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Sample records for high angle-of-attack aerodynamics

  1. Aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Grafton, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to, and a broad overiew of, the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack are provided. Items include: (1) some important fundamental phenomena which determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack; (2) static and dynamic aerodynamic characteristics near the stall; (3) aerodynamics of the spin; (4) test techniques used in stall/spin studies; (5) applications of aerodynamic data to problems in flight dynamics in the stall/spin area; and (6) the outlook for future research in the area. Although stalling and spinning are flight dynamic problems of importance to all aircraft, including general aviation aircraft, commercial transports, and military airplanes, emphasis is placed on military configurations and the principle aerodynamic factors which influence the stability and control of such vehicles at high angles of attack.

  2. High-angle-of-attack aerodynamics - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the military and civil technical communities have undertaken numerous studies of the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of advanced airplane and missile configurations. The method of approach and the design methodology employed have necessarily been experimental and exploratory in nature, due to the complex nature of separated flows. However, despite the relatively poor definition of many of the key aerodynamic phenomena involved for high-alpha conditions, some generic guidelines for design consideration have been identified. The present paper summarizes some of the more important lessons learned in the area of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics with examples of a number of key concepts and with particular emphasis on high-alpha stability and control characteristics of high performance aircraft. Topics covered in the discussion include the impact of design evolution, forebody flows, control of separated flows, configuration effects, aerodynamic controls, wind-tunnel flight correlation, and recent NASA research activities.

  3. Aerodynamic characteristics of cruciform missiles at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, Daniel J.; Mendenhall, Michael R.; Nazario, Susana M.; Hemsch, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    An aerodynamic prediction method for missile aerodynamic performance and preliminary design has been developed to utilize a newly available systematic fin data base and an improved equivalent angle of attack methodology. The method predicts total aerodynamic loads and individual fin forces and moments for body-tail (wing-body) and canard-body-tail configurations with cruciform fin arrangements. The data base and the prediction method are valid for angles of attack up to 45 deg, arbitrary roll angles, fin deflection angles between -40 deg and 40 deg, Mach numbers between 0.6 and 4.5, and fin aspect ratios between 0.25 and 4.0. The equivalent angle of attack concept is employed to include the effects of vorticity and geometric scaling.

  4. Aerodynamic characteristics of general aviation at high angle of attack with the propeller slipstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuo, N.; Hirano, S.

    1986-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the FA-300 business aircraft at high angle of attack with the propeller stream are described. The FA-300 offers two types, FA-300-700 for 340 HP, and -710 for 450 Hp of the engine. The effects of the propeller slipstream on the high angle of the attack are discussed.

  5. High angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of crescent and elliptic wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Static longitudinal and lateral-directional forces and moments were measured for elliptic- and crescent-wing models at high angles-of-attack in the NASA Langley 14 by 22-Ft Subsonic Tunnel. The forces and moments were obtained for an angle-of-attack range including stall and post-stall conditions at a Reynolds number based on the average wing chord of about 1.8 million. Flow-visualization photographs using a mixture of oil and titanium-dioxide were also taken for several incidence angles. The force and moment data and the flow-visualization results indicated that the crescent wing model with its highly swept tips produced much better high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics than the elliptic model. Leading-edge separation-induced vortex flow over the highly swept tips of the crescent wing is thought to produce this improved behavior at high angles-of-attack. The unique planform design could result in safer and more efficient low-speed airplanes.

  6. An Overview of the RTO Symposium on Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2002-01-01

    In May of 2001 the Research and Technology Organization (RTO) sponsored a symposium on Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack aerodynamics. Forty-six papers, organized into nine sessions, addressed computational and experimental studies of vortex flows pertinent to both aircraft and maritime applications. The studies also ranged from fundamental fluids investigations to flight test results. Selected highlights are included in this paper to provide a perspective toward the scope of the full symposium.

  7. Shuttle Orbiter Contingency Abort Aerodynamics: Real-Gas Effects and High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Papadopoulos, Periklis E.; Davies, Carol B.; Wright, Michael J.; McDaniel, Ryan D.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wercinski, Paul F.

    2005-01-01

    An important element of the Space Shuttle Orbiter safety improvement plan is the improved understanding of its aerodynamic performance so as to minimize the "black zones" in the contingency abort trajectories [1]. These zones are regions in the launch trajectory where it is predicted that, due to vehicle limitations, the Orbiter will be unable to return to the launch site in a two or three engine-out scenario. Reduction of these zones requires accurate knowledge of the aerodynamic forces and moments to better assess the structural capability of the vehicle. An interesting aspect of the contingency abort trajectories is that the Orbiter would need to achieve angles of attack as high as 60deg. Such steep attitudes are much higher than those for a nominal flight trajectory. The Orbiter is currently flight certified only up to an angle of attack of 44deg at high Mach numbers and has never flown at angles of attack larger than this limit. Contingency abort trajectories are generated using the data in the Space Shuttle Operational Aerodynamic Data Book (OADB) [2]. The OADB, a detailed document of the aerodynamic environment of the current Orbiter, is primarily based on wind-tunnel measurements (over a wide Mach number and angle-of-attack range) extrapolated to flight conditions using available theories and correlations, and updated with flight data where available. For nominal flight conditions, i.e., angles of attack of less than 45deg, the fidelity of the OADB is excellent due to the availability of flight data. However, at the off-nominal conditions, such as would be encountered on contingency abort trajectories, the fidelity of the OADB is less certain. The primary aims of a recent collaborative effort (completed in the year 2001) between NASA and Boeing were to determine: 1) accurate distributions of pressure and shear loads on the Orbiter at select points in the contingency abort trajectory space; and 2) integrated aerodynamic forces and moments for the entire

  8. Mathematical modeling of the aerodynamics of high-angle-of-attack maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.; Tobak, M.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current state of aerodynamic mathematical modeling for aircraft motions at high angles of attack. The mathematical model serves to define a set of characteristic motions from whose known aerodynamic responses the aerodynamic response to an arbitrary high angle-of-attack flight maneuver can be predicted. Means are explored of obtaining stability parameter information in terms of the characteristic motions, whether by wind-tunnel experiments, computational methods, or by parameter-identification methods applied to flight-test data. A rationale is presented for selecting and verifying the aerodynamic mathematical model at the lowest necessary level of complexity. Experimental results describing the wing-rock phenomenon are shown to be accommodated within the most recent mathematical model by admitting the existence of aerodynamic hysteresis in the steady-state variation of the rolling moment with roll angle. Interpretation of the experimental results in terms of bifurcation theory reveals the general conditions under which aerodynamic hysteresis must exist.

  9. Asymmetric aerodynamic forces on aircraft at high angles of attack - some design guides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. T.; Keener, E. R.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1976-01-01

    Aerodynamic side forces on forebodies are considered that are produced by two types of flow: asymmetric vortices on bodies of revolution and nonuniform flow separation on square bodies with rounded corners under spinning conditions. Steady side forces that can be as large as the normal force are produced by asymmetric vortices on pointed forebodies. This side force has a large variation with Reynolds number, decreases rapidly with Mach number, and can be nearly eliminated with small nose bluntness or strakes. The angle of attack where the side force first occurs depends primarily on body geometry. The theoretical techniques to predict these side forces are necessarily semi-empirical because the basic phenomenon is not well understood. The side forces produced by nonuniform flow separation under spinning conditions depend extensively on spin rate, angle of attack, and Reynolds number. The application of simple crossflow theory to predict this side force is inadequate much below angles of attack of 90 deg.

  10. Identification of an unsteady aerodynamic model up to high angle of attack regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yigang

    1997-12-01

    those from references, a state-space model is developed to describe the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics up to the high angle of attack regime. A nondimensional coordinate is introduced as the state variable describing the flow separation or vortex burst. First-order differential equation is used to govern the dynamics of flow separation or vortex bursting through this state variable. To be valid for general configurations, Taylor series expansions in terms of the input variables are used in the determination of aerodynamic characteristics, resembling the current approach of the stability derivatives. However, these derivatives are longer constant. They are dependent on the state variable of flow separation or vortex burst. In this way, the changes in stability derivatives with the angle of attack are included dynamically. The performance of the model is then validated by the wind-tunnel measurements of an NACA 0015 airfoil, a 70sp° delta wing and, finally two F-18 aircraft configurations. The results obtained show that within the framework of the proposed model, it is possible to obtain good agreement with different unsteady wind tunnel data in high angle-of-attack regime.

  11. Aerodynamic Loads on Tails at High Angles of Attack and Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.; Spahr, J. R.

    1957-01-01

    Results are presented for the loads and moments acting on the individual tail surfaces of a body-tail combination over a wide range of angles of attack and sideslip. The effects of forebody length and panel-panel interference on the characteristics are included. It is shown that large nonlinear variations in these loads and moments, which occur at some combinations of angle of attack and sideslip, cannot be predicted by low-angle theory. A relatively simple, but general, theoretical method for calculating these load and moment characteristics is described, and the results from this method are found to be in good agreement with experiment provided the initial positions of the forebody vortices are known. It is shown that a simple application of slender-body theory can be used to predict the side loads due to sideslip that are contributed by a vertical tail on a wide variety of wing-body-tail combinations at low angles of attack. For several configurations, changes are indicated which reduced the vertical-tail loads per unit yawing moment of each complete configuration at large angles of attack. Some results are presented on the effect of high angle of attack on the induced-flow field and tail loads due to a wing at supersonic speed.

  12. Actuator and aerodynamic modeling for high-angle-of-attack aeroservoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate prediction of airframe/actuation coupling is required by the imposing demands of modern flight control systems. In particular, for agility enhancement at high angle of attack and low dynamic pressure, structural integration characteristics such as hinge moments, effective actuator stiffness, and airframe/control surface damping can have a significant effect on stability predictions. Actuator responses are customarily represented with low-order transfer functions matched to actuator test data, and control surface stiffness is often modeled as a linear spring. The inclusion of the physical properties of actuation and its installation on the airframe is therefore addressed in this paper using detailed actuator models which consider the physical, electrical, and mechanical elements of actuation. The aeroservoelastic analysis procedure is described in which the actuators are modeled as detailed high-order transfer functions and as approximate low-order transfer functions. The impacts of unsteady aerodynamic modeling on aeroservoelastic stability are also investigated in this paper by varying the order of approximation, or number of aerodynamic lag states, in the analysis. Test data from a thrust-vectoring configuration of an F/A-18 aircraft are compared to predictions to determine the effects on accuracy as a function of modeling complexity.

  13. Actuator and aerodynamic modeling for high-angle-of-attack aeroservoelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate prediction of airframe/actuation coupling is required by the imposing demands of modern flight control systems. In particular, for agility enhancement at high angle of attack and low dynamic pressure, structural integration characteristics such as hinge moments, effective actuator stiffness, and airframe/control surface damping can have a significant effect on stability predictions. Actuator responses are customarily represented with low-order transfer functions matched to actuator test data, and control surface stiffness is often modeled as a linear spring. The inclusion of the physical properties of actuation and its installation on the airframe is therefore addressed using detailed actuator models which consider the physical, electrical, and mechanical elements of actuation. The aeroservoelastic analysis procedure is described in which the actuators are modeled as detailed high-order transfer functions and as approximate low-order transfer functions. The impacts of unsteady aerodynamic modeling on aeroservoelastic stability are also investigated by varying the order of approximation, or number of aerodynamic lag states, in the analysis. Test data from a thrust-vectoring configuration of an F/A-l8 aircraft are compared to predictions to determine the effects on accuracy as a function of modeling complexity.

  14. Determination of aerodynamic parameters of a fighter airplane from flight data at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.; Batterson, J. G.; Abbasy, I.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure for the estimation of airplane model structure and parameters is applied to data from a modern fighter airplane operating within an angle of attack range of 5 to 60 deg. The paper briefly describes the airplane, flight and wind tunnel data available, and the estimation method. The results presented contain basic longitudinal characteristics of the airplane and the estimates of aerodynamic parameters in the yawing-moment equations. These estimates are obtained from small and large amplitude maneuvers. Because the latter set of data was not suitable for airplane identification, some of the large amplitude maneuvers were joined together and then partitioned into subsets according to the values of angle of attack. Each subset was then analyzed as a separate data set. Most of the estimated parameters and functions are in good agreement with the wind tunnel measurements. The estimated lateral parameters in the model equations also demonstrate good prediction capabilities.

  15. Implications of scale effect for the prediction of high angle of attack aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, C. D.; Krus, P.; Jouannet, C.

    2005-04-01

    Scale effect is of significance in all experimental aerodynamics testing. At high angles of attack such issues as Reynolds and Mach number scaling are further complicated by the presence of complex, unsteady separated flow structures. The understanding and quantification of such flow effects remains a substantial challenge to the combat aircraft designer. The challenge, especially during conceptual and preliminary design stages, is to obtain sufficiently accurate information to make relevant design decisions, addressing potential weaknesses before proceeding to detail design. The focus in the present review is on the application of the water tunnel in such cases. The combination of qualitative and quantitative data obtainable from the water tunnel provides a useful complement to other tools during the early design stages. The effect of Reynolds number in particular is however critical; and appreciation of its effects are critical to the effective use of such a tool. It is shown however that for certain configurations such effects can be small in comparison to other experimental effects.

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics of two general aviation canard configurations at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Yip, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests of two propeller driven canard general aviation aircraft models at high angles of attack are reported. Both tractor and pusher prop configurations were examined. Angles of attack of -6 to 40 deg were used with the pusher model at Re of 1,600,000, and from -30 to 90 deg and Re of 550,000 for the tractor model. The tests showed that the canard would stall long before the wing and produce a nose-down tendency, thus effectively keeping the aircraft out of the stall regime. However, a sequence of pilot actions or design factors such as the airfoils, relative geometry of the canard and wing, the propeller location and the center of gravity location could introduce a wide variance in stall characteristics from one aircraft to another.

  17. Partitioning of flight data for aerodynamic modeling of aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, James G.; Klein, Vladislav

    1987-01-01

    It is sometimes necessary to determine aerodynamic model structure and estimate associated stability and control derivatives for airplanes from flight data that cover a large range of angle of attack or sideslip. One method of dealing with that problem is through data partitioning. The main purpose of this paper is to provide an explanation of a data partitioning procedure and its application and to discuss both the power and limitations of that procedure for the analysis of large maneuvers of aircraft. The partitioning methodology is shown to provide estimates for coefficients of those regressors that are well excited in the aircraft motion. In particular, primary lateral stability and damping derivatives are identified throughout the maneuver ranges.

  18. High angle-of-attack aerodynamics of a strake-canard-wing V/STOL fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durston, D. A.; Schreiner, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    High angle-of-attack aerodynamic data are analyzed for a strake-canard-wing V/STOL fighter configuration. The configuration represents a twin-engine supersonic V/STOL fighter aircraft which uses four longitudinal thrust-augmenting ejectors to provide vertical lift. The data were obtained in tests of a 9.39 percent scale model of the configuration in the NASA Ames 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel, at a Mach number of 0.2. Trimmed aerodynamic characteristics, longitudinal control power, longitudinal and lateral/directional stability, and effects of alternate strake and canard configurations are analyzed. The configuration could not be trimmed (power-off) above 12 deg angle of attack because of the limited pitch control power and the high degree of longitudinal instability (28 percent) at this Mach number. Aerodynamic center location was found to be controllable by varying strake size and canard location without significantly affecting lift and drag. These configuration variations had relatively little effect on the lateral/directional stability up to 10 deg angle of attack.

  19. Method for estimating the aerodynamic coefficients of wind turbine blades at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beans, E. W.; Jakubowski, G. S.

    1983-12-01

    The method is based on the hypothesis that at high angles of attack the force on an airfoil is produced by the deflection of the fluid across the lower surface. It is also hypothesized that all airfoils behave the same regardless of shape and that the effects of circulation and skin friction are small. It is pointed out that the expression for the force N normal to the airfoil due to momentum exchange can be written in terms of the component parallel to the flow (drag) and the component perpendicular to the flow (lift). A comparison of estimated values with measured values and generally accepted data indicates that the method given here estimates coefficients which are low. It is thought that the difference may derive from the persistence of circulation at high angles of attack. Low estimates are not seen as a serious limitation to the designer of wind turbines. Owing to the fifth power diameter relation, the effect of a low estimate of performance on the inner portion of the blade is minimized.

  20. Experimental study of the effects of Reynolds number on high angle of attack aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies during rotary motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, H.; Ralston, J.; Dickes, E.

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Defense Research Agency (United Kingdom) have ongoing experimental research programs in rotary-flow aerodynamics. A cooperative effort between the two agencies is currently underway to collect an extensive database for the development of high angle of attack computational methods to predict the effects of Reynolds number on the forebody flowfield at dynamic conditions, as well as to study the use of low Reynolds number data for the evaluation of high Reynolds number characteristics. Rotary balance experiments, including force and moment and surface pressure measurements, were conducted on circular and rectangular aftbodies with hemispherical and ogive noses at the Bedford and Farnborough wind tunnel facilities in the United Kingdom. The bodies were tested at 60 and 90 deg angle of attack for a wide range of Reynolds numbers in order to observe the effects of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow separation on the forebody characteristics when rolling about the velocity vector.

  1. Aerodynamic damping of blade flap motions at high angles of attack

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.C.

    1995-09-01

    The YawDyn computer code is used to calculate the aerodynamic damping for a typical teetering rotor configuration. The code has been modified to calculate the net work done by aerodynamic forces in one complete rotor revolution. All cases were run for a teetering rotor similar to the ESI-80 with a specified teeter angle motion in order to isolate the aerodynamic effects from the inertial and gravitational loads. Effects of nonlinear static stall, dynamic stall, dynamic inflow, and delayed static stall due to rotation stability of flap motions in high winds. Contributions of the various steady and unsteady aerodynamic effects are presented for two airfoils: the LS(1) and the NREL Thin Airfoil Family (S805A, S806, S807). Teeter stability is compared for a blade with 10{degree} of linear twist and a blade with optimum aerodynamic twist.

  2. Theoretical model of aerodynamic forces at high speeds and angle of attack in a stratified flowfield of UF6

    SciTech Connect

    Harloff, G.J.

    1985-09-01

    A theoretical aerodynamic model of lift and drag forces on a flat plate at angle of attack and at hypersonic speeds is presented. Real gas effects and friction drag are accounted for. Theoretical results are presented as a function of the viscous interaction parameter. The performance for two geometries is presented. 3 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of a fighter model undergoing large-amplitude pitching motions at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Shah, Gautam H.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of harmonic or constant-rate-ramp pitching motions (giving angles of attack from 0 to 75 deg) on the aerodynamic performance of a fighter-aircraft model with highly swept leading-edge extensions are investigated experimentally in the NASA Langley 12-ft low-speed wind tunnel. The model configuration and experimental setup are described, and the results of force and moment measurements and flow visualizations are presented graphically and discussed in detail. Large force overshoots and hysteresis are observed and attributed to lags in vortical-flow development and breakup. The motion variables have a strong influence on the persistence of dynamic effects, which are found to affect pitch-rate capability more than flight-path turning performance.

  4. Validation of aerodynamic parameters at high angles of attack for RAE high incidence research models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, A. Jean; Edwards, Geraldine F.; Klein, Vladislav; Batterson, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Two series of free-flight tests have been conducted for combat aircraft configuration research models in order to investigate flight behavior near departure conditions as well as to obtain response data from which aerodynamic characteristics can be derived. The structure of the mathematical model and values for the mathematical derivatives have been obtained through an analysis of the first series, using stepwise regression. The results thus obtained are the bases of the design of active control laws. Flight test results for a novel configuration are compared with predicted responses.

