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Sample records for high altitude podophyllum

  1. Cloning and functional characterization of β-1, 3-glucanase gene from Podophyllum hexandrum - a high altitude Himalayan plant.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Vivek; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum is a high-altitude medicinal plant exploited for its etoposides which are potential anticancer compounds. ß-1, 3-glucanase cDNA was cloned from the germinating seeds of Podophyllum (Ph-glucanase). Glucanases belong to pathogenesis related glycohydralase family of proteins, which also play an important role in endosperm weakening and testa rupture during seed germination. Analysis of cloned nucleotide sequence revealed Ph-glucanase with an open reading frame of 852bp encoding a protein of 283 amino acids with a molecular mass of 31kDa and pI of 4.39. In-silico structure prediction of Ph-glucanase showed homology with that of Hevea brasiliensis (3em5B). Structural stability and enhanced catalytic efficiency in harsh climatic conditions possibly due to the presence of glycosyl hydrolase motif (LGIVISESGWPSAG) and a connecting loop towards inner side and well exposed carbohydrate metabolism domain-COG5309, can readily hydrolyse cell wall sugar moieties. Seeds from the transgenic Arabidopsis plants over-expressing Ph-glucanase showed better germination performance against a wide range of temperatures and abscisic acid (ABA) stress. This can be attributed to the accumulation of Ph-glucanase at both transcript and protein levels during the seed germination in transgenic Arabidopsis. Results confirm that the cloned novel seed specific glucanase from a cold desert plant Podophyllum could be used for the manipulation of different plant species seeds against various harsh conditions. PMID:25303872

  2. Re-analysis of protein data reveals the germination pathway and up accumulation mechanism of cell wall hydrolases during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum hexandrum- a high altitude plant

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Vivek; Bagler, Ganesh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum Royle is an important high-altitude plant of Himalayas with immense medicinal value. Earlier, it was reported that the cell wall hydrolases were up accumulated during radicle protrusion step of Podophyllum seed germination. In the present study, Podophyllum seed Germination protein interaction Network (PGN) was constructed by using the differentially accumulated protein (DAP) data set of Podophyllum during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination, with reference to Arabidopsis protein–protein interaction network (AtPIN). The developed PGN is comprised of a giant cluster with 1028 proteins having 10,519 interactions and a few small clusters with relevant gene ontological signatures. In this analysis, a germination pathway related cluster which is also central to the topology and information dynamics of PGN was obtained with a set of 60 key proteins. Among these, eight proteins which are known to be involved in signaling, metabolism, protein modification, cell wall modification, and cell cycle regulation processes were found commonly highlighted in both the proteomic and interactome analysis. The systems-level analysis of PGN identified the key proteins involved in radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum. PMID:26579141

  3. PODOPHYLLUM PELTATUM POSSESSES A BETA-GLUCOSIDASE WITH HIGH SUBSTRATE SPECIFICITY FOR THE ARYLTETRALIN LIGNAN PODOPHYLLOTOXIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A beta-glucosidase with high specificity for podophyllotoxin-4-O-b-d-glucopyranoside was purified from the leaves of Podophyllum peltatum. The 65 kD polypeptide had optimum activity at pH 5.0 and was essentially inactive at physiological pH (6.5 or above). The maximum catalytic activity of this glu...

  4. High-Altitude Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... altitude illness: Acute mountain sickness High-altitude pulmonary edema (also called HAPE), which affects the lungs High-altitude cerebral edema (also called HACE), which affects the brain These ...

  5. Fulminant high altitude blindness.

    PubMed

    Mashkovskiy, Evgeny; Szawarski, Piotr; Ryzhkov, Pavel; Goslar, Tomaz; Mrak, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Prolonged altitude exposure even with acclimatization continues to present a physiological challenge to all organ systems including the central nervous system. We describe a case of a 41-year-old Caucasian female climber who suffered severe visual loss that was due to possible optic nerve pathology occurring during a high altitude expedition in the Himalayas. This case is atypical of classic high altitude cerebral oedema and highlights yet another danger of prolonged sojourn at extreme altitudes. PMID:27601532

  6. High altitude decelerator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silbert, Mendel N.; Moltedo, A. David; Gilbertson, Gaylord S.

    1989-01-01

    High Altitude Decelerator Systems are used to provide a stable descending platform when deployed from a sounding rocket at altitudes greater than 40 kilometers allowing a scientific mission to be conducted in a specific altitude region. The High Altitude Decelerator is designed to provide a highly stable, high drag area system packed in a minimum volume to deploy successfully from a sounding rocket. Deployment altitudes greater than 100 kilometers have been successfully demonstrated at dynamic pressures as low as 0.004 pounds per square foot.

  7. High-altitude headache.

    PubMed

    Marmura, Michael J; Hernandez, Pablo Bandres

    2015-05-01

    High-altitude headache is one of many neurological symptoms associated with the ascent to high altitudes. Cellular hypoxia due to decreased barometric pressure seems to be the common final pathway for headache as altitude increases. Susceptibility to high-altitude headache depends on genetic factors, history of migraine, and acclimatization, but symptoms of acute mountain sickness are universal at very high altitudes. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of acute mountain sickness and high-altitude headache as well as the evidence for treatment and prevention with different drugs and devices which may be useful for regular and novice mountaineers. This includes an examination of other headache disorders which may mimic high-altitude headache. PMID:25795155

  8. Delirium at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Buddha

    2002-01-01

    A 35-year-old man on a trek to the Mount Everest region of Nepal presented with a sudden, acute confusional state at an altitude of about 5000 m. Although described at higher altitudes, delirium presenting alone has not been documented at 5000 m or at lower high altitudes. The differential diagnosis which includes acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral edema is discussed. Finally, the importance of travelling with a reliable partner and using proper insurance is emphasized in treks to the Himalayas. PMID:12006167

  9. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    High altitudes and blocked ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... you are going up or coming down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are changing ...

  10. High Altitude Medical Problems

    PubMed Central

    Hultgren, Herbert N.

    1979-01-01

    Increased travel to high altitude areas by mountaineers and nonclimbing tourists has emphasized the clinical problems associated with rapid ascent. Acute mountain sickness affects most sojourners at elevations above 10,000 feet. Symptoms are usually worse on the second or third day after arrival. Gradual ascent, spending one to three days at an intermediate altitude, and the use of acetazolamide (Diamox) will prevent or ameliorate symptoms in most instances. Serious and potentially fatal problems, such as high altitude pulmonary edema or cerebral edema, occur in approximately 0.5 percent to 1.0 percent of visitors to elevations above 10,000 feet—especially with heavy physical exertion on arrival, such as climbing or skiing. Early recognition, high flow oxygen therapy and prompt descent are crucially important in management. Our knowledge of the causes of these and other high altitude problems, such as retinal hemorrhage, systemic edema and pulmonary hypertension, is still incomplete. Even less is known of the effect of high altitudes on medical conditions common at sea level or on the action of commonly used drugs. ImagesFigure 2. PMID:483805

  11. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... the middle ear and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  12. Infectious Diseases at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Buddha; Starling, Jennifer M

    2015-08-01

    Travel to elevations above 2,500 m is an increasingly common activity undertaken by a diverse population of individuals. These may be trekkers, climbers, miners in high-altitude sites in South America, and more recently, soldiers deployed for high-altitude duty in remote areas of the world. What is also being increasingly recognized is the plight of the millions of pilgrims, many with comorbidities, who annually ascend to high-altitude sacred areas. There are also 400 million people who reside permanently in high mountain ranges, which cover one-fifth of the Earth's surface. Many of these high-altitude areas are in developing countries, for example, the Himalayan range in South Asia. Although high-altitude areas may not harbor any specific infectious disease agents, it is important to know about the pathogens encountered in the mountains to be better able to help both the ill sojourner and the native high-altitude dweller. Often the same pathogens prevalent in the surrounding lowlands are found at high altitude, but various factors such as immunomodulation, hypoxia, poor physiological adaptation, and harsh environmental stressors at high altitude may enhance susceptibility to these pathogens. Against this background, various gastrointestinal, respiratory, dermatological, neurological, and other infections encountered at high altitude are discussed. PMID:26350326

  13. High altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdo, Renee Anna; Moller, David

    1990-01-01

    At the equator the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000 plus feet, which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. The Universities Space Research Association, in cooperation with NASA, is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to cruise at 130,000 feet for six hours at Mach 0.7, while carrying 3,000 lbs. of payload. In addition, the aircraft must have a minimum range of 6,000 miles. In consideration of the novel nature of this project, the pilot must be able to take control in the event of unforeseen difficulties. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable - a joined-wing, a biplane, and a twin-boom conventional airplane. The performance of each configuration was analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project.

  14. Cardiovascular physiology at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Hooper, T; Mellor, A

    2011-03-01

    The role of the cardiovascular system is to deliver oxygenated blood to the tissues and remove metabolic effluent. It is clear that this complex system will have to adapt to maintain oxygen deliver in the profound hypoxia of high altitude. The literature on the adaptation of both the systemic and pulmonary circulations to high altitude is reviewed. PMID:21465906

  15. Cardiovascular medicine at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2014-07-01

    Altitude physiology began with Paul Bert in 1878. Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) was defined by Carlos Monge in the 1940s in the Peruvian Andes as consisting of excess polycythemia. Hurtado et al performed studies in the Peruvian Andes in the 1950s to 1960s which defined acclimatization in healthy altitude natives, including polycythemia, moderate pulmonary hypertension, and low systemic blood pressure (BP). Electrocardiographic changes of right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) were noted. Acclimatization of newcomers to altitude involves hyperventilation stimulated by hypoxia and is usually benign. Acute mountain sickness (AMS) in travelers to altitude is characterized by hypoxia-induced anorexia, dyspnea, headache, insomnia, and nausea. The extremes of AMS are high-altitude cerebral edema and high-altitude pulmonary edema. The susceptible high-altitude resident can lose their tolerance to altitude and develop CMS, also referred to as Monge disease. The CMS includes extreme polycythemia, severe RVH, excess pulmonary hypertension, low systemic BP, arterial oxygen desaturation, and hypoventilation. PMID:23892441

  16. Lung Disease at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Stream, JO; Luks, AM; Grissom, CK

    2016-01-01

    Large numbers of people travel to high altitudes, entering an environment of hypobaric hypoxia. Exposure to low oxygen tension leads to a series of important physiologic responses that allow individuals to tolerate these hypoxic conditions. However, in some cases hypoxia triggers maladaptive responses that lead to various forms of acute and chronic high altitude illness, such as high-altitude pulmonary edema or chronic mountain sickness. Because the respiratory system plays a critical role in these adaptive and maladaptive responses, patients with underlying lung disease may be at increased risk for complications in this environment and warrant careful evaluation before any planned sojourn to higher altitudes. In this review, we describe respiratory disorders that occur with both acute and chronic exposures to high altitudes. These disorders may occur in any individual who ascends to high altitude, regardless of his/her baseline pulmonary status. We then consider the safety of high-altitude travel in patients with various forms of underlying lung disease. The available data regarding how these patients fare in hypoxic conditions are reviewed, and recommendations are provided for management prior to and during the planned sojourn. PMID:20477353

  17. High Altitude Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Dan

    2007-01-01

    An overview of emissions related research being conducted as part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Supersonics Project is presented. The overview includes project objectives, milestones, and descriptions of major research areas. The overview also includes information on the emissions research being conducted under NASA Research Announcements. Technical challenges include: 1) Environmental impact of supersonic cruise emissions is greater due to higher flight altitudes which makes emissions reduction increasingly important. 2) Accurate prediction tools to enable combustor designs that reduce emissions at supersonic cruise are needed as well as intelligent systems to minimize emissions. 3) Combustor operating conditions at supersonic cruise are different than at subsonic cruise since inlet fuel and air temperatures are considerably increased.

  18. High altitude atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, Alan E.

    1988-01-01

    Five empirical models were compared with 13 data sets, including both atmospheric drag-based data and mass spectrometer data. The most recently published model, MSIS-86, was found to be the best model overall with an accuracy around 15 percent. The excellent overall agreement of the mass spectrometer-based MSIS models with the drag data, including both the older data from orbital decay and the newer accelerometer data, suggests that the absolute calibration of the (ensemble of) mass spectrometers and the assumed drag coefficient in the atomic oxygen regime are consistent to 5 percent. This study illustrates a number of reasons for the current accuracy limit such as calibration accuracy and unmodeled trends. Nevertheless, the largest variations in total density in the thermosphere are accounted for, to a very high degree, by existing models. The greatest potential for improvements is in areas where we still have insufficient data (like the lower thermosphere or exosphere), where there are disagreements in technique (such as the exosphere) which can be resolved, or wherever generally more accurate measurements become available.

  19. High Altitude Ozone Research Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauthen, Timothy A.; Daniel, Leslie A.; Herrick, Sally C.; Rock, Stacey G.; Varias, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to create a mission model of the high altitude ozone research balloon (HAORB) several options for flight preparation, altitude control, flight termination, and payload recovery were considered. After the optimal launch date and location for two separate HAORB flights were calculated, a method for reducing the heat transfer from solar and infrared radiation was designed and analytically tested. This provided the most important advantage of the HAORB over conventional balloons, i.e., its improved flight duration. Comparisons of different parachute configurations were made, and a design best suited for the HAORB's needs was determined to provide for payload recovery after flight termination. In an effort to avoid possible payload damage, a landing system was also developed.

  20. Sleep and Breathing at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Himanshu; Anholm, James D.

    1999-01-01

    Sleep at high altitude is characterized by poor subjective quality, increased awakenings, frequent brief arousals, marked nocturnal hypoxemia, and periodic breathing. A change in sleep architecture with an increase in light sleep and decreasing slow-wave and REM sleep have been demonstrated. Periodic breathing with central apnea is almost universally seen amongst sojourners to high altitude, although it is far less common in long-standing high altitude dwellers. Hypobaric hypoxia in concert with periodic breathing appears to be the principal cause of sleep disruption at altitude. Increased sleep fragmentation accounts for the poor sleep quality and may account for some of the worsened daytime performance at high altitude. Hypoxic sleep disruption contributes to the symptoms of acute mountain sickness. Hypoxemia at high altitude is most severe during sleep. Acetazolamide improves sleep, AMS symptoms, and hypoxemia at high altitude. Low doses of a short acting benzodiazepine (temazepam) may also be useful in improving sleep in high altitude. PMID:11898114

  1. High Altitude Cooking and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Where to Place the Food Thermometer Recommended Internal Temperatures Is egg cookery affected at high altitudes? Is ... atmospheric pressure — affects both the time and the temperature of most everything that's cooked. Where the altitude ...

  2. High-altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yazdi, Renee Anna

    1991-01-01

    At the equator the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000+ ft, which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft. This project is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer. The aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. The first is a polar mission that ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n.m. at 100,000 ft with a 2500-lb payload. The second mission is also a polar mission with a decreased altitude and an increased payload. For the third mission, the aircraft will take off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft, and land in Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to make an excursion to 120,000 ft. All four missions require that a subsonic Mach number be maintained because of constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable for meeting the requirements. The performance of each is analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the mission requirements.

  3. The high-altitude brain.

    PubMed

    Hornbein, T F

    2001-09-01

    The highest place on our planet, Mount Everest (8850 m), appears to be close to the limit of how high an acclimatized human can go, albeit slowly. In this paper, I will explore the possibility that what limits human performance at such extreme degrees of hypoxia is the availability of oxygen to the brain. Also, one of the known costs of such extreme exposure is residual mild impairment of performance on neuropsychometric tests after return to sea level, implying injury to brain cells. That such injury could occur in the absence of any overt impairment of function, much less without loss of consciousness, is unexpected. I will speculate about physiological mechanisms that might cause or contribute to both decrements in real-time performance while at altitude and residual deficits for a time after return to low elevations; the effects of hypoxia on brain cells are an even greater puzzle at the present time. PMID:11581326

  4. Fire Fighting from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent; Ambrosia, Vince

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on high altitude fire fighting is shown. The topics include: 1) Yellowstone Fire - 1988; 2) 2006 Western States Fire Mission Over-View; 3) AMS-Wildfire Scanner; 4) October 24-25 Mission: Yosemite NP and NF; 5) October 24-25 Mission MODIS Overpass; 6) October 24-25 Mission Highlights; 7) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire, California; 8) Response to the Esperanza Fire in Southern California -- Timeline Oct 27-29 2006; 9) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Flight Routing; 10) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Over-Flights; 11) October 28-29 Mission Highlights; 12) Results from the Esperanza Fire Response; 13) 2007 Western States Fire Mission; and 14) Western States UAS Fire Mission 2007

  5. Return to Activity at Altitude After High-Altitude Illness

    PubMed Central

    DeWeber, Kevin; Scorza, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Context: Sports and other activities at high altitude are popular, yet they pose the unique risk for high-altitude illness (HAI). Once those who have suffered from a HAI recover, they commonly desire or need to perform the same activity at altitude in the immediate or distant future. Evidence Acquisition: As based on key text references and peer-reviewed journal articles from a Medline search, this article reviews the pathophysiology and general treatment principles of HAI. Results: In addition to the type of HAI experienced and the current level of recovery, factors needing consideration in the return-to-play plan include physical activity requirements, flexibility of the activity schedule, and available medical equipment and facilities. Most important, adherence to prudent acclimatization protocols and gradual ascent recommendations (when above 3000 m, no more than 600-m net elevation gain per day, and 1 rest day every 1 to 2 ascent days) is powerful in its preventive value and thus strongly recommended. When these are not practical, prophylactic medications (acetazolamide, dexamethasone, salmeterol, nifedipine, or phosphodiesterase inhibitors, depending on the type of prior HAI) may be prescribed and can reduce the risk of illness. Athletes with HAI should be counseled that physical and mental performance may be adversely affected if activity at altitude continues before recovery is complete and that there is a risk of progression to a more serious HAI. Conclusion: With a thoughtful plan, most recurrent HAI in athletes can be prevented. PMID:23015950

  6. Hormonal contraceptives and travel to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Women frequently ask about the safety and efficacy of using hormonal contraception (HC), either oral contraceptive pills (OC) or other forms, when traveling to high altitude locales. What are the risks and benefits of using HC at high altitude? Does HC affect acclimatization, exercise performance, or occurrence of acute mountain sickness? This article reviews current data regarding the risks and benefits of HC at high altitude, both demonstrated and theoretical, with the aim of helping health care providers to advise women traveling above 2500 meters. Most healthy women can safely use HC when traveling to high altitude, but should be aware of the potential risks and inconveniences. PMID:25759908

  7. Jupiter's High-Altitude Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) snapped this incredibly detailed picture of Jupiter's high-altitude clouds starting at 06:00 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, when the spacecraft was only 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the solar system's largest planet. Features as small as 50 kilometers (30 miles) are visible. The image was taken through a narrow filter centered on a methane absorption band near 890 nanometers, a considerably redder wavelength than what the eye can see. Images taken through this filter preferentially pick out clouds that are relatively high in the sky of this gas giant planet because sunlight at the wavelengths transmitted by the filter is completely absorbed by the methane gas that permeates Jupiter's atmosphere before it can reach the lower clouds.

    The image reveals a range of diverse features. The south pole is capped with a haze of small particles probably created by the precipitation of charged particles into the polar regions during auroral activity. Just north of the cap is a well-formed anticyclonic vortex with rising white thunderheads at its core. Slightly north of the vortex are the tendrils of some rather disorganized storms and more pinpoint-like thunderheads. The dark 'measles' that appear a bit farther north are actually cloud-free regions where light is completely absorbed by the methane gas and essentially disappears from view. The wind action considerably picks up in the equatorial regions where giant plumes are stretched into a long wave pattern. Proceeding north of the equator, cirrus-like clouds are shredded by winds reaching speeds of up to 400 miles per hour, and more pinpoint-like thunderheads are visible. Although some of the famous belt and zone structure of Jupiter's atmosphere is washed out when viewed at this wavelength, the relatively thin North Temperate Belt shows up quite nicely, as does a series of waves just north of the belt. The north polar region of

  8. High altitude aircraft flight tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmken, Henry; Emmons, Peter; Homeyer, David

    1996-03-01

    In order to make low earth orbit L-band propagation measurements and test new voice communication concepts, a payload was proposed and accepted for flight aboard the COMET (now METEOR) spacecraft. This Low Earth Orbiting EXperiment payload (LEOEX) was designed and developed by Motorola Inc. and sponsored by the Space Communications Technology Center (SCTC), a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) located at Florida Atlantic University. In order to verify the LEOEX payload for satellite operation and obtain some preliminary propagation data, a series of 9 high altitude aircraft (SR-71 and ER-2) flight tests were conducted. These flights took place during a period of 7 months, from October 1993 to April 1994. This paper will summarize the operation of the LEOEX payload and the particular configuration used for these flights. The series of flyby tests were very successful and demonstrated how bi-directional, Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) voice communication will work in space-to-ground L-band channels. The flight tests also acquired propagation data which will be representative of L-band Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) communication systems. In addition to verifying the LEOEX system operation, it also uncovered and ultimately aided the resolution of several key technical issues associated with the payload.

  9. High Altitude Illnesses in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High Altitude Headache (HAH), Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), and High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) are all high altitude related illnesses in order of severity from the mildly symptomatic to the potentially life-threatening. High altitude illnesses occur when travelers ascend to high altitudes too rapidly, which does not allow enough time for the body to adjust. Slow graded ascent to the desired altitude and termination of ascent if AMS symptoms present are keys to illness prevention. Early recognition and rapid intervention of AMS can halt progression to HACE. Pharmacologic prophylaxis with acetazolamide is a proven method of prevention and treatment of high altitude illness. If prevention fails then treatment modalities include supplemental oxygen, supportive therapy, hyperbaric treatment, and dexamethasone. Given the multitude of visitors to the mountains of Hawai‘i, high altitude illness will continue to persist as a prevalent local condition. This paper will emphasize the prevention and early diagnosis of AMS so that the illness does not progress to HACE. PMID:25478293

  10. High-Altitude Hydration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  11. [Human oxygen metabolism at high altitudes].

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Wojciech; Dabrowski, Roman; Wyciszczok, Tomasz; Falk, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    The rapid tourism development resulted in higher incidence of the diseases related to oxygen metabolism pathologies at high altitudes. On the other hand, the lack of ability of close monitoring of changes during oxygen breathing in these conditions still makes it a subject of high interest for clinical studies. It seems that the main problem in oxygen metabolism at high altitudes is the disorder of pulmonary oxygen diffusion. In this paper the authors present the current knowledge, based on available literature, about the high-altitude oxygen metabolism. PMID:16813271

  12. Sleep at high altitude: guesses and facts.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Konrad E; Buenzli, Jana C; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-12-15

    Lowlanders commonly report a poor sleep quality during the first few nights after arriving at high altitude. Polysomnographic studies reveal that reductions in slow wave sleep are the most consistent altitude-induced changes in sleep structure identified by visual scoring. Quantitative spectral analyses of the sleep electroencephalogram have confirmed an altitude-related reduction in the low-frequency power (0.8-4.6 Hz). Although some studies suggest an increase in arousals from sleep at high altitude, this is not a consistent finding. Whether sleep instability at high altitude is triggered by periodic breathing or vice versa is still uncertain. Overnight changes in slow wave-derived encephalographic measures of neuronal synchronization in healthy subjects were less pronounced at moderately high (2,590 m) compared with low altitude (490 m), and this was associated with a decline in sleep-related memory consolidation. Correspondingly, exacerbation of breathing and sleep disturbances experienced by lowlanders with obstructive sleep apnea during a stay at 2,590 m was associated with poor performance in driving simulator tests. These findings suggest that altitude-related alterations in sleep may adversely affect daytime performance. Despite recent advances in our understanding of sleep at altitude, further research is required to better establish the role of gender and age in alterations of sleep at different altitudes, to determine the influence of acclimatization and of altitude-related illness, and to uncover the characteristics of sleep in highlanders that may serve as a study paradigm of sleep in patients exposed to chronic hypoxia due to cardiorespiratory disease. PMID:26229000

  13. Cerebral blood flow at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Philip N; Subudhi, Andrew W

    2014-06-01

    This brief review traces the last 50 years of research related to cerebral blood flow (CBF) in humans exposed to high altitude. The increase in CBF within the first 12 hours at high altitude and its return to near sea level values after 3-5 days of acclimatization was first documented with use of the Kety-Schmidt technique in 1964. The degree of change in CBF at high altitude is influenced by many variables, including arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions, oxygen content, cerebral spinal fluid pH, and hematocrit, but can be collectively summarized in terms of the relative strengths of four key integrated reflexes: 1) hypoxic cerebral vasodilatation; 2) hypocapnic cerebral vasoconstriction; 3) hypoxic ventilatory response; and 4) hypercapnic ventilatory response. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these reflexes and their interactions with one another is critical to advance our understanding of global and regional CBF regulation. Whether high altitude populations exhibit cerebrovascular adaptations to chronic levels of hypoxia or if changes in CBF are related to the development of acute mountain sickness are currently unknown; yet overall, the integrated CBF response to high altitude appears to be sufficient to meet the brain's large and consistent demand for oxygen. This short review is organized as follows: An historical overview of the earliest CBF measurements collected at high altitude introduces a summary of reported CBF changes at altitude over the last 50 years in both lowlanders and high-altitude natives. The most tenable candidate mechanism(s) regulating CBF at altitude are summarized with a focus on available data in humans, and a role for these mechanisms in the pathophysiology of AMS is considered. Finally, suggestions for future directions are provided. PMID:24971767

  14. High-altitude cerebral oedema mimicking stroke.

    PubMed

    Yanamandra, Uday; Gupta, Amul; Patyal, Sagarika; Varma, Prem Prakash

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude cerebral oedema (HACO) is the most fatal high-altitude illness seen by rural physicians practising in high-altitude areas. HACO presents clinically with cerebellar ataxia, features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and coma. Early identification is important as delay in diagnosis can be fatal. We present two cases of HACO presenting with focal deficits mimicking stroke. The first patient presented with left-sided hemiplegia associated with the rapid deterioration in the sensorium. Neuroimaging revealed features suggestive of vasogenic oedema. The second patient presented with monoplegia of the lower limb. Neuroimaging revealed perfusion deficit in anterior cerebral artery territory. Both patients were managed with dexamethasone and they improved dramatically. Clinical picture and neuroimaging closely resembled acute ischaemic stroke in both cases. Thrombolysis in these patients would have been disastrous. Recent travel to high altitude, young age, absence of atherosclerotic risk factors and features of raised ICP concomitantly directed the diagnosis to HACO. PMID:24671373

  15. Child health and living at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Niermeyer, S; Andrade Mollinedo, P; Huicho, L

    2009-10-01

    The health of children born and living at high altitude is shaped not only by the low-oxygen environment, but also by population ancestry and sociocultural determinants. High altitude and the corresponding reduction in oxygen delivery during pregnancy result in lower birth weight with higher elevation. Children living at high elevations are at special risk for hypoxaemia during infancy and during acute lower respiratory infection, symptomatic high-altitude pulmonary hypertension, persistence of fetal vascular connections, and re-entry high-altitude pulmonary oedema. However, child health varies from one population group to another due to genetic adaptation as well as factors such as nutrition, intercurrent infection, exposure to pollutants and toxins, socioeconomic status, and access to medical care. Awareness of the risks uniquely associated with living at high altitude and monitoring of key health indicators can help protect the health of children at high altitude. These considerations should be incorporated into the scaling-up of effective interventions for improving global child health and survival. PMID:19066173

  16. Early history of high-altitude physiology.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2016-02-01

    High-altitude physiology can be said to have begun in 1644 when Torricelli described the first mercury barometer and wrote the immortal words "We live submerged at the bottom of an ocean of the element air." Interestingly, the notion of atmospheric pressure had eluded his teacher, the great Galileo. Blaise Pascal was responsible for describing the fall in pressure with increasing altitude, and Otto von Guericke gave a dramatic demonstration of the enormous force that could be developed by atmospheric pressure. Robert Boyle learned of Guericke's experiment and, with Robert Hooke, constructed the first air pump that allowed small animals to be exposed to a low pressure. Hooke also constructed a small low-pressure chamber and exposed himself to a simulated altitude of about 2400 meters. With the advent of ballooning, humans were rapidly exposed to very low pressures, sometimes with tragic results. For example, the French balloon, Zénith, rose to over 8000 m, and two of the three aeronauts succumbed to the hypoxia. Paul Bert was the first person to clearly state that the deleterious effects of high altitude were caused by the low partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), and later research was accelerated by high-altitude stations and expeditions to high altitude. PMID:25762218

  17. Paschen Considerations for High Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.; Hillard, G. B.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, there have been several proposals submitted to funding agencies for long-lived high altitude (about 70,000 feet) airships for communications, surveillance, etc. In order for these airships to remain at altitude, high power, high efficiency, lightweight solar arrays must be used, and high efficiency power management and distribution systems must be employed. The needs for high power and high efficiency imply high voltage systems. However, the air pressure at these extreme altitudes is such that electrical power systems will be near the Paschen discharge minimum over a wide range of electrode separations. In this paper, preliminary calculations are made for acceptable high voltage design practices under ambient, hydrogen and helium gas atmospheres.

  18. High altitude pulmonary edema in mountain climbers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Guzek, Aneta; Juszczak, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    Every year thousands of ski, trekking or climbing fans travel to the mountains where they stay at the altitude of more than 2500-3000m above sea level or climb mountain peaks, often exceeding 7000-8000m. High mountain climbers are at a serious risk from the effects of adverse environmental conditions prevailing at higher elevations. They may experience health problems resulting from hypotension, hypoxia or exposure to low temperatures; the severity of those conditions is largely dependent on elevation, time of exposure as well as the rate of ascent and descent. A disease which poses a direct threat to the lives of mountain climbers is high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). It is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema which typically occurs in rapidly climbing unacclimatized lowlanders usually within 2-4 days of ascent above 2500-3000m. It is the most common cause of death resulting from the exposure to high altitude. The risk of HAPE rises with increased altitude and faster ascent. HAPE incidence ranges from an estimated 0.01% to 15.5%. Climbers with a previous history of HAPE, who ascent rapidly above 4500m have a 60% chance of illness recurrence. The aim of this article was to present the relevant details concerning epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, prevention, and treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema among climbers in the mountain environment. PMID:25291181

  19. Sonic Thermometer for High-Altitude Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bognar, John

    2012-01-01

    The sonic thermometer is a specialized application of well-known sonic anemometer technology. Adaptations have been made to the circuit, including the addition of supporting sensors, which enable its use in the high-altitude environment and in non-air gas mixtures. There is a need to measure gas temperatures inside and outside of superpressure balloons that are flown at high altitudes. These measurements will allow the performance of the balloon to be modeled more accurately, leading to better flight performance. Small thermistors (solid-state temperature sensors) have been used for this general purpose, and for temperature measurements on radiosondes. A disadvantage to thermistors and other physical (as distinct from sonic) temperature sensors is that they are subject to solar heating errors when they are exposed to the Sun, and this leads to issues with their use in a very high-altitude environment

  20. Wind study for high altitude platform design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of upper air winds was performed to define the wind environment at potential operating altitudes for high-altitude powered platform concepts. Expected wind conditions of the contiguous United States, Pacific area (Alaska to Sea of Japan), and European area (Norwegian and Mediterranean Seas) were obtained using a representative network of sites selected based upon adequate high-altitude sampling, geographic dispersion, and observed upper wind patterns. A data base of twenty plus years of rawinsonde gathered wind information was used in the analysis. Annual variations from surface to 10 mb (approximately 31 km) pressure altitude were investigated to encompass the practical operating range for the platform concepts. Parametric analysis for the United States and foreign areas was performed to provide a basis for vehicle system design tradeoffs. This analysis of wind magnitudes indicates the feasibility of annual operation at a majority of sites and more selective seasonal operation for the extreme conditions between the pressure altitudes of 100 to 25 mb based upon the assumed design speeds.

  1. Wind study for high altitude platform design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strganac, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of upper air winds was performed to define the wind environment at potential operating altitudes for high altitude powered platform concepts. Wind conditions of the continental United States, Pacific area (Alaska to Sea of Japan), and European area (Norwegian and Mediterranean Sea) were obtained using a representative network of sites selected based upon adequate high altitude sampling, geographic dispersion, and observed upper wind patterns. A data base of twenty plus years of rawinsonde gathered wind information was used in the analysis. Annual variations from surface to 10 mb pressure altitude were investigated to encompass the practical operating range for the platform concepts. Parametric analysis for the United States and foreign areas was performed to provide a basis for vehicle system design tradeoffs. This analysis of wind magnitudes indicates the feasibility of annual operation at a majority of sites and more selective seasonal operation for the extreme conditions between the pressure altitudes of 100 to 25 mb based upon the assumed design speeds.

  2. Tests of artificial flight at high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradenwitz, Arthur

    1920-01-01

    If we wish to form an accurate idea of the extraordinary progress achieved in aeronautics, a comparison must be made of the latest altitude records and the figures regarded as highest attainable limit some ten years ago. It is desirable, for two reasons, that we should be able to define the limit of the altitudes that can be reached without artificial aid. First, to know to what extent the human body can endure the inhalation of rarified air. Second, the mental capacity of the aviator must be tested at high altitudes and the limit known below which he is able to make reliable observations without being artificially supplied with oxygen. A pneumatic chamber was used for the most accurate observations.

  3. The morbid anatomy of high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Donald

    1979-01-01

    The morbid anatomical changes which take place in man and animals exposed to the chronic hypoxia of residence at high altitude are briefly reviewed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:493205

  4. High-altitude physiology: lessons from Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Peter D.; Simonson, Tatum S.; Wei, Guan; Wagner, Harrieth; Wuren, Tanna; Yan, Ma; Qin, Ga; Ge, Rili

    2013-05-01

    Polycythemia is a universal lowlander response to altitude; healthy Andean high-altitude natives also have elevated [Hb]. While this may enhance O2 transport to tissues, studies have shown that acute isovolumic changes in [Hb] do not affect exercise capacity. Many high-altitude Tibetans have evolved sea-level values of [Hb], providing a natural opportunity to study this issue. In 21 young healthy male Tibetans with [Hb] between 15 and 23 g/dl, we measured VO2MAX and O2 transport capacity at 4200m. VO2MAX was higher when [Hb] was lower (P<0.05), enabled by both higher cardiac output and muscle O2 diffusional conductance, but neither ventilation nor the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference (AaPO2) varied with [Hb]. In contrast, Andean high altitude natives remain polycythemic with larger lungs and higher lung diffusing capacity, a smaller exercising AaPO2, and lower ventilation. The challenges now are (1) to understand the different adaptive pathways used by Andeans and Tibetans, and (2) to determine in Tibetans whether, during evolution, reduced [Hb] appeared first, causing compensatory cardiac and muscle adaptations, or if enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport capacity appeared first, permitting secondary reduction in [Hb]. For (2), further research is necessary to determine the basis of enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport, and identify molecular targets of evolution in heart and muscle. Putative mutations can then be timed and compared to appearance of those affecting [Hb].

  5. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  6. Italian high altitude laboratories: past and present.

    PubMed

    Cogo, A; Ponchia, A; Pecchio, O; Losano, G; Cerretelli, P

    2000-01-01

    Italy is a mountainous country with a total of 88 huts and bivouacs at altitudes higher than 3,000 m. Starting in the 19th century a great deal of research in high altitude pathophysiology has been carried out in Italy and many Italian physicians have been involved in mountain medicine. Most of the Italian research has been carried out at two locations: the scientific laboratories "Angelo Mosso" on Monte Rosa (Capanna Regina Margherita and Laboratorio Angelo Mosso), and the "Pyramid" in Nepal. The Capanna Regina Margherita, located on the top of Punta Gnifetti (Monte Rosa, 4,559 m), was inaugurated in 1893. With the support of Queen Margherita of Savoy, an Observatory for scientific studies was built beside this hut in 1894. In 1980 the hut was completely rebuilt by the Italian Alpine Club. The Istituto Angelo Mosso at Col d'Olen, at the base of Monte Rosa (at 2,900 m) was inaugurated in 1907. The high altitude laboratory named the "Pyramid" was built in 1990. Made of glass and aluminium, this pyramid-shaped structure is situated in Nepal at 5,050 m. The scientific laboratories "Angelo Mosso" on Monte Rosa (mainly the Capanna Regina Margherita) and the Pyramid form a nucleus for high altitude research: the former is especially devoted to research regarding acute mountain sickness and the response to subacute hypoxia, whereas the latter is a unique facility for research responses to chronic hypoxia, the effect of exposure to very high altitude, and the study of the resident population living in the Himalayas for at least 25,000 years. PMID:11256565

  7. HIGH ALTITUDE TESTING OF RESIDENTIAL WOOD-FIRED COMBUSTION EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine whether emissions from operating a wood stove at high altitude differ from those at low altitude, a high altitude sampling program was conducted which was compared to previously collected low altitude data. Emission tests were conducted in the identical model stove u...

  8. High-altitude solar power platform

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, M.D.; Bower, M.V.

    1992-04-01

    Solar power is a preeminent alternative to conventional aircraft propulsion. With the continued advances in solar cells, fuel cells, and composite materials technology, the solar powered airplane is no longer a simple curiosity constrained to flights of several feet in altitude or minutes of duration. A high altitude solar powered platform (HASPP) has several potential missions, including communications and agriculture. In remote areas, a HASPP could be used as a communication link. In large farming areas, a HASPP could perform remote sensing of crops. The impact of HASPP in continuous flight for one year on agricultural monitoring mission is presented. This mission provides farmers with near real-time data twice daily from an altitude which allows excellant resolution on water conditions, crop diseases, and insect infestation. Accurate, timely data will enable farmers to increase their yield and efficiency. A design for HASPP for the foregoing mission is presented. In the design power derived from solar cells covering the wings is used for propulsion, avionics, and sensors. Excess power produced midday will be stored in fuel cells for use at night to maintain altitude and course.

  9. HAWC - The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepe, Andreas; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory (HAWC) is an instrument for the detection of high energy cosmic gamma-rays. Its predecessor Milagro has successfully proven that the water Cherenkov technology for gamma-ray astronomy is a useful technique. HAWC is currently under construction at Sierra Negra in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m and will include several improvements compared to Milagro. Two complementary DAQ systems of the HAWC detector allow for the observation of a large fraction of the sky with a very high duty cycle and independent of environmental conditions. HAWC will observe the gamma-ray sky from about 100 GeV up to 100 TeV. Also the cosmic ray flux anisotropy on different angular length scales is object of HAWC science. Because of HAWC's large effective area and field of view, we describe its prospects to observe gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as an example for transient sources.

  10. High altitude syndromes at intermediate altitudes: a pilot study in the Australian Alps.

    PubMed

    Slaney, Graham; Cook, Angus; Weinstein, Philip

    2013-10-01

    Our hypothesis is that symptoms of high altitude syndromes are detectable even at intermediate altitudes, as commonly encountered under Australian conditions (<2500 m above sea level). High altitude medicine has long recognised several syndromes associated with rapid ascent to altitudes above 2500 m, including high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE), high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE) and high altitude flatus expulsion (HAFE). Symptoms of high altitude syndromes are of growing concern because of the global trend toward increasing numbers of tourists and workers exposed to both rapid ascent and sustained physical activity at high altitude. However, in Australia, high altitude medicine has almost no profile because of our relatively low altitudes by international standards. Three factors lead us to believe that altitude sickness in Australia deserves more serious consideration: Australia is subject to rapid growth in alpine recreational industries; altitude sickness is highly variable between individuals, and some people do experience symptoms already at 1500 m; and there is potential for an occupational health and safety issue amongst workers. To test this hypothesis we examined the relationship between any high altitude symptoms and a rapid ascent to an intermediate altitude (1800 m) by undertaking an intervention study in a cohort of eight medical clinic staff, conducted during July of the 2012 (Southern Hemisphere) ski season, using self-reporting questionnaires, at Mansfield (316 m above sea level) and at the Ski Resort of Mt Buller (1800 m), Victoria, Australia. The intervention consisted of ascent by car from Mansfield to Mt Buller (approx. 40 min drive). Participants completed a self-reporting questionnaire including demographic data and information on frequency of normal homeostatic processes (fluid intake and output, food intake and output, symptoms including thirst and headaches, and frequency of passing wind or urine). Data were recorded in hourly periods

  11. Mitochondrial function at extreme high altitude.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew J; Horscroft, James A

    2016-03-01

    At high altitude, barometric pressure falls and with it inspired P(O2), potentially compromising O2 delivery to the tissues. With sufficient acclimatisation, the erythropoietic response increases red cell mass such that arterial O2 content (C(aO2)) is restored; however arterial P(O2)(P(aO2)) remains low, and the diffusion of O2 from capillary to mitochondrion is impaired. Mitochondrial respiration and aerobic capacity are thus limited, whilst reactive oxygen species (ROS) production increases. Restoration of P(aO2) with supplementary O2 does not fully restore aerobic capacity in acclimatised individuals, possibly indicating a peripheral impairment. With prolonged exposure to extreme high altitude (>5500 m), muscle mitochondrial volume density falls, with a particular loss of the subsarcolemmal population. It is not clear whether this represents acclimatisation or deterioration, but it does appear to be regulated, with levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis factor PGC-1α falling, and shows similarities to adapted Tibetan highlanders. Qualitative changes in mitochondrial function also occur, and do so at more moderate high altitudes with shorter periods of exposure. Electron transport chain complexes are downregulated, possibly mitigating the increase in ROS production. Fatty acid oxidation capacity is decreased and there may be improvements in biochemical coupling at the mitochondrial inner membrane that enhance O2 efficiency. Creatine kinase expression falls, possibly impairing high-energy phosphate transfer from the mitochondria to myofibrils. In climbers returning from the summit of Everest, cardiac energetic reserve (phosphocreatine/ATP) falls, but skeletal muscle energetics are well preserved, possibly supporting the notion that mitochondrial remodelling is a core feature of acclimatisation to extreme high altitude. PMID:26033622

  12. Is High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Relevant to Hawai‘i?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai‘i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high altitude clinical syndromes, high altitude pulmonary edema. PMID:25478294

  13. Infrared reflectance of high altitude clouds.

    PubMed

    Hovis, W A; Blaine, L R; Forman, M L

    1970-03-01

    The spectral reflectance characteristics of cirrostratus, cirrus clouds, and a jet contrail, in the 0.68-2.4-micro spectral interval, are of interest for remote sensing of cloud types from orbiting satellites. Measurements made with a down-looking spectrometer from a high altitude aircraft show differences between the signatures of naturally formed ice clouds, a fresh jet contrail, and a snow covered surface. PMID:20076243

  14. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Miguel; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view experiment comprised of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs) to study transient and steady emission of TeV gamma and cosmic rays. Each 200000 l WCD is instrumented with 4 PMTs providing charge and timing information. The array covers ~22000 m2 at an altitude of 4100 m a.s.l. inside the Pico de Orizaba national park in Mexico. The high altitude, large active area, and optical isolation of the PMTs allows us to reliably estimate the energy and determine the arrival direction of gamma and cosmic rays with significant sensitivity over energies from several hundred GeV to a hundred TeV. Continuously observing 2 / 3 of the sky every 24 h, HAWC plays a significant role as a survey instrument for multi-wavelength studies. The performance of HAWC makes possible the detection of both transient and steady emissions, the study of diffuse emission and the measurement of the spectra of gamma-ray sources at TeV energies. HAWC is also sensitive to the emission from GRBs above 100 GeV. I will highlight the results from the first year of operation of the full HAWC array, and describe the ongoing site work to expand the array by a factor of 4 to explore the high energy range.

  15. High altitude plumes at Mars morning terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Garcia Muñoz, A.; Garcia Melendo, E.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Gomez Forrellad, J. M.; Pellier, C.; Delcroix, M.; Lopez Valverde, M. A.; González Galindo, F.; Jaeschke, W.; Parker, D.; Phillips, J.; Peach, D.

    2015-10-01

    In March and April 2012 two extremely high altitude plumes were observed at the Martian terminator reaching 200 -250 km or more above the surface[1]. They were located at about 195o West longitude and 45o South latitude (at Terra Cimmeria) and extended ˜500 -1,000 km in both North-South and East- West, and lasted for about 10 days. Both plumes exhibited day-to-day variability, and were seen at the morning terminator but not at the evening limb. Another large plume was captured on Hubble Space Telescope images in May 1997 at 99º West longitude and 3º South latitude, but its altitude cannot be pr ecisely determined.Broad-band photometry was performed of both events in the spectral range 255 nm -1052 nm. Based on the observed properties, we discuss different possible scenarios for the mechanism responsible for the formation of these plumes.

  16. Antidiuretic hormone excretion at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Harber, M J; Williams, J D; Morton, J J

    1981-01-01

    Urinary excretion of electrolytes, creatinine, urea, and antidiuretic hormone--measured as arginine vasopressin (AVP) by radioimmunoassay--was investigated in eight Himalayan mountaineers during ascent on foot from 1900- 5400 m. Specimens were collected from each individual whenever urine was voided, preserved with 1% boric acid, and subsequently pooled to give samples representative of 24-h collections. AVP was found to be reasonably stable under simulated conditions of storage. In all subjects, the observed AVP excretion rates were mostly in the lower region of the normal range and there was generally no correlation with altitude, urine osmolality, electrolyte excretion, or occurrence of AMS symptoms--even in a fatal case of cerebral oedema. It is concluded that AVP does not play a primary role in the changes in fluid balance which accompany either acclimatization to high altitude or the onset of AMS. PMID:7213286

  17. Renal adrenomedullin and high altitude diuresis.

    PubMed

    Haditsch, B; Roessler, A; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H G

    2007-01-01

    Previous investigations revealed that most of the fluid regulating hormones showed no consistent relationship to the hypoxic diuretic response (HDR). In this study we examined if adrenomedullin (AM), a hypoxia-mediated diuretic/natriuretic peptide is connected to HDR. Thirty-three persons were examined at low altitude (LA), on the third exposure day at 3440 m (medium altitude, MA) and on the fourteenth day at 5050 m (high altitude, HA). Nocturnal diuresis rose from 460 ml [interquartile range 302 ml] at LA to 560 [660] ml at MA to 1015 [750] ml at HA (p<0.005). Sodium excretion was similar at LA and MA (41.8 [27.0] vs. 41.4 [28.4] mM) and increased to 80.2 [29.1] mM at HA (p<0.005). Urinary AM excretion was 7.9 [3.9] at LA, 7.5 [5.7] pM at MA, and increased to 10.5 [5.1] pM (p<0.05) at HA. Urinary AM excretion was correlated to diuresis (r=0.72, p<0.005) and sodium excretion (r=0.57, p<0.005). Plasma AM concentration rose from 16.4 [3.1] to 18.8 [4.9] pM/l at MA (p<0.005) and to 18.3 [4.3] pM/l at HA (p<0.005). Plasma AM concentration and urinary AM excretion were not correlated, neither were plasma AM concentration and diuresis or natriuresis. Our data suggest the involvement of increased renal AM production in the pathophysiology of high altitude fluid and sodium loss. PMID:17087599

  18. Acute high-altitude illness: a clinically orientated review

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Acute high-altitude illness is an encompassing term for the range of pathology that the unacclimatised individual can develop at increased altitude. This includes acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. These conditions represent an increasing clinical problem as more individuals are exposed to the hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude for both work and leisure. In this review of acute high-altitude illness, the epidemiology, risk factors and pathophysiology are explored, before their prevention and treatment are discussed. Appropriate ascent rate remains the most effective acute high-altitude illness prevention, with pharmacological prophylaxis indicated in selected individuals. Descent is the definitive treatment for acute high-altitude illness, with the adjuncts of oxygen and specific drug therapies. PMID:26516505

  19. Pulmonary Embolism in Young Natives of High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sanjay; Bhattachar, Srinivasa Alasinga; Paliwal, Vivek; Malhotra, Vineet Kumar; Addya, Kalyani; Kotwal, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic events are relatively common in high altitude areas and known to occur in young soldiers working at high altitude without usual risk factors associated with thrombosis at sea-level. However, till now, cases with thrombotic events were reported only in lowlanders staying at high altitude. These two cases of pulmonary embolism demonstrate that thrombotic events can occur in highlanders after a prolonged stay at the extreme altitude. PMID:27512534

  20. Pulmonary Embolism in Young Natives of High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sanjay; Bhattachar, Srinivasa Alasinga; Paliwal, Vivek; Malhotra, Vineet Kumar; Addya, Kalyani; Kotwal, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic events are relatively common in high altitude areas and known to occur in young soldiers working at high altitude without usual risk factors associated with thrombosis at sea-level. However, till now, cases with thrombotic events were reported only in lowlanders staying at high altitude. These two cases of pulmonary embolism demonstrate that thrombotic events can occur in highlanders after a prolonged stay at the extreme altitude. PMID:27512534

  1. High altitude balloon experiments at IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Akshata; Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    Recent advances in balloon experiments as well as in electronics have made it possible to fly scientific payloads at costs accessible to university departments. We have begun a program of high altitude ballooning at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru. The primary purpose of this activity is to test low-cost ultraviolet (UV) payloads for eventual space flight, but we will also try scientific exploration of the phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, including sprites and meteorite impacts. We present the results of the initial experiments carried out at the CREST campus of IIA, Hosakote, and describe our plans for the future.

  2. High Altitude Ballooning and Site Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, John

    2008-10-01

    High altitude ballooning provides a near-space platform for amateur research projects in science and engineering. This venue allows new experiments, otherwise not conducted from costs or lack of transportation, from WSU and surrounding areas to be flown into the upper atmosphere. A highly skilled and motivated group of scientist and engineering students from WSU have contrived its own high altitude balloon to lift payload capsules filled with experiments and tracking equipment up to 120,000 feet where it then bursts and payload capsules are parachuted into a landing zone. Launch site selection is based upon the safety of those that come within the balloons projected flight path and terrain accessibility from the launch and landing zones. Restricted ground and airspace, mountainous regions, lakes and rivers, and densely populated or high air traffic areas were obstacles to be avoided. Computer flight simulations and region analysis show that there are several viable launch and recovery sites in Utah as well as SE Idaho, SW Wyoming, and NW Colorado.

  3. HIGH LIFE: High altitude fatalities led to pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2016-01-15

    In 1875, Paul Bert linked high altitude danger to the low partial pressure of oxygen when 2 of 3 French balloonists died euphorically at about 8,600 m altitude. World War I fatal crashes of high altitude fighter pilots led to a century of efforts to use oximetry to warn pilots. The carotid body, discovered in 1932 to be the hypoxia detector, led to most current physiologic understanding of the body's respiratory responses to hypoxia and CO2. The author describes some of his UCSF group's work: In 1963, we reported both the brain's ventral medullary near-surface CO2 (and pH) chemosensors and the role of cerebrospinal fluid in acclimatization to altitude. In 1966, we reported the effect of altitude on cerebral blood flow and later the changes of carotid body sensitivity at altitude and the differences in natives of high altitude. In 1973, pulse oximetry was invented when Japanese biophysicist Takuo Aoyagi read and applied to pulses a largely forgotten 35-year-old discovery by English medical student J. R. Squire of a method of computing oxygen saturation from red and infrared light passing through both perfused and blanched tissue. PMID:26251514

  4. Detection of ocean color changes from high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovis, W. A.; Forman, M. L.; Blaine, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    The detection of ocean color changes, thought to be due to chlorophyll concentrations and gelbstoffe variations, is attempted from high altitude (11.3km) and low altitude (0.3km). The atmospheric back scattering is shown to reduce contrast, but not sufficiently to obscure color change detection at high altitudes.

  5. High altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) in an Indian pilgrim.

    PubMed

    Panthi, Sagar; Basnyat, Buddha

    2013-11-01

    Increasing number of Hindu pilgrims visit the Himalayas where some of them suffer from high altitude illness including the life threatening forms, high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral oedema. Compared to tourists and trekkers, pilgrims are usually ignorant about altitude illness. This is a case of a pilgrim who suffered from HAPE on his trip to Kailash-Mansarovar and is brought to a tertiary level hospital in Kathmandu. This report emphasises on how to treat a patient with HAPE, a disease which is increasingly being seen in the high altitude pilgrim population. PMID:24974506

  6. Aerodynamics of heat exchangers for high-altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drela, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Reduction of convective beat transfer with altitude dictates unusually large beat exchangers for piston- engined high-altitude aircraft The relatively large aircraft drag fraction associated with cooling at high altitudes makes the efficient design of the entire heat exchanger installation an essential part of the aircraft's aerodynamic design. The parameters that directly influence cooling drag are developed in the context of high-altitude flight Candidate wing airfoils that incorporate heat exchangers are examined. Such integrated wing-airfoil/heat-exchanger installations appear to be attractive alternatives to isolated heat.exchanger installations. Examples are drawn from integrated installations on existing or planned high-altitude aircraft.

  7. Responses of the autonomic nervous system in altitude adapted and high altitude pulmonary oedema subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Radhakrishnan, U.; Sen Gupta, J.; Nayar, H. S.

    1985-06-01

    Studies were carried out to ascertain the role of sympatho-parasympathetic responses in the process of adaptation to altitude. The assessment of status of autonomic balance was carried out in a group of 20 young male subjects by recording their resting heart rate, blood pressure, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, extremity temperatures, pupillary diameter, cold pressor response, oxygen consumption, cardioacceleration during orthostasis and urinary excretion of catecholamines; in a thermoneutral laboratory. The same parameters were repeated on day 3 and at weekly intervals for a period of 3 weeks, after exposing them to 3,500 m; and also after return to sea level. At altitude, similar studies were carried out in a group of 10 acclimatized lowlanders, 10 high altitude natives and 6 patients who had recently recovered from high altitude pulmonary oedema. In another phase, similar studies were done in two groups of subjects, one representing 15 subjects who had stayed at altitude (3,500 4,000 m) without any ill effects and the other comprising of 10 subjects who had either suffered from high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) or acute mountain sickness (AMS). The results revealed sympathetic overactivity on acute induction to altitude which showed gradual recovery on prolonged stay, the high altitude natives had preponderance to parasympathetic system. Sympathetic preponderance may not be an essential etiological factor for the causation of maladaptation syndromes.

  8. Power Budget Analysis for High Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Elliott, James R.; King, Glen C.

    2006-01-01

    The High Altitude Airship (HAA) has various potential applications and mission scenarios that require onboard energy harvesting and power distribution systems. The energy source considered for the HAA s power budget is solar photon energy that allows the use of either photovoltaic (PV) cells or advanced thermoelectric (ATE) converters. Both PV cells and an ATE system utilizing high performance thermoelectric materials were briefly compared to identify the advantages of ATE for HAA applications in this study. The ATE can generate a higher quantity of harvested energy than PV cells by utilizing the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE in a tandem mode configuration. Assuming that each stage of ATE material has the figure of merit of 5, the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE system approaches the overall conversion efficiency greater than 60%. Based on this estimated efficiency, the configuration of a HAA and the power utility modules are defined.

  9. Anticoagulation Considerations for Travel to High Altitude.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2015-09-01

    DeLoughery, Thomas G. Anticoagulation considerations for travel to high altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:181-185, 2015.-An increasing percentage of the population are on anticoagulation medicine for clinical reasons ranging from stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation to long term prevention of deep venous thrombosis. In recent years, several new direct oral anticoagulants have entered the market. The key questions that should be kept in mind when approaching a potential traveler on anticoagulation are: 1) why is the patient on anticoagulation? 2) do they need to stay on anticoagulation? 3) what are the choices for their anticoagulation? 4) will there be any drug interactions with medications needed for travel? and 5) how will they monitor their anticoagulation while traveling? Knowing the answers to these questions then can allow for proper counseling and planning for the anticoagulated traveler's trip. PMID:26186419

  10. High-Altitude Illnesses: Physiology, Risk Factors, Prevention, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    High-altitude illnesses encompass the pulmonary and cerebral syndromes that occur in non-acclimatized individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude. The most common syndrome is acute mountain sickness (AMS) which usually begins within a few hours of ascent and typically consists of headache variably accompanied by loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, disturbed sleep, fatigue, and dizziness. With millions of travelers journeying to high altitudes every year and sleeping above 2,500 m, acute mountain sickness is a wide-spread clinical condition. Risk factors include home elevation, maximum altitude, sleeping altitude, rate of ascent, latitude, age, gender, physical condition, intensity of exercise, pre-acclimatization, genetic make-up, and pre-existing diseases. At higher altitudes, sleep disturbances may become more profound, mental performance is impaired, and weight loss may occur. If ascent is rapid, acetazolamide can reduce the risk of developing AMS, although a number of high-altitude travelers taking acetazolamide will still develop symptoms. Ibuprofen can be effective for headache. Symptoms can be rapidly relieved by descent, and descent is mandatory, if at all possible, for the management of the potentially fatal syndromes of high-altitude pulmonary and cerebral edema. The purpose of this review is to combine a discussion of specific risk factors, prevention, and treatment options with a summary of the basic physiologic responses to the hypoxia of altitude to provide a context for managing high-altitude illnesses and advising the non-acclimatized high-altitude traveler. PMID:23908794

  11. Growth among Tibetans at high and low altitudes in India.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Vikal; Gupta, Ranjan

    2007-01-01

    In India, Tibetans have been living at different altitudes for more than 40 years. This study describes physical growth in terms of height, weight, sitting height, skinfold thickness at triceps and upper arm circumference of Tibetans born and raised at three Tibetan refugee settlements (3,521; 970; and 800 m) from the view point of the hypothesis that growth is retarded at high altitude. Samples consist of individuals between the ages of 2 and 40 years. Tibetans at high altitude in India show a growth pattern similar to that previously observed among Tibetans in Tibet. Tibetans at high altitude are taller and heavier compared to Andean highlanders. The general trends show that Tibetan children and adults of both sexes at low altitude in India are advanced in terms of height, weight, skinfold thickness at triceps and upper arm circumference compared to Tibetans at high altitude. Trunk length (sitting height) is similar at the two altitudes but relative sitting height is greater at high altitude. Greater relative sitting height and lesser leg length at high altitude than at low altitudes is discussed in terms of effect of altitude, temperature, and nutritional status. PMID:17691098

  12. High Altitude Supersonic Decelerator Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant T.; Blando, Guillermo; Kennett, Andrew; Von Der Heydt, Max; Wolff, John Luke; Yerdon, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is tasked by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to advance the state of the art in Mars entry and descent technology in order to allow for larger payloads to be delivered to Mars at higher altitudes with better accuracy. The project will develop a 33.5 m Do Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute, 6m attached torus, robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R), and an 8 m attached isotensoid, exploration class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-E). The SSRS and SIAD-R should be brought to TRL-6, while the SIAD-E should be brought to TRL-5. As part of the qualification and development program, LDSD must perform a Mach-scaled Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) in order to demonstrate successful free flight dynamic deployments at Mars equivalent altitude, of all three technologies. In order to perform these tests, LDSD must design and build a test vehicle to deliver all technologies to approximately 180,000 ft and Mach 4, deploy a SIAD, free fly to approximately Mach 2, deploy the SSRS, record high-speed and high-resolution imagery of both deployments, as well as record data from an instrumentation suite capable of characterizing the technology induced vehicle dynamics. The vehicle must also be recoverable after splashdown into the ocean under a nominal flight, while guaranteeing forensic data protection in an off nominal catastrophic failure of a test article that could result in a terminal velocity, tumbling water impact.

  13. Control of erythropoiesis after high altitude acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Savourey, Gustave; Launay, Jean-Claude; Besnard, Yves; Guinet, Angélique; Bourrilhon, Cyprien; Cabane, Damien; Martin, Serge; Caravel, Jean-Pierre; Péquignot, Jean-Marc; Cottet-Emard, Jean-Marie

    2004-10-01

    Erythropoiesis was studied in 11 subjects submitted to a 4-h hypoxia (HH) in a hypobaric chamber (4,500 m, barometric pressure 58.9 kPa) both before and after a 3-week sojourn in the Andes. On return to sea level, increased red blood cells (+3.27%), packed cell volume (+4.76%), haemoglobin (+6.55%) ( P<0.05), and increased arterial partial pressure of oxygen (+8.56%), arterial oxygen saturation (+7.40%) and arterial oxygen blood content ( C(a)O(2)) (+12.93%) at the end of HH ( P<0.05) attested high altitude acclimatization. Reticulocytes increased during HH after the sojourn only (+36.8% vs +17.9%, P<0.01) indicating a probable higher reticulocyte release and/or production despite decreased serum erythropoietin (EPO) concentrations (-46%, P<0.01). Hormones (thyroid, catecholamines and cortisol), iron status (serum iron, ferritin, transferrin and haptoglobin) and renal function (creatinine, renal, osmolar and free-water clearances) did not significantly vary (except for lower thyroid stimulating hormone at sea level, P<0.01). Levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) increased throughout HH on return (+14.7%, P<0.05) and an inverse linear relationship was found between 2,3-DPG and EPO at the end of HH after the sojourn only ( r=-0.66, P<0.03). Inverse linear relationships were also found between C(a)O(2) and EPO at the end of HH before ( r=-0.63, P<0.05) and after the sojourn ( r=-0.60, P=0.05) with identical slopes but different ordinates at the origin, suggesting that the sensitivity but not the gain of the EPO response to hypoxia was modified by altitude acclimatization. Higher 2,3-DPG levels could partly explain this decreased sensitivity of the EPO response to hypoxia. In conclusion, we show that altitude acclimatization modifies the control of erythropoiesis not only at sea level, but also during a subsequent hypoxia. PMID:15248067

  14. High-altitude pulmonary edema: diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pennardt, Andre

    2013-01-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a lethal, noncardiogenic form of pulmonary edema that afflicts susceptible individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude above 2,500 m. Prevention of HAPE is achieved most effectively by gradual ascent allowing time for proper acclimatization. Certain prophylactic medications may further reduce the risk of ascending to high altitude in individuals with a prior history of HAPE. The most effective and reliable treatment of HAPE is immediate descent and administration of supplemental oxygen. PMID:23478563

  15. Microgravity combustion experiment using high altitude balloon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Yuji

    In JAXA, microgravity experiment system using a high altitude balloon was developed , for good microgravity environment and short turn-around time. In this publication, I give an account of themicrogravity experiment system and a combustion experiment to utilize the system. The balloon operated vehicle (BOV) as a microgravity experiment system was developed from 2004 to 2009. Features of the BOV are (1) BOV has double capsule structure. Outside-capsule and inside-capsule are kept the non-contact state by 3-axis drag-free control. (2) The payload is spherical shape and itsdiameter is about 300 mm. (3) Keep 10-4 G level microgravity environment for about 30 seconds However, BOV’s payload was small, and could not mount large experiment module. In this study, inherits the results of past, we established a new experimental system called “iBOV” in order toaccommodate larger payload. Features of the iBOV are (1) Drag-free control use for only vertical direction. (2) The payload is a cylindrical shape and its size is about 300 mm in diameter and 700 mm in height. (3) Keep 10-3-10-4 G level microgravity environment for about 30 seconds We have "Observation experiment of flame propagation behavior of the droplets column" as experiment using iBOV. This experiment is a theme that was selected first for technical demonstration of iBOV. We are conducting the flame propagation mechanism elucidation study of fuel droplets array was placed at regular intervals. We conducted a microgravity experiments using TEXUS rocket ESA and drop tower. For this microgravity combustion experiment using high altitude balloon, we use the Engineering Model (EM) for TEXUS rocket experiment. The EM (This payload) consists of combustion vessel, droplets supporter, droplets generator, fuel syringe, igniter, digital camera, high-speed camera. And, This payload was improved from the EM as follows. (1) Add a control unit. (2) Add inside batteries for control unit and heater of combustion

  16. SHARP (Stationary High Altitude Relay Platform) - Rectenna and low altitude tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesak, J. J.; Alden, A.; Ohno, T.

    This paper describes a planned low-altitude microwave-powered flight test to demonstrate several key features of the SHARP (Stationary High Altitude Relay Platform) concept. A small-scale airplane will be flown at an altitude of about 50 m, powered by microwave energy transmitted from the ground. RF power at a frequency of 2.45 GHz will be converted to dc by an array of rectennas mounted on the lower surfaces of the airplane's wings. A novel dual-polarized rectenna system has been developed for powering the scaled model. The RF to dc power conversion efficiency of this rectenna is about 60 percent.

  17. High Altitude Observatory YBJ and ARGO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y.; ARGO Collaboration

    A 5800 m2 RPC (Resistive Plate Chamber) full coverage air shower array is under construction in the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory, Tibet of China, by the ChinaItaly ARGO Collaboration. YBJ is a large flat grassland with an area 10 × 70 km2 at 4300m altitude, about 90 north west from Lhasa. Its nearby power station, asphalt road to Lhasa, passing railway (will be constructed during the coming 5 years), optical fiber link to the INTERNET, rare snow and other favourable weather conditions are well suitable for setting an Astrophysical Observatory here. The installation of a large area carpet-like detector in this peculiar site will allow one to perform an all-sky and high duty cycle study of high energy gamma rays from 100GeV to 50 TeV as well as accurate measurements on UHE cosmic rays. To insure the stable and uniform working condition of RPCs, a 104 M2 carpet hall was constructed, the RPC installation have be started in it since last November. The natural distribution and daily variation of temperature in the hall, the data concerning the performances of the installed RPCs, have been measured, the results are presented. ce

  18. The pulmonary circulation of some domestic animals at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, I.; Heath, D.; Williams, D.; Deen, M.; Ferrari, R.; Bergel, D.; Harris, P.

    1988-03-01

    Pulmonary haemodynamics and the histology of the pulmonary vasculature have been studied at high altitude in the yak, in interbreeds between yaks and cattle, and in domestic goats and sheep indigenous to high altitudes together with crosses between them and low-altitude strains. Cattle at high altitude had a higher pulmonary arterial pressure than cattle at low altitude. The yak and two interbreeds with cattle (dzos and stols) had a low pulmonary arterial pressure compared with cattle, while the medial thickness of the small pulmonary arteries was less than would be expected in cattle, suggesting that the yak has a low capacity for hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and that this characteristic is transmitted genetically. Goats and sheep showed haemodynamic evidence of a limited response of the pulmonary circulation to high altitude, but no evidence that the high altitude breeds had lost this response. There were no measurable differences in the thickness of the media of the small pulmonary arteries between high- and low-altitude breeds of goats and sheep. All these species showed prominent intimal protrusions of muscle into the pulmonary veins but no specific effect of high altitude in this respect.

  19. NASA/USRA high altitude reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Michael; Gudino, Juan; Chen, Kenny; Luong, Tai; Wilkerson, Dave; Keyvani, Anoosh

    1990-01-01

    At the equator, the ozone layer ranges from approximately 80,000 to 130,000+ feet which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. This project is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to cruise at 130,000 lbs. of payload. In addition, the aircraft must have a minimum of a 6,000 mile range. The low Mach number, payload, and long cruising time are all constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. A pilot must be able to take control in the event of unforseen difficulties. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements, a joined-wing, a bi-plane, and a twin-boom conventional airplane. The techniques used have been deemed reasonable within the limits of 1990 technology. The performance of each configuration is analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project requirements. In the event that a requirement can not be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  20. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view detector based upon a water Cherenkov technology developed by the Milagro experiment. HAWC observes, at an elevation of 4100 m on Sierra Negra Mountain in Mexico, extensive air showers initiated by gamma and cosmic rays. The completed detector will consist of 300 closely spaced water tanks each instrumented with four photomultiplier tubes that provide timing and charge information used to reconstruct energy and arrival direction. HAWC has been optimized to observe transient and steady emission from point as well as diffuse sources of gamma rays in the energy range from several hundred GeV to several hundred TeV. Studies in solar physics as well as the properties of cosmic rays will also be performed. HAWC has been making observations at various stages of deployment since completion of 10% of the array in summer 2012. A discussion of the detector design, science capabilities, current construction/commissioning status, and first results will be presented...

