias. Main outcome measures Complications and recurrence. Results The laparoscopic TAPP repair was successful in 550 of the 554 patients who underwent 632 hernia repairs. Conversion was necessary in 4 patients. Complications were infrequent and there were no recurrences. Only 3.4% of patients were lost to follow-up. The most frequent complications were urinary retention (27) and hematoma and seroma (38) in the early postoperative period. Neuralgia (11) and hydrocele (10) also occurred. Mesh infection occurred in only 1 patient and port-site hernias in 3 patients. There was 1 death from an acute myocardial infarction. Conclusion Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair is associated with an exceedingly low recurrence rate and an acceptable complication rate. PMID:9194780

  15. Hernias

    MedlinePlus

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  16. Rare Hernias Presenting as Acute Abdomen- A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ulahannan, Sansho Elavumkal; Kurien, John S; Joseph, Aneesh; Kurien, Annie Sandhya; Varghese, Sandeep Abraham; Thomas, Bindhya; Varghese, Fobin

    2016-01-01

    Hernia is an abnormal protrusion of an organ or tissue through a defect in its surrounding walls. It can be divided into internal, external and diaphragmatic hernias. Most of them can be asymptomatic. If they become symptomatic they can present with features of intestinal obstruction, incarceration or strangulation. In this case series we compare the incidence of these rare presentations of hernias with world literature and to warn surgeons not to cut the obstructing band in cases of internal hernias. In this case series, we review the clinical details of 7 rare presentations of hernia, who presented with various types of hernias to a tertiary care centre in Kerala over a period of one year. Of these 7 cases 6 cases were internal hernias (3 left paraduodenal hernias, 2 transmesentric hernias, and 1 pericaecal hernia) and a case of spigelian hernia above the level of umbilicus. All of them presented as acute abdomen in the emergency department. Among these 7 cases, only one case was diagnosed preoperatively. Three patients had bowel gangrene and had to undergo resection- anastomosis of the bowel. The survival rate among these cases was 100% as compared to 50% in the world literature if they had been left untreated. Even though internal hernias are a rare entity, we need to have it as a differential diagnosis in case of intestinal obstruction, in a previously non-operated abdomen. PMID:27134943

  17. [Surgical treatment of recurrent inguinal hernia using prosthetic materials].

    PubMed

    Paino, O; Rosato, L; Cossavella, D; Catania, S; Coluccio, G

    1998-03-01

    The authors affirm that plastic surgery using graft materials is a feasible technique also in case of recurrent inguinal hernia. They follow with interest the evolution of laparoscopic techniques which are still the cause of some perplexity. The paper reports a series of nine recurrent inguinal hernias out of 447 inguinal hernias operated during the period May 1994-May 1996. PMID:9617112

  18. [Trusses in the current management of hernia].

    PubMed

    Gianom, D; Schubiger, C; Decurtins, M

    2002-11-01

    To assess the frequency and reasons for truss prescription, we surveyed 437 general practitioners collaborating with the surgical department of the Kantonsspital Winterthur and all members of the Swiss Association of Orthotists. 59% of the general practitioners answered. For 85% of them trusses are obsolete. Based on the data of the orthotists, an estimated 1740 trusses are issued in Switzerland annually (250 per million population). In Switzerland approximately 16,000 hernia operations are performed annually. Therefore, 11% of hernia patients are supplied with a truss rather than referred for a consultant surgical opinion. Patients can be divided into groups, one that wears the truss only for a short time in order to delay surgery for medical or occupational reasons and another group, especially elderly patients, that wears the truss permanently. Poor hernia control and pain, hernia incarceration, or dissatisfaction with the uncomfortable truss are reasons for referral to a surgeon. In our personal experience with 14 patients, all judged their situation after the operation better than with the truss. Our study confirms that despite advances in hernia surgery and in the use of regional and local anesthesia trusses are often prescribed. PMID:12430061

  19. Left paraduodenal hernia: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Gavin A; Yurcisin, Basil J; Sell, Harry S

    2010-01-01

    Paraduodenal hernias are congenital internal hernias that usually present with non-specific symptoms, and are therefore rarely diagnosed preoperatively. Left-sided paraduodenal hernias are three times more likely to occur than right-sided ones. Both hernias present similarly, but have a differing embryological basis. Here, the case of a 76-year-old woman with a left paraduodenal hernia presenting with small bowel obstruction is presented, and a brief discussion of the literature on its diagnosis and management given. PMID:22797200

  20. Choice of imaging modality in the diagnosis of sciatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Labib, Peter L. Z.; Malik, Sohail N.

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic hernias are one of the rarest types of hernia and often pose diagnostic difficulty to clinicians. We report a case of an 80-year-old lady with a sciatic hernia who had a falsely negative computed tomography (CT) but was found to have a colonic hernia on ultrasonography. The authors recommend that for patients in which there is a high degree of clinical suspicion for a sciatic hernia and a negative CT, ultrasonography may be considered as a useful imaging modality to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:24968433

  1. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernia: one-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael S.

    1993-05-01

    In this study, 101 consecutive laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repairs (LTPR) were performed in 62 patients by a single surgeon. The series was begun in April 1991, and involved repair of 49 direct, 41 indirect, 4 femoral, 3 umbilical, 3 sliding, and 1 incisional hernias. Twelve cases were bilateral, eleven hernias were incarcerated, and fifteen hernias were recurrent. There were no intraoperative complications, and none of the procedures required conversion to open surgery. Patients experienced the following postoperative complications: transient testicular pain (1), transient anterior thigh paresthesias (2), urinary retention requiring TURP (1), and hernia recurrences (2). Follow up has ranged from 4 - 15 months and initial results have been encouraging.

  2. [Disease picture of intra-abdominal hernias in childhood].

    PubMed

    Waldschmidt, J; Pankrath, K; Charissis, G

    1985-01-01

    Through the demonstration of 3 cases (6-year-old-girl with right mesenterico-parietal hernia; 2 year-old-boy with a transverso-mesocolic hernia; 10-months-old-boy with a hernia in the mesenterium of a M.D.) we discuss the problems of intraabdominal hernia. The evaluation of the disease can take many forms. Only one third of the children remains without symptoms; the other third has a chronic evaluation and the last third an acute abdomen. Once diagnosed internal hernia must soon be operated. PMID:4058161

  3. Laparoscopy for Hemoperitoneum After Traditional Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kasamatsu, Hajime; Fujita, Sadanori; Mori, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Hemoperitoneum after inguinal hernia repair, with the exception of laparoscopic herniorrhaphy, is extremely rare. No other case of hemoperitoneum after traditional open inguinal hernia repair has been reported in the English-language literature. A 39-year-old woman had undergone inguinal hernia repair with the Bassini repair technique. Lower abdominal pain and anemia occurred on postoperative day 1. Laparoscopy was performed and revealed hemoperitoneum caused as a complication of inguinal hernia repair. The abdominal cavity was thoroughly washed with saline solution, and the aspirated blood was processed and reinfused. Laparoscopy for hemoperitoneum as a complication after inguinal hernia repair was very useful for both diagnosis and treatment. PMID:12166761

  4. Transfascial suture in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair; friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Sahu, Diwakar; Das, Somak; Wani, Majid Rasool; Reddy, Prasanna Kumar

    2015-01-01

    'Suture hernia' is fairly a new and rare type of ventral hernia. It occurs at the site of transfascial suture, following laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR). Employment of transfascial sutures in LVHR is still debatable in contrast to tackers. Prevention of mesh migration and significant post-operative pain are the pros and cons with the use of transfascial sutures, respectively. We report an unusual case of suture hernia or transfascial hernia, which can further intensify this dispute, but at the same time will provide insight for future consensus. PMID:25883460

  5. Laparoscopic Repair of Internal Transmesocolic Hernia of Transverse Colon

    PubMed Central

    Kishiki, Tomokazu; Mori, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Yoshikazu; Matsuoka, Hiroyoshi; Abe, Nobutsugu; Masaki, Tadahiko; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Internal hernias are often misdiagnosed because of their rarity, with subsequent significant morbidity. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old Japanese man with no history of surgery was referred for intermittent abdominal pain. CT suggested the presence of a transmesocolic internal hernia. The patient underwent a surgical procedure and was diagnosed with transmesocolic internal hernia. We found internal herniation of the small intestine loop through a defect in the transverse mesocolon, without any strangulation of the small intestine. We were able to complete the operation laparoscopically. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. Discussion. Transmesocolic hernia of the transverse colon is very rare. Transmesocolic hernia of the sigmoid colon accounts for 60% of all other mesocolic hernias. Paraduodenal hernias are difficult to distinguish from internal mesocolic transverse hernias. We can rule out paraduodenal hernias with CT. Conclusion. The patient underwent a surgical procedure and was diagnosed with transmesocolic internal hernia. We report a case of a transmesocolic hernia of the transverse colon with intestinal obstruction that was diagnosed preoperatively and for which laparoscopic surgery was performed. PMID:26246930

  6. Chronic pain after open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nikkolo, Ceith; Lepner, Urmas

    2016-01-01

    Following the widespread use of mesh repairs, recurrence rates after inguinal hernia surgery have become acceptable and focus has shifted from recurrence to chronic pain. Although pain can be controlled with analgesics, chronic postsurgical pain is a major clinical problem, which can significantly influence the patient's quality of life. The rate of chronic pain after inguinal hernia mesh repair can reach 51.6%. The reasons for posthernioplasty chronic pain are often unclear. It has been linked to nerve injury and nerve entrapment, but there is also association between the rate of chronic pain and the type of mesh used for hernia repair. As there are >160 meshes available in the market, it is difficult to choose a mesh whose usage would result in the best outcome. Different mesh characteristics have been studied, among them weight of mesh has probably gained the most attention. The choice of adequate therapy for chronic groin pain after inguinal hernia repair is controversial. The European Hernia Society recommends that a multidisciplinary approach at a pain clinic should be considered for the treatment of chronic postoperative pain. Although surgical treatment of chronic posthernioplasty pain is limited because of the lack of relevant research data, resection of entrapped nerves, mesh removal in the case of mesh related pain or removal of fixation sutures can be beneficial for the patient with severe pain after inguinal hernia surgery. One drawback of published studies is the lack of consensus over definition of chronic pain, which makes it complicated to compare the results of different studies and to conduct meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Therefore, a uniform definition of chronic pain and its best assessment methods should be developed in order to conduct top quality multicenter randomized trials. Further research to develop meshes with optimal parameters is of vital importance and should be encouraged. PMID:26567717