  5. Critical evaluation of the unsteady aerodynamics approach to dynamic stability at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    Bifurcation theory is used to analyze the nonlinear dynamic stability characteristics of an aircraft subject to single-degree-of-freedom. The requisite moment of the aerodynamic forces in the equations of motion is shown to be representable in a form equivalent to the response to finite amplitude oscillations. It is shown how this information can be deduced from the case of infinitesimal-amplitude oscillations. The bifurcation theory analysis reveals that when the bifurcation parameter is increased beyond a critical value at which the aerodynamic damping vanishes, new solutions representing finite amplitude periodic motions bifurcate from the previously stable steady motion. The sign of a simple criterion, cast in terms of aerodynamic properties, determines whether the bifurcating solutions are stable or unstable. For the pitching motion of flat-plate airfoils flying at supersonic/hypersonic speed and for oscillation of flaps at transonic speed, the bifurcation is subcritical, implying either the exchanges of stability between steady and periodic motion are accompanied by hysteresis phenomena, or that potentially large aperiodic departures from steady motion may develop.

  6. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircraft's unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  7. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  8. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal

  9. AEROX: Computer program for transonic aircraft aerodynamics to high angles of attack. Volume 1: Aerodynamic methods and program users' guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelson, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The AEROX program estimates lift, induced-drag and pitching moments to high angles (typ. 60 deg) for wings and for wingbody combinations with or without an aft horizontal tail. Minimum drag coefficients are not estimated, but may be input for inclusion in the total aerodynamic parameters which are output in listed and plotted formats. The theory, users' guide, test cases, and program listing are presented.

  10. Prediction of static aerodynamic characteristics for slender bodies alone and with lifting surfaces to very high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, L. H.

    1977-01-01

    An engineering-type method is presented for computing normal-force and pitching-moment coefficients for slender bodies of circular and noncircular cross section alone and with lifting surfaces. In this method, a semi-empirical term representing viscous-separation crossflow is added to a term representing potential-theory crossflow. For many bodies of revolution, computed aerodynamic characteristics are shown to agree with measured results for investigated free-stream Mach numbers from 0.6 to 2.9. The angles of attack extend from 0 deg to 180 deg for M = 2.9 from 0 deg to 60 deg for M = 0.6 to 2.0. For several bodies of elliptic cross section, measured results are also predicted reasonably well over the investigated Mach number range from 0.6 to 2.0 and at angles of attack from 0 deg to 60 deg. As for the bodies of revolution, the predictions are best for supersonic Mach numbers. For body-wing and body-wing-tail configurations with wings of aspect ratios 3 and 4, measured normal-force coefficients and centers are predicted reasonably well at the upper test Mach number of 2.0. Vapor-screen and oil-flow pictures are shown for many body, body-wing and body-wing-tail configurations. When spearation and vortex patterns are asymmetric, undesirable side forces are measured for the models even at zero sideslip angle. Generally, the side-force coefficients decrease or vanish with the following: increase in Mach number, decrease in nose fineness ratio, change from sharp to blunt nose, and flattening of body cross section (particularly the body nose).

  11. A study of prediction methods for the high angle-of-attack aerodynamics of straight wings and fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, O. J.; Mendenhall, M. R.; Perkins, S. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Work is described dealing with two areas which are dominated by the nonlinear effects of vortex flows. The first area concerns the stall/spin characteristics of a general aviation wing with a modified leading edge. The second area concerns the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of high performance military aircraft. For each area, the governing phenomena are described as identified with the aid of existing experimental data. Existing analytical methods are reviewed, and the most promising method for each area used to perform some preliminary calculations. Based on these results, the strengths and weaknesses of the methods are defined, and research programs recommended to improve the methods as a result of better understanding of the flow mechanisms involved.

  12. Prediction of static aerodynamic characteristics for slender bodies alone and with lifting surfaces to very high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    An engineering-type method is presented for computing normal-force and pitching-moment coefficients for slender bodies of circular and noncircular cross section alone and with lifting surfaces. In this method, a semi-empirical term representing viscous-separation crossflow is added to a term representing potential-theory crossflow. For many bodies of revolution, computed aerodynamic characteristics are shown to agree with measured results for investigated free-stream Mach numbers from 0.6 to 2.9. For several bodies of elliptic cross section, measured results are also predicted reasonably well over the investigated Mach number range from 0.6 to 2.0 and at angles of attack from 0 to 60 deg. As for the bodies of revolution, the predictions are best for supersonic Mach numbers. For body-wing and body-wing-tail configurations with wings of aspect ratios 3 and 4, measured normal-force coefficients and centers are predicted reasonably well at the upper test Mach number of 2.0. However, with a decrease in Mach number to 0.6, the agreement for C sub N rapidly deteriorates, although the normal-force centers remain in close agreement. Vapor-screen and oil-flow pictures are shown for many body, body-wing, and body-wing-tail configurations. When separation and vortex patterns are asymmetric, undesirable side forces are measured for the models even at zero sideslip angle. Generally, the side-force coefficients decrease or vanish with the following: increase in Mach number, decrease in nose fineness ratio, change from sharp to blunt nose, and flattening of body cross section (particularly the body nose).

  13. Aerodynamics of slender finned bodies at large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnone, A. M.; Zakkay, V.; Tory, E.; Stallings, R.

    1977-01-01

    In certain missions finned missiles perform slewing maneuvers. Here, large angles of attack are attained. Experimental data needed to understand the aerodynamics of such vehicles are presented. The purpose of this investigation was to study the interaction of the body flow field with that produced by the fins and the resulting effects on the aerodynamic forces and moments. The experiments were conducted at a nominal Mach number of 2.7 and angles of attack from 0 to 50 deg, with two different models. The tests were performed in a range of Reynolds number from 1.5 x 10 to the 6th to 4 x 10 to the 7th per foot (to cover both the laminar and fully turbulent regimes.) Several fin roll angles were investigated. Static pressures on both body and fin surfaces are reported.

  14. X-29 high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishmael, Stephen D.; Smith, Rogers E.; Purifoy, Dana D.; Womer, Rodney K.

    1990-01-01

    Flight test program highlights are discussed for the X-29 high angle-of-attack (AOA) aircraft. The AOA envelope extended from 10 to 66 deg; the X-29 exhibited precise pitch control, allowing AOA to be maintained within 1 deg during stabilized points as well as permitting rapid recoveries from all AOAs. Attention is given to controllability degradation above 40-deg AOA due to asymmetric yawing moments. The use of this aircraft as a fundamental research tool which complements analytical methods is powerfully justified by the obviation of scaling effects.

  15. A summary of the forebody high-angle-of-attack aerodynamics research on the F-18 and the X-29A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjarke, Lisa J.; Delfrate, John H.; Fisher, David F.

    1992-01-01

    High-angle-of-attack aerodynamic studies have been conducted on both the F18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) and the X-29A aircraft. Data obtained include on- and off-surface flow visualization and static pressure measurements on the forebody. Comparisons of similar results are made between the two aircraft where possible. The forebody shapes of the two aircraft are different and the X-29A forebody flow is affected by the addition of nose strakes and a flight test noseboom. The forebody flow field of the F-18 HARV is fairly symmetric at zero sideslip and has distinct, well-defined vortices. The X-29A forebody vortices are more diffuse and are sometimes asymmetric at zero sideslip. These asymmetries correlate with observed zero-sideslip aircraft yawing moments.

  16. Forebody tangential blowing for control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, I.; Rock, S.; Roberts, L.

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility study to determine if the use of tangential leading edge blowing over the forebody could produce effective and practical control of the F-18 HARV aircraft at high angles of attack was conducted. A simplified model of the F-18 configuration using a vortex-lattice model was developed to obtain a better understanding of basic aerodynamic coupling effects and the influence of forebody circulation on lifting surface behavior. The effect of tangential blowing was estimated using existing wind tunnel data on normal forebody blowing and analytical studies of tangential blowing over conical forebodies. Incorporation of forebody blowing into the flight control system was investigated by adding this additional yaw control and sideforce generating actuator into the existing F-18 HARV simulation model. A control law was synthesized using LQG design methods that would schedule blowing rates as a function of vehicle sideslip, angle of attack, and roll and yaw rates.

  17. X-31 Demonstrating High Angle of Attack - Herbst Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircraft's unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall

  18. Wind tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of five forebody models at high angles of attack at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, E. R.; Taleghani, J.

    1975-01-01

    Five forebody models of various shapes were tested in the Ames 6- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 2 at a Reynolds number of 800000. At a Mach number of 0.6 the Reynolds number was varied from 0.4 to 1.8 mil. Angle of attack was varied from -2 deg to 88 deg at zero sideslip. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the effect of Mach number of the side force that develops at low speeds and zero sideslip for all of these forebody models when the nose is pointed. Test results show that with increasing Mach number the maximum side forces decrease to zero between Mach numbers of 0.8 and 1.5, depending on the nose angle; the smaller the nose angle of the higher the Mach number at which the side force exists. At a Mach number of 0.6 there is some variation of side force with Reynolds number, the variation being the largest for the more slender tangent ogive.

  19. High-angle-of-attack yawing moment asymmetry of the X-31 aircraft from flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.

    1994-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries led to position saturations of the thrust vector vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some of the dynamic stability axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. This slowed the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion and resulted in maneuver restrictions. Several aerodynamic modifications were made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. A method for determining the yawing moment asymmetry from flight data was developed and an analysis of the various configuration changes completed. The baseline aircraft were found to have significant asymmetries above 45 deg angle of attack with the largest asymmetry typically occurring around 60 deg angle of attack. Applying symmetrical boundary layer transition strips along the forebody sides increased the magnitude of the asymmetry and widened the angle-of-attack range over which the largest asymmetry acted. Installing longitudinal forebody strakes and rounding the sharp nose of the aircraft caused the yawing moment asymmetry magnitude to be reduced. The transition strips and strakes made the asymmetry characteristic of the aircraft more repeatable than the clean forebody configuration. Although no geometric differences between the aircraft were known, ship 2 consistently had larger yawing moment asymmetries than ship 1.

  20. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  1. Buffeting of NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Dowell, Earl

    2014-11-01

    Buffeting is a fluid instability caused by flow separation or shock wave oscillations in the flow around a bluff body. Typically there is a dominant frequency of these flow oscillations called Strouhal or buffeting frequency. In prior work several researchers at Duke University have noted the analogy between the classic Von Karman Vortex Street behind a bluff body and the flow oscillations that occur for flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil at sufficiently large angle of attack. Lock-in is found for certain combinations of airfoil oscillation (pitching motion) frequencies and amplitudes when the frequency of the airfoil motion is sufficiently close to the buffeting frequency. The goal of this paper is to explore the flow around a static and an oscillating airfoil at high angle of attack by developing a method for computing buffet response. Simulation results are compared with experimental data. Conditions for the onset of buffeting and lock-in of a NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack are determined. Effects of several parameters on lift coefficient and flow response frequency are studied including Reynolds number, angle of attack and blockage ratio of the airfoil size to the wind tunnel dimensions. Also more detailed flow field characteristics are determined. For a static airfoil, a universal Strouhal number scaling has been found for angles of attack from 30° to 90°, where the flow around airfoil is fully separated. For an oscillating airfoil, conditions for lock-in are discussed. Differences between the lock-in case and the unlocked case are also studied. The second affiliation: Duke University.

  2. Pneumatic vortical flow control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavella, Domingo A.; Schiff, Lewis B.; Cummings, Russell M.

    1990-01-01

    The injection of thin, high-momentum jets of air into the fuselage forebody boundary layers of the F-18 aircraft is explored numerically as a means of controlling the onset of fuselage vortices and of generating yaw control forces. The study was carried out for an angle of attack of 30 deg with symmetrical and asymmetrical blowing configurations. One-sided blowing results in a strongly asymmetrical flow pattern in the fore portion of the fuselage, leading to a net lateral force.

  3. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/8-scale X-29A airplane model at high angles of attack and sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D.; Ricket, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A 1/8-scale model of the X-29A airplane was tested in the Ames 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel at a Mach number of 0.20 and Reynolds numbers of 0.13 x 10 to the 6th power to 2.00 x 10 to the 6th power based on a fuselage forebody depth of 0.4 ft, For the test series presented herein, the angle of attack ranged from 40 deg. to 90 deg. and the angle of sideslip ranged from -10 deg. to 30 deg. for the erect attitude. Tests with the model inverted covered angles of attack from -40 deg. to -90 deg. and angles of sideslip from -30 deg. to 10 deg. Data were obtained for the basic design and for several forebody strakes. An alternate forebody design was also tested. The results provided information for selection of forebody strakes for compensation of Reynolds number effect on the 1/25-scale free-spinning model tested in the Langley Spin Tunnel.

  4. A review of some Reynolds number effects related to bodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    A review of some effects of Reynolds number on selected aerodynamic characteristics of two- and three-dimensional bodies of various cross sections in relation to fuselages at high angles of attack at subsonic and transonic speeds is presented. Emphasis is placed on the Reynolds number ranges above the subcritical and angles of attack where lee side vortex flow or unsteady wake type flows predominate. Lists of references, arranged in subject categories, are presented with emphasis on those which include data over a reasonable Reynolds number range. Selected Reynolds number data representative of various aerodynamic flows around bodies are presented and analyzed and some effects of these flows on fuselage aerodynamic parameters are discussed.

  5. A high angle of attack inviscid shuttle orbiter computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    1992-01-01

    As a preliminary step toward predicting the leeside thermal environment for winged reentry vehicles at flight conditions, a computational solution for the flow about the Shuttle Orbiter at wind tunnel conditions was made using a point-implicit, finite volume scheme known as the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA). The surface pressures resulting from the computational solution are compared with wind tunnel data. The results indicate that the dominant inviscid flow features are being accurately predicted on the leeside of the Shuttle Orbiter at a moderately high angle of attack.

  6. Linear parameter-varying control of an F-16 aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bei

    To improve the aircraft capability at high angle of attack and expand the flight envelope, advanced linear parameter-varying (LPV) control methodologies are studied in this thesis with particular applications of actuator saturation control and switching control. A standard two-step LPV antiwindup control scheme and a systematic switching LPV control approach are derived, and the advantages of LPV control techniques are demonstrated through nonlinear simulations of an F-16 longitudinal autopilot control system. The aerodynamic surface saturation is one of the major issues of flight control in the high angle of attack region. The incorporated unconventional actuators such as thrust vectoring can provide additional control power, but may have a potentially significant pay-off. The proposed LPV antiwindup control scheme is advantageous from the implementation standpoint because it can be thought of as an augmented control algorithm to the existing control system. Moreover, the synthesis condition for an antiwindup compensator is formulated as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem and can be solved efficiently. By treating the input saturation as a sector bounded nonlinearity with a tight sector bound, the synthesized antiwindup compensator can stabilize the open-loop exponentially unstable systems. The LPV antiwindup control scheme is applied to the nonlinear F-16 longitudinal model, and compared with the thrust vectoring control approach. The simulation results show that the LPV antiwindup compensator improves the flight quality, and offers advantages over thrust vectoring in a high angle of attack region. For a thrust vectoring augmented aircraft, the actuator sets may be different at low and high angles of attack. Also due to different control objectives, a single controller may not exist over a wide angle of attack region. The proposed switching LPV control approach based on multiple parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions provides a flexible design

  7. Reconfigurable flight control for high angle of attack fighter aircraft, with wind tunnel study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Bilal Ahmed

    In this work we studied Reconfigurable Flight Control Systems to achieve acceptable performance of a fighter aircraft, even in the event of wing damage to the aircraft at low speeds and high angle of attack, which is typical of many combat maneuvers. Equations of motion for the damaged aircraft were derived, which helped in building simulators. A new methodology combining experimental and numerical aerodynamic prediction was proposed and implemented. For this a wind-tunnel study of a similar configuration was carried out to study the aerodynamics at low speeds and high angle of attack. A baseline control system for undamaged aircraft was developed, and finally a reconfigurable flight control scheme was implemented to keep the aircraft flyable even after the damage.

  8. Reynolds Number Effects at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Banks, Daniel W.; Hall, Robert M.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Lessons learned from comparisons between ground-based tests and flight measurements for the high-angle-of-attack programs on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), the X-29 forward-swept wing aircraft, and the X-31 enhanced fighter maneuverability aircraft are presented. On all three vehicles, Reynolds number effects were evident on the forebodies at high angles of attack. The correlation between flight and wind tunnel forebody pressure distributions for the F-18 HARV were improved by using twin longitudinal grit strips on the forebody of the wind-tunnel model. Pressure distributions obtained on the X-29 wind-tunnel model at flight Reynolds numbers showed excellent correlation with the flight data up to alpha = 50 deg. Above (alpha = 50 deg. the pressure distributions for both flight and wind tunnel became asymmetric and showed poorer agreement, possibly because of the different surface finish of the model and aircraft. The detrimental effect of a very sharp nose apex was demonstrated on the X-31 aircraft. Grit strips on the forebody of the X-31 reduced the randomness but increased the magnitude of the asymmetry. Nose strakes were required to reduce the forebody yawing moment asymmetries and the grit strips on the flight test noseboom improved the aircraft handling qualities.

  9. Full-scale wind-tunnel investigation of the effects of wing leading-edge modifications on the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of a low-wing general aviation airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. L., Jr.; Newsom, W. A.; Satran, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a recent investigation to determine the effects of wing leading-edge modifications on the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of a low-wing general aviation airplane in the Langley Full-Scale Wind Tunnel. The investigation was conducted to provide aerodynamic information for correlation and analysis of flight-test results obtained for the configuration. The wind-tunnel investigation consisted of force and moment measurements, wing pressure measurements, flow surveys, and flow visualization studies utilizing a tuft grid, smoke and nonintrusive mini-tufts which were illuminated by ultra-violet light. In addition to the tunnel scale system which measured overall forces and moments, the model was equipped with an auxiliary strain-gage balance within the left wing panel to measure lift and drag forces on the outer wing panel independent of the tunnel scale system. The leading-edge modifications studied included partial- and full-span leading-edge droop arrangements as well as leading-edge slats.

  10. Exploratory studies of actuated forebody strakes for yaw control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Rao, Dhanvada M.

    1987-01-01

    Wind-tunnel studies have been conducted to evaluate the potential of actuated forebody strakes to provide increased levels of yaw control on fighter aircraft at extremely high angles of attack where conventional aerodynamic controls are ineffective. The studies involved low-speed wind-tunnel tests of actuated forebody strake concepts applied to a generic fighter model and included circumferential pressure and flow visualization surveys on an isolated forebody. Results showed that the actuated forebody strake concept can provide high levels of yaw control over wide ranges of angle-of-attack and sideslip. However, when lifting surfaces were placed in close proximity to the forebody/strake combination, significant interaction effects occurred which reduced the yaw control effectiveness of the strakes and induced coupled rolling and pitching moments.