  1. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafá, Miguel A.

    2014-10-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV γ-ray experiment under construction at 4,100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow us to detect both the transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV γ-ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from γ-ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first 30 WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer 2012, and 100 WCDs will be taking data by May, 2013. We present in this paper the motivation for constructing the HAWC observatory, the status of the deployment, and the first results from the constantly growing array.

  2. Pulmonary hemodynamics in children living at high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Penaloza, Dante; Sime, Francisco; Ruiz, Luis

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous publications on altitude-related diseases in adults. In addition, an International Consensus Statement published in 2001 deals with altitude-related illnesses occurring in lowland children who travel to high altitudes. However, despite the millions of children living permanently at high altitudes around the world, there are few publications on altitude-related diseases and pulmonary hemodynamics in this pediatric population. In this paper, we review the published literature on this subject. First, the pulmonary hemodynamics of healthy children (newborns, infants, children, and adolescents) residing at altitudes above 4000 m are summarized. Asymptomatic pulmonary hypertension, which slowly declines with increasing age, is found in these children. This is followed by a discussion of the functional closure of ductus arteriosus, which is delayed at high altitude. Then, the high prevalence of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in highland children and the pulmonary hemodynamics in these patients are described. Next, the pulmonary hemodynamics in highland children who suffer high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) after a short stay at lower levels is discussed, and the possible reasons for susceptibility to reentry HAPE in this pediatric population are postulated. The pulmonary hemodynamics in children with subacute mountain sickness (SMS) are then described. Moderate to severe pulmonary hypertension is a common finding in all these altitude-related diseases. Finally, the management of these clinical conditions is outlined. PMID:18800956

  3. Work at high altitude and oxidative stress: antioxidant nutrients.

    PubMed

    Askew, E W

    2002-11-15

    A significant portion of the world's geography lies above 10,000 feet elevation, an arbitrary designation that separates moderate and high altitude. Although the number of indigenous people living at these elevations is relatively small, many people travel to high altitude for work or recreation, exposing themselves to chronic or intermittent hypoxia and the associated risk of acute mountain sickness (AMS) and less frequently, high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). The symptoms of AMS (headache, nausea, anorexia, fatigue, lassitude) occur in those who travel too high, too fast. Some investigators have linked the development of these symptoms with the condition of altered blood-brain barrier permeability, possibly related to hypoxia induced free radical formation. The burden of oxidative stress increases during the time spent at altitude and may even persist for some time upon return to sea level. The physiological and medical consequences of increased oxidative stress engendered by altitude is unclear; indeed, hypoxia is believed to be the trigger for the cascade of signaling events that ultimately leads to adaptation to altitude. These signaling events include the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may elicit important adaptive responses. If produced in excess, however, these ROS may contribute to impaired muscle function and reduced capillary perfusion at altitude or may even play a role in precipitating more serious neurological and pulmonary crisis. Oxidative stress can be observed at altitude without strenuous physical exertion; however, environmental factors other than hypoxia, such as exercise, UV light exposure and cold exposure, can also contribute to the burden. Providing antioxidant nutrients via the diet or supplements to the diet can reduce oxidative stress secondary to altitude exposure. In summary, the significant unanswered question concerning altitude exposure and antioxidant supplementation is

  4. Bronchial asthma: advice for patients traveling to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Cogo, Annalisa; Fiorenzano, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the possibility of traveling to altitude for patients suffering from bronchial asthma. The mountain environment, the adaptations of the respiratory system to high altitude, the underlying patho-physiologies of asthma, and the recommendations for patients, according to altitude, are discussed. In summary, staying at low altitude has a significant beneficial effect for asthmatic patients, due to the reduction of airway inflammation and the lower response to bronchoconstrictor stimuli; for staying at moderate altitude, there is conflicting information and no clinical data; at high altitude, the environment seems beneficial for well-controlled asthmatics, but intense exercise and upper airway infections (frequent during trekking) can be additional risks and should be avoided. Further, in remote areas health facilities are often difficult to reach. PMID:19519226

  5. Biventricular thrombosis in a structurally normal heart at high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Malani, Susheel; Chadha, Davinder; Banerji, Anup

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare case of biventricular thrombus in a young patient with a structurally normal heart at high altitude, complicated with pulmonary embolism. Detailed evaluation revealed him to have protein S deficiency. Altered environmental conditions at high altitude associated with protein S deficiency resulted in thrombus formation at an unusual location; the same is discussed in this case report. PMID:24879736

  6. Users guide to high altitude imagery of Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A guide to the high altitude imagery of Michigan outlines the areas of the state covered by selected recent high altitude aircraft and Earth Resources Technology Satellite flights. The types of remote sensing used are described. Maps of the flight coverage areas are included along with price lists of available imagery.

  7. Introductory address: lessons to be learned from high altitude.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    A historical account of the important landmarks in man's experience with the high altitude environment is followed by comments on the important stages in the understanding of its physiological effects. The work of The Mount Logan High Altitude Physiology Study on acute mountain sickness is reviewed from its inception in 1967 until the present. PMID:386292

  8. Effects of Ascent to High Altitude on Human Antimycobacterial Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Robert W.; Siedner, Mark J.; Necochea, Alejandro; Leybell, Inna; Valencia, Teresa; Herrera, Beatriz; Wiles, Siouxsie; Friedland, Jon S.; Gilman, Robert H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis infection, disease and mortality are all less common at high than low altitude and ascent to high altitude was historically recommended for treatment. The immunological and mycobacterial mechanisms underlying the association between altitude and tuberculosis are unclear. We studied the effects of altitude on mycobacteria and antimycobacterial immunity. Methods Antimycobacterial immunity was assayed in 15 healthy adults residing at low altitude before and after they ascended to 3400 meters; and in 47 long-term high-altitude residents. Antimycobacterial immunity was assessed as the extent to which participants’ whole blood supported or restricted growth of genetically modified luminescent Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) mycobacteria during 96 hours incubation. We developed a simplified whole blood assay that could be used by a technician in a low-technology setting. We used this to compare mycobacterial growth in participants’ whole blood versus positive-control culture broth and versus negative-control plasma. Results Measurements of mycobacterial luminescence predicted the number of mycobacterial colonies cultured six weeks later. At low altitude, mycobacteria grew in blood at similar rates to positive-control culture broth whereas ascent to high altitude was associated with restriction (p≤0.002) of mycobacterial growth to be 4-times less than in culture broth. At low altitude, mycobacteria grew in blood 25-times more than negative-control plasma whereas ascent to high altitude was associated with restriction (p≤0.01) of mycobacterial growth to be only 6-times more than in plasma. There was no evidence of differences in antimycobacterial immunity at high altitude between people who had recently ascended to high altitude versus long-term high-altitude residents. Conclusions An assay of luminescent mycobacterial growth in whole blood was adapted and found to be feasible in low-resource settings. This demonstrated that ascent to or

  9. Comparative aspects of high-altitude adaptation in human populations.

    PubMed

    Moore, L G; Armaza, F; Villena, M; Vargas, E

    2000-01-01

    The conditions and duration of high-altitude residence differ among high-altitude populations. The Tibetan Plateau is larger, more geographically remote, and appears to have been occupied for a longer period of time than the Andean Altiplano and, certainly, the Rocky Mountain region as judged by archaeological, linguistic, genetic and historical data. In addition, the Tibetan gene pool is less likely to have been constricted by small numbers of initial migrants and/or severe population decline, and to have been less subject to genetic admixture with lowland groups. Comparing Tibetans to other high-altitude residents demonstrates that Tibetans have less intrauterine growth retardation better neonatal oxygenation higher ventilation and hypoxic ventilatory response lower pulmonary arterial pressure and resistance lower hemoglobin concentrations and less susceptibility to CMS These findings are consistent with the conclusion that "adaptation" to high altitude increases with time, considering time in generations of high-altitude exposure. Future research is needed to compare the extent of IUGR and neonatal oxygenation in South American high-altitude residents of Andean vs. European ancestry, controlling for gestational age and other characteristics. Another fruitful line of inquiry is likely to be determining whether persons with CMS or other altitude-associated problems experienced exaggerated hypoxia during prenatal or neonatal life. Finally, the comparison of high-altitude populations with respect to the frequencies of genes involved in oxygen sensing and physiologic response to hypoxia will be useful, once candidate genes have been identified. PMID:10849648

  10. Turbulent mixing in high-altitude explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Bell, J.B. ); Ferguson, R.E. ); White, W.W.; McCartor, T.H. )

    1992-09-01

    Numerical simulations of a high-altitude explosion were performed using a Godunov code with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). The code solves the two-dimensional (2-D), time-dependent conservation laws of inviscid gas dynamics while AMR is used to focus the computational effort in the mixing regions. The calculations revealed that a spherical density interface embedded in this flow was unstable and rolled up into a turbulent mixing layer. The shape of the interface was qualitatively similar to experimental photographs. Initially, the mixing layer width grew as a linear function of time, but eventually it reached an asymptotically-constant value. The flow field was azimuthally-averaged to evaluate the mean-flow profiles and the R.M.S. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The mean kinetic energy rapidly approached zero as the blast wave decayed, but the fluctuating kinetic energy asymptotically approached a small constant value (a fraction of a percent of the maximum kinetic energy). This represents the rotational kinetic energy driven by the vorticity field, that continued to mix the fluid indefinitely. It was shown that the vorticity field corresponds to a function that fluctuates between plus and minus values -- with a volume-averaged mean of zero. The amplitude of the vorticity fluctuations decayed as t[sup [minus]1]. The corresponding enstrophy increased linearly with time because of a cascade process for the mean-squared vorticity. This result is in good agreement with the 2-D calculations of turbulent flow as reported by G.K. Batchelor. The problem should be recalculated in 3-D to study the decay of turbulent mixing for spherical interfaces.

  11. Turbulent mixing in high-altitude explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Bell, J.B.; Ferguson, R.E.; White, W.W.; McCartor, T.H.

    1992-09-01

    Numerical simulations of a high-altitude explosion were performed using a Godunov code with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). The code solves the two-dimensional (2-D), time-dependent conservation laws of inviscid gas dynamics while AMR is used to focus the computational effort in the mixing regions. The calculations revealed that a spherical density interface embedded in this flow was unstable and rolled up into a turbulent mixing layer. The shape of the interface was qualitatively similar to experimental photographs. Initially, the mixing layer width grew as a linear function of time, but eventually it reached an asymptotically-constant value. The flow field was azimuthally-averaged to evaluate the mean-flow profiles and the R.M.S. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The mean kinetic energy rapidly approached zero as the blast wave decayed, but the fluctuating kinetic energy asymptotically approached a small constant value (a fraction of a percent of the maximum kinetic energy). This represents the rotational kinetic energy driven by the vorticity field, that continued to mix the fluid indefinitely. It was shown that the vorticity field corresponds to a function that fluctuates between plus and minus values -- with a volume-averaged mean of zero. The amplitude of the vorticity fluctuations decayed as t{sup {minus}1}. The corresponding enstrophy increased linearly with time because of a cascade process for the mean-squared vorticity. This result is in good agreement with the 2-D calculations of turbulent flow as reported by G.K. Batchelor. The problem should be recalculated in 3-D to study the decay of turbulent mixing for spherical interfaces.

  12. High power synchronous altitude satellite system

    SciTech Connect

    Keigler, J.E.

    1981-12-01

    The design and attitude control system of the illustrated momentum stabilized synchronous altitude spacecraft are such that relatively large amounts of electrical power may be derived from its sun oriented planar solar array. The system is illustrated and the control of the spacecraft to stabilize it about all three axes with respect to the sun is described.

  13. Perspectives on functional adaptation of the high altitude native.

    PubMed

    Frisancho, A R

    1983-01-01

    The major physiological processes that enable humans to attain a complete acclimatization to high altitude are briefly reviewed. The available data indicate that: (a) complete acclimatization to high altitude is associated with changes of environmentally modifiable functional traits such as lung volume but not associated with the expression of genetically controlled features such as chest size; (b) as judged by measurements of maximal aerobic power, the high altitude native has attained at high altitude an adaptation that is comparable to that attained by the low altitude native at sea level; the available information suggests that such adaptation is acquired through growth and development in an hypoxic environment; at present, however, we do not know the developmental modifications that occur within each component of the oxygen transport system, such as ventilation, pulmonary diffusion, and oxygen transport, that enable a sea level native to attain a complete functional adaptation to high altitude; and (c) at comparable altitudes among high altitude natives, there are some inter-regional differences in hemopoietic response, so that the samples derived from mining regions of the Andes are characterized by higher hemoglobin concentration than those derived from non-mining areas or the Himalayas. The source of these differences remains to be investigated. PMID:6364176

  14. Increased oxidative stress following acute and chronic high altitude exposure.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, J Ashley; Simoni, Jan; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Swenson, Erik R; Wesson, Donald E; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Johnson, Richard J; Hurtado, Abdias

    2004-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species is typically associated with hyperoxia and ischemia reperfusion. Recent evidence has suggested that increased oxidative stress may occur with hypoxia. We hypothesized that oxidative stress would be increased in subjects exposed to high altitude hypoxia. We studied 28 control subjects living in Lima, Peru (sea level), at baseline and following 48 h exposure to high altitude (4300 m). To assess the effects of chronic altitude exposure, we studied 25 adult males resident in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude 4300 m). We also studied 27 subjects living in Cerro de Pasco who develop excessive erythrocytosis (hematocrit > 65%) and chronic mountain sickness. Acute high altitude exposure led to increased urinary F(2)-isoprostane, 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.31 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 2.15 +/- 1.1, p = 0.001) and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.37 +/- 0.09, p = 0.002), with a trend to increased plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 63.8 +/- 27, p = NS). High altitude residents had significantly elevated levels of urinary 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.3 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 4.1 +/- 3.4, p = 0.007), plasma TBARS (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 85 +/- 28, p = 0.008), and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.55 +/- 0.19, p < 0.0001) compared to sea level. High altitude residents with excessive erythrocytosis had higher levels of oxidative stress compared to high altitude residents with normal hematological adaptation. In conclusion, oxidative stress is increased following both acute exposure to high altitude without exercise and with chronic residence at high altitude. PMID:15072717

  15. Preterm birth risk at high altitude in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Lisa D.; Gonzales, Gustavo F.; Tapia, Vilma L.; Gasco, Manuel; Sammel, Mary D.; Srinivas, Sindhu K.; Ludmir, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Objective High altitude has been implicated in a variety of adverse pregnancy outcomes including preeclampsia and stillbirth. Smaller studies show conflicting data on the association between high altitude and preterm birth (PTB). The objective of this study was to assess the association between altitude and PTB. Study Design A retrospective cohort study was performed using data from the Perinatal Information System which includes deliveries from 43 hospitals in Peru from 2000–2010. Altitude was classified into: low (0–1999m), moderate (2000–2900m), and high (3000–4340m). The primary outcome was PTB (delivery <37 weeks). Secondary outcomes were cesarean delivery and small for gestational age (SGA). Deliveries <23 weeks are not included in the database. Chi-square analyses were performed to compare categorical variables and logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and control for confounders. Clustering by hospital was accounted for using generalized estimating equations. Results 550,166 women were included (68% low, 15% moderate, 17% high altitude). The overall PTB rate was 5.9% with no difference in PTB rate among the 3 altitudes (5.6, 6.2, 6.8%, p=0.13). There was a significant difference in cesarean rates (28.0, 26.6, 20.6%, p<0.001) with a 34% decreased risk at high vs. low altitude adjusted for confounders (aOR 0.66 [0.51–0.85]). There was a difference in SGA (3.3, 3.6, 5.0%, p=0.02) with a 51% increased risk at high vs. low altitude adjusted for confounders (aOR 1.49 [1.14–1.93]). Conclusions High altitude is not associated with PTB. At high altitude, the cesarean rate was reduced and SGA rate was increased. PMID:25173185

  16. Why Are High-Altitude Natives So Strong at Altitude? Maximal Oxygen Transport to the Muscle Cell in Altitude Natives.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Carsten; Calbet, Jose A L

    2016-01-01

    In hypoxia aerobic exercise performance of high-altitude natives is suggested to be superior to that of lowlanders; i.e., for a given altitude natives are reported to have higher maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). The likely basis for this is a higher pulmonary diffusion capacity, which in turn ensures higher arterial O2 saturation (SaO2) and therefore also potentially a higher delivery of O2 to the exercising muscles. This review focuses on O2 transport in high-altitude Aymara. We have quantified femoral artery O2 delivery, arterial O2 extraction and calculated leg VO2 in Aymara, and compared their values with that of acclimatizing Danish lowlanders. All subjects were studied at 4100 m. At maximal exercise SaO2 dropped tremendously in the lowlanders, but did not change in the Aymara. Therefore arterial O2 content was also higher in the Aymara. At maximal exercise however, fractional O2 extraction was lower in the Aymara, and the a-vO2 difference was similar in both populations. The lower extraction levels in the Aymara were associated with lower muscle O2 conductance (a measure of muscle diffusion capacity). At any given submaximal exercise intensity, leg VO2 was always of similar magnitude in both groups, but at maximal exercise the lowlanders had higher leg blood flow, and hence also higher maximum leg VO2. With the induction of acute normoxia fractional arterial O2 extraction fell in the highlanders, but remained unchanged in the lowlanders. Hence high-altitude natives seem to be more diffusion limited at the muscle level as compared to lowlanders. In conclusion Aymara preserve very high SaO2 during hypoxic exercise (likely due to a higher lung diffusion capacity), but the effect on VO2max is reduced by a lower ability to extract O2 at the muscle level. PMID:27343089

  17. Improving oxygenation at high altitude: acclimatization and O2 enrichment.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2003-01-01

    When lowlanders go to high altitude, the resulting oxygen deprivation impairs mental and physical performance, quality of sleep, and general well-being. This paper compares the effects of ventilatory acclimatization and oxygen enrichment of room air on the improvement of oxygenation as judged by the increase in the alveolar P(O2) and the reduction in equivalent altitude. The results show that, on the average, complete ventilatory acclimatization at an altitude of 5000 m increases the alveolar P(O2) by nearly 8 torr, which corresponds to a reduction in equivalent altitude of about 1000 m, although there is considerable individual variability. By comparison, oxygen enrichment to 27% at 5000 m can easily reduce the equivalent altitude to 3200 m, which is generally well tolerated. Because full ventilatory acclimatization at altitudes up to about 3600 m reduces the equivalent altitude to about 3000 m, oxygen enrichment is not justified for well-acclimatized persons. At an altitude of 4200 m, where several telescopes are located on the summit of Mauna Kea, full acclimatization reduces the equivalent altitude to about 3400 m, but the pattern of commuting probably would not allow this. Therefore, at this altitude, oxygen enrichment would be beneficial but is not essential. At higher altitudes such as 5050 m, where other telescopes are located or planned, the gain in oxygenation from acclimatization is insufficient to produce an adequate mental or physical performance for most work, and oxygen enrichment is highly desirable. Full ventilatory acclimatization requires at least a week of continuous exposure, although much of the improvement is seen in the first 2 days. PMID:14561244

  18. DLR HABLEG- High Altitude Balloon Launched Experimental Glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlach, S.; Schwarzbauch, M.; Laiacker, M.

    2015-09-01

    The group Flying Robots at the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics in Oberpfaffenhofen conducts research on solar powered high altitude aircrafts. Due to the high altitude and the almost infinite mission duration, these platforms are also denoted as High Altitude Pseudo-Satellites (HAPS). This paper highlights some aspects of the design, building, integration and testing of a flying experimental platform for high altitudes. This unmanned aircraft, with a wingspan of 3 m and a mass of less than 10 kg, is meant to be launched as a glider from a high altitude balloon in 20 km altitude and shall investigate technologies for future large HAPS platforms. The aerodynamic requirements for high altitude flight included the development of a launch method allowing for a safe transition to horizontal flight from free-fall with low control authority. Due to the harsh environmental conditions in the stratosphere, the integration of electronic components in the airframe is a major effort. For regulatory reasons a reliable and situation dependent flight termination system had to be implemented. In May 2015 a flight campaign was conducted. The mission was a full success demonstrating that stratospheric research flights are feasible with rather small aircrafts.

  19. The effect of high altitude on nasal nitric oxide levels.

    PubMed

    Altundag, Aytug; Salihoglu, Murat; Cayonu, Melih; Cingi, Cemal; Tekeli, Hakan; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether nasal nitric oxide (nNO) levels change in relation to high altitude in a natural setting where the weather conditions were favorable. The present study included 41 healthy volunteers without a history of acute rhinosinusitis within 3 weeks and nasal polyposis. The study group consisted of 31 males (76 %) and 10 females (24 %) and the mean age of the study population was 38 ± 10 years. The volunteers encamped for 2 days in a mountain village at an altitude of 1,500 m above sea level (masl) and proceeded to highlands at an altitude of 2,200 masl throughout the day. The measurements of nNO were done randomly, either first at the mountain village or at sea level. Each participant had nNO values both at sea level and at high altitude at the end of the study. The nNO values of sea level and high altitude were compared to investigate the effect of high altitude on nNO levels. The mean of average nNO measurements at the high altitude was 74.2 ± 41 parts-per-billion (ppb) and the mean of the measurements at sea level was 93.4 ± 45 ppb. The change in nNO depending on the altitude level was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The current investigation showed that nNO levels were decreased at high altitude even if the weather conditions were favorable, such as temperature, humidity, and wind. PMID:24972544

  20. Calibration of infrared satellite images using high altitude aircraft measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Philip D.; Gore, Warren J. Y.; Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1989-01-01

    The use of infrared radiance measurements made from high altitude aircraft for satellite image validation is discussed. Selected examples are presented to illustrate the techniques and the potentials of such validation studies.

  1. Energy metabolism and the high-altitude environment.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    At high altitude the barometric pressure falls, challenging oxygen delivery to the tissues. Thus, whilst hypoxia is not the only physiological stress encountered at high altitude, low arterial P(O2) is a sustained feature, even after allowing adequate time for acclimatization. Cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism is altered in subjects at, or returning from, high altitude. In the heart, energetic reserve falls, as indicated by lower phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but in the hypoxic rat heart fatty acid oxidation and respiratory capacity are decreased, whilst pyruvate oxidation is also lower after sustained hypoxic exposure. In skeletal muscle, there is not a consensus. With prolonged exposure to extreme high altitude (>5500 m) a loss of muscle mitochondrial density is seen, but this was not observed in a simulated ascent of Everest in hypobaric chambers. At more moderate high altitude, decreased respiratory capacity may occur without changes in mitochondrial volume density, and fat oxidation may be downregulated, although this is not seen in all studies. The underlying mechanisms, including the possible role of hypoxia-signalling pathways, remain to be resolved, particularly in light of confounding factors in the high-altitude environment. In high-altitude-adapted Tibetan natives, however, there is evidence of natural selection centred around the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway, and metabolic features in this population (e.g. low cardiac phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios, increased cardiac glucose uptake and lower muscle mitochondrial densities) share similarities with those in acclimatized lowlanders, supporting a possible role for the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway in the metabolic response of cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism to high altitude. PMID:26315373

  2. Aging, Tolerance to High Altitude, and Cardiorespiratory Response to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Lhuissier, François J

    2015-06-01

    Richalet, Jean-Paul, and François J. Lhuissier. Aging, tolerance to high altitude, and cardiorespiratory response to hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 16:117-124, 2015.--It is generally accepted that aging is rather protective, at least at moderate altitude. Some anecdotal reports even mention successful ascent of peaks over 8000 m and even Everest by elderly people. However, very few studies have explored the influence of aging on tolerance to high altitude and prevalence of acute high altitude related diseases, taking into account all confounding factors such as speed of ascent, altitude reached, sex, training status, and chemo-responsiveness. Changes in physiological responses to hypoxia with aging were assessed through a cross-sectional 20-year study including 4675 subjects (2789 men, 1886 women; 14-85 yrs old) and a longitudinal study including 30 subjects explored at a mean 10.4-year interval. In men, ventilatory response to hypoxia increased, while desaturation was less pronounced with aging. Cardiac response to hypoxia was blunted with aging in both genders. Similar results were found in the longitudinal study, with a decrease in cardiac and an increase in ventilatory response to hypoxia with aging. These adaptive responses were less pronounced or absent in post-menopausal untrained women. In conclusion, in normal healthy and active subjects, aging has no deleterious effect on cardiac and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, at least up to the eighth decade. Aging is not a contraindication for high altitude, as far as no pathological condition interferes and physical fitness is compatible with the intensity of the expected physical demand of one's individual. Physiological evaluation through hypoxic exercise testing before going to high altitude is helpful to detect risk factors of severe high altitude-related diseases. PMID:25946570

  3. The cerebral effects of ascent to high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Newman, Stanton; Imray, Chris H

    2009-02-01

    Cellular hypoxia is the common final pathway of brain injury that occurs not just after asphyxia, but also when cerebral perfusion is impaired directly (eg, embolic stroke) or indirectly (eg, raised intracranial pressure after head injury). We Review recent advances in the understanding of neurological clinical syndromes that occur on exposure to high altitudes, including high altitude headache (HAH), acute mountain sickness (AMS), and high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE), and the genetics, molecular mechanisms, and physiology that underpin them. We also present the vasogenic and cytotoxic bases for HACE and explore venous hypertension as a possible contributory factor. Although the factors that control susceptibility to HACE are poorly understood, the effects of exposure to altitude (and thus hypobaric hypoxia) might provide a reproducible model for the study of cerebral cellular hypoxia in healthy individuals. The effects of hypobaric hypoxia might also provide new insights into the understanding of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:19161909

  4. High altitude cerebral oedema during adventure training on Mount Kenya.

    PubMed

    Raitt, S

    2012-09-01

    The trekking ascent to Point Lenana (4,985m) on Mount Kenya is a popular objective for soldiers on adventurous training in Kenya. The standard route previously taken has been the Naro Moru route which involves an ascent rate far in excess of that recommended to avoid altitude illness. This article describes the case of a British soldier who developed high altitude cerebral oedema during an ascent of Point Lenana via the Naro Moro route. Recommendations to reduce the risk of altitude illness on Mount Kenya include alternative and more gradual routes of ascent. Early symptom recognition and descent are vital to prevent clinical deterioration. PMID:23472574

  5. Can patients with coronary heart disease go to high altitude?

    PubMed

    Dehnert, Christoph; Bärtsch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Tourism to high altitude is very popular and includes elderly people with both manifest and subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD). Thus, risk assessment regarding high altitude exposure of patients with CHD is of increasing interest, and individual recommendations are expected despite the lack of sufficient scientific evidence. The major factor increasing cardiac stress is hypoxia. At rest and for a given external workload, myocardial oxygen demand is increased at altitude, particularly in nonacclimatized individuals, and there is some evidence that blood-flow reserve is reduced in atherosclerotic coronary arteries even in the absence of severe stenosis. Despite a possible imbalance between oxygen demand and oxygen delivery, studies on selected patients have shown that exposure and exercise at altitudes of 3000 to 3500 m is generally safe for patients with stable CHD and sufficient work capacity. During the first days at altitude, patients with stable angina may develop symptoms of myocardial ischemia at slightly lower heart rate x  blood-pressure products. Adverse cardiac events, however, such as unstable angina coronary syndromes, do not occur more frequently compared with sea level except for those who are unaccustomed to exercise. Therefore, training should start before going to altitude, and the altitude-related decrease in exercise capacity should be considered. Travel to 3500 m should be avoided unless patients have stable disease, preserved left ventricular function without residual capacity, and above-normal exercise capacity. CHD patients should avoid travel to elevations above 4500 m owing to severe hypoxia at these altitudes. The risk assessment of CHD patients at altitude should always consider a possible absence of medical support and that cardiovascular events may turn into disaster. PMID:20919884

  6. Convergent Evolution of Rumen Microbiomes in High-Altitude Mammals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Dongming; Wang, Li; Hao, Junjun; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Weiwei; Qiu, Qiang; Huang, Xiaodan; Zhou, Jianwei; Long, Ruijun; Zhao, Fangqing; Shi, Peng

    2016-07-25

    Studies of genetic adaptation, a central focus of evolutionary biology, most often focus on the host's genome and only rarely on its co-evolved microbiome. The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) offers one of the most extreme environments for the survival of human and other mammalian species. Yaks (Bos grunniens) and Tibetan sheep (T-sheep) (Ovis aries) have adaptations for living in this harsh high-altitude environment, where nomadic Tibetan people keep them primarily for food and livelihood [1]. Adaptive evolution affects energy-metabolism-related genes in a way that helps these ruminants live at high altitude [2, 3]. Herein, we report convergent evolution of rumen microbiomes for energy harvesting persistence in two typical high-altitude ruminants, yaks and T-sheep. Both ruminants yield significantly lower levels of methane and higher yields of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) than their low-altitude relatives, cattle (Bos taurus) and ordinary sheep (Ovis aries). Ultra-deep metagenomic sequencing reveals significant enrichment in VFA-yielding pathways of rumen microbial genes in high-altitude ruminants, whereas methanogenesis pathways show enrichment in the cattle metagenome. Analyses of RNA transcriptomes reveal significant upregulation in 36 genes associated with VFA transport and absorption in the ruminal epithelium of high-altitude ruminants. Our study provides novel insights into the contributions of microbiomes to adaptive evolution in mammals and sheds light on the biological control of greenhouse gas emissions from livestock enteric fermentation. PMID:27321997

  7. Effects of high altitude and exercise on marksmanship.

    PubMed

    Tharion, W J; Hoyt, R W; Marlowe, B E; Cymerman, A

    1992-02-01

    The effects of exercise and high altitude (3,700 m to 4,300 m) on marksmanship accuracy and sighting time were quantified in 16 experienced marksmen. Subjects dry-fired a disabled rifle equipped with a laser-based system from a free-standing position. The 2.3-cm circular target was at a distance of 5 m. Marksmanship was assessed under the following conditions: 1) at rest at sea level; 2) immediately after a 21-km run/walk ascent from 1,800 m to 4,300 m elevation; 3) at rest during days 1 to 3 at altitude; 4) at rest during days 14 to 16 at altitude; and 5) immediately after a second ascent after 17 d at altitude. Exercise reduced marksmanship accuracy (p less than 0.05) but did not affect sighting time. Acute altitude exposure reduced marksmanship accuracy, and decreased sighting time (p less than 0.05). However, after residence at altitude, accuracy and sighting time at rest returned to sea level values. Exercise and acute altitude exposure had similar but independent detrimental effects on marksmanship. PMID:1546938

  8. Pulmonary vascular disease in a rabbit a high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Donald; Williams, David; Rios-Datenz, Jaime; Gosney, John

    1990-03-01

    A male weanling rabbit of the New Zealand White strain, born and living at an altitude of 3800 m in La Paz, Bolivia, developed right ventricular hypertrophy. This was found to be associated with growth of vascular smooth muscle cells in the intima of pulmonary arterioles, and contrasted with muscularization of the walls of pulmonary arterioles, without extension into the intima, found in a healthy, high-altitude control rabbit of the same strain. A low-altitude control showed no such muscularization. It is concluded that alveolar hypoxia, acting directly or through an intermediate agent, is a growth factor for vascular smooth muscle cells in pulmonary arterioles. This is the first report of pulmonary vascular disease due to high altitude in rabbits.

  9. The radiation protection problems of high altitude and space flight

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper considers the radiation environment in aircraft at high altitudes and spacecraft in low earth orbit and in deep space and the factors that influence the dose equivalents. Altitude, latitude and solar cycle are the major influences for flights below the radiation belts. In deep space, solar cycle and the occurrence of solar particle events are the factors of influence. The major radiation effects of concern are cancer and infertility in males. In high altitude aircraft the radiation consists mainly of protons and neutrons, with neutrons contributing about half the equivalent dose. The average dose rate at altitudes of transcontinental flights that approach the polar regions are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than on routes at low latitudes. Current estimates of does to air crews suggest they are well within the ICRP (1990) recommended dose limits for radiation workers.

  10. The radiation protection problems of high altitude and space flight

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1993-04-01

    This paper considers the radiation environment in aircraft at high altitudes and spacecraft in low earth orbit and in deep space and the factors that influence the dose equivalents. Altitude, latitude and solar cycle are the major influences for flights below the radiation belts. In deep space, solar cycle and the occurrence of solar particle events are the factors of influence. The major radiation effects of concern are cancer and infertility in males. In high altitude aircraft the radiation consists mainly of protons and neutrons, with neutrons contributing about half the equivalent dose. The average dose rate at altitudes of transcontinental flights that approach the polar regions are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than on routes at low latitudes. Current estimates of does to air crews suggest they are well within the ICRP (1990) recommended dose limits for radiation workers.

  11. Volume Regulation and Renal Function at High Altitude across Gender

    PubMed Central

    Haditsch, Bernd; Roessler, Andreas; Krisper, Peter; Frisch, Herwig; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut G.; Goswami, Nandu

    2015-01-01

    Aims We investigated changes in volume regulating hormones and renal function at high altitudes and across gender. Methodology Included in this study were 28 subjects (n = 20 males; n = 8 females. ages: 19 – 65 yrs), who ascended to a height of 3440m (HA1), on the 3rd day and to 5050m (HA2), on the 14th day. Plasma and urinary creatinine and urinary osmolality as well as plasma levels of plasma renin activity (PRA), Aldosterone, antidiuretic hormone (ADH), and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were measured. The plasma volume loss (PVL) was estimated from plasma density and hematocrit. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was measured based on nocturnal (9 hour) creatinine clearance; this was compared with various methods for estimation of GFR. Results The mean 24-hour urine production increased significantly in both sexes across the expedition. But PVL reached significance only in males. No changes in Na+ in plasma, urine or its fractional excretion were seen at both altitudes. Urinary osmolality decreased upon ascent to the higher altitudes. ADH and PRA decreased significantly at both altitudes in males but only at HA2 in females. However, no changes in aldosterone were seen across the sexes and at different altitudes. ANP increased significantly only in males during the expedition. GFR, derived from 9-h creatinine clearance (CreaCl), decreased in both sexes at HA1 but remained stable at HA2. Conventional Crea[p]-based GFR estimates (eGFR) showed only poor correlation to CreaCl. Conclusions We report details of changes in hormonal patterns across high altitude sojourn. To our knowledge we are not aware of any study that has examined these hormones in same subjects and across gender during high altitude sojourn. Our results also suggest that depending on the estimation formula used, eGFR underestimated the observed decrease in renal function measured by CreaCl, thus opening the debate regarding the use of estimated glomerular filtration rates at high altitudes. PMID

  12. SHARP: Subsonic High Altitude Research Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, Todd; Burton, Craig; Cabatan, Aileen; Hermano, Christine; Jones, Tom; Lee, Susan; Radloff, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. Mission one is a polar mission that ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n.mi. at 100,000 ft with a 2500 lb payload. The second mission is also a polar mission, with an altitude of 70,000 ft and an increased payload of 4000 lbs. For the third mission, the aircraft will takeoff at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft carrying a 2500 lb payload, and land at Puerto Montt, Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to take off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft with a 1000 lb payload, make an excursion to 120,000 ft, and land at Howard AFB, Panama. Three missions require that a subsonic Mach number be maintained due to constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. The aircraft need not be manned for all four missions. Three aircraft configurations have been determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements. In the event that a requirement cannot be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  13. Wilderness medicine at high altitude: recent developments in the field.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neeraj M; Hussain, Sidra; Cooke, Mark; O'Hara, John P; Mellor, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Travel to high altitude is increasingly popular. With this comes an increased incidence of high-altitude illness and therefore an increased need to improve our strategies to prevent and accurately diagnose these. In this review, we provide a summary of recent advances of relevance to practitioners who may be advising travelers to altitude. Although the Lake Louise Score is now widely used as a diagnostic tool for acute mountain sickness (AMS), increasing evidence questions the validity of doing so, and of considering AMS as a single condition. Biomarkers, such as brain natriuretic peptide, are likely correlating with pulmonary artery systolic pressure, thus potential markers of the development of altitude illness. Established drug treatments include acetazolamide, nifedipine, and dexamethasone. Drugs with a potential to reduce the risk of developing AMS include nitrate supplements, propagators of nitric oxide, and supplemental iron. The role of exercise in the development of altitude illness remains hotly debated, and it appears that the intensity of exercise is more important than the exercise itself. Finally, despite copious studies demonstrating the value of preacclimatization in reducing the risk of altitude illness and improving performance, an optimal protocol to preacclimatize an individual remains elusive. PMID:26445563

  14. Wilderness medicine at high altitude: recent developments in the field

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neeraj M; Hussain, Sidra; Cooke, Mark; O’Hara, John P; Mellor, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Travel to high altitude is increasingly popular. With this comes an increased incidence of high-altitude illness and therefore an increased need to improve our strategies to prevent and accurately diagnose these. In this review, we provide a summary of recent advances of relevance to practitioners who may be advising travelers to altitude. Although the Lake Louise Score is now widely used as a diagnostic tool for acute mountain sickness (AMS), increasing evidence questions the validity of doing so, and of considering AMS as a single condition. Biomarkers, such as brain natriuretic peptide, are likely correlating with pulmonary artery systolic pressure, thus potential markers of the development of altitude illness. Established drug treatments include acetazolamide, nifedipine, and dexamethasone. Drugs with a potential to reduce the risk of developing AMS include nitrate supplements, propagators of nitric oxide, and supplemental iron. The role of exercise in the development of altitude illness remains hotly debated, and it appears that the intensity of exercise is more important than the exercise itself. Finally, despite copious studies demonstrating the value of preacclimatization in reducing the risk of altitude illness and improving performance, an optimal protocol to preacclimatize an individual remains elusive. PMID:26445563

  15. Long-Term Exposure to High Altitude Affects Conflict Control in the Conflict-Resolving Stage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianhui; Wang, Baoxi; Guo, Shichun; Luo, Ping; Han, Buxin

    2015-01-01

    The neurocognitive basis of the effect of long-term high altitude exposure on conflict control is unclear. Event related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in a flanker task to investigate the influence of high altitude on conflict control in the high-altitude group (who had lived at high altitude for three years but were born at low altitude) and the low-altitude group (living in low altitude only). Although altitude effect was not significant at the behavioral level, ERPs showed cognitive conflict modulation. The interaction between group and trial type was significant: P3 amplitude was greater in the low-altitude group than in the high-altitude group in the incongruent trial. This result suggests that long-term exposure to high altitude affects conflict control in the conflict-resolving stage, and that attentional resources are decreased to resist the conflict control in the high-altitude group. PMID:26671280

  16. Periodic Breathing and Behavioral Awakenings at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Shogilev, Daniel J.; Tanner, John B.; Chang, Yuchiao; Harris, N. Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To study the relationship between nocturnal periodic breathing episodes and behavioral awakenings at high altitude. Methods. Observational study. It is 6-day ascent of 4 healthy subjects from Besisahar (760 meters) to Manang (3540 meters) in Nepal in March 2012. A recording pulse oximeter was worn by each subject to measure their oxygen saturation and the presence of periodic breathing continuously through the night. An actigraph was simultaneously worn in order to determine nocturnal behavioral awakenings. There were no interventions. Results. 187-hour sleep at high altitude was analyzed, and of this, 145 hours (78%) had at least one PB event. At high altitude, 10.5% (95% CI 6.5–14.6%) of total sleep time was spent in PB while 15 out of 50 awakenings (30%, 95% CI: 18–45%) occurring at high altitudes were associated with PB (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our data reveals a higher than expected number of behavioral awakenings associated with PB compared to what would be expected by chance. This suggests that PB likely plays a role in behavioral awakenings at high altitude. PMID:26483979

  17. Dilated hearts at high altitude: words from on high.

    PubMed

    Lankford, Harvey V; Swenson, Erik R

    2014-12-01

    From the time of the turn of the twentieth century, dilated hearts and presumed cardiac fatigue in expeditionary climbers and scientists have been the subject of much commentary in the medical and mountaineering literature. Although largely attributed by most, but not all, to left heart strain, the description of dilated hearts in these accounts is clearly that of right heart dilation as a consequence of high and sustained hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction with hypertensive remodeling. This essay will feature quotations from the writings of high altitude pioneers about dilated, strained, or enlarged hearts. It will give some brief physiology of the right side of the heart as background, but will focus on the words of mountaineers and mountaineering physicians as color commentary. PMID:25369424

  18. AltitudeOmics: Resetting of Cerebrovascular CO2 Reactivity Following Acclimatization to High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jui-Lin; Subudhi, Andrew W.; Duffin, James; Lovering, Andrew T.; Roach, Robert C.; Kayser, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported enhanced cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity upon ascent to high altitude using linear models. However, there is evidence that this response may be sigmoidal in nature. Moreover, it was speculated that these changes at high altitude are mediated by alterations in acid-base buffering. Accordingly, we reanalyzed previously published data to assess middle cerebral blood flow velocity (MCAv) responses to modified rebreathing at sea level (SL), upon ascent (ALT1) and following 16 days of acclimatization (ALT16) to 5260 m in 21 lowlanders. Using sigmoid curve fitting of the MCAv responses to CO2, we found the amplitude (95 vs. 129%, SL vs. ALT1, 95% confidence intervals (CI) [77, 112], [111, 145], respectively, P = 0.024) and the slope of the sigmoid response (4.5 vs. 7.5%/mmHg, SL vs. ALT1, 95% CIs [3.1, 5.9], [6.0, 9.0], respectively, P = 0.026) to be enhanced at ALT1, which persisted with acclimatization at ALT16 (amplitude: 177, 95% CI [139, 215], P < 0.001; slope: 10.3%/mmHg, 95% CI [8.2, 12.5], P = 0.003) compared to SL. Meanwhile, the sigmoidal response midpoint was unchanged at ALT1 (SL: 36.5 mmHg; ALT1: 35.4 mmHg, 95% CIs [34.0, 39.0], [33.1, 37.7], respectively, P = 0.982), while it was reduced by ~7 mmHg at ALT16 (28.6 mmHg, 95% CI [26.4, 30.8], P = 0.001 vs. SL), indicating leftward shift of the cerebrovascular CO2 response to a lower arterial partial pressure of CO2 (PaCO2) following acclimatization to altitude. Sigmoid fitting revealed a leftward shift in the midpoint of the cerebrovascular response curve which could not be observed with linear fitting. These findings demonstrate that there is resetting of the cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity operating point to a lower PaCO2 following acclimatization to high altitude. This cerebrovascular resetting is likely the result of an altered acid-base buffer status resulting from prolonged exposure to the severe hypocapnia associated with ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude. PMID:26779030

  19. Physiological adaptation of the cardiovascular system to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Naeije, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Altitude exposure is associated with major changes in cardiovascular function. The initial cardiovascular response to altitude is characterized by an increase in cardiac output with tachycardia, no change in stroke volume, whereas blood pressure may temporarily be slightly increased. After a few days of acclimatization, cardiac output returns to normal, but heart rate remains increased, so that stroke volume is decreased. Pulmonary artery pressure increases without change in pulmonary artery wedge pressure. This pattern is essentially unchanged with prolonged or lifelong altitude sojourns. Ventricular function is maintained, with initially increased, then preserved or slightly depressed indices of systolic function, and an altered diastolic filling pattern. Filling pressures of the heart remain unchanged. Exercise in acute as well as in chronic high-altitude exposure is associated with a brisk increase in pulmonary artery pressure. The relationships between workload, cardiac output, and oxygen uptake are preserved in all circumstances, but there is a decrease in maximal oxygen consumption, which is accompanied by a decrease in maximal cardiac output. The decrease in maximal cardiac output is minimal in acute hypoxia but becomes more pronounced with acclimatization. This is not explained by hypovolemia, acid-bases status, increased viscosity on polycythemia, autonomic nervous system changes, or depressed systolic function. Maximal oxygen uptake at high altitudes has been modeled to be determined by the matching of convective and diffusional oxygen transport systems at a lower maximal cardiac output. However, there has been recent suggestion that 10% to 25% of the loss in aerobic exercise capacity at high altitudes can be restored by specific pulmonary vasodilating interventions. Whether this is explained by an improved maximum flow output by an unloaded right ventricle remains to be confirmed. Altitude exposure carries no identified risk of myocardial ischemia in

  20. A high-altitude station-keeping astronomical platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert A.

    2006-06-01

    Several commercial telecommunication ventures together with a well funded US military program make it a likely possibility that an autonomous, high-altitude, light-than-air (LTA) vehicle which could maneuver and station-keep for weeks to many months will be a reality in a few years. Here I outline how this technology could be used to develop a high-altitude astronomical observing platform which could return high-resolution optical data rivaling those from space-based platforms but at a fraction of the cost.

  1. Microcomputer-controlled high-altitude data aquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-05-01

    A new microcomputer controlled high altitude data acquisition system was developed. The system provides a new technique for data acquisition from China's astronomical, meteorological and other high altitude experiments and opens up new territory in microcomputer applications. This microcomputer controlled high altitude data acquisition system is made up of a Z80 single board computer, 10 K memory expansion board, and keyboard and display board which can collect 16 analog signals simultaneously, and through analog/digital conversion can convert external analog signals into digital signals then encode them in a certain form through program modulation and store them on audio cassette. The data is immediately retrieved from the tape and sent to the surface microcomputer system for data processing and analysis.

  2. High-Altitude, Long-Endurance Airships for Coastal Surveillance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolce, James L.; Collozza, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    A high altitude solar powered airship provides the ability to carry large payloads to high altitudes and remain on station for extended periods of time. This study examines applications and background of this type of concept vehicle, reviews the history of high altitude flight and provides a point design analysis. The capabilities and limitations of the airship are demonstrated and possible solutions are proposed. Factors such as time of year, latitude, wind speeds, and payload are considered in establishing the capabilities of the airship. East and west coast operation is evaluated. The key aspect to success of this type of airship is the design and operation of the propulsion and power system. A preliminary propulsion/power system design was produced based on a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system and solar photovoltaic array for energy production. Results on power system requirements for year long operation is presented.

  3. The physiology and biomechanics of avian flight at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, Douglas L; Dudley, Robert

    2006-02-01

    Many birds fly at high altitude, either during long-distance flights or by virtue of residence in high-elevation habitats. Among the many environmental features that vary systematically with altitude, five have significant consequences for avian flight performance: ambient wind speeds, air temperature, humidity, oxygen availability, and air density. During migratory flights, birds select flight altitudes that minimize energy expenditure via selection of advantageous tail- and cross-winds. Oxygen partial pressure decreases substantially to as little as 26% of sea-level values for the highest altitudes at which birds migrate, whereas many taxa reside above 3000 meters in hypoxic air. Birds exhibit numerous adaptations in pulmonary, cardiovascular, and muscular systems to alleviate such hypoxia. The systematic decrease in air density with altitude can lead to a benefit for forward flight through reduced drag but imposes an increased aerodynamic demand for hovering by degrading lift production and simultaneously elevating the induced power requirements of flight. This effect has been well-studied in the hovering flight of hummingbirds, which occur throughout high-elevation habitats in the western hemisphere. Phylogenetically controlled studies have shown that hummingbirds compensate morphologically for such hypodense air through relative increases in wing size, and kinematically via increased stroke amplitude during the wingbeat. Such compensatory mechanisms result in fairly constant power requirements for hovering at different elevations, but decrease the margin of excess power available for other flight behaviors. PMID:21672723

  4. A young mountaineer surviving sudden cardiac arrest at high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Indermuehle, Andreas; Cook, Stéphan; Marty, Hans

    2010-01-01

    A young mountaineer suffered from sudden cardiac arrest at high altitude. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated immediately. After 30 min a rescue team arrived and successfully defibrillated ventricular fibrillation upon which spontaneous circulation returned. The subsequent ECG was suggestive of extensive anterior myocardial infarction. Therefore, the patient was thrombolysed and transferred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Echocardiography revealed severely reduced left ventricular function with antero-septo-apical akinesia. However, angiography showed unobstructed coronary arteries. The patient fully recovered and left ventricular function normalised within 2 weeks. It may be speculated that exposure to high altitude resulted in acute coronary thrombosis which dissolved by rapid thrombolysis. PMID:22778291

  5. [Medical certification for high altitude travel and scuba diving].

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, Timothée; Dos Santos Bragança, Angel; Ziltener, Jean-Luc; Berney, Jean-Yves; Lanier, Cédric

    2014-09-24

    People are more and more looking for adventures and discovery of unusual locations. Journeys to high altitude and scuba diving are part of these activities and their access has become easier for a lot of people not necessarily experienced with their dangers. The general practitioner will have to be able to deliver some advices and recommendations to his patients about the risks related to these activities and their ability to practice them. He will also have to deliver some certificates of medical fitness to dive. This paper proposes a brief review of the most important medical aspects to know about high altitude and scuba diving. PMID:25369697

  6. Archaic inheritance: supporting high-altitude life in Tibet.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Sánchez, Emilia; Casey, Fergal P

    2015-11-15

    The Tibetan Plateau, often called the roof of the world, sits at an average altitude exceeding 4,500 m. Because of its extreme altitude, the Plateau is one of the harshest human-inhabited environments in the world. This, however, did not impede human colonization, and the Tibetan people have made the Tibetan Plateau their home for many generations. Many studies have quantified their markedly different physiological response to altitude and proposed that Tibetans were genetically adapted. Recently, advances in sequencing technologies led to the discovery of a set of candidate genes which harbor mutations that are likely beneficial at high altitudes in Tibetans. Since then, other studies have further characterized this impressive adaptation. Here, in this minireview, we discuss the progress made since the discovery of the genes involved in Tibetans' adaptation to high altitude with a particular emphasis on describing the series of studies that led us to conclude that archaic human DNA likely contributed to this impressive adaptation. PMID:26294746

  7. Octane number requirements of vehicles at high altitude

    SciTech Connect

    Callison, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Past tests of vehicles show that their octane number requirements decrease with altitude. As a result, gasoline marketers sell lower-octane-number(ON) gasoline in the mountain states and other high-altitude areas. The current ASTM specifications, which allow reduction of gasoline octane of 1.0 to 1.5 ON per thousand feet, are based on CRC test programs run on 1967 to 1972 model vehicles. However, many new vehicles are now equipped with sophisticated electronic engine systems for control of emissions and improvement of performance and fuel economy at all altitudes. Because these new systems could minimize the altitude effect on octane requirement, Amoco Oil tested twelve 1984-1986 model cars and light trucks. The authors found their ON requirements were reduced on average about 0.2 ON per thousand feet on an (R+M)/2 basis (RMON/1,000 feet). The authors expect octane demand on gasoline suppliers in high-altitude areas to increase as these new cars make up a larger part of the vehicle population, and this could raise the cost of gasoline.

  8. Effect of phosphate supplementation on oxygen delivery at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. C.; Singh, M. V.; Rawal, S. B.; Sharma, V. M.; Divekar, H. M.; Tyagi, A. K.; Panwar, M. R.; Swamy, Y. V.

    1987-09-01

    In the present communication, effect of low doses of phosphate supplementation on short-term high altitude adaptation has been examined. Studies were carried out in 36 healthy, male, sea-level residents divided in a double blind fashion into drug and placebo treated groups. 3.2 mmol of phosphate were given orally to each subject of the drug treated group once a day for 4 days on arrival at an altitude of 3,500 m. Sequential studies were done in the subjects in both groups on the 3rd, 7th, 14th and 21st day of their altitude stay. Haemoglobin, haematocrit, erythrocyte and reticulocyte counts increased to the similar extent in both groups. Blood pH, pO2 and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) did not differ between the two groups. On 3rd day of the altitude stay, inorganic phosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3 DPG) levels in the drug treated group increased significantly as compared to the placebo group. No significant difference in inorganic phosphate and 2,3 DPG was observed later on in the two groups. Psychological and clinical tests also indicated that the drug treated subjects felt better as compared to the placebo treated subjects. The present study suggests that low doses of phosphate increases circulating 2,3-DPG concentration which in turn brings about beneficial effect towards short term high altitude adaptation.

  9. Admixture facilitates genetic adaptations to high altitude in Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Choongwon; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Basnyat, Buddha; Neupane, Maniraj; Witonsky, David B.; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Beall, Cynthia M.; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Admixture is recognized as a widespread feature of human populations, renewing interest in the possibility that genetic exchange can facilitate adaptations to new environments. Studies of Tibetans revealed candidates for high-altitude adaptations in the EGLN1 and EPAS1 genes, associated with lower hemoglobin concentration. However, the history of these variants or that of Tibetans remains poorly understood. Here, we analyze genotype data for the Nepalese Sherpa, and find that Tibetans are a mixture of ancestral populations related to the Sherpa and Han Chinese. EGLN1 and EPAS1 genes show a striking enrichment of high-altitude ancestry in the Tibetan genome, indicating that migrants from low altitude acquired adaptive alleles from the highlanders. Accordingly, the Sherpa and Tibetans share adaptive hemoglobin traits. This admixture-mediated adaptation shares important features with adaptive introgression. Therefore, we identify a novel mechanism, beyond selection on new mutations or on standing variation, through which populations can adapt to local environments. PMID:24513612

  10. Hyperuricemia, hypertension, and proteinuria associated with high-altitude polycythemia.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, J Ashley; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Kelly, Jackeline Pando; Swenson, Erik R; Wener, Mark H; Burnier, Michel; Maillard, Marc; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Hurtado, Abdias; Johnson, Richard J

    2002-06-01

    Chronic exposure to high altitude is associated with the development of erythrocytosis, proteinuria, and, in some cases, hyperuricemia. We examined the relationship between high-altitude polycythemia and proteinuria and hyperuricemia in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude, 4,300 m). We studied 25 adult men with hematocrits less than 65% and 27 subjects with excessive erythrocytosis (EE; hematocrit > 65%) living in Cerro de Pasco, Peru and compared them with 28 control subjects living in Lima, Peru (at sea level) and after 48 hours of exposure to high altitude. Serum urate levels were significantly elevated in patients with EE at altitude, and gout occurred in 4 of 27 of these subjects. Urate level strongly correlated with hematocrit (r = 0.71; P < 0.0001). Urate production (24-hour urine urate excretion and urine urate-creatinine ratio) was increased in this group compared with those at sea level. Fractional urate excretion was not increased, and fractional lithium excretion was reduced, in keeping with increased proximal reabsorption of filtrate. Significantly higher blood pressures and decreased renin levels in the EE group were in keeping with increased proximal sodium reabsorption. Serum urate levels correlated with mean blood pressure (r = 0.50; P < 0.0001). Significant proteinuria was more prevalent in the EE group despite normal renal function. Hyperuricemia is common in subjects living at high altitude and associated with EE, hypertension, and proteinuria. The increase in uric acid levels appears to be caused by increased urate generation secondary to systemic hypoxia, although a relative impairment in renal excretion also may contribute. PMID:12046023

  11. Enhanced temperature variability in high-altitude climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Atsumu

    2012-12-01

    In the present article, monthly mean temperature at 56 stations assembled in 18 regional groups in 10 major mountain ranges of the world were investigated. The periods of the analysis covered the last 50 to 110 years. The author found that the variability of temperature in climatic time scale tends to increase with altitude in about 65 % of the regional groups. A smaller number of groups, 20 %, showed the fastest change at an intermediate altitude between the peaks (or ridges) and their foot, while the remaining small number of sites, 15 %, showed the largest trends at the foot of mountains. This tendency provides a useful base for considering and planning the climate impact evaluations. The reason for the amplification of temperature variation at high altitudes is traced back to the increasing diabatic processes in the mid- and high troposphere as a result of the cloud condensation. This situation results from the fact that the radiation balance at the earth's surface is transformed more efficiently into latent heat of evaporation rather than sensible heat, the ratio between them being 4 to 1. Variation in the surface evaporation is converted into heat upon condensation into cloud particles and ice crystals in the mid- and high troposphere. Therefore, this is the altitude where the result of the surface radiation change is effectively transferred. Further, the low temperature of the environment amplifies the effect of the energy balance variation on the surface temperature, as a result of the functional shape of Stefan-Boltzmann law. These processes altogether contribute to enhancing temperature variability at high altitudes. The altitude play s an important role in determining the temperature variability, besides other important factors such as topography, surface characteristics, cryosphere/temperature feedback and the frequency and intensity of an inversion. These processes have a profound effect not only on the ecosystem but also on glaciers and permafrost.

  12. Infrared astronomy research and high altitude observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, B.; Stein, W. A.; Willner, S. P.; Soifer, B. T.

    1984-01-01

    Highlights are presented of studies of the emission mechanisms in the 4 to 8 micron region of the spectrum using a circular variable filter wheel spectrometer with a PbSnTe photovoltaic detector. Investigations covered include the spectroscopy of planets, stellar atmospheres, highly obscured objects in molecular clouds, planetary nebulae, H2 regions, and extragalactic objects.

  13. A method for sampling microbial aerosols using high altitude balloons.

    PubMed

    Bryan, N C; Stewart, M; Granger, D; Guzik, T G; Christner, B C

    2014-12-01

    Owing to the challenges posed to microbial aerosol sampling at high altitudes, very little is known about the abundance, diversity, and extent of microbial taxa in the Earth-atmosphere system. To directly address this knowledge gap, we designed, constructed, and tested a system that passively samples aerosols during ascent through the atmosphere while tethered to a helium-filled latex sounding balloon. The sampling payload is ~ 2.7 kg and comprised of an electronics box and three sampling chambers (one serving as a procedural control). Each chamber is sealed with retractable doors that can be commanded to open and close at designated altitudes. The payload is deployed together with radio beacons that transmit GPS coordinates (latitude, longitude and altitude) in real time for tracking and recovery. A cut mechanism separates the payload string from the balloon at any desired altitude, returning all equipment safely to the ground on a parachute. When the chambers are opened, aerosol sampling is performed using the Rotorod® collection method (40 rods per chamber), with each rod passing through 0.035 m3 per km of altitude sampled. Based on quality control measurements, the collection of ~ 100 cells rod(-1) provided a 3-sigma confidence level of detection. The payload system described can be mated with any type of balloon platform and provides a tool for characterizing the vertical distribution of microorganisms in the troposphere and stratosphere. PMID:25455021

  14. Adaptation of iron requirement to hypoxic conditions at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Max; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2015-12-15

    Adequate acclimatization time to enable adjustment to hypoxic conditions is one of the most important aspects for mountaineers ascending to high altitude. Accordingly, most reviews emphasize mechanisms that cope with reduced oxygen supply. However, during sojourns to high altitude adjustment to elevated iron demand is equally critical. Thus in this review we focus on the interaction between oxygen and iron homeostasis. We review the role of iron 1) in the oxygen sensing process and erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis, 2) in gene expression control mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-2 (HIF-2), and 3) as an oxygen carrier in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochromes. The blood hormone Epo that is abundantly expressed by the kidney under hypoxic conditions stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, a process requiring high iron levels. To ensure that sufficient iron is provided, Epo-controlled erythroferrone that is expressed in erythroid precursor cells acts in the liver to reduce expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Consequently, suppression of hepcidin allows for elevated iron release from storage organs and enhanced absorption of dietary iron by enterocytes. As recently observed in sojourners at high altitude, however, iron uptake may be hampered by reduced appetite and gastrointestinal bleeding. Reduced iron availability, as observed in a hypoxic mountaineer, enhances hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and may contribute to other hypoxia-related diseases. Overall, adequate systemic iron availability is an important prerequisite to adjust to high-altitude hypoxia and may have additional implications for disease-related hypoxic conditions. PMID:26183475

  15. The Genetic Architecture of Adaptations to High Altitude in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Beall, Cynthia M.; Witonsky, David B.; Gebremedhin, Amha; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Although hypoxia is a major stress on physiological processes, several human populations have survived for millennia at high altitudes, suggesting that they have adapted to hypoxic conditions. This hypothesis was recently corroborated by studies of Tibetan highlanders, which showed that polymorphisms in candidate genes show signatures of natural selection as well as well-replicated association signals for variation in hemoglobin levels. We extended genomic analysis to two Ethiopian ethnic groups: Amhara and Oromo. For each ethnic group, we sampled low and high altitude residents, thus allowing genetic and phenotypic comparisons across altitudes and across ethnic groups. Genome-wide SNP genotype data were collected in these samples by using Illumina arrays. We find that variants associated with hemoglobin variation among Tibetans or other variants at the same loci do not influence the trait in Ethiopians. However, in the Amhara, SNP rs10803083 is associated with hemoglobin levels at genome-wide levels of significance. No significant genotype association was observed for oxygen saturation levels in either ethnic group. Approaches based on allele frequency divergence did not detect outliers in candidate hypoxia genes, but the most differentiated variants between high- and lowlanders have a clear role in pathogen defense. Interestingly, a significant excess of allele frequency divergence was consistently detected for genes involved in cell cycle control and DNA damage and repair, thus pointing to new pathways for high altitude adaptations. Finally, a comparison of CpG methylation levels between high- and lowlanders found several significant signals at individual genes in the Oromo. PMID:23236293

  16. Nonequilibrium viscous flow over Jovian entry probes at high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Szema, K. Y.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    The viscous chemical nonequilibrium flow around a Jovian entry body is investigated at high altitudes using two different methods. First method is only for the stagnation region and integrates the full Navier-Stokes equations from the body surface to the freestream. The second method uses viscous shock layer equations between the body surface and the shock. Due to low Reynolds numbers, both methods use surface slip boundary conditions and the second method also uses shock slip boundary conditions. The results of the two methods are compared at the stagnation point. It is found that the entire shock layer is under chemical nonequilibrium at higher altitudes and that the slip boundary conditions are important at these altitudes.

  17. The GRAD high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichhorn, G.; Coldwell, R. L.; Dunnam, F. E.; Rester, A. C.; Trombka, J. I.; Starr, R.

    1989-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Advanced Detector (GRAD) consists of a n-type germanium detector inside an active bismuth-germanate Compton and charged particle shield with additional active plastic shielding across the aperture. It will be flown on a high-altitude balloon at 36 km altitude at a latitude of 78 deg S over Antarctica for observations of gamma radiation emitted by the radioactive decay of Co-56 in the supernova SN1987A, for assessment of the performance of bismuth-germanate scintillation material in the radiation environment of near space, for gathering information on the gamma-ray background over Antarctica, and for testing fault-tolerant software.

  18. High altitude, prolonged exercise, and the athlete biological passport.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Yorck O; Garvican, Laura A; Christian, Ryan; Lobigs, Louisa M; Qi, Jiliang; Fan, Rongyun; He, Yingying; Wang, Hailing; Gore, Christopher J; Ma, Fuhai

    2015-01-01

    The Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) detects blood doping in athletes through longitudinal monitoring of erythropoietic markers. Mathematical algorithms are used to define individual reference ranges for these markers for each athlete. It is unclear if altitude and exercise can affect the variables included in these calculations in a way that the changes might be mistaken for blood manipulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the simultaneous strenuous exercise and low to high altitude exposure on the calculation algorithms of the ABP. 14 sea level (SL) and 11 altitude native (ALT) highly trained athletes participated in a 14-day cycling stage race taking place at an average altitude of 2496 m above sea level (min. 1014 m, max. 4120 m), race distances ranged between 96 and 227 km per day. ABP blood measures were taken on days -1,3,6,10,14 (SL) and -1,9,15 (ALT) of the race. Four results from three samples of two different SL athletes exceeded the individual limits at the 99% specificity threshold and one value at 99.9%. In ALT, three results from three samples of three different athletes were beyond the individual limits at 99%, one at 99.9%. The variations could be explained by the expected physiological reaction to exercise and altitude. In summary, the abnormalities observed in the haematological ABP´s of well-trained athletes during extensive exercise at altitude are limited and in line with expected physiological changes. PMID:25252093

  19. High Altitude Platform Aircraft at NASA Past, Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelFrate, John H.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's significant accomplishments from the Environment Research and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, the present High Altitude Platform (HAP) needs and opportunities, NASA's Aeronautical focus shift, HAP Non-aeronautics challenges, and current HAP Capabilities.

  20. Can migraine prophylaxis prevent acute mountain sickness at high altitude?

    PubMed

    Kim, M W; Kim, M

    2011-11-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) develops in people trekking at high altitude. The underlying mechanism is vasodilation due to low pressure of oxygen. However, individual susceptibility for AMS is unknown, thus, one cannot predict when or to whom it happens. Because AMS usually begins with headache, and because migraineurs are more vulnerable to AMS, we studied by the literatures review on the mechanism and clinical features in common, and assessed the treatment modalities for both disorders. This led to us the following hypothesis that, migraine prophylaxis may prevent or delay the onset of AMS at high altitude. Clinical features of AMS include nausea or vomiting when it progresses. Hypobaric hypoxia, dehydration or increased physical exertion trigger or aggravate both disorders. In migraine, cerebral vasodilation can happen following alteration of neuronal activity, whereas the AMS is associated with peripheral vessel dilation. Medications that dilate the vessels worsen both conditions. Acute treatment strategies for migraine overlap with to those of AMS, including drugs such as vasoconstrictors, or other analgesics. To prevent AMS, adaptation to high altitude or pharmacological prophylaxis, i.e., acetazolamide has been recommended. This carbonic anhydrase inhibitor lowers serum potassium level, and thus stabilizes membrane excitability. Acetazolamide is also effective on specific forms of migraine. Taken together, these evidences implicate that migraine prophylaxis may prevent or delay the onset of AMS by elevating the threshold for high altitude. PMID:21856088

  1. Chicxulub High-Altitude Ballistic Ejecta from Central Belize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, K. O.; Ocampo, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    Chicxulub ejecta are found in central Belize, 475 km southeast of the impact crater center. These deposits are ballistic ejecta launched along high-altitude trajectories above the atmosphere and deposited as a discontinuous sheet on the terminal Cretaceous land surface.

  2. 40 CFR 600.310-86 - Labeling of high altitude vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Labeling of high altitude vehicles... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Labeling § 600.310-86 Labeling of high altitude vehicles... altitude vehicles according to § 600.306. (b) A high altitude vehicle may be labeled with a general...

  3. 40 CFR 600.310-86 - Labeling of high altitude vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Labeling of high altitude vehicles... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Labeling § 600.310-86 Labeling of high altitude vehicles... altitude vehicles according to § 600.306. (b) A high altitude vehicle may be labeled with a general...

  4. Hemoglobin concentration of high-altitude Tibetans and Bolivian Aymara.

    PubMed

    Beall, C M; Brittenham, G M; Strohl, K P; Blangero, J; Williams-Blangero, S; Goldstein, M C; Decker, M J; Vargas, E; Villena, M; Soria, R; Alarcon, A M; Gonzales, C

    1998-07-01

    Elevated hemoglobin concentrations have been reported for high-altitude sojourners and Andean high-altitude natives since early in the 20th century. Thus, reports that have appeared since the 1970s describing relatively low hemoglobin concentration among Tibetan high-altitude natives were unexpected. These suggested a hypothesis of population differences in hematological response to high-altitude hypoxia. A case of quantitatively different responses to one environmental stress would offer an opportunity to study the broad evolutionary question of the origin of adaptations. However, many factors may confound population comparisons. The present study was designed to test the null hypothesis of no difference in mean hemoglobin concentration of Tibetan and Aymara native residents at 3,800-4,065 meters by using healthy samples that were screened for iron deficiency, abnormal hemoglobins, and thalassemias, recruited and assessed using the same techniques. The hypothesis was rejected, because Tibetan males had a significantly lower mean hemoglobin concentration of 15.6 gm/dl compared with 19.2 gm/dl for Aymara males, and Tibetan females had a mean hemoglobin concentration of 14.2 gm/dl compared with 17.8 gm/dl for Aymara females. The Tibetan hemoglobin distribution closely resembled that from a comparable, sea-level sample from the United States, whereas the Aymara distribution was shifted toward 3-4 gm/dl higher values. Genetic factors accounted for a very high proportion of the phenotypic variance in hemoglobin concentration in both samples (0.86 in the Tibetan sample and 0.87 in the Aymara sample). The presence of significant genetic variance means that there is the potential for natural selection and genetic adaptation of hemoglobin concentration in Tibetan and Aymara high-altitude populations. PMID:9696153

  5. Humans at high altitude: hypoxia and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lorna G.; Charles, Shelton M.; Julian, Colleen G.