  7. Durability of laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Edye, M B; Canin-Endres, J; Gattorno, F; Salky, B A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To define a method of primary repair that would minimize hernia recurrence and to report medium-term follow-up of patients who underwent laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernia to verify durability of the repair and to assess the effect of inclusion of an antireflux procedure. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Primary paraesophageal hernia repair was completed laparoscopically in 55 patients. There were five recurrences within 6 months when the sac was not excised (20%). After institution of a technique of total sac excision in 30 subsequent repairs, no early recurrences were observed. METHODS: Inclusion of an antireflux procedure, incidence of subsequent hernia recurrence, dysphagia, and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms were recorded in clinical follow-up of patients who underwent a laparoscopic procedure. RESULTS: Mean length of follow-up was 29 months. Forty-nine patients were available for follow-up, and one patient had died of lung cancer. Mean age at surgery was 68 years. The surgical morbidity rate in elderly patients was no greater than in younger patients. Eleven patients (22%) had symptoms of mild to moderate reflux, and 15 were taking acid-reduction medication for a variety of dyspeptic complaints. All but 2 of these 15 had undergone 360 degrees fundoplication at initial repair. Two patients (4%) had late recurrent hernia, each small, demonstrated by esophagram or endoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic repair in the medium term appeared durable. The incidence of postsurgical reflux symptoms was unrelated to inclusion of an antireflux procedure. In the absence of motility data, partial fundoplication was preferred, although dysphagia after floppy 360 degrees wrap was rare. With the low morbidity rate of this procedure, correction of symptomatic paraesophageal hernia appears indicated in patients regardless of age. Images Figure 1. PMID:9790342

  8. Mesh plug repair and groin hernia surgery.

    PubMed

    Robbins, A W; Rutkow, I M

    1998-12-01

    Since the mid-1980s, dramatic progress has been made in the evolution of hernia surgery, highlighted by the increasing use of prosthetic mesh. Among the mesh-based "tension-free" hernioplasties, the use of mesh plugs has garnered a large number of spirited enthusiasts, and plug herniorrhaphy has become the fastest growing hernia repair currently employed by the American surgeon. To demonstrate the simplicity and effectiveness of mesh plugs, a 9-year experience with almost 3300 patients is reported. Technical details are discussed and presentation of a literature search serves to further emphasize the utilitarian nature of this elegantly unsophisticated surgical operation. PMID:9927981

  9. Laparoscopic repair of ventral / incisional hernias

    PubMed Central

    Chowbey, Pradeep K; Sharma, Anil; Mehrotra, Magan; Khullar, Rajesh; Soni, Vandana; Baijal, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Despite its significant prevalence, there is little in the way of evidence-based guidelines regarding the timing and method of repair of incisional hernias. To add to the above is the formidable rate of recurrence that has been seen with conventional tissue repairs of these hernias. With introduction of different prosthetic materials and laparoscopic technique, it was hoped that an improvement in the recurrence and complication rates would be realized. The increasing application of the laparoscopic technique across the world indicates that these goals might indeed be achieved. PMID:21187995

  10. The usefulness of laparoscopic hernia repair in the management of incisional hernia following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hegab, Bassem; Abdelfattah, Mohamed Rabei; Azzam, Ayman; Al Sebayel, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The reported incidence of incisional hernia following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) varies from 4% to 23%. Postoperative wound complications are less frequent after laparoscopic repair while maintaining low recurrence rates. We present our experience in managing this complication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospectively, collected data of all patients who underwent liver transplant and developed incisional hernias were analyzed. Patients’ demographic data, anthropometric data, transplantation-related data, and repair-related operative and postoperative data were collected. Risk factors for post-transplant incisional hernia were appraised in our patients. Patients were divided into two groups: Group A included patients who had their incisional hernia repaired through the laparoscopic approach, and Group B included patients who had their incisional hernia repaired through open conventional approach. RESULTS: A total of 488 liver transplantations were performed at our institution between May 2001 and end of December 2012. Thirty-three patients developed incisional hernias after primary direct closure of the abdominal wall with an overall incidence of 6.9%. Hernia repair was done in 25 patients. Follow-up ranged from 6.4 to 106.1 months with a mean of 48.3 ± 28.3 months. All patients were living at the end of the follow up except four patients (16%). Group A included 13 patients, and Group B included 12 patients. The size of defects and operative time did not differ significantly between both the groups. On the other hand, hospital stay was significantly shorter in laparoscopic group. Complication rate following laparoscopic repair was insignificantly different for open repair. CONCLUSION: In experienced hands, laparoscopic incisional hernia repair in post-liver transplant setting proved to be a safe and feasible alternative to open approach and showed superior outcome expressed in shorter hospital stay, with low recurrence and complication

  11. Spinal hernia tissue autofluorescence spectrum.

    PubMed

    Varanius, Darius; Terbetas, Gunaras; Vaitkus, Juozas V; Vaitkuviene, Aurelija

    2013-02-01

    The laser intervertebral disc decompression may provide appropriate relief in properly selected patients with contained disc herniations. The present investigation aims to characterise intervertebral disc material by autofluorescence induced by laser light. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is associated with progressive biochemical changes in disc material. Percutaneous laser disc decompression has become rather popular for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation, but there are problems in the selection of patients. For this purpose, recognition of the disc composition is necessary. We propose a new type of spectroscopic investigation. It is advantageous to the characterization of intervertebral disc material. Intervertebral disc specimens were removed during open surgery from different disc locations. Preoperative patients' MRI was evaluated using the Pfirrmann disc degeneration and Komori scale for migrating of herniated nucleus pulposus. Adjacent slices of stained disc sections were evaluated by histology/histochemistry and autofluorescence spectra. Comparison of the MRI, spectral, histological and histochemical data was performed. The MRI Komori scale correlated with the histology Boos degeneration index. In the histochemistry, collagens other than collagens I and II of the disc were distinguished with best positive correlation coefficient (0.829) and best negative one (-0.904) of proteoglycans of sequester to Boos index. A correlation of the IV Gaussian component of the hernia spectra with the Boos index was established. The Gaussian component correlation with different collagen types and proteoglycan was determined for the disc and sequester. "Autofluorescence-based diagnosis" refers to the evaluation of disc degeneration by histological and histochemical evaluation; it can provide additional data on the degeneration of an intervertebral disc. PMID:22389123

  12. Approaching porcine hernia inguinalis/scrotalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candidate genes for the genetic defect hernia inguinalis were selected and microsatellite markers developed from PAC clones using the targeted oligonucleotide-mediated microsatellite identification (TOMMI) approach. Four markers (S0894, S0898, S0899 and S0903) were either uninformative or could not ...

  13. Hiatus Hernia Repair with Bilateral Oesophageal Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite advances in surgical repair of hiatus hernias, there remains a high radiological recurrence rate. We performed a novel technique incorporating bilateral oesophageal fixation and evaluated outcomes, principally symptom improvement and hernia recurrence. Methods. A retrospective study was performed on a prospective database of patients undergoing hiatus hernia repair with bilateral oesophageal fixation. Retrospective and prospective quality of life (QOL), PPI usage, and patient satisfaction data were obtained. Hernia recurrence was assessed by either barium swallow or gastroscopy. Results. 87 patients were identified in the database with a minimum of 3 months followup. There were significant improvements in QOL scores including GERD HRQL (29.13 to 4.38, P < 0.01), Visick (3 to 1), and RSI (17.45 to 5, P < 0.01). PPI usage decreased from a median of daily to none, and there was high patient satisfaction (94%). 57 patients were assessed for recurrence with either gastroscopy or barium swallow, and one patient had evidence of recurrence on barium swallow at 45 months postoperatively. There was an 8% complication rate and no mortality or oesophageal perforation. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that our technique is both safe and effective in symptom control, and our recurrence investigations demonstrate at least short term durability. PMID:26065030

  14. What is a Certified Hernia Center? The Example of the German Hernia Society and German Society of General and Visceral Surgery.

    PubMed

    Köckerling, Ferdinand; Berger, Dieter; Jost, Johannes O

    2014-01-01

    To date, the scientific definition "hernia center" does not exist and this term is being used by hospitals and private institutions as a marketing instrument. Hernia surgery has become increasingly more complex over the past 25 years. Differentiated use of the various techniques in hernia surgery has been adopted as a "tailored approach" program and requires intensive engagement with, and extensive experience of, the entire field of hernia surgery. Therefore, there is a need for hernia centers. A basic requirement for a credible certification process for hernia centers involves definition of requirements and its verification by hernia societies and/or non-profit organizations that are interested in assuring the best possible quality of hernia surgery. At present, there are two processes for certification of hernia centers by hernia societies or non-profit organizations. PMID:25593950

  15. What is a Certified Hernia Center? The Example of the German Hernia Society and German Society of General and Visceral Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Köckerling, Ferdinand; Berger, Dieter; Jost, Johannes O.