  11. The transient roll moment response due to forebody tangential blowing at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Jonathan Kwokching

    The sustained ability for controlled flight at high angles of attack is desirable for future aircraft. For combat aircraft, enhancing maneuverability is important to increasing its survivability. For future supersonic commercial aircraft, an increase in lift at high angles of attack leads to improved performance during take-offs and landing, and a reduction in noise pollution. However, nonlinear and unsteady phenomena, such as flow separation and vortex shedding dominate the aerodynamics in the high angle of attack regime. These phenomena cause the onset of lateral loads and decrease the effectiveness of conventional control surfaces. For conventional aircraft, controlled flight at high angle of attack is difficult or unfeasible without augmented means of control and a good understanding of their impact on vehicle characteristics and dynamics. The injection of thin sheets of air tangentially to the forebody of the vehicle has been found to be an extremely promising method for augmenting the control of a flight vehicle at high angles of attack. Forebody Tangential Blowing (FTB) allows the flow structure to be altered in a rational manner and increase the controllability of the vehicle under these flight conditions. The feasibility of using FTB to control the roll-yaw motion of flight vehicles has been demonstrated. Existing knowledge of FTB's nonlinear impact on the aerodynamic moment responses is limited. Currently available dynamic models predict the general trends in the behavior but do not capture important transient effects that dominate the responses when small amounts of blowing is used. These transients can be large in comparison to the steady-state values. This thesis summarizes the experimental and theoretical results of an investigation into the transient effects of Forebody Tangential Blowing. The relationship between the aerodynamic roll moment, vortical flowfield, and blowing strength is examined to obtain a fundamental understanding of the physics of

  12. Trim angle of attack of flexible wings using non-linear aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, David Erik

    Multidisciplinary interactions are expected to play a significant role in the design of future high-performance aircraft (Blended-Wing Body, Truss-Braced wing; High Speed Civil transport, High-Altitude Long Endurance aircraft and future military aircraft). Also, the availability of supercomputers has made it now possible to employ high-fidelity models (Computational Fluid Dynamics for fluids and detailed finite element models for structures) at the preliminary design stage. A necessary step at that stage is to calculate the wing angle-of-attack at which the wing will generate the desired lift for the specific flight maneuver. Determination of this angle, a simple affair when the wing is rigid and the flow regime linear, becomes difficult when the wing is flexible and the flow regime non-linear. To solve this inherently nonlinear problem, a Newton's method type algorithm is developed to simultaneously calculate the deflection and the angle of attack. The developed algorithm is tested for a wing, used for in-house aeroelasticity research at Boeing (previously McDonnell Douglas) Long Beach. The trim angle of attack is calculated for a range of desired lift values. In addition to the Newton's method algorithm, a non derivative method (NDM) based on fixed point iteration, typical of fixed angle of attack calculations in aeroelasticity, is employed. The NDM, which has been extended to be able to calculate trim angle of attack, is used for one of the cases. The Newton's method calculation converges in fewer iterations, but requires more CPU time than the NDM method. The NDM, however, results in a slightly different value of the trim angle of attack. It should be noted that NDM will converge in a larger number of iterations as the dynamic pressure increases. For one value of the desired lift, both viscous and inviscid results were generated. The use of the inviscid flow model while not resulting in a markedly different value for the trim angle of attack, does result in a

  13. Experimental investigation of the high angle of attack characteristics of a high performance general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. F.; Yip, L. P.; Perkins, J. N.; Vess, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Scale model wind tunnel tests and full scale flight tests have been conducted for the Questair Venture general aviation aircraft configuration in order to investigate its high angle-of-attack aerodynamics. Attention is given to the formulation of a wing leading-edge modification capable of enhancing stall departure characteristics. This modification, which involved both outboard wing leading-edge droop and two chordwise leading-edge slots, is found to produce almost no wing-rock tendency when tested on a wind tunnel free-to-roll apparatus; in the full-scale aircraft, the modification yielded gentle, controllable stall characteristics with little cruise and climb performance penalty.

  14. Inlet Distortion for an F/A-18A Aircraft During Steady Aerodynamic Conditions up to 60 deg Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Kevin R.; Yuhas, Andrew J.; Williams, John G.; Steenken, William G.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of high-angle-of-attack flight on aircraft inlet aerodynamic characteristics were investigated at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, as part of NASA's High Alpha Technology Program. The highly instrumented F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle was used for this research. A newly designed inlet total-pressure rake was installed in front of the starboard F404-GE-400 engine to measure inlet recovery and distortion characteristics. One objective was to determine inlet total-pressure characteristics at steady high-angle-of-attack conditions. Other objectives include assessing whether significant differences exist in inlet distortion between rapid angle-of-attack maneuvers and corresponding steady aerodynamic conditions, assessing inlet characteristics during aircraft departures, providing data for developing and verifying computational fluid dynamic codes, and calculating engine airflow using five methods. This paper addresses the first objective by summarizing results of 79 flight maneuvers at steady aerodynamic conditions, ranging from -10 deg to 60 deg angle of attack and from -8 deg to 11 deg angle of sideslip at Mach 0.3 and 0.4. These data and the associated database have been rigorously validated to establish a foundation for understanding inlet characteristics at high angle of attack.

  15. Full-scale high angle-of-attack tests of an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Lanser, Wendy R.; James, Kevin D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of high angle-of-attack tests of a full-scale F/A-18 in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California. A production aircraft was tested over an angle-of-attack range of 18 to 50 deg and at wind speeds of up to 100 knots. These tests had three primary test objectives. Pneumatic and mechanical forebody flow control devices were tested at full-scale and shown to produce significant yawing moments for lateral control of the aircraft at high angles of attack. Mass flow requirements for the pneumatic system were found to scale with freestream density and speed rather than freestream dynamic pressure. Detailed measurements of the pressures buffeting the vertical tail were made and spatial variations in the buffeting frequency were found. The LEX fence was found to have a significant effect on the frequency distribution on the outboard surface of the vertical fin. In addition to the above measurements, an extensive set of data was acquired for the validation of computational fluid dynamics codes and for comparison with flight test and small-scale wind tunnel test results.

  16. A preliminary look at techniques used to obtain airdata from flight at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    Flight research at high angles of attack has posed new problems for airdata measurements. New sensors and techniques for measuring the standard airdata quantities of static pressure, dynamic pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip were subsequently developed. The ongoing airdata research supporting NASA's F-18 high alpha research program is updated. Included are the techniques used and the preliminary results. The F-18 aircraft was flown with three research airdata systems: a standard airdata probe on the right wingtip, a self-aligning airdata probe on the left wingtip, and a flush airdata system on the nose cone. The primary research goal was to obtain steady-state calibrations for each airdata system up to an angle of attack of 50 deg. This goal was accomplished and preliminary accuracies of the three airdata systems were assessed and are presented. An effort to improve the fidelity of the airdata measurements during dynamic maneuvering is also discussed. This involved enhancement of the aerodynamic data with data obtained from linear accelerometers, rate gyros, and attitude gyros. Preliminary results of this technique are presented.

  17. Aerodynamic Behavior at One Revolution Angle of Attack of Two-Dimensional Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yong; Lee, Eun; Kim, Jeong; Shin, Yong

    2011-11-01

    In order to investigate aerodynamic behaviors at extreme angles of attack beyond the normal static stall angle and in the reversed flow, lift and drag have been measured at one revolution angles of attack by rotating the wing around the 1/4 chord with use of a dynamic balance in the low speed wind tunnel. Three different geometries of wing section; a flat plate, a symmetric airfoil, NACA0018, and a cambered airfoil, Goe222, were selected for these experiments. It was turned out that the lift coefficient maintains substantially even beyond the traditional stall AoA of the wing. Drag coefficients of these wings showed sinusoidal profiles, and polar plots of Cl versus Cd provided distinctive behaviors unseen in the calculation by the classical wing theory. Application of the cyclic aerodynamic characteristics to a vertical axis wind turbine and wake characteristics around the critical angle will be displayed. This work was supported by Cooperative R&D program between Industry, Academy, and Research Institute funded Korea Small and Medium Business Administration in 2011.

  18. High angle of attack flying qualities criteria for longitudinal rate command systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David J.; Citurs, Kevin D.; Davidson, John B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate flying qualities requirements of alternate pitch command systems for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack. Flying qualities design guidelines have already been developed for angle of attack command systems at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, so this research fills a similar need for rate command systems. Flying qualities tasks that require post-stall maneuvering were tested during piloted simulations in the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Manned Air Combat Simulation facility. A generic fighter aircraft model was used to test angle of attack rate and pitch rate command systems for longitudinal gross acquisition and tracking tasks at high angle of attack. A wide range of longitudinal dynamic variations were tested at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack. Pilot comments, Cooper-Harper ratings, and pilot induced oscillation ratings were taken from five pilots from NASA, USN, CAF, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. This data was used to form longitudinal design guidelines for rate command systems at high angle of attack. These criteria provide control law design guidance for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack, low speed flight conditions. Additional time history analyses were conducted using the longitudinal gross acquisition data to look at potential agility measures of merit and correlate agility usage to flying qualities boundaries. This paper presents an overview of this research.

  19. Aerodynamic Characteristics at High and Low Subsonic Mach Numbers of the NACA 0012, 64(sub 2)-015, and 64(sub 3)-018 Airfoil Sections at Angles of Attack from -2 Degrees to 30 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Critzos, Chris C.

    1954-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel of the aerodynamic characteristics of the NACA 0012, 64(sub 2)-015, and 64(sub 3)-018 airfoil sections. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.3 to that for tunnel choke, at angles of attack from -2deg to 30deg, and with the surface. of each airfoil smooth-and with roughness applied at the leading edge.The Reynolds numbers of the tests ranged from 0.8 x 10(exp 6) to 4.4 x 10(exp 6). The results are presented as variations of lift, drag, and quarter-chord pitching-moment coefficients with Mach number.

  20. Flight test of the X-29A at high angle of attack: Flight dynamics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Clarke, Robert; Burken, John J.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has flight tested two X-29A aircraft at low and high angles of attack. The high-angle-of-attack tests evaluate the feasibility of integrated X-29A technologies. More specific objectives focus on evaluating the high-angle-of-attack flying qualities, defining multiaxis controllability limits, and determining the maximum pitch-pointing capability. A pilot-selectable gain system allows examination of tradeoffs in airplane stability and maneuverability. Basic fighter maneuvers provide qualitative evaluation. Bank angle captures permit qualitative data analysis. This paper discusses the design goals and approach for high-angle-of-attack control laws and provides results from the envelope expansion and handling qualities testing at intermediate angles of attack. Comparisons of the flight test results to the predictions are made where appropriate. The pitch rate command structure of the longitudinal control system is shown to be a valid design for high-angle-of-attack control laws. Flight test results show that wing rock amplitude was overpredicted and aileron and rudder effectiveness were underpredicted. Flight tests show the X-29A airplane to be a good aircraft up to 40 deg angle of attack.

  1. Multiaxis aircraft control power from thrust vectoring at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Mason, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive research programs conducted at the Langley Research Center have shown that thrust vectoring can be provided by multifunction (nonaxisymmetric) nozzles. Most of this research has been conducted on pitch vectoring at both static and forward flight conditions. Recent efforts have been aimed at evaluating yaw vectoring concepts at static (wind off) conditions. This paper summarizes results for three different twin-engine fighter configurations tested over a Mach number range of 0.15 to 2.47 at angles of attack up to 35 deg. The objective of these investigations was to determine the multiaxis control power characteristics provided by thrust vectoring. All three configurations employed two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles which provided pitch vectoring by differential deflection of the upper and lower nozzle divergent flaps. Three different means of yaw vectoring were tested: (1) a translating nozzle sidewall; (2) yaw flaps located in the nozzle sidewalls; and (3) canted nozzles. These investigations were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel and the Lewis 10x10-Foot Supersonic Tunnel. Longitudinal and direction control power from thrust vectoring was greater than that provided by aerodynamic control effectors at low speed or at high angles of attack.

  2. The equivalent angle-of-attack method for estimating the nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics of missile wings and control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, M. J.; Nielsen, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    A method has been developed for estimating the nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics of missile wing and control surfaces. The method is based on the following assumption: if a fin on a body has the same normal-force coefficient as a wing alone composed of two of the same fins joined together at their root chords, then the other force and moment coefficients of the fin and the wing alone are the same including the nonlinearities. The method can be used for deflected fins at arbitrary bank angles and at high angles of attack. In the paper, a full derivation of the method is given, its accuracy demonstrated and its use in extending missile data bases is shown.

  3. Delayed detached eddy simulations of fighter aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoliang; Jiang, Xiong; Liu, Gang

    2016-05-01

    The massively separated flows over a realistic aircraft configuration at 40°, 50°, and 60° angles of attack are studied using the delayed detached eddy simulation (DDES). The calculations are carried out at experimental conditions corresponding to a mean aerodynamic chord-based Reynolds number of 8.93× 105 and Mach number of 0.088. The influence of the grid size is investigated using two grids, 20.0× 106 cells and 31.0× 106 cells. At the selected conditions, the lift, drag, and pitching moment from DDES predictions agree with the experimental data better than that from the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes. The effect of angle of attack on the flow structure over the general aircraft is also studied, and it is found that the dominated frequency associated with the vortex shedding process decreases with increasing angle of attack.

  4. Delayed detached eddy simulations of fighter aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoliang; Jiang, Xiong; Liu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The massively separated flows over a realistic aircraft configuration at 40°, 50°, and 60° angles of attack are studied using the delayed detached eddy simulation (DDES). The calculations are carried out at experimental conditions corresponding to a mean aerodynamic chord-based Reynolds number of 8.93× 105 and Mach number of 0.088. The influence of the grid size is investigated using two grids, 20.0× 106 cells and 31.0× 106 cells. At the selected conditions, the lift, drag, and pitching moment from DDES predictions agree with the experimental data better than that from the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes. The effect of angle of attack on the flow structure over the general aircraft is also studied, and it is found that the dominated frequency associated with the vortex shedding process decreases with increasing angle of attack.

  5. Comparison of X-31 Flight and Ground-Based Yawing Moment Asymmetries at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.; Croom, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Significant yawing moment asymmetries were encountered during the high-angle-of-attack envelope expansion of the two X-31 aircraft. These asymmetries caused position saturations of the thrust-vectoring vanes and trailing-edge flaps during some stability-axis rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. The two test aircraft had different asymmetry characteristics, and ship two has asymmetries that vary as a function of Reynolds number. Several aerodynamic modifications have been made to the X-31 forebody with the goal of minimizing the asymmetry. These modifications include adding transition strips on the forebody and noseboom, using two different length strakes, and increasing nose bluntness. Ultimately, a combination of forebody strakes, nose blunting, and noseboom transition strips reduced the yawing moment asymmetry enough to fully expand the high-angle-of-attack envelope. Analysis of the X-31 flight data is reviewed and compared to wind-tunnel and water-tunnel measurements. Several lessons learned are outlined regarding high-angle-of-attack configuration design and ground testing.

  6. Use of piloted simulation for high-angle-of-attack agility research and design criteria development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The application of piloted simulations in the development of advanced fighter aircraft is reviewed in the context of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP). The HATP combines wind-tunnel experiments, computational aerodynamics, piloted simulations, and flight tests on a modified F-18 testbed aircraft and utilizes the experience and facilities of several NASA centers. Consideration is given to the role of simulation in the overall research process, simulation capabilities and software requirements, simulation flexibility and fidelity, evaluation maneuvers, the role of simulator pilots in evaluations, the analysis of simulation results, flight validation of maneuvers and rating approaches, and the use of simulations to define design criteria. Extensive diagrams, graphs, and flow charts are included.

  7. Simulator study of the effectiveness of an automatic control system designed to improve the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of a fighter airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, W. P.; Nguyen, L. T.; Vangunst, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation was conducted to study the effectiveness of some automatic control system features designed to improve the stability and control characteristics of fighter airplanes at high angles of attack. These features include an angle-of-attack limiter, a normal-acceleration limiter, an aileron-rudder interconnect, and a stability-axis yaw damper. The study was based on a current lightweight fighter prototype. The aerodynamic data used in the simulation were measured on a 0.15-scale model at low Reynolds number and low subsonic Mach number. The simulation was conducted on the Langley differential maneuvering simulator, and the evaluation involved representative combat maneuvering. Results of the investigation show the fully augmented airplane to be quite stable and maneuverable throughout the operational angle-of-attack range. The angle-of-attack/normal-acceleration limiting feature of the pitch control system is found to be a necessity to avoid angle-of-attack excursions at high angles of attack. The aileron-rudder interconnect system is shown to be very effective in making the airplane departure resistant while the stability-axis yaw damper provided improved high-angle-of-attack roll performance with a minimum of sideslip excursions.

  8. X-29A Lateral-Directional Stability and Control Derivatives Extracted From High-Angle-of-Attack Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles Wang

    1996-01-01

    The lateral-directional stability and control derivatives of the X-29A number 2 are extracted from flight data over an angle-of-attack range of 4 degrees to 53 degrees using a parameter identification algorithm. The algorithm uses the linearized aircraft equations of motion and a maximum likelihood estimator in the presence of state and measurement noise. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics over the aircraft at angles of attack above 15 degrees. The results supported the flight-envelope-expansion phase of the X-29A number 2 by helping to update the aerodynamic mathematical model, to improve the real-time simulator, and to revise flight control system laws. Effects of the aircraft high gain flight control system on maneuver quality and the estimated derivatives are also discussed. The derivatives are plotted as functions of angle of attack and compared with the predicted aerodynamic database. Agreement between predicted and flight values is quite good for some derivatives such as the lateral force due to sideslip, the lateral force due to rudder deflection, and the rolling moment due to roll rate. The results also show significant differences in several important derivatives such as the rolling moment due to sideslip, the yawing moment due to sideslip, the yawing moment due to aileron deflection, and the yawing moment due to rudder deflection.

  9. Parameter identification for X-31A at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, S.; Rohlf, D.; Plaetschke, Ermin

    1994-01-01

    The U.S./German experimental aircraft X-31A was designed and constructed to demonstrate enhanced fighter maneuverability. Post-stall maneuvering is enabled by applying new technologies such as high angle of attack aerodynamics and flight control system integrated thrust vectoring. Two demonstrator aircraft have been built by the main contractors, Rockwell International and Deutsche Aerospace (formerly MBB). Flight testing started in October 1990 and before the end of 1992 both aircraft had accomplished a significant number of flights covering the entire AoA regime from about -5 to 70 deg. Throughout the envelope expansion, DLR Institute of Flight Mechanics conducted parameter identification (PID) to determine the aerodynamic parameters of the aircraft from flight test data and to compare the results to the predictions from the aerodynamic dataset (ADS). The application of system identification to high AoA / post-stall flight data raises some major problems, which are discussed in this paper. Results from both longitudinal and lateral-directional motion will be presented.

  10. Prediction of static aerodynamic characteristics for space-shuttle-like and other bodies at angles of attack from 0 deg to 180 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    An engineering-type procedure is presented for computing normal-force, axial-force, and pitching-moment coefficients for bodies at angles of attack from 0 deg to 180 deg. The procedure is ideally suited for estimating the aerodynamic characteristics of space shuttle booster-like bodies because of the wide range of angles of attack, Mach numbers, and Reynolds numbers to be encountered. The analytical formulas, plots, and references given are also applicable for shuttle orbiter, missile, and aircraft-like bodies of both circular and noncircular cross section. The method for computing normal-force and pitching-moment coefficients is based upon the original proposal of Allen that the crossflow or lift distribution over a body can be expressed as the sum of slender-body potential term and an empirical viscous crossflow term. Although experimental data from which to verify the procedure at very high angles of attack are extremely limited, the comparisons made thus far of computed with experimental results are good. In this report the procedure has been shown to be capable of predicting reasonably well the experimental variation of C sub N, C sub A, C sub m, and x sub ac/l with angle of attack for nine bodies of revolution at a free-stream Mach number of 2.86.