    2011-01-01

    High-altitude studies offer insight into the evolutionary processes and physiological mechanisms affecting the early phases of the human lifespan. Chronic hypoxia slows fetal growth and reduces the pregnancy-associated rise in uterine artery (UA) blood flow. Multigenerational vs. shorter-term high-altitude residents are protected from the altitude-associated reductions in UA flow and fetal growth. Presently unknown is whether this fetal-growth protection is due to the greater delivery or metabolism of oxygen, glucose or other substrates or to other considerations such as mechanical factors protecting fragile fetal villi, the creation of a reserve protecting against ischemia/reperfusion injury, or improved placental O2 transfer as the result of narrowing the A-V O2 difference and raising uterine PvO2. Placental growth and development appear to be normal or modified at high altitude in ways likely to benefit diffusion. Much remains to be learned concerning the effects of chronic hypoxia on embryonic development. Further research is required for identifying the fetoplacental and maternal mechanisms responsible for transforming the maternal vasculature and regulating UA blood flow and fetal growth. Genomic as well as epigenetic studies are opening new avenues of investigation that can yield insights into the basic pathways and evolutionary processes involved. PMID:21536153

  6. Respiratory gas exchange of high altitude adapted chick embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wangensteen, O. D.; Rahn, H.; Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    Study of gas exchange by embryos from chickens acclimatized to an altitude of 3800 m. The oxygen partial pressure and carbon dioxide partial pressure differences across the egg shell were measured and found to be less than the values previously reported for sea-level eggs by about a factor of two. Further measurements of embryonic oxygen consumption and shell conductivity to oxygen indicated that, compared to eggs at sea level, oxygen consumption was reduced by a factor of 0.58 while conductivity to oxygen was increased only by a factor of 1.07 in the high-altitude eggs. These independent measurements predict the change in oxygen partial pressure across the egg shell of the high-altitude eggs to be only 0.54 times that of sea-level eggs; the directly measured factor was 0.53. The authors conclude that at high altitude, a major adaptation of the chick embryo is a reduced metabolism which decreases the change in oxygen partial pressure across the egg shell since its gas conductivity remains essentially unchanged.

  7. Common High Altitudes Illnesses a Primer for Healthcare Provider

    PubMed Central

    Mohsenin, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high altitude imposes significant strain on cardiopulmonary system and the brain. As a consequence, sojourners to high altitude frequently experience sleep disturbances, often reporting restless and sleepless nights. At altitudes above 3,000 meters (9,800 ft) almost all healthy subjects develop periodic breathing especially during NREM sleep. Sleep architecture gradually improves with increased NREM and REM sleep despite persistence of periodic breathing. The primary reason for periodic breathing at high altitude is a hypoxic-induced increase in chemoreceptor sensitivity to changes in PaCO2 – both above and below eupnea, leading to periods of apnea and hyperpnea. Acetazolamide improves sleep by reducing the periodic breathing through development of metabolic acidosis and induced hyperventilation decreasing the plant gain and widening the PCO2 reserve. This widening of the PCO2 reserve impedes development of central apneas during sleep. Benzodiazepines and GABA receptor antagonist such as zolpidem improve sleep without affecting breathing pattern or cognitive functions. PMID:27057512

  8. Nutritional aspects of high-altitude exposure in women.

    PubMed

    Hannon, J P; Klain, G J; Sudman, D M; Sullivan, F J

    1976-06-01

    The nutrient intake and urinary excretion characteristics of eight young university women were studied over a 4-day period at low altitude (140 m) and subsequently over a 7-day sojourn on Pikes Peak (4,300 m). High-altitude exposure was associated with a transient decrease in the consumption of protein, carbohydrate, fat, sodium, calcium, phosphorus, vitamin A, riboflavin, thiamin, and niacin and a more sustained decrease in the consumption of potassium and ascorbic acid. In most instances minimal values were observed during the first 3 days of exposure. The carbohydrate fraction of energy intake was increased at the expense of fat during this time period. Individual hypophagic responses appeared to be related to severity of acute mountain sickness. Altitude had no effect on water consumption but did lead to an average body weight loss of 1 kg. Urinary measurements revealed a marked oliguria during the entire sojourn. These measurements also showed the first 3 days to be associated with a net loss of body nitrogen and sodium. During this time period body potassium and phosphorus were conserved, and probably increased. The urea fraction of body potassium and phosphorus were conserved, and probably increased. The urea fraction of total urinary nitrogen was not affected by altitude exposure, nor was the daily excretion of uric acid and creatinine. Ammonia excretion, however, was reduced to 50% of the low-altitude value and remained at this level throughout the sojourn. With a few exceptions, the qualitative characteristics of altitude hypophagia in women were similar to those reported for men. Quantitatively, however, the responses were much more transient in women. PMID:1064332

  9. Martian high-altitude photoelectrons independent of solar zenith angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaosui; Liemohn, Michael; Bougher, Stephen; Mitchell, David

    2016-04-01

    Many aspects of the Martian upper atmosphere are known to vary with solar zenith angle (SZA). One would assume that dayside photoelectron fluxes are also SZA dependent, especially when transport along a semivertical magnetic field line is significant. However, our investigation presented here of the observed Martian high-altitude (˜400 km) photoelectron fluxes by the magnetometer/electron reflectometer (MAG/ER) instruments on board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) shows that the photoelectron fluxes are better correlated with just the solar irradiance, without SZA factored in, and also that the median photoelectron fluxes are independent of SZA, especially for high energies (above 100 eV). For lower energies (below 70 eV), the observed fluxes tend to vary to some degree with SZA. Such counterintuitive results are due to the existence of a photoelectron exobase, only above which the photoelectrons are able to transport and escape to high altitudes. Two methods are used here to determine the altitude range of this exobase, which varies between 145 km and 165 km depending on the atmosphere and SZA. Through our SuperThermal Electron Transport (STET) model, we found that the integral of the production rate above the photoelectron exobase, and therefore the high-altitude photoelectron fluxes, is rather independent of SZA. Such an independent relationship concerns energy redistribution in the Martian upper atmosphere, using photoelectrons to map magnetic topology and connectivity, as well as ion escape. This finding can also be carefully adapted to other solar bodies with semivertical magnetic fields at ionospheric altitudes, such as Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn.

  10. Anthropometric and body composition changes during expeditions at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Zaccagni, Luciana; Barbieri, Davide; Cogo, Annalisa; Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate separately in the two sexes the physical adaptations associated to exposure to high altitude in a sample of 18 nonacclimatized Caucasian subjects (10 males and 8 females, 22-59 years) who participated to scientific expeditions to Himalaya up to the Pyramid Laboratory (5050 m, Nepal) or Everest North Base Camp (5300 m, Tibet). Anthropometric traits (body height and weight, eight girths and six skinfolds) were collected according to standard procedures, before departure at sea level, during ascent (at altitude > 4000 m above sea level), and after return to low altitude. Body composition was assessed by means of the skinfold method. Both sexes lost on average 4.0% of initial body mass, corresponding to 7.6% of fat mass and 3.5% of fat free mass in males, and to 5.0% of fat mass and 3.6% of fat free mass in females. Average fat mass loss was greater in males than in females. Initial fat mass percentage was positively correlated to fat mass loss and negatively to FFM loss in males only, thus at HA leanest subjects lost more FFM and less FM than the fattest ones. Adaptations were faster in males than in females. In conclusion, the present research describes significant adaptations to high altitude, in terms of body weight reduction, regardless of the amount of performed physical activity. PMID:24665979

  11. Project ARES 2: High-altitude battery-powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A high-altitude, battery-powered, propeller-driven aircraft was designed and is being built by undergraduate students at California State University, Northridge. The aircraft will fly at an altitude of 104,000 ft at Mach 0.2 (190 ft/sec) and will be instrumented to record flight performance data, including low Reynolds number propeller and airfoil information. This project will demonstrate the feasibility of electric-powered flight in a low-density, low-temperature Earth environment that models the atmosphere of Mars. Data collected will be used to design a Mars aircraft to investigate the surface of Mars prior to manned missions. The instrumented payload and the mission profile for the high-altitude Earth flight were determined. Detailed aerodynamic and structural analyses were performed. Control, tracking, and data recording subsystems were developed. Materials were obtained and fabrication begun. The aircraft has a 32-ft wing span, a wing area of 105 sq ft, is 17.5 ft long, has a 12-in payload bay, and weighs 42 lb. It is composed primarily of lightweight materials, including Mylar, and composite materials, including graphite/epoxy and aramid core honeycomb sandwich. Low-altitude flight testing to check guidance and control systems and to calibrate data-gathering instruments will take place this summer, followed shortly by the 104,000-ft flight.

  12. Why Are High Altitude Natives So Strong at High Altitude? Nature vs. Nurture: Genetic Factors vs. Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Brutsaert, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Among high-altitude natives there is evidence of a general hypoxia tolerance leading to enhanced performance and/or increased capacity in several important domains. These domains likely include an enhanced physical work capacity, an enhanced reproductive capacity, and an ability to resist several common pathologies of chronic high-altitude exposure. The "strength" of the high-altitude native in this regard may have both a developmental and a genetic basis, although there is better evidence for the former (developmental effects) than for the latter. For example, early-life hypoxia exposure clearly results in lung growth and remodeling leading to an increased O2 diffusing capacity in adulthood. Genetic research has yet to reveal a population genetic basis for enhanced capacity in high-altitude natives, but several traits are clearly under genetic control in Andean and Tibetan populations e.g., resting and exercise arterial O2 saturation (SaO2). This chapter reviews the effects of nature and nurture on traits that are relevant to the process of gas exchange, including pulmonary volumes and diffusion capacity, the maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), the SaO2, and the alveolar-arterial oxygen partial pressure difference (A-aDO2) during exercise. PMID:27343091

  13. An oxygen enrichment device for lowlanders ascending to high altitude

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background When ascending to the high altitude, people living in low altitude areas will suffer from acute mountain sickness. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that whether an oxygen concentration membrane can be made and used to construct a new portable oxygen enrichment device for individuals in acute exposure to the high altitude. Methods The membrane was fabricated using vinylsiloxane rubber, polyphenylene oxide hydrogen silicone polymers, chloroplatinic acid and isopropyl alcohol. The membrane was assembled in a frame and the performance was tested in terms of concentration of oxygen, flow rate of oxygen enriched air, pressure ratio across the membrane and ambient temperature. Furthermore, the oxygen concentration device was constructed using the membrane, a DC fan, vacuum pump and gas buffer. A nonrandomized preliminary field test was conducted, in which eight healthy male subjects were flown to Tibet (Lhasa, 3,700 m). First, subjects wore the oxygen enrichment device and performed an incremental exercise on cycle ergometer. The test included heart rate (HR), saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO2) and physical work capacity (PWC). Then, after a rest period of 4 hours, the experimental protocol was repeated without oxygen enrichment device. Results The testing showed that the membrane could increase the oxygen concentration by up to 30%. Simulation test indicated that although the performance of the oxygen enrichment device decreased with altitudes, the oxygen concentration could still maintain 28% with flow rate of enriched air 110 cm3/s at 5000 m. The field test showed that higher SpO2, lower HR, and better PWC (measured by the PWC-170) were observed from all the subjects using oxygen enrichment device compared with non-using (P < 0.01). Conclusions We concluded that the new portable oxygen enrichment device would be effective in improving exercise performance when ascending to the high altitude. PMID:24103365

  14. Whole-genome sequencing of six dog breeds from continuous altitudes reveals adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Xiao; Wang, Zhen; Li, Ning; Qiu, Feng; Xu, Ze; Yan, Dawei; Yang, Shuli; Jia, Jia; Kong, Xiaoyan; Wei, Zehui; Lu, Shaoxiong; Lian, Linsheng; Wu, Changxin; Wang, Xueyan; Li, Guozhi; Ma, Teng; Jiang, Qiang; Zhao, Xue; Yang, Jiaqiang; Liu, Baohong; Wei, Dongkai; Li, Hong; Yang, Jianfa; Yan, Yulin; Zhao, Guiying; Dong, Xinxing; Li, Mingli; Deng, Weidong; Leng, Jing; Wei, Chaochun; Wang, Chuan; Mao, Huaming; Zhang, Hao; Ding, Guohui; Li, Yixue

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxic environment imposes severe selective pressure on species living at high altitude. To understand the genetic bases of adaptation to high altitude in dogs, we performed whole-genome sequencing of 60 dogs including five breeds living at continuous altitudes along the Tibetan Plateau from 800 to 5100 m as well as one European breed. More than 150× sequencing coverage for each breed provides us with a comprehensive assessment of the genetic polymorphisms of the dogs, including Tibetan Mastiffs. Comparison of the breeds from different altitudes reveals strong signals of population differentiation at the locus of hypoxia-related genes including endothelial Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain protein 1 (EPAS1) and beta hemoglobin cluster. Notably, four novel nonsynonymous mutations specific to high-altitude dogs are identified at EPAS1, one of which occurred at a quite conserved site in the PAS domain. The association testing between EPAS1 genotypes and blood-related phenotypes on additional high-altitude dogs reveals that the homozygous mutation is associated with decreased blood flow resistance, which may help to improve hemorheologic fitness. Interestingly, EPAS1 was also identified as a selective target in Tibetan highlanders, though no amino acid changes were found. Thus, our results not only indicate parallel evolution of humans and dogs in adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia, but also provide a new opportunity to study the role of EPAS1 in the adaptive processes. PMID:24721644

  15. Lockheed ER-2 #806 high altitude research aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 806, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F-118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  16. Lockheed ER-2 high altitude research aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 706, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F-118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  17. Lockheed ER-2 #809 high altitude research aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 809, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  18. Lockheed ER-2 #809 high altitude research aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 809, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F-118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  19. Lockheed ER-2 #806 high altitude research aircraft during landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 806, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F-118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  20. High altitude solar power platform. [aircraft design analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. D.; Bower, M. V.

    1992-01-01

    Solar power is a preeminent alternative to conventional aircraft propulsion. With the continued advances in solar cells, fuel cells, and composite materials technology, the solar powered airplane is no longer a simple curiosity constrained to flights of several feet in altitude or minutes of duration. A high altitude solar powered platform (HASPP) has several potential missions, including communications and agriculture. In remote areas, a HASPP could be used as a communication link. In large farming areas, a HASPP could perform remote sensing of crops. The impact of HASPP in continuous flight for one year on agricultural monitoring mission is presented. This mission provides farmers with near real-time data twice daily from an altitude which allows excellant resolution on water conditions, crop diseases, and insect infestation. Accurate, timely data will enable farmers to increase their yield and efficiency. A design for HASPP for the foregoing mission is presented. In the design power derived from solar cells covering the wings is used for propulsion, avionics, and sensors. Excess power produced midday will be stored in fuel cells for use at night to maintain altitude and course.

  1. High altitude pulmonary edema among “Amarnath Yatris”

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Parvaiz A.; Khan, Umar Hafiz; Hussain, Tajamul; Koul, Ajaz Nabi; Malik, Sajjad; Shah, Sanaullah; Bazaz, Sajjad Rajab; Rashid, Wasim; Jan, Rafi Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Annual pilgrimage (Yatra) to the cave shrine of Shri Amarnath Ji’ is a holy ritual among the Hindu devotees of Lord Shiva. Located in the Himalayan Mountain Range (altitude 13,000 ft) in south Kashmir, the shrine is visited by thousands of devotees and altitude sickness is reportedly common. Materials and Methods: More than 600,000 pilgrims visited the cave shrine in 2011 and 2012 with 239 recorded deaths. Thirty one patients with suspected altitude sickness were referred from medical centers en-route the cave to Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, a tertiary-care center in capital Srinagar (5,000 ft). The clinical features and the response to treatment were recorded. Results: Thirty-one patients (all lowlanders, 19 male; age 18-60 years, median 41) had presented with acute onset breathlessness of 1-4 days (median 1.9 d) starting within 12-24 h of a rapid ascent; accompanied by cough (68%), headache (8%), dizziness and nausea (65%). Sixteen patients had associated encephalopathy. Clinical features on admission included tachypnea (n = 31), tachycardia (n = 23), bilateral chest rales (n = 29), cyanosis (n = 22) and grade 2-4 encephalopathy. Hypoxemia was demonstrable in 24 cases and bilateral infiltrates on radiologic imaging in 29. Ten patients had evidence of high-altitude cerebral edema. All patients were managed with oxygen, steroids, nifedipine, sildenafil and other supportive measures including invasive ventilation (n = 3). Three patients died due to multiorgan dysfunction. Conclusions: Altitude sickness is common among Amaranath Yatris from the plains and appropriate educational strategies should be invoked for prevention and prompt treatment. PMID:24049253

  2. The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W.; Buttenschoen, A.; Farr, Q.; Hodgson, C.; Mann, I. R.; Mazzino, L.; Rae, J.; University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Team

    2011-12-01

    The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon (UA-HAB) program is a one and half year program sponsored by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) that offers hands on experience for undergraduate and graduate students in the design, build, test and flight of an experimental payload on a high altitude balloon platform. Utilising low cost weather balloon platforms, and through utilisation of the CSA David Florida Laboratory for thermal-vacuum tests , in advance of the final flight of the payload on a NASA high altitude balloon platform. Collectively the program provided unique opportunities for students to experience mission phases which parallel those of a space satellite mission. The program has facilitated several weather balloon missions, which additionally provide educational opportunities for university students and staff, as well as outreach opportunities among junior and senior high school students. Weather balloon missions provide a cheap and quick alternative to suborbital missions; they can be used to test components for more expensive missions, as well as to host student based projects from different disciplines such as Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS), Physics, and Engineering. In addition to extensive skills development, the program aims to promote recruitment of graduate and undergraduate students into careers in space science and engineering. Results from the UA-HAB program and the flight of the UA-HAB shielded Gieger counter payload for cosmic ray and space radiation studies will be presented. Lessons learned from developing and maintaining a weather balloon program will also be discussed. This project is undertaken in partnership with the High Altitude Student Platform, organized by Louisiana State University and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSpace), and sponsored by NASA, with the financial support of the Canadian Space Agency.

  3. NEW HORIZONS FOR THE NATIONAL HIGH-ALTITUDE PHOTOGRAPHY PROGRAM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bermel, Peter F.

    1983-01-01

    The National High-Altitude Photography Program (NHAP) is a multi-Federal agency activity to acquire uniform imagery for the establishment of a national high-altitude photographic data base. Since the inception of NHAP in 1980, black-and-white and color infrared stereoscopic imagery has been acquired for about 50% of the 3,000,000 square miles in the conterminous United States. An additional 40% of the 48-State area is under contract to private aerial survey firms, and the sixth and final contract to achieve complete once-over coverage will be awarded early in 1985. Extensive use has been made of the newly established data base. The participating agencies have begun studies to define the requirements for a maintenance program which would provide cyclic coverage of the conterminous United States and imagery for specific agency needs.

  4. Cerebral venous infarction during a high altitude expedition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S; Chng, S M; Singh, R

    2009-08-01

    Bilateral venous infarction of the brain due to thrombosis of the deep cerebral venous system is relatively rare, accounting for approximately 3-8 percent of all cases of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). Known risk factors include the use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, puerperium, malignancy and thrombophilic states. CVT, in the setting of acute mountain sickness (AMS), has rarely been reported. We present an unusual occurrence of bilateral deep subcortical venous infarction in a previously-well, 39-year-old woman, who developed AMS during a high altitude expedition in Nepal. The possible mechanisms responsible for this unfortunate event include dehydration with resultant relative polycythaemia and raised intracranial pressure at high altitudes. CVT should be considered in mountain climbers presenting with progressive neurological deterioration that is not solely attributable to AMS. PMID:19710966

  5. THe high altitude reconnaissance platform (HARP) and its capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rusk, D.; Rose, R.L.; Gibeau, E.

    1996-10-01

    The High Altitude Reconnaissance Platform (HARP), a Learjet 36A, is a multi-purpose, long-range, high-altitude aircraft specially modified to serve as a meteorological observation platform. Its instrument suite includes: particle probes, Ka-band radar, two-color lidar, infrared spectroradiometer, thermometer, hygrometer, liquid water probe, and a gust probe. Aeromet scientists have developed software and hardware systems that combine data using sensor fusion concepts, providing detailed environmental information. The HARP answers the need for defining and predicting meteorological conditions throughout large atmospheric volumes particularly in areas where conventional surface and upper-air observations are not available. It also fills the need for gathering and predicting meteorological conditions along an optical sensor`s line of sight or a missile`s reentry path. 6 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Coca: High Altitude Remedy of the Ancient Incas.

    PubMed

    Biondich, Amy Sue; Joslin, Jeremy D

    2015-12-01

    The use of coca leaf for medicinal purposes is a centuries-old tradition of the native peoples of South America. Coca products are thought by many laypersons to provide risk-free benefits to users participating in strenuous activities at high altitude. Physiologic studies of coca have increased understanding of its possible mechanism of action as well as its potential impact on high altitude activities. This present work explores the role of coca throughout the history of the Andean peoples and explores whether this ancient remedy has a place in modern medicine. A focused summary of research articles with particular relevance to the field of wilderness medicine is also included to better provide the reader with lessons not only from history but also from another culture. PMID:26507611

  7. Population variation revealed high-altitude adaptation of Tibetan mastiffs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wu, Dong-Dong; Boyko, Adam R; Wang, Guo-Dong; Wu, Shi-Fang; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-05-01

    With the assistance of their human companions, dogs have dispersed into new environments during the expansion of human civilization. Tibetan Mastiff (TM), a native of the Tibetan Plateau, was derived from the domesticated Chinese native dog and, like Tibetans, has adapted to the extreme environment of high altitude. Here, we genotyped genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 32 TMs and compared them with SNPs from 20 Chinese native dogs and 14 gray wolves (Canis lupus). We identified 16 genes with signals of positive selection in the TM, with 12 of these candidate genes associated with functions that have roles in adaptation to high-altitude adaptation, such as EPAS1, SIRT7, PLXNA4, and MAFG that have roles in responses to hypoxia. This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of the TM and potential mechanisms for adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:24520091

  8. Initial Feasibility Assessment of a High Altitude Long Endurance Airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony; Dolce, James (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A high altitude solar powered airship provides the ability to carry large payloads to high altitudes and remain on station for extended periods of time. This study examines the feasibility of this concept. Factors such as time of year, latitude, wind speeds and payload are considered in establishing the capabilities of a given size airship. East and West coast operation were evaluated. The key aspect to success of this type of airship is the design and operation of the propulsion and power system. A preliminary propulsion/power system design was produced based on a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system and solar photovoltaic array for energy production. A modular system design was chosen with four independent power/propulsion units utilized by the airship. Results on payload capacity and flight envelope (latitude and time of year) were produced for a range of airship sizes.

  9. Nike Black Brant V high altitude dynamic instability characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montag, W. H.; Walker, L. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Flight experience on the Nike Black Brant V has demonstrated the existence of plume induced flow separation over the fins and aft body of the Black Brant V motor. Modelling of the forces associated with this phenomenon as well as analysis of the resultant vehicle coning motion and its effect on the velocity vector heading are presented. A summary of Nike Black Brant V flight experience with high altitude dynamic instability is included.

  10. Performance testing of the high altitude observatory PDS microdensitometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, A.; Munro, R.; Friend, D.

    1984-01-01

    High Altitude Observatory HAO microdensitometer undergoes monthly testing to assure its consistent performance. These tests check positional and photometric stability at the 10 micron aperture level. The HAO test procedure is designed to run without operator intervention following initial configuration of the microdensitometer for each subprocedure. Specialized test software is resident in the PDP 8. The operator selects the proper subprocedure by entering commands. Once computer control is established, it is not relinquished until the test is complete.

  11. High altitude impairs in vivo immunity in humans.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Samuel J; Macdonald, Jamie H; Harper Smith, Adam D; Lawley, Justin S; Gallagher, Carla A; Di Felice, Umberto; Walsh, Neil P

    2013-06-01

    The aim was to assess the effect of high altitude on the development of new immune memory (induction) using a contact sensitization model of in vivo immunity. We hypothesized that high-altitude exposure would impair induction of the in vivo immune response to a novel antigen, diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP). DPCP was applied (sensitization) to the lower back of 27 rested controls at sea level and to ten rested mountaineers 28 hours after passive ascent to 3777 m. After sensitization, mountaineers avoided strenuous exercise for a further 24 hours, after which they completed alpine activities for 11-18 days. Exactly 4 weeks after sensitization, the strength of immune memory induction was quantified in rested mountaineers and controls at sea level, by measuring the response to a low, dose-series DPCP challenge, read at 48 hours as skin measures of edema (skinfold thickness) and redness (erythema). Compared with control responses, skinfold thickness and erythema were reduced in the mountaineers (skinfold thickness,-52%, p=0.01, d=0.86; erythema, -36%, p=0.02, d=0.77). These changes in skinfold thickness and erythema were related to arterial oxygen saturation (r=0.7, p=0.04), but not cortisol (r<0.1, p>0.79), at sensitization. In conclusion, this is the first study to show, using a contact sensitization model of in vivo immunity, that high altitude exposure impairs the development of new immunity in humans. PMID:23795734

  12. Key issues of ultraviolet radiation of OH at high altitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhuai; Wan, Tian; Jiang, Jianzheng; Fan, Jing

    2014-12-09

    Ultraviolet (UV) emissions radiated by hydroxyl (OH) is one of the fundamental elements in the prediction of radiation signature of high-altitude and high-speed vehicle. In this work, the OH A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}→X{sup 2}Π ultraviolet emission band behind the bow shock is computed under the experimental condition of the second bow-shock ultraviolet flight (BSUV-2). Four related key issues are discussed, namely, the source of hydrogen element in the high-altitude atmosphere, the formation mechanism of OH species, efficient computational algorithm of trace species in rarefied flows, and accurate calculation of OH emission spectra. Firstly, by analyzing the typical atmospheric model, the vertical distributions of the number densities of different species containing hydrogen element are given. According to the different dominating species containing hydrogen element, the atmosphere is divided into three zones, and the formation mechanism of OH species is analyzed in the different zones. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method and the Navier-Stokes equations are employed to compute the number densities of the different OH electronically and vibrationally excited states. Different to the previous work, the trace species separation (TSS) algorithm is applied twice in order to accurately calculate the densities of OH species and its excited states. Using a non-equilibrium radiation model, the OH ultraviolet emission spectra and intensity at different altitudes are computed, and good agreement is obtained with the flight measured data.

  13. A High Altitude-Low Reynolds Number Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Don; Krake, Keith; Hamory, Phil; Drela, Mark; Lee, Seunghee (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A sailplane is currently being developed at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center to support a high altitude flight experiment. The purpose of the experiment is to measure the performance characteristics of an airfoil at altitudes between 100,000 and 70,000 feet at Mach numbers between 0.65 and 0.5. The airfoil lift and drag are measured from pilot and static pressures. The location of the separation bubble and vortex shedding are measured from a hot film strip. The details of the flight experiment are presented. A comparison of several estimates of the airfoil performance is also presented. The airfoil, APEX-16, was designed by Drela (MIT) with his MSES code. A two dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis has been performed by Tatineni and Zhong (UCLA) and another at the Dryden Flight Research Center. The role these analysis served to define the experiment is discussed.

  14. Paleoindian settlement of the high-altitude Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Rademaker, Kurt; Hodgins, Gregory; Moore, Katherine; Zarrillo, Sonia; Miller, Christopher; Bromley, Gordon R M; Leach, Peter; Reid, David A; Álvarez, Willy Yépez; Sandweiss, Daniel H

    2014-10-24

    Study of human adaptation to extreme environments is important for understanding our cultural and genetic capacity for survival. The Pucuncho Basin in the southern Peruvian Andes contains the highest-altitude Pleistocene archaeological sites yet identified in the world, about 900 meters above confidently dated contemporary sites. The Pucuncho workshop site [4355 meters above sea level (masl)] includes two fishtail projectile points, which date to about 12.8 to 11.5 thousand years ago (ka). Cuncaicha rock shelter (4480 masl) has a robust, well-preserved, and well-dated occupation sequence spanning the past 12.4 thousand years (ky), with 21 dates older than 11.5 ka. Our results demonstrate that despite cold temperatures and low-oxygen conditions, hunter-gatherers colonized extreme high-altitude Andean environments in the Terminal Pleistocene, within about 2 ky of the initial entry of humans to South America. PMID:25342802

  15. Applications of a high-altitude powered platform /HAPP/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhner, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    The high-altitude powered platform (HAPP) is a conceptual unmanned vehicle which could be either an airship or airplane. It would keep station at an altitude of 70,000 ft above a fixed point on the ground. A microwave power transmission system would beam energy from the ground up to the HAPP to power an electric motor-driven propeller and the payload. A study of the HAPP has shown that it could potentially be a cost-competitive platform for such remote sensing applications as forest fire detection, Great Lakes ice monitoring and Coast Guard law enforcement. It also has significant potential as a communications relay platform for (among other things) direct broadcast to home TVs over a large region.

  16. Aerodynamic performance of osculating-cones waveriders at high altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Rick Evan

    The steady-state aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional waverider configurations immersed in hypersonic rarefied flows are investigated. Representative geometries are generated using an inverse design procedure, the method of osculating cones, which defines an exit plane shock shape and approximates the flow properties of the compression surface by assuming that each spanwise station along the shock profile lies within a region of locally conical flow. Vehicle surface and flow field properties are predicted using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, a probabilistic numerical scheme in which simulated molecules are followed through representative collisions with each other and solid surfaces, and subsequent deterministic displacement. The aerodynamic properties of high- and low-Reynolds number waverider geometries, optimized for maximum lift-to-drag ratio and subject to mission-oriented constraints, are contrasted with results from reference caret and delta wings with similar internal volumes to quantify the relevance and advantage of the waverider concept at high altitudes. The high-Reynolds number waverider, optimized for the continuum regime at Minfinity = 4 and Reinfinity = 250 million, was the focus of recent wind tunnel testing for near on-design and off-design conditions, including low subsonic speeds. The present work extends the previous analyses into the high-altitude regime. The low-Reynolds number waverider, optimized at Minfinity = 20 and Reinfinity = 2.5 million, is studied to determine if optimization potential exists for a high-Mach number waverider at high altitudes. A characteristic length of 5 m is assumed for both waverider configurations, representative of a hypersonic missile concept. The geometries are aerodynamically evaluated over a parametric space consisting of an altitude variation of 95 km to 150 km and an angle of attack range of --5° to 10°. The effect of off-design Mach number on the performance of the high

  17. Impaired osmoregulation at high altitude. Studies on Mt Everest.

    PubMed

    Blume, F D; Boyer, S J; Braverman, L E; Cohen, A; Dirkse, J; Mordes, J P

    1984-07-27

    Osmoregulation was studied in 13 mountaineers who had experienced long-term exposure to high altitude on Mt Everest. Serum osmolality rose from 290 +/- 1 mOsm/kg to 295 +/- 2 mOsm/kg at 5,400 m and finally to 302 +/- 4 mOsm/kg at 6,300 m after a mean of 26.5 days above 5,400 m. Despite this degree of osmoconcentration, plasma arginine-vasopressin concentration remained unchanged: 1.1 +/-0.1 microU/mL at sea level, 0.8 +/- 0.1 microU/mL at 5,400 m, and 0.9 +/- 0.1 microU/mL at 6,300 m. Urinary vasopressin excretion was also similar at all three altitudes. We conclude that prolonged exposure to high altitude may result in persistent impairment of osmoregulation, caused in part by an inappropriate arginine-vasopressin response to hyperosmolality. PMID:6429358

  18. High altitude Venus' upper haze from SOIR onboard Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Seiko; Mahieux, Arnaud; Wilquet, Valérie; Robert, Séverine; Drummond, Rachel; Carine Vandaele, Ann; Iwagami, Naomoto

    2015-04-01

    The Venus cloud consists of a main cloud deck at 47 - 70 km, with thinner hazes above and below. The upper haze on Venus lies above the main cloud surrounding the planet, ranging from the top of the cloud (70 km) up to as high as 90 km. The Solar Occultation in the InfraRed (SOIR) onboard Venus Express is designed to measure the atmospheric transmission at high altitudes (65 - 165 km) in the infrared (IR, 2.2 - 4.3 µm) with high spectral resolution by solar occultation. We investigated haze optical properties of Venus at above 90 km by analyzing SOIR spectral data. Vertical and latitudinal profiles of haze extinction, optical thickness, and mixing ratio were retrieved. These profiles exhibit the following characteristics. It shows that haze is present at altitude above 90 km although it has been recognized that the top of haze layer is 90 km. Extinctions vary order of magnitude every occultation. Extinctions are appeared to be independent of wavelength. This makes it clear that haze particles are sufficiently-small in size in comparison with observation wavelength. We find that haze extinction and optical thickness at low latitude are two times thicker than those at high latitude. One of the notable results is that mixing ratio of haze increases at above 90 km at both high and low latitudes. It's the first time that haze is speculated to be produced at high altitude. In this paper, haze transport and increase processes will be discussed to explain the results from SOIR observation.

  19. Atmospheric Sampling of Aerosols to Stratospheric Altitudes using High Altitude Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerde, E. A.; Thomas, E.

    2010-12-01

    Although carbon dioxide represents a long-lived atmospheric component relevant to global climate change, it is also understood that many additional contributors influence the overall climate of Earth. Among these, short-lived components are more difficult to incorporate into models due to uncertainties in the abundances of these both spatially and temporally. Possibly the most significant of these short-lived components falls under the heading of “black carbon” (BC). There are numerous overlapping definitions of BC, but it is basically carbonaceous in nature and light absorbing. Due to its potential as a climate forcer, an understanding of the BC population in the atmosphere is critical for modeling of radiative forcing. Prior measurements of atmospheric BC generally consist of airplane- and ground-based sampling, typically below 5000 m and restricted in time and space. Given that BC has a residence time on the order of days, short-term variability is easily missed. Further, since the radiative forcing is a result of BC distributed through the entire atmospheric column, aircraft sampling is by definition incomplete. We are in the process of planning a more comprehensive sampling of the atmosphere for BC using high-altitude balloons. Balloon-borne sampling is a highly reliable means to sample air through the entire troposphere and into the lower stratosphere. Our system will incorporate a balloon and a flight train of two modules. One module will house an atmospheric sampler. This sampler will be single-stage (samples all particle sizes together), and will place particles directly on an SEM sample stub for analysis. The nozzle depositing the sample will be offset from the center of the stub, placing the aerosol particles toward the edge. At various altitudes, the stub will be rotated 45 degrees, providing 6-8 sample “cuts” of particle populations through the atmospheric column. The flights will reach approximately 27 km altitude, above which the balloons

  20. Human nutrition in cold and high terrestrial altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, K. K.; Kumar, Ratan

    1992-03-01

    The calorie and nutritional requirements for a man working in an alien hostile environment of cold regions and high altitude are described and compared to those of normal requirements. Carbohydrates, fats and vitamins fulfilling the caloric and nutritional requirements are generally available in adequate amounts except under conditions of appetite loss. However, the proteins and amino acids should be provided in such a way as to meet the altered behavioral and metabolic requirements. Work in extreme cold requires fulfilling enhanced calorie needs. In high mountainous regions, cold combined with hypoxia produced loss of appetite and necessitated designing of special foods.

  1. High Altitude Venus Operations Concept Trajectory Design, Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugo, Rafael A.; Ozoroski, Thomas A.; Van Norman, John W.; Arney, Dale C.; Dec, John A.; Jones, Christopher A.; Zumwalt, Carlie H.

    2015-01-01

    A trajectory design and analysis that describes aerocapture, entry, descent, and inflation of manned and unmanned High Altitude Venus Operation Concept (HAVOC) lighter-than-air missions is presented. Mission motivation, concept of operations, and notional entry vehicle designs are presented. The initial trajectory design space is analyzed and discussed before investigating specific trajectories that are deemed representative of a feasible Venus mission. Under the project assumptions, while the high-mass crewed mission will require further research into aerodynamic decelerator technology, it was determined that the unmanned robotic mission is feasible using current technology.

  2. High altitude smoke in the NASA GISS GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, Robert; Luo, M.; Fromm, M.; Voulgarakis, A.; Mangeon, S.; Worden, J.

    2015-01-01

    High altitude smoke-plumes from large, explosive fires were discovered in the late 1990sThey can now be observed with unprecedented detail from space-borne instruments with high vertical resolution in the UTLS such as CALIOP, MLS and ACE. These events inject large quantities of pollutants into a relatively clean and dry environment They serve as unique natural experiments with which to understand, using chemical transport and composition-climate models, the chemical and radiative impacts of long-lived biomass burning emissions. We are currently studying the Black Saturday bushfires in Australia during February 2009

  3. Stratochip, a dual balloon high-altitude platform: controlled altitude flight experiments and potential applications in geosciences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlet, Christian; Vanbrabant, Yves

    2014-05-01

    A high-altitude dual balloons system, the 'Stratochip', was designed at the Geological Survey of Belgium to serve as a development platform to carry measurement and earth observation equipments, in altitudes comprised between 1000 and 25000m. These working altitudes far exceed the range of current motor powered unmanned aerial vehicules, with a higher weight carrying capacity (up to 10-15kg). This platform is built around a two helium balloons configuration, than can be released one by one at a target altitude or location, allowing a partially controlled drift of the platform. Using a 'nowcasting' meteorological model, updated by flight telemetry, the predicted path can be refined live to follow and retrieve the equipment in a predicted landing area. All subsystems (balloon cut-off devices, flight controller, telemetry system) have been developed in-house. Three independent communication channels, designed to work at extremely low temperature (up to -60° C) ensure a continuous tracking until landing. A calibrated parachute is used to control the safe descent of the equipment. Several flight tests have been performed in Belgium to control the meteorological model accuracy for wind predictions (model based on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data). Those tests demonstrated the capability of the platform to maintain its altitude in a predicted path, allowing using the platform for new types of atmospheric studies and affordable high-altitude remote-sensing applications (i.e. sub-meter resolution stereo imagery).

  4. Long-Term Exposure to High Altitude Affects Response Inhibition in the Conflict-monitoring Stage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hailin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jianhui; Luo, Ping; Han, Buxin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of high-altitude exposure on response inhibition, event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3 were measured in Go/NoGo task. The participants included an ‘immigrant’ high-altitude group (who had lived at high altitude for three years but born at low altitude) and a low-altitude group (living in low altitude only). Although the behavioural data showed no significant differences between the two groups, a delayed latency of NoGo-N2 was found in the high-altitude group compared to the low-altitude group. Moreover, larger N2 and smaller P3 amplitudes were found in the high-altitude group compared to the low-altitude group, for both the Go and NoGo conditions. These findings suggest that high-altitude exposure affects response inhibition with regard to processing speed during the conflict monitoring stage. In addition, high altitude generally increases the neural activity in the matching step of information processing and attentional resources. These results may provide some insights into the neurocognitive basis of the effects on high-altitude exposure on response inhibition. PMID:26324166

  5. An Undergraduate-Built Prototype Altitude Determination System (PADS) for High Altitude Research Balloons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verner, E.; Bruhweiler, F. C.; Abot, J.; Casarotto, V.; Dichoso, J.; Doody, E.; Esteves, F.; Morsch Filho, E.; Gonteski, D.; Lamos, M.; Leo, A.; Mulder, N.; Matubara, F.; Schramm, P.; Silva, R.; Quisberth, J.; Uritsky, G.; Kogut, A.; Lowe, L.; Mirel, P.; Lazear, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this project a multi-disciplinary undergraduate team from CUA, comprising majors in Physics, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Biology, design, build, test, fly, and analyze the data from a prototype attitude determination system (PADS). The goal of the experiment is to determine if an inexpensive attitude determination system could be built for high altitude research balloons using MEMS gyros. PADS is a NASA funded project, built by students with the cooperation of CUA faculty, Verner, Bruhweiler, and Abot, along with the contributed expertise of researchers and engineers at NASA/GSFC, Kogut, Lowe, Mirel, and Lazear. The project was initiated through a course taught in CUA's School of Engineering, which was followed by a devoted effort by students during the summer of 2014. The project is an experiment to use 18 MEMS gyros, similar to those used in many smartphones, to produce an averaged positional error signal that could be compared with the motion of the fixed optical system as recorded through a string of optical images of stellar fields to be stored on a hard drive flown with the experiment. The optical system, camera microprocessor, and hard drive are enclosed in a pressure vessel, which maintains approximately atmospheric pressure throughout the balloon flight. The experiment uses multiple microprocessors to control the camera exposures, record gyro data, and provide thermal control. CUA students also participated in NASA-led design reviews. Four students traveled to NASA's Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine, Texas to integrate PADS into a large balloon gondola containing other experiments, before being shipped, then launched in mid-August at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. The payload is to fly at a float altitude of 40-45,000 m, and the flight last approximately 15 hours. The payload is to return to earth by parachute and the retrieved data are to be analyzed by CUA undergraduates. A description of the instrument is presented

  6. Increased Cardiometabolic Risk and Worsening Hypoxemia at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Miele, Catherine H; Schwartz, Alan R; Gilman, Robert H; Pham, Luu; Wise, Robert A; Davila-Roman, Victor G; Jun, Jonathan C; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Miranda, J Jaime; Leon-Velarde, Fabiola; Checkley, William

    2016-06-01

    Miele, Catherine H., Alan R. Schwartz, Robert H. Gilman, Luu Pham, Robert A. Wise, Victor G. Davila-Roman, Jonathan C. Jun, Vsevolod Y. Polotsky, J. Jaime Miranda, Fabiola Leon-Velarde, and William Checkley. Increased cardiometabolic risk and worsening hypoxemia at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:93-100, 2016.-Metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, diabetes, and dyslipidemia are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. While excessive erythrocytosis is associated with cardiovascular complications, it is unclear how worsening hypoxemia of any degree affects cardiometabolic risk factors in high-altitude populations. We studied the relationship between daytime resting oxyhemoglobin saturation and cardiometabolic risk factors in adult participants living in Puno, Peru (3825 m above sea level). We used multivariable logistic regression models to study the relationship between having a lower oxyhemoglobin saturation and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Nine hundred and fifty-four participants (mean age 55 years, 52% male) had information available on pulse oximetry and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Average oxyhemoglobin saturation was 90% (interquartile range 88%-92%) and 43 (4.5%) had excessive erythrocytosis. Older age, decreased height-adjusted lung function, and higher body mass index (BMI) were associated with having an oxyhemoglobin saturation ≤85%. When adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic status, having excessive erythrocytosis, and site, we found that each 5% decrease in oxyhemoglobin saturation was associated with a higher adjusted odds of metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.07-1.72, p < 0.04), insulin resistance as defined by homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) >2 mass units (OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.00-1.67, p < 0.05), hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5% (OR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.09-2.51, p < 0.04), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) ≥3 mg/L (OR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.09-1.96, p

  7. Plasma density increase in the high altitude polar cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanoya, Yugo; Abe, Takumi; Mukai, Toshifumi

    In general situation, the electron density in the ionosphere decreases with altitude. As for the latitudinal variation, the electron density is generally smaller in the polar cap than in the midor low-latitude region. Few reliable measurements have been made to estimate thermal electron density and temperature with a simple instrument such as Langmuir probe in the highaltitude polar cap region. For example, only the limited amount of the electron temperature and density data are available for the high-altitude (> 3000 km) polar cap, where the density is generally less than 2.0*103 [/cm3 ]. Since the plasma density significantly correlates with the solar activity, thermal plasma density becomes smaller for the minimum solar activity period. Thermal Electron energy Distribution (TED) instrument onboard "AKEBONO" (EXOS-D) satellite has been operated in two modes; 1) DC mode to obtain the probe characteristic, 2) SH (second harmonic) mode to estimate the electron energy distribution function based on Druyvesteyn method, from which the electron temperature and density can be estimated even on the condition of low electron density. On the basis of statistical study of the Akebono observation for over 10 years, it is found that the electron number density occasionally increases up to 3.0-4.0*103 [/cm3 ] above altitude of 3000 km. While the electron temperature is believed to be about 8000 K at such a high altitude, the temperature inside the high density region is observed to be lower than that by several thousand degrees. It is noticeable that such a density enhancement occurs during the geomagnetically active period at solar maximum. The high density region is observed to exist not in whole but in part of the polar cap. In addition, it is obvious from the Suprathermal Mass Spectrometer (SMS) observations that the H+ velocity parallel to the upward field aligned direction is observed to be lower in the high density region than the surrounding region. Also, it is

  8. Compositae Plants Differed in Leaf Cuticular Waxes between High and Low Altitudes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Na; Gao, Jianhua; He, Yuji; Guo, Yanjun

    2016-06-01

    We sampled eight Compositae species at high altitude (3482 m) and seven species at low altitude (220 m), analyzed the chemical compositions and contents of leaf cuticular wax, and calculated the values of average chain length (ACL), carbon preference index (CPI), dispersion (d), dispersion/weighted mean chain length (d/N), and C31 /(C31  + C29 ) (Norm31). The amounts of total wax and compositions were significantly higher at high altitude than at low altitude, except for primary alcohol, secondary alcohol, and ketone. The main n-alkanes in most samples were C31 , C29 , and C33 . Low altitude had more C31 and C33 , whereas more C29 occurred at high altitude. The ACL, CPI, d, d/N, and Norma 31 were higher at low altitude than at high altitude. The fatty acid and primary alcohol at low altitude contained more C26 homologous than at high altitude. More short-chain primary alcohols were observed at high altitude. At low altitude, the primary alcohol gave on average the largest amount, while it was n-alkane at high altitude. These results indicated that the variations of leaf cuticular waxes benefited Compositae plants to adapt to various environmental stresses and enlarge their distribution. PMID:27133399

  9. Lightweight Liquid Helium Dewar for High-Altitude Balloon Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan; James, Bryan; Fixsen, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical observations at millimeter wavelengths require large (2-to-5- meter diameter) telescopes carried to altitudes above 35 km by scientific research balloons. The scientific performance is greatly enhanced if the telescope is cooled to temperatures below 10 K with no emissive windows between the telescope and the sky. Standard liquid helium bucket dewars can contain a suitable telescope for telescope diameter less than two meters. However, the mass of a dewar large enough to hold a 3-to-5-meter diameter telescope would exceed the balloon lift capacity. The solution is to separate the functions of cryogen storage and in-flight thermal isolation, utilizing the unique physical conditions at balloon altitudes. Conventional dewars are launched cold: the vacuum walls necessary for thermal isolation must also withstand the pressure gradient at sea level and are correspondingly thick and heavy. The pressure at 40 km is less than 0.3% of sea level: a dewar designed for use only at 40 km can use ultra thin walls to achieve significant reductions in mass. This innovation concerns new construction and operational techniques to produce a lightweight liquid helium bucket dewar. The dewar is intended for use on high-altitude balloon payloads. The mass is low enough to allow a large (3-to-5-meter) diameter dewar to fly at altitudes above 35 km on conventional scientific research balloons without exceeding the lift capability of the balloon. The lightweight dewar has thin (250- micron) stainless steel walls. The walls are too thin to support the pressure gradient at sea level: the dewar launches warm with the vacuum space vented continuously during ascent to eliminate any pressure gradient across the walls. A commercial 500-liter storage dewar maintains a reservoir of liquid helium within a minimal (hence low mass) volume. Once a 40-km altitude is reached, the valve venting the vacuum space of the bucket dewar is closed to seal the vacuum space. A vacuum pump then

  10. the APL Balloonborne High Altitude Research Platform (HARP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Arnold, S.; Bernasconi, P.

    2015-09-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) has developed and demonstrated a multi-purpose stratospheric balloonborne gondola known as the High Altitude Research Platform (HARP). HARP provides the power, mechanical supports, thermal control, and data transmission for multiple forms of high-altitude scientific research equipment. The platform has been used for astronomy, cosmology and heliophysics experiments but can also be applied to atmospheric studies, space weather and other forms of high altitude research. HARP has executed five missions. The first was Flare Genesis from Antarctica in 1993 and the most recent was the Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science (BOPPS) from New Mexico in 2014. HARP will next be used to perform again the Stratospheric Terahertz Observatory mission, a mission that it first performed in 2009. The structure, composed of an aluminum framework is designed for easy transport and field assembly while providing ready access to the payload and supporting avionics. A light-weighted structure, capable of supporting Ultra-Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flights that can last more than 100 days is available. Scientific research payloads as heavy as 600 kg (1322 pounds) and requiring up to 800 Watts electrical power can be supported. The platform comprises all subsystems required to support and operate the science payload, including both line-of-sight (LOS) and over-the-horizon (0TH) telecommunications, the latter provided by Iridium Pilot. Electrical power is produced by solar panels for multi-day missions and batteries for single-day missions. The avionics design is primarily single-string; however, use of ruggedized industrial components provides high reliability. The avionics features a Command and Control (C&C) computer and a Pointing Control System (PCS) computer housed within a common unpressurized unit. The avionics operates from ground pressure to 2 Torr and over a temperature range from —30 C to +85 C

  11. Benefits Assessment of Algorithmically Combining Generic High Altitude Airspace Sectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloem, Michael; Gupta, Pramod; Lai, Chok Fung; Kopardekar, Parimal

    2009-01-01

    In today's air traffic control operations, sectors that have traffic demand below capacity are combined so that fewer controller teams are required to manage air traffic. Controllers in current operations are certified to control a group of six to eight sectors, known as an area of specialization. Sector combinations are restricted to occur within areas of specialization. Since there are few sector combination possibilities in each area of specialization, human supervisors can effectively make sector combination decisions. In the future, automation and procedures will allow any appropriately trained controller to control any of a large set of generic sectors. The primary benefit of this will be increased controller staffing flexibility. Generic sectors will also allow more options for combining sectors, making sector combination decisions difficult for human supervisors. A sector-combining algorithm can assist supervisors as they make generic sector combination decisions. A heuristic algorithm for combining under-utilized air space sectors to conserve air traffic control resources has been described and analyzed. Analysis of the algorithm and comparisons with operational sector combinations indicate that this algorithm could more efficiently utilize air traffic control resources than current sector combinations. This paper investigates the benefits of using the sector-combining algorithm proposed in previous research to combine high altitude generic airspace sectors. Simulations are conducted in which all the high altitude sectors in a center are allowed to combine, as will be possible in generic high altitude airspace. Furthermore, the algorithm is adjusted to use a version of the simplified dynamic density (SDD) workload metric that has been modified to account for workload reductions due to automatic handoffs and Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B). This modified metric is referred to here as future simplified dynamic density (FSDD). Finally

  12. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2013-09-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI passbands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high-resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (˜1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. We also conclude that the variable TW Horologii and the blue straggler candidate HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km s-1.

  13. Mössbauer studies of hemoglobin in high altitude polycythemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiufang, Zhang; Linming, Shen; Songsen, Chen; Yuanyuan, Liu; Naifei, Gao; Yuanming, Zheng; Zhaohui, Ao; Liangquan, Shong

    1990-07-01

    The Mössbauer spectra have been measured in erythrocytes from normal adults and the patients with high altitude polycythemia (HAPC). The results indicated that two subspectra “a” and “b”, corresponding to oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin respectively, were present in all blood samples, and a third subspectrum “c” was found to exist in almost all samples from the patients. The parameters of the third subspectra “cl” in most samples from the patients were similar to those of carbon monoxyhemoglobin. The components were considered to be the denatured hemoglobin in RBCs (red blood cells). Together with clinical analysis, a possible mechanism of HAPC has been discussed.

  14. Pregnancy and Beyond Part II: Temperature Extremes and High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Borkenhagen, Rainer H.

    1988-01-01

    Over the last 35 years, transport technology has created new environmental frontiers in which family physicians are, and will continue to be, involved both in research and in administering patient care. Some frontiers address basic physiological problems that cross over into others. In a series of four articles, the author describes six of these frontiers with specific emphasis on pregnancy, from hyperbarism (undersea physiology) to microgravity (space physiology), and the problems, and linkages where evident. This second article explores the effects of temperature extremes and high altitude on the well-being of pregnant women. PMID:21253103

  15. Sun sensing guidance system for high altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A sun sensing guidance system for high altitude aircraft is described. The system is characterized by a disk shaped body mounted for rotation aboard the aircraft in exposed relation to solar radiation. The system also has a plurality of mutually isolated chambers; each chamber being characterized by an opening having a photosensor disposed therein and arranged in facing relation with the opening for receiving incident solar radiation and responsively providing a voltage output. Photosensors are connected in paired relation through a bridge circuit for providing heading error signals in response to detected imbalances in intensities of solar radiation.

  16. Human Behaviour and Development under High-Altitude Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virues-Ortega, Javier; Garrido, Eduardo; Javierre, Casimiro; Kloezeman, Karen C.

    2006-01-01

    Although we are far from a universally accepted pattern of impaired function at altitude, there is evidence indicating motor, perceptual, memory and behavioural deficits in adults. Even relatively low altitudes (2500 m) may delay reaction time, and impair motor function. Extreme altitude exposure (greater than 5000 m) may result in more pronounced…

  17. Wide distribution and altitude correlation of an archaic high-altitude-adaptive EPAS1 haplotype in the Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Hackinger, Sophie; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Xue, Yali; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Asan; van Driem, George; Jobling, Mark A; de Knijff, Peter; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Ayub, Qasim

    2016-04-01

    High-altitude adaptation in Tibetans is influenced by introgression of a 32.7-kb haplotype from the Denisovans, an extinct branch of archaic humans, lying within the endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1), and has also been reported in Sherpa. We genotyped 19 variants in this genomic region in 1507 Eurasian individuals, including 1188 from Bhutan and Nepal residing at altitudes between 86 and 4550 m above sea level. Derived alleles for five SNPs characterizing the core Denisovan haplotype (AGGAA) were present at high frequency not only in Tibetans and Sherpa, but also among many populations from the Himalayas, showing a significant correlation with altitude (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.75, p value 3.9 × 10(-11)). Seven East- and South-Asian 1000 Genomes Project individuals shared the Denisovan haplotype extending beyond the 32-kb region, enabling us to refine the haplotype structure and identify a candidate regulatory variant (rs370299814) that might be interacting in an additive manner with the derived G allele of rs150877473, the variant previously associated with high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. Denisovan-derived alleles were also observed at frequencies of 3-14% in the 1000 Genomes Project African samples. The closest African haplotype is, however, separated from the Asian high-altitude haplotype by 22 mutations whereas only three mutations, including rs150877473, separate the Asians from the Denisovan, consistent with distant shared ancestry for African and Asian haplotypes and Denisovan adaptive introgression. PMID:26883865

  18. High altitude adaptation in Daghestani populations from the Caucasus.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Luca; Ayub, Qasim; MacArthur, Daniel G; Xue, Yali; Baillie, J Kenneth; Chen, Yuan; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Turner, Daniel J; Tofanelli, Sergio; Bulayeva, Kazima; Kidd, Kenneth; Paoli, Giorgio; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2012-03-01

    We have surveyed 15 high-altitude adaptation candidate genes for signals of positive selection in North Caucasian highlanders using targeted re-sequencing. A total of 49 unrelated Daghestani from three ethnic groups (Avars, Kubachians, and Laks) living in ancient villages located at around 2,000 m above sea level were chosen as the study population. Caucasian (Adygei living at sea level, N = 20) and CEU (CEPH Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe; N = 20) were used as controls. Candidate genes were compared with 20 putatively neutral control regions resequenced in the same individuals. The regions of interest were amplified by long-PCR, pooled according to individual, indexed by adding an eight-nucleotide tag, and sequenced using the Illumina GAII platform. 1,066 SNPs were called using false discovery and false negative thresholds of ~6%. The neutral regions provided an empirical null distribution to compare with the candidate genes for signals of selection. Two genes stood out. In Laks, a non-synonymous variant within HIF1A already known to be associated with improvement in oxygen metabolism was rediscovered, and in Kubachians a cluster of 13 SNPs located in a conserved intronic region within EGLN1 showing high population differentiation was found. These variants illustrate both the common pathways of adaptation to high altitude in different populations and features specific to the Daghestani populations, showing how even a mildly hypoxic environment can lead to genetic adaptation. PMID:21904933

  19. Efforts toward achieving an unmanned, high-altitude LTA platform

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, Masahiko; Ford, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The modern demands for an unmanned aerospace platform, capable of long-duration stationkeeping at high-altitudes, are well-known. Satellites, balloons, and aircraft have traditionally served in the role of platform, facilitating tasks ranging from telecommunications to deep-space astronomy. However, limitations on the performance and flexibility of these systems, as well as the intrinsically high-cost of satellite construction, operation, and repair, warrants development of a supplemental technology for the platform. Much has been written in the literature on the possible advantages of a lighter-than-air (LTA) platform, if such an LTA could be constructed. Potential applications include remote sensing, environmental monitoring, mobile communications, space and polar observations, cargo delivery, military reconnaissance, and others. At present, conventional LTA`s are not capable of serving in the manner specified. Within this context, a research program known as HALROP (High Altitude Long Range Observational Platform) is currently underway. The goal is to create a stratospheric platform, possibly in the form of a next generation LTA vehicle. The authors present a qualitative review of their efforts, focusing on milestones in the HALROP Program. 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Studies on organ weights in naproxen treated rats after intermittent exposure to simulated high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, R. C.; Biswas, H. M.

    1990-06-01

    Rats were exposed intermittently for 8h per day over 6 days at simulated high altitude of 20 000 feet. One group of altitude-exposed animals was treated with naproxen, a prostaglandin inhibiting drug. Significant reduction in body weight gain was observed in both altitude-exposed and drug-treated altitude-exposed animals compared to the control group. Right and left ventricular weights and weights of the adrenal glands were increased significantly in altitude-exposed and altitude-exposed drug-treated animals. The weight of the spleen was increased significantly in altitude-exposed animals whereas no such increase of splenic weight was observed in drug-treated altitude-exposed group of animals. On the other hand, the weight of the liver was decreased significantly in both cases. In drug-treated altitude-exposed animals, the unaltered splenic weight was thought to be due to inhibition of the erythropoietic activity.

  1. Work capacity of permanent residents of high altitude.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Claudio; Marzorati, Mauro; Cerretelli, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Tibetan and Andean natives at altitude have allegedly a greater work capacity and stand fatigue better than acclimatized lowlanders. The principal aim of the present review is to establish whether convincing experimental evidence supports this belief and, should this be the case, to analyze the possible underlying mechanisms. The superior work capacity of high altitude natives is not based on differences in maximum aerobic power (V(O2 peak)), mL kg(-1)min(-1)). In fact, average V (O2 peak) of both Tibetan and Andean natives at altitude is only slightly, although not significantly, higher than that of Asian or Caucasian lowlanders resident for more than 1 yr between 3400 and 4700 m (Tibetans, n = 152, vs. Chinese Hans, n = 116: 42.4 +/- 3.4 vs. 39.2 +/- 2.6 mL kg(-1)min(-1), mean +/- SE; Andeans, n = 116, vs. Caucasians, n = 70: 47.1 +/- 1.7 vs. 41.6 +/- 1.2 mL kg(-1)min(-1)). However, compared to acclimatized lowlanders, Tibetans appear to be characterized by a better economy of cycling, walking, and running on a treadmill. This is possibly due to metabolic adaptations, such as increased muscle myoglobin content and antioxidant defense. All together, the latter changes may enhance the efficiency of the muscle oxidative metabolic machinery, thereby supporting a better prolonged submaximal performance capacity compared to lowlanders, despite equal V(O2 peak). With regard to Andeans, data on exercise efficiency is scanty and controversial and, at present, no conclusion can be drawn as to the origin of their superior performance. PMID:16764524

  2. Elevated suicide rates at high altitude: sociodemographic and health issues may be to blame.

    PubMed

    Betz, Marian E; Valley, Morgan A; Lowenstein, Steven R; Hedegaard, Holly; Thomas, Deborah; Stallones, Lorann; Honigman, Benjamin

    2011-10-01

    Suicide rates are higher at high altitudes; some hypothesize that hypoxia is the cause. We examined 8,871 suicides recorded in 2006 in 15 states by the National Violent Death Reporting System, with the victim's home county altitude determined from the National Elevation Dataset through FIPS code matching. We grouped cases by altitude (low<1000m; middle=1000-1999m; high≥2000m). Of reported suicides, 5% were at high and 83% at low altitude, but unadjusted suicide rates per 100,000 population were higher at high (17.7) than at low (5.7) altitude. High and low altitude victims differed with respect to race, ethnicity, rural residence, intoxication, depressed mood preceding the suicide, firearm use and recent financial, job, legal, or interpersonal problems. Even after multivariate adjustment, there were significant differences in personal, mental health, and suicide characteristics among altitude groups. Compared to low altitude victims, high altitude victims had higher odds of having family or friends report of a depressed mood preceding the suicide (OR 1.78; 95%CI:1.46-2.17) and having a crisis within 2weeks before death (OR 2.00; 95%CI:1.63-1.46). Suicide victims at high and low altitudes differ significantly by multiple demographic, psychiatric, and suicide characteristics; these factors, rather than hypoxia or altitude itself, may explain increased suicide rates at high altitude. PMID:21883411

  3. The sleep of elite athletes at sea level and high altitude: a comparison of sea-level natives and high-altitude natives (ISA3600)

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Gregory D; Schmidt, Walter F; Aughey, Robert J; Bourdon, Pitre C; Soria, Rudy; Claros, Jesus C Jimenez; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Buchheit, Martin; Simpson, Ben M; Hammond, Kristal; Kley, Marlen; Wachsmuth, Nadine; Gore, Christopher J; Sargent, Charli

    2013-01-01

    Background Altitude exposure causes acute sleep disruption in non-athletes, but little is known about its effects in elite athletes. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of altitude on two groups of elite athletes, that is, sea-level natives and high-altitude natives. Methods Sea-level natives were members of the Australian under-17 soccer team (n=14). High-altitude natives were members of a Bolivian under-20 club team (n=12). Teams participated in an 18-day (19 nights) training camp in Bolivia, with 6 nights at near sea level in Santa Cruz (430 m) and 13 nights at high altitude in La Paz (3600 m). Sleep was assessed on every day/night using activity monitors. Results The Australians’ sleep was shorter, and of poorer quality, on the first night at altitude compared with sea level. Sleep quality returned to normal by the end of the first week at altitude, but sleep quantity had still not stabilised at its normal level after 2 weeks. The quantity and quality of sleep obtained by the Bolivians was similar, or greater, on all nights at altitude compared with sea level. The Australians tended to obtain more sleep than the Bolivians at sea level and altitude, but the quality of the Bolivians’ sleep tended to be better than that of the Australians at altitude. Conclusions Exposure to high altitude causes acute and chronic disruption to the sleep of elite athletes who are sea-level natives, but it does not affect the sleep of elite athletes who are high-altitude natives. PMID:24282197

  4. High-altitude medicines: a short-term genotoxicity study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Manosij; Biswas, Dhrubojyoti; Mukherjee, Anita

    2010-08-01

    People live in the mountains distributed across the world and are exposed to reduced inspired oxygen and lower barometric pressure along with other factors that lead to high-altitude diseases. The present study was conducted to examine what extent of marketed medicines used in the management of high-altitude sickness has been tested for their genotoxic activity. Comet assay or the single-cell gel electrophoresis was utilized to evaluate genotoxicity of the six medicines on human peripheral whole blood cells and isolated lymphocytes at the concentrations 250 microg/mL, 500 microg/mL and 1 mg/mL. The comet assay endpoints included percentage Tail DNA (% Tail DNA) and olive tail moment (OTM) as they were considered to be sensitive and reliable scores across different laboratories. The results show that dexamethasone, deriphylline and furosemide can induce significant DNA damage in human whole blood and lymphocytes alike. Acetazolamide, ibuprofen and nifedipine show no genotoxic effect, neither on human whole blood nor on human lymphocytes. Taking into account the results of genotoxicity, it will be a prudent choice to restrict the use of these compounds for longer periods, until more information on the in vitro mutagenicity and in vivo genotoxicity studies are available. PMID:20504830

  5. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples. PMID:26459926

  6. High-altitude pulmonary edema at a ski resort.

    PubMed Central

    Hultgren, H N; Honigman, B; Theis, K; Nicholas, D

    1996-01-01

    Medical records of 150 patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema seen over a 39-month period in a Colorado Rocky Mountain ski area at 2,928 m (9,600 ft) (mean age 34.4 years; 84% male) were reviewed. The mean time to the onset of symptoms was 3 +/- 1.3 days after arrival. Common symptoms were dyspnea, cough, headache, chest congestion, nausea, fever, and weakness. Orthopnea, hemoptysis, and vomiting were rare, occurring in 7%, 6%, and 16%, respectively. Symptoms of cerebral edema occurred in 14%. A temperature exceeding 100 degrees F occurred in 20%, and 17% had a systolic blood pressure of 150 mm of mercury or higher. Blood pressures were higher in patients older than 50 years (142 mm of mercury). Rales were present in 85%, and a pulmonary infiltrate was present in 88%; both were most commonly bilateral or on the right side. The amount of infiltrate was mild. Men appeared to be more susceptible than women to high-altitude pulmonary edema. Pulse oximetry in 45 patients showed a mean oxygen saturation of 74% (38% to 93%). Treatment methods depended on severity and included a return to quarters for portable nasal oxygen, an overnight stay in the clinic for continuing oxygen, or a descent to Denver for recovery or admission to a hospital. All patients received oxygen for 2 to 4 hours in the clinic. There were no deaths or complications. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8775933

  7. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-10-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples.

  8. ER-2 High Altitude Solar Cell Calibration Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Matthew; Wolford, David; Snyder, David; Piszczor, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of space photovoltaics using ground-based simulators requires primary standard cells which have been characterized in a space or near-space environment. Due to the high cost inherent in testing cells in space, most primary standards are tested on high altitude fixed wing aircraft or balloons. The ER-2 test platform is the latest system developed by the Glenn Research Center (GRC) for near-space photovoltaic characterization. This system offers several improvements over GRC's current Learjet platform including higher altitude, larger testing area, onboard spectrometers, and longer flight season. The ER-2 system was developed by GRC in cooperation with NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) as well as partners at the Naval Research Laboratory and Air Force Research Laboratory. The system was designed and built between June and September of 2014, with the integration and first flights taking place at AFRC's Palmdale facility in October of 2014. Three flights were made testing cells from GRC as well as commercial industry partners. Cell performance data was successfully collected on all three flights as well as solar spectra. The data was processed using a Langley extrapolation method, and performance results showed a less than half a percent variation between flights, and less than a percent variation from GRC's current Learjet test platform.