    2014-01-01

    To date, the scientific definition “hernia center” does not exist and this term is being used by hospitals and private institutions as a marketing instrument. Hernia surgery has become increasingly more complex over the past 25 years. Differentiated use of the various techniques in hernia surgery has been adopted as a “tailored approach” program and requires intensive engagement with, and extensive experience of, the entire field of hernia surgery. Therefore, there is a need for hernia centers. A basic requirement for a credible certification process for hernia centers involves definition of requirements and its verification by hernia societies and/or non-profit organizations that are interested in assuring the best possible quality of hernia surgery. At present, there are two processes for certification of hernia centers by hernia societies or non-profit organizations. PMID:25593950

  16. Congenital Spigelian hernia with cryptorchidism: probably a new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raveenthiran, V

    2005-12-01

    Nearly 28% of pediatric Spigelian hernias reported in the literature are associated with ipsilateral cryptorchidism. However, the pathogenetic relationship between the two has not been satisfactorily explained in the past. This paper describes a male neonate born with cryptorchidism and imperforate anus. Anal stenosis following the treatment of imperforate anus had let to the development of multiple hernias including Spigelian hernia on the right side. Surgical exploration revealed the right testis being located within the Spigelian hernia. Based on the sequence of events, it is hypothesized that Spigelian hernia in this case is a sequela of maldescended testis and raised intraabdominal pressure. As this explanation is also applicable to all of the previously reported cases, the author suggests that the combination of Spigelian hernia and ipsilateral cryptorchidism could probably form a hitherto unrecognized new syndrome. PMID:15782280

  17. A case of De Garengeot hernia requiring early surgery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chao-Wen; Tsao, Min-Jen; Su, Ming-Shan

    2015-01-01

    De Garengeot hernia is a rare clinical entity defined as the presence of a vermiform appendix within a femoral hernia sac. A 50-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a painful lump over her right groin region. A bedside ultrasound was performed and soft tissue lesion was suspected. CT was performed and revealed a swollen tubular structure with fat stranding within the mass. De Garengeot hernia with acute appendicitis was diagnosed preoperatively, and an emergency appendectomy and hernioplasty were performed. Although it is usually an incidental finding during hernioplasty, De Garengeot hernia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with an incarcerated femoral hernia. Mesh repair can be performed depending on the clinical situation. We report a rare case of incarcerated femoral hernia with acute appendicitis that required early surgical management to avoid associated complications. PMID:26199302

  18. Left Inguinal Bladder Hernia that Causes Dilatation in the Ureter.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Mustafa; Atcı, Nesrin; Oruc, Cem; Akkucuk, Seckin; Aydogan, Akin

    2016-05-01

    The scrotal bladder hernia is a rare condition that may present as scrotal swelling and urinary system obstruction or infection symptoms. Diagnosis of this condition before the operation decreases the severe complications like bladder injury during operation. In this article, a 75-year-old man presented to our clinic with right inguinal swelling and lower urinary system infection. Inguinal bladder hernia was diagnosed after performing a computed tomography. The hernia was repaired without any complications. PMID:27179171

  19. [Spigelian hernia. Clinical and anatomo-surgical considerations].

    PubMed

    Gioiella, M; Martini, A; Mutarelli, A; Pindozzi, V; Donnarumma, G; Manzo, V A

    1993-06-15

    The authors describe a case of Spigelian hernia observed and treated. This hernia is uncommon, although the true incidence is probably greater than the small number of patients reported in literature. The signs and symptoms of the hernia are not always characteristic and then a correct diagnosis can be difficult. Sometime instrumental examination is essential for diagnosis, when clinical examination is not clear. Surgical repair as mandatory for a correct reconstruction of the abdominal wall and a prevention of recurrences. PMID:8414104

  20. An unusual outcome of a giant ventral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Muhammad; Alsenani, Mohammad; Al-Akeely, Muhammad; Al-Qahtani, Hamad

    2015-01-01

    Hernias are routine general surgical problems that may present in any age group, regardless of the patient’s socioeconomic status. We present a rare case of a complicated ventral hernia leading to short bowel. This is an unusual case and is very rarely reported in the literature. This current case report describes a 54-year-old gentleman who presented to the hospital with a giant strangulated ventral hernia causing massive bowel ischemia and resulting in a short bowel. The literature on large abdominal wall hernias leading to short bowel is reviewed, and a discussion on short bowel syndrome is also presented. PMID:26219451

  1. Bochdalek Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in an Adult Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R. D.; Katz, M. G.; Fargnoli, A. S.; Kendle, A. P.; Mihalko, K. L.; Bridges, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare condition. The aetiology of CDH is often unclear. In our case, a hollow mass was noted on MRI. Cardiac ejection fraction was diminished (47.0%) compared to 60.5% (average of 10 other normal animals, P < 0.05). The final diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) was made when the sheep underwent surgery. The hernia was right-sided and contained the abomasum. Lung biopsy demonstrated incomplete development with a low number of bronchopulmonary segments and vessels. The likely cause of this hernia was genetic malformation. PMID:26293994

  2. Bilateral Morgagni Hernia: A Unique Presentation of a Rare Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Morgagni hernia is an unusual congenital herniation of abdominal content through the triangular parasternal gaps of the anterior diaphragm. They are commonly asymptomatic and right-sided. We present a case of a bilateral Morgagni hernia resulting in delayed growth in a 10-month-old boy. The presentation was unique due to its bilateral nature and its symptomatic compression of the mediastinum. Diagnosis was made by 3D reconstructed CT angiogram. The patient underwent medical optimization until he was safely able to tolerate laparoscopic surgical repair of his hernia. Upon laparoscopy, the CT findings were confirmed and the hernia was repaired.

  3. Clinicoradiological Images of a Rare Type of Lumbar Hernia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Arjun; Mukherjee, Sujoy; Garg, Cheena

    2015-12-01

    A surgeon will rarely see a case of lumbar hernia in his lifetime. They are usually divided into superior and inferior types, but in cases of huge hernias where anatomical delineation is not possible, they are called as diffuse. Further classification into primary and secondary types (on the basis of etiology) and congenital and acquired types is done. Evisceration in a lumbar hernia can be present due to secondary causes but never spontaneously. This is therefore probably the first reported case of a primary eviscerated diffuse lumbar hernia. PMID:26884669

  4. Endometriosis in a spigelian hernia sac: an unexpected finding.

    PubMed

    Moris, Demetrios; Michalinos, Adamantios; Vernadakis, Spiridon

    2015-01-01

    Describes the existence of endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac. Spigelian Hernia is a rare ventral hernia, presenting difficulties in diagnosis and carrying a high incarceration and obstruction risk. Endometriomas occur due to implantation of endometrial cells into a surgical wound, most often after a cesarean delivery. A 37-year-old woman presented to our department with persistent abdominal pain, exacerbating during menses, and vomiting for 2 days. Physical examination revealed a mass-like lesion in the border between the left-upper and left-lower quadrant. Ultrasound examination was inconclusive and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed an abdominal wall mass. During surgery, a spigelian hernia was found 5 to 7 cm above a previous cesarean incision. Tissue like "chocolate cysts" was present at the hernia sac. Hernia was repaired while tissue was excised and sent for histological examination that confirmed the diagnosis. Spigelian hernia is a hernia presenting difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. Endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac is a rare diagnosis, confirmed only histologically. Clinical suspicion can be posed only through symptoms and thorough investigation. PMID:25594648

  5. Increasing Body Mass Index Is Inversely Related to Groin Hernias.

    PubMed

    Ravanbakhsh, Samine; Batech, Michael; Tejirian, Talar

    2015-10-01

    Few studies describe the relationship between obesity and groin hernias. Our objective was to investigate the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and groin hernias in a large population. Patients with the diagnosis of inguinal or femoral hernia with and without incarceration or strangulation were identified using the Kaiser Permanente Southern California regional database including 14 hospitals over a 7-year period. Patients were stratified by BMI. There were 47,950 patients with a diagnosis of a groin hernia--a prevalence of 2.28 per cent. Relative to normal BMI (20-24.9 kg/m(2)), lower BMI was associated with an increased risk for hernia diagnosis. With increasing BMI, the risk of incarceration or strangulation increased. Additionally, increasing age, male gender, white race, history of hernia, tobacco use history, alcohol use, and higher comorbidity index increased the chance of a groin hernia diagnosis. Complications were higher for women, patients with comorbidities, black race, and alcohol users. Our study is the largest to date correlating obesity and groin hernias in a diverse United States population. Obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) is associated with a lower risk of groin hernia diagnosis, but an increased risk of complications. This inverse relationship may be due to limitations of physical exam in obese patients. PMID:26463305

  6. Bochdalek Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in an Adult Sheep.

    PubMed

    Williams, R D; Katz, M G; Fargnoli, A S; Kendle, A P; Mihalko, K L; Bridges, C R

    2016-06-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a rare condition. The aetiology of CDH is often unclear. In our case, a hollow mass was noted on MRI. Cardiac ejection fraction was diminished (47.0%) compared to 60.5% (average of 10 other normal animals, P < 0.05). The final diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek type) was made when the sheep underwent surgery. The hernia was right-sided and contained the abomasum. Lung biopsy demonstrated incomplete development with a low number of bronchopulmonary segments and vessels. The likely cause of this hernia was genetic malformation. PMID:26293994

  7. Abdominal wall hernias in the setting of cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Belghiti, J; Durand, F

    1997-01-01

    In cirrhotic patients, umbilical hernias occur almost exclusively when longstanding ascites is present. Umbilical hernias expose cirrhotic patients to potentially life-threatening complications such as strangulation (which can be precipitated by rapid removal of ascitic fluid) and rupture (which is usually preceded by cutaneous ulcerations on the surface of the hernia). In cirrhotic patients, prevention of umbilical hernias is based on prevention of ascites. When prevention has failed, medical treatment of ascites should be first attempted. In patients in whom medical treatment is effective, and after ascites has disappeared, surgical treatment of umbilical hernia can be safely performed in most cases. In patients in whom medical treatment is ineffective and who develop refractory ascites, treatment strategy for umbilical hernia depends on the presence or absence of indication for liver transplantation. In patients who are candidates for liver transplantation, careful local care with pressure bandage must be performed until transplantation. Herniorrhaphy must be performed at the time of transplantation. In patients with refractory ascites, and who are not candidates for transplantation, portocaval shunt, transjugular intrahepatic portocaval shunt (both followed by surgical herniorrhaphy when ascites has disappeared) or concomitant peritoneo-venous shunt and herniorrhaphy should be considered. In contrast to umbilical hernias, groin hernias are not markedly influenced by ascites. However, ascites is a major risk factor for surgery. Therefore, surgical repair should not be recommended in patients with ascites and poor liver function. In cirrhotic patients with incisional hernia, prosthetic devices should be avoided because of the high risk of bacterial infection. PMID:9308126

  8. Endometriosis in a Spigelian Hernia Sac: An Unexpected Finding

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Demetrios; Michalinos, Adamantios; Vernadakis, Spiridon

    2015-01-01

    Describes the existence of endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac. Spigelian Hernia is a rare ventral hernia, presenting difficulties in diagnosis and carrying a high incarceration and obstruction risk. Endometriomas occur due to implantation of endometrial cells into a surgical wound, most often after a cesarean delivery. A 37-year-old woman presented to our department with persistent abdominal pain, exacerbating during menses, and vomiting for 2 days. Physical examination revealed a mass-like lesion in the border between the left-upper and left-lower quadrant. Ultrasound examination was inconclusive and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed an abdominal wall mass. During surgery, a spigelian hernia was found 5 to 7 cm above a previous cesarean incision. Tissue like “chocolate cysts” was present at the hernia sac. Hernia was repaired while tissue was excised and sent for histological examination that confirmed the diagnosis. Spigelian hernia is a hernia presenting difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. Endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac is a rare diagnosis, confirmed only histologically. Clinical suspicion can be posed only through symptoms and thorough investigation. PMID:25594648