  11. Roll-yaw control at high angle of attack by forebody tangential blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedreiro, N.; Rock, S. M.; Celik, Z. Z.; Roberts, L.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using forebody tangential blowing to control the roll-yaw motion of a wind tunnel model is experimentally demonstrated. An unsteady model of the aerodynamics is developed based on the fundamental physics of the flow. Data from dynamic experiments is used to validate the aerodynamic model. A unique apparatus is designed and built that allows the wind tunnel model two degrees of freedom, roll and yaw. Dynamic experiments conducted at 45 degrees angle of attack reveal the system to be unstable. The natural motion is divergent. The aerodynamic model is incorporated into the equations of motion of the system and used for the design of closed loop control laws that make the system stable. These laws are proven through dynamic experiments in the wind tunnel using blowing as the only actuator. It is shown that asymmetric blowing is a highly non-linear effector that can be linearized by superimposing symmetric blowing. The effects of forebody tangential blowing and roll and yaw angles on the flow structure are determined through flow visualization experiments. The transient response of roll and yaw moments to a step input blowing are determined. Differences on the roll and yaw moment dependence on blowing are explained based on the physics of the phenomena.

  12. Roll-Yaw control at high angle of attack by forebody tangential blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedreiro, N.; Rock, S. M.; Celik, Z. Z.; Roberts, L.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using forebody tangential blowing to control the roll-yaw motion of a wind tunnel model is experimentally demonstrated. An unsteady model of the aerodynamics is developed based on the fundamental physics of the flow. Data from dynamic experiments is used to validate the aerodynamic model. A unique apparatus is designed and built that allows the wind tunnel model two degrees of freedom, roll and yaw. Dynamic experiments conducted at 45 degrees angle of attack reveal the system to be unstable. The natural motion is divergent. The aerodynamic model is incorporated into the equations of motion of the system and used for the design of closed loop control laws that make the system stable. These laws are proven through dynamic experiments in the wind tunnel using blowing as the only actuator. It is shown that asymmetric blowing is a highly non-linear effector that can be linearized by superimposing symmetric blowing. The effects of forebody tangential blowing and roll and yaw angles on the flow structure are determined through flow visualization experiments. The transient response of roll and yaw moments to a step input blowing are determined. Differences on the roll and yaw moment dependence on blowing are explained based on the physics of the phenomena.

  13. Optimum subsonic, high-angle-of-attack nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luidens, R. W.; Stockman, N. O.; Diedrich, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The optimum design of nacelles that operate over a wide range of aerodynamic conditions and their inlets is described. For low speed operation the optimum internal surface velocity distributions and skin friction distributions are described for three categories of inlets: those with BLC, and those with blow in door slots and retractable slats. At cruise speed the effect of factors that reduce the nacelle external surface area and the local skin friction is illustrated. These factors are cruise Mach number, inlet throat size, fan-face Mach number, and nacelle contour. The interrelation of these cruise speed factors with the design requirements for good low speed performance is discussed.

  14. Investigation of Model Wake Blockage Effects at High Angles of Attack in Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, Lih-Shyng; Chuang, Shu-Hao

    To improve the fidelity of measured aerodynamic characteristics at high angle of attack for modern jet fighters, this paper examines the model wake blockage effect. The wake blockage effect in a 2.2×3.1 m low-speed wind tunnel is investigated by analyzing drag and wall pressure measurements. Circular flat plates of different sizes are used to simulate a test model at high angles of attack. The present analysis results in simple formulas for corrections of model wake blockage effect. To verify the present correction formula, the NASA TP-1803 model is force-tested in the tunnel. The corrected test data agree well with the NASA TP-1803 data.

  15. Experimental and Computational Induced Aerodynamics from Missile Jet Reaction Controls at Angles of Attack to 75 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Ashbury, Scott C.; Deere, Karen A.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine induced aerodynamic effects from jet reaction controls of an advanced air-to-air missile concept. The 75-percent scale model featured independently controlled reaction jets located near the nose and tail of the model. Aerodynamic control was provided by four fins located near the tail of the model. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.35 and 0.60, at angles of attack up to 75 deg and at nozzle pressure ratios up to 90. Jet-reaction thrust forces were not measured by the force balance but jet-induced forces were. In addition, a multiblock three-dimensional Navier-Stokes method was used to calculate the flowfield of the missile at angles of attack up to 40 deg. Results indicate that large interference effects on pitching moment were induced from operating the nose jets with the the off. Excellent correlation between experimental and computational pressure distributions and pitching moment were obtained a a Mach number of 0.35 and at angles of attack up to 40 deg.

  16. Exploratory investigation of deflectable forebody strakes for high angle of attack yaw control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.; Murri, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    A deflectable strake concept was investigated on a conical forebody to evaluate its yaw control potential at high angles of attack. In exploratory low-speed tunnel tests using a generic delta wing fighter configuration, antisymmetrically deflected strakes provided useful levels of yaw power at angles of attack when the conventional rudder became totally degraded. Symmetrical strakes prevented side force development at high angles of attack, and provided pitch control through symmetrical deflection. The strake performance was sensitive to its circumferential position on the forebody due to varying interaction of strake vortices with the wing and vertical tail. The low Reynolds number results of this study provided a favorable initial validation of the concept, subject to verification in regard to scale effects.

  17. Magnus effects at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Ringel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Magnus force and moment experienced by a yawed, spinning cylinder were studied experimentally in low speed and subsonic flows at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers. Flow-field visualization aided in describing a flow model that divides the Magnus phenomenon into a subcritical region, where reverse Magnus loads are experienced, and a supercritical region where these loads are not encountered. The roles of the spin rate, angle of attack, and crossflow Reynolds number in determining the boundaries of the subcritical region and the variations of the Magnus loads were studied.

  18. Side-force alleviation on slender, pointed forebodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    A new device was proposed for alleviating high angle-of-attack side force on slender, pointed forebodies. A symmetrical pair of separation strips in the form of helical ridges are applied to the forebody to disrupt the primary lee-side vortices and thereby avoid the instability that produces vortex asymmetry. Preliminary wind tunnel tests at Mach 0.3 and Reynolds no. 5,250,000 on a variety of forebody configurations and on a wing-body combination at angles of attack up to 56 degrees, demonstrated the effectiveness of the device.

  19. A Semigraphical Method of Applying Impact Theory to an Arbitrary Body to Obtain the Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics at Angle of Attack and Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Charlie M., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    A simple semigraphical method of applying impact theory to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of an arbitrary body at combined angle of attack and sideslip is presented. The necessary equations are derived, a general procedure for application is outlined, and the effects of graphical errors and areas of application are discussed. One of the features of the present method is the requirement of only one graphical construction for any combination of angle of attack and sideslip. As an example application the present method is applied to a blunted elliptical cone in order to obtain the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics at an angle of attack of 40 degrees and an angle of sideslip of 0 degrees.

  20. The Aerodynamics of Axisymmetric Blunt Bodies Flying at Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Kutty, Prasad; Queen, Eric; Karlgaard, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory entry capsule is used as an example to demonstrate how a blunt body of revolution must be treated as asymmetric in some respects when flying at a non-zero trim angle of attack. A brief description of the axisymmetric moment equations are provided before solving a system of equations describing the lateral-directional moment equations for a blunt body trimming at an angle of attack. Simplifying assumptions are made which allow the solution to the equations to be rearranged to relate the roll and yaw stability with sideslip angle to the frequency of oscillation of the vehicle body rates. The equations show that for a blunt body the roll and yaw rates are in phase and proportional to each other. The ratio of the rates is determined by the static stability coefficients and mass properties about those axes. A trajectory simulation is used to validate the static yaw stability parameter identification equation and a simple method of identifying the oscillation frequency from the body rates. The approach is shown to successfully extract the modeled yaw stability coefficient along a simulated Mars entry in agreement with data earlier analysis of MSL flight data.

  1. Investigation of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Model Wing-Propeller Combination and of the Wing and Propeller Separately at Angles of Attack up to 90 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E; Draper, John W

    1956-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation conducted in the Langley 300 mph 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel for the purpose of determining the aerodynamic characteristics of a model wing-propeller combination, and of the wing and propeller separately at angles of attack up to 90 degrees. The tests covered thrust coefficients corresponding to free-stream velocities from zero forward speed to the normal range of cruising speeds. The results indicate that increasing the thrust coefficient increases the angle of attack for maximum lift and greatly diminishes the usual reduction in lift above the angle of attack for maximum lift.

  2. An aerodynamic design study of a series of lifting bodies at angles of attack from 10 to 53 degrees at Mach numbers from 2.30 to 4.62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.; Torres, Abel O.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics in the transition from high to low angles of attack at supersonic speeds have been experimentally and theoretically studied for a series of lifting bodies with various upper and lower surface camber designs. The configurations under consideration have a 75-degree swept delta planform with a rounded nose. Data obtained indicate that changes in the camber design cause some distinct changes in the aerodynamic characteristics that shoud be taken into account in the selection of a lifting body shape. The flat bottom designs with upper surface camber are found to provide greater drag for retardation at high angles of attack but are considerably out of trim longitudinally. The flat top designs with lower surface camber provide less drag at high angles of attack but can be more easily trimmed. Calculated results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Preliminary results from an airdata enhancement algorithm with application to high-angle-of-attack flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A technique was developed to improve the fidelity of airdata measurements during dynamic maneuvering. This technique is particularly useful for airdata measured during flight at high angular rates and high angles of attack. To support this research, flight tests using the F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV) were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility. A Kalman filter was used to combine information from research airdata, linear accelerometers, angular rate gyros, and attitude gyros to determine better estimates of airdata quantities such as angle of attack, angle of sideslip, airspeed, and altitude. The state and observation equations used by the Kalman filter are briefly developed and it is shown how the state and measurement covariance matrices were determined from flight data. Flight data are used to show the results of the technique and these results are compared to an independent measurement source. This technique is applicable to both postflight and real-time processing of data.

  4. Evaluation of Gritting Strategies for High Angle of Attack Using Wind Tunnel and Flight Test Data for the F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Erickson, Gary E.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.; Banks, Daniel W.; Fisher, David F.

    1998-01-01

    A subsonic study of high-angle-of-attack gritting strategies was undertaken with a 0.06-scale model of the F/A-18, which was assumed to be typical of airplanes with smooth-sided forebodies. This study was conducted in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel and was intended to more accurately simulate flight boundary layer characteristics on the model in the wind tunnel than would be possible by using classical, low-angle-of-attack gritting on the fuselage. Six-component force and moment data were taken with an internally mounted strain-gauge balance, while pressure data were acquired by using electronically scanned pressure transducers. Data were taken at zero sideslip over an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg to 40 deg and, at selected angles of attack, over sideslip angles from -10 deg to 10 deg. Free-stream Mach number was fixed at 0.30, which resulted in a Reynolds number, based on mean aerodynamic chord, of 1.4 x 10(exp 6). Pressure data measured over the forebody and leading-edge extensions are compared to similar pressure data taken by a related NASA flight research program by using a specially instrumented F/A-18, the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). Preliminary guidelines for high-angle-of-attack gritting strategies are given.

  5. Pitch control margin at high angle of attack - Quantitative requirements (flight test correlation with simulation predictions)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackey, J.; Hadfield, C.

    1992-01-01

    Recent mishaps and incidents on Class IV aircraft have shown a need for establishing quantitative longitudinal high angle of attack (AOA) pitch control margin design guidelines for future aircraft. NASA Langley Research Center has conducted a series of simulation tests to define these design guidelines. Flight test results have confirmed the simulation studies in that pilot rating of high AOA nose-down recoveries were based on the short-term response interval in the forms of pitch acceleration and rate.

  6. A study of roll attractor and wing rock of delta wings at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjana, T.; Rao, D. M.; Pamadi, Bandu N.

    1993-01-01

    Wing rock is a high angle of attack dynamic phenomenon of limited cycle motion predominantly in roll. The wing rock is one of the limitations to combat effectiveness of the fighter aircraft. Roll Attractor is the steady state or equilibrium trim angle (phi(sub trim)) attained by the free-to-roll model, held at some angle of attack, and released form rest at a given initial roll (bank) angle (phi(sub O)). Multiple roll attractors are attained at different trim angles depending on initial roll angle. The test facility (Vigyan's low speed wind tunnel) and experimental work is presented here along with mathematical modelling of roll attractor phenomenon and analysis and comparison of predictions with experimental data.

  7. Numerical simulation of vortical flow over an elliptical-body missile at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, R. N.; Adams, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical solutions to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are given for the flow about an elliptical body missile (3:1 ellipse) at a Mach number of 2.5 and a unit Reynolds number of 6.56 x 10 to the 6th/m. At high angles of attack, the flow is dominated by large-scale free vortices which occur in the lee-side flow field due to crossflow boundary-layer separation. Emphasis is focused on the accurate prediction of the lee-side vortical flow. Solutions are presented for both symmetric and asymmetric (body rolled 45 deg) configurations at 10 deg and 20 deg angle of attack. The computed results are compared with experimental surface pressure coefficients and vapor-screen photographs. Excellent agreement is obtained in all cases.

  8. High-angle-of-attack stability and control improvements for the EA-6B Prowler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Frank L.; Hahne, David E.; Masiello, Matthew F.; Gato, William

    1987-01-01

    The factors involved in high-angle-of-attack directional divergence phenomena for the EA-6B ECM aircraft have been investigated in NASA-Langley wind tunnel facilities in order to evaluate airframe modifications which would eliminate or delay such divergence to angles-of-attack farther removed from the operational flight envelope of the aircraft. The results obtained indicate that an adverse sidewash at the aft fuselage and vertical tail location is responsible for the directional stability loss, and that the sidewash is due to a vortex system generated by the fuselage-wing juncture. Modifications encompassing a wing inboard leading edge droop, a wing glove strake, and a vertical fin extension, have significantly alleviated the stability problem.

  9. A system for testing airdata probes at high angles of attack using a ground vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geenen, Robert J.; Moulton, Bryan J.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A system to calibrate airdata probes at angles of attack between 0 and 90 deg was developed and tested at the NASA Ames Dryden Flight Research Facility. This system used a test fixture mounted to the roof of a ground vehicle and included an onboard instrumentation and data acquisition system for measuring pressures and flow angles. The data could be easily transferred to the facility mainframe computer for further analysis. The system was designed to provide convenient and inexpensive airdata probe calibrations for projects which require airdata at high angles of attack, such as the F-18 High Alpha Research Program. This type of probe was tested to 90 deg angle of attack in a wind tunnel and using the ground vehicle system. The results of both tests are in close agreement. An airdata probe with a swiveling pilot-static tube was also calibrated with the ground vehicle system. This paper presents the results of these tests and gives a detailed description of the test system.

  10. Evaluation of High-Angle-of-Attack Handling Qualities for the X-31A Using Standard Evaluation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoliker, Patrick C.; Bosworth, John T.

    1997-01-01

    The X-31A aircraft gross-acquisition and fine-tracking handling qualities have been evaluated using standard evaluation maneuvers developed by Wright Laboratory, Wright Patterson Air Force Base. The emphasis of the testing is in the angle-of-attack range between 30 deg. and 70 deg. Longitudinal gross-acquisition handling qualities results show borderline Level l/Level 2 performance. Lateral gross-acquisition testing results in Level l/Level 2 ratings below 45 deg. angle of attack, degrading into Level 3 as angle of attack increases. The fine tracking performance in both longitudinal and lateral axes also receives Level 1 ratings near 30 deg. angle of attack, with the ratings tending towards Level 3 at angles of attack greater than 50 deg. These ratings do not match the expectations from the extensive close-in combat testing where the X-31A aircraft demonstrated fair to good handling qualities maneuvering for high angles of attack. This paper presents the results of the high-angle-of-attack handling qualities flight testing of the X-31A aircraft. Discussion of the preparation for the maneuvers, the pilot ratings, and selected pilot comments are included. Evaluation of the results is made in conjunction with existing Neal Smith, bandwidth, Smith-Geddes, and military specifications.

  11. Evaluation of High-Angle-of-Attack Handling Qualities for the X-31A Using Standard Evaluation Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoliker, Patrick C.; Bosworth, John T.

    1996-01-01

    The X-31A aircraft gross-acquisition and fine-tracking handling qualities have been evaluated using standard evaluation maneuvers developed by Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The emphasis of the testing is in the angle-of-attack range between 30 deg and 70 deg. Longitudinal gross-acquisition handling qualities results show borderline Level 1/Level 2 performance. Lateral gross-acquisition testing results in Level 1/Level 2 ratings below 45 deg angle of attack, degrading into Level 3 as angle of attack increases. The fine-tracking performance in both longitudinal and lateral axes also receives Level 1 ratings near 30 deg angle of attack, with the ratings tending towards Level 3 at angles of attack greater than 50 deg. These ratings do not match the expectations from the extensive close-in combat testing where the X-31A aircraft demonstrated fair to good handling qualities maneuvering for high angles of attack. This paper presents the results of the high-angle-of-attack handling qualities flight testing of the X-31A aircraft. Discussion of the preparation for the maneuvers, the pilot ratings, and selected pilot comments are included. Evaluation of the results is made in conjunction with existing Neal-Smith, bandwidth, Smith-Geddes, and military specifications.

  12. Application of dynamical systems theory to the high angle of attack dynamics of the F-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Craig C.; Culick, Fred E. C.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamical systems theory has been used to study the nonlinear dynamics of the F-14. An eight degree of freedom model that does not include the control system present in operational F-14s has been analyzed. The aerodynamic model, supplied by NASA, includes nonlinearities as functions of the angles of attack and sideslip, the rotation rate, and the elevator deflection. A continuation method has been used to calculate the steady states of the F-14 as continuous functions of the control surface deflections. Bifurcations of these steady states have been used to predict the onset of wing rock, spiral divergence, and jump phenomena which cause the aircraft to enter a spin. A simple feedback control system was designed to eliminate the wing rock and spiral divergence instabilities. The predictions were verified with numerical simulations.

  13. Side forces on forebodies at high angles of attack and Mach numbers from 0.1 to 0.7: two tangent ogives, paraboloid and cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, E. R.; Chapman, G. T.; Taleghani, J.; Cohen, L.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Ames 12-Foot Wind Tunnel to determine the subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of four forebodies at high angles of attack. The forebodies tested were a tangent ogive with fineness ratio of 5, a paraboloid with fineness ratio of 3.5, a 20 deg cone, and a tangent ogive with an elliptic cross section. The investigation included the effects of nose bluntness and boundary-layer trips. The tangent-ogive forebody was also tested in the presence of a short afterbody and with the afterbody attached. Static longitudinal and lateral/directional stability data were obtained. The investigation was conducted to investigate the existence of large side forces and yawing moments at high angles of attack and zero sideslip. It was found that all of the forebodies experience steady side forces that start at angles of attack of from 20 deg to 35 deg and exist to as high as 80 deg, depending on forebody shape. The side is as large as 1.6 times the normal force and is generally repeatable with increasing and decreasing angle of attack and, also, from test to test. The side force is very sensitive to the nature of the boundary layer, as indicated by large changes with boundary trips. The maximum side force caries considerably with Reynolds number and tends to decrease with increasing Mach number. The direction of the side force is sensitive to the body geometry near the nose. The angle of attack of onset of side force is not strongly influenced by Reynolds number or Mach number but varies with forebody shape. Maximum normal force often occurs at angles of attack near 60 deg. The effect of the elliptic cross section is to reduce the angle of onset by about 10 deg compared to that of an equivalent circular forebody with the same fineness ratio. The short afterbody reduces the angle of onset by about 5 deg.