  9. Depression and Altitude: Cross-Sectional Community-Based Study Among Elderly High-Altitude Residents in the Himalayan Regions.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Motonao; Yamanaka, Gaku; Yamamoto, Naomune; Nakaoka, Takashi; Okumiya, Kiyohito; Matsubayashi, Kozo; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Sakura, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Suicide rates are higher at high altitudes, and some hypothesize that hypoxia is the cause. There may be a significant correlation between rates of depression and altitude, but little data exist outside the United States. The purpose of the present study is to conduct a survey of depression among the elderly highlanders in Asia. We enrolled 114 persons aged 60 years or older (mean, 69.2 ± 6.7 years; women, 58.8%) in Domkhar (altitude, 3800 m), Ladakh, India and 173 ethnic Tibetans (mean, 66.5 ± 6.1 years; women, 61.3%) in Yushu (altitude, 3700 m), Qinghai Province, China. The two-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) and the geriatric depression scale were administered. A psychiatrist interviewed the subjects who had a positive score on the PHQ-2. The results of the interview with the residents conducted by the specialist showed that two cases (1.8%) from Domkhar and four (2.3%) from Qinghai had depression. Despite the high altitude, the probability of depression was low in elderly highlander in Ladakh and Qinghai. Our finding seems to indicate that cultural factors such as religious outlook and social/family relationship inhibit the development of depression. PMID:26162459

  10. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  11. [Should hypertensive patients adapt their antihypertensive drugs during high altitude exposure?].

    PubMed

    Wuerzner, G; Allemann, Y

    2015-09-01

    High altitude exposure during leisure time is becoming more and more frequent. Due to the high prevalence of hypertension in the general population, high altitude exposure in hypertensive patients may not be uncommon. The increase in blood pressure with altitude has been confirmed by ambulatory blood pressure measurement in normotensive as well as in hypertensive patients. Compared to a placebo, most hypertensive drugs keep their blood pressure lowering effect up to a certain altitude. It is recommended that hypertensive patients measure their blood pressure during high altitude, exposure and plan a possible adaptation of treatment with their physician before their sojourn. PMID:26540993

  12. Exhaustive exercise and vitamins C and E modulate thyroid hormone levels at low and high altitudes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashem, Fahaid; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud; Al-Ani, Bahjat; Sakr, Hussein; Khalil, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play an important role in cell growth and differentiation and regulation of oxygen consumption and thermogenesis. The effect of altitude and vitamin supplementation on thyroid hormone levels in animals or humans performing acute exhaustive exercise have not been investigated before. Therefore, we thought to test whether exhaustive exercise-induced stress with antioxidant supplementation was capable of modulating the level of thyroid hormones at different altitudes. Serum levels of T4 (Thyroxin), T3 (Triiodothyronine), and TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) were measured in rats (N=36) born and bred in low altitude (600 m above sea level) and high altitude (2200 m above sea level) following forced swimming with or without vitamins C and E (25 mg/kg) pre-treatments. Thyroid levels were significantly decreased in resting rats at high altitude compared to low altitude, and swimming exercise moderately increased T3 and TSH at both high and low altitudes, whereas T4 was markedly increased (62 %) at low altitude compared to a moderate high altitude increase (28 %). Co-administration of vitamins C and E augmented the observed forced swimming-induced thyroid release. However, the conversion of T4 to T3 was reduced in both altitude areas following swimming exercise and vitamin pre-treatment had no effect. We conclude that acute stress induced thyroidal hormones in rats, which was augmented by antioxidant drugs in both high and low altitude areas. These findings may play an important role in the human pathophysiology of thyroid gland at different altitudes.

  13. Isothermal pumping analysis for high-altitude tethered balloons

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kirsty A.; Hunt, Hugh E. M.

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude tethered balloons have potential applications in communications, surveillance, meteorological observations and climate engineering. To maintain balloon buoyancy, power fuel cells and perturb atmospheric conditions, fluids could be pumped from ground level to altitude using the tether as a hose. This paper examines the pumping requirements of such a delivery system. Cases considered include delivery of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and powders as fluid-based slurries. Isothermal analysis is used to determine the variation of pressures and velocities along the pipe length. Results show that transport of small quantities of hydrogen to power fuel cells and maintain balloon buoyancy can be achieved at pressures and temperatures that are tolerable in terms of both the pipe strength and the current state of pumping technologies. To avoid solidification, transport of SO2 would require elevated temperatures that cannot be tolerated by the strength fibres in the pipe. While the use of particle-based slurries rather than SO2 for climate engineering can reduce the pipe size significantly, the pumping pressures are close to the maximum bursting pressure of the pipe. PMID:26543573

  14. Isothermal pumping analysis for high-altitude tethered balloons.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Kirsty A; Hunt, Hugh E M

    2015-06-01

    High-altitude tethered balloons have potential applications in communications, surveillance, meteorological observations and climate engineering. To maintain balloon buoyancy, power fuel cells and perturb atmospheric conditions, fluids could be pumped from ground level to altitude using the tether as a hose. This paper examines the pumping requirements of such a delivery system. Cases considered include delivery of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and powders as fluid-based slurries. Isothermal analysis is used to determine the variation of pressures and velocities along the pipe length. Results show that transport of small quantities of hydrogen to power fuel cells and maintain balloon buoyancy can be achieved at pressures and temperatures that are tolerable in terms of both the pipe strength and the current state of pumping technologies. To avoid solidification, transport of SO2 would require elevated temperatures that cannot be tolerated by the strength fibres in the pipe. While the use of particle-based slurries rather than SO2 for climate engineering can reduce the pipe size significantly, the pumping pressures are close to the maximum bursting pressure of the pipe. PMID:26543573

  15. Radiation Safety Issues in High Altitude Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1995-01-01

    The development of a global economy makes the outlook for high speed commercial intercontinental flight feasible, and the development of various configurations operating from 20 to 30 km have been proposed. In addition to the still unresolved issues relating to current commercial operations (12-16 km), the higher dose rates associated with the higher operating altitudes makes il imperative that the uncertainties in the atmospheric radiation environment and the associated health risks be re-examined. Atmospheric radiation associated with the galactic cosmic rays forms a background level which may, under some circumstances, exceed newly recommended allowable exposure limits proposed on the basis of recent evaluations of the A -bomb survivor data (due to increased risk coefficients). These larger risk coefficients, within the context of the methodology for estimating exposure limits, are resulting in exceedingly low estimated allowable exposure limits which may impact even present day flight operations and was the reason for the CEC workshop in Luxembourg (1990). At higher operating altitudes, solar particles events can produce exposures many orders of magnitude above background levels and pose significant health risks to the most sensitive individuals (such as during pregnancy). In this case the appropriate quality factors are undefined, and some evidence exists which indicates that the quality factor for stochastic effects is a substantial underestimate.

  16. Elevated Suicide Rates at High Altitude: Sociodemographic and Health Issues May Be to Blame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Marian E.; Valley, Morgan A.; Lowenstein, Steven R.; Hedegaard, Holly; Thomas, Deborah; Stallones, Lorann; Honigman, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Suicide rates are higher at high altitudes; some hypothesize that hypoxia is the cause. We examined 8,871 suicides recorded in 2006 in 15 states by the National Violent Death Reporting System, with the victim's home county altitude determined from the National Elevation Dataset through FIPS code matching. We grouped cases by altitude (low less…

  17. Electric Power System for High Altitude UAV Technology Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Electric powertrain technologies with application to high altitude Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are assessed. One hundred twenty five solar electric UAV configurations and missions were simulated. Synergistic design opportunities were investigated with the premise that specific benefits may be realized, for example, if a single component can serve multiple functions, such as a battery being used for energy storage as well as for a structural component of the aircraft. For each UAV mission simulation, the airframe structure, powertrain configuration (type of solar cells, energy storage options) and performance baseline (1997 or 2001) were specified. It has been found that the use of the high efficiency (multijunction) solar cells or the use of the synergistic amorphous silicon solar cell configuration yields aircraft that can accomplish the majority of the missions of interest for any latitude between 0 deg and 55 deg, hence, a single versatile aircraft can be constructed and implemented to accomplish these missions.

  18. Radiation Physics for Space and High Altitude Air Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Saganti, P.; Shavers, M. R.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are of extra-solar origin consisting of high-energy hydrogen, helium, and heavy ions. The GCR are modified by physical processes as they traverse through the solar system, spacecraft shielding, atmospheres, and tissues producing copious amounts of secondary radiation including fragmentation products, neutrons, mesons, and muons. We discuss physical models and measurements relevant for estimating biological risks in space and high-altitude air travel. Ambient and internal spacecraft computational models for the International Space Station and a Mars mission are discussed. Risk assessment is traditionally based on linear addition of components. We discuss alternative models that include stochastic treatments of columnar damage by heavy ion tracks and multi-cellular damage following nuclear fragmentation in tissue.

  19. Aeroelastic considerations for continuous patrol/high altitude surveillance platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, C. D.; Rocketts, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    For the last several years, an investigation has been conducted regarding the feasibility of unmanned, airborne, High-Altitude Powered Platforms (HAPP), and High Surveillance Platforms for Over-the-Horizon Targeting (HI-SPOT). These airborne platforms have been proposed as a means of achieving a continuous regional communication-relay or for continuous regional surveillance for use in agricultural research or military applications, i.e., fleet support. These platforms would offer improvements over existing orbiting satellites. These improvements are related to better resolution and increased mission flexibility. The required mission endurance up to six months, would be obtained through the use of either solar power, a cryogenically fueled engine, or microwave-power. Attention is given to airborne platform configuration, structure, structural and aerodynamic modeling, modal analysis, and flutter analysis.

  20. Thermoelectric Energy Conversion Technology for High-Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Elliott, James R.; King, Glen C.; Park, Yeonjoon; Kim, Jae-Woo; Chu, Sang-Hyon

    2011-01-01

    The High Altitude Airship (HAA) has various application potential and mission scenarios that require onboard energy harvesting and power distribution systems. The power technology for HAA maneuverability and mission-oriented applications must come from its surroundings, e.g. solar power. The energy harvesting system considered for HAA is based on the advanced thermoelectric (ATE) materials being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The materials selected for ATE are silicon germanium (SiGe) and bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3), in multiple layers. The layered structure of the advanced TE materials is specifically engineered to provide maximum efficiency for the corresponding range of operational temperatures. For three layers of the advanced TE materials that operate at high, medium, and low temperatures, correspondingly in a tandem mode, the cascaded efficiency is estimated to be greater than 60 percent.

  1. Centurion solar-powered high-altitude aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Since 1980 AeroVironment, Inc. (founded in 1971 by the ultra-light airplane innovator--Dr. Paul MacCready) has been experimenting with solar-powered aircraft, often in conjunction with the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Thus far, AeroVironment, now headquartered in Monrovia, California, has achieved several altitude records with its Solar Challenger, Pathfinder, and Pathfinder-Plus aircraft. It expects to exceed these records with the newer and larger solar-powered Centurion and its successors the Centelios and Helios vehicles, in the NASA Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. The Centurion is a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft that is demonstrating the technology of applying solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. It is considered to be a prototype technology demonstrator for a future fleet of solar-powered aircraft that could stay airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions or while serving as telecommunications relay platforms. Although it shares many of the design concepts of the Pathfinder, the Centurion has a wingspan of 206 feet, more than twice the 98-foot span of the original Pathfinder and 70-percent longer than the Pathfinder-Plus' 121-foot span. At the same time, Centurion maintains the 8-foot chord (front to rear distance) of the Pathfinder wing, giving the wing an aspect ratio (length-to-chord) of 26 to 1. Other visible changes from its predecessor include a modified wing airfoil designed for flight at extreme altitude and four underwing pods to support its landing gear and electronic systems (compared with two such pods on the Pathfinder). The flexible wing is primarily fabricated from carbon fiber, graphite epoxy composites, and kevlar. It is built in five sections, a 44-foot-long center section and middle and outer sections just over 40 feet long. All five sections have an identical thickness--12 percent of the chord

  2. Increased lung vasoreactivity in children from Leadville, Colorado, after recovery from high-altitude pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Fasules, J W; Wiggins, J W; Wolfe, R R

    1985-11-01

    Cardiac catheterization was performed on seven children after recovery from high-altitude pulmonary edema. All were life-long residents at elevations above 10,000 feet. Three of the seven had developed pulmonary edema without antecedent travel to low altitude but had an upper respiratory infection. Response of pulmonary arterial pressure to 16% inspired oxygen in all seven was compared with that in six well children who resided at a similar altitude and had no history of high-altitude pulmonary edema. With hypoxia the susceptible patients had a greater mean pulmonary arterial pressure (56.3 +/- 23.8) than the nonsusceptible children (18.8 +/- 3.9, p less than .05). Comparison with historical hemodynamic responses in children at high altitudes showed a similar greater mean pulmonary arterial pressure in the susceptible children. Thus, in children from high altitudes, increased pulmonary vasoreactivity to hypoxia may play a role in the pathogenesis of high-altitude pulmonary edema. The development of pulmonary edema in high-altitude residents with upper respiratory infections and no antecedent low-altitude journey is consistent with the presence of other factors such as inflammation, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of the edema. The finding of right ventricular hypertrophy on an electrocardiogram in children from high altitudes may be predictive of their susceptibility to high-altitude pulmonary edema. PMID:4042303

  3. An Investigation into the Nature of High Altitude Cosmic Radiation in the Stratosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, Samuel; Bancroft, Ben; Greenwood, Jake

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to investigate the changes in ionizing cosmic radiation as a function of altitude. This was carried out using a Geiger-Müller tube on-board a high altitude balloon, which rose to an altitude of 31 685 m. The gathered data show that the Geiger-Müller tube count readings increased to a maximum at an altitude of about 24…

  4. Incidence and Symptoms of High Altitude Illness in South Pole Workers: Antarctic Study of Altitude Physiology (ASAP)

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Paul J.; Miller, Andrew D.; O’Malley, Kathy A.; Ceridon, Maile L.; Beck, Kenneth C.; Wood, Christina M.; Wiste, Heather J.; Mueller, Joshua J.; Johnson, Jacob B.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Each year, the US Antarctic Program rapidly transports scientists and support personnel from sea level (SL) to the South Pole (SP, 2835 m) providing a unique natural laboratory to quantify the incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS), patterns of altitude related symptoms and the field effectiveness of acetazolamide in a highly controlled setting. We hypothesized that the combination of rapid ascent (3 hr), accentuated hypobarism (relative to altitude), cold, and immediate exertion would increase altitude illness risk. Methods: Medically screened adults (N = 246, age = 37 ± 11 yr, 30% female, BMI = 26 ± 4 kg/m2) were recruited. All underwent SL and SP physiological evaluation, completed Lake Louise symptom questionnaires (LLSQ, to define AMS), and answered additional symptom related questions (eg, exertional dyspnea, mental status, cough, edema and general health), during the 1st week at altitude. Acetazolamide, while not mandatory, was used by 40% of participants. Results: At SP, the barometric pressure resulted in physiological altitudes that approached 3400 m, while T °C averaged −42, humidity 0.03%. Arterial oxygen saturation averaged 89% ± 3%. Overall, 52% developed LLSQ defined AMS. The most common symptoms reported were exertional dyspnea-(87%), sleeping difficulty-(74%), headache-(66%), fatigue-(65%), and dizziness/lightheadedness-(46%). Symptom severity peaked on days 1–2, yet in >20% exertional dyspnea, fatigue and sleep problems persisted through day 7. AMS incidence was similar between those using acetazolamide and those abstaining (51 vs. 52%, P = 0.87). Those who used acetazolamide tended to be older, have less altitude experience, worse symptoms on previous exposures, and less SP experience. Conclusion: The incidence of AMS at SP tended to be higher than previously reports in other geographic locations at similar altitudes. Thus, the SP constitutes a more intense altitude exposure than might be expected considering physical

  5. Transthoracic Electrical Impedance in Cases of High-altitude Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sujoy B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Khan, M. R.; Kaushik, V. S.; Manchanda, S. C.; Guha, S. K.

    1974-01-01

    Changes in transthoracic electrical impedance (T.E.I.) due to high-altitude hypoxia (3,658 m) have been measured in 20 young, healthy Indian soldiers. They were first studied at sea level (198 m) and then rapidly transported by air to 3,658 m, where they were studied daily from day 1 to day 5 and then on days 8 and 10. The mean (±S.D.) T.E.I. at sea level (34·6±0·6Ω) fell sharply to 29·6±0·8Ω, 30·3±0·9Ω, and 30·5±1·1Ω on days 1, 2, and 3 (P <0·001) and levelled off at 31·5±0·7Ω on day 10, which was comparable to the mean value obtained in 13 persons permanently resident at high altitude (32·2±0·7Ω). Five sea-level residents who had acute mountain sickness (A.M.S.) or high-altitude pulmonary oedema (H.A.P.O.) had a still lower mean value (22·5±1·1Ω). One normal healthy subject who at sea level had a T.E.I. of 34·7Ω developed H.A.P.O. when the T.E.I. fell to 21·1Ω. Ninety minutes after the administration of 80 mg of intravenous frusemide the value increased to 35·5Ω. In another subject with A.M.S. who received 40 mg of frusemide intravenously the T.E.I. rose from 21·9 to 33·2Ω. Since the study was non-invasive the changes in impedance could not be correlated objectively with alterations in either pulmonary blood volume or pulmonary extravascular water space. In the subject, however, with x-ray evidence of H.A.P.O. and a low T.E.I. intravenous frusemide produced a marked rise in T.E.I. together with clearing of the chest x-ray picture within 24 hours, indicating an inverse relationship between impedance and thoracic fluid volume. It is suggested that with further objective verification in man the measurement of T.E.I. may be a potentially promising technique for the early detection of increased pulmonary fluid volume. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4 PMID:4416705

  6. Observational Characteristics of the Dayside High-Altitude Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, T. A.; Chen, J.; Zong, Q -

    2002-05-01

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities have been observed on many successive passes when the POLAR spacecraft was crossing through the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. These diamagnetic cavities were associated with an extended region of solar wind plasma inside the magnetopause coincident with a depressed and turbulent magnetic field. These observations argue that the cusp in a region of very broad extent, and not the funnel-shaped feature depicted in schematic drawings to date. The size of the cavities was found to be as large as 6 Re. There is an energetic component of ions associated nearly always with these cavities that have energies more typical of the trapped ring current and radiation belt populations than the solar wind. The intensities of the energetic ions were observed to increase by many orders of the magnitudes during the cavity crossings, indicating the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. Use of the variation of the charge state of solar wind Fe ions at the ACE spacecraft and at Polar has indicated that energization of ions to these high energies is a rapid process. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles in many cases. Taken together these facts argue for a local acceleration of plasma within the cusp to 10s and 100s of keV. By their geometry cusp magnetic field lines are connected to all of the magnetopause boundary layers and these cavity charged particles will form an energetic particle layer on the magnetopause.

  7. Pulmonary vascular remodelling in a high-altitude Aymara Indian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Donald; Williams, David

    1991-12-01

    A histological study of the pulmonary vasculature in a young male high-altitude Aymara Indian revealed four aspects of interest. There was muscularization of the terminal portion of the pulmonary arterial tree to involve pulmonary arterioles as small as 15 μm in diameter, thus forming a basis for the slightly increased pulmonary vascular resistance of native highlanders. Intimal longitudinal muscle was found in pulmonary arteries and arterioles and thought to be due to chronic alveolar hypoxia. Inner muscular tubes similar to those found in chronic obstructive lung disease were present. Pulmonary veins and venules also showed intimal muscularization suggesting that alveolar hypoxia affects vascular smooth muscle cells per se irrespective of their situation. The nature of the remodelling in a pulmonary blood vessel depends on a combination of hypoxia and haemodynamics.

  8. Genetic determinants of Tibetan high-altitude adaptation.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Tatum S; McClain, Donald A; Jorde, Lynn B; Prchal, Josef T

    2012-04-01

    Some highland populations have genetic adaptations that enable their successful existence in a hypoxic environment. Tibetans are protected against many of the harmful responses exhibited by non-adapted populations upon exposure to severe hypoxia, including elevated hemoglobin concentration (i.e., polycythemia). Recent studies have highlighted several genes subject to natural selection in native high-altitude Tibetans. Three of these genes, EPAS1, EGLN1 and PPARA, regulate or are regulated by hypoxia inducible factor, a principal controller of erythropoiesis and other organismal functions. Uncovering the molecular basis of hypoxic adaptation should have implications for understanding hematological and other adaptations involved in hypoxia tolerance. Because the hypoxia response involves a variety of cardiovascular, pulmonary and metabolic functions, this knowledge would improve our understanding of disease mechanisms and could ultimately be translated into targeted therapies for oxygen deprivation, cardiopulmonary and cerebral pathologies, and metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity. PMID:22068265

  9. Risk assessment of high altitude free flight commercial aircraft operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, C.Y.; Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M.; Sanzo, D.L.

    1998-04-23

    A quantitative model is under development to assess the safety and efficiency of commercial aircraft operations under the Free Flight Program proposed for air traffic control for the US National Airspace System. The major objective of the Free Flight Program is to accommodate the dramatic growth anticipated in air traffic in the US. However, the potential impacts upon aircraft safety from implementing the Program have not been fully explored and evaluated. The model is directed at assessing aircraft operations at high altitude over the continental US airspace since this action is the initial step for Free Flight. Sequential steps with analysis, assessment, evaluation, and iteration will be required to satisfactorily accomplish the complete transition of US commercial aircraft traffic operations.

  10. Development of High Altitude UAV Weather Radars for Hurricane Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Li-Hua

    2005-01-01

    A proposed effort within NASA called (ASHE) over the past few years was aimed at studying the genesis of tropical disturbances off the east coast of Africa. This effort was focused on using an instrumented Global Hawk UAV with high altitude (%Ok ft) and long duration (30 h) capability. While the Global Hawk availability remains uncertain, development of two relevant instruments, a Doppler radar (URAD - UAV Radar) and a backscatter lidar (CPL-UAV - Cloud Physics Lidar), are in progress. The radar to be discussed here is based on two previous high-altitude, autonomously operating radars on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, the ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP) at X-band (9.6 GHz), and the Cloud Radar System (CRS) at W- band (94 GHz). The nadir-pointing EDOP and CRS radars profile vertical reflectivity structure and vertical Doppler winds in precipitation and clouds, respectively. EDOP has flown in all of the CAMEX flight series to study hurricanes over storms such as Hurricanes Bonnie, Humberto, Georges, Erin, and TS Chantal. These radars were developed at Goddard over the last decade and have been used for satellite algorithm development and validation (TRMM and Cloudsat), and for hurricane and convective storm research. We describe here the development of URAD that will measure wind and reflectivity in hurricanes and other weather systems from a top down, high-altitude view. URAD for the Global Hawk consists of two subsystems both of which are at X-band (9.3-9.6 GHz) and Doppler: a nadir fixed-beam Doppler radar for vertical motion and precipitation measurement, and a Conical scanning radar for horizontal winds in cloud and at the surface, and precipitation structure. These radars are being designed with size, weight, and power consumption suitable for the Global Hawk and other UAV's. The nadir radar uses a magnetron transmitter and the scanning radar uses a TWT transmitter. With conical scanning of the radar at a 35" incidence angle over an ocean surface in the absence of

  11. Cooling electronic equipment at simulated high altitude in hypobaric chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, James A.

    1987-08-01

    An air cooling system has been designed to minimize electronic equipment failures during simulated exposures to 9,000 meters (29,000 ft) in hypobaric chambers. Air density, critical to convective heat transfer during electronic equipment operations, diminishes rapidly below 830 grams cubic meter (16,000 ft, 5,000 meters) resulting in equipment failures. Forced convection, using fans, can be effective up to 6,000meters but extensive equipment failures occur at higher altitudes. A newly designed cooling system incorporates a micrometer-like air flow control nozzle that directs compressed air onto the subject area. The design also accelerates surrounding air molecules to create a highly amplified flow by adding the entrained ambient air to the compressed air. Air flows may be directed on heat exchangers, power supplies, through ventilation ports, ports, to assist fan units, and for general in-cabinet cooling.

  12. ECC ozonesonde performance at high altitudes: Pump efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    The ECC ozonesonde sampling behavior was examined at pressures ranging from 60 to 6 hPa with the objective of evaluating uncertainties in high altitude ozone data caused by variations in pumping efficiency. The averaged pump efficiency correction curve for a 43 sample set of 3A type ECC pumps showed a 2-3% bias from the curve provided by the manufacturer. In addition, random pump to pump variations (2 sigma) + or - were 5% at 6 hPa. These values probably represent minimum errors since the pumps were from the same production batch. A seven sample set of the newer 4A type ECC pumps was examined, with similar findings as for the 3A types.

  13. An artificially constructed Syngonium podophyllum-Aspergillus niger combinate system for removal of uranium from wastewater.

    PubMed

    He, Jia-dong; Wang, Yong-dong; Hu, Nan; Ding, Dexin; Sun, Jing; Deng, Qin-wen; Li, Chang-wu; Xu, Fei

    2015-12-01

    Aspergillus niger was inoculated to the roots of five plants, and the Syngonium podophyllum-A. niger combinate system (SPANCS) was found to be the most effective in removing uranium from hydroponic liquid with initial uranium concentration of 5 mg L(-1). Furthermore, the hydroponic experiments on the removal of uranium from the hydroponic liquids with initial uranium concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg L(-1) by the SPANCS were conducted, the inhibitory effect of A. niger on the growth of S. podophyllum in the SPANCS was studied, the accumulation characteristics of uranium by S. podophyllum in the SPANCS were analyzed, and the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra were measured. The results show that the removal of uranium by the SPANCS from the hydroponic liquids with initial uranium concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg L(-1) reached 98.20, 97.90, and 98.50%, respectively, after 37 days of accumulation of uranium; that the uranium concentrations in the hydroponic liquids decreased to 0.009, 0.021, and 0.045 mg L(-1), respectively, which are lower than the stipulated concentration for discharge of 0.050 mg L(-1) by the People's Republic of China; that A. niger helped to generate more groups in the root of S. podophyllum which can improve the complexing capability of S. podophyllum for uranium; and that the uranium accumulated in the root of S. podophyllum was in the form of phosphate uranyl and carboxylic uranyl. PMID:26208659

  14. New horizons for the national high-altitude photography program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bermel, Peter F.

    1983-01-01

    The National High-Altitude Photography Program (NHAP) is a multi-Federal agency activity to acquire uniform imagery for the establishment of a national high-altitude photographic data base. Federal agencies participating in NHAP have pooled their resources and consolidated photographic requirements in a systematic 6-year effort that will minimize duplication of photographic programs, reduce overall Federal expenditures for aerial photography, and provide imagery for a wide range of public and private users, The U.S. Geological Survey has the lead coordination role and shares, with the other participating agencies, the responsibility for funding the acquisition of photography. Since the inception of NHAP in 1980, black-and-white and color infrared stereoscopic imagery has been acquired for about 50% of the 3,000,000 square miles in the conterminous United States. An additional 40% of the 48-State area is under contract to provide aerial survey firms, and the sixth and final contract to achieve complete once-over coverage will be awarded early in 1985. Extensive use has been made of the newly established data base for mapping, landform studies, land use planning, natural resource inventory, evaluation and management, engineering, and education. In anticipation of the completion of once-over coverage, the participating agencies have begun studies to define the requirements for a maintenance program which would provide cyclic coverage of the conterminous United States and imagery for specific agency needs. Although continued funding at the same level is not assured, under consideration are requirements for new cameras, films, and other remote sensors, photographic parameters, and extension of program coverage to Alaska, Hawaii, and outlying areas. In addition, new applications of the data base to prepare cartographic map and data products are being investigated. It is becoming increasingly clear that some major decision needs to be made soon if a NHAP II is to begin in

  15. [Human life at high altitudes: myths and realities].

    PubMed

    Vargas, E; Villena, M

    1989-01-01

    Life at high altitude presents very interesting biological and medical aspects. For countries such as the Andeans, it also has socio-economical implications. The most important towns of Bolivia are situated between 3,000 and 4,850 m. It's to say that a great percentage of the population is permanently staying there. Moreover owing to the improvement of the roads and transport, an extensive migration (professional life, business, tourism, sport) developed some years ago. At 3,000 to 4,850 m, an oxygen arterial pressure (PaO2) between 40 and 70 mm Hg is resulting from the environmental hypoxia. The adaptation to hypoxia takes place in two phases: --that incomplete, observed at short time in people who recently arrived, --that at very long time, observed in the native. The rapid arrival at more than 3,000 m, exposes the traveller to an hypoxic ventilatory stimulus which produces a hyperventilation response to increased PaO2. This hyperventilation brings out a decreasing of carbon dioxide arterial pressure (PaCO2) and alkalosis of the blood. This respiratory alkalosis seems to be responsible for most troubles which are present in the Acute Mountain Sickness linked to the CO2 role in cerebral blood circulation. At the same time but more slowly the classical high altitude polycythemia develops which permits compensate partially the hypoxic effect in 3 to 4 weeks. In the native the adaptation implies physiological variations of some parameters concerning the individual development. The principal studies showed that the native present a notable hyposensitivity to hypoxia and also to the stimulus CO2-H+. The Chronic Mountain Sickness patients have a less sensitivity to the same stimuli than the natives. PMID:2699275

  16. Recommendations for resuscitation after ascent to high altitude and in aircrafts.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Georgiou, Marios; Böttiger, Bernd; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Svavarsdóttir, Hildigunnur; Raffay, Violetta; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2013-09-01

    Human exposure to high altitude is increasing, through inhabitation of areas of high altitude, expansion of tourism into more remote areas, and air travel exposing passengers to typical altitudes equivalent to 8005 ft (2440 m). With ascent to high altitude, a number of acute and chronic physiological changes occur, influencing all systems of the human body. When considering that cardiac arrest is the second most common cause of death in the mountains and that up to 60% of the elderly have significant heart disease or other health problems, these changes are of particular importance as they may have a significant impact on resuscitation efforts. Current guidelines for resuscitation lack specific recommendations regarding treatment of cardiac arrest after ascent to high altitude or in aircraft. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive search in PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases for studies relevant to resuscitation at high altitude. As no randomized trials evaluating the effects of physiological changes after ascent to high altitude on cardiopulmonary resuscitation were identified, our search was expanded to include all studies addressing important aspects on high altitude physiology which could have a potential impact on the resuscitation of cardiac arrest victims. The aim of this review is to discuss the major physiological changes occurring after ascent to high altitude and their potential effects on cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Based on the available data, specific suggestions are proposed regarding resuscitation at high altitude. PMID:23219316

  17. From Low Altitude to High Altitude: Assimilating SAMPEX Data in Global Radiation Belt Models by Quantifying Precipitation and Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, W.; Reeves, G. D.; Cunningham, G.; Selesnick, R. S.; Li, X.; Looper, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Since its launch in 1992, SAMPEX has been continuously providing measurements of radiation belt electrons at low altitude, which are not only ideal for the direct quantification of the electron precipitation loss in the radiation belt, but also provide data coverage in a critical region for global radiation belt data assimilation models. However, quantitatively combining high-altitude and low-earth-orbit (LEO) measurements on the same L-shell is challenging because LEO measurements typically contain a dynamic mixture of trapped and precipitating populations. Specifically, the electrons measured by SAMPEX can be distinguished as trapped, quasi-trapped (in the drift loss cone), and precipitating (in the bounce loss cone). To simulate the low-altitude electron distribution observed by SAMPEX/PET, a drift-diffusion model has been developed that includes the effects of azimuthal drift and pitch angle diffusion. The simulation provides direct quantification of the rates and variations of electron loss to the atmosphere, a direct input to our Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) as the electron loss lifetimes. The current DREAM uses data assimilation to combine a 1D radial diffusion model with observational data of radiation belt electrons. In order to implement the mixed electron measurements from SAMPEX into DREAM, we need to map the SAMPEX data from low altitude to high altitudes. To perform the mapping, we will first examine the well-known 'global coherence' of radiation belt electrons by comparing SAMPEX electron fluxes with the energetic electron data from LANL GEO and GPS spacecraft. If the correlation is good, we can directly map the SAMPEX fluxes to high altitudes based on the global coherence; if not, we will use the derived pitch angle distribution from the drift-diffusion model to map up the field and test the mapping by comparing to the high-altitude flux measurements. Then the globally mapped electron fluxes can be assimilated into DREAM

  18. The HAMMER: High altitude multiple mission environmental researcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Darren; Zylla, Cara; Amaro, Ernesto; Colin, Phil; Klause, Thomas; Lopez, Bernardo; Williamson, Danna

    1991-01-01

    At the equator, the ozone layer ranges from 65,000 to 130,000+ feet which is beyond the capabilities of the ER-2, NASA's current high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. The Universities Space Research Association, in cooperation with NASA, is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. Mission one is a polar mission which ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n. mi. at 100,000 feet with a 2500 lb. payload. The second mission is also a polar mission with a decreased altitude of 70,000 feet and an increased payload of 4000 lb. For the third mission, the aircraft will take-off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 feet carrying a 2500 lb. payload, and land in Puerto Montt, Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to take-off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 feet with a 1000 lb. payload, make an excursion to 120,000 feet, and land at Howard AFB, Panama. All three missions require that a subsonic Mach number is maintained due to constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. The aircraft need not be manned for all four missions. Three aircraft configurations were determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements. The performance of each configuration is analyzed to investigate the feasibility of the project requirements. In the event that a requirement can not be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  19. Neurologic decompression sickness following cabin pressure fluctuations at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Auten, Jonathan D; Kuhne, Michael A; Walker, Harlan M; Porter, Henry O

    2010-04-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) occurs in diving, altitude chamber exposures, and unpressurized or depressurized high-altitude flights. Because DCS takes many forms, in-flight cases may be misinterpreted as hypoxia, hyperventilation, or viral illness, with resulting failure to respond appropriately. In this case, a 28-yr-old male pilot of a single-seat, tactical aircraft experienced 12 rapid pressure fluctuations while flying at 43,000 ft above sea level. He had no symptoms and decided to complete the flight, which required an additional 2 h in the air. Approximately 1 h later he began to experience fatigue, lightheadedness, and confusion, which he interpreted as onset of a viral illness. However, symptoms progressed to visual, cognitive, motor, and sensory degradations and it was with some difficulty that he landed safely at his destination. Neurologic DCS was suspected on initial evaluation by flight line medical personnel because of the delayed onset and symptom progression. He was transferred to a local Emergency Department and noted to have altered mental status, asymmetric motor deficits, and non-dermatomal paresthesias of the upper and lower extremities. Approximately 3.5 h after the incident and 2.5 h after the onset of symptoms he began hyperbaric oxygen therapy. He received partial relief at 30 min of the Navy DiveTable 6 and full resolution at 90 min; there were no recurrent symptoms at a 1-yr follow-up. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of in-flight DCS symptoms and landing as soon as possible rather than as soon as practical in all likely scenarios. PMID:20377149

  20. Deducing high-altitude precipitation from glacier mass balance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesen, Rianne H.; Immerzeel, Walter W.; Wanders, Niko

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution of precipitation in mountainous terrain is generally not well known due to underrepresentation of gauge observations at higher elevations. Precipitation tends to increase with elevation, but since observations are mainly performed in the valleys, the vertical precipitation gradient cannot be deduced from these measurements. Furthermore, the spatial resolution of gridded meteorological data is often too coarse to resolve individual mountain chains. Still, a reliable estimate of high-elevation precipitation is required for many hydrological applications. We present a method to determine the vertical precipitation gradient in mountainous terrain, making use of glacier mass balance observations. These measurements have the advantage that they provide a basin-wide precipitation estimate at high elevations. The precipitation gradient is adjusted until the solid precipitation over the glacier area combined with the calculated melt gives the measured annual glacier mass balance. Results for the glacierized regions in Central Europe and Scandinavia reveal spatially coherent patterns, with predominantly positive precipitation gradients ranging from -4 to +28 % (100 m)‑1. In some regions, precipitation amounts at high elevations are up to four times as large as in the valleys. A comparison of the modelled winter precipitation with observed snow accumulation on glaciers shows a good agreement. Precipitation measured at the few high-altitude meteorological stations is generally lower than our estimate, which may result from precipitation undercatch. Our findings will improve the precipitation forcing for glacier modelling and hydrological studies in mountainous terrain.

  1. Short-term responses of the kidney to high altitude in mountain climbers

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander S.; Alper, Seth L.

    2014-01-01

    In high-altitude climbers, the kidneys play a crucial role in acclimatization and in mountain sickness syndromes [acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude cerebral edema, high-altitude pulmonary edema] through their roles in regulating body fluids, electrolyte and acid–base homeostasis. Here, we discuss renal responses to several high-altitude-related stresses, including changes in systemic volume status, renal plasma flow and clearance, and altered acid–base and electrolyte status. Volume regulation is considered central both to high-altitude adaptation and to maladaptive development of mountain sickness. The rapid and powerful diuretic response to the hypobaric hypoxic stimulus of altitude integrates decreased circulating concentrations of antidiuretic hormone, renin and aldosterone, increased levels of natriuretic hormones, plasma and urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine, endothelin and urinary adrenomedullin, with increased insensible fluid losses and reduced fluid intake. The ventilatory and hormonal responses to hypoxia may predict susceptibility to AMS, also likely influenced by multiple genetic factors. The timing of altitude increases and adaptation also modifies the body's physiologic responses to altitude. While hypovolemia develops as part of the diuretic response to altitude, coincident vascular leak and extravascular fluid accumulation lead to syndromes of high-altitude sickness. Pharmacological interventions, such as diuretics, calcium blockers, steroids, phosphodiesterase inhibitors and β-agonists, may potentially be helpful in preventing or attenuating these syndromes. PMID:23525530

  2. Time-varying signal analysis to detect high-altitude periodic breathing in climbers ascending to extreme altitude.

    PubMed

    Garde, A; Giraldo, B F; Jané, R; Latshang, T D; Turk, A J; Hess, T; Bosch, M M; Barthelmes, D; Merz, T M; Hefti, J Pichler; Schoch, O D; Bloch, K E

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates the performance of cardiorespiratory analysis detecting periodic breathing (PB) in chest wall recordings in mountaineers climbing to extreme altitude. The breathing patterns of 34 mountaineers were monitored unobtrusively by inductance plethysmography, ECG and pulse oximetry using a portable recorder during climbs at altitudes between 4497 and 7546 m on Mt. Muztagh Ata. The minute ventilation (VE) and heart rate (HR) signals were studied, to identify visually scored PB, applying time-varying spectral, coherence and entropy analysis. In 411 climbing periods, 30-120 min in duration, high values of mean power (MP(VE)) and slope (MSlope(VE)) of the modulation frequency band of VE, accurately identified PB, with an area under the ROC curve of 88 and 89%, respectively. Prolonged stay at altitude was associated with an increase in PB. During PB episodes, higher peak power of ventilatory (MP(VE)) and cardiac (MP(LF)(HR) ) oscillations and cardiorespiratory coherence (MP(LF)(Coher)), but reduced ventilation entropy (SampEn(VE)), was observed. Therefore, the characterization of cardiorespiratory dynamics by the analysis of VE and HR signals accurately identifies PB and effects of altitude acclimatization, providing promising tools for investigating physiologic effects of environmental exposures and diseases. PMID:25820153

  3. [Pathophysiological changes in mitochondria of mammalian exposed to hypoxia at high altitude].

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen-xiang; Wu, Gang; Gao, Yu-qi

    2014-11-01

    As human beings ascend to high altitude, a number of reactions may occur against hypoxic injuries. These hypoxic responses are related to intake, transportation and utility of the oxygen. As a crucial subcellular organelle of oxygen utility, mitochondrion is a central link of high altitude acclimatization, adaptation and mountain sicknesses. In this review, we discussed the recent advances in researches on hypoxic mitochondrial responses at high altitude. PMID:26016358

  4. Latest news from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Muñoz, A.; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory is an air shower detector designed to study very-high-energy gamma rays (∼ 100 GeV to ∼ 100 TeV). It is located in the Pico de Orizaba National Park, Mexico, at an elevation of 4100 m. HAWC started operations since August 2013 with 111 tanks and in April of 2015 the 300 tanks array was completed. HAWC's unique capabilities, with a field of view of ∼ 2 sr and a high duty cycle of 5%, allow it to survey 2/3 of the sky every day. These features makes HAWC an excellent instrument for searching new TeV sources and for the detection of transient events, like gamma-ray bursts. Moreover, HAWC provides almost continuous monitoring of already known sources with variable gamma-ray fluxes in most of the northern and part of the southern sky. These observations will bring new information about the acceleration processes that take place in astrophysical environments. In this contribution, some of the latest scientific results of the observatory will be presented.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of hot desert, high altitude epilithic lichens.

    PubMed

    Villar, Susana E Jorge; Edwards, Howell G M; Seaward, Mark R D

    2005-05-01

    Twenty-three highly-coloured lichen specimens belonging to the genera Candelariella, Aspicilia and Xanthoria from high altitude sites in the Atacama Desert, Chile, 2300-4500 metres, have been analysed non-destructively by Raman spectroscopy. The vibrational band assignments in the spectra of the specimens, which were still attached to their limestone or sandstone substrata, were accomplished by comparison with the chemical compositions obtained from wet chemical extraction methods. Carotenoids and chlorophyll were found in all specimens as major components and the characteristic spectral signatures of calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite) and dihydrate (weddellite) could be identified; chemical signatures were found for these materials even in lichen thalli growing on the non-calcareous substrata, indicating probably that the calcium was provided here from wind- or rain-borne sources. The Raman spectral biomarkers for a variety of protective biomolecules and accessory pigments such as usnic acid, calycin, pulvinic acid dilactone and rhizocarpic acid have been identified in the lichens, in broad agreement with the chemical extraction profiles. The present study indicates that some form of non-destructive taxonomic identification based on Raman spectroscopy was also possible. PMID:15852144

  6. Star formation in a diffuse high-altitude cloud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerp, J.; Lenz, D.; Röhser, T.

    2016-04-01

    Context. A recent discovery of two stellar clusters associated with the diffuse high-latitude cloud HRK 81.4-77.8 has important implications for star formation in the Galactic halo. Aims: We derive a plausible distance estimate to HRK 81.4-77.8 primarily from its gaseous properties. Methods: We spatially correlate state-of-the-art HI, far-infrared and soft X-ray data to analyze the diffuse gas in the cloud. The absorption of the soft X-ray emission from the Galactic halo by HRK 81.4-77.8 is used to constrain the distance to the cloud. Results: HRK 81.4-77.8 is most likely located at an altitude of about 400 pc within the disk-halo interface of the Milky Way Galaxy. The HI data discloses a disbalance in density and pressure between the warm and cold gaseous phases. Apparently, the cold gas is compressed by the warm medium. This disbalance might trigger the formation of molecular gas high above the Galactic plane on pc to sub-pc scales.

  7. When is O+ Observed in the High Altitude Polar Cap?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, H. A.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.; Chandler, M. O.; Moore, T. E.

    2000-01-01

    Solar wind and IMF properties are correlated with the properties of O+ and H+ in the polar cap at altitudes greater than 5.5 Re geocentric using the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) on the Polar satellite. O+ is of primary interest in this study because the fraction of O+ present in the magnetosphere is commonly used as a measure of the ionospheric contribution to the magnetosphere. O+ is observed to be most abundant at lower latitudes when the solar wind speed is low and across most of the polar cap at high solar winds speeds and Kp. As the solar wind dynamic pressures increases more O+ is present in the polar cap. The O+ density is also shown to be more highly correlated with the solar wind dynamic pressure when IMF Bz is positive. H+ was not as well correlated with solar wind and IMF parameters although some correlation with IMF By is observed. H+ is more plentiful when IMF By is negative than when it is positive. In this data set H+ is very dominate so that if this plasma makes it to the plasma sheet its contribution to the plasma sheet would have a very low O+ to H+ ratio.

  8. Propulsion System for Very High Altitude Subsonic Unmanned Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.; Mockler, Ted; Maldonado, Jaime; Harp, James L., Jr.; King, Joseph F.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper explains why a spark ignited gasoline engine, intake pressurized with three cascaded stages of turbocharging, was selected to power NASA's contemplated next generation of high altitude atmospheric science aircraft. Beginning with the most urgent science needs (the atmospheric sampling mission) and tracing through the mission requirements which dictate the unique flight regime in which this aircraft has to operate (subsonic flight at greater then 80 kft) we briefly explore the physical problems and constraints, the available technology options and the cost drivers associated with developing a viable propulsion system for this highly specialized aircraft. The paper presents the two available options (the turbojet and the turbocharged spark ignited engine) which are discussed and compared in the context of the flight regime. We then show how the unique nature of the sampling mission, coupled with the economic considerations pursuant to aero engine development, point to the spark ignited engine as the only cost effective solution available. Surprisingly, this solution compares favorably with the turbojet in the flight regime of interest. Finally, some remarks are made about NASA's present state of development, and future plans to flight demonstrate the three stage turbocharged powerplant.

  9. Radar-anomalous, high-altitude features on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, Duane O.; Butler, Bryan J.

    1992-01-01

    Over nearly all of the surface of Venus the reflectivity and emissivity at centimeter wavelengths are about 0.15 and 0.85 respectively. These values are consistent with moderately dense soils and rock populations, but the mean reflectivity is about a factor of 2 greater than that for the Moon and other terrestrial planets. Pettingill and Ford, using Pioneer Venus reflectivities and emissivities, found a number of anomalous features on Venus that showed much higher reflectivities and much lower emissivities with both values approaching 0.5. These include Maxwell Montes, a number of high regions in Aphrodite Terra and Beta Regio, and several isolated mountain peaks. Most of the features are at altitudes above the mean radius by 2 to 3 km or more. However, such features have been found in the Magellan data at low altitudes and the anomalies do not exist on all high structures, Maat Mons being the most outstanding example. A number of papers have been written that attempt to explain the phenomena in terms of the geochemistry balance of weathering effects on likely surface minerals. The geochemists have shown that the fundamentally basaltic surface would be stable at the temperatures and pressures of the mean radius in the form of magnetite, but would evolve to pyrite and/or pyrrhotite in the presence of sulfur-bearing compounds such as SO2. Pyrite will be stable at altitudes above 4 or 5 km on Venus. Although the geochemical arguments are rather compelling, it is vitally important to rationally look at other explanations for radar and radio emission measurements such as that presented by Tryka and Muhleman. The radar reflectivity values are retrieved from the raw Magellan backscatter measurements by fitting the Hagfors' radar scattering model in which a surface roughness parameters and a normal incidence electrical reflectivity are estimated. The assumptions of the theory behind the model must be considered carefully before the results can be believed. These include

  10. Incidence of high altitude illnesses among unacclimatized persons who acutely ascended to Tibet.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yusheng; Fu, Zhongming; Shen, Weimin; Jiang, Ping; He, Yanlin; Peng, Shaojun; Wu, Zonggui; Cui, Bo

    2010-01-01

    High altitude illnesses pose health threats to unwary travelers after their acute ascent to high altitude locations. The incidence of high altitude illnesses among unacclimatized persons who acutely ascend to Tibet has not been previously reported. In the present study, we surveyed the incidence of high altitude illness among 3628 unacclimatized persons who had no previous high altitude experience and who traveled to Tibet by air to an altitude of 3600 m. These subjects were asked to answer questions in a written questionnaire about symptoms associated with high altitude illnesses that occurred within 2 weeks of their first arrival, their severity, and possible contributing factors. Physical examination and appropriate laboratory tests were also performed for hospitalized subjects. We found that 2063 respondents had mild acute mountain sickness with an incidence of 57.2%, and 249 (12.07%) of them were hospitalized for treatment. The incidence of high altitude pulmonary edema was 1.9%, while no case of high altitude cerebral edema was found. Additionally, there was no report of death. Psychological stresses and excessive physical exertions possibly contributed to the onset of HAPE. Acute mountain sickness is common among unacclimatized persons after their acute ascent to Tibet. The incidence of HAPE and HACE, however, is very low among them. PMID:20367487

  11. Design study for remotely piloted, high-altitude airplanes powered by microwave energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. E. K., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A design study has been conducted for unmanned, microwave-powered airplanes that must fly with long endurance at high altitude. They are proposed to conduct communications-relay, observation, or various scientific missions above approximately 55,000 feet altitude. The special characteristics of the microwave-power system and high-altitude, low-speed vehicle are reviewed. Examples of both sizing and performance analysis are used to suggest design procedure guidelines.

  12. Investigation of Mechanical Clearance Change with Thermal Flying-height Control Slider at High Altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ookubo, Satoru; Shiramatsu, Toshiya; Kurita, Masayuki; Kohira, Hidekazu; Takeuchi, Yoshinori

    Clearance change between a magnetic head with a thermal flying-height control (TFC) function and a magnetic disk at high altitude was investigated. To clarify the change of head-disk clearance in the case of TFC actuation at high altitude, head-disk clearance change was experimentally evaluated as a function of altitude and head-disk clearance by using a TFC function. The evaluation results show that the head-disk clearance change is larger in the case with TFC actuation at high altitude than that in the case without TFC actuation.

  13. The scavenging of high altitude aerosol by small ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew Bell, D.; Saunders, Clive P. R.

    There have been several global models developed for the theoretical investigation of the removal of high altitude aerosol from the atmosphere, following concern about the injection of particulate material by nuclear explosions and volcanic events. These models lack a knowledge of the scavenging efficiencies of the small ice crystals associated with cirus clouds and storm ice anvils. These are the only hydrometers that could remove the injected particles. In the past there have been a number of practical studies into the scavenging efficiencies of large ice crystaks and snowflakes. A comparison of the extrapolated results of these findings and the theoretical models of Martin et al. (1980, Pure appl. Phys.188, 1109-1129, J. atmos. Sci.37, 1628-1638) for the small crystal situation has been made. It was found that in general the extrapolated results gave efficiencies that were significantly higher than the predicted value. This difference was found to be enhanced as the crystal diameter decreased. Experiments used small ice plates grown at ˜-18.5°C in a cloud chamber, which were then permitted to fall through a dense aerosol cloud, to provide the first direct measurements of the scavenging efficiencies of this small crystals under cloud conditions. Initial results are presented for mono-disperse NaCl aerosol particles of size 4-6 μm.

  14. An extremely high altitude plume seen at Mars morning terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Garcia-Muñoz, Antonio; Garcia-Melendo, Enrique; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Gomez-Forrellad, Josep M.; Pellier, Christophe; Delcroix, Marc; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Gonzalez-Galindo, Francisco; Jaeschke, Wayne; Parker, Donald C.; Phillips, James H.; Peach, Damian

    2014-11-01

    We report the occurrence in March and April 2012 of two bright very high altitude plumes at the Martian terminator at 250 km or more above the surface, thus well into the ionosphere and bordering on the exosphere. They were located at about 195 deg West longitude and -45 deg latitude (at Terra Cimmeria) and lasted for about 10 days. The features showed day-to-day variability, and were seen at the morning terminator but not at the evening limb, which indicates rapid evolution in less than 10 hours and a cyclic behavior. Photometric measurements are used to explore two possible scenarios to explain their nature. If the phenomenon is due to suspended particles (dust, CO2 or H2O ice clouds) reflecting solar radiation, the mean size is about 0.1 microns with a nadir optical depth > 0.06. Alternatively, the plume could be auroral emission above a region with a strong magnetic anomaly and where aurora has previously been detected. Importantly, both explanations defy our current understanding of the Mars upper atmosphere.AcknowledgementsThis work was supported by the Spanish MINECO projects AYA2012-36666 with FEDER support, CONSOLIDER program ASTROMOL CSD2009-00038 and AYA2011-30613-CO2-1. Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT765-13 and UPV/EHU UFI11/55.

  15. Design of a MIPAS Instrument for high-altitude aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Piesch, C.; Gulde, T.; Sartorius, F.F.V.

    1996-11-01

    A new MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) is being designed for remote sensing of atmospheric trace constituents from high-altitude aircraft. The main goal is the measurement of cross sections of stratospheric species relevant to ozone research, such as ClONO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, NO, NO{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3}. The instrument measures the mid-infrared thermal emission of the atmosphere by limb- and upward sounding. From the spectra the two-dimensional distribution of the trace species along the flight trajectory can be derived. The instrument development is based on the approved balloon-borne MIPAS-B2 and aircraft MIPAS-FT systems. The system will be located in unpressurized compartments and thus operate under ambient temperature and pressure conditions. Major design constraints are the low mass-budget (max. 200 kg) and the automated operation without personnel intervention. The paper presents the concept and current status of the instrument development. 6 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. High Altitude Venus Operational Concept (HAVOC): Proofs of Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christopher A.; Arney, Dale C.; Bassett, George Z.; Clark, James R.; Hennig, Anthony I.; Snyder, Jessica C.

    2015-01-01

    The atmosphere of Venus is an exciting destination for both further scientific study and future human exploration. A recent internal NASA study of a High Altitude Venus Operational Concept (HAVOC) led to the development of an evolutionary program for the exploration of Venus, with focus on the mission architecture and vehicle concept for a 30-day crewed mission into Venus's atmosphere at 50 kilometers. Key technical challenges for the mission include performing the aerocapture maneuvers at Venus and Earth, inserting and inflating the airship at Venus during the entry sequence, and protecting the solar panels and structure from the sulfuric acid in the atmosphere. Two proofs of concept were identified that would aid in addressing some of the key technical challenges. To mitigate the threat posed by the sulfuric acid ambient in the atmosphere of Venus, a material was needed that could protect the systems while being lightweight and not inhibiting the performance of the solar panels. The first proof of concept identified candidate materials and evaluated them, finding FEP-Teflon (Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene-Teflon) to maintain 90 percent transmittance to relevant spectra even after 30 days of immersion in concentrated sulfuric acid. The second proof of concept developed and verified a packaging algorithm for the airship envelope to inform the entry, descent, and inflation analysis.

  17. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng Li; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Zhi Qiang; Zhao, Heng Li; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200) detection, and neurocognitive assessment was performed and total hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and homocysteine was estimated at 500m altitude, 3650m altitude, 3day, 1, and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400m), and 1 month after coming back to the 500m altitude. High altitude increased brain oxygen saturation, prolonged P300 and N200 latencies, injured cognitive functions, and raised plasma hsCRP levels. But they all recovered in varying degrees at 1 and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400m). P300 latencies and hsCRP levels were strongly correlated to cognitive performances. These results suggested that cognitive deterioration occurred during the acute period of exposure to high altitude and may recover probably owning to acclimatization after extended stay at high altitude. Plasma hsCRP is inversely correlated to neurological cognition and it may be a potential biomarker for the prediction of high altitude induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26731740

  18. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sheng Li; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Zhi Qiang; Zhao, Heng Li; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD), stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200) detection, and neurocognitive assessment was performed and total hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and homocysteine was estimated at 500 m altitude, 3650 m altitude, 3 day, 1, and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m), and 1 month after coming back to the 500 m altitude. High altitude increased brain oxygen saturation, prolonged P300 and N200 latencies, injured cognitive functions, and raised plasma hsCRP levels. But they all recovered in varying degrees at 1 and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m). P300 latencies and hsCRP levels were strongly correlated to cognitive performances. These results suggested that cognitive deterioration occurred during the acute period of exposure to high altitude and may recover probably owning to acclimatization after extended stay at high altitude. Plasma hsCRP is inversely correlated to neurological cognition and it may be a potential biomarker for the prediction of high altitude induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26731740

  19. Fit for high altitude: are hypoxic challenge tests useful?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Altitude travel results in acute variations of barometric pressure, which induce different degrees of hypoxia, changing the gas contents in body tissues and cavities. Non ventilated air containing cavities may induce barotraumas of the lung (pneumothorax), sinuses and middle ear, with pain, vertigo and hearing loss. Commercial air planes keep their cabin pressure at an equivalent altitude of about 2,500 m. This leads to an increased respiratory drive which may also result in symptoms of emotional hyperventilation. In patients with preexisting respiratory pathology due to lung, cardiovascular, pleural, thoracic neuromuscular or obesity-related diseases (i.e. obstructive sleep apnea) an additional hypoxic stress may induce respiratory pump and/or heart failure. Clinical pre-altitude assessment must be disease-specific and it includes spirometry, pulsoximetry, ECG, pulmonary and systemic hypertension assessment. In patients with abnormal values we need, in addition, measurements of hemoglobin, pH, base excess, PaO2, and PaCO2 to evaluate whether O2- and CO2-transport is sufficient. Instead of the hypoxia altitude simulation test (HAST), which is not without danger for patients with respiratory insufficiency, we prefer primarily a hyperoxic challenge. The supplementation of normobaric O2 gives us information on the acute reversibility of the arterial hypoxemia and the reduction of ventilation and pulmonary hypertension, as well as about the efficiency of the additional O2-flow needed during altitude exposure. For difficult judgements the performance of the test in a hypobaric chamber with and without supplemental O2-breathing remains the gold standard. The increasing numbers of drugs to treat acute pulmonary hypertension due to altitude exposure (acetazolamide, dexamethasone, nifedipine, sildenafil) or to other etiologies (anticoagulants, prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists) including mechanical aids to reduce periodical or

  20. Fit for high altitude: are hypoxic challenge tests useful?

    PubMed

    Matthys, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    Altitude travel results in acute variations of barometric pressure, which induce different degrees of hypoxia, changing the gas contents in body tissues and cavities. Non ventilated air containing cavities may induce barotraumas of the lung (pneumothorax), sinuses and middle ear, with pain, vertigo and hearing loss. Commercial air planes keep their cabin pressure at an equivalent altitude of about 2,500 m. This leads to an increased respiratory drive which may also result in symptoms of emotional hyperventilation. In patients with preexisting respiratory pathology due to lung, cardiovascular, pleural, thoracic neuromuscular or obesity-related diseases (i.e. obstructive sleep apnea) an additional hypoxic stress may induce respiratory pump and/or heart failure. Clinical pre-altitude assessment must be disease-specific and it includes spirometry, pulsoximetry, ECG, pulmonary and systemic hypertension assessment. In patients with abnormal values we need, in addition, measurements of hemoglobin, pH, base excess, PaO2, and PaCO2 to evaluate whether O2- and CO2-transport is sufficient.Instead of the hypoxia altitude simulation test (HAST), which is not without danger for patients with respiratory insufficiency, we prefer primarily a hyperoxic challenge. The supplementation of normobaric O2 gives us information on the acute reversibility of the arterial hypoxemia and the reduction of ventilation and pulmonary hypertension, as well as about the efficiency of the additional O2-flow needed during altitude exposure. For difficult judgements the performance of the test in a hypobaric chamber with and without supplemental O2-breathing remains the gold standard. The increasing numbers of drugs to treat acute pulmonary hypertension due to altitude exposure (acetazolamide, dexamethasone, nifedipine, sildenafil) or to other etiologies (anticoagulants, prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists) including mechanical aids to reduce periodical or

  1. Hands-on Space Exploration through High Altitude Ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammergren, Mark; Gyuk, G.

    2010-01-01

    The Adler Planetarium's "Far Horizons" high-altitude ballooning effort serves as the focus for a diverse set of educational activities, including middle school summer camps, a high school summer program (the Astro-Science Workshop), school-year internships for high school students, summer internships for undergraduates, a NSF-funded graduate fellowship, and a thriving public volunteer program. The relatively low costs of both the reusable hardware (less than $1000) and expendable supplies (around $150 per launch) allow us to mount frequent missions throughout the year - and make such a program ideal for replication at institutions of any size. The rapid development schedule for each individual mission permits the cradle-to-grave involvement of short-term participants, making it easy to draw in a wide audience. Students are involved literally in a hands-on manner in all aspects of the construction, launch, tracking, and recovery of simple experimental payloads, which typically include sensors for temperature, pressure, light intensity, and radiation. Stunning imagery provided by onboard cameras can attract significant media interest, which can bring outreach efforts to a very broad audience. Future plans include the design and construction of CubeSats - decimeter-sized picosatellites carried to orbit as secondary payloads. Our first satellite will be a relatively simple Earth-imager, built from commercial, off-the-shelf components. As in the ballooning program, students and volunteers will be involved in all stages of this effort. Once operational, imagery and other data from the satellite will be incorporated into a museum exhibit that will allow visitors to submit target requests. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0525995.

  2. High Altitude Aerial Natural Gas Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Richard T. Wainner; Mickey B. Frish; B. David Green; Matthew C. Laderer; Mark G. Allen; Joseph R. Morency

    2006-12-31

    The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate a cost-effective and power-efficient advanced standoff sensing technology able to detect and quantify, from a high-altitude (> 10,000 ft) aircraft, natural gas leaking from a high-pressure pipeline. The advanced technology is based on an enhanced version of the Remote Methane Leak Detector (RMLD) platform developed previously by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI). The RMLD combines a telecommunications-style diode laser, fiber-optic components, and low-cost DSP electronics with the well-understood principles of Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy (WMS), to indicate the presence of natural gas located between the operator and a topographic target. The transceiver transmits a laser beam onto a topographic target and receives some of the laser light reflected by the target. The controller processes the received light signal to deduce the amount of methane in the laser's path. For use in the airborne platform, we modified three aspects of the RMLD, by: (1) inserting an Erbium-doped optical fiber laser amplifier to increase the transmitted laser power from 10 mW to 5W; (2) increasing the optical receiver diameter from 10 cm to 25 cm; and (3) altering the laser wavelength from 1653 nm to 1618 nm. The modified RMLD system provides a path-integrated methane concentration sensitivity {approx}5000 ppm-m, sufficient to detect the presence of a leak from a high capacity transmission line while discriminating against attenuation by ambient methane. In ground-based simulations of the aerial leak detection scenario, we demonstrated the ability to measure methane leaks within the laser beam path when it illuminates a topographic target 2000 m away. We also demonstrated simulated leak detection from ranges of 200 m using the 25 cm optical receiver without the fiber amplifier.

  3. Influence of high altitude clouds on upper tropospheric radiance measurements.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E O; Patterson, E M; Williams, W J

    1990-10-01

    Altitude profiles of atmospheric window radiance measured with upward-looking sensors frequently show a rapid decrease in radiance with increasing height over a narrow altitude region in the upper troposphere. This region of rapid decrease is termed a radiometric knee in the altitude profile. The top of this knee defines a radiometric tropopause with a latitudinal height dependence similar to that of the usually defined barometric tropopause. Atmospheric window (10-12-microm) radiance at these altitudes can be associated with the presence of ice particulates. Comparison of the measurements with predicted altitude profiles of atmospheric radiance from the LOWTRAN 7 atmospheric model code shows that a well-defined knee occurs when there is a cloud layer (liquid or ice) such as a subvisual cirrus cloud present. The rate and magnitude of the radiance decrease depend on the optical depth and, therefore, the water content of the layer. Atmospheric background radiance values for near horizontal (large zenith angle) viewing with upward-looking sensors can be as much as a factor of 100 lower above the knee than below it. Comparisons between calculated and observed radiance profiles were used to estimate the vertical extent, total optical depth, and water content of the clouds. PMID:20577363

  4. A strategy for reducing neonatal mortality at high altitude using oxygen conditioning.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    2015-11-01

    Neonatal mortality increases with altitude. For example, in Peru the incidence of neonatal mortality in the highlands has been shown to be about double that at lower altitudes. An important factor is the low inspired PO2 of newborn babies. Typically, expectant mothers at high altitude will travel to low altitude to have their babies if possible, but often this is not feasible because of economic factors. The procedure described here raises the oxygen concentration in the air of rooms where neonates are being housed and, in effect, this means that both the mother and baby are at a much lower altitude. Oxygen conditioning is similar to air conditioning except that the oxygen concentration of the air is increased rather than the temperature being reduced. The procedure is now used at high altitude in many hotels, dormitories and telescope facilities, and has been shown to be feasible and effective. PMID:26426252

  5. Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine position statement: athletes at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Koehle, Michael S; Cheng, Ivy; Sporer, Benjamin

    2014-03-01

    Many sports incorporate training at altitude as a key component of their athlete training plan. Furthermore, many sports are required to compete at high altitude venues. Exercise at high altitude provides unique challenges to the athlete and to the sport medicine clinician working with these athletes. These challenges include altitude illness, alterations in training intensity and performance, nutritional and hydration difficulties, and challenges related to the austerity of the environment. Furthermore, many of the strategies that are typically utilized by visitors to altitude may have implications from an anti-doping point of view.This position statement was commissioned and approved by the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine. The purpose of this statement was to provide an evidence-based, best practices summary to assist clinicians with the preparation and management of athletes and individuals travelling to altitude for both competition and training. PMID:24569430

  6. Why are the high altitude inhabitants like the Tibetans shorter and lighter?

    PubMed

    Panesar, N S

    2008-09-01

    High altitude inhabitants (HAI) are generally smaller than low altitude inhabitants (LAI). This anthropological observation has recently been confirmed in the Tibetan refugees who have settled in India since 1950s. Those settled at lower altitudes (970 m) are taller and muscular than compatriots settled at higher altitudes (3500 m). While lower socioeconomic status is implicated in growth retardation at higher altitudes, the smaller stature in adults in well-off communities says otherwise. Hypobaric hypoxia (HH) is the main challenge at high altitudes, which the long established HAI have overcome via biological adaptations, including larger chests, raised blood hemoglobin, and producing more nitric oxide (NO), which deliver similar levels of oxygen to tissues, as LAI. The Tibetans produce 10-fold more NO than LAI. NO is a potent inhibitor of steroidogenesis. Therefore I hypothesize that the short stature and lower musculature in HAI results from steroid deficiency precipitated by NO, which HAI produce to cope with HH. PMID:18495367

  7. Oxygen enrichment of room air to improve well-being and productivity at high altitude.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    1999-01-01

    Increasingly, commercial activities, such as mines, and scientific facilities, such as telescopes, are being placed at very high altitudes, up to 5,000 m. Frequently workers commute to these locations from much lower altitudes, or even from sea level. In addition, large numbers of people permanently live and work at high altitudes. The hypoxia of high altitude impairs sleep quality, mental performance, productivity, and general well-being. Recently it has become feasible to raise the oxygen concentration of room air by injecting oxygen into the air conditioning. This is remarkably effective at reducing the equivalent altitude. For example, increasing the oxygen concentration by 1% (e.g., from 21% to 22%) reduces the equivalent altitude by about 300 m. In other words, a room at an altitude of 4,500 m containing 26% oxygen is effectively at an altitude of 3,000 m. Oxygen enrichment has now been tested in several studies and shown to improve sleep quality and cognitive function. The fire hazard is less than in air at sea level. This innovative technique promises to improve productivity and well-being at high altitude. PMID:10441257

  8. Physiological and Clinical Implications of Adrenergic Pathways at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The adrenergic system is part of a full array of mechanisms allowing the human body to adapt to the hypoxic environment. Triggered by the stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors, the adrenergic centers in the medulla are activated in acute hypoxia and augment the adrenergic drive to the organs, especially to the heart, leading to tachycardia. With prolonged exposure to altitude hypoxia, the adrenergic drive persists, as witnessed by elevated blood concentrations of catecholamines and nerve activity in adrenergic fibers. In response to this persistent stimulation, the pathways leading to the activation of adenylate cyclase are modified. A downregulation of β-adrenergic and adenosinergic receptors is observed, while muscarinic receptors are upregulated. The expression and activity of Gi and Gs proteins are modified, leading to a decreased response of adenylate cyclase activity to adrenergic stimulation. The clinical consequences of these cellular and molecular changes are of importance, especially for exercise performance and protection of heart function. The decrease in maximal exercise heart rate in prolonged hypoxia is fully accounted for the observed changes in adrenergic and muscarinic pathways. The decreased heart rate response to isoproterenol infusion is another marker of the desensitization of adrenergic pathways. These changes can be considered as mechanisms protecting the heart from a too high oxygen consumption in conditions where the oxygen availability is severely reduced. Similarly, intermittent exposure to hypoxia has been shown to protect the heart from an ischemic insult with similar mechanisms involving G proteins and downregulation of β receptors. Other pathways with G proteins are concerned in adaptation to hypoxia, such as lactate release by the muscles and renal handling of calcium. Altogether, the activation of the adrenergic system is useful for the acute physiological response to hypoxia. With prolonged exposure to hypoxia, the autonomous

  9. Light duty diesel vehicle emissions at high altitude

    SciTech Connect

    Hollman, T.W.; Gallagher, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Twenty 1981-82 light-duty diesel vehicles were randomly selected from Denver metropolitan vehicle registration lists for Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions testing. Opacity levels were monitored during the entire FTP and during various ''short tests'', which were designed to detect FTP failures and/or excessively high opacity levels under loaded driving conditions. Regulated emissions from this fleet of vehicles were lower than an earlier study conducted in Denver of 1978-80 light-duty diesel vehicles. Five vehicles which exceeded current federal emissions standards received restorative maintenance, i.e., high altitude adjustments and kits, air filter changes, and fuel injection system maintenance (as needed). Following restorative maintenance these vehicles were retested under the third phase of the FTP (Hot transient section) to evaluate the effect of the adjustment on emissions and opacity. Both increases and decreases were seen on emissions and opacity as a result of these procedures. Hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and particulate emissions averaged decreases as a result of the adjustment maintenance, while oxides of nitrogen and mean opacity averaged increases. Mean opacity values of FTP opacity levels were calculated on all 20 vehicles. Mean opacity was used only to compare individual vehicles and groups of vehicles. The ''passed'' fleet (based on FTP regulated emissions standards) did show a lower mean opacity than the ''failed'' fleet. The restorative maintenance procedures increased mean opacity levels on four of the five ''failed'' vehicles. Initial review of the short tests did not show any incriminating evidence for detecting FTP failures. However, further analysis is on-going as of this writing to determine the value of individual short tests in detecting FTP failures and/or excessive smoke levels from light-duty diesel vehicles.