  9. Endoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair for inguinal disruption (Sportsman's hernia): rationale and design of a prospective observational cohort study (TEP-ID-study)

    PubMed Central

    Voorbrood, C E H; Goedhart, E; Verleisdonk, E J M M; Sanders, F; Naafs, D; Burgmans, J P J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic inguinal pain is a frequently occurring problem in athletes. A diagnosis of inguinal disruption is performed by exclusion of other conditions causing groin pain. Up to now, conservative medical management is considered to be the primary treatment for this condition. Relevant large and prospective clinical studies regarding the treatment of inguinal disruption are limited; however, recent studies have shown the benefits of the totally extraperitoneal patch (TEP) technique. This study provides a complete assessment of the inguinal area in athletes with chronic inguinal pain before and after treatment with the TEP hernia repair technique. Methods and analysis We describe the rationale and design of an observational cohort study for surgical treatment with the endoscopic TEP hernia repair technique in athletes with a painful groin (inguinal disruption). The study is being conducted in a high-volume, single centre hospital with specialty in TEP hernia repair. Patients over 18 years, suffering from inguinal pain for at least 3 months during or after playing sports, and whom have not undergone previous inguinal surgery and have received no benefit from physiotherapy are eligible for inclusion. Patients with any another cause of inguinal pain, proven by physical examination, inguinal ultrasound, X-pelvis/hip or MRI are excluded. Primary outcome is reduction in pain after 3 months. Secondary outcomes are pain reduction, physical functioning, and resumption of sport (in frequency and intensity). Ethics and dissemination An unrestricted research grant for general study purposes was assigned to the Hernia Centre. This study itself is not directly subject to the above mentioned research grant or any other financial sponsorship. We intend to publish the outcome of the study, regardless of the findings. All authors will give final approval of the manuscript version to be published. PMID:26739740

  10. Umbilical hernia in Xhosa infants and children.

    PubMed Central

    James, T

    1982-01-01

    During the period 12 March 1980 to 10 March 1981 a consecutive series of 1200 Xhosa (Black) infants and young children, ranging in age from the newborn to the prepubertal, who attended the general outpatients department for a variety of medical complaints were examined for umbilical herniation. None had undergone any surgical operation, and patients with conditions possibly associated with umbilical herniation were excluded. Evidence of umbilical protrusion was found in 742 (61.8%), with a similar incidence in males and females. The overall incidence was reflected in each age group by a preponderance of children with umbilical hernia. This study confirms the validity of a generally-held impression that in Black children there is a strong tendency towards the persistence of umbilical hernia when it appears after separation of the cord. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7086806

  11. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in the older child.

    PubMed Central

    Booker, P D; Meerstadt, P W; Bush, G H

    1981-01-01

    Five children aged between 9 months and 7 years were admitted to hospital each with an unsuspected congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In 4 the diagnosis was pneumonia with a secondary pleural effusion or lung abscess. Initial investigations were unhelpful to the admitting physician; two of the children had had a previous chest x-ray which was normal. For 3 children the correct diagnosis was only made at necropsy. It is suggested that the possibility of a congenital diaphragmatic hernia be considered in any patient who has an indefinable diaphragm and cystic lesion on his chest x-ray film. Barium studies with the patient in Trendelenburg's position are of value in excluding the presence of bowel in the chest. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7247437

  12. What is inside the hernia sac?

    PubMed Central

    Virgínia, Ana Araújo; Santos, Cláudia; Contente, Helena; Branco, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Most ovarian inguinal hernias occur in children and are frequently associated with congenital genitalia defects. The authors present the case of a multiparous 89-year-old woman, without any genitalia defect, who was brought to the emergency department with an irreducible inguinal hernia. The patient was proposed for emergency surgery during which we encountered an ovary and a fallopian tube inside the hernial sac. An oophorosalpingectomy and a Lichtenstein procedure were carried out and the postoperative period was uneventful. This case shows that, even though it is rare, a hernial sac may contain almost any intra-abdominal organ, including those least frequent such as the appendix, an ovary or the fallopian tubes. PMID:27511751

  13. Chronic Pain after Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Manangi, Mallikarjuna; Shivashankar, Santhosh

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic postherniorrhaphy groin pain is defined as pain lasting >6 months after surgery, which is one of the most important complications occurring after inguinal hernia repair, which occurs with greater frequency than previously thought. Material and Methods. Patients undergoing elective inguinal hernioplasty in Victoria Hospital from November 2011 to May 2013 were included in the study. A total of 227 patients met the inclusion criteria and were available for followup at end of six months. Detailed preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative details of cases were recorded according to proforma. The postoperative pain and pain at days two and seven and at end of six months were recorded on a VAS scale. Results. Chronic pain at six-month followup was present in 89 patients constituting 39.4% of all patients undergoing hernia repair. It was seen that 26.9% without preoperative pain developed chronic pain whereas 76.7% of patients with preoperative pain developed chronic pain. Preemptive analgesia failed to show statistical significance in development of chronic pain (P = 0.079). Nerve injury was present in 22 of cases; it was found that nerve injury significantly affected development of chronic pain (P = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, it was found that development of chronic pain following hernia surgery was dependent upon factors like preoperative pain, type of anesthesia, nerve injury, postoperative local infiltration, postoperative complication, and most importantly the early postoperative pain. Conclusions. In the present study, we found that chronic pain following inguinal hernia repair causes significant morbidity to patients and should not be ignored. Preemptive analgesia and operation under local anesthesia significantly affect pain. Intraoperative identification and preservation of all inguinal nerves are very important. Early diagnosis and management of chronic pain can remove suffering of the patient.

  14. [Median incisional hernias and coexisting parastomal hernias : new surgical strategies and an algorithm for simultaneous repair].

    PubMed

    Köhler, G

    2014-08-01

    The co-occurrence of incisional and parastomal hernias (PSH) remains a surgical challenge. Standardized treatment guidelines are missing, and the patients concerned require an individualized surgical approach. The laparoscopic techniques can be performed with incised and/or stoma-lateralizing flat meshes with intraperitoneal onlay placement. The purely laparoscopic and laparoscopic-assisted approaches with 3-D meshes offer advantages regarding the complete coverage of the edges of the stomal areas and the option of equilateral or contralateral stoma relocation in cases of PSH, which are difficult to handle due to scarring, adhesions, and large fascial defects > 5 cm with intestinal hernia sac contents. A relevant stoma prolapse can be relocated by tunnel-like preformed 3-D meshes and shortening the stoma bowel. The positive effect on prolapse prevention arises from the dome of the 3-D mesh, which is directed toward the abdominal cavity and tightly fits to the bowel. In cases of large incisional hernias (> 8-10 cm in width) or young patients with higher physical demands, an open abdominal wall reconstruction in sublay technique is required. Component separation techniques that enable tension-free ventral fascial closure should be preferred to mesh-supported defect bridging methods. The modified posterior component separation with transversus abdominis release (TAR) and the minimally invasive anterior component separation are superior to the original Ramirez technique with respect to wound morbidity. By using 3-D textile implants, which were specially designed for parastomal hernia prevention, the stoma can be brought out through the lateral abdominal wall without increased risk of parastomal hernia or prolapse development. An algorithm for surgical treatment, in consideration of the complexity of combined hernias, is introduced for the first time. PMID:24823998

  15. Sports hernia and femoroacetabular impingement in athletes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Munegato, Daniele; Bigoni, Marco; Gridavilla, Giulia; Olmi, Stefano; Cesana, Giovanni; Zatti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between sports hernias and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in athletes. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched for articles relating to sports hernia, athletic pubalgia, groin pain, long-standing adductor-related groin pain, Gilmore groin, adductor pain syndrome, and FAI. The initial search identified 196 studies, of which only articles reporting on the association of sports hernia and FAI or laparoscopic treatment of sports hernia were selected for systematic review. Finally, 24 studies were reviewed to evaluate the prevalence of FAI in cases of sports hernia and examine treatment outcomes and evidence for a common underlying pathogenic mechanism. RESULTS: FAI has been reported in as few as 12% to as high as 94% of patients with sports hernias, athletic pubalgia or adductor-related groin pain. Cam-type impingement is proposed to lead to increased symphyseal motion with overload on the surrounding extra-articular structures and muscle, which can result in the development of sports hernia and athletic pubalgia. Laparoscopic repair of sports hernias, via either the transabdominal preperitoneal or extraperitoneal approach, has a high success rate and earlier recovery of full sports activity compared to open surgery or conservative treatment. For patients with FAI and sports hernia, the surgical management of both pathologies is more effective than sports pubalgia treatment or hip arthroscopy alone (89% vs 33% of cases). As sports hernias and FAI are typically treated by general and orthopedic surgeons, respectively, a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis and treatment is recommended for optimal treatment of patients with these injuries. CONCLUSION: The restriction in range of motion due to FAI likely contributes to sports hernias; therefore, surgical treatment of both pathologies represents an optimal therapy. PMID:26380829

  16. Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal Hernia Repair Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Erin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has become increasingly popular as an alternative to open surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal procedure with the use of staple fixation and polypropylene mesh. Methods: A retrospective chart review examined outcomes of 1240 laparoscopic hernia operations in 783 patients, focusing on intraoperative and early postoperative complications, pain, and time until return to work and normal physical activities. Results: There were no intraoperative complications in this series; 106 patients experienced early postoperative complications across 8 evaluated categories: urinary retention (4.1%), seroma (3.0%), testicular/hemiscrotal swelling (1.9%), testicular atrophy (0%), hydrocele (0.6%), mesh infection (0.1%), and neurological symptoms (transient, 1.0%; persistent, 0.2%). Patients used an average of 5.6 Percocet pills after the procedure, and mean times until return to work and normal activities, including their routine exercise regimen, were 3.0 and 3.8 days, respectively. Conclusion: Complication rates and convalescence times were considered equivalent or superior to those found in other studies assessing both laparoscopic and open techniques. The usage of multiple Endostaples did not result in increased neurologic complications in the early postoperative period when compared with findings in the literature. In the hands of an experienced surgeon, total extraperitoneal repair is a safe, effective alternative to open inguinal hernia repair. PMID:27493471