  14. Experimental and theoretical study of aerodynamic characteristics of some lifting bodies at angles of attack from -10 degrees to 53 degrees at Mach numbers from 2.30 to 4.62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy; Torres, Abel O.

    1994-01-01

    Lifting bodies are of interest for possible use as space transportation vehicles because they have the volume required for significant payloads and the aerodynamic capability to negotiate the transition from high angles of attack to lower angles of attack (for cruise flight) and thus safely reenter the atmosphere and perform conventional horizontal landings. Results are presented for an experimental and theoretical study of the aerodynamic characteristics at supersonic speeds for a series of lifting bodies with 75 deg delta planforms, rounded noses, and various upper and lower surface cambers. The camber shapes varied in thickness and in maximum thickness location, and hence in body volume. The experimental results were obtained in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel for both the longitudinal and the lateral aerodynamic characteristics. Selected experimental results are compared with calculated results obtained through the use of the Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Aerodynamic Computer Program.

  15. Prediction of forces and moments on finned bodies at high angle of attack in transonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W. L.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes a theoretical method for the prediction of fin forces and moments on bodies at high angle of attack in subsonic and transonic flow. The body is assumed to be a circular cylinder with cruciform fins (or wings) of arbitrary planform. The body can have an arbitrary roll (or bank) angle, and each fin can have individual control deflection. The method combines a body vortex flow model and lifting surface theory to predict the normal force distribution over each fin surface. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and experiment for various planform fins. A description of the use of the computer program that implements the method is given.

  16. 2-D and 3-D oscillating wing aerodynamics for a range of angles of attack including stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piziali, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of the pressure distribution over a semispan wing undergoing pitching motions representative of a helicopter rotor blade was conducted. Testing the wing in the nonrotating condition isolates the three-dimensional (3-D) blade aerodynamic and dynamic stall characteristics from the complications of the rotor blade environment. The test has generated a very complete, detailed, and accurate body of data. These data include static and dynamic pressure distributions, surface flow visualizations, two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil data from the same model and installation, and important supporting blockage and wall pressure distributions. This body of data is sufficiently comprehensive and accurate that it can be used for the validation of rotor blade aerodynamic models over a broad range of the important parameters including 3-D dynamic stall. This data report presents all the cycle-averaged lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficient data versus angle of attack obtained from the instantaneous pressure data for the 3-D wing and the 2-D airfoil. Also presented are examples of the following: cycle-to-cycle variations occurring for incipient or lightly stalled conditions; 3-D surface flow visualizations; supporting blockage and wall pressure distributions; and underlying detailed pressure results.

  17. Longitudinal-control design approach for high-angle-of-attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.; Proffitt, Melissa S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a control synthesis methodology that emphasizes a variable-gain output feedback technique that is applied to the longitudinal channel of a high-angle-of-attack aircraft. The aircraft is a modified F/A-18 aircraft with thrust-vectored controls. The flight regime covers a range up to a Mach number of 0.7; an altitude range from 15,000 to 35,000 ft; and an angle-of-attack (alpha) range up to 70 deg, which is deep into the poststall region. A brief overview is given of the variable-gain mathematical formulation as well as a description of the discrete control structure used for the feedback controller. This paper also presents an approximate design procedure with relationships for the optimal weights for the selected feedback control structure. These weights are selected to meet control design guidelines for high-alpha flight controls. Those guidelines that apply to the longitudinal-control design are also summarized. A unique approach is presented for the feed-forward command generator to obtain smooth transitions between load factor and alpha commands. Finally, representative linear analysis results and nonlinear batch simulation results are provided.

  18. Preliminary results from a subsonic high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system: Design, calibration, and flight test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Larson, Terry J.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was installed and flight-tested on the F-18 high alpha research flight vehicle. The system is a matrix of 25 pressure orifices in concentric circles on the nose of the vehicle. The orifices determine angles of attack and sideslip, Mach number, and pressure altitude. Pressure was transmitted from the orifices to an electronically scanned pressure module by lines of pneumatic tubing. The HI-FADS system was calibrated and demonstrated using dutch roll flight maneuvers covering large Mach, angle-of-attack, and sideslip ranges. Reference airdata for system calibration were generated by a minimum variance estimation technique blending measurements from two wingtip airdata booms with inertial velocities, aircraft angular rates and attitudes, precision radar tracking, and meteorological analyses. The pressure orifice calibration was based on identifying empirical adjustments to modified Newtonian flow on a hemisphere. Calibration results are presented. Flight test results used all 25 orifices or used a subset of 9 orifices. Under moderate maneuvering conditions, the HI-FADS system gave excellent results over the entire subsonic Mach number range up to 55 deg angle of attack. The internal pneumatic frequency response of the system is accurate to beyond 10 Hz. Aerodynamic lags in the aircraft flow field caused some performance degradation during heavy maneuvering.

  19. Large-Vortex Capture by a Wing at Very High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. M.; Wu, J. Z.; Denny, G. A.; Lu, X. Y.

    1996-01-01

    In generating the lift on a wing, the static stall is a severe barrier. As the angle of attack, alpha, increases to the stall angle, alpha(sub stall) the flow separation point on the upper surface of the wing moves to the leading edge, so that on a two-dimensional airfoil or a large-aspect-ratio wing, the lift abruptly drops to a very low level. Therefore, the first generation of aeronautical flow type, i.e., the attached steady flow, has been limited to alpha less than alpha(sub stall). Owing to the obvious importance in applications, therefore, a great effort has been made in the past two decades to enlarge the range of usable angles of attack by various flow controls for a large-aspect-ratio wing. Basically, relevant works fall into two categories. The first category is usually refereed to as separation control, which concentrates on partially separated flow at alpha less than alpha(sub stall). Since the first experimental study of Collins and Zelenevitz, there has been ample literature showing that a partially separated flow can be turned to almost fully attached by flow controls, so that the lift is recovered and the stall is delayed (for a recent work see Seifert et al.). It has been well established that, in this category, unsteady controls are much more effective than steady ones and can be realized at a very low power-input level (Wu et al.; Seifert et al.). The second and more ambitious category of relevant efforts is the post-stall lift enhancement. Its possibility roots at the existence of a second lift peak at a very high angle of attack. In fact, As alpha further increases from alpha(sub stall), the completely separated flow develops and gradually becomes a bluff-body flow. This flow gives a normal force to the airfoil with a lift component, which reaches a peak at a maximum utilizable angle of attack, alpha(sub m) approx.= 40 deg. This second peak is of the same level as the first lift peak at alpha(sub stall). Meanwhile, the drag is also quickly

  20. Development of a preliminary high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control requirement for high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Luat T.; Foster, John V.

    1990-01-01

    The requirements for high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control for advanced high-performance aircraft are discussed. Background information on fundamental factors that influence and, to a large extent, determine the high angle-of-attack nose-down control requirement is briefly reviewed. Guidelines currently proposed by other sources which attempt to define these requirements are discussed. A requirement based on NASA analysis of the characteristics of existing relaxed static stability (RSS) aircraft is presented. This analysis could provide the basis for a preliminary design guide.

  1. Simulating Effects of High Angle of Attack on Turbofan Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Claus, Russell W.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2013-01-01

    A method of investigating the effects of high angle of attack (AOA) flight on turbofan engine performance is presented. The methodology involves combining a suite of diverse simulation tools. Three-dimensional, steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is used to model the change in performance of a commercial aircraft-type inlet and fan geometry due to various levels of AOA. Parallel compressor theory is then applied to assimilate the CFD data with a zero-dimensional, nonlinear, dynamic turbofan engine model. The combined model shows that high AOA operation degrades fan performance and, thus, negatively impacts compressor stability margins and engine thrust. In addition, the engine response to high AOA conditions is shown to be highly dependent upon the type of control system employed.

  2. Flight validation of ground-based assessment for control power requirements at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Ross, Holly M.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Sternberg, Charles A.; Traven, Ricardo; Lackey, James B.; Abbott, Troy D.

    1994-01-01

    A review is presented in viewgraph format of an ongoing NASA/U.S. Navy study to determine control power requirements at high angles of attack for the next generation high-performance aircraft. This paper focuses on recent flight test activities using the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), which are intended to validate results of previous ground-based simulation studies. The purpose of this study is discussed, and the overall program structure, approach, and objectives are described. Results from two areas of investigation are presented: (1) nose-down control power requirements and (2) lateral-directional control power requirements. Selected results which illustrate issues and challenges that are being addressed in the study are discussed including test methodology, comparisons between simulation and flight, and general lessons learned.

  3. Optimization of lateral-directional dynamics for an aircraft operating at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, S. A.; Garrard, William L., Jr.; Enns, Dale F.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the control laws for the lateral-directional dynamics of a supermaneuverable aircraft is analyzed with a view to reducing the levels of lateral acceleration and sideslip, which are encountered during aggressive rolling maneuvers at high angles of attack. The analysis uses a linearized model of the lateral-directional dynamics and thus H-free-flow techniques can be applied. It is shown that trade-offs exist between simultaneously minimizing lateral acceleration measured at the pilot's station, ny(p), minimizing sideslip and minimizing tracking errors between the roll-rate about the velocity vector and its command. The paper concludes that a significant reduction in ny(p) is only attainable by compromising the roll-rate performance.

  4. Flight-Determined Subsonic Longitudinal Stability and Control Derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) with Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1997-01-01

    The subsonic longitudinal stability and control derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are extracted from dynamic flight data using a maximum likelihood parameter identification technique. The technique uses the linearized aircraft equations of motion in their continuous/discrete form and accounts for state and measurement noise as well as thrust-vectoring effects. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics over the aircraft, particularly at high angles of attack. Thrust vectoring was implemented using electrohydraulically-actuated nozzle postexit vanes and a specialized research flight control system. During maneuvers, a control system feature provided independent aerodynamic control surface inputs and independent thrust-vectoring vane inputs, thereby eliminating correlations between the aircraft states and controls. Substantial variations in control excitation and dynamic response were exhibited for maneuvers conducted at different angles of attack. Opposing vane interactions caused most thrust-vectoring inputs to experience some exhaust plume interference and thus reduced effectiveness. The estimated stability and control derivatives are plotted, and a discussion relates them to predicted values and maneuver quality.

  5. Flight determination of the aerodynamic stability and control characteristics of the NASA SGS 1-36 sailplane in the conventional and deep stall angles-of-attack of between -5 and 75 degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahdavi, F. A.; Sandlin, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    The flight test procedure and the preliminary analysis of the results obtained from twenty manned flights of the SGS 1-36 in the high angles of attack Deep Stall region are discussed. A comparison of the flight determined stability and control derivatives, those of the wind tunnel, and the estimated aerodynamic data is also presented. Furthermore, deep stall dynamics response of the SGS 1-36 is discussed briefly to explain some of the unexpected flight observations.

  6. In-flight flow visualization results from the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delfrate, John H.; Saltzman, John A.

    1992-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques were used on the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack to study the vortical flow off the forebody and the surface flow on the wing and tail. The forebody vortex system was studied because asymmetries in the vortex system were suspected of inducing uncommanded yawing moments at zero sideslip. Smoke enabled visualization of the vortex system and correlation of its orientation with flight yawing moment data. Good agreement was found between vortex system asymmetries and the occurrence of yawing moments. Surface flow on the forward-swept wing of the X-29A was studied using tufts and flow cones. As angle of attack increased, separated flow initiated at the root and spread outboard encompassing the full wing by 30 deg angle of attack. In general, the progression of the separated flow correlated well with subscale model lift data. Surface flow on the vertical tail was also studied using tufts and flow cones. As angle of attack increased, separated flow initiated at the root and spread upward. The area of separated flow on the vertical tail at angles of attack greater than 20 deg correlated well with the marked decrease in aircraft directional stability.

  7. PIV-based estimation of unsteady loads on a flat plate at high angle of attack using momentum equation approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guissart, Amandine; Bernal, Luis; Dimitriadis, Gregorios; Terrapon, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    The direct measurement of loads with force balance can become challenging when the forces are small or when the body is moving. An alternative is the use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) velocity fields to indirectly obtain the aerodynamic coefficients. This can be done by the use of control volume approaches which lead to the integration of velocities, and other fields deriving from them, on a contour surrounding the studied body and its supporting surface. This work exposes and discusses results obtained with two different methods: the direct use of the integral formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations and the so-called Noca's method. The latter is a reformulation of the integral Navier-Stokes equations in order to get rid of the pressure. Results obtained using the two methods are compared and the influence of different parameters is discussed. The methods are applied to PIV data obtained from water channel testing for the flow around a 16:1 plate. Two cases are considered: a static plate at high angle of attack and a large amplitude imposed pitching motion. Two-dimensional PIV velocity fields are used to compute the aerodynamic forces. Direct measurements of dynamic loads are also carried out in order to assess the quality of the indirectly calculated coefficients.

  8. Application of piloted simulation to high-angle-of-attack flight-dynamics research for fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    1992-01-01

    The use of piloted simulation at Langley Research Center as part of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP), which was created to provide concepts and methods for the design of advanced fighter aircraft, is reviewed. A major research activity within this program is the development of the design processes required to take advantage of the benefits of advanced control concepts for high angle of attack agility. Fundamental methodologies associated with the effective use of piloted simulation for this research are described, particularly those relating to the test techniques, validation of the test results, and design guideline/criteria development.

  9. Application of Piloted Simulation to High-Angle-of-Attack Flight-Dynamics Research for Fighter Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of piloted simulation at Langley Research Center as part of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP), which was created to provide concepts and methods for the design of advanced fighter aircraft. A major research activity within this program is the development of the design processes required to take advantage of the benefits of advanced control concepts for high-angle-of-attack agility. Fundamental methodologies associated with the effective use of piloted simulation for this research are described, particularly those relating to the test techniques, validation of the test results, and design guideline/criteria development.

  10. Development of high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control margin design guidelines for combat aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.

    1993-01-01

    A broad research program to identify maneuvering requirements for advanced fighters and the corresponding design criteria to aid in making critical design tradeoffs is being conducted under the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP). As part of this activity, NASA and the U.S. Navy are conducting cooperative research to develop high-angle-of-attack control margin requirements. This paper will summarize the status of this program. Following some background information, the simulation study conducted to develop a set of preliminary guidelines for nose-down pitch control is reviewed, and the results of some very limited flight tests are described.

  11. Aerodynamic characteristics of seven symmetrical airfoil sections through 180-degree angle of attack for use in aerodynamic analysis of vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldahl, R E; Klimas, P C

    1981-03-01

    When work began on the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) program at Sandia National Laboratories, it was recognized that there was a paucity of symmetrical airfoil data needed to describe the aerodynamics of turbine blades. Curved-bladed Darrieus turbines operate at local Reynolds numbers (Re) and angles of attack (..cap alpha..) seldom encountered in aeronautical applications. This report describes (1) a wind tunnel test series conducted at moderate values of Re in which 0 less than or equal to ..cap alpha.. less than or equal to 180/sup 0/ force and moment data were obtained for four symmetrical blade-candidate airfoil sections (NACA-0009, -0012, -0012H, and -0015), and (2) how an airfoil property synthesizer code can be used to extend the measured properties to arbitrary values of Re (10/sup 4/ less than or equal to Re less than or equal to 10/sup 7/) and to certain other section profiles (NACA-0018, -0021, -0025).

  12. LDV Surveys Over a Fighter Model at Moderate to High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, William L., III; Meyers, James F.; Hepner, Timothy E.

    2004-01-01

    The vortex flowfield over an advanced twin-tailed fighter configuration was measured in a low-speed wind tunnel at two angles of attack. The primary test data consisted of 3-component velocity surveys obtained using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter. Laser light sheet and surface flow visualization were also obtained to provide insight into the flowfield structure. Time-averaged velocities and the root mean square of the velocity fluctuations were obtained at two cross-sections above the model. At 15 degrees angle of attack, the vortices generated by the wing leading edge extension (LEX) were unburst over the model and passed outboard of the vertical tail. At 25 degrees angle of attack, the vortices burst in the vicinity of the wing-LEX intersection and impact directly on the vertical tails. The RMS levels of the velocity fluctuations reach values of approximately 30% in the region of the vertical tails.

  13. A Tail Buffet Loads Prediction Method for Aircraft at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.; Moses, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Aircraft designers commit significant resources to the design of aircraft in meeting performance goals. Despite fulfilling traditional design requirements, many fighter aircraft have encountered buffet loads when demonstrating their high angle-of-attack maneuver capabilities. As a result, during test or initial production phases of fighter development programs, many new designs are impacted, usually in a detrimental way, by resulting in reassessing designs or limiting full mission capability. These troublesome experiences usually stem from overlooking or completely ignoring the effects of buffet during the design phase of aircraft. Perhaps additional requirements are necessary that addresses effects of buffet in achieving best aircraft performance in fulfilling mission goals. This paper describes a reliable, fairly simple, but quite general buffet loads analysis method to use in the initial design phases of fighter-aircraft development. The method is very similar to the random gust load analysis that is now commonly available in a commercial code, which this analysis capability is based, with some key modifications. The paper describes the theory and the implementation of the methodology. The method is demonstrated on a JSF prototype example problem. The demonstration also serves as a validation of the method, since, in the paper, the analysis is shown to nearly match the flight data. In addition, the paper demonstrates how the analysis method can be used to assess candidate design concepts in determining a satisfactory final aircraft configuration.

  14. Technical Evaluation Report, Part A - Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2003-01-01

    A symposium entitled Vortex Flow and High Angle of Attack was held in Loen, Norway, from May 7 through May 11, 2001. The Applied Vehicle Technology (AVT) panel, under the auspices of the Research and Technology Organization (RTO), sponsored this symposium. Forty-eight papers, organized into nine sessions, addressed computational and experimental studies of vortex flows pertinent to both aircraft and maritime applications. The studies also ranged from fundamental fluids investigations to flight test results, and significant results were contributed from a broad range of countries. The principal emphasis of this symposium was on "the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on military vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads." It was further observed by the program committee that "separation- induced vortex flows are an important part of the design and off-design performance of conventional fighter aircraft and new conventional or unconventional manned or unmanned advanced vehicle designs (UAVs, manned aircraft, missiles, space planes, ground-based vehicles, and ships)." The nine sessions addressed the following topics: vortical flows on wings and bodies, experimental techniques for vortical flows, numerical simulations of vortical flows, vortex stability and breakdown, vortex flows in maritime applications, vortex interactions and control, vortex dynamics, flight testing, and vehicle design. The purpose of this paper is to provide brief reviews of these papers along with some synthesizing perspectives toward future vortex flow research opportunities. The paper includes the symposium program. (15 refs.)