  10. Active Learning in the Atmospheric Science Classroom and beyond through High-Altitude Ballooning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Jill S. M.; Mitchell, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of high-altitude balloon (HAB) research into a variety of undergraduate atmospheric science classes as a means of increasing active student engagement in real-world, problem-solving events. Because high-altitude balloons are capable of reaching heights of 80,000-100,000 ft (24-30 km), they provide a…

  11. High altitude gust acceleration environment as experienced by a supersonic airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehernberger, L. J.; Love, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    High altitude turbulence experienced at supersonic speeds is described in terms of gust accelerations measured on the YF-12A airplane. The data were obtained during 90 flights at altitudes above 12.2 kilometers (40,000 feet). Subjective turbulence intensity ratings were obtained from air crew members. The air crew often rated given gust accelerations as being more intense during high altitude supersonic flight than during low altitude subsonic flight. The portion of flight distance in turbulence ranged from 6 percent to 8 percent at altitudes between 12.2 kilometers and 16.8 kilometers (40,000 feet and 55,000 feet) to less than 1 percent at altitudes above 18.3 kilometers (60,000 feet). The amount of turbulence varied with season, increasing by a factor of 3 or more from summer to winter. Given values of gust acceleration were less frequent, on the basis of distance traveled, for supersonic flight of the YF-12A airplane at altitudes above 12.2 kilometers (40,000 feet) than for subsonic flight of a jet passenger airplane at altitudes below 12.2 kilometers (40,000 feet). The median thickness of high altitude turbulence patches was less than 400 meters (1300 feet); the median length was less than 16 kilometers (10 miles). The distribution of the patch dimensions tended to be log normal.

  12. Iridium: Global OTH data communications for high altitude scientific ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denney, A.

    While the scientific community is no stranger to embracing commercially available technologies, the growth and availability of truly affordable cutting edge technologies is opening the door to an entirely new means of global communications. For many years high altitude ballooning has provided science an alternative to costly satellite based experimental platforms. As with any project, evolution becomes an integral part of development. Specifically in the NSBF ballooning program, where flight durations have evolved from the earlier days of hours to several weeks and plans are underway to provide missions up to 100 days. Addressing increased flight durations, the harsh operational environment, along with cumbersome and outdated systems used on existing systems, such as the balloon vehicles Support Instrumentation Package (SIP) and ground-based systems, a new Over-The-Horizon (OTH) communications medium is sought. Current OTH equipment planning to be phased-out include: HF commanding systems, ARGOS PTT telemetry downlinks and INMARSAT data terminals. Other aspects up for review in addition to the SIP to utilize this communications medium include pathfinder balloon platforms - thereby, adding commanding abilities and increased data rates, plus providing a package for ultra-small experiments to ride aloft. Existing communication systems employed by the National Scientific Balloon Facility ballooning program have been limited not only by increased cost, slow data rates and "special government use only" services such as TDRSS (Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System), but have had to make special provisions to geographical flight location. Development of the Support Instrumentation Packages whether LDB (Long Duration Balloon), ULDB (Ultra Long Duration Balloon) or conventional ballooning have been plagued by non-standard systems configurations requiring additional support equipment for different regions and missions along with a myriad of backup for redundancy. Several

  13. Study on Oxygen Supply Standard for Physical Health of Construction Personnel of High-Altitude Tunnels

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chun; Xu, Jianfeng; Wang, Mingnian; Yan, Tao; Yang, Lu; Sun, Zhitao

    2015-01-01

    The low atmospheric pressure and low oxygen content in high-altitude environment have great impacts on the functions of human body. Especially for the personnel engaged in complicated physical labor such as tunnel construction, high altitude can cause a series of adverse physiological reactions, which may result in multiple high-altitude diseases and even death in severe cases. Artificial oxygen supply is required to ensure health and safety of construction personnel in hypoxic environments. However, there are no provisions for oxygen supply standard for tunnel construction personnel in high-altitude areas in current tunnel construction specifications. As a result, this paper has theoretically studied the impacts of high-altitude environment on human bodies, analyzed the relationship between labor intensity and oxygen consumption in high-altitude areas and determined the critical oxygen-supply altitude values for tunnel construction based on two different standard evaluation systems, i.e., variation of air density and equivalent PIO2. In addition, it has finally determined the oxygen supply standard for construction personnel in high-altitude areas based on the relationship between construction labor intensity and oxygen consumption. PMID:26703703

  14. Study on Oxygen Supply Standard for Physical Health of Construction Personnel of High-Altitude Tunnels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun; Xu, Jianfeng; Wang, Mingnian; Yan, Tao; Yang, Lu; Sun, Zhitao

    2016-01-01

    The low atmospheric pressure and low oxygen content in high-altitude environment have great impacts on the functions of human body. Especially for the personnel engaged in complicated physical labor such as tunnel construction, high altitude can cause a series of adverse physiological reactions, which may result in multiple high-altitude diseases and even death in severe cases. Artificial oxygen supply is required to ensure health and safety of construction personnel in hypoxic environments. However, there are no provisions for oxygen supply standard for tunnel construction personnel in high-altitude areas in current tunnel construction specifications. As a result, this paper has theoretically studied the impacts of high-altitude environment on human bodies, analyzed the relationship between labor intensity and oxygen consumption in high-altitude areas and determined the critical oxygen-supply altitude values for tunnel construction based on two different standard evaluation systems, i.e., variation of air density and equivalent PIO₂. In addition, it has finally determined the oxygen supply standard for construction personnel in high-altitude areas based on the relationship between construction labor intensity and oxygen consumption. PMID:26703703

  15. Oviposition of aquatic insects in a tropical high altitude stream.

    PubMed

    Rios-Touma, Blanca; Encalada, A C; Prat, N

    2012-12-01

    The persistence of aquatic insect populations in streams depends on the recruitment of larval populations from egg masses deposited by adults, especially after disturbance. However, recruitment of aquatic populations by oviposition is a process that remains unstudied in streams and rivers. The objectives of our study were to document flying and oviposition patterns of aquatic insects in a high altitude tropical stream during both dry and wet seasons. In particular we studied 1) richness and abundance of adult forms of aquatic insects flying and ovipositing; 2) number of eggs (oviposition pattern), egg mass identity, and morphology; and 3) substrate preferences by ovipositing females. We found 2,383 aquatic insects corresponding to 28 families, with dipterans representing 89% of total individuals collected. Adult insects had lower richness (28 taxa) than larval diversity (up to 52 taxa) and distinct community composition. Richness and relative abundance of most taxa (adults) were not significantly different between seasons, behaviors, diel period, or all three. During both sampling periods we found females with eggs in a total of 15 different families (13 in the dry season and 14 in the wet season). There were no significant differences in the proportion of females with eggs between seasons, diel periods, or different behaviors (flying versus ovipositing traps) of the different female taxa. Few types of egg masses were found in rocks at the stream during both seasons, and most egg masses found corresponded to families Baetidae and Chironomidae. Finally, we provide the first description of eggs masses (size, shape, color, and number of eggs per female) of gravid females (10 taxa) and those found in the stream substrate (six taxa) of Andean macroinvertebrates. This is the first study reporting oviposition, adult diversity, and oviposition patterns of aquatic insects in the Andean region. PMID:23321079

  16. Quercetin as a prophylactic measure against high altitude cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Patir, Himadri; Sarada, S K S; Singh, Saumya; Mathew, Titto; Singh, Bhagwat; Bansal, Anju

    2012-08-15

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the intervention of quercetin against high altitude cerebral edema (HACE) using male Sprague Dawley rats as an animal model. This study was also programmed to compare and correlate the effect of both quercetin (flavonoid) and dexamethasone (steroid) against HACE. Six groups of animals were designed for this experiment, (I) normoxia, (II) hypoxia (25,000 ft, 24 h), (III) normoxia+quercetin (50 mg/kg body wt), (IV) normoxia+dexamethasone (4 mg/kg body wt), (V) hypoxia+quercetin (50 mg/kg body wt), (VI) hypoxia+dexamethasone (4 mg/kg body wt). Quercetin at 50 mg/kg body wt, orally 1h prior to hypoxia exposure, was considered as the optimum dose, due to a significant reduction in the level of brain water content and cerebral transvascular leakage (P < 0.001), as compared to control (24 h hypoxia). Dexamethasone was administered at 4 mg/kg body wt, orally, 1h prior to hypoxia exposure. Both drugs (quercetin and dexamethasone) could efficiently reduce the hypoxia-induced hematological changes. Quercetin was observed to be a more potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory agent. It blocks nuclear factor kappa-beta (NFκB) more significantly (P < 0.05) than the dexamethasone-administered hypoxia-exposed rats. Histopathological findings demonstrate the absence of an edema and inflammation in the brain sections of quercetin-administered hypoxia-exposed rats. The present study reveals quercetin to be a potent drug against HACE, as it efficiently attenuates inflammation as well as cerebral edema formation without any side effects of steroid therapy (dexamethasone). PMID:22743108

  17. Frostbite: epidemiology at high altitude in the Karakoram mountains.

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, M. A.; Rashid, M.; Haleem, A.; Bokhari, S. A.; Hussain, T.

    1998-01-01

    During a 10-year period (December 1984 to December 1994), 1500 cases of frostbite were treated at a tertiary care medical facility. They were all males with their ages ranging from 17 to 43 years. All the patients sustained the frostbite injury in the northeastern part of Pakistan known as the Karakoram range of mountains. They included a large number of porters and guides employed by various mountaineering expeditions (approximately 250-300 expeditions per year) in that region, as well as local inhabitants. This retrospective study included the heights at which frostbite occurred (range 11,000-22,000 feet above sea level). Of the patients, 15% (n = 225) got frostbitten within 1 h of exposure, whereas the majority (71%) had an exposure of 1-3 h. The effect of seasonal variations (relative hypothermia) on the extent and depth (degree) of frostbite and the distribution of lesions as per body surface subunits (areas) was noted and found to be statistically significant with P < 0.05 for both. The occurrence of frostbite at various heights showed a very steep upward curve beyond a height of 17,000 feet above sea level. This has been termed the 'cut-off' point for frostbite by the authors, the increase depicting the true picture of 'high altitude frostbite'. Tobacco smoking and peripheral vascular disease were found to be important contributing factors. The feet were involved most frequently (64%) followed by the hands (32%), the head and neck region (3%) and the perineum (1%). Independent effects of the height (relative hypoxia) on the depth of frostbite lesion (degree) and on the involvement of multiple body areas (surface subunits) showed significant correlation with P values well below 0.05 for each. Of cases, 92% (n = 1386) had second- or third-degree frostbite necessitating definitive surgical intervention. Total frostbite-related mortality spanned over 10 years was 11%. PMID:9623370

  18. Nutritional Strategies for the Preservation of Fat Free Mass at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Wing-Gaia, Stacie L.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to extreme altitude presents many physiological challenges. In addition to impaired physical and cognitive function, energy imbalance invariably occurs resulting in weight loss and body composition changes. Weight loss, and in particular, loss of fat free mass, combined with the inherent risks associated with extreme environments presents potential performance, safety, and health risks for those working, recreating, or conducting military operations at extreme altitude. In this review, contributors to muscle wasting at altitude are highlighted with special emphasis on protein turnover. The article will conclude with nutritional strategies that may potentially attenuate loss of fat free mass during high altitude exposure. PMID:24531260

  19. Special problems and capabilities of high altitude lighter than air vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, P. R.; Petrone, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    Powered LTA vehicles have historically been limited to operations at low altitudes. Conditions exist which may enable a remotely piloted unit to be operated at an altitude near 70,000 feet. Such systems will be launched like high altitude balloons, operate like nonrigid airships, and have mission capabilities comparable to a low altitude stationary satellite. The limited lift available and the stratospheric environment impose special requirements on power systems, hull materials and payloads. Potential nonmilitary uses of the vehicle include communications relay, environmental monitoring and ship traffic control.

  20. Bats aloft: Variation in echolocation call structure at high altitudes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bats alter their echolocation calls in response to changes in ecological and behavioral conditions, but little is known about how they adjust their call structure in response to changes in altitude. This study examines altitudinal variation in the echolocation calls of Brazilian free-tailed bats, T...

  1. Effect of egg composition and oxidoreductase on adaptation of Tibetan chicken to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Jia, C L; He, L J; Li, P C; Liu, H Y; Wei, Z H

    2016-07-01

    Tibetan chickens have good adaptation to hypoxic conditions, which can be reflected by higher hatchability than lowland breeds when incubated at high altitude. The objective of this trial was to study changes in egg composition and metabolism with regards the adaptation of Tibetan chickens to high altitude. We measured the dry weight of chicken embryos, egg yolk, and egg albumen, and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) in breast muscle, heart, and liver from embryos of Tibetan chicken and Dwarf chicken (lowland breed) incubated at high (2,900 m) and low (100 m) altitude. We found that growth of chicken embryos was restricted at high altitude, especially for Dwarf chicken embryos. In Tibetan chicken, the egg weight was lighter, but the dry weight of egg yolk was heavier than that of Dwarf chicken. The LDH activities of the three tissues from the high altitude groups were respectively higher than those of the lowland groups from d 15 to hatching, except for breast muscle of Tibetan chicken embryos on d 15. In addition, under the high altitude environment, the heart tissue from Tibetan chicken had lower LDH activity than that from Dwarf chicken at d 15 and 18. The lactic acid content of blood from Tibetan chicken embryos was lower than that of Dwarf chicken at d 12 and 15 of incubation at high altitude. There was no difference in SDH activity in the three tissues between the high altitude groups and the lowland groups except in three tissues of hatchlings and at d 15 of incubation in breast muscle, nor between the two breeds at high altitude except in the heart of hatchlings. Consequently, the adaptation of Tibetan chicken to high altitude may be associated with higher quantities of yolk in the egg and a low metabolic oxygen demand in tissue, which illuminate the reasons that the Tibetan chicken have higher hatchability with lower oxygen transport ability. PMID:26957629

  2. Electrocardiographic observations in high altitude residents of Nepal and Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, Jeanne; Valeix, P.; Drouet, L.; Escourrou, P.; Durand, J.

    1981-09-01

    Parameters computed from electrocardiographic recordings (mean frontal QRS axis, â QRS, positive (R-S) difference in lead V1, incidence of atypical conduction pattern in V1) were compared: (1) in two populations residing at the same altitude (3 800 m) but in different geographical sites: Aymaras in Bolivia and Tibetans in Nepal, (2) in three groups of Bolivians dwellers, ethnically similar and fully acclimatized, at three altitudes (4 780 m, 3 800 m, 400 m). This work involved 661 subjects. Results: (a) The mean â QRS value in highlanders is shifted to the right when compared to that of lowlanders: the right axis deviation increases with altitude, (b) The mean â QRS value is identical in Bolivian and Tibetan groups living at the same altitude, (c) The axis deviates to the left with aging in all the environmental conditions. This migration is accompanied by a lower incidence of positive (R-S) difference in adults compared to younger subjects, (d) The mean â QRS value of the females is always situated to the left of that males for all age groups. This difference receives a possible confirmation by the lower incidence of atypical complexes in V1 in females, (e) The present values of â QRS as well as others found in the litterature and those of mean pulmonary arterial pressure reported by different authors have been plotted, both as a function of elevation: The two relationships can be described by two linear functions with a point of intersection. Such points suggest an altitude threshold above which a further decrease in barometric pressure results in marked cardiovascular responses. They are both located in the vicinity of 2 500 m.

  3. High altitude, continuous positive airway pressure, and obstructive sleep apnea: subjective observations and objective data.

    PubMed

    Ginosar, Yehuda; Malhotra, Atul; Schwartz, Eli

    2013-06-01

    We report observations made by one of the authors who ascended to the Thorang La pass (5416 m) in the Nepal Himalaya in October 2010, despite moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea. We report the first recorded use of nasal CPAP to treat high altitude pulmonary edema (progressively severe dyspnea at rest and severe orthopnea, with tachycardia and tachypnea) that occurred at 4400 meters, when snow and darkness made safe evacuation difficult. We also present objective longitudinal data of the effects of altitude on auto-adjusting CPAP delivered via a portable nasal CPAP device, and on the apnea hypopnea index measured during sleep while using the device. OSA may be a risk factor for the development of high altitude pulmonary edema and we suggest that a nasal CPAP device located in high altitude trekking stations may provide an additional or alternative treatment option for managing high altitude pulmonary edema until evacuation is possible. PMID:23795742

  4. Altitude matters: differences in cardiovascular and respiratory responses to hypoxia in bar-headed geese reared at high and low altitudes.

    PubMed

    Lague, Sabine L; Chua, Beverly; Farrell, Anthony P; Wang, Yuxiang; Milsom, William K

    2016-07-01

    Bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) fly at high altitudes during their migration across the Himalayas and Tibetan plateau. However, we know relatively little about whether rearing at high altitude (i.e. phenotypic plasticity) facilitates this impressive feat because most of what is known about their physiology comes from studies performed at sea level. To provide this information, a comprehensive analysis of metabolic, cardiovascular and ventilatory responses to progressive decreases in the equivalent fractional composition of inspired oxygen (FiO2 : 0.21, 0.12, 0.09, 0.07 and 0.05) was made on bar-headed geese reared at either high altitude (3200 m) or low altitude (0 m) and on barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis), a low-altitude migrating species, reared at low altitude (0 m). Bar-headed geese reared at high altitude exhibited lower metabolic rates and a modestly increased hypoxic ventilatory response compared with low-altitude-reared bar-headed geese. Although the in vivo oxygen equilibrium curves and blood-oxygen carrying capacity did not differ between the two bar-headed goose study groups, the blood-oxygen carrying capacity was higher than that of barnacle geese. Resting cardiac output also did not differ between groups and increased at least twofold during progressive hypoxia, initially as a result of increases in stroke volume. However, cardiac output increased at a higher FiO2  threshold in bar-headed geese raised at high altitude. Thus, bar-headed geese reared at high altitude exhibited a reduced oxygen demand at rest and a modest but significant increase in oxygen uptake and delivery during progressive hypoxia compared with bar-headed geese reared at low altitude. PMID:27385754

  5. Model of Atmospheric Links on Optical Communications from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subich, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Optical communication links have the potential to solve many of the problems of current radio and microwave links to satellites and high-altitude aircraft. The higher frequency involved in optical systems allows for significantly greater signal bandwidth, and thus information transfer rate, in excess of 10 Gbps, and the highly directional nature of laser-based signals eliminates the need for frequency-division multiplexing seen in radio and microwave links today. The atmosphere, however, distorts an optical signal differently than a microwave signal. While the ionosphere is one of the most significant sources of noise and distortion in a microwave or radio signal, the lower atmosphere affects an optical signal more significantly. Refractive index fluctuations, primarily caused by changes in atmospheric temperature and density, distort the incoming signal in both deterministic and nondeterministic ways. Additionally, suspended particles, such as those in haze or rain, further corrupt the transmitted signal. To model many of the atmospheric effects on the propagating beam, we use simulations based on the beam-propagation method. This method, developed both for simulation of signals in waveguides and propagation in atmospheric turbulence, separates the propagation into a diffraction and refraction problem. The diffraction step is an exact solution, within the limits of numerical precision, to the problem of propagation in free space, and the refraction step models the refractive index variances over a segment of the propagation path. By applying refraction for a segment of the propagation path, then diffracting over that same segment, this method forms a good approximation to true propagation through the atmospheric medium. Iterating over small segments of the total propagation path gives a good approximation to the problem of propagation over the entire path. Parameters in this model, such as initial beam profile and atmospheric constants, are easily modified in a

  6. High-altitude pulmonary edema among visitors to Summit County, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Sophocles, A M; Bachman, J

    1983-12-01

    Twenty-nine cases of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) affecting visitors to Summit County, Colorado, were analyzed. The mean age of the group was 37.8 years, and all the patients were male. These results differ from previous studies and suggest that there are two varieties of HAPE. The first type (type 1, or nonresident-ascent HAPE) affects visitors to altitudes above 8,000 ft (2,439 m). At altitudes up to 11,000 ft (3,354 m), it is a disease that affects primarily adult men. The second variety (type 2, or resident-reascent HAPE) affects residents of high altitudes when they descend to an elevation below 8,000 ft (2,430 m) and then return to high altitude. This type of HAPE affects male and female residents almost equally and is a disease of childhood and adolescence. PMID:6644250

  7. CONDOR: Long endurance high altitude vehicle, volume 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, L. Cullen; Augsburger, Bill; Cote, Thomas; Ghitea, Mihael; Lee, Il Sik; Lee, Susik; Leong, Gary

    1988-01-01

    The results of a design study resulting in the proposed CONDOR aircraft are presented. The basic requirements are for the aircraft to maintain continuous altitude at or above 45,000 feet for at least a 3-day mission, be able to comfortably support a two-man crew during this period with their field of vision not obstructed to a significant degree, carry a payload of 200 pounds, and provide a power supply to the payload of 2000 watts. The take-off and landing distances must be below 5000. feet, and time to reach cruise altitude must not exceed 3 hours. The subjects discussed are configuration selection, structural analysis, stability and control, crew and payload accomodations, and economic estimates.

  8. High altitude aerodynamic platform concept evaluation and prototype engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A design concept has been developed for maintaining a 150-pound payload at 60,000 feet altitude for about 50 hours. A 600-pound liftoff weight aerodynamic vehicle is used which operates at sufficient speeds to withstand prevailing winds. It is powered by a turbocharged four-stoke cycle gasoline fueled engine. Endurance time of 100 hours or more appears to be feasible with hydrogen fuel and a lighter payload. A prototype engine has been tested to 40,000 feet simulated altitude. Mismatch of the engine and the turbocharger system flow and problems with fuel/air mixture ratio control characteristics prohibited operation beyond 40,000 feet. But there seems to be no reason why the concept cannot be developed to function as analytically predicted.

  9. Stunting and the Prediction of Lung Volumes Among Tibetan Children and Adolescents at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Charles A; Garruto, Ralph M

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the extent to which stunting (height-for-age Z-scores ≤ -2) compromises the use of low altitude prediction equations to gauge the general increase in lung volumes during growth among high altitude populations. The forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume (FEV1) of 208 stunted and 365 non-stunted high-altitude Tibetan children and adolescents between the ages of 6 and 20 years are predicted using the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANESIII) and the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLF) equations, and compared to observed lung volumes. Stunted Tibetan children show smaller positive deviations from both NHANESIII and GLF prediction equations at most ages than non-stunted children. Deviations from predictions do not correspond to differences in body proportions (sitting heights and chest circumferences relative to stature) between stunted and non-stunted children; but appear compatible with the effects of retarded growth and lung maturation that are likely to exist among stunted children. These results indicate that, before low altitude standards can be used to evaluate the effects of hypoxia, or before high altitude populations can be compared to any other group, it is necessary to assess the relative proportion of stunted children in the samples. If the proportion of stunted children in a high altitude population differs significantly from the proportion in the comparison group, lung function comparisons are unlikely to yield an accurate assessment of the hypoxia effect. The best solution to this problem is to (1) use stature and lung function standards based on the same low altitude population; and (2) assess the hypoxic effect by comparing observed and predicted values among high altitude children whose statures are most like those of children on whom the low altitude spirometric standard is based-preferably high altitude children with HAZ-scores ≥ -1. PMID:26397381

  10. Exercise economy does not change after acclimatization to moderate to very high altitude.

    PubMed

    Lundby, C; Calbet, J A L; Sander, M; van Hall, G; Mazzeo, R S; Stray-Gundersen, J; Stager, J M; Chapman, R F; Saltin, B; Levine, B D

    2007-06-01

    For more than 60 years, muscle mechanical efficiency has been thought to remain unchanged with acclimatization to high altitude. However, recent work has suggested that muscle mechanical efficiency may in fact be improved upon return from prolonged exposure to high altitude. The purpose of the present work is to resolve this apparent conflict in the literature. In a collaboration between four research centers, we have included data from independent high-altitude studies performed at varying altitudes and including a total of 153 subjects ranging from sea-level (SL) residents to high-altitude natives, and from sedentary to world-class athletes. In study A (n=109), living for 20-22 h/day at 2500 m combined with training between 1250 and 2800 m caused no differences in running economy at fixed speeds despite low typical error measurements. In study B, SL residents (n=8) sojourning for 8 weeks at 4100 m and residents native to this altitude (n=7) performed cycle ergometer exercise in ambient air and in acute normoxia. Muscle oxygen uptake and mechanical efficiency were unchanged between SL and acclimatization and between the two groups. In study C (n=20), during 21 days of exposure to 4300 m altitude, no changes in systemic or leg VO(2) were found during cycle ergometer exercise. However, at the substantially higher altitude of 5260 m decreases in submaximal VO(2) were found in nine subjects with acute hypoxic exposure, as well as after 9 weeks of acclimatization. As VO(2) was already reduced in acute hypoxia this suggests, at least in this condition, that the reduction is not related to anatomical or physiological adaptations to high altitude but to oxygen lack because of severe hypoxia altering substrate utilization. In conclusion, results from several, independent investigations indicate that exercise economy remains unchanged after acclimatization to high altitude. PMID:17501869

  11. Transcriptomic analysis provides insight into high-altitude acclimation in domestic goats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qianzi; Huang, Wenyao; Guan, Jiuqiang; Jin, Long; Che, Tiandong; Fu, Yuhua; Hu, Yaodong; Tian, Shilin; Wang, Dawei; Jiang, Zhi; Li, Xuewei; Li, Mingzhou

    2015-08-10

    Domestic goats are distributed in a wide range of habitats and have acclimated to their local environmental conditions. To investigate the gene expression changes of goats that are induced by high altitude stress, we performed RNA-seq on 27 samples from the three hypoxia-sensitive tissues (heart, lung, and skeletal muscle) in three indigenous populations from distinct altitudes (600 m, 2000 m, and 3000 m). We generated 129Gb of high-quality sequencing data (~4Gb per sample) and catalogued the expression profiles of 12,421 annotated hircine genes in each sample. The analysis showed global similarities and differences of high-altitude transcriptomes among populations and tissues as well as revealed that the heart underwent the most high-altitude induced expression changes. We identified numerous differentially expressed genes that exhibited distinct expression patterns, and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variant-containing genes that were highly differentiated between the high- and low-altitude populations. These genes have known or potential roles in hypoxia response and were enriched in functional gene categories potentially responsible for high-altitude stress. Therefore, they are appealing candidates for further investigation of the gene expression and associated regulatory mechanisms related to high-altitude acclimation. PMID:25958351

  12. On the High- and Low- Altitude Limits of the Auroral Electric Field Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiff, P. H.; Lu, G.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.; Frank, L. A.; Craven, J. D.; Peterson, W. K.; Heelis, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    Using measurements from the High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) on the Dynamics-Explorer 1 (DE-1) spacecraft and the Low Altitude Plasma Instrument (LAPI) on Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2), we investigate both die high altitude and low altitude extents of the auroral acceleration region. To infer the high altitude limit, we searched the HAPI data base for evidence of upward-directed auroral electric fields located above the spacecraft when the HAPI spacecraft is above 9000 km altitude. We find that such acceleration is common when DE-1 flies through die auroral oval at an altitude of 9,000-11,000 km. At altitudes above 11,000 km, the fraction of the orbits with evidence of at least a 1000 V potential drop above the spacecraft falls, becoming essentially zero above an altitude of 15,000 km. Above that altitude, small (100 V) potential drops are frequently observed, but only rarely are approx. 1 kV potentials observed, typically associated with polar cap or 'theta' arcs or westward traveling surges. To investigate the low-altitude limit of the auroral acceleration region, we use conjunctions of DE 1 and DE 2 along auroral field lines and match the upgoing fluxes of ionospheric ions observed by DE 2 with the flux of accelerated upgoing ions observed at DE 1. Calculating the ionospheric scale height from the ion and electron temperatures and assuming that the parallel flow velocity is independent of height above 800 km, we calculate the altitude at which the upwelling ionospheric ions are effectively completely lost to upward acceleration. The initial lowest-altitude acceleration process could be either a perpendicular acceleration or a parallel electric field, but it must be sufficient to give the entire distribution escape energy. We find that in the two cases studied, near the region of peak auroral potential drop the altitude of this acceleration was around 1700 km (near the O/H neutral crossover altitude), but was significantly higher (approx. 2000 km) near the

  13. Body water metabolism in high altitude natives during and after a stay at sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. C.; Bardhan, Jaya; Swamy, Y. V.; Grover, A.; Nayar, H. S.

    1981-03-01

    Body fluid compartments were studied in a group of high altitude natives after a stay of two months at sea level and during 12 days at an altitude of 3,500 m. Measurements of total body water and extracellular water were made on day 3 and 12 of reinduction to altitude, while plasma volume was measured on day 12 only. The intracellular water, blood volume and red cell mass were computed from the above parameters. Total body water and intracellular water decreased by 3.3% (P<0.001) and 5.0% (P<0.001) respectively by the 3rd day at altitude and did not change thereafter. Extracellular water increased progressively at altitude, but the increase was not significant. Blood volume and red cell mass increased significantly while plasma volume decreased at altitude. These data were compared with that of low landers. This study suggested body hypohydration on high altitude induction in low landers as well as in high altitude natives on reinduction.

  14. High altitude medicine education in China: exploring a new medical education reform.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongjun; Luo, Rong; Li, Weiming; Huang, Jianjun; Zhou, Qiquan; Gao, Yuqi

    2012-03-01

    China has the largest plateau in the world, which includes the whole of Tibet, part of Qinghai, Xinjiang, Yunnan, and Sichuan. The plateau area is about 257.2×10(4) km(2), which accounts for about 26.8% of the total area of China. According to data collected in 2006, approximately twelve million people were living at high altitudes, between 2200 to 5200 m high, on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, there is a need for medical workers who are trained to treat individuals living at high altitudes. To train undergraduates in high altitude medicine, the College of High Altitude Military Medicine was set up at the Third Military Medical University (TMMU) in Chongqing in 1999. This is the only school to teach high altitude medicine in China. Students at TMMU study natural and social sciences, basic medical sciences, clinical medical sciences, and high altitude medicine. In their 5(th) year, students work as interns at the General Hospital of Tibet Military Command in Lhasa for 3 months, where they receive on-site teaching. The method of on-site teaching is an innovative approach for training in high altitude medicine for undergraduates. Three improvements were implemented during the on-site teaching component of the training program: (1) standardization of the learning progress; (2) integration of formal knowledge with clinical experience; and (3) coaching students to develop habits of inquiry and to engage in ongoing self-improvement to set the stage for lifelong learning. Since the establishment of the innovative training methods in 2001, six classes of high altitude medicine undergraduates, who received on-site teaching, have graduated and achieved encouraging results. This evidence shows that on-site teaching needs to be used more widely in high altitude medicine education. PMID:22429234

  15. Identification of novel serum peptide biomarkers for high-altitude adaptation: a comparative approach

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juan; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Siyuan; Yuan, Dongya; Guo, Yijiao; Jia, Cheng; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify serum biomarkers for screening individuals who could adapt to high-altitude hypoxia at sea level. HHA (high-altitude hypoxia acclimated; n = 48) and HHI (high-altitude hypoxia illness; n = 48) groups were distinguished at high altitude, routine blood tests were performed for both groups at high altitude and at sea level. Serum biomarkers were identified by comparing serum peptidome profiling between HHI and HHA groups collected at sea level. Routine blood tests revealed the concentration of hemoglobin and red blood cells were significantly higher in HHI than in HHA at high altitude. Serum peptidome profiling showed that ten significantly differentially expressed peaks between HHA and HHI at sea level. Three potential serum peptide peaks (m/z values: 1061.91, 1088.33, 4057.63) were further sequence identified as regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 fragment (ITIH4 347–356), regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H1 fragment (ITIH1 205–214), and isoform 1 of fibrinogen α chain precursor (FGA 588–624). Expression of their full proteins was also tested by ELISA in HHA and HHI samples collected at sea level. Our study provided a novel approach for identifying potential biomarkers for screening people at sea level who can adapt to high altitudes. PMID:27150491

  16. Identification of novel serum peptide biomarkers for high-altitude adaptation: a comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Siyuan; Yuan, Dongya; Guo, Yijiao; Jia, Cheng; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify serum biomarkers for screening individuals who could adapt to high-altitude hypoxia at sea level. HHA (high-altitude hypoxia acclimated; n = 48) and HHI (high-altitude hypoxia illness; n = 48) groups were distinguished at high altitude, routine blood tests were performed for both groups at high altitude and at sea level. Serum biomarkers were identified by comparing serum peptidome profiling between HHI and HHA groups collected at sea level. Routine blood tests revealed the concentration of hemoglobin and red blood cells were significantly higher in HHI than in HHA at high altitude. Serum peptidome profiling showed that ten significantly differentially expressed peaks between HHA and HHI at sea level. Three potential serum peptide peaks (m/z values: 1061.91, 1088.33, 4057.63) were further sequence identified as regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 fragment (ITIH4 347-356), regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H1 fragment (ITIH1 205-214), and isoform 1 of fibrinogen α chain precursor (FGA 588-624). Expression of their full proteins was also tested by ELISA in HHA and HHI samples collected at sea level. Our study provided a novel approach for identifying potential biomarkers for screening people at sea level who can adapt to high altitudes. PMID:27150491

  17. Identification of novel serum peptide biomarkers for high-altitude adaptation: a comparative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Siyuan; Yuan, Dongya; Guo, Yijiao; Jia, Cheng; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to identify serum biomarkers for screening individuals who could adapt to high-altitude hypoxia at sea level. HHA (high-altitude hypoxia acclimated; n = 48) and HHI (high-altitude hypoxia illness; n = 48) groups were distinguished at high altitude, routine blood tests were performed for both groups at high altitude and at sea level. Serum biomarkers were identified by comparing serum peptidome profiling between HHI and HHA groups collected at sea level. Routine blood tests revealed the concentration of hemoglobin and red blood cells were significantly higher in HHI than in HHA at high altitude. Serum peptidome profiling showed that ten significantly differentially expressed peaks between HHA and HHI at sea level. Three potential serum peptide peaks (m/z values: 1061.91, 1088.33, 4057.63) were further sequence identified as regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 fragment (ITIH4 347–356), regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H1 fragment (ITIH1 205–214), and isoform 1 of fibrinogen α chain precursor (FGA 588–624). Expression of their full proteins was also tested by ELISA in HHA and HHI samples collected at sea level. Our study provided a novel approach for identifying potential biomarkers for screening people at sea level who can adapt to high altitudes.

  18. The effect of high altitude and other risk factors on birthweight: independent or interactive effects?

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, G M; Moore, L G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether the decline in birth-weight with increasing altitude is due to an independent effect of altitude or an exacerbation of other risk factors. METHODS: Maternal, paternal, and infant characteristics were obtained from 3836 Colorado birth certificates from 1989 through 1991. Average altitude of residence for each county was determined. RESULTS: None of the characteristics related to birthweight (gestational age, maternal weight gain, parity, smoking, prenatal care visits, hypertension, previous small-for-gestational-age infant, female newborn) interacted with the effect of altitude. Birthweight declined an average of 102 g per 3300 ft (1000 m) elevation when the other characteristics were taken into account, increasing the percentage of low birthweight by 54% from the lowest to the highest elevations in Colorado. CONCLUSIONS: High altitude acts independently from other factors to reduce birthweight and accounts for Colorado's high rate of low birthweight. PMID:9224184

  19. Proteins differentially expressed in elicited cell suspension culture of Podophyllum hexandrum with enhanced podophyllotoxin content

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Podophyllotoxin (PTOX), the precursor for semi-synthesis of cancer therapeutics like etoposide, teniposide and etophos, is primarily obtained from an endangered medicinal herb, Podophyllum hexandrum Royle. PTOX, a lignan is biosynthetically derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the P. hexandrum cell proteome potentially related to PTOX accumulation in response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitation. High-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by colloidal Coomassie staining and mass spectrometric analysis was used to detect statistically significant changes in cell’s proteome. Result The HPLC analysis showed approximately 7–8 fold change in accumulation of PTOX, in the 12day old cell suspension culture (i.e. after 9days of elicitation) elicited with 100 μM MeJA as compared to the control. Using 2-DE a total of 233 spots was detected, out of which 105 spots were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS/MS. Data were subjected to functional annotation from a biological point of view through KEGG. The phenylpropanoid and monolignol pathway enzymes were identified, amongst these, chalcone synthase, polyphenol oxidase, caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase, S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases, caffeic acid-O-methyl transferase etc. are noted as important. The relation of other differentially accumulated proteins with varied effects caused by elicitors on P. hexandrum cells namely stress and defense related protein, transcription and DNA replication and signaling are also discussed. Conclusions Elicitor-induced PTOX accumulation in P. hexandrum cell cultures provides a responsive model system to profile modulations in proteins related to phenylpropanoid/monolignol biosynthesis and other defense responses. Present findings form a baseline for future investigation on a non-sequenced medicinal herb P. hexandrum at molecular level. PMID:22621772

  20. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Samir A.; Omar, Hany A.; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A.; AlSaeed, Mohammed S.; EL-Tarras, Adel E.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  1. Barcroft's bold assertion: All dwellers at high altitudes are persons of impaired physical and mental powers.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2016-03-01

    Barcroft's bold assertion that everyone at high altitude has physical and mental impairment compared with sea level was very provocative. It was a result of the expedition that he led to Cerro de Pasco in Peru, altitude 4300 m. Although it is clear that newcomers to high altitude have reduced physical powers, some people believe that this does not apply to permanent residents who have been at high altitude for generations. The best evidence supports Barcroft's contention, although permanent residents often perform better than acclimatized lowlanders. Turning to neuropsychological function, newcomers to high altitude certainly have some impairment, and there is evidence that the same applies to highlanders. However the notion that permanent residents are impaired is anathema to many people. For example the eminent Peruvian physician Carlos Monge took great exception to Barcroft's remark and even attributed it to the fact that Barcroft was suffering from acute mountain sickness when he made it! Monge referred to 'climatic aggression', by which he meant the negative consequences of the inevitable hypoxia of high altitude. Recent technological advances such as oxygen enrichment of room air can overcome this 'aggression'. This might be useful in some settings at high altitude such as a nursery where newborn babies are cared for, and possibly operating rooms where the surgeon's dexterity may be enhanced. Other situations might be dormitories, conference rooms, and perhaps some school rooms. These constitute possible ways by which the effects of Barcroft's assertion might be countered. PMID:25962370

  2. Transpulmonary plasma ET-1 and nitrite differences in high altitude pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Berger, Marc M; Dehnert, Christoph; Bailey, Damian M; Luks, Andrew M; Menold, Elmar; Castell, Christian; Schendler, Guido; Faoro, Vitalie; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Bärtsch, Peter; Swenson, Erik R

    2009-01-01

    Berger, Marc M., Christoph Dehnert, Damian M. Bailey, Andrew M. Luks, Elmar Menold, Christian Castell, Guido Schendler, Vitalie Faoro, Heimo Mairbäurl, Peter Bärtsch, and Eric R. Swenson. Transpulmonary plasma ET-1 and nitrite differences in high altitude pulmonary hypertension. High Alt. Med. Biol. 10:17-24, 2009.- Thirty-four mountaineers were studied at low (110 m) and high altitude (4559 m) to evaluate if increased pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) at high altitude is associated with increased pulmonary endothelin-1 (ET-1) availability and alterations in nitrite metabolism across the lung. Blood samples were obtained using central venous and radial artery catheters for plasma ET-1 and nitrite. Pulmonary blood flow was measured by inert gas rebreathing to calculate transpulmonary exchange of plasma ET-1 and nitrite, and PASP was assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. After ascent to high altitude, PASP increased from 23 +/- 4 to 39 +/- 10 mmHg. Arterial and central venous plasma ET-1 increased, while plasma nitrite did not change significantly. At low altitude there was a transpulmonary loss of plasma ET-1, but a transpulmonary gain at high altitude. In contrast was a transpulmonary gain of plasma nitrite at low altitude and a transpulmonary loss at high altitude. PASP positively correlated with a transpulmonary gain of plasma ET-1 and negatively correlated with a transpulmonary loss of plasma nitrite. These results suggest that a transpulmonary gain of plasma ET- 1 is associated with higher PASP at high altitude. Transpulmonary loss of plasma nitrite indicates either less pulmonary nitric oxide (NO) production, which contributes to higher PASP, or increased NO bioavailability arising from nitrite reduction, which may oppose ET-1-mediated vasoconstriction. PMID:19326597

  3. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) as environmental risk factors in remote high-altitude ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Kallenborn, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and their transformation products, are the most investigated organic environmental contaminants within the past five decades. Organochlorines have been found in virtually all environmental compartments on the globe. Severe environmental implications have been shown to be associated with the presence of the POP group of contaminants in the environment. However, in the late 1990s, Canadian scientists first pinpointed the implication of POPs for high-altitude environments in a comprehensive way (Blais et al., 1998, Nature 395, 585-588). Under certain meteorological and geographic conditions, high-altitude environments can serve as "cold condensers" for atmospheric POP loadings. Subsequent investigations in high-altitude environments in Asia, Europe, and North and South America have confirmed suspicions that high-altitude mountainous regions have the potential to serve as focus regions for POPs and even for nonpersistent, medium-lived contaminants, such as "currently used pesticides", due to cold condensation and deposition in high altitudes. Although the presence and the altitude-dependent increase of POP levels in mountainous regions are confirmed by many international studies, the ecotoxicological consequences still remain largely unknown. At present, only a few studies have been published describing the biological effects in high-altitude environments due to increased POP exposure. Therefore, in this early stage of the international research effort on the ecotoxicological risk evaluation of persistent contaminants in high-altitude, pristine ecosystems, the present review intends to summarize the current state of research on POPs in high-altitude environments and draw preliminary conclusions on possible consequences of the presence of POPs in mountainous ecosystems based on currently available information from alpine and related Arctic environments. PMID:16399161

  4. Domain Specific Changes in Cognition at High Altitude and Its Correlation with Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Das, Saroj K.; Dhar, Priyanka; Hota, Kalpana B.; Mahapatra, Bidhu B.; Vashishtha, Vivek; Kumar, Ashish; Hota, Sunil K.; Norboo, Tsering; Srivastava, Ravi B.

    2014-01-01

    Though acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia is reported to impair cognitive performance, the effects of prolonged exposure on different cognitive domains have been less studied. The present study aimed at investigating the time dependent changes in cognitive performance on prolonged stay at high altitude and its correlation with electroencephalogram (EEG) and plasma homocysteine. The study was conducted on 761 male volunteers of 25–35 years age who had never been to high altitude and baseline data pertaining to domain specific cognitive performance, EEG and homocysteine was acquired at altitude ≤240 m mean sea level (MSL). The volunteers were inducted to an altitude of 4200–4600 m MSL and longitudinal follow-ups were conducted at durations of 03, 12 and 18 months. Neuropsychological assessment was performed for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), attention, information processing rate, visuo-spatial cognition and executive functioning. Total homocysteine (tHcy), vitamin B12 and folic acid were estimated. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) showed temporal increase in the percentage prevalence of MCI from 8.17% on 03 months of stay at high altitude to 18.54% on 18 months of stay. Impairment in visuo-spatial executive, attention, delayed recall and procedural memory related cognitive domains were detected following prolonged stay in high altitude. Increase in alpha wave amplitude in the T3, T4 and C3 regions was observed during the follow-ups which was inversely correlated (r = −0.68) to MMSE scores. The tHcy increased proportionately with duration of stay at high altitude and was correlated with MCI. No change in vitamin B12 and folic acid was observed. Our findings suggest that cognitive impairment is progressively associated with duration of stay at high altitude and is correlated with elevated tHcy in the plasma. Moreover, progressive MCI at high altitude occurs despite acclimatization and is independent of vitamin B12 and folic acid. PMID:24988417

  5. Certification and safety aspects relating to the transport of passengers on high altitude balloons in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenmaker, Annelie

    2014-07-01

    High-altitude balloons typically fly between 25 and 50 km in altitude, which, while below the Karman line of 100 km, is yet far above the altitudes typically flown by aircraft. For example, the highest-flying commercial aircraft - the Concorde - had a maximum cruising altitude of only 18 km. zero2infinity, a Spanish company, is currently developing a pressurized pod named “bloon” which will be capable of lifting six people, including two pilot crew members and four paying passengers, to an altitude of 36 km through the use of high-altitude balloons. The boundary between Airspace and Outer Space has never been legally defined, mostly because of the lack of activities taking place between the altitude where airplanes fly and the lowest orbiting spacecraft. High-altitude balloons do fly at these in-between altitudes and the prospect of commercializing access to these parts of the stratosphere poses some questions in a new light. Given the relatively low altitude at which they fly, it may well be that these types of balloons would be considered to operate exclusively within air space. However, given the technology involved in crewed high altitude balloon flights, which is more similar to spacecraft engineering than to traditional hot-air or gas ballooning, it is necessary to evaluate the various legal regimes, codes, and regulations that would apply to such flights, especially regarding licenses and liabilities. For high altitude balloon flights commencing in Europe, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) would very likely be the competent certification or licensing agency for these flights, although there would likely be input from various national aviation authorities as well. However, because the European Commission (EC) has not yet issued regulations regarding commercial spaceflight, particularly the use of high altitude balloons, new rules and regulations governing such flights may still need to be drafted and promulgated. With the development of

  6. Radiation measurements aboard nasa ER-2 high altitude aircraft with the liulin-4J portable spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchihori, Y.; Benton, E.; Moeller, J.; Bendrick, G.

    The risks to aircrew health posed by prolonged exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation at aircraft altitudes have recently received renewed attention. Civil and military aircraft currently on the drawing board are expected to operate at higher altitudes (>12 km) and fly longer ranges than do existing aircraft, thereby exposing their crews to higher levels of ionizing radiation. for longer periods of time. We are currently carrying out dosimetric measurements of the ionizing radiation environment at ˜20 km altitude using portable Si detectors aboard NASA's two ER-2 high altitude research aircraft. The instruments, Liulin-4J, have been extensively calibrated at several particle accelerators. With these instruments, we can measure not only absorbed dose, but also variation of the absorbed dose as a function of time. We report radiation dose measurements as function of time, altitude, and latitude for several ER-2 missions.

  7. Rummy high-altitude pressure measurements and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, J.R.; Hereford, W.V.

    1982-01-01

    Five pressure-measurement canisters equipped with parachutes were deployed from an A7C aircraft on the Rummy test. Their altitudes above Yucca flat were over 8.5 km when the pressure pulse arrived. Three successful measurements were obtained. These time histories showed a more complicated behavior than histories obtained on Pahute Mesa tests because the Rummy event developed double spall closures over a large area. Excellent agreement was obtained between the observed pressure histories and those calculated from surface acceleration measurements. The Yucca Flat terrain was so level that pressure pulses were not appreciably changed or weakened by elevation differences.

  8. Flow separation in rocket nozzles under high altitude condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, R.; Génin, C.

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of flow separation in rocket nozzles is crucial for rocket engine design and optimum performance. Typically, flow separation is studied under sea-level conditions. However, this disregards the change of the ambient density during ascent of a launcher. The ambient flow properties are an important factor concerning the design of altitude-adaptive rocket nozzles like the dual bell nozzle. For this reason an experimental study was carried out to study the influence of the ambient density on flow separation within conventional nozzles.

  9. High-altitude medical and operations problems and solutions for the Millimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napier, Peter J.; West, John B.

    1998-07-01

    The 5000m altitude of the potential site for the Millimeter Array (MMA) in Northern Chile is so high that high-altitude problems for both the staff and equipment must be considered and included in planing for the facility. The very good accessibility of the site, only one hour's drive from the nearest town at altitude 2440m, makes it possible for MMA workers to sleep and perform much of their work at low altitude. Workers on the site will have 11 percent less oxygen available than workers at Mauna Kea Observatory. It is expected that the mental abilities and ability to do hard physical labor of workers on the high site will be reduced by 10 percent to 30 percent compared to sea-level. In-doors working areas on the MMA site will have their atmospheres oxygen enriched to provide an effective working altitude of 3500m where loss of mental ability should be small. Tests of oxygen enrichment at high-altitude Chilean mines and at the University of California White Mountain Research Station show that it is feasible and economic. Problems of equipment operation at 5000m altitude are expected to be manageable.

  10. Acetazolamide pre-treatment before ascending to high altitudes: when to start?

    PubMed

    Burtscher, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Faulhaber, Martin; Burtscher, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is the main responsible factor initiating the symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) in susceptible individuals. Measures that improve oxygenation and/or hasten acclimatization like pre-treatment with acetazolamide will prevent the development of AMS. We hypothesized that pre-treatment with acetazolamide the day before arrival at high altitude would elicit improved oxygenation compared to placebo not until the second day of high-altitude exposure. Fifteen study participants were randomly assigned in a double blind fashion to receive placebo or acetazolamide (2 × 125 mg) before (10 hours and 1 hour) exposure to high altitude (Monte Rosa plateau, 3480 m). Beside AMS scoring, heart rate, minute ventilation, and blood gas analyses were performed during rest and submaximal exercise at low altitude and on day 1, 2 and 3 at high altitude. From low altitude to day 1 at high altitude changes of pH (7.41 ± 0.01 vs. 7.48 ± 0.04) and HCO3 (24.0 ± 0.46 vs. 24.6 ± 2.6 mmol/L) within the placebo group differed significantly from those within the acetazolamide group (7.41 ± 0.01 vs. 7.41 ± 0.02; 23.6 ± 0.38 vs. 20.7 ± 1.8 mmol/L) (P < 0.05). AMS incidence tended to be lower with acetazolamide (P < 0.1). From low altitude to day 2 at high altitude changes of paO2 within the placebo group (75.3 ± 5.4 vs. 40.5 ± 3.4 mmHg) differed significantly from those within the acetazolamide group (76.5 ± 4.5 vs. 48.2 ± 4.9 mmHg) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, pre-treatment with low-dose acetazolamide on the day before ascending to high altitude tended to reduce AMS incidence on the first day at high altitude but improved oxygen availability to tissues not until the second day of exposure. Therefore, it is suggested that the beginning of pre-treatment with low-dose acetazolamide at least two days before arrival at high altitude, in contrast to usual recommendations, would be of greater beneficial effect on AMS development. PMID:25550957

  11. Metabolic Characteristics and Response to High Altitude in Phrynocephalus erythrurus (Lacertilia: Agamidae), a Lizard Dwell at Altitudes Higher Than Any Other Living Lizards in the World

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaolong; Xin, Ying; Wang, Huihui; Li, Weixin; Zhang, Yang; Liang, Shiwei; He, Jianzheng; Wang, Ningbo; Ma, Ming; Chen, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic response to high altitude remains poorly explored in reptiles. In the present study, the metabolic characteristics of Phrynocephaluserythrurus (Lacertilia: Agamidae), which inhabits high altitudes (4500 m) and Phrynocephalusprzewalskii (Lacertilia: Agamidae), which inhabits low altitudes, were analysed to explore the metabolic regulatory strategies for lizards living at high-altitude environments. The results indicated that the mitochondrial respiratory rates of P. erythrurus were significantly lower than those of P. przewalskii, and that proton leak accounts for 74~79% of state 4 and 7~8% of state3 in P. erythrurus vs. 43~48% of state 4 and 24~26% of state3 in P. przewalskii. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in P. erythrurus was lower than in P. przewalskii, indicating that at high altitude the former does not, relatively, have a greater reliance on anaerobic metabolism. A higher activity related to β-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (HOAD) and the HOAD/citrate synthase (CS) ratio suggested there was a possible higher utilization of fat in P. erythrurus. The lower expression of PGC-1α and PPAR-γ in P. erythrurus suggested their expression was not influenced by cold and low PO2 at high altitude. These distinct characteristics of P. erythrurus are considered to be necessary strategies in metabolic regulation for living at high altitude and may effectively compensate for the negative influence of cold and low PO2. PMID:23951275

  12. Acclimatisation in trekkers with and without recent exposure to high altitude.

    PubMed

    MacNutt, Meaghan J; Laursen, Paul B; Kedia, Shiksha; Neupane, Maniraj; Parajuli, Parash; Pokharel, Jhapindra; Sheel, A William

    2012-09-01

    In mountaineers, recent altitude exposure has been shown to improve climbing performance and clinical outcomes during re-exposure to high altitude. However, the timing of previous altitude exposure has not been clearly reported and previous findings might be driven by individuals who were still acclimatised at the time of re-exposure. Our goal was to determine whether recent altitude exposure would confer an advantage even in individuals who had de-acclimatised for ≥ 1 week before being re-exposure. Low-altitude natives kept a daily trekking log throughout 7- to 8-day trek from Lukla (2,840 m) to Gokyo Ri (5,360 m). Trekkers with recent altitude exposure (re-acclimatisers, RA; n = 20) walked 20% faster (p < 0.01), reported lower acute mountain sickness scores (9 ± 8 vs. 15 ± 13; p = 0.02), and used less medication to treat headache (p < 0.05) compared to trekkers with no recent altitude exposure (initial acclimatisers, IA; n = 30). On Gokyo Ri, S(p)O(2) was significantly higher in RA than IA trekkers (85 ± 6 vs. 78 ± 6; p = 0.01). These data indicate improved functional outcomes and physiological compensation for hypoxia in RA. However, even after de-acclimatisation for 7-30 days, it is possible that RA trekkers began the trek in a more acclimatised state than IA trekkers. RA trekkers might represent a self-selected group that has previously tolerated altitude well and has therefore opted to return. Some findings might also reflect improved psychological altitude tolerance in RA. A direct comparison of the functional and physiological responses to hypoxia throughout an initial and re-acclimatisation to high altitude is needed. PMID:22252248

  13. Cardiovascular effects of chronic carbon monoxide and high-altitude exposure

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, J.J. )

    1989-07-01

    At higher altitudes, ambient carbon monoxide levels are increasing with the number of residents and tourists and their use of motor vehicles and heating devices (such as fireplaces, furnaces, and stoves). Although chronic exposure to carbon monoxide or high altitude causes pronounced cardiovascular changes in humans as well as in animals, there is little information on the effects elicited by these stressors combined. Data from acute studies and theoretical considerations suggest that carbon monoxide inhaled at altitude may be more detrimental than carbon monoxide inhaled at sea level. It is not known, however, if the cardiovascular system adapts or deteriorates with continuous, concurrent exposure to carbon monoxide and high altitude. Male laboratory rats were exposed for six weeks in steel barometric chambers to altitudes ranging from 3,300 ft (ambient) to 18,000 ft and to concentrations ranging from 0 to 500 parts per million (ppm)2. Carbon monoxide had no effect on body weight at any altitude. There was a tendency for hematocrit to increase even at the lowest concentration of carbon monoxide (9 ppm), but the increase did not become significant until 100 ppm. At 10,000 ft, there was a tendency for total heart weight to increase in rats inhaling 100 ppm carbon monoxide. Although its effects on the heart at altitude are complex, carbon monoxide, in concentrations of 500 ppm or less, had little effect on the right ventricle; it did not exacerbate any effects due to altitude. There was a tendency for the left ventricle weight to increase with exposure to 35 ppm carbon monoxide at altitude, but the increase was not significant until 100 ppm carbon monoxide. Heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, and peripheral resistance were unaffected by exposure to 35 ppm carbon monoxide or 10,000-ft altitude singly or in combination.

  14. The oxygen consuming systems of the liver of mice exposed to simulated high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, K.; Aguilar, R.; Burgos, C.; Alvarez, J.

    1981-12-01

    Altitude hypoxia does not induce any changes in the enzymatic systems related to oxygen consumption in guinea pigs native of the Peruvian high altitudes. The biochemical changes frequently found in high altitude animals are the result of exposure to the low temperature of this environment rather than to hypoxia. In the present work, mice were chronically exposed to hypobaric hypoxia and maintained at equal temperature as the sea level control group, and measurements of enzymatic activities of the three major oxygen consuming systems of the liver were carried out, i.e., mitochondria, microsomes and peroxisomes. The results obtained have confirmed that hypoxia has no apparent influence on these enzymatic systems.

  15. Acute ischaemic stroke during short-term travel to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Chan, T; Wong, Winnie W Y; Chan, Jonathan K C; Ma, Johnny K F; Mak, Henry K F

    2012-02-01

    This is a case report of a young healthy adult who had acute cerebral infarcts after a short-term visit to high-altitude area. He developed acute onset of right-sided limb weakness and right hemianopia a few hours after arrival at an altitude of 3600 m by train. He was initially treated for high-altitude cerebral oedema but later computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed ischaemic infarcts in the medial left occipital lobe and left thalamus. Subsequent investigations, including laboratory tests and imaging including an echocardiogram, revealed no culpable predisposing factors. PMID:22302915

  16. Renin and aldosterone at high altitude in man.

    PubMed

    Keynes, R J; Smith, G W; Slater, J D; Brown, M M; Brown, S E; Payne, N N; Jowett, T P; Monge, C C

    1982-01-01

    Measurements have been made of hormonal changes relevant to salt and water balance during prolonged exposure to hypoxia to improve our understanding of the syndrome of acute mountain sickness. We have attempted to delineate the detailed inter-relationships between the renin-aldosterone and the vasopressin systems by a metabolically controlled study, involving an orthostatic stress (45 degrees head-up tilt) and an injection of a standard dose of ACTH to test adrenal responsiveness. Three Caucasian medical students underwent a 7-day equilibration at 150 m (Lima, Peru), followed by a 6-day sojourn at 4350 m (Cerro de Pasco, Peru) and a final 7 days at 150 m. Measurements were made of sodium and potassium balance, body weight and the 24-h renal excretion of vasopressin, cortisol and aldosterone 18-glucuronide. These variables showed little change, except for that of aldosterone 18-glucuronide, which fell sharply at altitude and rebounded even more sharply on return to sea level. At altitude, basal plasma levels of renin activity and aldosterone fell, and the response to orthostasis was attenuated, but the fall of plasma renin activity, as compared to plasma aldosterone, was delayed; on return to sea level this dissociation was exacerbated with the return of normal renin responsiveness lagging behind that of aldosterone. We suggest that unknown factors which dissociate the orthodox renin-aldosterone relationship, other than the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme, are operative on exposure to hypoxia. PMID:7057120

  17. O-THREE: A high altitude, remotely piloted vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A conceptual design for a remotely piloted vehicle to be used for ozone research above 80,000 feet was developed as part of the one-semester NASA/Universities Space Research Association Aerospace Design course at Case Western Reserve University in Fall 1989. The O-Three design team chose as its mission requirements a cruise altitude of 100,000 ft, a range of 1000 n.m., an endurance of 6 hrs., a 1000 lb payload, and a power to payload of 2 kW. These are based on the Boeing requirements for an ozone research vehicle. In addition, the vehicle should not be restricted to operation over any particular global location. Efforts were made to minimize atmospheric contamination that might increase the rate of ozone depletion and cause discrepancies in data accuracy. Design was not limited to today's level of technology. The design team was divided into four groups: aerodynamics, structures, stability, and control. The specifications and performance estimates for cruise at altitude are given in tabular form.

  18. Glucose Homeostasis During Short-term and Prolonged Exposure to High Altitudes

    PubMed Central

    Ader, Marilyn; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the literature related to high altitude medicine is devoted to the short-term effects of high-altitude exposure on human physiology. However, long-term effects of living at high altitudes may be more important in relation to human disease because more than 400 million people worldwide reside above 1500 m. Interestingly, individuals living at higher altitudes have a lower fasting glycemia and better glucose tolerance compared with those who live near sea level. There is also emerging evidence of the lower prevalence of both obesity and diabetes at higher altitudes. The mechanisms underlying improved glucose control at higher altitudes remain unclear. In this review, we present the most current evidence about glucose homeostasis in residents living above 1500 m and discuss possible mechanisms that could explain the lower fasting glycemia and lower prevalence of obesity and diabetes in this population. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate and maintain the lower fasting glycemia in individuals who live at higher altitudes could lead to new therapeutics for impaired glucose homeostasis. PMID:25675133

  19. Scientific Approach for Optimising Performance, Health and Safety in High-Altitude Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böcker, Michael; Vogy, Joachim; Nolle-Gösser, Tanja

    2008-09-01

    The ESO coordinated study “Optimising Performance, Health and Safety in High-Altitude Observatories” is based on a psychological approach using a questionnaire for data collection and assessment of high-altitude effects. During 2007 and 2008, data from 28 staff and visitors involved in APEX and ALMA were collected and analysed and the first results of the study are summarised. While there is a lot of information about biomedical changes at high altitude, relatively few studies have focussed on psychological changes, for example with respect to performance of mental tasks, safety consciousness and emotions. Both, biomedical and psychological changes are relevant factors in occupational safety and health. The results of the questionnaire on safety, health and performance issues demonstrate that the working conditions at high altitude are less detrimental than expected.

  20. Dual Wavelength Lidar Observation of Tropical High-Altitude Cirrus Clouds During the ALBATROSS 1996 Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, G.; Schafer, J.; Neuber, R.; Schrems, O.; McDermid, I. S.

    1998-01-01

    Dual wavelength aerosol lidar observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds were performed during the ALBATROSS 1996 campaign aboard the research vessel POLARSTERN on the Atlantic ocean in October-November 1996.

  1. [Functional morphology of resistant pulmonary vessels and capillaries in individual and species adaptation to high altitude].

    PubMed

    Kadyraliev, T K; Mirrakhimov, M M

    1992-07-01

    Morphological and structural rearrangement of resistant pulmonary vessels and alveolar capillaries was assessed in lowland animals (rabbits) during high-altitude adaptation, in aboriginal high-altitude species (yaks, mountain goats) and on native highlanders. Structural adaptive developments in pulmonary vessels and capillaries of high-altitude animals contribute to maximal facilitation of gas diffusion. Similar adaptive changes in pulmonary resistant vessels and capillaries of laboratory animals and in native highlanders are associated with pathological alterations manifest in the elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, increases in the thickness of the basal membrane of the air-blood barrier. In all the subjects studied the process of high-altitude adaptation is associated with hypertrophy of pulmonary endothelium. The intensification of pulmonary endothelium. The intensification of pulmonary endothelium metabolic activity may be directed at regulation of vascular tone. PMID:1421290

  2. Is Pulse Oximetry Useful for Screening Neonates for Critical Congenital Heart Disease at High Altitudes?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Julien I E

    2016-06-01

    Now that pulse oximetry is used widely to screen for critical congenital heart disease, it is time to consider whether this screening method is applicable to those who live at high altitudes. Consideration of basic physical principles and reports from the literature indicate that not only is the 95 % cutoff point for arterial oxygen saturation incorrect at high altitudes, but the lower saturations are accompanied by greater variability and therefore there is the possibility of a greater percentage of false-positive screening tests at high altitudes. Because of ethnic differences in response to high altitudes, normative data will have to be collected separately in different countries and perhaps for different ethnic groups. PMID:27090652

  3. High Diversity of Drosophilidae in High-Altitude Wet Forests in Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, L S; Garcia, A C L; Oliveira, G F; Rohde, C

    2016-06-01

    The high-altitude wet forests of northeastern Brazil, locally known as "Brejos de Altitude," are enclaves of the Atlantic Forest situated above 500 m, surrounded by dryland vegetation, the Caatinga. The aim of this study was to characterize drosophilid communities in these upland forests, since few ecological studies on drosophilid communities have been conducted in northeastern Brazil. Four sites were investigated in three different times of the year throughout standardized traps. The results reveal the presence of 55 different species in a total of 13,064 specimens collected. The data were evaluated using ecological diversity measurements and compared with those obtained for other environments in the same geographic region. As for species composition, the Bonito upland forest, in a boundary forest location, stood out as having high species richness. PMID:26957082

  4. Initial feasibility study of a microwave-powered sailplane as a high-altitude observation platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyson, H. H.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that a microwave-powered sailplane can be a reasonable substitute for a satellite in some missions requiring only limited coverage of the surface of the earth. A mode of operation in which the aircraft cyclically climbs to high altitude in the beam, and then glides for several hundred kilometers, is feasible and takes advantage of the inherent forward speed of the sailplane at high altitude.

  5. Aviation, high altitude, cumulative radiation exposure and their associations with cancer.

    PubMed

    Krain, L S

    1991-01-01

    High altitude exposure and/or aviator status correlate significantly with cancerous conditions of the skin, testicles, bladder, and thyroid based upon a comprehensive literature review and survey of governmental sources. Other lesser significantly associated conditions include leukemia, lymphosarcoma, and Hodgkin's disease. Although radiation and sunlight are strongly associated with cancer incidence and risk at high altitudes, other intervening variables are discussed and critically reviewed using malignant melanoma of the skin as an example. PMID:2056925

  6. White Mountain Research Station: 25 years of high-altitude research. [organization and functions of test facility for high altitude research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.

    1973-01-01

    The organization and functions of a test facility for conducting research projects at high altitudes are discussed. The projects conducted at the facility include the following: (1) bird physiology, (2) cardiorespiratory physiology, (3) endocrinological studies, (4) neurological studies, (5) metabolic studies, and (6) geological studies.

  7. Tracking performance with two breathing oxygen concentrations after high altitude rapid decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesthus, Thomas E.; Schiflett, Samuel G.; Oakley, Carolyn J.