  17. Laparoscopic Hernia Repair and Bladder Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bhoyrul, Sunil; Mulvihill, Sean J.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Bladder injury is a complication of laparoscopic surgery with a reported incidence in the general surgery literature of 0.5% and in the gynecology literature of 2%. We describe how to recognize and treat the injury and how to avoid the problem. Case Reports: We report two cases of bladder injury repaired with a General Surgical Interventions (GSI) trocar and a balloon device used for laparoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair. One patient had a prior appendectomy; the other had a prior midline incision from a suprapubic prostatectomy. We repaired the bladder injury, and the patients made a good recovery. Conclusion: When using the obturator and balloon device, it is important to stay anterior to the preperitoneal space and bladder. Prior lower abdominal surgery can be considered a relative contraindication to extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair. Signs of gas in the Foley bag or hematuria should alert the surgeon to a bladder injury. A one- or two-layer repair of the bladder injury can be performed either laparoscopically or openly and is recommended for a visible injury. Mesh repair of the hernia can be completed provided no evidence exists of urinary tract infection. A Foley catheter is placed until healing occurs. PMID:11394432

  18. The Laparoscopic Approach to Paraesophageal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Nason, Katie S.; Levy, Ryan M.; Witteman, Bart P.L.; Luketich, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair continues to be one of the most challenging procedures facing the minimally invasive surgeon. A thorough understanding of the tenets of the operation and advanced skills in minimally invasive laparoscopy are needed for long-term freedom from symptomatic and anatomic recurrence. These include complete reduction of the hernia sac from the mediastinum back into the abdomen with careful preservation of the integrity of muscle and peritoneal lining of the crura, aggressive and complete mobilization of the esophagus to the level of the inferior pulmonary vein, clear identification of the gastroesophageal junction to allow accurate assessment of the intraabdominal esophageal length and use of Collis gastroplasty when esophageal lengthening is required for a tension-free intraabdominal repair. Liberal mobilization of the phrenosplenic and phrenogastric attachments substantially increases the mobility of the left limb of the crura, allowing for a tension-free primary closure in a large percentage of patients. The following describes our current approach to laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair following a decade of refinement in a high-volume center. PMID:22160778

  19. Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia: imaging aspects in three cases*

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Ana Carolina Sandoval; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; de Campos, José Ribas Milanez; Aranha, André Galante Alencar; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão

    2013-01-01

    Transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia is uncommon and mostly related to blunt or penetrating trauma. We report three similar cases of cough-induced transdiaphragmatic intercostal hernia, highlighting the anatomic findings obtained with different imaging modalities (radiography, ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonance) in each of the cases. PMID:24068274

  20. Diaphragmatic Hernia after Transhiatal Esophagectomy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohun; Kim, Si-Wook; Hong, Jong-Myeon

    2016-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia was found in a patient who had undergone transhiatal esophagectomy for early esophageal cancer. Chest X-ray was not helpful, but abdominal or chest computed tomography was useful for accurate diagnosis. Primary repair through thoracotomy was performed and was found to be feasible and effective. However, long-term follow-up is required because hernia recurrence is common. PMID:27525243

  1. Incarcerated obturator hernia: early diagnostic using helical computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Avaro, J-P; Biance, N; Savoie, P-H; Peycru, T; Pauleau, G; Richez, P; Charpentier, R; Balandraud, P

    2008-04-01

    Obturator hernia is a rare event with poor clinical signs. Delayed diagnosis is a cause of increased mortality due to ruptured gangrenous bowel. We report a case of incarcerated obturator hernia which highlights the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) scanning in diagnosing this condition. PMID:17628737

  2. Undiagnosed diaphragmatic hernia--the importance of preanesthetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ricco, Carolina H; Graham, Lynelle

    2007-06-01

    A 6-year-old, neutered male, Pembroke Welsh corgi was presented for hind limb paralysis. After anesthetic induction, marked cyanosis and hypotension were noted. Diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed based upon radiographic findings. Risks and complications associated with undiagnosed diaphragmatic hernia and the importance of thorough physical examination and patient assessment are discussed. PMID:17616059

  3. Left paramesocolic hernia presenting as post appendicectomy abdominal cocoon.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ramnik; Gabra, H Os; Nour, Shawqui

    2010-11-01

    We describe a rare case of left mesocolic hernia presenting as post appendicectomy intestinal obstruction in a girl. Laparotomy confirmed partial peritoneal encapsulation of upper small bowel due to herniation of jejunal loops into the left mesocolic hernia sac. Reduction of contents, resection of the sac and repair of the defect concluded the procedure uneventfully. PMID:21149902

  4. Evolution and advances in laparoscopic ventral and incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Vorst, Alan L; Kaoutzanis, Christodoulos; Carbonell, Alfredo M; Franz, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Primary ventral hernias and ventral incisional hernias have been a challenge for surgeons throughout the ages. In the current era, incisional hernias have increased in prevalence due to the very high number of laparotomies performed in the 20th century. Even though minimally invasive surgery and hernia repair have evolved rapidly, general surgeons have yet to develop the ideal, standardized method that adequately decreases common postoperative complications, such as wound failure, hernia recurrence and pain. The evolution of laparoscopy and ventral hernia repair will be reviewed, from the rectoscopy of the 4th century to the advent of laparoscopy, from suture repair to the evolution of mesh reinforcement. The nuances of minimally invasive ventral and incisional hernia repair will be summarized, from preoperative considerations to variations in intraoperative practice. New techniques have become increasingly popular, such as primary defect closure, retrorectus mesh placement, and concomitant component separation. The advent of robotics has made some of these repairs more feasible, but only time and well-designed clinical studies will tell if this will be a durable modality for ventral and incisional hernia repair. PMID:26649152

  5. Simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias under local anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Amid, P K; Shulman, A G; Lichtenstein, I L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors confirm the advantages of simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias, indicate that it is feasible to perform the procedure under local anesthesia, and suggest that when an open tension-free technique is used, the results are superior to those of laparoscopic repair of bilateral inguinal hernias. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Between 1971 and 1995, simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias were performed in 2953 men. Initially, between 1971 and 1984, patients with indirect hernias underwent the traditional tissue approximation repair. Those with direct hernias had the same procedure, with the repair additionally buttressed by a sheet of Marlex mesh (Davol, Inc., Cronston, RI). Between 1984 and 1995, both direct and indirect hernias were repaired using the open tension-free hernioplasty procedure. METHOD: The 2953 patients underwent simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias under local anesthesia in a private practice setting in general hospitals. RESULTS: In those cases in which the "tension free" technique was used, patients experienced minimal to mild postoperative pain and had a short recovery period, with a recurrence rate of 0.1%. CONCLUSIONS: Uncomplicated bilateral inguinal hernias in adults are best treated simultaneously. It is feasible to perform the operation under local anesthesia, and when an open tension-free repair is used, postoperative pain and recovery periods are equally comparable with those of laparoscopic repair, although the complication and the recurrence rates are significantly less. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8604904

  6. [Surgery of inguinal hernias in the geriatric patient].

    PubMed

    Palumbo, P; Pulcini, M; Vietri, F; Turano, R; Gallinaro, L; Montesano, G; Martinelli, V

    1997-10-01

    The Authors report a series of 73 elderly patients undergone to Lichtenstein hernioplasty with local anaesthesia. Treatment of inguinal hernia in emergency involves a high mortality; on the contrary, the lack of complications and a very good patient compliance shows that elective repair of inguinal hernia should be preferred and performed in the elderly. PMID:9479989

  7. Incidence of Ostomy Site Incisional Hernias after Stoma Closure.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Stephen P; Francis, Jacquelyn K; Valerian, Brian T; Canete, Jonathan J; Chismark, A David; Lee, Edward C

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the incidence of ostomy site incisional hernias after stoma reversal at a single institution. This is a retrospective analysis from 2001 to 2011 evaluating the following demographics: age, gender, indication for stoma, urgent versus elective operation, time to closure, total follow-up time, the incidence of and reoperation for stoma incisional hernia, diabetes, postoperative wound infection, smoking status within six months of surgery, body mass index, and any immunosuppressive medications. A total of 365 patients were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 30 months. The clinical hernia rate was 19 percent. Significant risk factors for hernia development were age, diabetes, end colostomies, loop colostomies, body mass index >30, and undergoing an urgent operation. The median time to clinical hernia detection was 32 months. Sixty-four percent of patients required surgical repair of their stoma incisional hernia. A significant number of patients undergoing stoma closure developed an incisional hernia at the prior stoma site with the majority requiring definitive repair. These hernias are a late complication after stoma closure and likely why they are under-reported in the literature. PMID:26736162

  8. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: an unusual cause of obstructive jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Jones, HG; Kadhim, A; Nutt, M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias in adults are exceedingly rare. They have been reported to cause dyspnoea, gastric reflux and intestinal obstruction. We present the case of a young woman with obstructive jaundice secondary to a Bochdalek hernia of the right hemidiaphragm. We discuss the aetiologies, presentation, investigation and treatment of the disorder, and make recommendations on the management. PMID:22524906

  9. Painful incarcerated hernia following a rugby union lineout

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R. H.; Thomas, G. O.

    1999-01-01

    Discussion related to hernias in sport usually involves the diagnosis and treatment of chronic musculotendinous groin disruption. A case of acute trauma in an incarcerated inguinal hernia, occurring in a rugby union player during a lineout, is presented. The injury arose as a result of a change in the laws of the game. 