  15. Vortex force generation of an impulsively started wing at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiang; Wang, Fuxin; Liu, Hong; Qin, Suyang; Xiang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    A wing at high angle of attack (AoA) impulsively started from rest is a fundamental motion employed by insects during flight. Previous studies have almost solely focused on the lift enhancement by the leading-edge vortex (LEV). However, the influences of the starting vortex and secondary vortex on both the lift and drag generation have been less studied. In this paper, the vorticity fields for three AoAs of 45°, 58.5° and 72° are obtained numerically. The roles of the LEV, starting vortex and secondary vortex in generating the lift and drag are quantitatively studied using the vorticity moment theory. It is revealed that the LEV provides positive lift whereas the starting vortex and secondary vortex provide negative lift during the whole motion. The negative lift produced by the starting vortex or secondary vortex is not trivial and cannot be ignored. Regarding the drag, the LEV reduces the total drag whereas the starting vortex, the secondary vortex increases the total drag. As the AoA increases, the drag resulting from the starting vortex increases quickly and comprises almost all the total drag for the AoA of 72°. The relations between the motion of the vortical structures and the forces are also investigated. Financial support from the State Key Development Program of Basic Research of China (2014CB744802) is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Experimental study of effects of forebody geometry on high angle of attack static and dynamic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, J. M.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    A series of low speed wind tunnel tests on a generic fighter model with a cylindrical fuselage were made to investigate the effects of forebody shape on static and dynamic lateral/directional stability. Five forebodies, including a chine nose of unconventional cross-sectional shape, were tested. Conventional force tests were conducted to determine static stability characteristics and single degree-of-freedom free-to-roll tests were used to study the wing rock susceptibility of the model with the various forebodies. Flow visualization data were obtained to aid in analysis of the complex flow phenomena involved. The results show that forebody cross-sectional shape can strongly effect both static and dynamic (roll) stability at high angles of attack. Large variations in stability were obtained for the various forebody geometries. These characteristics result from the impact of cross-sectional shape on forebody vortex development, the behavior of the vortices at sideslip conditions, and their interaction with the wing and empennage flow fields.

  17. High angle-of-attack characteristics of three-surface fighter aircraft. [canard-wing-horizontal tail configuration for greater stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croom, M. A.; Grafton, S. B.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a research program aimed at providing information on the high angle-of-attack characteristics of three-surface fighter concepts incorporating a close-coupled canard, an investigation is being conducted on two specific configurations based on the F-18 and F-15 designs. The study configurations are being subjected to a wide range of tests including wind-tunnel tests, dynamic model tests, and piloted simulation. This paper summarizes the results obtained to date in this study. High-alpha results in the areas of static stability, damping, and control characteristics are reviewed and some of the more significant aerodynamic phenomena are identified.

  18. Extraction of Lateral-Directional Stability and Control Derivatives for the Basic F-18 Aircraft at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1997-01-01

    The results of parameter identification to determine the lateral-directional stability and control derivatives of an F-18 research aircraft in its basic hardware and software configuration are presented. The derivatives are estimated from dynamic flight data using a specialized identification program developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The formulation uses the linearized aircraft equations of motions in their continuous/discrete form and a maximum likelihood estimator that accounts for both state and measurement noise. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics, such as separated and vortical flows, over the aircraft. The derivatives are plotted as functions of angle of attack between 3 deg and 47 deg and compared with wind-tunnel predictions. The quality of the derivative estimates obtained by parameter identification is somewhat degraded because the maneuvers were flown with the aircraft's control augmentation system engaged, which introduced relatively high correlations between the control variables and response variables as a result of control motions from the feedback control system.

  19. Low-speed wind tunnel performance of high-speed counterrotation propellers at angle-of-attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Gazzaniga, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The low-speed aerodynamic performance characteristics of two advanced counterrotation pusher-propeller configurations with cruise design Mach numbers of 0.72 were investigated in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. The tests were conducted at Mach number 0.20, which is representative of the aircraft take/off/landing flight regime. The investigation determined the effect of nonuniform inflow on the propeller performance characteristics for several blade angle settings and a range of rotational speeds. The inflow was varied by yawing the propeller mode to angle-of-attack by as much as plus or minus 16 degrees and by installing on the counterrotation propeller test rig near the propeller rotors a model simulator of an aircraft engine support pylon and fuselage. The results of the investigation indicated that the low-speed performance of the counterrotation propeller configurations near the take-off target operating points were reasonable and were fairly insensitive to changes in model angle-of-attack without the aircraft pylon/fuselage simulators installed on the propeller test rig. When the aircraft pylon/fuselage simulators were installed, small changes in propeller performance were seen at zero angle-of-attack, but fairly large changes in total power coefficient and very large changes of aft-to-forward-rotor torque ratio were produced when the propeller model was taken to angle-of-attack. The propeller net efficiency, though, was fairly insensitive to any changes in the propeller flowfield conditions near the take-off target operating points.

  20. Low-speed wind tunnel performance of high-speed counterrotation propellers at angle-of-attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Gazzaniga, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The low-speed aerodynamic performance characteristics of two advanced counterrotation pusher-propeller configurations with cruise design Mach numbers of 0.72 were investigated in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. The tests were conducted at Mach number 0.20, which is representative of the aircraft take-off/landing flight regime. The investigation determined the effect of nonuniform inflow on the propeller performance characteristics for several blade angle settings and a range of rotational speeds. The inflow was varied by yawing the propeller model to angle-of-attack by as much as plus or minus 16 degrees and by installing on the counterrotation propeller test rig near the propeller rotors a model simulator of an aircraft engine support pylon and fuselage. The results of the investigation indicated that the low-speed performance of the counterrotation propeller configurations near the take-off target operating points were reasonable and were fairly insensitive to changes in model angle-of-attack without the aircraft pylon/fuselage simulators installed on the propeller test rig. When the aircraft pylon/fuselage simulators were installed, small changes in propeller performance were seen at zero angle-of-attack, but fairly large changes in total power coefficient and very large changes of aft-to-forward-rotor torque ratio were produced when the propeller model was taken to angle-of-attack. The propeller net efficiency, though, was fairly insensitive to any changes in the propeller flowfield conditions near the take-off target operating points.

  1. Analysis of flight data on boundary layer transition at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haigh, W. W.; Lake, B. M.; Ko, D. R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Boundary layer transition data were obtained on the flight of two cones which reentered at velocities of about 7.0 km/sec. One cone reentered at a nominal zero degree angle of attack and the other, due to an anomaly above the earth atmosphere, reentered at local angles of attack up to 7.0 km/sec. The transition data were obtained from on-board acoustic and electrostatic sensors. A description of the design, calibration, and method used to detect transition from the sensors is included. The flow field calculation used to obtain the local flow properties on the cones is described. Finally, the transition data found from both cone flights is correlated.

  2. Forebody vortex management for yaw control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.; Moskovitz, C.; Murri, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    The yaw-control potential of deployable forebody strakes at angles of attack above the range of conventional rudder effectiveness has been investigated. The conformally-stored strakes when deployed force asymmetrical vortex shedding from the forebody, thereby generating a controlled yawing moment. The concept was explored through low-speed wind tunnel tests on a conical forebody in isolation and in a generic fighter configuration. Force and moment measurements on the complete model were supplemented with circumferential pressure and flow-visualization surveys on an isolated forebody, in order to gain insight into the vortex flow mechanisms resulting from forced asymmetrical separations and to quantify the obtainable yaw power at angles of attack to 80 deg. This preliminary, low-Reynolds-number study showed asymmetrically-deployed forebody strakes to have considerable yaw control potential, whose sensitivity to scale effects needs further investigation.

  3. Experimental investigation into wing span and angle-of-attack effects on sub-scale race car wing/wheel interaction aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diasinos, S.; Gatto, A.

    2008-09-01

    This paper details a quantitative 3D investigation using LDA into the interaction aerodynamics on a sub-scale open wheel race car inverted front wing and wheel. Of primary importance to this study was the influence of changing wing angle of attack and span on the resulting near-field and far-field flow characteristics. Results obtained showed that both variables do have a significant influence on the resultant flow-field, particularly on wing vortex and wheel wake development and propagation.

  4. Wind-tunnel research comparing lateral control devices, particularly at high angles of attack VI : skewed ailerons on rectangular wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Harris, Thomas A

    1934-01-01

    This report covers the sixth of a series of investigations in which various lateral control devices are compared with particular reference to their effectiveness at high angles of attack. The present report deals with flap-type ailerons hinged about axes having an angle with respect to the leading and trailing edges of the wing. Tests were made on four different skewed ailerons, including two different angles of skew and two sizes of ailerons. At the high angles of attack, all the skewed ailerons tested were slightly inferior with respect to rolling and yawing moments to straight ailerons having the same span and average chord. Computations indicate that the skewed ailerons are also inferior with respect to hinge moments.

  5. Flutter Clearance of the F-18 High-angle-of-attack Research Vehicle with Experimental Wingtip Instrumentation Pods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    1989-01-01

    An F-18 aircraft was modified with wingtip instrumentation pods for use in NASA's high-angle-of-attack research program. Ground vibration and flight flutter testing were performed to clear an acceptable flight envelope for the aircraft. Flight test utilized atmospheric turbulence for structural excitation; the aircraft displayed no adverse aeroelastic trends within the envelope tested. The data presented in this report include mode shapes from the ground vibration and estimates of frequency and damping as a function of Mach number.

  6. Comparison of high-angle-of-attack slender-body theory and exact solutions for potential flow over an ellipsoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of high-alpha slender-body theory (HASBT) for bodies with elliptical cross-sections is presently demonstrated by means of a comparison with exact solutions for incompressible potential flow over a wide range of ellipsoid geometries and angles of attack and sideslip. The addition of the appropriate trigonometric coefficients to the classical slender-body theory decomposition yields the formally correct HASBT, and results in accuracies previously considered unattainable.

  7. Side forces on a tangent ogive forebody with a fineness ratio of 3.5 at high angles of attack and Mach numbers from 0.1 to 0.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, E. R.; Chapman, G. T.; Cohen, L.; Taleghani, J.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Ames 12-Foot Wind Tunnel to determine the subsonic aerodynamic characteristics, at high angles of attack, of a tangent ogive forebody with a fineness ratio of 3.5. The investigation included the effects of nose bluntness, nose strakes, nose booms, a simulated canopy, and boundary-layer trips. The forebody was also tested with a short afterbody attached. Static longitudinal and lateral-directional stability data were obtained at Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.3 mil. to 3.8 mil. (based on base diameter) at a Mach number of 0.25, and at a Reynolds number of 0.8 mil. at Mach numbers ranging from 0.1 to 0.7. Angle of attack was varied from 0 to 88 deg at zero sideslip, and the sideslip angle was varied from -10 to 30 deg at angles of attack of 40, 55, and 70 deg.

  8. Status of the validation of high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control margin design guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Wilson, R. J.; Lackey, James B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of results obtained to date in an ongoing cooperative research program between NASA and the U.S. Navy to develop design criteria for high-angle-of-attack nose-down pitch control for combat aircraft. A fundamental design consideration for aircraft incorporating relaxed static stability in pitch is the level of stability which achieves a proper balance between high-speed performance considerations and low-speed requirements for maneuvering at high angles of attack. A comprehensive data base of piloted simulation results was generated for parametric variations of critical parameters affecting nose-down control capability. The results showed a strong correlation of pilot rating to the short-term pitch response for nose-down commands applied at high-angle-of-attack conditions. Using these data, candidate design guidelines and flight demonstration requirements were defined. Full-scale flight testing to validate the research methodology and proposed guidelines is in progress, some preliminary results of which are reviewed.

  9. Status of the Validation of High-Angle-Of-Attack Nose-Down Pitch Control Margin Design Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Wilson, R. Joe; Lackey, James B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of results obtained to date in an ongoing cooperative research program between NASA and the U.S. Navy to develop design criteria for high-angle-of-attack nose- down pitch control for combat aircraft. A fundamental design consideration for aircraft incorporating relaxed static stability in pitch is the level of stability which achieves a proper balance between high- speed performance considerations and low-speed requirements for maneuvering at high angles of attack. A comprehensive data base of piloted simulation results was generated for parametric variations of critical parameters affecting nose-down control capability. The results showed a strong correlation of pilot rating to the short-term pitch response for nose-down commands applied at high- angle-of-attack conditions. Using these data, candidate design guidelines and flight demonstration requirements were defined. Full- scale flight testing to validate the research methodology and proposed guidelines is in progress, some preliminary results of which are reviewed.

  10. Large-scale wind-tunnel investigation of a close-coupled canard-delta-wing fighter model through high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, F.; Koenig, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Data obtained through very high angles of attack from a large-scale, subsonic wind-tunnel test of a close-coupled canard-delta-wing fighter model are analyzed. The canard delays wing leading-edge vortex breakdown, even for angles of attack at which the canard is completely stalled. A vortex-lattice method was applied which gave good predictions of lift and pitching moment up to an angle of attack of about 20 deg, where vortex-breakdown effects on performance become significant. Pitch-control inputs generally retain full effectiveness up to the angle of attack of maximum lift, beyond which, effectiveness drops off rapidly. A high-angle-of-attack prediction method gives good estimates of lift and drag for the completely stalled aircraft. Roll asymmetry observed at zero sideslip is apparently caused by an asymmetry in the model support structure.

  11. Vortex Effects for Canard-wing Configurations at High Angles of Attack in Subsonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, B. M. E.; Medan, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional subsonic panel method that can handle arbitrary shed vortex wakes is used to compute the nonlinear forces and moments on simple canard-wing configurations. The lifting surfaces and wakes are represented by doublet panels. The Mangler-Smith theory is used to provide an initial estimate for the vortex sheet shed from the leading edge. The trailing-edge wake and the leading-edge wake downstream of the trailing edge are assumed to be straight and leave the trailing edge at an angle of alpha/2. Results indicate good agreement with experimental data up to 40 degs angle of attack.

  12. Experimental study of effects of forebody geometry on high angle of attack static and dynamic stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, J. M.; Murri, D. G.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    A series of low-speed wind tunnel tests on a generic airplane model with a cylindrical fuselage were made to investigate the effects of forebody shape and fitness ratio, and fuselage/wing proximity on static and dynamic lateral/directional stability. In addition, some preliminary testing to determine the effectiveness of deflectable forebody strakes for high angle of attack yaw control was conducted. During the stability investigation, 11 forebodies were tested including three different cross-sectional shapes with fineness ratios of 2, 3, and 4. In addition, the wing was tested at two longitudinal positions to provide a substantial variation in forebody/wing proximity. Conventional force tests were conducted to determine static stability characteristics, and single-degree-of-freedom free-to-roll tests were conducted to study the wing rock characteristics of the model with the various forebodies. Flow visualization data were obtained to aid in the analysis of the complex flow phenomena involved. The results show that the forebody cross-sectional shape and fineness ratio and forebody/wing proximity can strongly affect both static and dynamic (roll) stability at high angles of attack. These characteristics result from the impact of these factors on forebody vortex development, the behavior of the vortices in sideslip, and their interaction with the wing flow field. Preliminary results from the deflectable strake investigation indicated that forebody flow control using this concept can provide very large yaw control moments at stall and post-stall angles of attack.

  13. Effect of aerodynamic and angle-of-attack uncertainties on the May 1979 entry flight control system of the Space Shuttle from Mach 8 to 1.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. W.; Powell, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    A six degree of freedom simulation analysis was performed for the space shuttle orbiter during entry from Mach 8 to Mach 1.5 with realistic off nominal conditions by using the flight control systems defined by the shuttle contractor. The off nominal conditions included aerodynamic uncertainties in extrapolating from wind tunnel derived characteristics to full scale flight characteristics, uncertainties in the estimates of the reaction control system interaction with the orbiter aerodynamics, an error in deriving the angle of attack from onboard instrumentation, the failure of two of the four reaction control system thrusters on each side, and a lateral center of gravity offset coupled with vehicle and flow asymmetries. With combinations of these off nominal conditions, the flight control system performed satisfactorily. At low hypersonic speeds, a few cases exhibited unacceptable performances when errors in deriving the angle of attack from the onboard instrumentation were modeled. The orbiter was unable to maintain lateral trim for some cases between Mach 5 and Mach 2 and exhibited limit cycle tendencies or residual roll oscillations between Mach 3 and Mach 1. Piloting techniques and changes in some gains and switching times in the flight control system are suggested to help alleviate these problems.

  14. Numerical simulation of the flow about the F-18 HARV at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.

    1995-01-01

    This research has been aimed at validating numerical methods for computing the flow about the complete F-18 HARV at alpha = 30 deg and alpha = 45 deg. At 30 deg angle of attack, the flow about the F-18 is dominated by the formation, and subsequent breakdown, of strong vortices over the wing leading-edge extensions (LEX). As the angle of attack is increased to alpha = 45 deg, the fuselage forebody of the F-18 contains significant laminar and transitional regions which are not present at alpha = 30 deg. Further, the flow over the LEX at alpha = 45 deg is dominated by an unsteady shedding in time, rather than strong coherent vortices. This complex physics, combined with the complex geometry of a full-aircraft configuration, provides a challenge for current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The following sections present the numerical method and grid generation scheme that was used, a review of prior research done to numerically model the F-18 HARV, and a discussion of the current research. The current research is broken into three main topics; the effect of engine-inlet mass-flow rate on the F-18 vortex breakdown position, the results using a refined F-18 computational model to compute the flow at alpha = 30 deg and alpha = 45 deg, and research done using the simplified geometry of an ogive-cylinder configuration to investigate the physics of unsteady shear-layer shedding. The last section briefly summarizes the discussion.

  15. High angle of attack position sensing for the Southampton University magnetic suspension and balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, David H.

    1987-01-01

    An all digital five channel position detection system is to be installed in the Southampton University Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (SUMSBS). The system is intended to monitor a much larger range of model pitch attitudes than has been possible hitherto, up to a maximum of a 90 degree angle of attack. It is based on the use of self-scanning photodiode arrays and illuminating laser light beams, together with purpose built processing electronics. The principles behind the design of the system are discussed, together with the results of testing one channel of the system which was used to control the axial position of a magnetically suspended model in SUMSBS. The removal of optically coupled heave position information from the axial position sensing channel is described.

  16. Effect of aerodynamic and angle-of-attack uncertainties on the blended entry flight control system of the Space Shuttle from Mach 10 to 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. W.; Powell, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom simulation analysis has been performed for the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry from Mach 10 to 2.5 with realistic off-nominal conditions using the entry flight control system specified in May 1978. The off-nominal conditions included the following: (1) aerodynamic uncertainties, (2) an error in deriving the angle of attack from onboard instrumentation, (3) the failure of two of the four reaction control-system thrusters on each side, and (4) a lateral center-of-gravity offset. With combinations of the above off-nominal conditions, the control system performed satisfactorily with a few exceptions. The cases that did not exhibit satisfactory performance displayed the following main weaknesses. Marginal performance was exhibited at hypersonic speeds with a sensed angle-of-attack error of 4 deg. At supersonic speeds the system tended to be oscillatory, and the system diverged for several cases because of the inability to hold lateral trim. Several system modifications were suggested to help solve these problems and to maximize safety on the first flight: alter the elevon-trim and speed-brake schedules, delay switching to rudder trim until the rudder effectiveness is adequate, and reduce the overall rudder loop gain. These and other modifications were incorporated in a flight-control-system redesign in May 1979.

  17. Exploratory low-speed wind-tunnel study of concepts designed to improve aircraft stability and control at high angles of attack. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of concepts to improve the high angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a high performance aircraft was conducted. The effect of vertical tail geometry on stability and the effectiveness of several conventional and unusual control concepts was determined. These results were obtained over a large angle-of-attack range. Vertical tail location, cant angle and leading edge sweep could influence both longitudinal and lateral-directional stability. The control concepts tested were found to be effective and to provide control into the post stall angle-of-attack region.