    1992-01-01

    Current military aircraft Liquid Oxygen (LOX) systems supply 99.5 pct. gaseous Aviator's Breathing Oxygen (ABO) to aircrew. Newer Molecular Sieve Oxygen Generation Systems (MSOGS) supply breathing gas concentration of 93 to 95 pct. O2. The margin is compared of hypoxia protection afforded by ABO and MSOGS breathing gas after a 5 psi differential rapid decompression (RD) in a hypobaric research chamber. The barometric pressures equivalent to the altitudes of 46000, 52000, 56000, and 60000 ft were achieved from respective base altitudes in 1 to 1.5 s decompressions. During each exposure, subjects remained at the simulated peak altitude breathing either 100 or 94 pct. O2 with positive pressure for 60 s, followed by a rapid descent to 40000 ft. Subjects used the Tactical Life Support System (TLSS) for high altitude protection. Subcritical tracking task performance on the Performance Evaluation Device (PED) provided psychomotor test measures. Overall tracking task performance results showed no differences between the MSOGS breathing O2 concentration of 94 pct. and ABO. Significance RMS error differences were found between the ground level and base altitude trials compared to peak altitude trials. The high positive breathing pressures occurring at the peak altitudes explained the differences.

  8. High-Altitude Air Mass Zero Calibration of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Snyder, David B.

    2005-01-01

    Air mass zero calibration of solar cells has been carried out for several years by NASA Glenn Research Center using a Lear-25 aircraft and Langley plots. The calibration flights are carried out during early fall and late winter when the tropopause is at the lowest altitude. Measurements are made starting at about 50,000 feet and continue down to the tropopause. A joint NASA/Wayne State University program called Suntracker is underway to explore the use of weather balloon and communication technologies to characterize solar cells at elevations up to about 100 kft. The balloon flights are low-cost and can be carried out any time of the year. AMO solar cell characterization employing the mountaintop, aircraft and balloon methods are reviewed. Results of cell characterization with the Suntracker are reported and compared with the NASA Glenn Research Center aircraft method.

  9. Spacecraft charging at high altitudes - The SCATHA satellite program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, D. A.; Cauffman, D. P.; Schober, W.

    1975-01-01

    Satellites at synchronous altitude exhibit unexplained behavior in the operation of electronic circuits and in the performance of thermal controls. A possible explanation for this behavior is the fact that satellites can be charged to large negative voltages by energetic electrons in the space environment. A space measurements program entitled SCATHA has been formulated to determine the characteristics of the charging process, to measure the response of the satellite when charging occurs, and to evaluate the utility of various corrective techniques which can minimize differential charging on the satellite. The instrumentation will measure charging levels and rates of twenty samples of satellite materials, some of which will be modified to prevent buildup of electrostatic charge. The electromagnetic interference background on the satellite will be measured for comparison with MIL STD 461, Electromagnetic Interference Characteristics Requirements for Equipment.

  10. Plasma and electric field boundaries at high and low altitudes on July 29, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennell, J. F.; Johnson, R. G.; Young, D. T.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    Hot plasma observations at high and low altitudes were compared. The plasma ion composition at high altitudes outside the plasmasphere was 0+. Heavy ions were also observed at low altitudes outside the plasmasphere. It is shown that at times these ions are found well below the plasmapause inside the plasmasphere. Comparisons of the low altitude plasma and dc electric fields show that the outer limits of the plasmasphere is not always corotating at the low L-shells. The corotation boundary, the estimated plasmapause boundary at the boundary of the inner edge of plasma sheet ions were at the same position. The inner edge of plasma sheet electrons is observed at higher latitudes than the plasmasphere boundary during disturbed times. The inner edge of the plasma sheaths shows a strong dawn to dusk asymmetry. At the same time the inner edge of the ring current and plasma sheath also moves to high latitudes reflecting an apparent inflation of the magnetosphere.

  11. Considerations for resuscitation at high altitude in elderly and untrained populations and rescuers.

    PubMed

    Suto, Takashi; Saito, Shigeru

    2014-03-01

    With the development of transportation technologies, elderly people with chronic diseases are increasingly enjoying trekking and tours of nature resorts that include mountain highlands. Because of problems related to circulation, respiration, metabolism, and/or the musculoskeletal system in this population, the impact of high altitude on cardiopulmonary function is increased. Alpine accidents, therefore, tend to be more common in this population, and cases of cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) at high altitudes seem to be increasing. However, relatively few studies have described cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at high altitudes. Although insufficient studies are available to standardize CPR guidelines at high altitude at this time, the aim of this review is to summarize previous studies relevant to physiologic changes after exposure to high-altitude environments and exercise, which may be a risk factor for CPA in elderly trekkers. In addition, we summarize our previous studies that described the effect of CPR procedures on cardiopulmonary function in untrained rescuers. The available data suggest that prolonged CPR at high altitudes requires strenuous work from rescuers and negatively affects their cardiopulmonary physics and subjectively measured fatigue. Alpine rescue teams should therefore be well prepared for their increased physical burden and difficult conditions. Elderly travelers should be made aware of their increased risk of CPA in alpine settings. The use of mechanical devices to assist CPR should be considered wherever possible. PMID:24388065

  12. Seasonal changes of blood values in Rufous-collared sparrows from high and low altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Gricelda; Rosenmann, Mario; Novoa, F. Fernando

    1995-06-01

    Haematocrit, red blood cell (RBC) count, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration, and plasma solids concentration, were measured in populations of Zonotrichia capensis captured during different seasons of the year at altitudes ranging from sea level up to 3500 m. Winter blood values of birds from high and low altitude proved not to be significantly different. Similar results were obtained during summertime, with the exception of cell Hb content and concentration, which were about 10% higher in low-altitude birds. Seasonal changes in RBC size and number appear to be better correlated with the prevailing summer and winter conditions than with the particular altitudinal distribution of the examined populations.

  13. Prelude to Everest: Alexander M. Kellas and the 1920 high altitude scientific expedition to Kamet.

    PubMed

    Rodway, George W

    2004-01-01

    Following his untimely death due to illness during the early stages of the first Mount Everest Reconnaissance Expedition in 1921, Alexander M. Kellas has received relatively little attention in either mountaineering or scientific literature. He remains an obscure figure despite his noteworthy contributions to high altitude physiology and exploration. He can be considered not only one of the finest exploratory Himalayan mountaineers in history, but also the first person to apply state-of-the-art knowledge of high altitude physiology to field investigations at altitudes over 6000 m. By the time of his death, it is extremely likely that Kellas had spent more time above 6000 m than anyone on Earth, undertaking no fewer than eight Himalayan expeditions between 1907 and 1921. This article revisits and examines in some detail the most ambitious high altitude physiological field study undertaken through the second decade of the 20th century, A. M. Kellas and Henry T. Morshead's 1920 Kamet Expedition. This undertaking by Kellas and Morshead was unique because it specifically emphasized investigation of the practical difficulties inherent in climbing at very high altitudes. During this endeavor, Kellas carried out the first rigorous tests of the value of supplementary oxygen for climbing at high altitude. The results of the field studies conducted during the 1920 Kamet Expedition provided strong support for the use of supplementary oxygen at high altitude. However, after Kellas died on the approach march to Everest the following year, the British mountaineering establishment did not again have a similar proponent or exponent of extreme altitude field research until physiologist Griffith Pugh once again took up the challenge in the early 1950s. PMID:15454003

  14. The effect of 18 h of simulated high altitude on left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Snyder, Eric M; Hassager, Christian; Olson, Thomas P; Oh, Jae K; Johnson, Bruce D

    2006-11-01

    High altitude produces increased pulmonary capillary pressure by hypoxia induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. It is also possible that hypoxia results in mildly elevated left ventricular (LV) filling pressures that may contribute to the elevated capillary pressures. This study investigates the impact of simulated high altitude on global and regional echocardiographic measures of LV performance and filling pressure. Seventeen healthy individuals underwent transthoracic echocardiography, including tissue Doppler of the septal mitral annulus and basal segments before and after an 18-h overnight stay in a high altitude simulation tent with a FiO(2) of 12%, simulating an altitude of approximately 4,000 m above sea level. In simulated high altitude, the ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early myocardial relaxation velocity increased 22%, P < 0.001, and the Index of Myocardial Performance increased 30%, P < 0.01 due to an 58% increase in the isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT), P < 0.001. Simulated high altitude leads to a reduction in LV performance with an accompanying increase in markers of LV filling pressure. The significant changes in filling pattern and IVRT in the setting of normal and unchanged systolic function, indicates that hypoxia induces mild diastolic dysfunction in young healthy individuals. PMID:17016703

  15. Remote ischemic preconditioning for prevention of high-altitude diseases: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Berger, Marc Moritz; Macholz, Franziska; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Bärtsch, Peter

    2015-11-15

    Preconditioning refers to exposure to brief episodes of potentially adverse stimuli and protects against injury during subsequent exposures. This was first described in the heart, where episodes of ischemia/reperfusion render the myocardium resistant to subsequent ischemic injury, which is likely caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proinflammatory processes. Protection of the heart was also found when preconditioning was performed in an organ different from the target, which is called remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC). The mechanisms causing protection seem to include stimulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, increase in antioxidant enzymes, and downregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. These pathways are also thought to play a role in high-altitude diseases: high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is associated with decreased bioavailability of NO and increased generation of ROS, whereas mechanisms causing acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) seem to involve cytotoxic effects by ROS and inflammation. Based on these apparent similarities between ischemic damage and AMS, HACE, and HAPE, it is reasonable to assume that RIPC might be protective and improve altitude tolerance. In studies addressing high-altitude/hypoxia tolerance, RIPC has been shown to decrease pulmonary arterial systolic pressure in normobaric hypoxia (13% O2) and at high altitude (4,342 m). Our own results indicate that RIPC transiently decreases the severity of AMS at 12% O2. Thus preliminary studies show some benefit, but clearly, further experiments to establish the efficacy and potential mechanism of RIPC are needed. PMID:26089545

  16. Airway responses to methacholine and exercise at high altitude in healthy lowlanders.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Riccardo; Pompilio, Pasquale; Quaranta, Marco; Aliverti, Andrea; Kayser, Bengt; Miserocchi, Giuseppe; Fasano, Valter; Cogo, Annalisa; Milanese, Manlio; Cornara, Giuseppe; Brusasco, Vito; Dellacà, Raffaele

    2010-02-01

    Peribronchial edema has been proposed as a mechanism enhancing airway responses to constrictor stimuli. Acute exposure to altitude in nonacclimatized lowlanders leads to subclinical interstitial pulmonary edema that lasts for several days after ascent, as suggested by changes in lung mechanics. We, therefore, investigated whether changes in lung mechanics consistent with fluid accumulation at high altitude within the lungs are associated with changes in airway responses to methacholine or exercise. Fourteen healthy subjects were studied at 4,559 and at 120 m above sea level. At high altitude, both static and dynamic lung compliances and respiratory reactance at 5 Hz significantly decreased, suggestive of interstitial pulmonary edema. Resting minute ventilation significantly increased by approximately 30%. Compared with sea level, inhalation of methacholine at high altitude caused a similar reduction of partial forced expiratory flow but less reduction of maximal forced expiratory flow, less increments of pulmonary resistance and respiratory resistance at 5 Hz, and similar effects of deep breath on pulmonary and respiratory resistance. During maximal incremental exercise at high altitude, partial forced expiratory flow gradually increased with the increase in minute ventilation similarly to sea level but both achieved higher values at peak exercise. In conclusion, airway responsiveness to methacholine at high altitude is well preserved despite the occurrence of interstitial pulmonary edema. We suggest that this may be the result of the increase in resting minute ventilation opposing the effects and/or the development of airway smooth muscle force, reduced gas density, and well preserved airway-to-parenchyma interdependence. PMID:19940099

  17. High-Altitude Flight Cooling Investigation of a Radial Air-Cooled Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manganiello, Eugene J; Valerino, Michael F; Bell, E Barton

    1947-01-01

    An investigation of the cooling of an 18-cylinder, twin-row, radial, air-cooled engine in a high-performance pursuit airplane has been conducted for variable engine and flight conditions at altitudes ranging from 5000 to 35,000 feet in order to provide a basis for predicting high-altitude cooling performance from sea-level or low altitude experimental results. The engine cooling data obtained were analyzed by the usual NACA cooling-correlation method wherein cylinder-head and cylinder-barrel temperatures are related to the pertinent engine and cooling-air variables. A theoretical analysis was made of the effect on engine cooling of the change of density of the cooling air across the engine (the compressibility effect), which becomes of increasing importance as altitude is increased. Good agreement was obtained between the results of the theoretical analysis and the experimental data.

  18. Turbojet Performance and Operation at High Altitudes with Hydrogen and Jp-4 Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, W A; Kaufman, H R; Harp, J L , Jr; Chelko, L J

    1956-01-01

    Two current turbojet engines were operated with gaseous-hydrogen and JP-4 fuels at very high altitudes and a simulated Mach number of 0.8. With gaseous hydrogen as the fuel stable operation was obtained at altitudes up to the facility limit of about 90,000 feet and the specific fuel consumption was only 40 percent of that with JP-4 fuel. With JP-4 as the fuel combustion was unstable at altitudes above 60,000 to 65,000 feet and blowout limits were reached at 75,000 to 80,000 feet. Over-all performance, component efficiencies, and operating range were reduced considerable at very high altitudes with both fuels.

  19. Systemic oxygen extraction during exercise at high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Martin, D. S.; Cobb, A.; Meale, P.; Mitchell, K.; Edsell, M.; Mythen, M. G.; Grocott, M. P. W.; Adams, Tom; Biseker, Lindsay; Booth, Adam; Burdall, Oliver; Cobb, Alexandra; Cumpstey, Andrew; Dauncey, Steve; Edsell, Mark; Farrant, James; Feelisch, Martin; Fernandez, Bernadette; Firth, Oliver; Gilbert, Edward; Grant, Daniel; Grocott, Michael; Hennis, Phil; Jackson, Laura; Jenner, Will; van der Kaaij, Jildou; Khosravi, Maryam; Kortekaas, Edith; Levett, Denny; Mahomed, Zeyn; Martin, Daniel; Meale, Paula; Milledge, Jim; Mitchell, Kay; Mole, Damian; Moses, Oliver; Mythen, Michael; Rigat, Fabio; O'Doherty, Alasdair; Salam, Alex; Sanborn, Matt; Sheperdigian, Adam; Shrubb, Fiona; Simpson, Jo; Talbot, Nick; Wandrag, Liesel; Wijesingha, Savini; Williamson, Wilby; Woolley, Tom; Yow, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Background Classic teaching suggests that diminished availability of oxygen leads to increased tissue oxygen extraction yet evidence to support this notion in the context of hypoxaemia, as opposed to anaemia or cardiac failure, is limited. Methods At 75 m above sea level, and after 7–8 days of acclimatization to 4559 m, systemic oxygen extraction [C(a−v)O2] was calculated in five participants at rest and at peak exercise. Absolute [C(a−v)O2] was calculated by subtracting central venous oxygen content (CcvO2) from arterial oxygen content (CaO2) in blood sampled from central venous and peripheral arterial catheters, respectively. Oxygen uptake (V˙O2) was determined from expired gas analysis during exercise. Results Ascent to altitude resulted in significant hypoxaemia; median (range) SpO2 87.1 (82.5–90.7)% and PaO2 6.6 (5.7–6.8) kPa. While absolute C(a−v)O2 was reduced at maximum exercise at 4559 m [83.9 (67.5–120.9) ml litre−1 vs 99.6 (88.0–151.3) ml litre−1 at 75 m, P=0.043], there was no change in oxygen extraction ratio (OER) [C(a−v)O2/CaO2] between the two altitudes [0.52 (0.48–0.71) at 4559 m and 0.53 (0.49–0.73) at 75 m, P=0.500]. Comparison of C(a−v)O2 at peak V˙O2 at 4559 m and the equivalent V˙O2 at sea level for each participant also revealed no significant difference [83.9 (67.5–120.9) ml litre1 vs 81.2 (73.0–120.7) ml litre−1, respectively, P=0.225]. Conclusion In acclimatized individuals at 4559 m, there was a decline in maximum absolute C(a−v)O2 during exercise but no alteration in OER calculated using central venous oxygen measurements. This suggests that oxygen extraction may have become limited after exposure to 7–8 days of hypoxaemia. PMID:25501722

  20. Measurement of the Space Radiation Dose for the Flight Aircrew at High-Altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaewon; Park, Inchun; Kim, Junsik; Lee, Jaejin; Hwang, Junga; Kim, Young-chul

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes an experimental approach to evaluate the effective doses of space radiations at high-altitude by combining the measured data from the Liulin-6K spectrometer loaded onto the air-borne RC-800 cockpit and the calculated data from CARI-6M code developed by FAA. In this paper, 15 exposed dose experiments for the flight missions at a highaltitude above 10 km and 3 experiments at a normal altitude below 4 km were executed over the Korean Peninsula in 2012. The results from the high-altitude flight measurements show a dramatic change in the exposed doses as the altitude increases. The effective dose levels (an average of 15.27 mSv) of aircrew at the high-altitude are an order of magnitude larger than those (an average of 0.30 mSv) of the normal altitude flight. The comparison was made between the measure dose levels and the calculated dose levels and those were similar each other. It indicates that the annual dose levels of the aircrew boarding RC- 800 could be above 1 mSv. These results suggest that a proper procedure to manage the exposed dose of aircrew is required for ROK Air Force.

  1. Flight test evaluation of an RAF high altitude partial pressure protective assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, G. R.; Putnam, T. W.; Dana, W. J.; Enevoldson, E. K.; Winter, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    A partial pressure suit was evaluated during tests in an F-104 and F-15 as a protective garment for emergency descents. The garment is an pressure jerkin and modified anti-g suit combined with an oronasal mask. The garment can be donned and doffed at the aircraft to minimize thermal buildup. The oronasal mask was favored by the pilots due to its immobility on the face during high g-loading. The garment was chosen to provide optimum dexterity for the pilot, which is not available in a full pressure suit, while protecting the pilot at altitudes up to 18,288 meters, during a cabin decompression, and subsequent aircraft descent. During cabin decompressions in the F-104 and F-15, cabin pressure altitude was measured at various aircraft angles of attack, Mach numbers, and altitudes to determine the effect of the aerodynamic slipstream on the cabin altitude.

  2. Study on the radiation property of high temperature gas relation with flight altitude and velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Weihua; Xu, Hang; Xiang, Jingbo; Song, Jiangtao

    2013-08-01

    While flying in the aerosphere at high speed, it will form shock wave around the noddle of flight vehicle. The radiation of hot air behind shock wave is a major factor responsible for the infrared signature of the vehicle, and has an important influence on the infrared detection system mounted in it. Calculating the infrared radiation of high temperature gas is significant for selecting an optimal detection band and improving detection capability of the IR system. In this paper, focused on the high-speed flight in typical altitude, the line-by-line method was adopted to calculate the radiation properties of high temperature gas around the noddle of the vehicle to study the relationship with the flight altitude and velocity. At first, based on the flight altitude, the related parameters of the flow, such as pressure, temperature and density, were calculated using the standard atmosphere model. Then, the parameters of the air which had passed through the shock wave were calculated according to the shock wave theory. At last, the line-by-line method had been used to calculate the radiant absorption coefficient of high temperature gas in different velocity and flight altitude. The results of calculation show that in the same velocity, the average absorption coefficient of high temperature gas is smaller while the higher flight altitude; in the same flight altitude, the coefficient is bigger while the higher velocity. And so, while flying in low altitude with high speed, the radiation of the hot air should be taken into consideration more carefully for infrared system design.

  3. Control of breathing and the circulation in high-altitude mammals and birds.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Catherine M; Scott, Graham R

    2015-08-01

    Hypoxia is an unremitting stressor at high altitudes that places a premium on oxygen transport by the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Phenotypic plasticity and genotypic adaptation at various steps in the O2 cascade could help offset the effects of hypoxia on cellular O2 supply in high-altitude natives. In this review, we will discuss the unique mechanisms by which ventilation, cardiac output, and blood flow are controlled in high-altitude mammals and birds. Acclimatization to high altitudes leads to some changes in respiratory and cardiovascular control that increase O2 transport in hypoxia (e.g., ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia). However, acclimatization or development in hypoxia can also modify cardiorespiratory control in ways that are maladaptive for O2 transport. Hypoxia responses that arose as short-term solutions to O2 deprivation (e.g., peripheral vasoconstriction) or regional variation in O2 levels in the lungs (i.e., hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction) are detrimental at in chronic high-altitude hypoxia. Evolved changes in cardiorespiratory control have arisen in many high-altitude taxa, including increases in effective ventilation, attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and changes in catecholamine sensitivity of the heart and systemic vasculature. Parallel evolution of some of these changes in independent highland lineages supports their adaptive significance. Much less is known about the genomic bases and potential interactive effects of adaptation, acclimatization, developmental plasticity, and trans-generational epigenetic transfer on cardiorespiratory control. Future work to understand these various influences on breathing and circulation in high-altitude natives will help elucidate how complex physiological systems can be pushed to their limits to maintain cellular function in hypoxia. PMID:25446936

  4. Heart rate and respiratory rhythm dynamics on ascent to high altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipsitz, L. A.; Hashimoto, F.; Lubowsky, L. P.; Mietus, J.; Moody, G. B.; Appenzeller, O.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the alterations in autonomic control of heart rate at high altitude and to test the hypothesis that hypoxaemic stress during exposure to high altitude induces non-linear, periodic heart rate oscillations, similar to those seen in heart failure and the sleep apnoea syndrome. SUBJECTS--11 healthy subjects aged 24-64. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--24 hour ambulatory electrocardiogram records obtained at baseline (1524 m) and at 4700 m. Simultaneous heart rate and respiratory dynamics during 2.5 hours of sleep by fast Fourier transform analysis of beat to beat heart rate and of an electrocardiographically derived respiration signal. RESULTS--All subjects had resting hypoxaemia at high altitude, with an average oxyhaemoglobin saturation of 81% (5%). There was no significant change in mean heart rate, but low frequency (0.01-0.05 Hz) spectral power was increased (P < 0.01) at high altitude. Time series analysis showed a complex range of non-linear sinus rhythm dynamics. Striking low frequency (0.04-0.06 Hz) heart rate oscillations were observed during sleep in eight subjects at high altitude. Analysis of the electrocardiographically derived respiration signal indicated that these heart rate oscillations correlated with low frequency respiratory oscillations. CONCLUSIONS--These data suggest (a) that increased low frequency power during high altitude exposure is not simply attributable to increased sympathetic modulation of heart rate, but relates to distinctive cardiopulmonary oscillations at approximately 0.05 Hz and (b) that the emergence of periodic heart rate oscillations at high altitude is consistent with an unstable cardiopulmonary control system that may develop on acute exposure to hypoxaemic stress.

  5. High altitude medicine in China in the 21st century: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lan

    2014-01-01

    China has the largest plateau, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, where inhabited the most high altitude populations. Moreover, millions of people from plain areas come to the plateau for travel and work purposes and the number of the newcomers has been increasing every year. The hypoxic environment of plateau raised a series of related health issues in the new immigrants, so have created a special medical discipline - High Altitude Medicine. Over the past decades, researches on high altitude medicine have never being ceased in China, and lots of research findings have been reported. Application and practice of these achievements have greatly decreased the mobility and mortality of high-altitude diseases, however, there remained lots of questions to be elucidated. In view of this, the authors were granted a special project from the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China, and conducted a multi-center, prospective, on-scene high altitude medicine study for the acute mountain sickness. Some innovative findings were achieved, and the parameters for diagnosis and application conditions were proposed. Furthermore, the different diagnoses and treatment effects were compared, and a more standardized, reasonable scheme was drawn up. Regarding the unbalanced medical resources in the vast high altitude area, an application system for the public and the army has been established. In the 21st century, innovations in China and novel research approaches have provided great opportunities for the development of high altitude medicine. It is believed that the researchers in China are able to catch the opportunities and address the challenges. PMID:25937936

  6. Does chewing coca leaves influence physiology at high altitude?

    PubMed

    Casikar, V; Mujica, E; Mongelli, M; Aliaga, J; Lopez, N; Smith, C; Bartholomew, F

    2010-07-01

    Andean Indians have used coca leaves (Erythroxylon coca and related species) for centuries to enhance physical performance. The benefits and disadvantages of using coca leaf have been a subject of many political debates. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chewing coca leaves on biochemical and physiological parameters. Cutaneous microdialysis catheters were used to estimate systemic biochemical changes. We subjected 10 healthy adult males (local residents) in Cajamarca (Peru, altitude 2700 m) to a standardised exercise routine on a stationary cycle ergometer. The blood pressure, oxygen saturation (digital), pulse, VO2 max and ECG (Holter monitor) were recorded before the exercise. Cutaneous microdialysis catheters were introduced in the forearm. The subjects were given to chew 8 g of coca leaves with a small amount of lime. They were then placed on the cycle ergometer for 20 min. Blood pressure, oxygen saturation, pulse, ECG and VO2 max were recorded. Pyruvate, glucose, lactate, glycerol and glutamate levels were estimated. Oxygen saturation, blood pressure, and pulse rate did not show any significant changes between the two groups. Glucose levels showed hyperglycaemic response. Glycerol, Lactate and Pyruvate increased. Glutamate remained unchanged. Similar changes were not seen in the controls. These results suggest that coca leaves have blocked the glycolytic pathway of glucose oxidation resulting in accumulation of glucose and pyruvate. The energy requirement for exercise is being met with beta-oxidation of fatty acids. The glycerol released was also getting accumulated since its pathway for oxidation was blocked. These experimental findings suggest that chewing coca leaves is beneficial during exercise and that the effects are felt over a prolonged period of sustained physical activity. PMID:21731204

  7. Reconciling high-altitude precipitation in the upper Indus basin with glacier mass balances and runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immerzeel, Walter; Wanders, Niko; Lutz, Arthur; Shea, Joseph; Bierkens, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Mountain ranges in Asia are important water suppliers, especially if downstream climates are arid, water demands are high and glaciers are abundant. In such basins, the hydrological cycle depends heavily on high-altitude precipitation. Yet direct observations of high-altitude precipitation are lacking and satellite derived products are of insufficient resolution and quality to capture spatial variation and magnitude of mountain precipitation. Here we use glacier mass balances to inversely infer the high-altitude precipitation in the upper Indus basin and show that the amount of precipitation required to sustain the observed mass balances of large glacier systems is far beyond what is observed at valley stations or estimated by gridded precipitation products. An independent validation with observed river flow confirms that the water balance can indeed only be closed when the high altitude precipitation on average is more than twice as high and in extreme cases up to a factor of 10 higher than previously thought. We conclude that these findings alter the present understanding of high-altitude hydrology and will have an important bearing on climate change impact studies, planning and design of hydropower plants and irrigation reservoirs as well as the regional geopolitical situation in general.

  8. Reconciling high-altitude precipitation in the upper Indus basin with glacier mass balances and runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immerzeel, W. W.; Wanders, N.; Lutz, A. F.; Shea, J. M.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2015-11-01

    Mountain ranges in Asia are important water suppliers, especially if downstream climates are arid, water demands are high and glaciers are abundant. In such basins, the hydrological cycle depends heavily on high-altitude precipitation. Yet direct observations of high-altitude precipitation are lacking and satellite derived products are of insufficient resolution and quality to capture spatial variation and magnitude of mountain precipitation. Here we use glacier mass balances to inversely infer the high-altitude precipitation in the upper Indus basin and show that the amount of precipitation required to sustain the observed mass balances of large glacier systems is far beyond what is observed at valley stations or estimated by gridded precipitation products. An independent validation with observed river flow confirms that the water balance can indeed only be closed when the high-altitude precipitation on average is more than twice as high and in extreme cases up to a factor of 10 higher than previously thought. We conclude that these findings alter the present understanding of high-altitude hydrology and will have an important bearing on climate change impact studies, planning and design of hydropower plants and irrigation reservoirs as well as the regional geopolitical situation in general.

  9. Diabetes, trekking and high altitude: recognizing and preparing for the risks.

    PubMed

    Mohajeri, S; Perkins, B A; Brubaker, P L; Riddell, M C

    2015-11-01

    Although regular physical activity is encouraged for individuals with diabetes, exercise at high altitude increases risk for a number of potential complications. This review highlights our current understanding of the key physiological and clinical issues that accompany high-altitude travel and proposes basic clinical strategies to help overcome obstacles faced by trekkers with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Although individuals with diabetes have adaptations to the hypoxia of high altitude (increased ventilation, heart rate, blood pressure and hormonal responses), elevated counter-regulatory hormones can impair glycaemic control, particularly if mountain sickness occurs. Moreover, high-altitude-induced anorexia and increased energy expenditure can predispose individuals to dysglycaemia unless careful adjustments in medication are performed. Frequent blood glucose monitoring is imperative, and results must be interpreted with caution because capillary blood glucose meter results may be less accurate at high elevations and low temperatures. It is also important to undergo pre-travel screening to rule out possible contraindications owing to chronic diabetes complications and make well-informed decisions about risks. Despite the risks, healthy, physically fit and well-prepared individuals with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes who are capable of advanced self-management can be encouraged to participate in these activities and attain their summit goals. Moreover, trekking at high altitude can serve as an effective means to engage in physical activity and to increase confidence with fundamental diabetes self-management skills. PMID:25962798

  10. Reconciling high altitude precipitation in the upper Indus Basin with glacier mass balances and runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immerzeel, W. W.; Wanders, N.; Lutz, A. F.; Shea, J. M.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2015-05-01

    Mountain ranges in Asia are important water suppliers, especially if downstream climates are arid, water demands are high and glaciers are abundant. In such basins, the hydrological cycle depends heavily on high altitude precipitation. Yet direct observations of high altitude precipitation are lacking and satellite derived products are of insufficient resolution and quality to capture spatial variation and magnitude of mountain precipitation. Here we use glacier mass balances to inversely infer the high altitude precipitation in the upper Indus Basin and show that the amount of precipitation required to sustain the observed mass balances of the large glacier systems is far beyond what is observed at valley stations or estimated by gridded precipitation products. An independent validation with observed river flow confirms that the water balance can indeed only be closed when the high altitude precipitation is up to a factor ten higher than previously thought. We conclude that these findings alter the present understanding of high altitude hydrology and will have an important bearing on climate change impact studies, planning and design of hydropower plants and irrigation reservoirs and the regional geopolitical situation in general.

  11. Body and organ weights of rats exposed to carbon monoxide at high altitude.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J J

    1988-01-01

    Although chronic exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) or high altitude produces pronounced cardiovascular changes in humans as well as animals, there is little information on the effects elicited by these stressors combined. Theoretical considerations, as well as data from acute studies, suggest that CO inhaled at high altitude may be more detrimental than CO inhaled at low altitude. The purpose of these studies was to construct a system in which CO and altitude could be controlled precisely, and to investigate the effects of continuous exposure to CO and high altitude on body weights and hematocrit ratios, as well as heart, spleen, adrenals, kidneys, and pituitary weights. Male, laboratory rats were exposed for 6 wk in steel barometric chambers to (1) 100 ppm CO, (2) 15,000 ft simulated high altitude (SHA), and (3) CO at SHA. Altitude was simulated by a system of gate valves and a vacuum pump, and measured by an altimeter. CO, from high-pressure cylinders, was introduced into the air supplying each chamber through a mass flow controller and measured by a nondispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer. Although SHA had no affect on left ventricle plus septum (LV + S), adrenal, spleen, or kidney weights, SHA decreased body weights, and increased hematocrit ratios, as well as right ventricle (RV), total heart (HT), and pituitary weights. CO had no affect on body weights, RV, HT, adrenal, spleen, or kidney weights, but CO increased hematocrit ratios and LV + S weights. There was no significant interaction between SHA and CO on any parameter except kidney weight. These results indicate that, in general, the effects produced by 15,000 ft SHA are not intensified by exposure to 100 ppm CO. PMID:3351978

  12. NAU's High Altitude Balloon Satellite Program for Middle and High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Barry L.

    2007-10-01

    Northern Arizona University is entering its fourth year of offering a high altitude balloon satellite program designed for middle and high school students. The program, called Changes in Altitudes, was originally piloted by the NAU Space Grant, a member of the Arizona Space Grant Consortium, and is currently being supported by the University of Arizona's Phoenix Mars Mission as a robotics strand of its Education and Public Outreach program. Each year, ten schools from across Arizona, selected on a competitive basis, are invited to form teams of fours student each to design and build payloads that they will fly on a high altitude weather balloon up to 100, 000 ft above sea level. The baseline payload consists of 6-inch cube containing a pressure data logger, a temperature/relative humidity data logger, and a small film camera that is modified to take photographs approximately every three minutes during the flight. The students track the balloon from launch through burst to touch down. They recover their payloads in the field to retrieve the pressure and temperature profiles of the atmosphere and the images of the Earth recorded during the flight. A post-flight debriefing allows students to see and share their data with students from the other schools. Each school is participates in four flights over a period of two years allowing up to 16 students from each school to experience the project. In addition, the teachers are provided a training workshop and launch to prepare them for leading their student teams. In this poster, examples of student data are presented and the failures and successes are discussed, along with the challenges associated with offering such a program at the pre-college level. The handbook used for teacher training will be available, along with words of encouragement to build a similar program in your state.

  13. Which medications are safe and effective for improving sleep at high altitude?

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M

    2008-01-01

    Given the well-established problems with sleep at high altitude, it is not uncommon for people planning trips to the mountains to seek advice from clinicians regarding pharmacologic options for improving sleep during their trip. This review article considers the various medications that have been studied for this purpose at high altitude with an emphasis on both their efficacy and safety. The available data support the use of either acetazolamide, temazepam, zolpidem or zaleplon in this environment. Other agents commonly used at sea-level such as eszopiclone and diphenhydramine have not been studied at high altitude but are likely safe to use given their mechanism of action and known side effects. Limited evidence suggests diazepam may cause hypoventilation at high altitude and its use in this environment should be discouraged. Insufficient data exist to determine which agent is most effective at altitude nor do we know whether combination therapy with acetazolamide and a hypnotic agent offers any benefits over monotherapy. PMID:18800955

  14. Butterflies of the high-altitude Atacama Desert: habitat use and conservation

    PubMed Central

    Despland, Emma

    2014-01-01

    The butterfly fauna of the high-altitude desert of Northern Chile, though depauperate, shows high endemism, is poorly known and is of considerable conservation concern. This study surveys butterflies along the Andean slope between 2400 and 5000 m asl (prepuna, puna and Andean steppe habitats) as well as in high and low-altitude wetlands and in the neoriparian vegetation of agricultural sites. We also include historical sightings from museum records. We compare abundances between altitudes, between natural and impacted sites, as well as between two sampling years with different precipitation regimes. The results confirm high altitudinal turnover and show greatest similarity between wetland and slope faunas at similar altitudes. Results also underscore vulnerability to weather fluctuations, particularly in the more arid low-altitude sites, where abundances were much lower in the low precipitation sampling season and several species were not observed at all. Finally, we show that some species have shifted to the neoriparian vegetation of the agricultural landscape, whereas others were only observed in less impacted habitats dominated by native plants. These results suggest that acclimation to novel habitats depends on larval host plant use. The traditional agricultural environment can provide habitat for many, but not all, native butterfly species, but an estimation of the value of these habitats requires better understanding of butterfly life history strategies and relationships with host plants. PMID:25309583

  15. Preparation for high altitude expedition and changes in cardiopulmonary and biochemical laboratory parameters with ascent to high altitude in transplant patients and live donors.

    PubMed

    Suh, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Taehoon; Yi, Nam-Joon; Hong, Geun

    2015-11-01

    High-altitude climbing has many risks, and transplant recipients should discuss the associated risks and means of preparation with their physicians. This study aimed to help prepare athletic transplant donors and recipients for mountain climbing and was designed to evaluate physical performance and changes in cardiopulmonary and biochemical laboratory parameters of transplant recipients and donors in extreme conditions of high altitude. Ten subjects-six liver transplant recipients, two liver donors, and one kidney transplant recipient and his donor-were selected for this expedition to Island Peak, Himalayas, Nepal. Six healthy subjects joined the group for comparison. Blood samplings, vital signs, and oxygen saturation were evaluated, as was the Lake Louise acute mountain sickness score. All transplant subjects and donors reached the base camp (5150 m), and two liver transplant recipients and a liver donor reached the summit (6189 m). The blood levels of immunosuppressants were well maintained. The serum erythropoietin level was significantly higher in transplant recipients taking tacrolimus. With proper preparation, certain liver transplant patients and donors can tolerate strenuous physical activity and can tolerate high altitude similarly to normal healthy control subjects without significant biochemical laboratory changes in liver and renal function. PMID:26331794

  16. Effects of simulated heliox diving at high altitudes on blood cells, liver functions and renal functions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui-Jun; Fan, Dan-Feng; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Chen; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, Ru-Gang; Pan, Xiao-Wen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of simulated heliox diving at high altitudes on divers' blood cells, liver functions and renal functions. In this experiment, four divers lived for nine consecutive days in a dual-function high-low pressure chamber, which simulated air pressure at an altitude of 3,000 meters and at a 30-meter depth; an altitude of 4,000 meters and 30-meter depth; and at an altitude of 5,200 meters and 30 meters and 50 meters in depth. Total time underwater was 60 minutes. The subjects breathed heliox (with oxygen at 40% and helium at 60%) during the simulated 30-meter dive from zero altitude to 30 meters and while remaining underwater; they breathed air while ascending from 30 meters to 18. They breathed heliox (with oxygen at 26.7% and helium at 73.3%) in the simulated dive from zero altitude to 50 meters underwater, in remaining underwater and in ascending from 50 meters to 29; air while ascending from 29 meters to 18. Pure oxygen was breathed while ascending from 18 meters to the surface; then air. Results indicated: (1) the correlating indices of routine blood, liver and renal functions, and urine routine were all within normal reference ranges; and (2) the indices tested at other periods of time were not significantly different (p > 0.05) from the results at zero-meter level and 3,000-meter level. The study suggests that the heliox diving processes at different high altitudes simulated in this experiment have no significant impact upon divers' blood routine, liver functions and renal functions. PMID:23957203

  17. The use of high altitude remote sensing in determining existing vegetation and monitoring ecological stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, K.; Garcia, A.

    1972-01-01

    High altitude color and multispectral black and white photography was used to survey existing vegetation and soil conditions on the Empire Ranch where large scale development will soon begin. Utilizing stereo pairs of the high altitude color photography, four vegetation classifications were discernable as a function of topography and foliage characteristics. In contrast to the undeveloped Ranch, the same photography was used to detect environmental changes in the Tucson metropolitan area as a result of rapid urbanization. The most prevalent change related to development is the removal of vegetation in high density areas to allow for housing starts. Erosion then occurs where vegetation has been removed.

  18. Ozone Exposure System Designed and Used to High-Altitude Airship Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2005-01-01

    High-altitude airships can receive high doses of ozone over short mission durations. For example, in 1 year at an altitude of 70,000 ft, the ozone fluence (number arriving per unit area) can be as high as 1.2 1024 molecules/sq cm. Ozone exposure at these levels can embrittle materials or change the performance of solar cells. It is important to expose components and materials to the expected ozone dosage to determine if the ozone exposure could cause any mission-critical failures.

  19. Reduction of military high-altitude parachute entanglement using the controlled alternating parachute exit system.

    PubMed

    Hadley, A T; Hibst, J D

    1984-01-01

    The phenomenon of high-altitude parachute entanglement (HAE) results when two paratroopers have both a simultaneous and weak exit from the jump doors. They are then caught in the aircraft's slipstream and collision and entanglement follow. To avoid this phenomenon, the Controlled Alternating Parachute Exit System (CAPES) was introduced. CAPES focused upon manipulation of the exit technique to eliminate simultaneous paratrooper exit. Data from 90,894 consecutive parachute jumps revealed that the CAPES is highly successful in reducing te rate of high-altitude entanglement and the associated injury rate. CAPES seems to reduce the mid-altitude entanglement (MAE) and its injury rate but the results did not reach statistical significance as measured by chi square technique. The rate of landing or ground injuries, was essentially unchanged by the CAPES. PMID:6696698

  20. Relationship of High-Altitude Photoelectron Fluxes and Solar Zenith Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaosui; Liemohn, Michael; Bougher, Stephen W.; Mitchell, David L.

    2015-04-01

    Numerous studies have shown the ionosphere quantities' dependence on solar zenith angle (SZA), following Chapman theory. One would assume that photoelectron fluxes are also SZA dependent. However, high-altitude (~400 km) electron observations from magnetometer/electron reflectometer (MAG/ER) on board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) show that the high energy (>100 eV) photoelectron fluxes are better correlated with the solar irradiance solely, without SZA factored in, while the low energy is somehow insensitive to SZA. Such counterintuitive results are due to the existence of a photoelectron exobase, only above which the photoelectrons are able to transport and escape to high altitudes. Through our SuperThermal Electron Transport (STET) model, we have determined that this exobase is around an altitude of 150-160 km, above which the production rate is rather independent of SZA.

  1. Evidence for life history changes in high-altitude populations of three perennial forbs.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Georg; Edwards, Peter J; Dietz, Hansjorg

    2006-03-01

    Relatively little is known about how the life histories of perennial forb species, and especially their lifetime patterns of growth, vary across environmental gradients. We used a post hoc approach (herb-chronology) to determine plant age and previous growth (width of successive annual rings in roots) in three species of perennial forb (two long-lived species [Penstemon venustus, Lupinus laxiflorus] and one short-lived [Rudbeckia occidentalis]) along a 1000-m altitudinal gradient in the Wallowa Mountains (northeast Oregon, USA). Plants from the highest altitude tended to be considerably older and produced up to five times as many flowering shoots as lowland plants. In addition, mean ring widths of high-altitude plants were about half those of lowland plants. In plants from low and intermediate altitudes, ring width either decreased linearly or varied inconsistently during the life of the plant. In contrast, ring widths of high-altitude plants increased at first and later decreased, resulting in curvilinear growth trajectories that were highly consistent among species. Together, these data for three ecologically distinct forb species provide evidence of a consistent shift toward more conservative and strongly constrained life histories at higher altitudes. More generally, the results indicate the possible importance of changes in selection pressures across strong environmental gradients on life history strategies within a single species. PMID:16602296

  2. Solar Cell Short Circuit Current Errors and Uncertainties During High Altitude Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, David D.

    2012-01-01

    High altitude balloon based facilities can make solar cell calibration measurements above 99.5% of the atmosphere to use for adjusting laboratory solar simulators. While close to on-orbit illumination, the small attenuation to the spectra may result in under measurements of solar cell parameters. Variations of stratospheric weather, may produce flight-to-flight measurement variations. To support the NSCAP effort, this work quantifies some of the effects on solar cell short circuit current (Isc) measurements on triple junction sub-cells. This work looks at several types of high altitude methods, direct high altitude meas urements near 120 kft, and lower stratospheric Langley plots from aircraft. It also looks at Langley extrapolation from altitudes above most of the ozone, for potential small balloon payloads. A convolution of the sub-cell spectral response with the standard solar spectrum modified by several absorption processes is used to determine the relative change from AMO, lscllsc(AMO). Rayleigh scattering, molecular scatterin g from uniformly mixed gases, Ozone, and water vapor, are included in this analysis. A range of atmosph eric pressures are examined, from 0. 05 to 0.25 Atm to cover the range of atmospheric altitudes where solar cell calibrations a reperformed. Generally these errors and uncertainties are less than 0.2%

  3. Magnetospheric plasma studies using data from the Dynamics high and low altitude plasma instruments. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Barfield, J.N.

    1983-05-15

    Plasma data from the High and Low Altitude Plasma Instruments aboard the Dynamics 1 and 2 (DE-1 and DE-2) satellites have been analyzed to investigate high latitude plasma characteristics. DE-1 hot plasma observations in the mid-altitude polar cusp have shown evidence of a significant velocity filtering phenomenon which is consistent with a latitudinally narrow region of plasma injection located at a geocentric distance of about 8 earth radii (RE). This velocity filtering effect allows the measurement of much smaller flow velocities (about km/s) than have heretofore been possible with plasma measurements. Observations at altitudes of 2-3 RE indicate two distinct types of counterstreaming electron events. The type 1 event is characterized by two Maxwellian distribution functions, an isotropic high-temperature component and a field-aligned low temperature component. Type 1 events appear to involve wave-particle interactions while type 2 events imply direct acceleration by oppositely-directed electric fields pointing toward the satellite along magnetic field lines. The data indicate that cold ionospheric electrons, which carry the downward region-1 Birkeland currents on the morning side, are accelerated upward by potential drops of tens of eV at altitudes of several thousand kilometers. This acceleration process allows spacecraft above those altitudes to measure routinely the charge carriers of both downward and upward current systems.

  4. A strategy for oxygen conditioning at high altitude: comparison with air conditioning.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2015-09-15

    Large numbers of people live or work at high altitude, and many visit to trek or ski. The inevitable hypoxia impairs physical working capacity, and at higher altitudes there is also cognitive impairment. Twenty years ago oxygen enrichment of room air was introduced to reduce the hypoxia, and this is now used in dormitories, hotels, mines, and telescopes. However, recent advances in technology now allow large amounts of oxygen to be obtained from air or cryogenic oxygen sources. As a result it is now feasible to oxygenate large buildings and even institutions such as hospitals. An analogy can be drawn between air conditioning that has improved the living and working conditions of millions of people who live in hot climates and oxygen conditioning that can do the same at high altitude. Oxygen conditioning is similar to air conditioning except that instead of cooling the air, the oxygen concentration is raised, thus reducing the equivalent altitude. Oxygen conditioning on a large scale could transform living and working conditions at high altitude, where it could be valuable in homes, hospitals, schools, dormitories, company headquarters, banks, and legislative settings. PMID:26139219

  5. Physiology in Medicine: A physiologic approach to prevention and treatment of acute high-altitude illnesses.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M

    2015-03-01

    With the growing interest in adventure travel and the increasing ease and affordability of air, rail, and road-based transportation, increasing numbers of individuals are traveling to high altitude. The decline in barometric pressure and ambient oxygen tensions in this environment trigger a series of physiologic responses across organ systems and over a varying time frame that help the individual acclimatize to the low oxygen conditions but occasionally lead to maladaptive responses and one or several forms of acute altitude illness. The goal of this Physiology in Medicine article is to provide information that providers can use when counseling patients who present to primary care or travel medicine clinics seeking advice about how to prevent these problems. After discussing the primary physiologic responses to acute hypoxia from the organ to the molecular level in normal individuals, the review describes the main forms of acute altitude illness--acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral edema, and high-altitude pulmonary edema--and the basic approaches to their prevention and treatment of these problems, with an emphasis throughout on the physiologic basis for the development of these illnesses and their management. PMID:25539941

  6. High altitude bird migration at temperate latitudes: a synoptic perspective on wind assistance.

    PubMed

    Dokter, Adriaan M; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Kemp, Michael U; Tijm, Sander; Holleman, Iwan

    2013-01-01

    At temperate latitudes the synoptic patterns of bird migration are strongly structured by the presence of cyclones and anticyclones, both in the horizontal and altitudinal dimensions. In certain synoptic conditions, birds may efficiently cross regions with opposing surface wind by choosing a higher flight altitude with more favourable wind. We observed migratory passerines at mid-latitudes that selected high altitude wind optima on particular nights, leading to the formation of structured migration layers at varying altitude up to 3 km. Using long-term vertical profiling of bird migration by C-band Doppler radar in the Netherlands, we find that such migration layers occur nearly exclusively during spring migration in the presence of a high-pressure system. A conceptual analytic framework providing insight into the synoptic patterns of wind assistance for migrants that includes the altitudinal dimension has so far been lacking. We present a simple model for a baroclinic atmosphere that relates vertical profiles of wind assistance to the pressure and temperature patterns occurring at temperate latitudes. We show how the magnitude and direction of the large scale horizontal temperature gradient affects the relative gain in wind assistance that migrants obtain through ascending. Temperature gradients typical for northerly high-pressure systems in spring are shown to cause high altitude wind optima in the easterly sectors of anticyclones, thereby explaining the frequent observations of high altitude migration in these synoptic conditions. Given the recurring synoptic arrangements of pressure systems across temperate continents, the opportunities for exploiting high altitude wind will differ between flyways, for example between easterly and westerly oceanic coasts. PMID:23300969

  7. High Altitude Bird Migration at Temperate Latitudes: A Synoptic Perspective on Wind Assistance

    PubMed Central

    Dokter, Adriaan M.; Shamoun-Baranes, Judy; Kemp, Michael U.; Tijm, Sander; Holleman, Iwan

    2013-01-01

    At temperate latitudes the synoptic patterns of bird migration are strongly structured by the presence of cyclones and anticyclones, both in the horizontal and altitudinal dimensions. In certain synoptic conditions, birds may efficiently cross regions with opposing surface wind by choosing a higher flight altitude with more favourable wind. We observed migratory passerines at mid-latitudes that selected high altitude wind optima on particular nights, leading to the formation of structured migration layers at varying altitude up to 3 km. Using long-term vertical profiling of bird migration by C-band Doppler radar in the Netherlands, we find that such migration layers occur nearly exclusively during spring migration in the presence of a high-pressure system. A conceptual analytic framework providing insight into the synoptic patterns of wind assistance for migrants that includes the altitudinal dimension has so far been lacking. We present a simple model for a baroclinic atmosphere that relates vertical profiles of wind assistance to the pressure and temperature patterns occurring at temperate latitudes. We show how the magnitude and direction of the large scale horizontal temperature gradient affects the relative gain in wind assistance that migrants obtain through ascending. Temperature gradients typical for northerly high-pressure systems in spring are shown to cause high altitude wind optima in the easterly sectors of anticyclones, thereby explaining the frequent observations of high altitude migration in these synoptic conditions. Given the recurring synoptic arrangements of pressure systems across temperate continents, the opportunities for exploiting high altitude wind will differ between flyways, for example between easterly and westerly oceanic coasts. PMID:23300969

  8. Cold-induced peripheral vasodilation at high altitudes--a field study.

    PubMed

    Daanen, H A; van Ruiten, H J

    2000-01-01

    A significant reduction in cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) is observed at high altitudes. No agreement is found in the literature about acclimatization effects on CIVD. Two studies were performed to investigate the effect of altitude acclimatization on CIVD. In the first study 13 male subjects immersed the distal phalanx of the left middle finger in water of 0 degrees C for 30 min to evoke CIVD. Five subjects were exposed to altitudes of 5,100 to 7,000 m for 45 days (A). Eight subjects were exposed to an altitude of 5,100 m for <3 days (NA). The groups did not differ in age, weight, and stature. No significant differences were observed between A and NA. However, the maximum finger skin temperature of group A tended to return to sea level values (6.9 +/- 3.2 degrees C at sea level vs. 6.0 +/- 0.7 degrees C at altitude), while a strong reduction was observed for the NA group (7.7 +/- 4.3 degrees C vs. 3.7 +/- 3.1 degrees C). This indicates that the CIVD response at altitude tended to be stronger for the acclimatized subjects. In a second study, nine males were followed in a longitudinal study. CIVD was measured before, during and after 7 days of exposure to 4,350 m. Maximum finger skin temperature before and after exposure did not differ (8.5 +/- 2.6 degrees C vs. 7.8 +/- 1.6 degrees C), and was reduced at altitude. There was no difference in maximum finger skin temperature between the 7 days at altitude (e.g., 5.3 +/- 2.7 degrees C at day 2 and 4.7 +/- 1.1 degrees C at Day 7). It can be concluded that no acclimatization effects of CIVD occur during the first 7 days of altitude exposure, but that differences may occur after altitude exposure of several weeks. PMID:11256468

  9. The effect of chronic erythrocytic polycythemia and high altitude upon plasma and blood volumes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of two kinds of physiological chronic erythrocytic polycythemias in order to differentiate the specific effect of erythrocytic polycythemia from the general effects of high altitude upon the plasma volume. The two kinds were produced hormonally in female chickens, at sea level, or by protracted high-altitude exposures. It appears that the vascular system of the body may account for an increase in red blood cell mass either by reduction in plasma volume, or by no change in plasma volume, resulting in differential changes in total blood volumes.

  10. Identifying positive selection candidate loci for high-altitude adaptation in Andean populations

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    High-altitude environments (>2,500 m) provide scientists with a natural laboratory to study the physiological and genetic effects of low ambient oxygen tension on human populations. One approach to understanding how life at high altitude has affected human metabolism is to survey genome-wide datasets for signatures of natural selection. In this work, we report on a study to identify selection-nominated candidate genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in one highland group, Andeans from the South American Altiplano. We analysed dense microarray genotype data using four test statistics that detect departures from neutrality. Using a candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism-based approach, we identified genes exhibiting preliminary evidence of recent genetic adaptation in this population. These included genes that are part of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) pathway, a biochemical pathway involved in oxygen homeostasis, as well as three other genomic regions previously not known to be associated with high-altitude phenotypes. In addition to identifying selection-nominated candidate genes, we also tested whether the HIF pathway shows evidence of natural selection. Our results indicate that the genes of this biochemical pathway as a group show no evidence of having evolved in response to hypoxia in Andeans. Results from particular HIF-targeted genes, however, suggest that genes in this pathway could play a role in Andean adaptation to high altitude, even if the pathway as a whole does not show higher relative rates of evolution. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaptation and provide a basis for genotype/phenotype association studies that are necessary to confirm the role of putative natural selection candidate genes and gene regions in adaptation to altitude. PMID:20038496

  11. Comparative study of acetazolamide and spironolactone on body fluid compartments on induction to high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. V.; Jain, S. C.; Rawal, S. B.; Divekar, H. M.; Parshad, Rajinder; Tyagi, A. K.; Sinha, K. C.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were conducted on 29 male healthy subjects having no previous experience of living at high altitude. These subjects were divided into three groups, i.e., subjects treated with placebo, acetazolamide and spironolactone. These subjects were first studied in Delhi. The drug schedule was started 24 hour prior to the airlift of these subjects to an altitude of 3,500 m and was continued for 48 hour after arrival at high altitude. Total body water, extra cellular water, plasma volume, blood electrolytes, pH, pO2, pCO2 and blood viscosity were determined on 3rd and 12th day of their stay at high altitude. Total body water, extra cellular water intracellular water and plasma volume decreased on high altitude exposure. There was a further slight decrease in these compartments with acetazolamide and spironolactone. It was also observed that spironolactone drives out more water from the extracellular compartment. Loss of plasma water was also confirmed by increased plasma osmolality. Increase in arterial blood pH was noticed on hypoxic exposure but the increase was found less in acetazolamide and spironolactone cases. This decrease in pH is expected to result in better oxygen delivery to the tissues at the low oxygen tension. It was also confirmed because blood pO2 increased in both the groups. No significant change in plasma electrolytes was observed in subjects of various groups. Blood viscosity slightly increased on exposure to high altitude. The degree of rise was found less in the group treated with spironolactone. This study suggests that both the drugs are likely to be beneficial in ameliorating/prevention of AMS syndrome.

  12. Comparing the contributions of ionospheric outflow and high-altitude production to O+ loss at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, Michael; Curry, Shannon; Fang, Xiaohua; Johnson, Blake; Fraenz, Markus; Ma, Yingjuan

    2013-04-01

    The Mars total O+ escape rate is highly dependent on both the ionospheric and high-altitude source terms. Because of their different source locations, they appear in velocity space distributions as distinct populations. The Mars Test Particle model is used (with background parameters from the BATS-R-US magnetohydrodynamic code) to simulate the transport of ions in the near-Mars space environment. Because it is a collisionless model, the MTP's inner boundary is placed at 300 km altitude for this study. The MHD values at this altitude are used to define an ionospheric outflow source of ions for the MTP. The resulting loss distributions (in both real and velocity space) from this ionospheric source term are compared against those from high-altitude ionization mechanisms, in particular photoionization, charge exchange, and electron impact ionization, each of which have their own (albeit overlapping) source regions. In subsequent simulations, the MHD values defining the ionospheric outflow are systematically varied to parametrically explore possible ionospheric outflow scenarios. For the nominal MHD ionospheric outflow settings, this source contributes only 10% to the total O+ loss rate, nearly all via the central tail region. There is very little dependence of this percentage on the initial temperature, but a change in the initial density or bulk velocity directly alters this loss through the central tail. However, a density or bulk velocity increase of a factor of 10 makes the ionospheric outflow loss comparable in magnitude to the loss from the combined high-altitude sources. The spatial and velocity space distributions of escaping O+ are examined and compared for the various source terms, identifying features specific to each ion source mechanism. These results are applied to a specific Mars Express orbit and used to interpret high-altitude observations from the ion mass analyzer onboard MEX.

  13. Simultaneous radio and satellite optical measurements of high-altitude sprite current and lightning continuing current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Frey, Harald U.; Mende, Stephen B.; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Su, Han-Tzong; Chen, Alfred B.; Fukunishi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2006-10-01

    We report coordinated measurements of lightning and resulting sprites using ground-level magnetic field sensors (<0.1 Hz to 30 kHz bandwidth) and the ISUAL instrument on the FORMOSAT-2 satellite. These measurements demonstrate two distinct elements of the connection between the radio and optical emissions. First, the quasi-static magnetic field signature is tightly correlated with the low-altitude optical emissions from the lightning flash, indicating that this radio signature is produced by continuing lightning current. Second, in two events with strong postreturn stroke extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic pulses, the optical emissions demonstrate that there are no observable intensifications of low-altitude optical emissions associated with those pulses. If they were produced by a lightning process, such as an M-component, the connection between optical emissions and current seen in the return stroke and the continuing current suggests they should be visible. However, as has been observed previously, the bright, high-altitude optical emissions associated with the sprite are simultaneous with the ELF pulse. This is strong evidence that these ELF pulses originate in high-altitude electric current in the sprite itself and are not produced by a low-altitude lightning process.

  14. Moderate Altitude Affects High Intensity Running Performance in a Collegiate Women's Soccer Game.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Jonathan D; Hoffman, Jay R; McCormack, William P; Scanlon, Tyler C; Townsend, Jeremy R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fragala, Maren S; Fukuda, David H

    2015-09-29

    The effect of altitude on soccer game activity profiles was retrospectively examined in six NCAA Division I female soccer players. Comparisons were made between two matches played at sea level (SL) and one match played at a moderate altitude (1839 m). A 10-Hz global positioning system device was used to measure distance and velocity. The rate of total distance capacity (TDC) and high intensity running (HIR) as well as percent of time at HIR were evaluated. Significant differences were seen in the distance rate (120.55 ± 8.26 m·min-1 versus 105.77 ± 10.19 m·min-1) and the HIR rate (27.65 ± 9.25 m·min-1 versus 25.07 ± 7.66 m·min-1) between SL and altitude, respectively. The percent of time at HIR was not significantly different (p = 0.064), yet tended to be greater at SL (10.4 ± 3.3%) than at altitude (9.1 ± 2.2%). Results indicate that teams residing at SL and competing at a moderate altitude may have a reduced ability in distance covered and a high intensity run rate. PMID:26557199

  15. Airborne reconnaissance in the civilian sector - Agricultural monitoring from high-altitude powered platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngblood, J. W.; Jackson, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Design concepts and mission applications for unmanned high-altitude powered platforms (HAPPs) are discussed. A chemically powered HAPP (operating altitude 18-21 km, wingspan 26 m, payload 91 kg, endurance 2-3 days) would use current turboprop technology. A microwave-powered HAPP (operating altitude around 21 km, wingspan 57.9 m, payload 500 kg, endurance weeks or months) would circle within or perform boost-glide maneuvers around a microwave beam of density 1.1 kw/sq m. Of two solar-powered-HAPP designs presented, the more promising uses five vertical solar-panel-bearing fins, two of which can be made horizontal at night, (wingspan 57.8/98.3 m, payload 113 kg, endurance weeks or months). The operating altitude depends on the latitude and season: this HAPP design is shown to be capable of year-round 20-km-altitude flights over the San Joaquin Valley in California, where an agricultural-monitoring mission using Landsat-like remote sensors is proposed. Other applications may be better served by the characteristics of the other HAPPs. The primary advantage of HAPPs over satellites is found to be their ability to provide rapidly available high-resolution continuous or repetitive coverage of specific areas at relatively low cost.

  16. Subtle Cognitive Dysfunction in Resolving High Altitude Cerebral Edema Revealed by a Clock Drawing Test.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Ian; Zafren, Ken

    2016-06-01

    High altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is a life-threatening condition that can affect people who ascend to altitudes above 2500 m. Altered mental status and the presence of ataxia distinguishes HACE from acute mountain sickness (AMS). We describe a patient with subtle cognitive dysfunction, likely due to HACE that had not fully resolved. When he initially presented, the patient appeared to have normal mental status and was not ataxic. The diagnosis of HACE was missed initially but was made when further history became available. Cognitive dysfunction was then diagnosed based on abnormal performance of a clock drawing test. A formal mental status examination, using a clock drawing test, may be helpful in assessing whether a patient at high altitude with apparently normal mental status and with normal gait has HACE. PMID:26874815

  17. Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter (PM) at high altitude cities.

    PubMed

    Bravo Alvarez, H; Sosa Echeverria, R; Sanchez Alvarez, P; Krupa, S

    2013-02-01

    The Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter (PM) at high altitude urban areas in different countries, must consider the pressure and temperature due to the effect that these parameters have on the breath volume. This paper shows the importance to correct Air Quality Standards for PM considering pressure and temperature at different altitudes. Specific factors were suggested to convert the information concerning PM, from local to standard conditions, and adjust the Air Quality Standards for different high altitudes cities. The correction factors ranged from: 1.03 for Santiago de Chile to 1.47 for El Alto Bolivia. Other cities in this study include: Mexico City, México; La Paz, Bolivia; Bogota, Cali and Medellin, Colombia; Quito, Ecuador and Cuzco, Peru. If these corrections are not considered, the atmospheric concentrations will be underestimated. PMID:23202983

  18. Altitude and configuration of the water table in the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pabst, Marilyn E.; Stullken, Lloyd E.

    1985-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer in Kansas is a part of a regional system that extends from South Dakota to Texas. The aquifer in Kansas underlies an area of 31,000 square miles in the western and south-central part of the State. This aquifer is a hydraulically connected assemblage of unconsolidated water-bearing deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age. Maps published at a scale of 1:500 ,000 show the altitude and configuration of the water table in Kansas during 1980. Ground water moves from higher altitudes in the western part of the high Plains to lower altitudes in the eastern part at an average rate of 10 feet per mile. The up-gradient flexure of water-table contours along some of the valleys indicates that ground water discharges to the streams in those areas. (USGS)

  19. Altitude and configuration of the water table in the High Plains Aquifer in Kansas, 1970

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pabst, Marilyn E.; Stullken, Lloyd E.

    1985-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer in Kansas is a part of a regional system that extends from South Dakota to Texas. The aquifer in Kansas underlies an area of 31,000 square miles in the western and south-central part. This aquifer is a hydraulically connected assemblage of unconsolidated water-bearing deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age. Maps published at a scale of 1:500,000 show the altitude and configuration of the water table in Kansas during 1970. Ground water moved from higher altitudes in the western part of the High Plains to lower altitudes in the eastern part under an average gradient of 10 feet per mile. The upgradient flexure of water-table contours along some of the valleys indicates that ground water was discharged to the streams in those areas. (USGS)

  20. Altitude and configuration of the water table in the High Plains Aquifer in Kansas, 1965

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pabst, Marilyn E.; Stullken, Lloyd E.

    1982-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer in Kansas is a part of a regional system that extends South Dakota to Texas. The aquifer in Kansas underlies an area of 31,000 square miles in the western and south-central part. This aquifer is a hydraulically connected assemblage of unconsolidated water-bearing deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age. Maps published at a scale of 1:500,000 show the altitude and configuration of the water table in Kansas during 1965. Groundwater moved from higher altitudes in the western part of the High Plains to lower altitudes in the eastern part at a average rate of 10 ft/mi. The upgradient flexure of water table contours along some of the valleys indicates that groundwater was discharged to the streams in those areas. (USGS)

  1. HF echoes from ionization potentially produced by high-altitude discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Blanc, E.

    1997-03-01

    The presence of ionization associated with high-altitude discharges has been detected using an HF radar operating at 2.2, 2.5, and 2.8 MHz. On several occasions, oblique echoes lasting several hundred ms at night and 1{r_arrow}10s during the day were observed. The echoes turned on in several interpulse times of 70 ms and were generally correlated with strong lightning activity prior to onset. The angles of arrival of sferics detected at three goniometer stations were used to determine the distance to thunderstorms. The data are consistent with specular reflections from columns of ionization produced at 55{endash}65 km altitude and having minimum electron densities of 6{times}10{sup 4}{endash}10{sup 5}cm{sup {minus}3}. The source of the ionization is believed to be high-altitude discharges.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

  2. Low-pressure electrical discharge experiment to simulate high-altitude lightning above thunderclouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, M. A.; Srivastava, V.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, extremely interesting high-altitude cloud-ionosphere electrical discharges, like lightning above thunderstorms, have been observed from NASA's space shuttle missions and during airborne and ground-based experiments. To understand these discharges, a new experiment was conceived to simulate a thundercloud in a vacuum chamber using a dielectric in particulate form into which electrodes were inserted to create charge centers analogous to those in an electrified cloud. To represent the ionosphere, a conducting medium (metallic plate) was introduced at the top of the chamber. It was found that for different pressures between approximately 1 and 300 mb, corresponding to various upper atmospheric altitudes, different discharges occurred above the simulated thundercloud, and these bore a remarkable similarity to the observed atmospheric phenomena. At pressures greater than 300 mb, these discharges were rare and only discharges within the simulated thundercloud were observed. Use of a particulate dielectric was critical for the successful simulation of the high-altitude lightning.

  3. Novel Airborne Imaging Polarimeter Undergoes High-Altitude Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J.; Pingree, Paula J.; Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-01-01

    Optical and signal processing technologies for high-accuracy polarimetric imaging, aimed at studying the impact of atmospheric haze and clouds on Earth's climate, have been demonstrated on checkout flights aboard NASA's ER-2 aircraft.