 PMID:10027060

  10. Surgical correction of a diaphragmatic hernia in a newborn calf

    PubMed Central

    Bellavance, Anne; Bonneville-Hébert, Ariane; Desrochers, André; Fecteau, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    A 2-day-old Holstein calf was admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital (VTH) in St-Hyacinthe for respiratory distress. Thoracic auscultations revealed asymmetric lung sounds. A diaphragmatic hernia was diagnosed on thoracic radiographs. Herniorrhaphy was performed; postoperative recovery was uneventful. This case indicates that diaphragmatic hernia in calves can be surgically treated successfully. PMID:20885833

  11. ROBOTIC ASSISTED SINGLE SITE FOR BILATERAL INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    BOSI, Henrique Rasia; GUIMARÃES, José Ricardo; CAVAZZOLA, Leandro Totti

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The inguinal hernia is one of the most frequent surgical diseases, being frequent procedure and surgeon´s everyday practice. Aim: To present technical details in making hernioplasty using robotic equipment on bilateral inguinal hernia repair with single port and preliminary results with the method. Method: The bilateral inguinal hernia repair was performed by using the Single-Site(c) Da Vinci Surgical Access Platform to the abdominal cavity and the placement of clamps. Results: This technique proved to be effective for inguinal hernia and have more aesthetic result when compared to other techniques. Conclusions: Inguinal hernia repair robot-assisted with single-trocar is feasible and effective. However, still has higher costs needing surgical team special training. PMID:27438038

  12. Laparoscopic mesh repair of parahiatal hernia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lew, Pei Shi; Wong, Andrew Siang Yih

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of a primary parahiatal hernia that was repaired laparoscopically with a composite mesh. A 51-year-old woman presented with vomiting and epigastric pain. CT scan showed a giant paraesophageal hernia with intrathoracic gastric volvulus. Intraoperatively, a diaphragmatic muscular defect was found lateral to an attenuated left crus of the diaphragm, distinct from the normal esophageal hiatus. The defect ring was fibrotic, making a tension-free primary repair difficult. A laparoscopic mesh repair was performed with a composite mesh, which was covered with the hernia sac to prevent potential erosion into the esophagus or stomach. Recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the 5 days postoperatively. She remained asymptomatic at subsequent follow-up. Laparoscopic repair of parahiatal hernia can be safely performed. In circumstances where a large or fibrotic defect prevents a tension-free primary repair, the use of a composite mesh can provide effective repair of the hernia. PMID:23879418

  13. A Traumatic Abdominal Wall Hernia Repair: A Laparoscopic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kenneth L.; Rosser, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Traumatic abdominal wall hernias from blunt trauma usually occur as a consequence of motor vehicle collisions where the force is tangential, sudden, and severe. Although rare, these hernias can go undetected due to preservation of the skin overlying the hernia defect. Open repairs can be challenging and unsuccessful due to avulsion of muscle directly from the iliac crest, with or without bone loss. A laparoscopic approach to traumatic abdominal wall hernia can aid in the delineation of the hernia and allow for a safe and effective repair. Case Description: A 36-year-old female was admitted to our Level 1 trauma center with a traumatic abdominal wall hernia located in the right flank near the iliac crest after being involved in a high-impact motor vehicle collision. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen revealed the presence of an abdominal wall defect that was unapparent on physical examination. The traumatic abdominal wall hernia in the right flank was successfully repaired laparoscopically. One-year follow-up has shown no sign of recurrence. Discussion: A traumatic abdominal wall hernia rarely presents following blunt trauma, but should be suspected following a high-impact motor vehicle collision. Frequently, repair is complicated by the need to have fixation of mesh to bony landmarks (eg, iliac crest). In spite of this challenge, the laparoscopic approach with tension-free mesh repair of a traumatic abdominal wall hernia can be accomplished successfully using an approach similar to that taken for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. PMID:23477181

  14. [Is the presence of an asymptomatic inguinal hernia enough to justify repair?].

    PubMed

    Metzger, Jürg

    2015-11-11

    The risk of strangulation in case of a inguinal hernia is low. Patients with a symptomatic inguinal hernia should undergo an operation. Morbidity and mortality in inguinal hernia surgery are very rare. There is also non-conservative treatment of inguinal hernias. Trusses should no longer be recommended. Watchful waiting is an option for men with minimally symptomatic or asymptomatic inguinal hernias. But patients must be informed that there is a high risk of becoming symptomatic. PMID:26558931

  15. Incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia--differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Bukvić, Nado; Versić, Ana Bosak; Bacić, Giordano; Gusić, Nadomir; Nikolić, Harry; Bukvić, Frane

    2014-12-01

    The incarceration of diaphragmatic hernia is very rare. We present a case of a four-year-old girl who developed the incarceration of left-sided diaphragmatic hernia, who, until then, was completely asymptomatic. This incarceration of the hernia represented a surgical emergency presenting as obstructive ileus and a severe respiratory distress which developed from what appeared to be full health. During a brief pre-operative examination a number of differential diagnoses were suggested. Along with the laboratory blood analysis (complete blood count and acid-base balance) a plain thoracic and abdominal radiography was done (babygram). After that, through an inserted nasal-gastric tube, barium meal of the upper gastrointestinal tract was done, showing abdominal organs in the left half of the thorax and a significant shift of the mediastinum to the right. With an urgent upper medial laparotomy we accessed the abdominal cavity and made the correct diagnosis. An opening was shown in the rear part of the left hemi-diaphragm with thickened and edematous edges, approx. 6 cm in diameter with incarcerated content. The incarcerated abdominal organs (stomach, transversal colon, small intestine and spleen) gradually moved into the abdominal cavity. The opening was closed with nonresorptive sutures (TiCron) size 2-0 with aprevious control and ventilated expansion of the well-developed left lung. In postoperative course the acid-base balance quickly recovered, as well as the general state of the patient and radiography showed a good expansion and lucency of the lung parenchyma and a return of the mediastinum into the middle part of the thorax. PMID:25842758

  16. Genetic causes of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Julia; Yu, Lan; Chung, Wendy K.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a moderately prevalent birth defect that, despite advances in neonatal care, is still a significant cause of infant death, and surviving patients have significant morbidity. The goal of ongoing research to elucidate the genetic causes of CDH is to develop better treatment and ultimately prevention. CDH is a complex developmental defect that is etiologically heterogeneous. This review summarizes the recurrent genetic causes of CDH including aneuploidies, chromosome copy number variants, and single gene mutations. It also discusses strategies for genetic evaluation and genetic counseling in an era of rapidly evolving technologies in clinical genetic diagnostics. PMID:25447988

  17. Genetic aspects of human congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Pober, BR

    2010-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common major malformation affecting 1/3000–1/4000 births, which continues to be associated with significant perinatal mortality. Much current research is focused on elucidating the genetics and pathophysiology contributing to CDH to develop more effective therapies. The latest data suggest that many cases of CDH are genetically determined and also indicate that CDH is etiologically heterogeneous. The present review will provide a brief summary of diaphragm development and model organism work most relevant to human CDH and will primarily describe important human phenotypes associated with CDH and also provide recommendations for diagnostic evaluation of a fetus or infant with CDH. PMID:18510546

  18. Retroperitoneal vascular malformation mimicking incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Indu Bhushan; Sharma, Anuj; Singh, Ajay Kumar; Mohanty, Debajyoti

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old man presented to the Department of Surgery with a painful groin swelling on right side. Exploration revealed a reddish-blue hemangiomatous mass in the scrotum extending through inguinal canal into the retroperitoneum. On further dissection swelling was found to be originating from right external iliac vein. The swelling was excised after ligating all vascular connections. The histopathological examination of excised mass confirmed the diagnosis of venous variety of vascular malformation. This is the first reported case of vascular malformation arising from retroperitoneum and extending into inguinoscrotal region, presenting as incarcerated inguinal hernia. PMID:21633582

  19. Sportsman’s hernia? An ambiguous term

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrakopoulou, Alexandra; Schilders, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is common in athletes. Yet, there is disagreement on aetiology, pathomechanics and terminology. A plethora of terms have been employed to explain inguinal-related groin pain in athletes. Recently, at the British Hernia Society in Manchester 2012, a consensus was reached to use the term inguinal disruption based on the pathophysiology while lately the Doha agreement in 2014 defined it as inguinal-related groin pain, a clinically based taxonomy. This review article emphasizes the anatomy, pathogenesis, standard clinical assessment and imaging, and highlights the treatment options for inguinal disruption. PMID:27026822

  20. Return to Play After Sports Hernia Surgery.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ho-Rim; Elattar, Osama; Dills, Vickie D; Busconi, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Sports hernia is a condition that causes acute/chronic pain of low abdominal, groin, or adductor area in athletes. It is considered a weakness in the rectus abdominis insertion or posterior inguinal wall of lower abdomen caused by acute or repetitive injury of the structure. It is most commonly seen in soccer, ice hockey, and martial arts players who require acute cutting, pivoting, or kicking. A variety of surgical options have been reported with successful outcome and with high rates of return to the sports in a majority of cases. PMID:27543403

  1. Umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis: A surgical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Julio C U; Claus, Christiano M P; Campos, Antonio C L; Costa, Marco A R; Blum, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical hernia occurs in 20% of the patients with liver cirrhosis complicated with ascites. Due to the enormous intraabdominal pressure secondary to the ascites, umbilical hernia in these patients has a tendency to enlarge rapidly and to complicate. The treatment of umbilical hernia in these patients is a surgical challenge. Ascites control is the mainstay to reduce hernia recurrence and postoperative complications, such as wound infection, evisceration, ascites drainage, and peritonitis. Intermittent paracentesis, temporary peritoneal dialysis catheter or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may be necessary to control ascites. Hernia repair is indicated in patients in whom medical treatment is effective in controlling ascites. Patients who have a good perspective to be transplanted within 3-6 mo, herniorrhaphy should be performed during transplantation. Hernia repair with mesh is associated with lower recurrence rate, but with higher surgical site infection when compared to hernia correction with conventional fascial suture. There is no consensus on the best abdominal wall layer in which the mesh should be placed: Onlay, sublay, or underlay. Many studies have demonstrated several advantages of the laparoscopic umbilical herniorrhaphy in cirrhotic patients compared with open surgical treatment. PMID:27462389

  2. A prospective study of bilateral inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed Central

    Serpell, J. W.; Johnson, C. D.; Jarrett, P. E.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study of outcome after inguinal hernia repair in patients undergoing simultaneous repair of bilateral hernias (n = 31), sequential repair of bilateral hernias (n = 5), and unilateral hernia repair (n = 75) is reported. There were no differences in wound complications, post-operative respiratory complications, or other adverse effects in the three groups. Operating time was similar in the unilateral and bilateral simultaneous repairs (median 55 min), but was longer (100 min) for the combination of two sequential repairs. Hospital stay was shortest for patients undergoing unilateral repair (2 days) but was less with bilateral simultaneous repair (4 days) than after two sequential repairs (total of 6 days). There were 12 (11%) wound complications of which five (5%) were infections. There was no difference in complication rate between unilateral and bilateral hernia repair. Postoperative recovery was assessed prospectively and was recorded at 1 month. There was no difference between unilateral and bilateral simultaneous repairs in the number of days before the patient was able to climb stairs easily, drive a car or return to work. The duration of the requirement for analgesia was similar in each group. We conclude that bilateral simultaneous hernia repair can be carried out with no greater morbidity than a unilateral repair, and the return to normal activity is as rapid. Bilateral hernias should be repaired simultaneously rather than sequentially. PMID:2221764