  18. Multiaxis Thrust-Vectoring Characteristics of a Model Representative of the F-18 High-Alpha Research Vehicle at Angles of Attack From 0 deg to 70 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Capone, Francis J.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the multiaxis thrust-vectoring characteristics of the F-18 High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). A wingtip supported, partially metric, 0.10-scale jet-effects model of an F-18 prototype aircraft was modified with hardware to simulate the thrust-vectoring control system of the HARV. Testing was conducted at free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.30 to 0.70, at angles of attack from O' to 70', and at nozzle pressure ratios from 1.0 to approximately 5.0. Results indicate that the thrust-vectoring control system of the HARV can successfully generate multiaxis thrust-vectoring forces and moments. During vectoring, resultant thrust vector angles were always less than the corresponding geometric vane deflection angle and were accompanied by large thrust losses. Significant external flow effects that were dependent on Mach number and angle of attack were noted during vectoring operation. Comparisons of the aerodynamic and propulsive control capabilities of the HARV configuration indicate that substantial gains in controllability are provided by the multiaxis thrust-vectoring control system.

  19. Survey of needs and capabilities for wind tunnel testing of dynamic stability of aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlik-Ruckemann, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    A survey was conducted relative to future requirements for dynamic stability information for such aerospace vehicles as the space shuttle and advanced high performance military aircraft. High-angle-of-attack and high-Reynolds number conditions were emphasized. A review was made of the wind-tunnel capabilities in North America for measuring dynamic stability derivatives, revealing an almost total lack of capabilities that could satisfy these requirements. Recommendations are made regarding equipment that should be constructed to remedy this situation. A description is given of some of the more advanced existing capabilities, which can be used to at least partly satisfy immediate demands.

  20. High angle of attack control law development for a free-flight wind tunnel model using direct eigenstructure assignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendel, Thomas R.; Boland, Joseph R.; Hahne, David E.

    1991-01-01

    Flight-control laws are developed for a wind-tunnel aircraft model flying at a high angle of attack by using a synthesis technique called direct eigenstructure assignment. The method employs flight guidelines and control-power constraints to develop the control laws, and gain schedules and nonlinear feedback compensation provide a framework for considering the nonlinear nature of the attack angle. Linear and nonlinear evaluations show that the control laws are effective, a conclusion that is further confirmed by a scale model used for free-flight testing.

  1. Impulsive Start of a Symmetric Airfoil at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Yon, Steven; Rogers, Stuart E.

    1996-01-01

    The fluid dynamic phenomena following the impulsive start of a NACA 0015 airfoil were studied by using a time accurate solution of the incompressible laminar Navier-Stokes equations. Angle of attack was set at 10 deg to simulate steady-state poststall conditions at a Reynolds number of 1.2 x 10(exp 4). The calculation revealed that large initial lift values can be obtained, immediately following the impulsive start, when a trapped vortex develops above the airfoil. Before the buildup of this trapped vortex and immediately after the airfoil was set into motion, the fluid is attached to the airfoil's surface and flows around the trailing edge, demonstrating the delay in the buildup of the classical Kutta condition. The transient of this effect is quite short and is followed by an attached How event that leads to the trapped vortex that has a longer duration. The just described initial phenomenon eventually transits into a fully developed separated flow pattern identifiable by an alternating, periodic vortex shedding.

  2. Reynolds number effects on supersonic asymmetrical flows over a cone at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The supersonic viscous flow over a 5-degree half-angle cone at an angle of attack of four times the cone half-angle is studied computationally using both the conical and the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical solutions were obtained with an implicit, upwind-biased algorithm. Asymmetrical flowfields of the absolute-instability type are found using the conical-flow equations which agree with published results. However, the absolute instabilities of the originally symmetric flow found with the conical equations do not occur in the three-dimensional simulations, although spurious asymmetric three-dimensional flows for symmetric bodies arise if the grid resolution is insufficient in the nose region. The asymmetric flows computed with the three-dimensional equations are convective instabilities and are possible if the local Reynolds number exceeds a critical value and a fixed geometric asymmetry is imposed. A continuous range of asymmetries can be developed, depending on the size of the disturbance and the Reynolds number. As the Reynolds number is increased, the asymmetries demonstrate a bistable behavior at levels of side force consistent with those predicted using the conical equations. Below a certain critical Reynolds number, any flow asymmetries arising from a geometrical asymmetry are damped with increasing distance downstream from the geometrical asymmetry.

  3. In-flight flow visualization characteristics of the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Delfrate, John H.; Richwine, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Surface and off-surface flow visualization techniques were used to visualize the 3-D separated flows on the NASA F-18 high alpha research vehicle at high angles of attack. Results near the alpha = 25 to 26 deg and alpha = 45 to 49 deg are presented. Both the forebody and leading edge extension (LEX) vortex cores and breakdown locations were visualized using smoke. Forebody and LEX vortex separation lines on the surface were defined using an emitted fluid technique. A laminar separation bubble was also detected on the nose cone using the emitted fluid technique and was similar to that observed in the wind tunnel test, but not as extensive. Regions of attached, separated, and vortical flow were noted on the wing and the leading edge flap using tufts and flow cones, and compared well with limited wind tunnel results.

  4. Numerical simulation by TVD schemes of complex shock reflections from airfoils at high angle of attack. [Total Variation Diminishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Young J.; Yee, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    The shock-capturing capability of total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes is demonstrated for a more realistic complex shock-diffraction problem for which the experimental data are available. Second-order explicit upwind and symmetric TVD schemes are used to solve the time-dependent Euler equations of gas dynamics for the interaction of a blast wave with an airfoil at high angle-of-attack. The test cases considered are a time-dependent moving curved-shock wave and a contant moving planar-shock wave impinging at an angle-of-attack 30 deg on a NACA 0018 airfoil. Good agreement is obtained between isopycnic contours computed by the TVD schemes and those from experimental interferograms. No drastic difference in flow-field structure is found between the curved- and planar-shock wave cases, except for a difference in density level near the lower surface of the airfoil. Computation for cases with higher shock Mach numbers is also possible. Numerical experiments show that the symmetric TVD scheme is less sensitive to the boundary conditions treatment than the upwind scheme.

  5. Correlation of forebody pressures and aircraft yawing moments on the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Richwine, David M.; Landers, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    In-flight pressure distributions at four fuselage stations on the forebody of the X-29A aircraft have been reported at angles of attack from 15 to 66 deg and at Mach numbers from 0.22 to 0.60. At angles of attack of 20 deg and higher, vortices shed from the nose strake caused suction peaks in the pressure distributions that generally increased in magnitude with angle of attack. Above 30 deg-angle of attack, the forebody pressure distributions became asymmetrical at the most forward station, while they remained nearly symmetrical until 50 to 55 deg-angle of attack for the aft stations. Between 59 to 66 deg-angle of attack, the asymmetry of the pressure distributions changed direction. Yawing moments for the forebody alone were obtained by integrating the forebody pressure distributions. At 45 deg-angle of attack, the aircraft yaws to the right and at 50 deg and higher, the aircraft yaws to the left. The forebody yawing moments correlated well with the aircraft left yawing moment at an angle of attack of 50 deg or higher. At a 45 deg-angle of attack, the forebody yawing moments did not correlate well with the aircraft yawing moment, but it is suggested that this was due to asymmetric pressures on the cockpit region of the fuselage which was not instrumented. The forebody was also shown to provide a positive component of directional stability of the aircraft at angles of attack of 25 deg or higher. A Mach number effect was noted at angles of attack of 30 deg or higher at the station where the nose strake was present. At this station, the suction peaks in the pressure distributions at the highest Mach number were reduced and much more symmetrical as compared to the lower Mach number pressure distributions.

  6. Wind-tunnel investigation to determine the low speed yawing stability derivatives of a twin jet fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Newsom, W. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the low-speed yawing stability derivatives of a twin-jet fighter airplane model at high angles of attack. Tests were performed in a low-speed tunnel utilizing variable-curvature walls to simulate pure yawing motion. The results of the study showed that at angles of attack below the stall the yawing derivatives were essentially independent of the yawing velocity and sideslip angle. However, at angles of attack above the stall some nonlinear variations were present and the derivatives were strongly dependent upon sideslip angle. The results also showed that the rolling moment due to yawing was primarily due to the wing-fuselage combination, and that at angles of attack below the stall both the vertical and horizontal tails produced significant contributions to the damping in yaw. Additionally, the tests showed that the use of the forced-oscillation data to represent the yawing stability derivatives is questionable, at high angles of attack, due to large effects arising from the acceleration in sideslip derivatives.

  7. Calculation of inviscid flow over shuttle-like vehicles at high angles of attack and comparisons with experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weilmuenster, K. J.; Hamilton, H. H., II

    1983-01-01

    A computer code HALIS, designed to compute the three dimensional flow about shuttle like configurations at angles of attack greater than 25 deg, is described. Results from HALIS are compared where possible with an existing flow field code; such comparisons show excellent agreement. Also, HALIS results are compared with experimental pressure distributions on shuttle models over a wide range of angle of attack. These comparisons are excellent. It is demonstrated that the HALIS code can incorporate equilibrium air chemistry in flow field computations.

  8. Estimation of Static Longitudinal Stability of Aircraft Configurations at High Mach Numbers and at Angles of Attack Between 0 deg and +/-180 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Duane W.

    1959-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining useful estimates of the static longitudinal stability of aircraft flying at high supersonic Mach numbers at angles of attack between 0 and +/-180 deg is explored. Existing theories, empirical formulas, and graphical procedures are employed to estimate the normal-force and pitching-moment characteristics of an example airplane configuration consisting of an ogive-cylinder body, trapezoidal wing, and cruciform trapezoidal tail. Existing wind-tunnel data for this configuration at a Mach number of 6.86 provide an evaluation of the estimates up to an angle of attack of 35 deg. Evaluation at higher angles of attack is afforded by data obtained from wind-tunnel tests made with the same configuration at angles of attack between 30 and 150 deg at five Mach numbers between 2.5 and 3.55. Over the ranges of Mach numbers and angles of attack investigated, predictions of normal force and center-of-pressure locations for the configuration considered agree well with those obtained experimentally, particularly at the higher Mach numbers.

  9. Low-speed wind-tunnel study of the high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a cranked-arrow-wing fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grafton, S. B.

    1984-01-01

    The low-speed, high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a fighter configuration incorporating a cranked arrow wing were investigated in the Langley 30- by 60-foot tunnel as part of a NASA/General Dynamics cooperative research program to investigate the application of advanced wing designs to combat aircraft. Tests were conducted on a baseline configuration and on several modified configurations. The results show that the baseline configuration exhibited a high level of maximum lift but displayed undesirable longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics at high angles of attack. Various wing modifications were made which improved the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics of the configuration at high angles of attack. However, most of the modifications were detrimental to maximum lift.

  10. Simulation model of the F/A-18 high angle-of-attack research vehicle utilized for the design of advanced control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, Mark E.; Bundick, W. Thomas; Messina, Michael D.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Carzoo, Susan W.; Yeager, Jessie C.; Beissner, Fred L., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The 'f18harv' six degree-of-freedom nonlinear batch simulation used to support research in advanced control laws and flight dynamics issues as part of NASA's High Alpha Technology Program is described in this report. This simulation models an F/A-18 airplane modified to incorporate a multi-axis thrust-vectoring system for augmented pitch and yaw control power and actuated forebody strakes for enhanced aerodynamic yaw control power. The modified configuration is known as the High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The 'f18harv' simulation was an outgrowth of the 'f18bas' simulation which modeled the basic F/A-18 with a preliminary version of a thrust-vectoring system designed for the HARV. The preliminary version consisted of two thrust-vectoring vanes per engine nozzle compared with the three vanes per engine actually employed on the F/A-18 HARV. The modeled flight envelope is extensive in that the aerodynamic database covers an angle-of-attack range of -10 degrees to +90 degrees, sideslip range of -20 degrees to +20 degrees, a Mach Number range between 0.0 and 2.0, and an altitude range between 0 and 60,000 feet.

  11. Preliminary results from a subsonic high-angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system - Design, calibration, algorithm development, and flight test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Larson, Terry J.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was installed and flight-tested on the F-18 high alpha research vehicle. This paper discusses the airdata algorithm development and composite results expressed as airdata parameter estimates and describes the HI-FADS system hardware, calibration techniques, and algorithm development. An independent empirical verification was performed over a large portion of the subsonic flight envelope. Test points were obtained for Mach numbers from 0.15 to 0.94 and angles of attack from -8.0 to 55.0 deg. Angles of sideslip ranged from -15.0 to 15.0 deg, and test altitudes ranged from 18,000 to 40,000 ft. The HI-FADS system gave excellent results over the entire subsonic Mach number range up to 55 deg angle of attack. The internal pneumatic frequency response of the system is accurate to beyond 10 Hz.

  12. Wind-tunnel static and free-flight investigation of high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a model of the EA-6B airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Hahne, David E.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel and the Langley 12-Foot Low-Speed Tunnel to identify factors contributing to a directional divergence at high angles of attack for the EA-6B airplane. The study consisted of static wind-tunnel tests, smoke and tuft flow-visualization tests, and free-flight tests of a 1/8.5-scale model of the airplane. The results of the investigation indicate that the directional divergence of the airplane is brought about by a loss of directional stability and effective dihedral at high angles of attack. Several modifications were tested that significantly alleviate the stability problem. The results of the free-flight study show that the modified configuration exhibits good dynamic stability characteristics and could be flown at angles of attack significantly higher than those of the unmodified configuration.

  13. Airfoil Lift with Changing Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Elliott G

    1927-01-01

    Tests have been made in the atmospheric wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine the effects of pitching oscillations upon the lift of an airfoil. It has been found that the lift of an airfoil, while pitching, is usually less than that which would exist at the same angle of attack in the stationary condition, although exceptions may occur when the lift is small or if the angle of attack is being rapidly reduced. It is also shown that the behavior of a pitching airfoil may be qualitatively explained on the basis of accepted aerodynamic theory.

  14. Navy and the HARV: High angle of attack tactical utility issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sternberg, Charles A.; Traven, Ricardo; Lackey, James B.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation will highlight results from the latest Navy evaluation of the HARV (March 1994) and focus primarily on the impressions from a piloting standpoint of the tactical utility of thrust vectoring. Issue to be addressed will be mission suitability of high AOA flight, visual and motion feedback cues associated with operating at high AOA, and the adaptability of a pilot to effectively use the increased control power provided by the thrust vectoring system.

  15. Investigation on Stability in Roll of Square Section Missile at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Fan, Zhaolin; Wu, Jifei; Wu, Wenhua

    An experimental investigation of the stability in roll of a square section missile at high incidence was conducted in FL-23 wind tunnel. Dynamic motions were obtained on a square section missile that is free to rotate about its longitudinal axis. Different dynamic rolling motions were observed depending on the incidence of the model sting. These dynamic regimes include damped oscillations, quasi-limit-cycle wing-rock motion, and constant rolling. A coupling numerical method was established by solving the fluid dynamics equations and the rigid-body dynamics equations synchronously in order to predict the onset and the development of uncommented motions and then explore the unsteady movement characteristics of the aircraft. The study indicates that the aircraft loss stability at high incidence is caused by the asymmetric vertex on the level fin tip liftoff and attach alternately. The computation results are in line with the experiment results.

  16. Component build-up method for engineering analysis of missiles at low-to-high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are presented for estimating the component build-up terms, with the exception of zero-lift drag, for missile airframes in steady flow and at arbitrary angles of attack and bank. The underlying and unifying bases of all these efforts are slender-body theory and its nonlinear extensions through the equivalent angle-of-attack concept. Emphasis is placed on the forces and moments which act on each of the fins, so that control cross-coupling effects as well as longitudinal and lateral-directional effects can be determined.

  17. Experimental Evaluation of the Effect of Angle-of-attack on the External Aerodynamics and Mass Capture of a Symmetric Three-engine Air-breathing Launch Vehicle Configuration at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun D.; Frate, Franco C.

    2001-01-01

    A subscale aerodynamic model of the GTX air-breathing launch vehicle was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel from Mach 2.0 to 3.5 at various angles-of-attack. The objective of the test was to investigate the effect of angle-of-attack on inlet mass capture, inlet diverter effectiveness, and the flowfield at the cowl lip plane. The flow-through inlets were tested with and without boundary-layer diverters. Quantitative measurements such as inlet mass flow rates and pitot-pressure distributions in the cowl lip plane are presented. At a 3deg angle-of-attack, the flow rates for the top and side inlets were within 8 percent of the zero angle-of-attack value, and little distortion was evident at the cowl lip plane. Surface oil flow patterns showing the shock/boundary-layer interaction caused by the inlet spikes are shown. In addition to inlet data, vehicle forebody static pressure distributions, boundary-layer profiles, and temperature-sensitive paint images to evaluate the boundary-layer transition are presented. Three-dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics calculations of the forebody flowfield are presented and show good agreement with the experimental static pressure distributions and boundary-layer profiles. With the boundary-layer diverters installed, no adverse aerodynamic phenomena were found that would prevent the inlets from operating at the required angles-of-attack. We recommend that phase 2 of the test program be initiated, where inlet contraction ratio and diverter geometry variations will be tested.

  18. Experimental Investigations of the Initial Growth of Flow Asymmetries over a Slender Body of Revolution at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yiding; Yuan, Huijing; Lee, Cunbiao

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the initial growth of flow asymmetries over a slender body of revolution at high angles of attack with natural and disturbed noses. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to investigate the flow field around the body. The experimental results show that initially different amplitudes of unsteady disturbances near the tip are established owing to the tip imperfections. These unsteady disturbances experience a super-exponential growth near the tip and continue to grow exponentially due to linear instabilities. Attachment of a piece to the tip brings a larger initial difference and extends the super-exponential growth region. Thus, the disturbance amplitudes and their differences are larger for the disturbed case than for the natural case before reaching the neutral point of linear instability. The amplified disturbances lead to different instability vortex strengths in the separated shear layers, which feed continuously into the two primary concentrated vortices. As a result, the primary vortex strengths differ which result in the initial vortex asymmetry. The experiment results demonstrate that the initial flow asymmetry arises from an asymmetric development of the boundary layer instability.

  19. Experimental investigations of the initial growth of flow asymmetries over a slender body of revolution at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yiding; Yuan, Huijing; Lee, Cunbiao

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the initial growth of flow asymmetries over a slender body of revolution at high angles of attack with natural and disturbed noses. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry was used to investigate the flow field around the body. The experimental results show that initially different amplitudes of unsteady disturbances near the tip are established owing to the tip imperfections. These unsteady disturbances experience a super-exponential growth near the tip and continue to grow exponentially due to linear instabilities. Attachment of a piece to the tip brings a larger initial difference and extends the super-exponential growth region. Thus, the disturbance amplitudes and their differences are larger for the disturbed case than for the natural case before reaching the neutral point of linear instability. The amplified disturbances lead to different instability vortex strengths in the separated shear layers, which feed continuously into the two primary concentrated vortices. As a result, the primary vortex strengths differ, which result in the initial vortex asymmetry. The experiment results demonstrate that the initial flow asymmetry arises from an asymmetric development of the boundary layer instability.

  20. Flight-Determined, Subsonic, Lateral-Directional Stability and Control Derivatives of the Thrust-Vectoring F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV), and Comparisons to the Basic F-18 and Predicted Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1999-01-01

    The subsonic, lateral-directional, stability and control derivatives of the thrust-vectoring F-1 8 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are extracted from flight data using a maximum likelihood parameter identification technique. State noise is accounted for in the identification formulation and is used to model the uncommanded forcing functions caused by unsteady aerodynamics. Preprogrammed maneuvers provided independent control surface inputs, eliminating problems of identifiability related to correlations between the aircraft controls and states. The HARV derivatives are plotted as functions of angles of attack between 10deg and 70deg and compared to flight estimates from the basic F-18 aircraft and to predictions from ground and wind tunnel tests. Unlike maneuvers of the basic F-18 aircraft, the HARV maneuvers were very precise and repeatable, resulting in tightly clustered estimates with small uncertainty levels. Significant differences were found between flight and prediction; however, some of these differences may be attributed to differences in the range of sideslip or input amplitude over which a given derivative was evaluated, and to differences between the HARV external configuration and that of the basic F-18 aircraft, upon which most of the prediction was based. Some HARV derivative fairings have been adjusted using basic F-18 derivatives (with low uncertainties) to help account for differences in variable ranges and the lack of HARV maneuvers at certain angles of attack.