  4. Pulmonary vascular reserve and exercise capacity at sea level and at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Pavelescu, Adriana; Faoro, Vitalie; Guenard, Hervé; de Bisschop, Claire; Martinot, Jean-Benoit; Mélot, Christian; Naeije, Robert

    2013-03-01

    It has been suggested that increased pulmonary vascular reserve, as defined by reduced pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and increased pulmonary transit of agitated contrast measured by echocardiography, might be associated with increased exercise capacity. Thus, at altitude, where PVR is increased because of hypoxic vasoconstriction, a reduced pulmonary vascular reserve could contribute to reduced exercise capacity. Furthermore, a lower PVR could be associated with higher capillary blood volume and an increased lung diffusing capacity. We reviewed echocardiographic estimates of PVR and measurements of lung diffusing capacity for nitric oxide (DL(NO)) and for carbon monoxide (DL(CO)) at rest, and incremental cardiopulmonary exercise tests in 64 healthy subjects at sea level and during 4 different medical expeditions at altitudes around 5000 m. Altitude exposure was associated with a decrease in maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), from 42±10 to 32±8 mL/min/kg and increases in PVR, ventilatory equivalents for CO2 (V(E)/VCO2), DL(NO), and DL(CO). By univariate linear regression VO2max at sea level and at altitude was associated with V(E)/VCO2 (p<0.001), mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPpa, p<0.05), stroke volume index (SVI, p<0.05), DL(NO) (p<0.02), and DL(CO) (p=0.05). By multivariable analysis, VO2max at sea level and at altitude was associated with V(E)/VCO2, mPpa, SVI, and DL(NO). The multivariable analysis also showed that the altitude-related decrease in VO2max was associated with increased PVR and V(E)/VCO2. These results suggest that pulmonary vascular reserve, defined by a combination of decreased PVR and increased DL(NO), allows for superior aerobic exercise capacity at a lower ventilatory cost, at sea level and at high altitude. PMID:23537256

  5. High-resolution Ceres High Altitude Mapping Orbit atlas derived from Dawn Framing Camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, Th.; Kersten, E.; Matz, K.-D.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    The Dawn spacecraft Framing Camera (FC) acquired over 2400 clear filter images of Ceres with a resolution of about 140 m/pixel during the six cycles in the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) phase between August 18 and October 21, 2015. We ortho-rectified the images from the first cycle and produced a global, high-resolution, controlled photomosaic of Ceres. This global mosaic is the basis for a high-resolution Ceres atlas that consists of 15 tiles mapped at a scale of 1:750,000. The nomenclature used in this atlas was proposed by the Dawn team and was approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The full atlas is available to the public through the Dawn Geographical Information System (GIS) web page

  6. High Altitude Remains Associated with Elevated Suicide Rates after Adjusting for Socioeconomic Status: A Study from South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaelim; Choi, Nari; Lee, Yu-Jin; An, Hyonggin; Kim, Namkug; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    There have been several studies supporting a possible relationship between high suicide rate and high altitude. However socioeconomic status may confound this association because low socioeconomic status, which is known to be related to a high suicide rate, is also associated with living at high altitude. This study aims to explore whether the relationship between high altitude and high suicide rate remains after adjusting for socioeconomic status in South Korea. We collected demographic data of completed suicides, the mean altitude of the district where each suicide took place, and the mean income of each district. We analyzed the data using regression analysis before and after adjustment for mean income. We found that there is a positive correlation between altitude and suicide rate, even after adjustment for mean income. Thus, altitude appears to be an independent risk factor for suicide. PMID:25395983

  7. The difference of mutation in the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma2 gene among people at high altitudes and low altitudes in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Yuji; Kashiwazaki, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma is present in two isoforms generated by alternative splicing, PPAR gamma 1 and PPAR gamma 2. A Pro12Ala polymorphism in human PPAR gamma 2 moderately reduces its transcriptional activity, and thus PPAR gamma 2 is thought to be a promising candidate gene for several human disorders, including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this report, we examined the polymorphism of the PPAR gamma 2 gene in people at high and low altitudes in Bolivia, and found a significant difference in the frequency of Ala carriers (Pro/Ala and Ala/Ala) between 153 native high-altitude Bolivian subjects (64.1%) and 288 low-altitude Bolivian subjects (37.9%). The frequency of this Ala allele in Bolivian subjects was fairly higher than that in other ethnic groups. As body mass index, however, was not associated with Pro12Ala polymorphism of the PPAR gamma 2 gene among either the high altitude Bolivians or low altitude Bolivians, Pro12Ala polymorphism of the gene has little relationship to obesity in Bolivians. PMID:16180511

  8. Increased Insulin Requirements During Exercise at Very High Altitude in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    de Mol, Pieter; de Vries, Suzanna T.; de Koning, Eelco J.P.; Gans, Rijk O.B.; Tack, Cees J.; Bilo, Henk J.G.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Safe, very high altitude trekking in subjects with type 1 diabetes requires understanding of glucose regulation at high altitude. We investigated insulin requirements, energy expenditure, and glucose levels at very high altitude in relation to acute mountain sickness (AMS) symptoms in individuals with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eight individuals with complication-free type 1 diabetes took part in a 14-day expedition to Mount Meru (4,562 m) and Mount Kilimanjaro (5,895 m) in Tanzania. Daily insulin doses, glucose levels, energy expenditure, and AMS symptoms were determined. Also, energy expenditure and AMS symptoms were compared with a healthy control group. RESULTS We found a positive relation between AMS symptoms and insulin requirements (r = 0.78; P = 0.041) and AMS symptoms and glucose levels (r = 0.86; P = 0.014) for Mount Kilimanjaro. Compared with sea level, insulin doses tended to decrease by 14.2% (19.7) (median [interquartile range]) (P = 0.41), whereas glucose levels remained stable up to 5,000 m altitude. However, at altitudes >5,000 m, insulin dose was unchanged (36.8 ± 17 vs. 37.6 ± 19.1 international units [mean ± SD] P = 0.75), but glucose levels (7.5 ± 0.6 vs. 9.5 ± 0.8 mmol/L [mean ± SD] P = 0.067) and AMS scores (1.3 ± 1.6 vs. 4.4 ± 4 points [mean ± SD] P = 0.091) tended to increase. Energy expenditure and AMS symptoms were comparable in both groups (P = 0.84). CONCLUSIONS Our data indicate that in complication-free individuals with type 1 diabetes, insulin requirements tend to increase during altitudes above 5,000 m despite high energy expenditure. This change may be explained, at least partly, by AMS. PMID:21273491

  9. High-Altitude Laser Altimetry from the Global Hawk UAV for Regional Mapping of Surface Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, J. B.; Rabine, D.; Wake, S.; Hofton, M. A.; Michell, S.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS) is a high-altitude, full-waveform, geodetic-imaging laser altimeter system of which a UAV-based version (LVIS-GH) is currently being tested. From 20 km above the surface in the Global Hawk UAV, LVIS-GH images surface topography and roughness (including forest height) across a 4 km wide swath using 15 m diameter footprints. In recent years, the LVIS has been flown at altitudes of up to 14 km over Greenland and Antarctica on flights up to 12 hours in duration, enabling the efficient and precise mapping of large areas from the air. The Global Hawk will extend this capability to up to 32 hours and altitudes approaching 20 km. In order to achieve decimeter level vertical precision and accuracy from high altitude, advanced parameter estimation techniques, based on those implemented in NASA's GEODYN software, are used to estimate the angular, spatial, and temporal biases required to accurately georeference the component lidar data sets. Data from specific in-air maneuvers are utilized in order to isolate the effects of different error sources and to break correlations between biases. Examples of high-altitude data and airborne/spaceborne sensor intercomparison and fusion will be shown. For example, the comparison of data from NASA's ICESat-1 mission with coincident LVIS data collected around 86S (the maximum extent of data collected during ICESat) to quantify inter-campaign biases in Icesat-1 elevation measurements and improve estimates of long -term elevation change rates of ice sheets will be shown. These results illustrate the utility of high-altitude wide swath imaging, particularly from platforms such as the Global-Hawk, for enhancing spacebased data sets.

  10. High Altitude Balloons as a Platform for Space Radiation Belt Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzino, L.; Buttenschoen, A.; Farr, Q.; Hodgson, C.; Johnson, W.; Mann, I. R.; Rae, J.; University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons (UA-HAB)

    2011-12-01

    The goals of the University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons Program (UA-HAB) are to i) use low cost balloons to address space radiation science, and ii) to utilise the excitement of "space mission" involvement to promote and facilitate the recruitment of undergraduate and graduate students in physics, engineering, and atmospheric sciences to pursue careers in space science and engineering. The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons (UA-HAB) is a unique opportunity for University of Alberta students (undergraduate and graduate) to engage in the hands-on design, development, build, test and flight of a payload to operate on a high altitude balloon at around 30km altitude. The program development, including formal design and acceptance tests, reports and reviews, mirror those required in the development of an orbital satellite mission. This enables the students to gain a unique insight into how space missions are flown. UA-HAB is a one and half year program that offers a gateway into a high-altitude balloon mission through hands on experience, and builds skills for students who may be attracted to participate in future space missions in their careers. This early education will provide students with the experience necessary to better assess opportunities for pursuing a career in space science. Balloons offer a low-cost alternative to other suborbital platforms which can be used to address radiation belt science goals. In particular, the participants of this program have written grant proposal to secure funds for this project, have launched several 'weather balloon missions', and have designed, built, tested, and launched their particle detector called "Maple Leaf Particle Detector". This detector was focussed on monitoring cosmic rays and space radiation using shielded Geiger tubes, and was flown as one of the payloads from the institutions participating in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP), organized by the Louisiana State University and the Louisiana

  11. A high-altitude barium radial injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Deehr, C. S.; Romick, G. J.; Olson, J. V.; Roederer, J. G.; Sydora, R.

    1980-01-01

    A rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, carried a new type of high-explosive barium shaped charge to 571 km, where detonation injected a thin disk of barium vapor with high velocity nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. The TV images of the injection are spectacular, revealing three major regimes of expanding plasma which showed early instabilities in the neutral gas. The most unusual effect of the injection is a peculiar rayed barium-ion structure lying in the injection plane and centered on a 5 km 'black hole' surrounding the injection point. Preliminary electrostatic computer simulations show a similar rayed development.

  12. Review of "Do High Flyers Maintain Their Altitude?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jaekyung

    2011-01-01

    The research report reviewed here concludes that many initially high-achieving students are falling further and further behind over the course of their years in school. The report intends to raise the alarm and to advocate for improved programs for these students. It is, however, a false alarm due to biased methodology and misleading arguments.…

  13. Experiments and Modeling of High Altitude Chemical Agent Release

    SciTech Connect

    Nakafuji, G.; Greenman, R.; Theofanous, T.

    2002-07-08

    Using ASCA data, we find, contrary to other researchers using ROSAT data, that the X-ray spectra of the VY Scl stars TT Ari and KR Aur are poorly fit by an absorbed blackbody model but are well fit by an absorbed thermal plasma model. The different conclusions about the nature of the X-ray spectrum of KR Aur may be due to differences in the accretion rate, since this Star was in a high optical state during the ROSAT observation, but in an intermediate optical state during the ASCA observation. TT Ari, on the other hand, was in a high optical state during both observations, so directly contradicts the hypothesis that the X-ray spectra of VY Sol stars in their high optical states are blackbodies. Instead, based on theoretical expectations and the ASCA, Chandra, and XMM spectra of other nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables, we believe that the X-ray spectra of VY Sol stars in their low and high optical states are due to hot thermal plasma in the boundary layer between the accretion disk and the surface of the white dwarf, and appeal to the acquisition of Chandra and XMM grating spectra to test this prediction.

  14. High-Altitude Particle Acceleration and Radiation in Pulsar Slot Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2004-01-01

    We explore the pulsar slot gap (SG) electrodynamics up to very high altitudes, where for most relatively rapidly rotating pulsars both the standard small-angle approximation and the assumption that the magnetic field lines are ideal stream lines break down. We address the importance of the electrodynamic conditions at the SG boundaries and the occurrence of a steady-state drift of charged particles across the SG field lines at very high altitudes. These boundary conditions and the cross-field particle motion determine the asymptotic behavior of the scalar potential at all radii from the polar cap (PC) to near the light cylinder. As a result, we demonstrate that the steady-state accelerating electric field, E(sub ll), must approach a small and constant value at high altitude above the PC. This E(sub ll) is capable of maintaining electrons moving with high Lorentz factors (approx. a few x 10(exp 7)) and emitting curvature gamma-ray photons up to nearly the light cylinder. By numerical simulations, we show that primary electrons accelerating from the PC surface to high altitude in the SG along the outer edge of the open field region will form caustic emission patterns on the trailing dipole field lines. Acceleration and emission in such an extended SG may form the physical basis of a model that can successfully reproduce some pulsar high-energy light curves.

  15. High-altitude dust layers on Mars: Observations with the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Talaat, Elsayed R.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Waugh, Darryn W.; McConnochie, Timothy H.

    2013-06-01

    Limb-scanning observations of Martian atmospheric dust with the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) over 3 Mars years indicate two distinct altitude layers with persistent maxima in the dust mixing ratio vertical profile. The first, lower maximum in the dust distribution profile is the "high-altitude tropical dust maximum" (HATDM) centered at 20-30 km, previously detected by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS). Through the observation period, the HATDM followed a repeatable seasonal cycle with a brief absence in early northern spring and reached its highest altitudes and largest amplitude during the dust storm season in southern spring and summer. The HATDM is likely maintained during the day by a combination of convective and topographic updrafts and then degraded at night by scavenging from water ice clouds. The second, upper maximum in the dust distribution profile, which we refer, for convenience, to as the upper dust maximum (UDM), is centered at 45-65 km and is only detected in daytime observations. We see additional evidence of its presence in the limited number of MCS aerosol opacity retrievals available at these altitudes. Comparable dust mixing ratios are nearly absent from this altitude range at night. This upper maximum is generally a northern hemisphere phenomenon, peaking in amplitude in northern summer and nearly absent from the TES observational domain during the dust storm season. We suggest topographic updrafts over Martian volcanoes, small particle size, diurnal transport associated with thermal tides, and scavenging by water ice as probable key factors in the creation of the UDM.

  16. Comparison of muscle force, muscle endurance, and electromyogram activity during an expedition at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Sakai, A.; Yanagidaira, N.; Asano, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Kashimura, N.; Ueda, G.; Wu, T.; Zhang, Y.

    1996-09-01

    Handgrip force (HF), maximal pinch force (MF), muscle endurance (ME), and the median power frequency (MdPF) of the activity shown in the electromyogram (EMG) were studied at various altitudes in eight normal healthy subjects. MF and ME were measured between the index finger and thumb, and all measurements were obtained at altitudes ranging from 610 to 4860 m during an expedition in the Qinghai Plateau in China. With the change in altitude HF, ME, and MF showed no significant change. Compared to the MdPF at 2260 m on ascent, the MdPF at other altitudes showed a significant decrease ( P<0.01). Thus, we conclude that muscle performance (HF, MF, and ME) was not affected by the environment at high altitude. However, MdPF was affected and the mean MdPF at 610 m after the expedition did not recover to initial values of MdPF. We suggest these results may have been affected by fatigue and chronic exposure to the hypobaric hypoxic environment, since the members of the expedition party expressed feelings of sluggishness and fatigue after the expedition.

  17. Pollen, mite and mould samplings by a personal collector at high altitude in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Fiorina, A; Legnani, D; Fasano, V; Cogo, A; Basnyat, B; Passalacqua, G; Scordamaglia, A

    1998-01-01

    The new personal portable sampler for detection of environmental biologic particles (Partrap FA52, Coppa, Biella, Italy) was used to evaluate both atmospheric and indoor biologic particles in bedding at high altitudes during two Italian scientific expeditions in Nepal, in 1994 and 1996 respectively. The sampling was performed outdoors and indoors at the following altitudes: Katmandu 1,330 meters (m), LuKla 2,800 m, Namche 3,500 m, Pericle 4,200 m and Piramide 5,050 m. In both expeditions each sample of outdoor and indoor air was obtained by sucking air into the sampler either against the wind during a 6-h period, from 9 am to 3 pm, or from bedding of inhabitants resident at the different altitudes for 5 min. The number of pollens, moulds and mites trapped in each sample were assessed. The statistical analysis of the results by Spearman correlation test revealed a significant inverse correlation (p < 0.02) between altitude and the number of the considered biologic particles for sampling carried out during both the 1994 and 1996 expeditions. Moreover, Wilcoxon paired test showed no significant difference between the biologic sampling obtained in the two expeditions. These results confirm the decrease of the environmental biologic charge in relation to the increase of altitude and prove the efficacy of Partrap FA52 in obtaining reproducible quantitative data. PMID:9615300

  18. High altitude measurements of fluctuations in the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.D. )

    1990-01-15

    The detection of fluctuations in the primordial CMB emission requires long integrations on limited areas of the sky; such extensive observations are best made from the ground on (high) dry sites. A current programme of measurements is described covering the frequency range 5 to 32 GHz using equipment at Teide Observatory, Tenerife, and in Antarctica. A bolometer system is under development for observations in the range 100 to 300 GHz to be made on Mauna Kea.

  19. Elevated plasma atrial natriuretic factor and vasopressin in high-altitude pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Cosby, R L; Sophocles, A M; Durr, J A; Perrinjaquet, C L; Yee, B; Schrier, R W

    1988-11-15

    A diagnosis of acute high-altitude pulmonary edema was made in five male skiers (age, 35.0 +/- 1.8 years) by history and physical examination and was confirmed by a characteristic chest radiogram showing alveolar infiltrates associated with a normal cardiac silhouette. Five healthy age- and sex-matched subjects with similar physical activity at the same altitude served as controls. Plasma sodium was 135.0 +/- 1.5 mmol/L in the acutely ill patients compared with 144.0 +/- 3.3 mmol/L in the controls (P less than 0.025). Mean plasma atrial natriuretic factor immunoreactivity averaged 17.6 +/- 5.6 pmol/L in patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema compared with 6.8 +/- 0.7 pmol/L in the controls at the same altitude (P less than 0.05). Elevated atrial natriuretic factor levels normalized to 7.5 +/- 1.9 pmol/L (P less than 0.05) during recovery in Denver (altitude, 1600 meters) 24 hours later. Plasma arginine vasopressin levels were 1.8 +/- 0.37 pmol/L in patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema at diagnosis compared with 0.92 +/- 0.28 pmol/L in controls (P = 0.07). The inappropriately elevated arginine vasopressin levels decreased to 1.29 +/- 0.37 pmol/L during recovery (P less than 0.025), but the lowered plasma sodium concentration had not normalized by discharge within 24-hours of transfer to Denver and averaged 135.8 +/- 1.2 mmol/L. The pathophysiologic implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:2973274

  20. Meteorological Support of the Helios World Record High Altitude Flight to 96,863 Feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.; Donohue, Casey J.; Wright, Patrick T.; DelFrate, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In characterizing and understanding atmospheric behavior when conducting high altitude solar powered flight research flight planning engineers and meteorologists are able to maximize the use of available airspace and coordinate aircraft maneuvers with pilots to make the best use of changing sun elevation angles. The result of this cooperative research produced a new world record for absolute altitude of a non-rocket powered aircraft of 96,863 ft (29,531.4 m). The Helios prototype solar powered aircraft, with a wingspan of 247 ft (75.0m), reached this altitude on August 13, 2001, off the coast of Kauai, Hawaii. The analyses of the weather characterization, the planning efforts, and the weather-of-the-day summary that led to at record flight are described in this paper.

  1. [The study of the somnological aspects of the human acute adaptation to the high-altitude].

    PubMed

    Voĭnov, V V; Verbitskiĭ, E V

    2014-01-01

    The primary reason of neocortex electrogenesis alteration in high-altitude adaptation at the altitude 3000-5600 m above sea level according to the EEG parameters of the night sleep and wakefulness is brain noncompensated superficial hypoxia. The situation becomes worse at the night by reason of apnoe/hypopnoe effects which occur because of muscular atony during slow sleep fall. The compensation these disorders at the expense of hypertensive and cardiorespiratory responses are identified by general mechanisms and individual strategy. PMID:25711108

  2. Gravity waves and high-altitude CO2 ice cloud formation in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, Erdal; Medvedev, Alexander S.; Hartogh, Paul

    2015-06-01

    We present the first general circulation model simulations that quantify and reproduce patches of extremely cold air required for CO2 condensation and cloud formation in the Martian mesosphere. They are created by subgrid-scale gravity waves (GWs) accounted for in the model with the interactively implemented spectral parameterization. Distributions of GW-induced temperature fluctuations and occurrences of supersaturation conditions are in a good agreement with observations of high-altitude CO2 ice clouds. Our study confirms the key role of GWs in facilitating CO2 cloud formation, discusses their tidal modulation, and predicts clouds at altitudes higher than have been observed to date.

  3. Variation in airborne 137Cs peak levels with altitude from high-altitude locations across Europe after the arrival of Fukushima-labeled air masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Olivier; Bieringer, Jacqueline; Dalheimer, Axel; Estier, Sybille; Evrard, Olivier; Penev, Ilia; Ringer, Wolfgang; Schlosser, Clemens; Steinkopff, Thomas; Tositti, Laura; de Vismes-Ott, Anne

    2015-04-01

    During the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident, a dozen of high-altitude aerosol sampling stations, located between 850 and 3,454 m above sea level (a.s.l.), provided airborne activity levels across Europe (Fig. 1). This represents at most 5% of the total number of aerosol sampling locations that delivered airborne activity levels (at least one result) in Europe, in connection with this nuclear accident. High altitude stations are typically equipped with a high volume sampler that collects aerosols on filters. The Fukushima-labeled air mass arrival and the peak of airborne cesium-137 (137Cs) activity levels were registered in Europe at different dates depending on the location, with differences up to a factor of six on a regional scale. Besides this statement related to lowland areas, we have compared the maximum airborne levels registered at high-altitude European locations (850 m < altitudes < 3450 m) with what was observed at the closest lowland location. The vertical distribution of 137Cs peak level was not uniform even after a long travel time/distance from Japan. This being true at least in the atmospheric boundary layer and in the lower free troposphere. Moreover the relation '137Csmax vs. altitude' shows a decreasing trend (Fig. 2). Results and discussion : Comparison of 137Cs and 7Be levels shows simultaneous increases at least when the 137Cs airborne level rose for the first time (Fig. 3). Zugspitze and Jungfraujoch stations attest of a time shift between 7Be and 137Cs peak that can be due to the particular dynamic of air movements at such high altitudes. After the 137Cs peak value, the plume concentration decreased whatever the 7Be level. Due to the cosmogenic origin of 7Be, its increase in the ground-level air is usually associated with downwind air movements, i.e. stratospheric air intrusions or at least air from high-tropospheric levels, into lower atmospheric layers. This means that Fukushima-labeled air masses registered at ground

  4. Carbohydrate supplementation and exercise performance at high altitude: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Samuel J; Golja, Petra; Macdonald, Jamie H

    2012-03-01

    Acute carbohydrate supplementation decreases effort perception and increases endurance exercise capacity at sea level. It also improves laboratory-based endurance performance at altitude. However, the effect of chronic carbohydrate supplementation at altitude, when acclimatization may attenuate carbohydrate effects, achieved doses are lower and metabolic effects may be different, is unknown and was therefore focused on in the present study. Forty-one members of a 22-day high altitude expedition were randomized in a double-blind design to receive either placebo or carbohydrate supplementation. Diet was manipulated with commercially available energy drinks consumed ad libitum throughout the expedition. Participants performed a mountaineering time trial at 5192 m, completed submaximal incremental exercise step tests to assess cardiovascular parameters before, during, and after the expedition, and recorded spontaneous physical activity by accelerometer on rest days. Compared to placebo, compliant individuals of the carbohydrate-supplemented group received daily an additional 3.5±1.4 g carbohydrate·kg body mass(-1). Compliant individuals of the carbohydrate supplemented group reported 18% lower ratings of perceived exertion during the time trial at altitude, and completed it 17% faster than the placebo group (both p<0.05 by t-test). However, cardiovascular parameters obtained during submaximal exercise and spontaneous physical activity on rest days were similar between the two groups (all p>0.05 by analysis of variance). This study utilized testing protocols of specific relevance to high altitude sojourners, including the highest mountaineering time trial completed to date at altitude. Chronic carbohydrate supplementation reduced ratings of perceived exertion and improved physical performance, especially during prolonged and higher intensity exercise tasks. PMID:22429229

  5. Temporal Development of Auroral Acceleration Potentials: High-Altitude Evolutionary Sequences, Drivers and Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Wilber, M.; Chaston, C.; Bonnell, J.; Mozer, F.; McFadden, J.; Goldstein, M.; Fillingim, M.

    2007-12-01

    The region above the auroral acceleration region is an integral part of the auroral zone electrodynamic system. At these altitudes (≥ 3 Re) we find the source plasma and fields that determine acceleration processes occurring at lower altitudes, which play a key role in the transport of mass and energy into the ionosphere. Dynamic changes in these high-altitude regions can affect and/or control lower-altitude acceleration processes according to how field-aligned currents and specific plasma sources form and decay and how they are spatially distributed, and through magnetic configuration changes deeper in the magnetotail. Though much progress has been made, the time development and consequential effects of the high-altitude plasma and fields are still not fully understood. We present Cluster multi-point observations at key instances within and above the acceleration region (> 3 RE) of evolving auroral arc current systems. Results are presented from events occurring under different conditions, such as magnetospheric activity, associations with density depletions or gradients, and Alfvenic turbulence. A preliminary survey, primarily at or near the plasma sheet boundary, indicates quasi- static up-down current pair systems are at times associated with density depletions and other instances occur in association with density gradients. The data suggest that such quasi-static current systems may be evolving from structured Alfvenic current systems. We will discuss the temporal development of auroral acceleration potentials, plasma and currents, including quasi-static system formation from turbulent systems of structured Alfvenic field-aligned currents, density depletion and constituent reorganization of the source and ionospheric plasma that transpire in such systems. Of particular emphasis is how temporal changes in magnetospheric source plasma and fields affect the development of auroral acceleration potentials at lower altitudes.

  6. Morphology of the internal organs in the adaptation of animals to high-altitude conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakhimov, Y. A.; Belkin, V. S.; Usmanov, M. U.

    1975-01-01

    Disruption of metabolic processes in the walls of the blood vessels as well as changes in the functional activity of the endocrine glands play an important role in the process of an animal's accommodation to a combination of stress factors. Preliminary training of animals for stays at high-altitude markedly reduces the severity of the morphological picture.

  7. Dry biomass and nitrogen content of cover crops grown in a high altitude arid system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is a high altitude intermountain desert valley with an average precipitation of 180 mm and average elevation of 2341 m. This region is one of the leading areas for fresh-market potato production in the USA. With more than 2,000 wells, irrigated agriculture is key for the e...

  8. Prevalence of Hypertension in a Tribal Land Locked Population at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Raina, Sunil Kumar; Chander, Vishav; Prasher, Chaman Lal; Raina, Sujeet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Extensive pubmed search reveals paucity of data on prevalence of hypertension in tribal population at high altitude. The data is all the more scarce from our part of India. Studies among tribal populations at high altitudes provide an interesting epidemiological window to study human evolution and adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia. Material and Methods. 401 participants above the age of 20 years were evaluated for blood pressure using a stratified simple random technique among villages located at high altitude. Results. Out of a total of 401 individuals studied 43 (males: 35; females: 8) were identified as hypertensive yielding a crude prevalence of 10.7%. The prevalence was higher in males (35/270; 12.9%) as compared to females (8/131; 6%). Prevalence was the highest in the age group of 30-39 among males (16/35; 45.7%) while it was the highest in the age group of 40-49 among females (7/8; 87%). Conclusions. Prevalence of 10.5% is noteworthy when interpreted in light of prevalence of hypertension in general population especially if hypobaric hypoxia is considered to have a protective effect on blood pressure in high altitude native populations. PMID:26989560

  9. System for beaming power from earth to a high altitude platform

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Herbert W.; Porter, Terry J.

    2002-01-01

    Power is transmitted to a high altitude platform by an array of diode pumped solid state lasers each operated at a single range of laser wavelengths outside of infrared and without using adaptive optics. Each laser produces a beam with a desired arrival spot size. An aircraft avoidance system uses a radar system for automatic control of the shutters of the lasers.

  10. REMOTE SENSING OF SEAGRASS WITH AVIRIS AND HIGH ALTITUDE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    On May 15,2002 AVIRlS (Advanced VisuaJ/lnfrared Imaging Spectrometer) data and high altitude aerial photographs were acquired tor coastal .waters from Cape Lookout to Oregon Inlet, North Carolina. The study encompasses extensive areas of seagrass, federally protected submersed, r...

  11. Prevalence of Hypertension in a Tribal Land Locked Population at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Sunil Kumar; Chander, Vishav; Prasher, Chaman Lal; Raina, Sujeet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Extensive pubmed search reveals paucity of data on prevalence of hypertension in tribal population at high altitude. The data is all the more scarce from our part of India. Studies among tribal populations at high altitudes provide an interesting epidemiological window to study human evolution and adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia. Material and Methods. 401 participants above the age of 20 years were evaluated for blood pressure using a stratified simple random technique among villages located at high altitude. Results. Out of a total of 401 individuals studied 43 (males: 35; females: 8) were identified as hypertensive yielding a crude prevalence of 10.7%. The prevalence was higher in males (35/270; 12.9%) as compared to females (8/131; 6%). Prevalence was the highest in the age group of 30–39 among males (16/35; 45.7%) while it was the highest in the age group of 40–49 among females (7/8; 87%). Conclusions. Prevalence of 10.5% is noteworthy when interpreted in light of prevalence of hypertension in general population especially if hypobaric hypoxia is considered to have a protective effect on blood pressure in high altitude native populations. PMID:26989560

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-Altitude Counties III Appendix III to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROVISIONS FOR ENGINE PROGRAMS Pt. 1068, App. III Appendix III to Part...

  13. Oxygen enrichment and its application to life support systems for workers in high-altitude areas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongling; Liu, Yingshu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Workers coming from lowland regions are at risk of developing acute mountain sickness (AMS) when working in low oxygen high-altitude areas. Objectives: The aim of this study was to improve the conditions that lead to hypoxia and ensure the safety of the high-altitude workers. We analyzed the influence of low atmospheric pressure on the oxygen enrichment process in high-altitude areas using an engineering method called low-pressure swing adsorption (LPSA). Methods: Fourteen male subjects were screened and divided into three groups by type of oxygen supply system used: (1) oxygen cylinder group; (2) LPSA oxygen dispersal group; and (3) control group. These tests included arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), pulse rate (PR), breaths per minute (BPM), and blood pressure (BP). Results: The results showed that after supplying oxygen using the LPSA method at the tunnel face, the SaO2 of workers increased; the incidence of acute mountain sickness, PR, and BPM significantly decreased. Conclusions: The LPSA life support system was found to be a simple, convenient, efficient, reliable, and applicable approach to ensure proper working conditions at construction sites in high-altitude areas. PMID:25000108

  14. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain; Haas, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    Rarefied flows about hypersonic vehicles entering the upper atmosphere or through nozzles expanding into a near vacuum may only be simulated accurately with a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Under this grant, researchers enhanced the models employed in the DSMC method and performed simulations in support of existing NASA projects or missions. DSMC models were developed and validated for simulating rotational, vibrational, and chemical relaxation in high-temperature flows, including effects of quantized anharmonic oscillators and temperature-dependent relaxation rates. State-of-the-art advancements were made in simulating coupled vibration-dissociation recombination for post-shock flows. Models were also developed to compute vehicle surface temperatures directly in the code rather than requiring isothermal estimates. These codes were instrumental in simulating aerobraking of NASA's Magellan spacecraft during orbital maneuvers to assess heat transfer and aerodynamic properties of the delicate satellite. NASA also depended upon simulations of entry of the Galileo probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter to provide drag and flow field information essential for accurate interpretation of an onboard experiment. Finally, the codes have been used extensively to simulate expanding nozzle flows in low-power thrusters in support of propulsion activities at NASA-Lewis. Detailed comparisons between continuum calculations and DSMC results helped to quantify the limitations of continuum CFD codes in rarefied applications.

  15. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain; Haas, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    Rarefied flows about hypersonic vehicles entering the upper atmosphere or through nozzles expanding into a near vacuum may only be simulated accurately with a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Under this grant, researchers enhanced the models employed in the DSMC method and performed simulations in support of existing NASA projects or missions. DSMC models were developed and validated for simulating rotational, vibrational, and chemical relaxation in high-temperature flows, including effects of quantized anharmonic oscillators and temperature-dependent relaxation rates. State-of-the-art advancements were made in simulating coupled vibration - dissociation - recombination for post-shock flows. Models were also developed to compute vehicle surface temperatures directly in the code rather than requiring isothermal estimates. These codes were instrumental in simulating aerobraking of NASA's Magellan spacecraft during orbital maneuvers to assess heat transfer and aerodynamic properties of the delicate satellite. NASA also depended upon simulations of entry of the Galileo probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter to provide drag and flow field information essential for accurate interpretation of an onboard experiment. Finally, the codes have been used extensively to simulate expanding nozzle flows in low-power thrusters in support of propulsion activities at NASA-Lewis. Detailed comparisons between continuum calculations and DSMC results helped to quantify the limitations of continuum CFD codes in rarefied applications.

  16. Carbonaceous aerosols at a high altitude location in central Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Z.; Kang, S.; Cao, J.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols receive increasing attention due to their role in many atmospheric processes. Especially, the carbonaceous aerosols may result in global climate change through scattering/absorbing the solar radiation. In the Himalayan region, the carbonaceous aerosols at high elevations may act as the major reason causing the melting of snow packs and glaciers, posing negative effects on water resources of millions of people. Nevertheless, large uncertainties still exist to evaluate the impact of aerosols in this area, primarily due to the scarcity of adequate information on the aerosol properties. In the study, total suspended particle samples were collected weekly from Aug. 2009 to Jul. 2010 at the north slope of Mt. Qomolangma (Mt. Everest), the summit of the world. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were analyzed using the thermal/optical reflectance (TOR) method. EC varied from below detection to 1.12 μg m-3 with the average of 0.26 μg m-3, while OC ranged from 0.23 μg m-3 to 7.22 μg m-3 with the average of 1.58 μg m-3. The OC and EC concentrations at Mt. Qomolangma are generally comparable to other remote sites like McMurdo in Antarctica, representing a regional background. Finally the source region and the warming effect of the carbonaceous aerosols are discussed.

  17. Analysis on high-altitude earth Orbit Satellite Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Hou, Y. W.; Yang, L.

    2016-02-01

    The difference is introduced between approx circular apogee orbit and approx circular perigee one by error transmitting at first. Then the characteristic of secant compensation is analysed when radar tracking object with high elevation. And two kinds of orbit force be pressed to, their perturbation influence and their earth-core angles are explained. And then the series of emulation results are shown including error data emulated with Monte Carlo method, the influence of the velocity increment from the ejecting force of spring while satellite-rocket separating and their perturbation influence and the length of influence of the data arc. Then decision analysis of Wald method and Bayesian statistics rule and the results from the two rule are introduced. So the suitable orbit determination decision is put forward from the decision method. Finally the result is tested reasonable and feasible via the real data. In the end it is useful to reference to make orbit decision in short injection of circular orbit far from the earth for calculating concurrently precise and timely.

  18. Nighttime chemistry at a high altitude site above Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven S.; Dubé, William P.; Tham, Yee Jun; Zha, Qiaozhi; Xue, Likun; Poon, Steven; Wang, Zhe; Blake, Donald R.; Tsui, Wilson; Parrish, David D.; Wang, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Nighttime reactions of nitrogen oxides influence ozone, volatile organic compounds, and aerosol and are thus important to the understanding of regional air quality. Despite large emissions and rapid recent growth of nitrogen oxide concentrations, there are few studies of nighttime chemistry in China. Here we present measurements of nighttime nitrogen oxides, NO3 and N2O5, from a coastal mountaintop site in Hong Kong adjacent to the megacities of the Pearl River Delta region. This is the first study of nighttime chemistry from a site within the residual layer in China. Key findings include the following. First, highly concentrated urban NOx outflow from the Pearl River Delta region was sampled infrequently at night, with N2O5 mixing ratios up to 8 ppbv (1 min average) or 12 ppbv (1 s average) in nighttime aged air masses. Second, the average N2O5 uptake coefficient was determined from a best fit to the available steady state lifetime data as γ(N2O5) = 0.014 ± 0.007. Although this determination is uncertain due to the difficulty of separating N2O5 losses from those of NO3, this value is in the range of previous residual layer determinations of N2O5 uptake coefficients in polluted air in North America. Third, there was a significant contribution of biogenic hydrocarbons to NO3 loss inferred from canister samples taken during daytime. Finally, daytime N2O5 mixing ratios were in accord with their predicted photochemical steady state. Heterogeneous uptake of N2O5 in fog is determined to be an important production mechanism for soluble nitrate, even during daytime.

  19. Particle kinetic simulation of high altitude hypervelocity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.

    1993-01-01

    In this grant period, the focus has been on enhancement and application of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) particle method for computing hypersonic flows of re-entry vehicles. Enhancement efforts dealt with modeling gas-gas interactions for thermal non-equilibrium relaxation processes and gas-surface interactions for prediction of vehicle surface temperatures. Both are important for application to problems of engineering interest. The code was employed in a parametric study to improve future applications, and in simulations of aeropass maneuvers in support of the Magellan mission. Detailed comparisons between continuum models for internal energy relaxation and DSMC models reveals that several discrepancies exist. These include definitions of relaxation parameters and the methodologies for implementing them in DSMC codes. These issues were clarified and all differences were rectified in a paper (Appendix A) submitted to Physics of Fluids A, featuring several key figures in the DSMC community as co-authors and B. Haas as first author. This material will be presented at the Fluid Dynamics meeting of the American Physical Society on November 21, 1993. The aerodynamics of space vehicles in highly rarefied flows are very sensitive to the vehicle surface temperatures. Rather than require prescribed temperature estimates for spacecraft as is typically done in DSMC methods, a new technique was developed which couples the dynamic surface heat transfer characteristics into the DSMC flow simulation code to compute surface temperatures directly. This model, when applied to thin planar bodies such as solar panels, was described in AIAA Paper No. 93-2765 (Appendix B) and was presented at the Thermophysics Conference in July 1993. The paper has been submitted to the Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer. Application of the DSMC method to problems of practical interest requires a trade off between solution accuracy and computational expense and limitations. A

  20. Aero-thermo-dynamic analysis of the Spaceliner-7.1 vehicle in high altitude flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuppardi, Gennaro; Morsa, Luigi; Sippel, Martin; Schwanekamp, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    SpaceLiner, designed by DLR, is a visionary, extremely fast passenger transportation concept. It consists of two stages: a winged booster, a vehicle. After separation of the two stages, the booster makes a controlled re-entry and returns to the launch site. According to the current project, version 7-1 of SpaceLiner (SpaceLiner-7.1), the vehicle should be brought at an altitude of 75 km and then released, undertaking the descent path. In the perspective that the vehicle of SpaceLiner-7.1 could be brought to altitudes higher than 75 km, e.g. 100 km or above and also for a speculative purpose, in this paper the aerodynamic parameters of the SpaceLiner-7.1 vehicle are calculated in the whole transition regime, from continuum low density to free molecular flows. Computer simulations have been carried out by three codes: two DSMC codes, DS3V in the altitude interval 100-250 km for the evaluation of the global aerodynamic coefficients and DS2V at the altitude of 60 km for the evaluation of the heat flux and pressure distributions along the vehicle nose, and the DLR HOTSOSE code for the evaluation of the global aerodynamic coefficients in continuum, hypersonic flow at the altitude of 44.6 km. The effectiveness of the flaps with deflection angle of -35 deg. was evaluated in the above mentioned altitude interval. The vehicle showed longitudinal stability in the whole altitude interval even with no flap. The global bridging formulae verified to be proper for the evaluation of the aerodynamic coefficients in the altitude interval 80-100 km where the computations cannot be fulfilled either by CFD, because of the failure of the classical equations computing the transport coefficients, or by DSMC because of the requirement of very high computer resources both in terms of the core storage (a high number of simulated molecules is needed) and to the very long processing time.

  1. Effect of acetazolamide on cytokines in rats exposed to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang; Wang, Rong; Xie, Hua; Sun, Yuhuan; Tao, Rui; Liu, Wenqing; Li, Wenbin; Lu, Hui; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-07-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a dangerous hypoxic illness that can affect humans who rapidly reach a high altitude above 2500m. In the study, we investigated the changes of cytokines induced by plateau, and the acetazolamide (ACZ) influenced the cytokines in rats exposed to high altitude. Wistar rats were divided into low altitude (Control), high altitude (HA), and high altitude+ACZ (22.33mg/kg, Bid) (HA+ACZ) group. The rats were acute exposed to high altitude at 4300m for 3days. The HA+ACZ group were given ACZ by intragastric administration. The placebo was equal volume saline. The results showed that hypoxia caused the heart, liver and lung damage, compared with the control group. Supplementation with ACZ significantly alleviated hypoxia-caused damage to the main organs. Compared with the HA group, the biochemical and blood gas indicators of the HA+ACZ group showed no difference, while some cytokines have significantly changed, such as activin A, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54), interleukin-1α,2 (IL-1α,2), l-selectin, monocyte chemotactic factor (MCP-1), CC chemokines (MIP-3α) and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1). Then, the significant difference pro-inflammatory cytokines in protein array were chosen for further research. The protein and mRNA content of pro-inflammatory cytokines MCP-1, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in rat lung were detected. The results demonstrated that the high altitude affected the body's physiological and biochemical parameters, but, ACZ did not change those parameters of the hypoxia rats. This study found that ACZ could decrease the content of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as MCP-1, IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ in rat lungs, and, the lung injury in the HA+ACZ group reduced. The mechanism that ACZ protected hypoxia rats might be related to changes in cytokine content. The reducing of the pro-inflammatory cytokines in rat lung might be other

  2. Sweat rate and prediction validation during high-altitude treks on Mount Kilimanjaro.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Richard R; Kenefick, Robert W; Muza, Stephen R; Hamilton, Scott W; Sawka, Michael N

    2013-02-15

    This study measured sweat rates (m(sw)) during high-altitude summer treks on Mt. Kilimanjaro to evaluate the efficacy of a recently developed fuzzy piecewise sweat prediction equation (Pw,sol) for application to high-altitude conditions. We hypothesized that the Pw,sol equation, adjusted for the barometric pressure (Pb) decreasing steadily at high altitude (Pw,sol+Alt), would allow for a more accurate prediction of m(sw) than Pw,sol unadjusted for altitude (Pw,sol(SL)). Fifteen men (43 ± 16 yr; 80 ± 22 kg) and seven women (46 ± 16 yr; 77 ± 18 kg) wearing hiking clothes (clo ∼1.15; clothing evaporative potential = 0.27) and carrying light loads (9 ± 2 kg), were studied during morning and afternoon treks (∼2-3 h) while ascending from 2,829 m to 3,505 m. After each trek, m(sw) was measured with specific biophysical parameters at 15-min intervals. During the trek day, Pb progressively declined (530 to 504 Torr), as solar radiation and ambient temperature (°C) rose transiently. During all treks, m(sw) ranged from 68 to 393 g·m(-2)·h(-1) (0.14 to 0.79 l/h). For each subject, derived Pw,sol(SL) and Pw,sol+Alt model outputs accurately predicted the morning and afternoon average m(sw) within a root mean square error of 0.145 l/h. No differences were found between Pw,sol(SL) and Pw,sol+Alt values. In conclusion, we report the first m(sw) measured during outdoor high-altitude activities and determined that Pw,sol(SL) equation can be used to predict fluid needs during high-altitude activities without alterations for lower Pb. This model prediction provides a valid water planning tool for outdoor activities at high altitude up to 3,500 m. PMID:23271696

  3. Evidence of adaptive evolution of alpine pheasants to high-altitude environment from mitogenomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Gu, Peng; Liu, Wei; Yao, Yong-fang; Ni, Qing-yong; Zhang, Ming-wang; Li, Di-yan; Xu, Huai-liang

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive evolutions to high-altitude adaptation have been intensively studied in mammals. However, considering the additional vertebrate groups, new perception regarding selection challenged by high-altitude stress on mitochondrial genome can be gained. To test this hypothesis, we compiled and analyzed the mitochondrial genomes of 5 alpine pheasants and 12 low-altitude species in Phasianidae. The results that evolutionary rates of ATP6 and ND6 showing significant fluctuation among branches when involved with five alpine pheasants revealed both genes might have implications with adapting to highland environment. The radical physico-chemical property changes identified by the modified MM01 model, including composition (C) and equilibrium constant (ionization of COOH) (Pk') in ATP6 and beta-structure tendencies (Pβ), Pk', and long-range non-bonded energy (El) in ND6, suggested that minor overall adjustments in size, protein conformation and relative orientation of reaction interfaces have been optimized to provide the ideal environments for electron transfer, proton translocation and generation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Additionally, three unique substitution sites were identified under selection in ND6, which could be potentially important adaptive changes contributing to cellular energy production. Our findings suggested that adaptive evolution may occur in alpine pheasants, which are an important complement to the knowledge of genetic mechanisms against the high-altitude environment in non-mammal animals. PMID:24708132

  4. The paradox of extreme high-altitude migration in bar-headed geese Anser indicus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hawkes, L.A.; Balachandran, S.; Batbayar, N.; Butler, P.J.; Chua, B.; Douglas, D.C.; Frappell, P.B.; Hou, Y.; Milsom, W.K.; Newman, S.H.; Prosser, D.J.; Sathiyaselvam, P.; Scott, G.R.; Takekawam, J.Y.; Natsagdorj, T.; Wikelski, M.; Witt, M.J.; Yan, B.; Bishop, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Bar-headed geese are renowned for migratory flights at extremely high altitudes over the world's tallest mountains, the Himalayas, where partial pressure of oxygen is dramatically reduced while flight costs, in terms of rate of oxygen consumption, are greatly increased. Such a mismatch is paradoxical, and it is not clear why geese might fly higher than is absolutely necessary. In addition, direct empirical measurements of high-altitude flight are lacking. We test whether migrating bar-headed geese actually minimize flight altitude and make use of favourable winds to reduce flight costs. By tracking 91 geese, we show that these birds typically travel through the valleys of the Himalayas and not over the summits. We report maximum flight altitudes of 7290 m and 6540 m for southbound and northbound geese, respectively, but with 95 per cent of locations received from less than 5489 m. Geese travelled along a route that was 112 km longer than the great circle (shortest distance) route, with transit ground speeds suggesting that they rarely profited from tailwinds. Bar-headed geese from these eastern populations generally travel only as high as the terrain beneath them dictates and rarely in profitable winds. Nevertheless, their migration represents an enormous challenge in conditions where humans and other mammals are only able to operate at levels well below their sea-level maxima.

  5. Widespread Signals of Convergent Adaptation to High Altitude in Asia and America

    PubMed Central

    Foll, Matthieu; Gaggiotti, Oscar E.; Daub, Josephine T.; Vatsiou, Alexandra; Excoffier, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Living at high altitude is one of the most difficult challenges that humans had to cope with during their evolution. Whereas several genomic studies have revealed some of the genetic bases of adaptations in Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian populations, relatively little evidence of convergent evolution to altitude in different continents has accumulated. This lack of evidence can be due to truly different evolutionary responses, but it can also be due to the low power of former studies that have mainly focused on populations from a single geographical region or performed separate analyses on multiple pairs of populations to avoid problems linked to shared histories between some populations. We introduce here a hierarchical Bayesian method to detect local adaptation that can deal with complex demographic histories. Our method can identify selection occurring at different scales, as well as convergent adaptation in different regions. We apply our approach to the analysis of a large SNP data set from low- and high-altitude human populations from America and Asia. The simultaneous analysis of these two geographic areas allows us to identify several candidate genome regions for altitudinal selection, and we show that convergent evolution among continents has been quite common. In addition to identifying several genes and biological processes involved in high-altitude adaptation, we identify two specific biological pathways that could have evolved in both continents to counter toxic effects induced by hypoxia. PMID:25262650

  6. The paradox of extreme high-altitude migration in bar-headed geese Anser indicus

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, L. A.; Balachandran, S.; Batbayar, N.; Butler, P. J.; Chua, B.; Douglas, D. C.; Frappell, P. B.; Hou, Y.; Milsom, W. K.; Newman, S. H.; Prosser, D. J.; Sathiyaselvam, P.; Scott, G. R.; Takekawa, J. Y.; Natsagdorj, T.; Wikelski, M.; Witt, M. J.; Yan, B.; Bishop, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Bar-headed geese are renowned for migratory flights at extremely high altitudes over the world's tallest mountains, the Himalayas, where partial pressure of oxygen is dramatically reduced while flight costs, in terms of rate of oxygen consumption, are greatly increased. Such a mismatch is paradoxical, and it is not clear why geese might fly higher than is absolutely necessary. In addition, direct empirical measurements of high-altitude flight are lacking. We test whether migrating bar-headed geese actually minimize flight altitude and make use of favourable winds to reduce flight costs. By tracking 91 geese, we show that these birds typically travel through the valleys of the Himalayas and not over the summits. We report maximum flight altitudes of 7290 m and 6540 m for southbound and northbound geese, respectively, but with 95 per cent of locations received from less than 5489 m. Geese travelled along a route that was 112 km longer than the great circle (shortest distance) route, with transit ground speeds suggesting that they rarely profited from tailwinds. Bar-headed geese from these eastern populations generally travel only as high as the terrain beneath them dictates and rarely in profitable winds. Nevertheless, their migration represents an enormous challenge in conditions where humans and other mammals are only able to operate at levels well below their sea-level maxima. PMID:23118436

  7. Comparison of high-altitude production and ionospheric outflow contributions to O+ loss at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, Michael W.; Curry, Shannon M.; Fang, Xiaohua; Ma, Yingjuan

    2013-07-01

    Mars Test Particle model is used (with background parameters from a magnetohydrodynamic code) to simulate the transport of O+ ions in the near-Mars space environment to study the source processes responsible for ion escape. The MHD values at this altitude are used to inject an ionospheric outflow source of ions for the Mars Test Particle (MTP). The resulting loss distributions (in both real and velocity space) from this ionospheric source term are compared against those from high-altitude ionization mechanisms, in particular photoionization, charge exchange, and electron impact ionization, each of which has its own source regions, albeit overlapping. For the nominal MHD settings, this ionospheric outflow source contributes only 10% to the total O+ loss rate at solar maximum, predominantly via the central tail region. This percentage has very little dependence on the initial temperature, but a change in the initial ion density or bulk velocity directly alters this loss through the central tail. A density or bulk velocity increase of a factor of 10 makes the ionospheric outflow loss comparable in magnitude to the loss from the combined high-altitude sources. The spatial and velocity space distributions of escaping O+ are examined and compared for the various source terms to identify features specific to each ion source mechanism. For solar minimum conditions, the nominal MHD ionospheric outflow settings yield a 27% contribution to the total O+ loss rate, i.e., roughly equal to any one of the three high-altitude source terms with respect to escape.

  8. Effect of high altitude on sensitivity to the taste of phenylthiocarbamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. B.; Chatterjee, A.; Panjwani, U.; Yadav, D. K.; Selvamurthy, W.; Sharma, K. N.

    Sensitivity to the taste of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) was studied using the Harris-Kalmus method in healthy human volunteers at sea level and then subsequently at an altitude of 3500 m over a period of 3 weeks, after which they were brought back to sea level. Blood sugar, insulin and blood cortisol levels were estimated weekly. The results indicated that, out of 51 subjects studied, 26 (55%) were PTC tasters at sea level. Eight of those unable to taste PTC at sea level tested as tasters at high altitude, and 2 of them reverted to being non-tasters on return to sea level. In the blood, an increase in cortisol and blood insulin levels was seen without any significant change in sugar levels. All the changes recorded at high altitude tended to return to basal values after re-induction to sea level. The study suggests that high-altitude hypoxia in some way, possibly involving changes in hormonal profile among other factors, causes an alteration in sensitivity to the taste of PTC, resulting in some of the individuals shifting to lower PTC sensitivity.

  9. Ambulatory and central haemodynamics during progressive ascent to high-altitude and associated hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Schultz, M G; Climie, R E D; Sharman, J E

    2014-12-01

    High-altitude hypoxia causes major cardiovascular changes, which may result in raised resting brachial blood pressure (BP). However, the effect of high-altitude hypoxia on more sensitive measures of BP control (such as 24 h ambulatory BP and resting central BP) is largely unknown. This study aimed to assess this and compare high-altitude responses to resting brachial BP, as well as determine the haemodynamic correlates of acute mountain sickness (AMS) during a progressive trekking ascent to high-altitude. Measures of oxygen saturation (pulse oximetry), 24 h ambulatory BP, resting brachial and central BP (Pulsecor) were recorded in 10 adults (aged 27±4, 30% male) during a 9-day trek to Mount Everest base camp, Nepal. Data were recorded at sea level (stage 1; <450 m above sea level (ASL)) and at progressive ascension to 3440 m ASL (stage 2), 4350 m ASL (stage 3) and 5164 m ASL (stage 4). The Lake Louise score (LLS) was used to quantify AMS symptoms. Total LLS increased stepwise from sea level to stage 4 (0.3±0.7 vs 4.4±2.0, P=0.012), whereas oxygen saturation decreased to 77±9% (P=0.001). The highest recordings of 24 h ambulatory, daytime, night time, brachial and central systolic BP and diastolic BP were achieved at stage 3, which were significantly greater than at sea level (P<0.005 for all). Twenty-four-hour ambulatory heart rate (HR) and night HR correlated with oxygen saturation (r=-0.741 and -0.608, both P<0.001) and total LLS (r=0.648 and r=0.493, both P<0.001). We conclude that 24 h ambulatory BP, central BP and HR are elevated during high-altitude hypoxia, but AMS symptoms are only related to tachycardia. PMID:24621622

  10. Chronic intermittent high altitude exposure, occupation, and body mass index in workers of mining industry.

    PubMed

    Esenamanova, Marina K; Kochkorova, Firuza A; Tsivinskaya, Tatyana A; Vinnikov, Denis; Aikimbaev, Kairgeldy

    2014-09-01

    The obesity and overweight rates in population exposed to chronic intermittent exposure to high altitudes are not well studied. The aim of the retrospective study was to evaluate whether there are differences in body mass index in different occupation groups working in intermittent shifts at mining industry at high altitude: 3800-4500 meters above sea level. Our study demonstrated that obesity and overweight are common in workers of high altitude mining industry exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia. The obesity rate was lowest among miners as compared to blue- and white-collar employees (9.5% vs. 15.6% and 14.7%, p=0.013). Obesity and overweight were associated with older age, higher rates of increased blood pressure (8.79% and 5.72% vs. 1.92%), cholesterol (45.8% and 45.6% vs. 32.8%) and glucose (4.3% and 1.26% vs. 0.57%) levels as compared to normal body mass index category (p<0.0001 for all). There were differences in patterns of cholesterol and glucose levels in men and women employees according to occupation type. In conclusion, obesity and overweight rates are prevalent and associated with increase in blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose levels in workers of mining industry exposed to intermittent high-altitude hypoxia. Therefore, assessment and monitoring of body mass index seems to be essential in those who live and work at high altitudes to supply the correct nutrition, modify risk factors, and prevent related disorders. PMID:25162204

  11. High-altitude adaptation of Tibetan chicken from MT-COI and ATP-6 perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoling; Wu, Nan; Zhu, Qing; Gaur, Uma; Gu, Ting; Li, Diyan

    2016-09-01

    The problem of hypoxia adaptation in high altitudes is an unsolved brainteaser in the field of life sciences. As one of the best chicken breeds with adaptability to highland environment, the Tibetan chicken, is genetically different from lowland chicken breeds. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of hypoxic adaptability in high altitude, in the present study, we focused on the MT-COI together with ATP-6 gene to explore the regulatory mechanisms for hypoxia adaptability in Tibet chicken. Here, we sequenced MT-COI of 29 Tibetan chickens and 30 Chinese domestic chickens and ATP-6 gene of 28 Tibetan chickens and 29 Chinese domestic chickens. In MT-COI gene, 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected though none of these was a missense mutation, confirming the fact that MT-COI gene is a largely conservative sequence. In ATP-6 gene, 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected and we found a missense mutation (m.9441G > A) in the ATP-6 gene of Tibetan chicken resulting in an amino acid substitution. Due to the critical role of ATP-6 gene in the proton translocation and energy metabolism, we speculated the possibility of this mutation playing an important role in easier energy conversion and metabolism in Tibetan chickens than Chinese domestic chickens so as to better adapt to the harsh environment of the high-altitude areas. The Median-joining profile also suggested that haplotype Ha2 has the ancestral position to the other haplotypes and has significant relationship with high-altitude adaptation in ATP-6 gene. Therefore, we considered that the polymorphism (m.9441G > A) in the ATP-6 gene may affect the specific functions of ATP-6 enzyme relating to high-altitude adaptation of Tibetan chicken and MT-COI gene is a largely conservative sequence. PMID:25693693

  12. Seasonal variation of Titan's haze at low and high altitudes from HST-STIS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2016-05-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph accumulated image cubes of Titan in five years between 1997 and 2004 that we calibrated and analyzed. The observations probe Titan's early northern fall to early winter. Methane bands between 543 and 990 nm wavelength are well resolved spectrally, and Titan's latitudinal and center-to-limb reflectivity variations are resolved spatially. A principal component analysis revealed two large components and two small components of less significance. The first principal component describes a variation of Titan's haze below 80 ± 20 km altitude. Haze particles change their size, opacity, and/or shape of the single scattering phase function. The largest and smallest opacities occurred both in 1997 at high southern latitudes and northern latitudes, respectively. The hemispherical asymmetry switched sign in 2002 at low latitudes, in 2003 at mid latitudes, and in early 2004 at high latitudes. The seasonal amplitude increased almost linearly with distance from the Equator. Tropical latitudes had slightly lower opacities than the annual and global average if the observed variation is seasonally symmetric and shaped like a sine curve. The cause for the variation may be condensation of gases onto aerosols seasonally driven by atmospheric dynamics. The second principal component describes a variation of haze opacity at altitudes above 150 ± 50 km. Largest and smallest opacities both occurred in 2004 at northern and high southern latitudes, respectively. The asymmetry switched in late 2001. Tropical latitudes had significantly higher haze opacity than the annual and global average, opposite to the case at low altitudes. The cause for the high-altitude variation may be aerosols transported at varying speeds driven by atmospheric dynamics. We present a seasonal model that completely describes the haze parameters at each altitude, latitude, and time. It compares fairly well with Cassini results obtained since 2004. The north-south asymmetry may

  13. Characteristics and drivers of high-altitude ladybird flight: insights from vertical-looking entomological radar.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Daniel L; Chapman, Jason; Roy, Helen E; Humphries, Stuart; Harrington, Richard; Brown, Peter M J; Handley, Lori-J Lawson

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and drivers of dispersal is crucial for predicting population dynamics, particularly in range-shifting species. Studying long-distance dispersal in insects is challenging, but recent advances in entomological radar offer unique insights. We analysed 10 years of radar data collected at Rothamsted Research, U.K., to investigate characteristics (altitude, speed, seasonal and annual trends) and drivers (aphid abundance, air temperature, wind speed and rainfall) of high-altitude flight of the two most abundant U.K. ladybird species (native Coccinella septempunctata and invasive Harmonia axyridis). These species cannot be distinguished in the radar data since their reflectivity signals overlap, and they were therefore analysed together. However, their signals do not overlap with other, abundant insects so we are confident they constitute the overwhelming majority of the analysed data. The target species were detected up to ∼1100 m above ground level, where displacement speeds of up to ∼60 km/h were recorded, however most ladybirds were found between ∼150 and 500 m, and had a mean displacement of 30 km/h. Average flight time was estimated, using tethered flight experiments, to be 36.5 minutes, but flights of up to two hours were observed. Ladybirds are therefore potentially able to travel 18 km in a "typical" high-altitude flight, but up to 120 km if flying at higher altitudes, indicating a high capacity for long-distance dispersal. There were strong seasonal trends in ladybird abundance, with peaks corresponding to the highest temperatures of mid-summer, and warm air temperature was the key driver of ladybird flight. Climatic warming may therefore increase the potential for long-distance dispersal in these species. Low aphid abundance was a second significant factor, highlighting the important role of aphid population dynamics in ladybird dispersal. This research illustrates the utility of radar for studying high-altitude insect

  14. Characteristics and Drivers of High-Altitude Ladybird Flight: Insights from Vertical-Looking Entomological Radar

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Daniel L.; Chapman, Jason; Roy, Helen E.; Humphries, Stuart; Harrington, Richard; Brown, Peter M. J.; Handley, Lori-J. Lawson

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and drivers of dispersal is crucial for predicting population dynamics, particularly in range-shifting species. Studying long-distance dispersal in insects is challenging, but recent advances in entomological radar offer unique insights. We analysed 10 years of radar data collected at Rothamsted Research, U.K., to investigate characteristics (altitude, speed, seasonal and annual trends) and drivers (aphid abundance, air temperature, wind speed and rainfall) of high-altitude flight of the two most abundant U.K. ladybird species (native Coccinella septempunctata and invasive Harmonia axyridis). These species cannot be distinguished in the radar data since their reflectivity signals overlap, and they were therefore analysed together. However, their signals do not overlap with other, abundant insects so we are confident they constitute the overwhelming majority of the analysed data. The target species were detected up to ∼1100 m above ground level, where displacement speeds of up to ∼60 km/h were recorded, however most ladybirds were found between ∼150 and 500 m, and had a mean displacement of 30 km/h. Average flight time was estimated, using tethered flight experiments, to be 36.5 minutes, but flights of up to two hours were observed. Ladybirds are therefore potentially able to travel 18 km in a “typical” high-altitude flight, but up to 120 km if flying at higher altitudes, indicating a high capacity for long-distance dispersal. There were strong seasonal trends in ladybird abundance, with peaks corresponding to the highest temperatures of mid-summer, and warm air temperature was the key driver of ladybird flight. Climatic warming may therefore increase the potential for long-distance dispersal in these species. Low aphid abundance was a second significant factor, highlighting the important role of aphid population dynamics in ladybird dispersal. This research illustrates the utility of radar for studying high-altitude

  15. High anthropogenic volatile organic compounds over a high altitude Himalayan station in eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Chirantan; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji; Majumdar, Dipanjali; Srivastava, Anjali

    A first ever study on the characterization of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds has been made over eastern part of Himalaya in India. Measurements were carried out for a year-long period (2010- 2011) over Darjeeling (27.01 (°) N, 88.15 (°) E), a high altitude (2200 a msl) station over eastern Himalaya. A total of 96 samples were collected separately for day (6 A.M - 6 P.M.) and night time (6 P.M. - 6 A.M.) and anlysed for 20 VOCs using GC-MS. The annual average concentration of total anthropogenic VOC was 871 muµgm-3. VOC shows a distinct seasonal variation with the maximum concentration of 3254 muµgm-3 during postmonsoon (October-November) followed by 120 muµgm-3 during monsoon (June-September), 72 muµgm-3 during winter (December-February) and minimum concentration of 39 muµgm-3 during premonsoon (March-May). Styrene was found to be the most abundant VOC followed by benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylene (BTEX) and chloroform. Styrene alone contributed 50 % to the total VOC whereas BTEX contributed 47 %. Styrene was found to be much higher in concentration compared to other high altitude stations and metro-cities in India. Earlier, biomass burning during night-time was used to be a common practice over Darjeeling like any other hill stations, but now-a-days, burning of plastics, tyres and other polystyrene products has become a common practice to get warmth against cold. This could significantly generate styrene in the atmosphere. Night time concentration was found to be higher than day time concentration for most of the VOCs through out the year. Higher solar radiation, high surface ozone and OH radical concentration could oxidise/destruct VOCs resulting to minimum concentration during premonsoon. Very high mixing layer depth and higher wind speed during premonsoon compared to other seasons favours ventilation and dispersion of VOCs from the sampling station. On the other hand, higher vehicular activities associated to high influx of tourists and

  16. Short-term cardiorespiratory adaptation to high altitude in children compared with adults.

    PubMed

    Kriemler, S; Radtke, T; Bürgi, F; Lambrecht, J; Zehnder, M; Brunner-La Rocca, H P

    2016-02-01

    As short-term cardiorespiratory adaptation to high altitude (HA) exposure has not yet been studied in children, we assessed acute mountain sickness (AMS), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) at rest and maximal exercise capacity (CPET) at low altitude (LA) and HA in pre-pubertal children and their fathers. Twenty father-child pairs (11 ± 1 years and 44 ± 4 years) were tested at LA (450 m) and HA (3450 m) at days 1, 2, and 3 after fast ascent (HA1/2/3). HVR was measured at rest and CPET was performed on a cycle ergometer. AMS severity was mild to moderate with no differences between generations. HVR was higher in children than adults at LA and increased at HA similarly in both groups. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) relative to body weight was similar in children and adults at LA and decreased significantly by 20% in both groups at HA; maximal heart rate did not change at HA in children while it decreased by 16% in adults (P < 0.001). Changes in HVR and VO2 peak from LA to HA were correlated among the biological child-father pairs. In conclusion, cardiorespiratory adaptation to altitude seems to be at least partly hereditary. Even though children and their fathers lose similar fractions of aerobic capacity going to high altitude, the mechanisms might be different. PMID:25648726

  17. Enzymatic analysis of the gingival crevicular fluid in hypoxia of high altitude (Everest).

    PubMed

    Trentini, P; Ferrante, M; Dolci, M; Ciavarelli, L; Tondi, A; Spoto, G

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the qualitative and quantitative changes of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that occur in the Gingival Crevicular Fluid (GCF) in hypobaric-hypoxic conditions (high altitude). Hypoxia affects systemic adaptation responses in different organs. We examined 17 Caucasians subjects, of whom 13 were mountain climbers (1 female and 12 males), and 4 Tibetans (2 females and 2 males) following exposure to the hypoxia environment of high altitude. The study was conducted at different altitudes (0 m control, 1000 m, 5200 m above sea level) on Mount Everest. The protocol consisted of withdrawing crevicular fluid through the use of cones made of endodontic paper size 30 sectioned to 15 mm from the apex, inserted for 30 seconds in the gingival sulcus (about 2 mm). The analyzed sites were the mesial and distal, buccal and palatal of tooth 1.1 and 2.1. Blood exams were performed on the subjects using I-Stat, furnishing analysis in real time (about 2 mins). In agreement with other results reported in literature, in all the subjects we found an increase in the hematocrit and hemoglobin with a large range of values between them, and with significant differences, as analysed with the Fisher, Scheffe and Bonferroni/Dunn statistical methods. The enzymatic analysis of the GFC showed an increase of the levels of ALP at each altitude studied. With this preliminary study we show that hypoxic environment determines not only the well known cardiovascular systemic responses, but also crevicular fluid adaptation. PMID:17897492

  18. Reversibility of electrophysiological changes induced by chronic high-altitude hypoxia in adult rat heart.

    PubMed

    Chouabe, C; Amsellem, J; Espinosa, L; Ribaux, P; Blaineau, S; Mégas, P; Bonvallet, R

    2002-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that regression of left ventricular hypertrophy normalizes membrane ionic current abnormalities. This work was designed to determine whether regression of right ventricular hypertrophy induced by permanent high-altitude exposure (4,500 m, 20 days) in adult rats also normalizes changes of ventricular myocyte electrophysiology. According to the current data, prolonged action potential, decreased transient outward current density, and increased inward sodium/calcium exchange current density normalized 20 days after the end of altitude exposure, whereas right ventricular hypertrophy evidenced by both the right ventricular weight-to-heart weight ratio and the right ventricular free wall thickness measurement normalized 40 days after the end of altitude exposure. This morphological normalization occurred at both the level of muscular tissue, as shown by the decrease toward control values of some myocyte parameters (perimeter, capacitance, and width), and the level of the interstitial collagenous connective tissue. In the chronic high-altitude hypoxia model, the regression of right ventricular hypertrophy would not be a prerequisite for normalization of ventricular electrophysiological abnormalities. PMID:11893582

  19. Human autonomic activity and its response to acute oxygen supplement after high altitude acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xuping; Kennedy, Brian P; Hopkins, Susan R; Bogaard, Harm J; Wagner, Peter D; Ziegler, Michael G

    2002-11-29

    It is well established that after acclimatization at high altitude, many sympathetic pathways are hyperactive yet heart rate (HR) remains unchanged. In this study, we attempted to determine if this unchanged heart rate is due to compensatory mechanisms such as changes in parasympathetic activity or levels of receptors for autonomic neurotransmitters. We also examined the role played by hypoxia in these autonomic adaptations to high altitude. Three experiments were carried out on five healthy lowlanders both at sea level (SL) and after 2 weeks of acclimatization at 3800 m (Post-Ac) with: (a) placebo (control); (b) acute beta-adrenergic receptor blockade by propranolol (PRO), or (c) acute parasympathetic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate (GLY). Compared with SL control values, post-Ac venous norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine increased by 96% (p < 0.001) and 55% (p < 0.05), but epinephrine and HR did not change. PRO resulted in a smaller decrease in HR (bpm) Post-Ac than at SL (15 +/- 6 vs. 21 +/- 6, p < 0.05), while GLY caused a greater increase in HR Post-Ac than at SL (59 +/- 8 vs. 45 +/- 6, p < 0.05). Breathing oxygen at SL concentration while at altitude did not decrease NE, or alter the effect of PRO on HR, but reduced the chronotropic effect of GLY by 14% (p < 0.05). These results suggest that after acclimatization to altitude, increased parasympathetic neurotransmitter release and decreased beta-adenoreceptor activity account for the unchanged HR despite enhanced sympathetic activity. Acute oxygen replacement rapidly counteracted the parasympathetic, but not sympathetic hyperactivity that occurs at high altitude. PMID:12492136

  20. Systems Design and Experimental Evaluation of a High-Altitude Relight Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, Brendan

    Novel advances in gas turbine engine combustor technology, led by endeavors into fuel efficiency and demanding environmental regulations, have been fraught with performance and safety concerns. While the majority of low emissions gas turbine engine combustor technology has been necessary for power generation applications, the push for ultra-low NOx combustion in aircraft jet engines has been ever present. Recent state-of-the-art combustor designs notably tackle historic emissions challenges by operating at fuel-lean conditions, which are characterized by an increase in the amount of air flow sent to the primary combustion zone. While beneficial in reducing NOx emissions, the fuel-lean mechanisms that characterize these combustor designs rely heavily upon high-energy and high-velocity air flows to sufficiently mix and atomize fuel droplets, ultimately leading to flame stability concerns during low-power operation. When operating at high-altitude conditions, these issues are further exacerbated by the presence of low ambient air pressures and temperatures, which can lead to engine flame-out situations and hamper engine relight attempts. To aid academic and industrial research ventures into improving the high-altitude lean blow-out and relight performance of modern gas turbine engine combustor technologies, the High-Altitude Relight Test Facility (HARTF) was designed and constructed at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Combustion and Fire Research Laboratory (CFRL). Following its construction, an experimental evaluation of its abilities to facilitate optically-accessible ignition, combustion, and spray testing for gas turbine engine combustor hardware at simulated high-altitude conditions was performed. In its evaluation, performance limit references were established through testing of the HARTF vacuum and cryogenic air-chilling capabilities. These tests were conducted with regard to end-user control---the creation and the maintenance of a realistic high-altitude

  1. Comparison of physiological responses to hypoxia at high altitudes between highlanders and lowlanders.

    PubMed

    Zhongyuan, S; Xuehan, N; Pengguo, H; Shoucheng, Z; Deming, Z; Shengyue, Y; Yan, W; Zhaoshen, D

    1979-12-01

    This report deals with the differences and changes of physiological functions of the highlanders and the lowlanders at different altitudes during the period when the Chinese Mountaineering Team was climbing up and reached the peak of Qomolangma Feng. In a period of relaxation, there are no significant changes in ventilatory responsiveness to hypercapnia, electrocardiogram and electroencephalogram between highlanders and lowlanders with the changes at different altitudes. At 5,000 m a.s.l., however, electrocardiogram and the result of cardiac ventricular functional test show significant differences after the subjects are physically loaded. Those whose electrocardiogram readings show unusual changes, and whose cardiac ventricular functional tests show their physiological functions at low degree after physical activities at the altitude of 5,000 m, have a climbing ability hardly below 6,500 m, while those who have reached the altitudes above 8,200 m have no unusual changes in electrocardiogram, and the results of cardiac ventricular functional tests show that their physiological functions are at high degree. PMID:534322

  2. Lockheed ER-2 #709 high altitude research aircraft during take off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    ER-2 tail number 709, is one of two Airborne Science ER-2s used as science platforms by Dryden. The aircraft are platforms for a variety of high-altitude science missions flown over various parts of the world. They are also used for earth science and atmospheric sensor research and development, satellite calibration and data validation. The ER-2s are capable of carrying a maximum payload of 2,600 pounds of experiments in a nose bay, the main equipment bay behind the cockpit, two wing-mounted superpods and small underbody and trailing edges. Most ER-2 missions last about six hours with ranges of about 2,200 nautical miles. The aircraft typically fly at altitudes above 65,000 feet. On November 19, 1998, the ER-2 set a world record for medium weight aircraft reaching an altitude of 68,700 feet. The aircraft is 63 feet long, with a wingspan of 104 feet. The top of the vertical tail is 16 feet above ground when the aircraft is on the bicycle-type landing gear. Cruising speeds are 410 knots, or 467 miles per hour, at altitude. A single General Electric F-118 turbofan engine rated at 17,000 pounds thrust powers the ER-2.