  3. Umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis: A surgical challenge.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Julio C U; Claus, Christiano M P; Campos, Antonio C L; Costa, Marco A R; Blum, Caroline

    2016-07-27

    Umbilical hernia occurs in 20% of the patients with liver cirrhosis complicated with ascites. Due to the enormous intraabdominal pressure secondary to the ascites, umbilical hernia in these patients has a tendency to enlarge rapidly and to complicate. The treatment of umbilical hernia in these patients is a surgical challenge. Ascites control is the mainstay to reduce hernia recurrence and postoperative complications, such as wound infection, evisceration, ascites drainage, and peritonitis. Intermittent paracentesis, temporary peritoneal dialysis catheter or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may be necessary to control ascites. Hernia repair is indicated in patients in whom medical treatment is effective in controlling ascites. Patients who have a good perspective to be transplanted within 3-6 mo, herniorrhaphy should be performed during transplantation. Hernia repair with mesh is associated with lower recurrence rate, but with higher surgical site infection when compared to hernia correction with conventional fascial suture. There is no consensus on the best abdominal wall layer in which the mesh should be placed: Onlay, sublay, or underlay. Many studies have demonstrated several advantages of the laparoscopic umbilical herniorrhaphy in cirrhotic patients compared with open surgical treatment. PMID:27462389

  4. Transverse testicular ectopia: a rare association with inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Prakash; Koirala, Rabin; Subedi, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Transverse testicular ectopia (TTE) is a rare anomaly that is commonly associated with inguinal hernia. Most of the reported cases are in children with very few reported cases in adults. We report a case of 42 years, fertile male, who presented with left reducible inguinal hernia. During surgery, he was found to have a left indirect inguinal hernia with TTE with both testes on the left side. Hernioplasty and bilateral orchidopexy were performed. He had an uneventful recovery. Most of these cases are diagnosed intraoperatively, but imaging (ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging) has emerged as a promising tool for preoperative diagnosis although ultrasound missed it in this case. PMID:25287117

  5. [CLINICO-EXPERIMENTAL SUBSTANTIATION OF INTRAABDOMINAL PLASTY FOR UMBILICAL HERNIAS].

    PubMed

    Joffe, O Yu; Shvets, I M; Tarasyuk, T V; Stetsenko, O P; Tsyura, Yu P

    2015-04-01

    The impact of various methods of plasty, using net implants, on results of umbilical hernias treatment was studied in experimental and clinical investigation. The umbilical hernias plasty was performed in accordance to the IPOM (intraperitoneal on lay mesh) method, application of which have permitted to reduce a hospital stay of the patients as well as their period of social rehabilitation, and to guarantee the best cosmetic effect in comparison with such while making umbilical hernias plasty in accordance to a sub lay method. PMID:26263641

  6. A rare case of appendicitis incarcerated in an inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Smith-Singares, Eduardo; Boachie, Joseph Adjei; Iglesias, Izaskun Melania

    2016-01-01

    Amyand's hernia was coined after Claudius Amyand (1660-1740), who was the first to describe the presence of a perforated appendix in a hernial sac and also was the first to perform a successful appendectomy in 1735. It is an exceptionally rare condition in which the hernia itself contains the appendix, which may not necessarily be inflamed. The presence of an inflamed appendix further contributes to the rarity of this case. We report a case of acute appendicitis brought on by its incarceration in the inguinal hernia. PMID:27273683

  7. A rare case of appendicitis incarcerated in an inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Singares, Eduardo; Boachie, Joseph Adjei; Iglesias, Izaskun Melania

    2016-01-01

    Amyand's hernia was coined after Claudius Amyand (1660–1740), who was the first to describe the presence of a perforated appendix in a hernial sac and also was the first to perform a successful appendectomy in 1735. It is an exceptionally rare condition in which the hernia itself contains the appendix, which may not necessarily be inflamed. The presence of an inflamed appendix further contributes to the rarity of this case. We report a case of acute appendicitis brought on by its incarceration in the inguinal hernia. PMID:27273683

  8. Chest wall reconstruction after resection using hernia repair piece

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yimin; Zhang, Guofei; Zhu, Zhouyu

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of chest wall tumor is very important link of chest wall tumor resection. Many implants have been reported to be used to reconstruct the chest wall, such as steelwire, titanium mesh and polypropylene mesh. It is really hard for clinicians to decide which implant is the best one to replace the chest wall. We herein report a 68-year-old man who had underwent a chest wall reconstruction with a hernia repair piece and a Dacron hernia repair piece. The patient has maintained an excellent cosmetic and functional outcome since surgery, which proves that the hernia piece still has its place in reconstruction of chest wall. PMID:27293859

  9. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman’s active sports life. Sportsman’s hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman’s hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman’s hernia at our hospital between 2011–2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  10. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman's active sports life. Sportsman's hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman's hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman's hernia at our hospital between 2011-2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  11. Age and sex-based distribution of lumbar multifidus muscle atrophy and coexistence of disc hernia: an MRI study of 2028 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ekin, Elif Evrim; Yıldız, Hülya Kurtul; Mutlu, Harun

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to investigate the prevalence of lumbar multifidus muscle (LMM) atrophy in patients having mechanical low back pain with and without disc hernia. METHODS In total, 2028 lumbar magnetic resonance imaging scans of low back pain patients (age range, 18–88 years) were re-evaluated retrospectively. LMM atrophy was visually assessed in axial sections of L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels. RESULTS LMM atrophy prevalence at both levels was significantly higher in subjects ≥40 years compared with younger adults (P < 0.001). LMM atrophy was significantly more frequent in women than in men (P < 0.001). Among patients with low back pain without hernia, LMM atrophy was significantly more frequent than normal muscle (n=559 vs. n=392; P < 0.001). Frequency of LMM atrophy in low back pain patients without disc hernia was 13%. Hernia was more frequent in patients with LMM atrophy compared with patients without atrophy (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION LMM atrophy is more common in women; its prevalence and severity are observed to increase with advancing age, and disc hernia is found more frequently in individuals with LMM atrophy. PMID:27035591

  12. [Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernias].

    PubMed

    Bezsilla, János

    2010-10-01

    Repair of abdominal wall defects is a challenge for all general surgeons and a variety of methods have been described in the past. Traditionally, primary suture repair was shown to have a high recurrence rate in long-term follow-up studies. Herniorrhaphies that apply a large prosthetic mesh are appear to have a lower failure rate, but extensive dissection of soft tissue contributes to an increased incidence of wound infections and wound-related complications. The method of laparoscopic incisional hernia repair was developed in the early 1990s. This technique is based on the same physical and surgical principles as the open underlay procedure. The laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) technique and mesh materials were developed further in subsequent years, and there have been numerous reports on successful use of the IPOM technique even for extremely large hernia openings in obese and elderly patients. Reduced surgical trauma and lower infection and recurrence rates are key advantages of the minimally invasive repair. Therefore, this operation has increased in popularity promising shorter hospital stay, improved outcome, and fewer complications than traditional open procedures. PMID:20965866

  13. Amyand’s Hernia: Case Report -Current Dilemma in Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Vasanth Mark; Kodiatte, Thomas; Gaikwad, Pranay

    2015-01-01

    Amyand’s hernia is an extremely rare condition, often misdiagnosed as a strangulated inguinal hernia, in which the inguinal hernial sac contains the vermiform appendix. It is often a surgical surprise. The reported incidence is approximately 1% of all adult inguinal hernia cases. Acute appendicitis in the Amyand’s hernia is even less common. We report a rare presentation of acute appendicitis associated with Amyand’s hernia managed by en masse reduction of the hernia followed by laparoscopic appendicectomy and open Lichtenstein’s tension free inguinal hernioplasty. PMID:25859489

  14. Transmesenteric hernia: A rare cause of bowel ischaemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, J.; Cross, Trent; Butterworth, William; Mousa, Paul; Thomas, S.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Transmesenteric herniae are a rare cause of bowel ischaemia in adults with few reported cases in published literature. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a rare case of a 26-year-old female with spontaneous transmesenteric hernia of jejunum and proximal ileum due to a congenital mesenteric defect resulting in bowel gangrene, presenting initially with no haemodynamic or biochemical abnormalities. The hernia was reduced, small bowel resected and primary side to side anastomosis performed, following which the patient made a good recovery and was discharged 5 days later. DISCUSSION The insidious onset of transmesenteric herniae and lack of specific radiological or laboratory investigations reaffirms the importance of surgeons maintaining a high index of suspicion for this critical surgical emergency. CONCLUSION Close monitoring of the patient's general condition in cases of non-specific abdominal pain is essential to identify the rare deteriorating patient for early surgical intervention and optimal outcome. PMID:23685474

  15. Surgical mesh for ventral incisional hernia repairs: Understanding mesh design.

    PubMed

    Rastegarpour, Ali; Cheung, Michael; Vardhan, Madhurima; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Butler, Charles E; Levinson, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Surgical mesh has become an indispensable tool in hernia repair to improve outcomes and reduce costs; however, efforts are constantly being undertaken in mesh development to overcome postoperative complications. Common complications include infection, pain, adhesions, mesh extrusion and hernia recurrence. Reducing the complications of mesh implantation is of utmost importance given that hernias occur in hundreds of thousands of patients per year in the United States. In the present review, the authors present the different types of hernia meshes, discuss the key properties of mesh design, and demonstrate how each design element affects performance and complications. The present article will provide a basis for surgeons to understand which mesh to choose for patient care and why, and will explain the important technological aspects that will continue to evolve over the ensuing years. PMID:27054138

  16. The maneuver to release an incarcerated obturator hernia.

    PubMed

    Shigemitsu, Y; Akagi, T; Morimoto, A; Ishio, T; Shiraishi, N; Kitano, S

    2012-12-01

    An obturator hernia occurs through the pelvic obturator canal, a rigid ring made up of the underside of the superior pubic ramus and the obturator fascia. Obturator hernias have been associated with a high mortality due to the difficulty in diagnosis and the population in which it occurs. We examined four patients diagnosed with incarcerated obturator hernia, and showed that the strangulated intestine was not necrotic. We flexed the diseased leg calmly and repeatedly with slight rotation toward the outside and slight adduction toward the inside at supine position. The pain vanished suddenly during this maneuver. After this maneuver, the patients were able to undergo elective surgery after a certain interval. We discuss the possible use of this maneuver to release an incarcerated obturator hernia. PMID:21369820