  3. A statistical study of high-altitude electric fields measured on the Viking satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Lindqvist, P.A.; Marklund, G.T. )

    1990-05-01

    Characteristics of high-altitude data from the Viking electric field instrument are presented in a statistical study based on 109 Viking orbits. The study is focused in particular on the signatures of and relationships between various parameters measured by the electric field instrument, such as the parallel and transverse (to B) components of the electric field instrument, such as electric field variability. A major goal of the Viking mission was to investigate the occurrence and properties of parallel electric fields and their role in the auroral acceleration process. The results in this paper on the altitude distribution of the electric field variability confirm earlier findings on the distribution of small-scale electric fields and indicate the presence of parallel fields up to about 11,000 km altitude. The directly measured parallel electric field is also investigated in some detail. It is in general directed upward with an average value of 1 mV/m, but depends on, for example, altitude and plasma density. Possible sources of error in the measurement of the parallel field are also considered and accounted for.

  4. Randomness and changes of heart rate and respiratory frequency during high altitude mountain ascent without acclimatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesfreid, Eva; Billat, Véronique

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to detect and compare the changes in the time-frequency and fractal scaling behaviors of heart rate (HR) and respiratory frequency (Rf), recorded simultaneously during a high altitude mountain ascent. The time-frequency analysis was performed using the local cosine4 orthonormal bases of Coifman, Malvar and Meyer, whose spectrum is not redundant as those computed with the short Fourier transform. The fractal scaling behavior was obtained using the detrended fluctuation (DFA) and the wavelet leaders (WL) analysis. Results showed that the high altitude mountain ascent differently affected HR and Rf variability. Rf average values increased (p=0.0003) while HR average values did not change. The scaling variability of HR was altered during the mountain ascent, which was detected by the increasing HR short range DFA exponents with altitude (p<0.03). Rf scaling variability remained unchanged. These differences between HR and Rf alterations were also observed for the local cosine4 power law behavior since power law exponents, in absolute values, increased for HR (p<0.003) while those of Rf did not change. Furthermore, the ratio of low over the whole local spectrum energy of Rf decreased with altitude (p=0.04) in contrast to HR. In most of these HR and Rf analyses, one of the two time series was significantly modified but not both. Moreover, the Rf local cosine4 spectrum had higher entropy compared to HR (p<0.01), the difference between the Rf and the HR entropy increased (p=0.04) during the mountain ascent. In consequence, Rf had more randomness than HR and altitude increased this difference.

  5. Influence of Cerebral Blood Flow on Central Sleep Apnea at High Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Keith R.; Lucas, Samuel J.E.; Shepherd, Kelly; Dawson, Andrew; Swart, Marianne; Thomas, Kate N.; Lucas, Rebekah A.I.; Donnelly, Joseph; Peebles, Karen C.; Basnyat, Rishi; Ainslie, Philip N.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To further our understanding of central sleep apnea (CSA) at high altitude during acclimatization, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacologically altering cerebral blood flow (CBF) would alter the severity of CSA at high altitude. Design: The study was a randomized, placebo-controlled single-blind study. Setting: A field study at 5,050 m in Nepal. Patients or Participants: We studied 12 normal volunteers. Interventions: Between days 5 to10 at high altitude, CBF velocity (CBFv) was increased by intravenous (IV) acetazolamide (10 mg/kg) and reduced by oral indomethacin (100 mg). Measurements and Results: Arterial blood gases, hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses, and CBFv and its reactivity to carbon dioxide were measured awake. Overnight polysomnography was performed. The central apnea-hypopnea index was elevated following administration of indomethacin (89.2 ± 43.7 to 112.5 ± 32.9 events/h; mean ± standard deviation; P < 0.05) and was reduced following IV acetazolamide (89.2 ± 43.7 to 47.1 ± 48.1 events/h; P < 0.001). Intravenous acetazolamide elevated CBFv at high altitude by 28% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 22-34%) but did not affect ventilatory responses. The elevation in CBFv was partly mediated via a selective rise in partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) (28 ± 4 to 31 ± 3 mm Hg) and an associated fall in pH (P < 0.01). Oral indomethacin reduced CBFv by 23% (95% CI: 16-30%), blunted CBFv reactivity, and increased the hypercapnic ventilatory response by 66% (95% CI: 30-102%) but had no effect on PaCO2 or pH. Conclusion: Our findings indicate an important role for cerebral blood flow regulation in the pathophysiology of central sleep apnea at high altitude. Citation: Burgess KR, Lucas SJE, Shepherd K, Dawson A, Swart M, Thomas KN, Lucas RAI, Donnelly J, Peebles KC, Basnyat R, Ainslie PN. Influence of cerebral blood flow on central sleep apnea at high altitude. SLEEP 2014;37(10):1679-1687. PMID:25197804

  6. Relativistic electron flux comparisons at low and high altitudes with fast time resolution and broad spatial coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhof, W. L.; Gaines, E. E.; Mcglennon, J. P.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Belian, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Analyses are presented for the first high-time resolution multisatellite study of the spatial and temporal characteristics of a relativistic electron enhancement event with a rapid onset. Measurements of MeV electrons were made from two low-altitude polar orbiting satellites and three spacecraft at synchronous altitude. The electron fluxes observed by the low-altitude satellites include precipitating electrons in both the bounce and drift loss cones as well as electrons that are stably trapped, whereas the observations at geosynchronous altitude are dominated by the trapped population. The fluxes of greater than 1 MeV electrons at low-satellite altitude over a wide range of L shells tracked very well the fluxes greater than 0.93 MeV at synchronous altitude.

  7. High-Altitude Aircraft-Based Electric-Field Measurements Above Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, M. G.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Stewart, M. F.; Blair, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a new set of eight electric field mills that were flown on a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. During the Third Convection And Moisture EXperiment (CAMEX-3; Fall, 1998), measurements of electric field, storm dynamics, and ice microphysics were made over several hurricanes. Concurrently, the TExas-FLorida UNderflights (TEFLUN) program was being conducted to make the same measurements over Gulf Coast thunderstorms. Sample measurements are shown: typical flight altitude is 20km. Our new mills have an internal 16-bit A/D, with a resolution of 0.25V/m per bit at high gain, with a noise level less than the least significant bit. A second, lower gain channel gives us the ability to measure fields as high as 150 kV/m.

  8. Design and Predictions for High-Altitude (Low Reynolds Number) Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald; Harmory, Phil; Krake, Keith; Drela, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A sailplane being developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will support a high-altitude flight experiment. The experiment will measure the performance parameters or an airfoil at high altitudes (70,000 - 100,000 ft), low Reynolds numbers (2 x 10(exp 5) - 7 x 10(exp 5)), and high subsonic Mach numbers (0.5 and 0.65). The airfoil section lift and drag are determined from pilot and static pressure measurements. The locations of the separation bubble, Tollmien-Schlichting boundary-layer instability frequencies, and vortex shedding are measured from a hot-film strip. The details of the planned flight experiment are presented as well as several predictions of the airfoil performance.

  9. Body fluid status on induction, reinduction and prolonged stay at high altitude of human volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. V.; Rawal, S. B.; Tyagi, A. K.

    1990-06-01

    Studies on adaptation to high altitude (HA) of 3500 m in the Himalayas were conducted in three phases, each including 10 normal and healthy males normally resident at sea-level. Phase I subjects had no previous experience of HA, phase II subjects after 4 6 months at HA were airlifted to sea-level and phase III subjects stayed continuously for 6 months at 3500 m. Body fluid compartments and blood gases were determined in all three groups. Plasma volume was highly elevated in the phase II subjects on reinduction to sea-level from HA. In comparison to phase I subjects, the retention of fluid in extracellular compartment was increased at HA leading to increased susceptibility to high altitude illness. Phase III subjects were hyperhydrated with decreased plasma volume and increased PO2 in comparison to the other two groups.

  10. Design and Predictions for a High-Altitude (Low-Reynolds-Number) Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald; Hamory, Phil; Krake, Keith; Drela, Mark

    1999-01-01

    A sailplane being developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will support a high-altitude flight experiment. The experiment will measure the performance parameters of an airfoil at high altitudes (70,000 to 100,000 ft), low Reynolds numbers (200,000 to 700,000), and high subsonic Mach numbers (0.5 and 0.65). The airfoil section lift and drag are determined from pitot and static pressure measurements. The locations of the separation bubble, Tollmien-Schlichting boundary layer instability frequencies, and vortex shedding are measured from a hot-film strip. The details of the planned flight experiment are presented. Several predictions of the airfoil performance are also presented. Mark Drela from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology designed the APEX-16 airfoil, using the MSES code. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses were performed by Mahidhar Tatineni and Xiaolin Zhong from the University of California, Los Angeles, and by the authors at NASA Dryden.

  11. High altitude AM0 testing of PV concentrator lens elements. [Air Mass Zero

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, M. F.; Brinker, D. J.; Boyer, E. O.; Mcknight, R. C.; Ranaudo, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, the NASA Lewis Research Center modified its Lear High Altitude Test Facility to fly two prototype ENTECH minidome Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator elements. The tests were highly successful, and the results verified the ability of the Lear High Altitude Facility to measure the optical performance of individual concentrator lens elements and concentrator/cell combinations at near AM0 insolation conditions. The two concentrator lenses flown achieved optical efficiencies, based on a gallium arsenide concentrator cell response, of 89.8 percent and 90.0 percent. The flights demonstrated the ability of the aircraft to maintain the pointing accuracy required to obtain useful data. With proper alignment of the collimating tube and the pilot's sunsight, this facility could easily maintain a pointing accuracy of + or - 0.5 deg for a sufficiently long time to obtain accurate, reproducible results.

  12. Plasma density enhancements in the high-altitude polar cap region observed on Akebono

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Yoh-ichi; Abe, Takumi; Yau, Andrew W.

    2002-05-01

    The plasma density in the polar cap ionosphere is generally low (<103 cm-3 above 3000 km), mainly because of plasma escape from the ionosphere along open magnetic-field lines. The Akebono satellite occasionally encounters regions of unusually high plasma density (>=103 cm-3) above 4000 km altitude, in which the thermal plasma exhibits a distinctively low electron temperature (<3000 K) and low parallel ion drift velocity (<=1 km/s). Such events are almost always observed on the dusk side. The occurrence of low electron temperature and ion drift velocity appears to suggest the antisunward convection of high-density plasma into the polar cap, and the decrease in electron temperature due to the disruption of field-aligned heat flux in the high-altitude polar cap.

  13. Effects of growth, diving history, and high altitude on blood oxygen capacity in harbor seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kodama, A. M.; Elsner, R.; Pace, N.

    1977-01-01

    Blood volume and body composition for diving and nondiving harbor seals were measured at six-week intervals during a 10-month period of captitivity. Whole body hematocrit, red cell volume per kg of lean body mass, and total circulating hemoglobin per kg lean body mass were significantly higher in the diving group, but relatively large blood volumes expressed in terms of body weight (11-12%) were found in both groups. A pair of harbor seals exposed to high altitude for about three months registered significant increases in red cell volume, blood hemoglobin levels, and blood volume expressed in terms of body weight; results of alveolar gas analyses indicate that hyperventilation also occurred. These typical mammalian responses to hypoxia suggest that the harbor seal's large blood volume and high hemoglobin content are an expression of phylogenetic control, and that in spite of its adaptability to apnea during its diving life, the animal cannot be considered preacclimatized to high altitude.

  14. Sensitivity of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Experiment to observe Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. M.

    Ground based telescopes have marginally observed very high energy emission (>100GeV) from gamma-ray bursts(GRB). For instance, Milagrito observed GRB970417a with a significance of 3.7 sigmas over the background. Milagro have not yet observed TeV emission from a GRB with its triggered and untriggered searches or GeV emission with a triggered search using its scalers. These results suggest the need of new observatories with higher sensitivity to transient sources. The HAWC (High Altitute Water Cherenkov) observatory is proposed as a combination of the Milagro tecnology with a very high altitude (>4000m over see level) site. The expected HAWC sensitivity for GRBs is at least >10 times the Milagro sensitivity. In this work HAWC sensitivity for GRBs is discussed for different detector configurations such as altitude, distance between PMTs, depth under water of PMTs, number of PMTs required for a trigger, etc.

  15. Glucose intolerance associated with hypoxia in people living at high altitudes in the Tibetan highland

    PubMed Central

    Okumiya, Kiyohito; Sakamoto, Ryota; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Ishikawa, Motonao; Suwa, Kuniaki; Imai, Hissei; Chen, Wenling; Kato, Emiko; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Kasahara, Yoriko; Fujisawa, Michiko; Wada, Taizo; Wang, Hongxin; Dai, Qingxiang; Xu, Huining; Qiao, Haisheng; Ge, Ri-Li; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Kosaka, Yasuyuki; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ando, Kazuo; Inamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Shinya; Ishine, Masayuki; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To clarify the association between glucose intolerance and high altitudes (2900–4800 m) in a hypoxic environment in Tibetan highlanders and to verify the hypothesis that high altitude dwelling increases vulnerability to diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerated by lifestyle change or ageing. Design Cross-sectional epidemiological study on Tibetan highlanders. Participants We enrolled 1258 participants aged 40–87 years. The rural population comprised farmers in Domkhar (altitude 2900–3800 m) and nomads in Haiyan (3000–3100 m), Ryuho (4400 m) and Changthang (4300–4800 m). Urban area participants were from Leh (3300 m) and Jiegu (3700 m). Main outcome measure Participants were classified into six glucose tolerance-based groups: DM, intermediate hyperglycaemia (IHG), normoglycaemia (NG), fasting DM, fasting IHG and fasting NG. Prevalence of glucose intolerance was compared in farmers, nomads and urban dwellers. Effects of dwelling at high altitude or hypoxia on glucose intolerance were analysed with the confounding factors of age, sex, obesity, lipids, haemoglobin, hypertension and lifestyle, using multiple logistic regression. Results The prevalence of DM (fasting DM)/IHG (fasting IHG) was 8.9% (6.5%)/25.1% (12.7%), respectively, in all participants. This prevalence was higher in urban dwellers (9.5% (7.1%)/28.5% (11.7%)) and in farmers (8.5% (6.1%)/28.5% (18.3%)) compared with nomads (8.2% (5.7%)/15.7% (9.7%)) (p=0.0140/0.0001). Dwelling at high altitude was significantly associated with fasting IHG+fasting DM/fasting DM (ORs for >4500 and 3500–4499 m were 3.59/4.36 and 2.07/1.76 vs <3500 m, respectively). After adjusting for lifestyle change, hypoxaemia and polycythaemia were closely associated with glucose intolerance. Conclusions Socioeconomic factors, hypoxaemia and the effects of altitudes >3500 m play a major role in the high prevalence of glucose intolerance in highlanders. Tibetan highlanders may be vulnerable to glucose

  16. Contribution of a mutational hot spot to hemoglobin adaptation in high-altitude Andean house wrens.

    PubMed

    Galen, Spencer C; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki; Weber, Roy E; Fago, Angela; Benham, Phred M; Chavez, Andrea N; Cheviron, Zachary A; Storz, Jay F; Witt, Christopher C

    2015-11-10

    A key question in evolutionary genetics is why certain mutations or certain types of mutation make disproportionate contributions to adaptive phenotypic evolution. In principle, the preferential fixation of particular mutations could stem directly from variation in the underlying rate of mutation to function-altering alleles. However, the influence of mutation bias on the genetic architecture of phenotypic evolution is difficult to evaluate because data on rates of mutation to function-altering alleles are seldom available. Here, we report the discovery that a single point mutation at a highly mutable site in the β(A)-globin gene has contributed to an evolutionary change in hemoglobin (Hb) function in high-altitude Andean house wrens (Troglodytes aedon). Results of experiments on native Hb variants and engineered, recombinant Hb mutants demonstrate that a nonsynonymous mutation at a CpG dinucleotide in the β(A)-globin gene is responsible for an evolved difference in Hb-O2 affinity between high- and low-altitude house wren populations. Moreover, patterns of genomic differentiation between high- and low-altitude populations suggest that altitudinal differentiation in allele frequencies at the causal amino acid polymorphism reflects a history of spatially varying selection. The experimental results highlight the influence of mutation rate on the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution by demonstrating that a large-effect allele at a highly mutable CpG site has promoted physiological differentiation in blood O2 transport capacity between house wren populations that are native to different elevations. PMID:26460028

  17. Contribution of a mutational hot spot to hemoglobin adaptation in high-altitude Andean house wrens

    PubMed Central

    Galen, Spencer C.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki; Weber, Roy E.; Fago, Angela; Benham, Phred M.; Chavez, Andrea N.; Cheviron, Zachary A.; Storz, Jay F.; Witt, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    A key question in evolutionary genetics is why certain mutations or certain types of mutation make disproportionate contributions to adaptive phenotypic evolution. In principle, the preferential fixation of particular mutations could stem directly from variation in the underlying rate of mutation to function-altering alleles. However, the influence of mutation bias on the genetic architecture of phenotypic evolution is difficult to evaluate because data on rates of mutation to function-altering alleles are seldom available. Here, we report the discovery that a single point mutation at a highly mutable site in the βA-globin gene has contributed to an evolutionary change in hemoglobin (Hb) function in high-altitude Andean house wrens (Troglodytes aedon). Results of experiments on native Hb variants and engineered, recombinant Hb mutants demonstrate that a nonsynonymous mutation at a CpG dinucleotide in the βA-globin gene is responsible for an evolved difference in Hb–O2 affinity between high- and low-altitude house wren populations. Moreover, patterns of genomic differentiation between high- and low-altitude populations suggest that altitudinal differentiation in allele frequencies at the causal amino acid polymorphism reflects a history of spatially varying selection. The experimental results highlight the influence of mutation rate on the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution by demonstrating that a large-effect allele at a highly mutable CpG site has promoted physiological differentiation in blood O2 transport capacity between house wren populations that are native to different elevations. PMID:26460028

  18. Centrifugal acceleration at high altitudes above the polar cap: A Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudayyeh, H. A.; Barghouthi, I. A.; Slapak, R.; Nilsson, H.

    2015-08-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation was used to study the outflow of O+ and H+ ions along three flight trajectories above the polar cap up to altitudes of about 15 RE. Barghouthi (2008) developed a model on the basis of altitude and velocity-dependent wave-particle interactions and a radial geomagnetic field which includes the effects of ambipolar electric field and gravitational and mirror forces. In the present work we improve this model to include the effect of the centrifugal force, with the use of relevant boundary conditions. In addition, the magnetic field and flight trajectories, namely, the central polar cap (CPC), nightside polar cap (NPC), and cusp, were calculated using the Tsyganenko T96 model. To simulate wave-particle interactions, the perpendicular velocity diffusion coefficients for O+ ions in each region were determined such that the simulation results fit the observations. For H+ ions, a constant perpendicular velocity diffusion coefficient was assumed for all altitudes in all regions as recommended by Nilsson et al. (2013). The effect of centrifugal acceleration was simulated by considering three values for the ionospheric electric field: 0 (no centrifugal acceleration), 50, and 100 mV/m. It was found that the centrifugal acceleration increases the parallel bulk velocity and decreases the parallel and perpendicular temperatures of both ion species at altitudes above about 4 RE. Centrifugal acceleration also increases the temperature anisotropy at high altitudes. At a given altitude, centrifugal acceleration decreases the density of H+ ions while it increases the density of O+ ions. This implies that with higher centrifugal acceleration more O+ ions overcome the potential barrier. It was also found that aside from two exceptions centrifugal acceleration has the same effect on the velocities of both ions. This implies that the centrifugal acceleration is universal for all particles. The parallel bulk velocities at a given value of ionospheric electric field

  19. Prevalence of Chronic Mountain Sickness in high altitude districts of Himachal Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Sahota, Inderjeet Singh; Panwar, Nidhi Singh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS) is a maladaptation condition that can affect people who reside permanently at high altitude (HA). It is characterized by polycythemia, hypoxemia and dyspnea and can be fatal. Over 140 million people live permanently at HA around the world. Unfortunately, research into CMS is lacking and accurate data on the prevalence of this condition do not exist for many regions around the world. In this study, we sought to examine prevalence rates of CMS in the Indian Himalayas, focusing on the Northern State of Himachal Pradesh. Materials and Methods: We surveyed 83 individuals (69 males) in eight towns across the HA districts of Sirmaur, Kinnaur and Lahaul and Spiti in Himachal Pradesh, India. Altitudes ranged from 2350 to 4150 m. We used an adapted Qinghai CMS scoring system to diagnose CMS. Information related to subject demographics, medical history, socioeconomic status, and geography were collected to identify risk factors for CMS. Physiologic recordings of oxygen saturation (SpO2) and pulse rate were made through pulse oximetry. Results: Overall CMS prevalence was 6.17% and mean altitude was 3281 m. At altitudes above 3000 m CMS prevalence rose to 13.73%. All cases of CMS were mild and there was a significant positive correlation between CMS scores and altitude (R = 0.784, P = 0.0213). Mean SpO2 was 90.7 ± 0.4% and mean pulse rate was 80.3 ± 1.3 bpm. SpO2 significantly correlated with altitude (R = −0.929, P < 0.001). In our study, age, gender, and tobacco use were not independent risk factors for CMS. Individuals with CMS lived at higher altitudes than their non-CMS counterparts (3736.00 ± 113.30 m vs. 3279.80 ± 69.50 m, respectively; P = 0.017). Conclusion: CMS prevalence in HA towns of the Indian Himalayas of Himachal Pradesh is 6.17% and 13.73% for towns above 3000 m. Further research is required to determine the prevalence of CMS in other regions of the world and to determine risk factors associated with CMS. PMID

  20. Altitude and configuration of the water table in the High Plains Aquifer in Kansas, 1960

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pabst, Marilyn E.; Stullken, Lloyd E.

    1986-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer in Kansas is part of a regional aquifer system that extends into Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The aquifer in Kansas underlies an area of 31,000 square miles in the western and south-central part of the State. The aquifer is a hydraulically connected assemblage of unconsolidated water-bearing deposits. In western Kansas, the High Plains aquifer consists principally of the Ogallala Formation of the late Tertiary age and the overlying deposits of Quaternary age. In south-central Kansas, the aquifer consists of unconsolidated deposits principally of Quaternary age. Valley alluvium of Quaternary age also is included in the deposits in both areas. The High Plains aquifer is delimited on the east by outcrops of Permian or Cretaceous rocks and by unsaturated deposits of Quaternary age. The altitude and configuration of the water table during 1960 are shown for the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. The water table sloped generally from west to east at an average rate of 10 feet per mile. The altitude of the water table ranged from about 3,900 feet in the southwest corner of Sherman County, northwestern Kansas, to about 1,350 feet in northern Sedgwick County, southcentral Kansas. Groundwater moves perpendicular to the water table contours from higher altitudes in the western part of the High Plains to lower altitudes in the east. Contours that cross stream valleys without flexure may indicate that the water table was below the streambed. Upstream flexure of water table contours along streams indicates that groundwater flowed toward, and discharged into, streams. This is most evident along the South Fork Republican River in Cheyenne County, Northwestern Kansas, and the South Fork Ninnescah River in Pratt and Kingman Counties, south-central Kansas. (USGS)

  1. Changes in body fluid compartments on re-induction to high altitude and effect of diuretics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. V.; Rawal, S. B.; Tyagi, A. K.; Bhagat, Maj J. K.; Parshad, R.; Divekar, H. M.

    1988-03-01

    Studies were carried out in 29 healthy young adults in the Indian Army stationed in the plains and posted at an elevation of 3500 m for more than 6 months. After exposure to a low elevation in Delhi (260 m) for 3 weeks they were reinduced to a height of 3500 m. The subjects were divided into three groups, each of which was treated with either placebo or acetazolamide or spironolactone. The drug treatment was started immediately after their landing at high altitude and continued for 2 days only. Total body water, extracellular fluid, intracellular fluid, plasma volume, blood pH, PaO2, PaCO2 and blood viscosity were determined on exposure at Delhi and on re-induction to high altitude. Plasma volume was increased after the descent from high altitude and remained high for up to 21 day's study. This increased plasma volume may have some significance in the pathogenesis of pulmonary oedema. Total body water and intracellular fluid content were increased at 260 m elevation, while extracellular fluid decreased. On re-induction there was a decrease in total body water with no change in the extracellular fluid content.

  2. Liver transplantation in a patient with pulmonary hypertension at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Dou, Kefeng; Wang, Desheng; Zhao, Qingchuan; Song, Zhenshun; Yue, Shuqiang; Tao, Kaishan; Chen, Shaoyang; He, Yong; Ti, Zhenyu

    2010-03-01

    Chronic hypoxia at high altitude stresses many of the body's homeostatic mechanisms. As a consequence, the body develops alveolar hypoxia, hypoxemia, and polycythemia, which in turn causes vasoconstriction, pulmonary hypertension, and an increased risk of atherothrombotic complications. We report a successful liver transplantation in a patient with pulmonary hypertension who lives 4500 m above sea level. Pulmonary hypertension and hypercoagulable state induced by chronic hypoxia at high altitude may increase the risk of cardiopulmonary complication and perioperative mortality. The patient was discharged in good condition with normal liver function at the 34th postoperative day. After 41 months of follow-up, the patient is alive and well with a continued normalization of hepatic function and is continuing to live at 4500 m above sea level. PMID:20591354

  3. Current Status of a NASA High-Altitude Balloon-Based Observatory for Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varga, Denise M.; Dischner, Zach

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that progress can be made on over 20% of the key questions called out in the current Planetary Science Decadal Survey by a high-altitude balloon-borne observatory. Therefore, NASA has been assessing concepts for a gondola-based observatory that would achieve the greatest possible science return in a low-risk and cost-effective manner. This paper addresses results from the 2014 Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science (BOPPS) mission, namely successes in the design and performance of the Fine Pointing System. The paper also addresses technical challenges facing the new Gondola for High Altitude Planetary Science (GHAPS) reusable platform, including thermal control for the Optical Telescope Assembly, power generation and management, and weight-saving considerations that the team will be assessing in 2015 and beyond.

  4. Stroke at high altitude diagnosed in the field using portable ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Levett, Denny Z; Dhillon, Sundeep; Mitchell, Kay; Morgan, Jon; Grocott, Michael P W; Imray, Chris

    2011-03-01

    A tool that can differentiate ischemic stroke from other neurological conditions (eg, hemorrhagic stroke, high-altitude cerebral edema) in the field could enable more rapid thrombolysis when appropriate. The resources (eg, an MRI or CT scanner) to investigate stroke at high altitude may be limited, and hence a portable tool would be of benefit. Such a tool may also be of benefit in emergency departments when CT scanning is not available. We report a case of a 49-year-old man who, while climbing at 5900 m, suffered a left middle cerebral infarct. The clinical diagnosis was supported using 2D Power Doppler. The patient received aspirin and continuous transcranial Doppler was used for its potential therapeutic effects for 12 hours. The patient was then evacuated to a hospital in Kathmandu over the next 48 hours. This case report suggests that portable ultrasound could be used in the prehospital arena to enable early diagnosis of thrombotic stroke. PMID:21377120

  5. Human high-altitude adaptation: forward genetics meets the HIF pathway.

    PubMed

    Bigham, Abigail W; Lee, Frank S

    2014-10-15

    Humans have adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude in several locations, and recent genome-wide studies have indicated a genetic basis. In some populations, genetic signatures have been identified in the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway, which orchestrates the transcriptional response to hypoxia. In Tibetans, they have been found in the HIF2A (EPAS1) gene, which encodes for HIF-2α, and the prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2, also known as EGLN1) gene, which encodes for one of its key regulators, PHD2. High-altitude adaptation may be due to multiple genes that act in concert with one another. Unraveling their mechanism of action can offer new therapeutic approaches toward treating common human diseases characterized by chronic hypoxia. PMID:25319824

  6. High altitude color photography as a tool for regional analysis: As demonstrated for southeastern Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eyre, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    High altitude color and color infrared photography of the tri-county region of southeast Florida made it feasible to evaluate its potential for quantifying the dimensions of regional change. Attention was focused upon three main aspects of change in the region, which in fact overlap. These were; (1) the transformation of the southeast Florida wetlands; (2) the expansion of agriculture; and (3) the growth of the urbanized area. The development analyzed covered the period of thirteen years from 1956 to 1969. Results using this new 18 km photography were superior because of the degree of resolution, the combined power of color and color infrared interpretation, and the large area covered by each frame. The greatest advantage of high altitude imagery is the time-saving element, since it is possible to delineate and identify major geographic patterns over thousands of sq km very rapidly.

  7. Glycolytic intermediates and adenosine phosphates in rat liver at high altitude /3,800 m/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipriano, L. F.; Pace, N.

    1973-01-01

    Liver tissue obtained from adult rats exposed to 3800 m altitude for intervals ranging from 1.5 hr to 63 days was examined by enzymatic analysis. During the first 3 hr of exposure, an immediate decrease in rephosphorylation of high-energy phosphates led to reduced glycogenesis and eventual pileup of AMP, pyruvate, fructose 1,6-diphosphate, glucose 6-phosphate, and glucose. This was accompanied by a reduction of pentose phosphate pathway activity. After 3 to 6 hr, a secondary adjustment of substrate concentrations occurred along with the apparent facilitation of phosphofructokinase. This secondary adjustment appears to increase anaerobic production of ATP and represents a significant intracellular contribution to the acclimatization process at high altitude.

  8. The physiology of extremes: Ancel Keys and the International High Altitude Expedition of 1935.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Sarah W

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the International High Altitude Expedition of 1935 and its significance in the life and science of Ancel Keys. Both the expedition and Keys's story afford excellent opportunities to explore the growing reach of interwar physiology into extreme climates-whether built or natural. As IHAE scientists assessed human performance and adaptation to hypoxia, low barometric pressure, and cold, they not only illuminated the physiological and psychological processes of high altitude acclimatization, but they also drew borderlines between the normal and the pathological, paved the way for the neocolonial exploitation of natural and human resources in Latin America, and pioneered field methods in physiology that were adapted and adopted by the Allied Forces during the Second World War. This case study in the physiology of place reveals the power and persistence of environmental determinism within biomedicine well into the twentieth century. PMID:23263349

  9. [Systemic and organ mechanisms of the organism oxygen supply in high altitude].

    PubMed

    Balykin, M V; Karkobatov, Kh D

    2012-01-01

    Organ and systemic mechanisms of organism oxygen supply in adaptation to high altitude of the Tien Shan (3200 m above sea level) were studied in the experiments on dogs. It is shown that in the first few days in the mountains (5-7th and 15th days) oxygen supply of the body is due to the increased delivery of O2 to organs and tissues; in the process of adaptation (30 days), the efficiency of tissue utilization of O2 increases. Changes of organ blood flow in visceral and somatic organs, features of compensation of the tissue hypoxia and oxygen supply of the heart, brain, skeletal muscle in different periods of adaptation to high altitude were established. PMID:22586935

  10. Nozzle start flow investigation in the conditions of high-altitude test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodin, V. V.; Bazhenova, T. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Golub, V. V.; Makeich, A. A.; Shcherbak, S. B.

    Rocket engines for future-technology vehicles development requires special ground-based test facilities to simulate the conditions at high altitude. The unsteady flow phenomena in the nozzle during starting process can cause the dangerous loads on the nozzles. The real propulsion engines high-altitude tests in the vacuum chamber are very expensive due to the huge vacuum chamber should be used. Usually ejector pumps are used for the initial rarefaction creation. The investigations of real propulsions in the test facilities with ejector are not so expensive but they can cause external loads on the nozzle wall at the nozzle start. Both of these techniques do not allow the flow pattern in the diffuser observing. Because the modern nozzles usually are thin any pressure excess around the nozzle may cause nozzle damage. In the present paper, a method of experimental and numerical analyses of disturbances at the start of a rocket engine is proposed.

  11. Human high-altitude adaptation: forward genetics meets the HIF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bigham, Abigail W.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude in several locations, and recent genome-wide studies have indicated a genetic basis. In some populations, genetic signatures have been identified in the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway, which orchestrates the transcriptional response to hypoxia. In Tibetans, they have been found in the HIF2A (EPAS1) gene, which encodes for HIF-2α, and the prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2, also known as EGLN1) gene, which encodes for one of its key regulators, PHD2. High-altitude adaptation may be due to multiple genes that act in concert with one another. Unraveling their mechanism of action can offer new therapeutic approaches toward treating common human diseases characterized by chronic hypoxia. PMID:25319824

  12. [Morphofunctional adaptation of the placenta under conditions of natural high-altitude hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Milovanov, A P; Reshetnikova, O S; Borzykh, A N

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-six III trimester placentae from Kirghiz puerperas residents of high-altitude regions (2200-3000 m above the sea level) and 22 such placentae from female residents of the plains (group I and II, respectively) were subjected to ultrasonic placentometry and organo-stereohistometry. Group I placentae appeared to fall behind in thickness on weeks 28, 32 and 36 as well as in development on the last 4 weeks which is coupled with synchronous reduction of weight of mature newborns and relevant placentae. Enhanced morphofunctional activity, excessive vasculature of villous network, increased epithelial volume of the villi and vascular-syncytial membranes, intensive growth of separate cotyledons were characteristic for placentae exposed to high-altitude factors, which also bore the signs of dysadaptation manifesting with more frequent infarctions, adherent villi, hemorrhages. PMID:3060048

  13. Multiple Magnetic Storm Study of the High-Altitude Redistribution of Equatorial Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Curtis, N.; Anderson, D.

    2008-12-01

    During geomagnetic storms, particularly when prompt penetration electric fields (PPE) occur, the equatorial plasma can be lifted to very high altitudes and then diffuse along magnetic field lines to higher than normal latitudes. During these cases very high plasma density (total electron content (TEC) greater than 200 TECU) can be found at these higher latitudes. Shortly after the PPE lifts the equatorial plasma to higher altitudes, at least in the US sector, phenomena known as storm-enhanced density (SED) can occur. SEDs occur in the post-noon time frame and consist of a very high density bulge that seems to occur in the southern USA and Caribbean region, followed by a narrow plume of high density plasma that flows into the high-latitude throat near local noon, and across the polar cap. An outstanding research question is: Exactly how is the high density SED plasma, particularly in the bulge related to the PPE and lifting of the equatorial plasma? Ionospheric imaging of electron density and TEC seem to show a gap in density between the poleward extent of the equatorial plasma and the equatorial extent of the SED plasma. Further, there are magnetic storm events where SEDs do not form (November 2004 as a good example). This paper will investigate the relationship between the equatorial high altitude plasma distribution during magnetic storms, and the initiation and evolution of the SED feature. We will examine eight separate storms from 2003-2006 using the ionospheric data assimilation algorithm IDA4D. In particular we will focus on time periods when LEO satellite GPS TEC data is available from CHAMP, SACC, GRACE and the COSMIC constellation (2006 and beyond). These data sets directly measure the TEC above the satellites, and therefore are good tracers of the high altitude plasma distribution. IDA4D ingests these data sets and uses them to get an improved image of the plasma density for the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere. The resulting 4D images of high

  14. Effects of high altitude acclimatization on heart rate variability in resting humans.

    PubMed

    Perini, R; Milesi, S; Biancardi, L; Veicsteinas, A

    1996-01-01

    The sympatho-vagal nerve interaction at the heart was studied by means of power spectrum analysis of heart rate variability in seven Caucasians (aged 27-35 years) in resting supine and sitting positions before and during 35 days of a sojourn at 5050 m above sea level (asl) and in six Sherpas (aged 22-30 years) at high altitude only. A high frequency peak (HF)-central frequency between 0.20 and 0.33 Hz, a low frequency peak (LF)-central frequency between 0.08 and 0.14 Hz, and a very low frequency component (< 0.05 Hz), no peak observed, were found in the power spectrum in both positions and independent of altitude. The peak powers, as a percentage of the total power, were affected by both body position and altitude. At sea level the change from a supine to a sitting position yielded a decrease in percentage HF from 25 (SEM 1.9)% to 6.2 (SEM 1.5)% (P < 0.05) and a significant increase in the ratio between LF and HF powers (LF:HF) from 1.7 (SEM 0.4) to 6.9 (SEM 1.6). At altitude compared to sea level in the supine position, percentage HF decreased from 25% to 10.9 (SEM 1.0)% (P < 0.05) and the LF:HF ratio increased from 1.7 to 4.8 (SEM 0.7) (P < 0.05). No changes occurred at altitude in the sitting position either in the peak powers or in the LF:HF ratio, but the central frequency of HF peak increased significantly from 0.25 (SEM 0.02) Hz to 0.32 (SEM 0.01) Hz. In the Sherpas comparable results to the Caucasians were found in both body positions. The high LF:HF ratios observed at altitude in both body positions and groups would suggest that hypoxia caused a shift of sympatho-vagal nerve interaction at rest toward a dominance of the sympathetic system, which was found at sea level only in the sitting position. An acclimatization period of 10 days higher than 2850 m asl and 1 month at 5050 m asl did not modify the interactions of the autonomic systems. PMID:8817122

  15. Influence of Acute Exposure to High Altitude on Basal and Postprandial Plasma Levels of Gastroenteropancreatic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Riepl, Rudolf L.; Fischer, Rainald; Hautmann, Hubert; Hartmann, Gunther; Müller, Timo D.; Tschöp, Matthias; Toepfer, Marcell; Otto, Bärbel

    2012-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is characterized by headache often accompanied by gastrointestinal complaints that vary from anorexia through nausea to vomiting. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of high altitude on plasma levels of gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) peptides and their association to AMS symptoms. Plasma levels of 6 GEP peptides were measured by radioimmunoassay in 11 subjects at 490 m (Munich, Germany) and, after rapid passive ascent to 3454 m (Jungfraujoch, Switzerland), over the course of three days. In a second study (n = 5), the same peptides and ghrelin were measured in subjects who consumed standardized liquid meals at these two elevations. AMS symptoms and oxygen saturation were monitored. In the first study, both fasting (morning 8 a.m.) and stimulated (evening 8 p.m.) plasma levels of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and cholecystokinin (CCK) were significantly lower at high altitude as compared to baseline, whereas gastrin and motilin concentrations were significantly increased. Fasting plasma neurotensin was significantly enhanced whereas stimulated levels were reduced. Both fasting and stimulated plasma motilin levels correlated with gastrointestinal symptom severity (r = 0.294, p = 0.05, and r = 0.41, p = 0.006, respectively). Mean O2-saturation dropped from 96% to 88% at high altitude. In the second study, meal-stimulated integrated ( = area under curve) plasma CCK, PP, and neurotensin values were significantly suppressed at high altitude, whereas integrated levels of gastrin were increased and integrated VIP and ghrelin levels were unchanged. In summary, our data show that acute exposure to a hypobaric hypoxic environment causes significant changes in fasting and stimulated plasma levels of GEP peptides over consecutive days and after a standardized meal. The changes of peptide levels were not uniform. Based on the inhibition of PP and neurotensin release a reduction of the cholinergic tone can be

  16. Quantitative wildlife habitat evaluation using high-altitude color infrared aerial photographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pettinger, Lawrence R.; Farmer, Adrian; Schamberger, Mel

    1978-01-01

    The habitat value for elk and sage grouse of two proposed phosphate strip mine sites was determined using habitat parameter measurements from high-altitude color infrared aerial photographs. Habitat suitability was assessed using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures being developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Similar results were obtained from two approaches--a remote-sensing-only approach and a mix of measurements from photo interpretation and conventional field surveys.

  17. The design of an airfoil for a high-altitude, long-endurance remotely piloted vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, Mark D.; Somers, Dan M.

    1987-01-01

    Airfoil design efforts are studied. The importance of integrating airfoil and aircraft designs was demonstrated. Realistic airfoil data was provided to aid future high altitude, long endurance aircraft preliminary design. Test cases were developed for further validation of the Eppler program. Boundary layer, not pressure distribution or shape, was designed. Substantial improvement was achieved in vehicle performance through mission specific airfoil designed utilizing the multipoint capability of the Eppler program.

  18. A balloon-borne aerosol spectrometer for high altitude low aerosol concentration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S. ); Weiss, R.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Funded by Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory, a new balloon-borne high altitude aerosol spectrometer, for the measurement of cirrus cloud ice crystals, has been developed and successfully flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report (1) details the aerosol spectrometer design and construction, (2) discusses data transmission and decoding, (3) presents data collected on three Florida flights in tables and plots. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. System Analysis Applied to Autonomy: Application to High-Altitude Long-Endurance Remotely Operated Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    Maturation of intelligent systems technologies and their incorporation into aerial platforms are dictating the development of new analysis tools and incorporation of such tools into existing system analysis methodologies in order to fully capture the trade-offs of autonomy on vehicle and mission success. A first-order "system analysis of autonomy" methodology is outlined in this paper. Further, this analysis methodology is subsequently applied to notional high-altitude long-endurance (HALE) aerial vehicle missions.

  20. Genetic Variants in EPAS1 Contribute to Adaptation to High-Altitude Hypoxia in Sherpas

    PubMed Central

    Basnyat, Buddha; Ito, Michiko; Kobayashi, Nobumitsu; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Kubo, Keishi; Ota, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Sherpas comprise a population of Tibetan ancestry in the Himalayan region that is renowned for its mountaineering prowess. The very small amount of available genetic information for Sherpas is insufficient to explain their physiological ability to adapt to high-altitude hypoxia. Recent genetic evidence has indicated that natural selection on the endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1) gene was occurred in the Tibetan population during their occupation in the Tibetan Plateau for millennia. Tibetan-specific variations in EPAS1 may regulate the physiological responses to high-altitude hypoxia via a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor pathway. We examined three significant tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs13419896, rs4953354, and rs4953388) in the EPAS1 gene in Sherpas, and compared these variants with Tibetan highlanders on the Tibetan Plateau as well as with non-Sherpa lowlanders. We found that Sherpas and Tibetans on the Tibetan Plateau exhibit similar patterns in three EPAS1 significant tag SNPs, but these patterns are the reverse of those in non-Sherpa lowlanders. The three SNPs were in strong linkage in Sherpas, but in weak linkage in non-Sherpas. Importantly, the haplotype structured by the Sherpa-dominant alleles was present in Sherpas but rarely present in non-Sherpas. Surprisingly, the average level of serum erythropoietin in Sherpas at 3440 m was equal to that in non-Sherpas at 1300 m, indicating a resistant response of erythropoietin to high-altitude hypoxia in Sherpas. These observations strongly suggest that EPAS1 is under selection for adaptation to the high-altitude life of Tibetan populations, including Sherpas. Understanding of the mechanism of hypoxia tolerance in Tibetans is expected to provide lights to the therapeutic solutions of some hypoxia-related human diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:23227185

  1. Design considerations for remotely piloted, high-altitude airplanes powered by microwave energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. E. K., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Several types of systems have been considered in a design study of unmanned, microwave-powered, long-endurance, high-altitude airplanes. The study includes vehicles that use power from a continuously transmitted beam and other aircraft that receive intermittent power during cycles of boost-glide flight. Simple design algorithms are presented. Examples of sizing and performance analyses are used to suggest design-procedure guidelines.

  2. High altitude perspective. [cost-reimbursable services using NASA U-2 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The capabilities of the NASA Ames Center U-2 aircraft for research or experimental programs are described for such areas as Earth resources inventories; remote sensing data interpretation, electronic sensor research and development; satellite investigative support; stratospheric gas studies; and astronomy and astrophysics. The availability of this aircraft on a cost-reimbursable basis for use in high-altitude investigations that cannot be performed by the private sector is discussed.

  3. A unified thermal and vertical trajectory model for the prediction of high altitude balloon performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.; Horn, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model for the prediction of the trajectory and thermal behavior of zero-pressure high altitude balloon was developed. In accord with flight data, the model permits radiative emission and absorption of the lifting gas and daytime gas temperatures above that of the balloon film. It also includes ballasting, venting, and valving. Predictions obtained with the model are compared with flight data from several flights and newly discovered features are discussed.

  4. The Italian Spacegate: Study and innovative approaches to future generation transportation based on High Altitude Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Francesco; Bellomo, Alessandro; Bolle, Andrea; Vittori, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the pre-feasibility studies carried out in 2012 on the concept of sub orbital and hypersonic, high altitude flight in support of future generation transportation. Currently, while the High Altitude Flight is mostly instrumental to touristic purposes and emphasizes the so called Spaceports as futuristic, customers-luring airports featured with all the support services, the “Spacegate” concept deals with scheduled traveling in the upper part of the atmosphere between two points over the Earth surface, with significant reduction of the transfer time. The first part of the paper provides a theoretical approach to the matter, by proposing an “operational” mapping of the atmosphere as well as of the different kinds of flight occurring at High Altitude. The second part of the paper addresses the problem of the limited human capability of maintaining an active control of the vehicle during the re-entry phase and introduces the “Spacegate” concept as the conical portion of the atmosphere above the landing site, whose surface delimits the spiral-descending trajectories that the pilot can travel for a safe re-entry. This paper further outlines the results of the preliminary definition of top level operational requirements and derived architecture functional modules in support to the “Spacegate” implementation. Special attention was given to the favorable geographic and climatic conditions of Italy that make this Country suitable enough for future experimental sub orbital flights and related operations. An initial analysis was performed on the regulatory backbone that has to be built to properly operate High Altitude Flight vehicles in Italy according to the concept of an Italian “Spacegate”. A Preliminary Master Plan/Road Map for the “Spacegate” has been laid out, with special emphasis to selected near term activities and support infrastructures necessary to be carried out to better refine the study in preparation

  5. Mechanisms underlying reductions in stroke volume at rest and during exercise at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Stembridge, Mike; Ainslie, Philip N; Shave, Rob

    2016-08-01

    High-altitude exposure challenges the cardiovascular system to maintain oxygen delivery to the mitochondria under conditions of hypoxic stress. Following acclimatisation (3-5 days), stroke volume (SV) falls to below sea-level values but heart rate remains elevated, such that cardiac output is maintained compared to sea level. The decrease in SV has been a topic of research for over 40 years, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Impaired systolic contractile function secondary to reduced coronary arterial oxygen tension has been investigated as a potential cause for the decrease in SV. However, despite in vitro evidence of impaired cardiac contractile force in severe hypoxia, the majority of studies to date have reported enhanced in vivo ventricular systolic function at rest and during exercise in humans up to and above 5000 m. However, the elevated function observed at rest has recently been suggested to reduce the functional reserve available during exercise. While in vivo systolic function appears enhanced at high altitude, a decrease in left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV) and altered filling patterns of both ventricles has been observed. The reduction in ventricular filling will undoubtedly affect SV, and four potential mechanisms have been proposed to explain the reduction in left ventricular filling. In this article, both historical and recent reports of systolic function at high altitude will be reviewed, and evidence supporting and refuting each of the four mechanisms underpinning reduced left ventricular filling will be discussed. PMID:26325452

  6. Freestanding Flag-Type Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting High-Altitude Wind Energy from Arbitrary Directions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenfu; Pu, Xiong; Du, Chunhua; Li, Linxuan; Jiang, Chunyan; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-02-23

    Wind energy at a high altitude is far more stable and stronger than that near the ground, but it is out of reach of the wind turbine. Herein, we develop an innovative freestanding woven triboelectric nanogenerator flag (WTENG-flag) that can harvest high-altitude wind energy from arbitrary directions. The wind-driven fluttering of the woven unit leads to the current generation by a coupled effect of contact electrification and electrostatic induction. Systematic study is conducted to optimize the structure/material parameters of the WTENG-flag to improve the power output. This 2D WTENG-flag can also be stacked in parallel connections in many layers for a linearly increased output. Finally, a self-powered high-altitude platform with temperature/humidity sensing/telecommunicating capability is demonstrated with the WTENG-flag as a power source. Due to the light weight, low cost, and easy scale-up, this WTENG-flag has great potential for applications in weather/environmental sensing/monitoring systems. PMID:26738695

  7. High-altitude radar meteors observed at Jicamarca Radio Observatory using a multibaseline interferometric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Boyi; Mathews, John D.

    2015-10-01

    A new unambiguous, multibaseline interferometric technique was recently employed for meteor observations at Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO). These observations largely confirm high-altitude radar meteors (HARMs). The 50 MHz JRO array is arranged in contiguous quarter-arrays (Q) each of which is comprised of 4 × 4 sub-arrays (M), which are referred to as square modules in the Ochs' manual. In these observations the radar transmission was from two quarter-arrays sharing a common diagonal. Signal reception was via three, quarter-array (Q) receivers and three adjacent (M) module receivers all of the same polarization. This arrangement offered the usual Q-Q and M-M interferometric baseline-pairs as well as new Q-M baselines that were rotated ˜6° from the Q-Q and M-M baselines. For relatively high signal-to-noise ratio meteors, this arrangement yields ambiguity resolution to the horizon and confirms the existence of HARM events. We report results from 2014 August 4 to 5 observations that include interesting new HARM events and also suggest the meteoric origin of high-altitude, altitude-extended transient events we named `Dragons' in our earlier report (Gao & Mathews 2015a). We hope to extend this new technique with yet more baselines and higher sensitivity in near future observations.

  8. Periodic breathing and oxygen supplementation in Chilean miners at high altitude (4200m).

    PubMed

    Moraga, Fernando A; Jiménez, Daniel; Richalet, Jean Paul; Vargas, Manuel; Osorio, Jorge

    2014-11-01

    Our objective was to determine the nocturnal ventilatory pattern and characterize the effect of oxygen enrichment on nocturnal ventilatory pattern and sleep quality in miners exposed to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia at 4200m. A total of 16 acclimatized miners were studied. Nocturnal ventilatory pattern (plethysmographic inductance), arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate (pulse oximetry) were performed in 9/16 subjects. Sleep quality at high altitude was assessed by self-questionnaires in 16/16 subjects. All measurements were performed during at least 7h of sleep. Subjects were studied while sleeping at high altitude without (control, C) and with oxygen supplementation (FiO2=0.25, treated, T). Periodic breathing (%) C: 25±18 vs T: 6.6±5.6 (p<0.05), apneas index (no./h) C: 34.9±24.1 vs T: 8.5±6.8 (p<0.05); and sleep quality C: 17.8±3.4 vs T: 12.1±2.2 (p<0.0001) were evaluated. In conclusion, periodic breathing with apneas was present in miners exposed to high altitude for 1 to 4 years and was reduced by treatment with supplementary oxygen. PMID:25219448

  9. [Interaction of hypoxia and haemostasis--hypoxia as a prothrombotic factor at high altitude?].

    PubMed

    Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Georg; Gunga, Hanns-Christian

    2005-04-01

    For an extended period of time various research projects have been conducted on the relationship of hypoxia and haemostasis. The enclosed article contains the conclusion to which extent lack of oxygen can activate the coagulation system and induce a prothrombotic state. The majority of studies proved a shortening of coagulation times during acute exposure to hypoxia, whereas activated parameters of coagulation and fibrinolysis like prothrombin fragment F1+2 as well as thrombin-antithrombin III complexes and D-dimer remained mostly unmodified. It is suggested that a prolonged sojourn at high altitudes could lead to activation of the coagulation system through an increase of haematocrit and blood viscosity. Recently it was proven that people living at high altitudes show an enhanced risk of stroke incidents. The significance of the change in haemostasis on that outcome has not yet been part of the research. However, it has been proven that the activity of the coagulation system does not play a pathophysiological part in the development of acute mountain sickness and high altitude pulmonary edema. Recent studies also demonstrated that moderate hypoxia during long haul flights may not be the main trigger in inducing deep vein thrombosis in passengers. PMID:15966261

  10. Combining Undergraduate Student Curriculum, Research, and Outreach: High-altitude Balloon and Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. J.; Nielsen, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Society of Physics Students chapter at Utah Valley University (UVU) recently established a high altitude balloon project to provide students with research opportunities. This highly successful program involves students not only from physics but also from other STEM fields and non-STEM subjects, and as such acts as a unique outreach program for the department of physics. Examples of experiments performed with the balloon project are: 3D-acceleration measurements, altitude/pressure/temperature measurements, ozone monitoring, bio-aerosol collection, and solar panel performance output. All these experiment are designed and build by groups of students either as part of research projects or through class participation as the projects link with the curriculum in several courses. Most recently, a group of UVU students have initiated the implementation of small rockets capable of carrying payloads to this high-altitude program. Both balloon and rocket platforms are fundamental in-situ measuring techniques for numerous geoscience subjects, and are arguably best illustrated by the NASA balloon and sounding rocket programs. In this presentation, we give an overview of the program and how it is 1) being implemented into the curriculum, 2) provide unique research opportunities for students, and 3) specific outreach activities.

  11. Optimal hemoglobin concentration and high altitude: a theoretical approach for Andean men at rest.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Cárdenas, Rosa; Monge-C, Carlos

    2004-05-01

    The beneficial role of erythrocytosis for O2 transport has been questioned by evidence from bloodletting and hemodilution research as well as by studies suggesting the existence of an "optimal" hematocrit (Hct) or hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) value. To assess to what extent erythrocytosis is beneficial in Andean men at high altitude, we examined and discussed optimal [Hb] using a mathematical approach by modeling the mixed (mean) venous Po2 (Pv(O2)) and arterial O2 content, considering for both the relation between [Hb] and arterial Po2. Relations of [Hb] to other physiological variables such as cardiac output and convective arterial O2 transport were also discussed, revealing the importance of Pv(O2) in this model. Our theoretical analysis suggests that increasing [Hb] allows increase and maintenance of Pv(O2) with only moderate declines in arterial Po2 as a consequence of moderate increases in altitude, reaching its maximum at the optimal [Hb] of 14.7 g/dl. Our analysis also shows that [Hb] corresponding to high arterial O2 content and O2 transport values is apparently not quite advantageous for improvement of oxygenation. Furthermore, chronic mountain sickness is discussed as an insightful example of the effects of excessive erythrocytosis at high altitude. PMID:14672972

  12. Cerebral spinal fluid dynamics: effect of hypoxia and implications for high-altitude illness.

    PubMed

    Lawley, Justin S; Levine, Benjamin D; Williams, Michael A; Malm, Jon; Eklund, Anders; Polaner, David M; Subudhi, Andrew W; Hackett, Peter H; Roach, Robert C

    2016-01-15

    The pathophysiology of acute mountain sickness and high-altitude cerebral edema, the cerebral forms of high-altitude illness, remain uncertain and controversial. Persistently elevated or pathological fluctuations in intracranial pressure are thought to cause symptoms similar to those reported by individuals suffering cerebral forms of high-altitude illness. This review first focuses on the basic physiology of the craniospinal system, including a detailed discussion of the long-term and dynamic regulation of intracranial pressure. Thereafter, we critically examine the available literature, based primarily on invasive pressure monitoring, that suggests intracranial pressure is acutely elevated at altitude due to brain swelling and/or elevated sagittal sinus pressure, but normalizes over time. We hypothesize that fluctuations in intracranial pressure occur around a slightly elevated or normal mean intracranial pressure, in conjunction with oscillations in arterial Po2 and arterial blood pressure. Then these modest fluctuations in intracranial pressure, in concert with direct vascular stretch due to dilatation and/or increased blood pressure transmission, activate the trigeminal vascular system and cause symptoms of acute mountain sickness. Elevated brain water (vasogenic edema) may be due to breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. However, new information suggests cerebral spinal fluid flux into the brain may be an important factor. Regardless of the source (or mechanisms responsible) for the excess brain water, brain swelling occurs, and a "tight fit" brain would be a major risk factor to produce symptoms; activities that produce large changes in brain volume and cause fluctuations in blood pressure are likely contributing factors. PMID:26494441

  13. High-altitude headache: the effects of real vs sham oxygen administration.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Fabrizio; Durando, Jennifer; Giudetti, Lucia; Pampallona, Alan; Vighetti, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    High-altitude, or hypobaric hypoxia, headache has recently emerged as an interesting model to study placebo and nocebo responses, and particularly their peripheral mechanisms. In this study, we analyze the response of this type of headache to either real or sham (placebo) oxygen (O(2)) administration at an altitude of 3500 m, where blood oxygen saturation (SO(2)) drops from the normal value of about 98% to about 85%. In a trial in which a double-blind administration of either 100% O(2) or sham O(2) was administered, we tested pre- and post-exercise headache, along with fatigue, heart rate (HR) responses, and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) salivary concentration. Although real O(2) breathing increased SO(2) along with a decrease in pre- and post-exercise headache, fatigue, HR, and PGE(2), placebo O(2) changed neither pre-/post-exercise headache nor SO(2)/HR/PGE(2), but it decreased fatigue. However, in another group of subjects, when sham O(2) was delivered after 2 previous exposures to O(2) (O(2) preconditioning), it decreased fatigue, post-exercise headache, HR, and PGE(2), yet without any increase in SO(2). Three main findings emerge from these data. First, placebo O(2) is effective in reducing post-exercise headache, along with HR and PGE(2) decrease, only after O(2) preconditioning. Second, pre-exercise (at rest) headache is not affected by placebo O(2), which emphasizes the limits of a placebo treatment at high altitude. Third, fatigue is affected by placebo O(2) even without prior O(2) conditioning, which suggests the higher placebo sensitivity of fatigue compared with headache pain at high altitude. PMID:26164587

  14. A Novel Candidate Region for Genetic Adaptation to High Altitude in Andean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Lippold, Sebastian; de Filippo, Cesare; Tang, Kun; López Herráez, David; Li, Jing; Stoneking, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Humans living at high altitude (≥2,500 meters above sea level) have acquired unique abilities to survive the associated extreme environmental conditions, including hypoxia, cold temperature, limited food availability and high levels of free radicals and oxidants. Long-term inhabitants of the most elevated regions of the world have undergone extensive physiological and/or genetic changes, particularly in the regulation of respiration and circulation, when compared to lowland populations. Genome scans have identified candidate genes involved in altitude adaption in the Tibetan Plateau and the Ethiopian highlands, in contrast to populations from the Andes, which have not been as intensively investigated. In the present study, we focused on three indigenous populations from Bolivia: two groups of Andean natives, Aymara and Quechua, and the low-altitude control group of Guarani from the Gran Chaco lowlands. Using pooled samples, we identified a number of SNPs exhibiting large allele frequency differences over 900,000 genotyped SNPs. A region in chromosome 10 (within the cytogenetic bands q22.3 and q23.1) was significantly differentiated between highland and lowland groups. We resequenced ~1.5 Mb surrounding the candidate region and identified strong signals of positive selection in the highland populations. A composite of multiple signals like test localized the signal to FAM213A and a related enhancer; the product of this gene acts as an antioxidant to lower oxidative stress and may help to maintain bone mass. The results suggest that positive selection on the enhancer might increase the expression of this antioxidant, and thereby prevent oxidative damage. In addition, the most significant signal in a relative extended haplotype homozygosity analysis was localized to the SFTPD gene, which encodes a surfactant pulmonary-associated protein involved in normal respiration and innate host defense. Our study thus identifies two novel candidate genes and associated pathways

  15. Rationale and operational plan for a U.S. high-altitude magnetic survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Acuna, Mario; Bracken, Robert E.; Hardwick, Doug; Hinze, William J.; Keller, Gordon R.; Phillips, Jeff; Roest, Walter

    2002-01-01

    On August 8, 2002, twenty-one scientists from the federal, private and academic sectors met at a workshop in Denver, Co., to discuss the feasibility of collecting magnetic anomaly data on a Canberra aircraft (Figure 1). The need for this 1-day workshop arose because of an exciting and cost-effective opportunity to collect invaluable magnetic anomaly data during a Canberra mission over the U.S. in 2003 and 2004. High Altitude Mapping Missions (HAMM) is currently planning a mission to collect Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) imagery at an altitude of about 15 km and with a flight-line spacing of about 18 km over the conterminous U.S. and Alaska. The additional collection of total and vector magnetic field data would represent a secondary mission objective (i.e., a "piggy-back" magnetometer system). Because HAMM would fund the main flight costs of the mission, the geomagnetic community would obtain invaluable magnetic data at a nominal cost. These unique data would provide new insights on fundamental tectonic and thermal processes and give a new view of the structural and lithologic framework of the crust and possibly the upper mantle. This document highlights: (1) the reasons to conduct this national survey and (2) a preliminary operational plan to collect high-altitude magnetic data of a desired quality and for the expected resources. Although some operational plan issues remain to be resolved, the important conclusions of the workshop are that the Canberra is a very suitable platform to measure the magnetic field and that the planned mission will result in quality high-altitude magnetic data to greatly expand the utility of our national magnetic database.

  16. The hydrology of three high-altitude forests in Central Himalaya, India: a reconnaissance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, G. C. S.; Rikhari, H. C.; Garkoti, S. C.

    1998-02-01

    In this preliminary study the partitioning of rain-water into various components of the hydrological cycle in three high-altitude forests of contrasting tree physiognomies (namely, Aesculus indica, Quercus semecarpifolia and Abies pindrow) were studied in the Nandadevi Biosphere Reserve, Central Himalaya, India. The results are compared with the hydrological characteristics of low-altitude forests of this region. The study has indicated a significant role of tree physiognomy with regard to rainfall partitioning into the various components of the hydrological cycle. It is suggested that A. pindrow (an evergreen tree) should be considered superior to A. indica (a deciduous tree) with regard to soil and water conservation in this region. This work is of relevance to land management programmes pertaining to afforestation, logging and regeneration.

  17. On the Accuracy of Stratospheric Meteorological Reanalyses Using Wind Measurements at High Altitude in the Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huret, N.; Duruisseau, F.; Andral, A.

    2015-09-01

    This study is motivated by the improvement of the knowledge of stratospheric dynamics and the evaluation of the ability of models to represent wind variability in the stratosphere. We deduce from the Zero Pressure Balloons trajectories, operated by CNES during the last decade, zonal and meridional wind to provide a unique database in the altitude range [25-40] km. The collected data are associated with ZBP flights launch during winter and summer in polar region above the Esrange (Sweden) launch base and in equatorial region above the Teresina (Brazil) during easterly and westerly Quasibiennal Oscillation phase. We performed systematic comparisons between wind measurements and ERA—interim reanalysis from ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) and present the vertical profile of biases for both wind component in winter at high latitude. The biases and the standard deviation obtained increase with altitude.

  18. The effects of high altitude on age at menarche and menopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, A. K.; Kapoor, Satwanti

    1986-03-01

    The age at menarche and menopause of three groups of Bhotia females living at high altitude, Himalayan region — Uttar Pradesh, North India, were studied. The Johari Bhotia women had earliest menarche (¯X=15.1±1.1 years) as compared to Rang Bhotias, settled (¯X=15.6±0.9 years) and Rang Bhotias, migratory (¯X=16.0±1.0 years). The differences between all these three groups for age at menarche were significant. A trend towards increase in age at menarche with an increase in altitude has been observed, but the total fertility period in the three groups remained similar as early menarche has been found to be associated with early onset of menopause and late menarche with late menopause.

  19. High-altitude pulmonary edema in Vail, Colorado, 1975-1982.