  17. Hiatus/paraesophageal hernias in neonatal Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parida, S K; Kriss, V M; Hall, B D

    1997-10-17

    We report on an infant with neonatal Marfan syndrome (NMS) and hiatus/paraesophageal hernia who presented to a university hospital with an unusual early complication of this connective tissue disorder. An abnormal course of the nasogastric tube was noted on the first day of life by a radiograph of the chest and abdomen performed for bloody gastric drainage. The question of esophageal perforation was raised. Subsequent contrast study demonstrated a large hiatus/paraesophageal hernia with pronounced gastroesophageal reflux (GER). A part of the hernia was positioned posterior and to the right of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), presumably the location of the nasogastric tube as noted on the initial films. Although characterized by cardiac/aortic abnormalities, NMS can be a difficult diagnosis and should be considered in any infant with hiatus/ paraesophageal hernia with or without GER. PMID:9382135

  18. Parastomal hernia: a growing problem with new solutions.

    PubMed

    Aquina, Christopher T; Iannuzzi, James C; Probst, Christian P; Kelly, Kristin N; Noyes, Katia; Fleming, Fergal J; Monson, John R T

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the most common complications following stoma creation and its prevalence is only expected to increase. It often leads to a decrease in the quality of life for patients due to discomfort, pain, frequent ostomy appliance leakage, or peristomal skin irritation and can result in significantly increased healthcare costs. Surgical technique for parastomal hernia repair has evolved significantly over the past two decades with the introduction of new types of mesh and laparoscopic procedures. The use of prophylactic mesh in high-risk patients at the time of stoma creation has gained attention in lieu of several promising studies that have emerged in the recent days. This review will attempt to demonstrate the burden that parastomal hernias present to patients, surgeons, and the healthcare system and also provide an overview of the current management and surgical techniques at both preventing and treating parastomal hernias. PMID:25531238

  19. Beware of spontaneous reduction "en masse" of inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Berney, C R

    2015-12-01

    Reduction 'en masse' of inguinal hernia is a rare entity defined as manual reduction of an external hernia sac back through the abdominal wall but where its content still remains incarcerated or strangulated into a displaced position, most often in the pre-peritoneal space. Small bowel obstruction habitually follows requiring urgent repair, preferentially via a trans-abdominal approach. Pre-operative clinical diagnosis is difficult and abdominal CT-scan imaging is the investigation of choice. PMID:24430579

  20. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Harihar, Vivek; Kothudum, Ashwini Rajareddy; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism. PMID:27579208

  1. Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia in children: Diagnostic difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Ndour, O.; Mustapha, H.; Ndoye, N. A.; Faye Fall, A. L.; Ngom, G.; Ndoye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia is rare in children. Its diagnosis can be difficult in the acute phase of trauma because its signs are not specific, especially in a poly trauma context. We report two cases of traumatic right diaphragmatic hernia following a blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma, highlighting some difficulties in establishing an early diagnosis and the need for a high index of suspicion. PMID:25659563

  2. Unusual perforated appendicitis within umbilical hernia: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz, J; Ortiz, A; Marco de Lucas, E; Piedra, T; Jordá, J; Arnáiz, A M; Pagola, M A

    2006-01-01

    We present the first imaging report of perforated appendicitis in an umbilical hernia. Computed tomography demonstrated a gas-forming abscess within an umbilical hernia and the cecum was found inside the hernial sac, with an inner relation to the abscess. Computed tomographic findings suggested appendicitis as possible diagnosis, which was confirmed at surgery. Physicians must consider appendicitis within the differential diagnosis of an abdominal abscess located near to the cecum, even at an unexpected location. PMID:16465570

  3. WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Emergency repair of complicated abdominal hernias is associated with poor prognosis and a high rate of post-operative complications. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference was held in Bergamo in July 2013, during the 2nd Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery with the goal of defining recommendations for emergency repair of abdominal wall hernias in adults. This document represents the executive summary of the consensus conference approved by a WSES expert panel. PMID:24289453

  4. Internal hernia associated with colostomy after laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hajime; Hoshino, Isamu; Sugamoto, Yuji; Fukunaga, Toru; Fujimoto, Hajime; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Uno, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We herein describe a case with an internal hernia that developed after laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer. The small intestine passed through the space between the sigmoid colon loop of the stoma and the abdominal wall. Internal hernias associated with colostomy are rare; however, the condition is an important complication, because it causes ischemia in both the herniated intestine and the sigmoid colon pulled through the abdominal wall as a stoma. PMID:23601774

  5. Laparoscopic Repair of Sportman's Hernia - The Trinidad Experience.

    PubMed

    Gopeesingh, Anyl; Dan, Dilip; Naraynsingh, Vijay; Hariharan, Seetharaman; Seetahal, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    Sportman's hernia: (Athletic pubalgia) is an uncommon and poorly understood condition afflicting athletic individuals. Sufferers complain of chronic groin pain and often present diagnostic dilemmas to physicians and physiotherapists. We present a series of cases illustrating the varying presentations of sportman's hernia and diagnostic approaches that can be utilized to exclude common differentials. We also describe laparoscopic mesh repair as an effective treatment option for this condition. PMID:26744116

  6. Pantaloon Hernia: Obstructed Indirect Component and Direct Component with Cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Kariappa, Mohan Kumar; Hiremath, Vivekanand Kedarlingayya

    2016-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testes have not passed down into the scrotal sac. It is categorized as true undescended testis in which testes are present in the normal path of descent, and as ectopic testis, in which testes are present at abnormal site. Common complications of cryptorchidism are testicular torsion, subfertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Here we present a rare case of pantaloon hernia of obstructed indirect component and direct component with cryptorchidism. PMID:27579208

  7. Current Status of Hernia Centres Around the Globe.

    PubMed

    Kulacoglu, Hakan; Oztuna, Derya

    2015-12-01

    Institutions specifically dedicated to treatment of abdominal wall hernias have gained popularity over the last years. This study aimed to determine the current situation of hernia centres worldwide. A web-based search was conducted using the common search engines Google and PubMed. The details recorded were as follows: name of the centre, country, establishment year, administrative structure (hospital affiliated, private practice group, or independent solo practice), whether or not the centre has its own operation room, the number of employed surgeons, preferred anaesthesia type, preferred repair type, laparoscopic technique option, case volume per year, and the number of scientific publications. A total of 182 centres were found in 30 different countries. Eighty-one (44.5 %) centres provide services as part of an affiliation within a general hospital (18 in university hospitals). Only 28 (15.5 %) of the centres have published a paper on abdominal wall hernias indexed by PubMed. The total number of papers in PubMed by 182 centres is 354. We observed that clinical outcomes in hernia centres are not shared globally by publishing them in scientific journals, and whether specific hernia surgeons and centres provide better outcomes in treating abdominal wall hernias, compared to general surgeons who deal with all kinds of surgical procedures, remains unclear. PMID:27011503

  8. [Abdominal wall closure by incisional hernia and herniation after laparostoma].

    PubMed

    Mischinger, H-J; Kornprat, P; Werkgartner, G; El Shabrawi, A; Spendel, S

    2010-03-01

    As hernias and abdominal wall defects have a variety of etiologies each with its own complications and comorbidities in various constellations, efficient treatment requires patient-oriented management. There is no recommended standard treatment and the very different clinical pictures demand an individualized interdisciplinary approach. Particularly in the case of complicated hernias, the planning of the operation should focus on the problems posed by the individual patient. Treatment mainly depends on the etiology of the hernia, immediate or long-term complications and the efficiency of individual repair techniques. Abdominal wall repair for recurrent herniation requires direct closure of the fascia generally using the sublay technique with a lightweight mesh. It is still unclear whether persistent inflammation, mesh dislocation, fistula formation or other long-term complications are due to certain materials or to the surgical technique. With mesh infections it has been shown to be advantageous to remove a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mesh, while the combination of systemic and local treatment appears to suffice for a polypropylene or polyester mesh. Heavier meshes in the sublay position or plastic reconstruction with autologous tissue are indicated as substitutes for the abdominal wall for giant hernias, repeated recurrences and large abdominal wall defects. A laparostoma is increasingly more often created to treat septic intra-abdominal processes but is very often responsible for a complicated hernia. If primary repair of the abdominal wall is not an option, resorbable material or split skin is used for coverage under the auspices of a planned hernia repair. PMID:20145901

  9. Personalized identification of abdominal wall hernia meshes on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tuan D; Le, Dinh T P; Xu, Jinwei; Nguyen, Duc T; Martindale, Robert G; Deveney, Clifford W

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal wall hernia is a protrusion of the intestine through an opening or area of weakness in the abdominal wall. Correct pre-operative identification of abdominal wall hernia meshes could help surgeons adjust the surgical plan to meet the expected difficulty and morbidity of operating through or removing the previous mesh. First, we present herein for the first time the application of image analysis for automated identification of hernia meshes. Second, we discuss the novel development of a new entropy-based image texture feature using geostatistics and indicator kriging. Third, we seek to enhance the hernia mesh identification by combining the new texture feature with the gray-level co-occurrence matrix feature of the image. The two features can characterize complementary information of anatomic details of the abdominal hernia wall and its mesh on computed tomography. Experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed study. The new computational tool has potential for personalized mesh identification which can assist surgeons in the diagnosis and repair of complex abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24184112

  10. Amyand's hernia in elderly patients: diagnostic, anesthetic, and perioperative considerations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiping; Tao, Zongyuan; Chen, Hao; Li, Qinyu; Chu, Peiguo G; Yen, Yun; Qiu, Weihua

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a vermiform appendix in an inguinal hernia sac is termed as Amyand's hernia. Although rare, mistakes in diagnosis and treatment can cause catastrophic results. Charts of patients with inguinal hernia were reviewed, and four cases of Amyand's hernia were confirmed. The clinical presentation, anesthetic, and perioperative management of Amyand's hernia were further analyzed. The mean age of patients was over 70 years, and all were males. None of the patients were diagnosed preoperatively. All the patients had little abdominal complaint only with a right inguinal mass and dragging sensation for several hours. Due to the short time after incarceration and significant cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbidities, manual reduction was attempted first in three patients. With complete preoperative evaluation and careful perioperative support, all patients underwent appendectomy and Bassini's hernia repair through a groin incision. Based on age-related organ failure and associated chronic medical illnesses of geriatric patients, the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment are also summarized and analyzed. PMID:20001812