  1. Effects of fuselage forebody geometry on low-speed lateral-directional characteristics of twin-tail fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, P. C.; Gilbert, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    Low-speed, static wind-tunnel tests were conducted to explore the effects of fighter fuselage forebody geometry on lateral-directional characteristics at high angles of attack and to provide data for general design procedures. Effects of eight different forebody configurations and several add-on devices (e.g., nose strakes, boundary-layer trip wires, and nose booms) were investigated. Tests showed that forebody design features such as fineness ratio, cross-sectional shape, and add-on devices can have a significant influence on both lateral-directional and longitudinal aerodynamic stability. Several of the forebodies produced both lateral-directional symmetry and strong favorable changes in lateral-directional stability. However, the same results also indicated that such forebody designs can produce significant reductions in longitudinal stability near maximum lift and can significantly change the influence of other configuration variables. The addition of devices to highly tailored forebody designs also can significantly degrade the stability improvements provided by the clean forebody.

  2. Factors Affecting Inlet-Engine Compatibility During Aircraft Departures at High Angle of Attack for an F/A -18A Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steenken, W. G.; Williams, J. G.; Yuhas, A. J.; Walsh, K. R.

    1999-01-01

    The F404-GE-400 engine powered F/A- 18A High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) was used to examine the quality of inlet airflow during departed flight maneuvers, that is, during flight outside the normal maneuvering envelope where control surfaces have little or no effectiveness. A series of six nose-left and six nose-right departures were initiated at Mach numbers between 0.3 and 0.4 at an altitude of 35 kft. The yaw rates at departure recovery were in the range of 40 to 90 degrees per second. Engine surges were encountered during three of the nose-left and one of the nose-right departures. Time-variant inlet-total-pressure distortion levels at the engine face were determined to not significantly exceed those measured at maximum angle-of-attack and - sideslip maneuvers during controlled flight. Surges as a result of inlet distortion levels were anticipated to initiate in the fan. Analysis revealed that the surges initiated in the compressor and were the result of a combination of high levels of inlet distortion and rapid changes in aircraft motion. These rapid changes in aircraft motion are indicative of a combination of engine mount and gyroscopic loads being applied to the engine structure that impact the aerodynamic stability of the compressor through changes in the rotor-to-case clearances.

  3. Flow-visualization study of the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack using a 1/48-scale model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, Stacey J.; Bjarke, Lisa J.

    1994-01-01

    A water-tunnel study on a 1/48-scale model of the X-29A aircraft was performed at the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. The water-tunnel test enhanced the results of the X-29A flight tests by providing flow-visualization data for comparison and insights into the aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft. The model was placed in the water tunnel at angles of attack of 20 to 55 deg. and with angles of sideslip from 0 to 5 deg. In general, flow-visualization techniques provided useful information on vortex formation, separation, and breakdown and their role in yaw asymmetries and tail buffeting. Asymmetric forebody vortices were observed at angles of attack greater than 30 deg. with 0 deg. sideslip and greater than 20 deg. with 5 deg. sideslip. While the asymmetric flows observed in the water tunnel did not agree fully with the flight data, they did show some of the same trends. In addition, the flow visualization indicated that the interaction of forebody vortices and the wing wake at angles of attack between 20 and 35 deg. may cause vertical-tail buffeting observed in flight.

  4. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. 2: High-wing model C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultberg, R. S.; Chu, J.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a helical flow environment utilizing a rotary balance located in the Langley spin g tunnel are presented in plotted form for a 1/6 scale, single engine, high wing, general aviation model. The configurations tested included the basic airplane and control deflections, wing leading edge devices, tail designs, and airplane components. Data are presented without analysis for an angle of attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg and clockwise and counter clockwise rotations covering a spin coefficient range from 0 to 0.9.

  5. Space shuttle: Stability and control effectiveness at high and low angles of attack and effects of variations in engine shround, fin, and drag petal configurations for the Boeing 0.008899-scale pressure-fed ballistic recoverable booster, model 979-160

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. L.; Obrien, R. G.; Oiye, M. Y.; Vanderleest, S.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were carried out in the Boeing transonic and supersonic wind tunnels on a 0.008899-scale model of a proposed pressure-fed ballistic recoverable booster (BRB) configuration. The purpose of the test program was to determine the stability and control effectiveness of the basic configuration at high and low angles of attack, and to conduct parametric studies of various engine shroud, fin, and drag petal configurations. Six-component force data and base pressure data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.35 to 4.0 at angles of attack of -5 to 25 and 55 to 85 at zero degrees sideslip and over a sideslip range of -10 to +10 at angles of attack ranging from -10 to 72.5. Two-component force data were also obtained with a fin balance on selected runs.

  6. Wall-modeled large eddy simulation of high-lift devices from low to post-stall angle of attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodart, Julien; Larsson, Johan; Moin, Parviz

    2013-11-01

    The flow around a McDonnell-Douglas 30P/30N multi-element airfoil at the flight Reynolds number of 9 million (based on chord) is computed using LES with an equilibrium wall-model with special treatment for transitional flows. Several different angles of attack are considered, up to and including stall, challenging the wall-model in several flow regimes. The maximum lift coefficient, which is generally difficult to predict with RANS approaches, is accurately predicted, as compared to experiments performed in the NASA LPT wind-tunnel. NASA grant: NNX11AI60A.

  7. Turbofan blade stresses induced by the flow distortion of a VTOL inlet at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. C.; Diedrich, J. H.; Shaw, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A 51-cm-diameter turbofan with a tilt-nacelle VTOL inlet was tested in the Lewis Research Center's 9- by 15-Ft Low Speed Wind Tunnel at velocities up to 72 m/s and angles of attack up to 120 deg. Fan-blade vibratory stress levels were investigated over a full aircraft operating range. These stresses were due to inlet air flow distortion resulting from (1) internal flow separation in the inlet, and (2) ingestion of the exterior nacelle wake. Stress levels are presented, along with an estimated safe operating envelope, based on infinite blade fatigue life.

  8. Wind-tunnel research comparing lateral control devices, particularly at high angles of attack V : spoilers and ailerons on rectangular wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Shortal, Joseph A

    1933-01-01

    This report covers the fifth of a series of systematic investigations in which lateral control devices are compared with particular reference to their effectiveness at high angles of attack. The present report deals with tests of spoilers and ordinary ailerons on rectangular Clark y wing models. In an effort to obtain satisfactory control throughout the entire angle-of-attack range that can be maintained in flight, various spoilers were tested in combination with two sizes of previously tested ordinary ailerons - one of average proportions and the other short and wide. In addition, one large spoiler was tested alone. It was found that when ailerons and spoilers are used together the full effect of both is not obtained if the spoilers are located directly in front of the ailerons. With the proper combination of spoiler and aileron, however, it is possible to obtain satisfactory rolling control up to high angles of attack (15 degrees to 20 degrees), together with favorable yawing moments and small control forces. A moderate amount of rolling control with favorable yawing moments and small control forces was obtained with the large spoiler alone.

  9. Exploratory investigation of the effects of vortex bursting on the high angle-of-attack lateral-directional stability characteristics of highly-swept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. L., Jr.; Grafton, S. B.; Yip, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    A recent low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of highly-swept wings has shown that vortex breakdown at high angles of attack can cause large destabilizing effects on static lateral-directional stability characteristics, and that the destabilizing effects of vortex breakdown can be greatly aggravated by model support strut interference effects. The present paper discusses these effects based on the results of static force tests of several highly-swept wing configurations for different wind-tunnel strut setup arrangements. Also included in the paper are photographs obtained during tuft-, smoke-, and helium-bubble flow visualization studies to indicate wing flow behavior patterns

  10. Navier-Stokes computations of the NREL airfoil using a {kappa}-{omega} turbulent model at high angles of attack

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.L.; Chang, Y.L.; Arici, O.

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional numerical simulation of the turbulent flow fields for the NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) S809 airfoil. The flow is modeled as steady, viscous, turbulent, and incompressible. The pseudo-compressible formulation is used for the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations so that a time marching scheme developed for the compressible flow can be applied directly. The turbulent flow is simulated using Wilcox`s modified {kappa}-{omega} model to account for the low Reynolds number effects near a solid wall and the model`s sensitivity to the freestream conditions. The governing equations are solved by an implicit approximate-factorization scheme. To correctly model the convection terms in the mean-flow and turbulence model equations, the symmetric TVD (Total Variational Diminishing) scheme is incorporated. The methodology developed is then applied to analyze the NREL S809 airfoil at various angles of attack ({alpha}) from 1 to 45 degrees. The accuracy of the numerical results is compared with the available Delft wind tunnel test data. For comparison, two Eppler code results at low angles of attack are also included. Depending on the value of {alpha}, preliminary results show excellent to fairly good agreement with the experimental data. Directions for future work are also discussed.

  11. Comparison of X-31 flight, wind-tunnel, and water-tunnel yawing moment asymmetries at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent R.; Croom, Mark A.; Tamrat, B. F.

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft are being used in the enhanced fighter maneuverability (EFM) research program, which is jointly funded by the (U.S.) Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and Germany's Federal Ministry of Defense (FMOD). The flight test portion of the program, which involves two aircraft, is being conducted by an International Test Organization (ITO) comprising the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the U.S. Navy, the U.S. Air Force, Rockwell International, and Deutsche Aerospace (DASA). The goals of the flight program are to demonstrate EFM technologies, investigate close-in-combat exchange ratios, develop design requirements, build a database for application to future fighter aircraft, and develop and validate low-cost prototype concepts. For longitudinal control the X-31 uses canards, symmetrical movement of the trailing-edge flaps, and pitch deflection of the thrust vectoring system. The trim, inertial coupling, and engine gyroscopic coupling compensation tasks are performed primarily by the trailing-edge flaps. For lateral-directional control the aircraft uses differential deflection of the trailing-edge flaps for roll coordination and a conventional rudder combined with the thrust vectoring system to provide yaw control. The rudder is only effective up to about 40 deg angle of attack (alpha), after which the thrust vectoring becomes the primary yaw control effector. Both the leading-edge flaps and the inlet lip are scheduled with the angle of attack to provide best performance.

  12. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Missile Configurations with Wings of Low Aspect Ratio for Various Combinations of Forebodies, Afterbodies, and Nose Shapes for Combined Angles of Attack and Sideslip at a Mach Number of 2.01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Ross B

    1957-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 4-by-4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a series of missile configurations having low-aspect-ratio wings at a Mach number of 2.01. The effects of wing plan form and size, length-diameter ratio, forebody and afterbody length, boattailed and flared afterbodies, and component force and moment data are presented for combined angles of attack and sideslip to about 28 degrees. No analysis of the data was made in this report.

  13. Computation of hypersonic laminar viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, R.; Rakich, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    Computational results, obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code, are presented for hypersonic viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones at angle of attack. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flow field resulting from spinning motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, crossflow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, crossflow separation, and vortex structure. The Magnus force and moments are also computed. Comparisons are made with other theoretical analyses based on boundary-layer and boundary-region equations, and an anomaly is discovered in the displacement thickness contribution to the Magnus force when compared with boundary-layer results. In addition, a new criterion for defining crossflow separation behind spinning bodies is introduced which generalizes the Moore-Rott-Sears criterion for two-dimensional unsteady separation. A condition which characterizes the onset of separation in the flow field is defined.

  14. A modification to linearized theory for prediction of pressure loadings on lifting surfaces at high supersonic Mach numbers and large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    A new linearized-theory pressure-coefficient formulation was studied. The new formulation is intended to provide more accurate estimates of detailed pressure loadings for improved stability analysis and for analysis of critical structural design conditions. The approach is based on the use of oblique-shock and Prandtl-Meyer expansion relationships for accurate representation of the variation of pressures with surface slopes in two-dimensional flow and linearized-theory perturbation velocities for evaluation of local three-dimensional aerodynamic interference effects. The applicability and limitations of the modification to linearized theory are illustrated through comparisons with experimental pressure distributions for delta wings covering a Mach number range from 1.45 to 4.60 and angles of attack from 0 to 25 degrees.

  15. Test data report: Low speed wind tunnel tests of a full scale, fixed geometry inlet, with engine, at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shain, W. M.

    1976-01-01

    A full scale inlet test was to be done in the NASA-ARC 40' X 80' WT to demonstrate satisfactory inlet performance at high angles of attack. The inlet was designed to match a Hamilton-Standard 55 inch, variable pitch fan, driven by a Lycoming T55-L-11A gas generator. The test was installed in the wind tunnel on two separate occasions, but mechanical failures in the fan drive gear box early in each period terminated testing. A detailed description is included of the Model, installation, instrumentation and data reduction procedures.

  16. Flow analysis for the nacelle of an advanced ducted propeller at high angle-of-attack and at cruise with boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, D. P.; Boldman, D. R.; Hughes, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    An axisymmetric panel code and a three dimensional Navier-Stokes code (used as an inviscid Euler code) were verified for low speed, high angle of attack flow conditions. A three dimensional Navier-Stokes code (used as an inviscid code), and an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes code (used as both viscous and inviscid code) were also assessed for high Mach number cruise conditions. The boundary layer calculations were made by using the results from the panel code or Euler calculation. The panel method can predict the internal surface pressure distributions very well if no shock exists. However, only Euler and Navier-Stokes calculations can provide a good prediction of the surface static pressure distribution including the pressure rise across the shock. Because of the high CPU time required for a three dimensional Navier-Stokes calculation, only the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes calculation was considered at cruise conditions. The use of suction and tangential blowing boundary layer control to eliminate the flow separation on the internal surface was demonstrated for low free stream Mach number and high angle of attack cases. The calculation also shows that transition from laminar flow to turbulent flow on the external cowl surface can be delayed by using suction boundary layer control at cruise flow conditions. The results were compared with experimental data where possible.

  17. Wind-Tunnel Investigation at a Mach Number of 2.01 of the Aerodynamic Characteristics in Combined Angles of Attack and Sideslip of Several Hypersonic Missile Configurations with Various Canard Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. B.

    1958-01-01

    An investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of several hypersonic missile configurations with various canard controls for an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg to about 28 deg at sideslip angles of about 0 deg and 4 deg at a Mach number of 2.01 has been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel. The configurations tested we re a body alone which had a ratio of length to diameter of 10, the b ody with a 10 deg flare, the body with cruciform fins of 5 deg or 15 deg apex angle, and a flare-stabilized rocket model with a modified Von Karman nose. Various canard surfaces for pitch control only were te sted on the body with the 10 deg flare and on the body with both sets of fins. The results indicated that the addition of a flared afterbody or cruciform fins produced configurations which were longitudinally and directionally stable. The body with 5 deg fins should be capable of producing higher normal accelerations than the flared body. A l l of the canard surfaces were effective longitudinal controls which produced net positive increments of normal force and pitching moments which progressively decreased with increasing angle of attack.

  18. BiGlobal linear stability analysis on low-Re flow past an airfoil at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    We perform BiGlobal linear stability analysis on flow past a NACA0012 airfoil at 16° angle of attack and Reynolds number ranging from 400 to 1000. The steady-state two-dimensional base flows are computed using a well-tested finite difference code in combination with the selective frequency damping method. The base flow is characterized by two asymmetric recirculation bubbles downstream of the airfoil whose streamwise extent and the maximum reverse flow velocity increase with the Reynolds number. The stability analysis of the flow past the airfoil is carried out under very small spanwise wavenumber β = 10-4 to approximate the two-dimensional perturbation, and medium and large spanwise wavenumbers (β = 1-8) to account for the three-dimensional perturbation. Numerical results reveal that under small spanwise wavenumber, there are at most two oscillatory unstable modes corresponding to the near wake and far wake instabilities; the growth rate and frequency of the perturbation agree well with the two-dimensional direct numerical simulation results under all Reynolds numbers. For a larger spanwise wavenumber β = 1, there is only one oscillatory unstable mode associated with the wake instability at Re = 400 and 600, while at Re = 800 and 1000 there are two oscillatory unstable modes for the near wake and far wake instabilities, and one stationary unstable mode for the monotonically growing perturbation within the recirculation bubble via the centrifugal instability mechanism. All the unstable modes are weakened or even suppressed as the spanwise wavenumber further increases, among which the stationary mode persists until β = 4.

  19. The effects of pressure sensor acoustics on airdata derived from a High-angle-of-attack Flush Airdata Sensing (HI-FADS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.

    1991-01-01

    The accuracy of a nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was verified for quasi-steady flight conditions up to 55 deg angle of attack during the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) Program. The system is a matrix of nine pressure ports arranged in annular rings on the aircraft nose. The complete airdata set is estimated using nonlinear regression. Satisfactory frequency response was verified to the system Nyquist frequency (12.5 Hz). The effects of acoustical distortions within the individual pressure sensors of the nonintrusive pressure matrix on overall system performance are addressed. To quantify these effects, a frequency-response model describing the dynamics of acoustical distortion is developed and simple design criteria are derived. The model adjusts measured HI-FADS pressure data for the acoustical distortion and quantifies the effects of internal sensor geometries on system performance. Analysis results indicate that sensor frequency response characteristics very greatly with altitude, thus it is difficult to select satisfactory sensor geometry for all altitudes. The solution used presample filtering to eliminate resonance effects, and short pneumatic tubing sections to reduce lag effects. Without presample signal conditioning the system designer must use the pneumatic transmission line to attenuate the resonances and accept the resulting altitude variability.

  20. Flight and wind-tunnel calibrations of a flush airdata sensor at high angles of attack and sideslip and at supersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A nonintrusive airdata-sensing system was calibrated in flight and wind-tunnel experiments to an angle of attack of 70 deg and to angles of sideslip of +/- 15 deg. Flight-calibration data have also been obtained to Mach 1.2. The sensor, known as the flush airdata sensor, was installed on the nosecap of an F-18 aircraft for flight tests and on a full-scale F-18 forebody for wind-tunnel tests. Flight tests occurred at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California, using the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle. Wind-tunnel tests were conducted in the 30- by 60-ft wind tunnel at the NASA LaRC, Hampton, Virginia. The sensor consisted of 23 flush-mounted pressure ports arranged in concentric circles and located within 1.75 in. of the tip of the nosecap. An overdetermined mathematical model was used to relate the pressure measurements to the local airdata quantities. The mathematical model was based on potential flow over a sphere and was empirically adjusted based on flight and wind-tunnel data. For quasi-steady maneuvering, the mathematical model worked well throughout the subsonic, transonic, and low supersonic flight regimes. The model also worked well throughout the angle-of-attack and sideslip regions studied.

  1. Flight and wind-tunnel calibrations of a flush airdata sensor at high angles of attack and sideslip and at supersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Whitmore, Stephen A.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A nonintrusive airdata-sensing system was calibrated in flight and wind-tunnel experiments to an angle of attack of 70 deg and to angles of sideslip of +/- 15 deg. Flight-calibration data have also been obtained to Mach 1.2. The sensor, known as the flush airdata sensor, was installed on the nosecap of an F-18 aircraft for flight tests and on a full-scale F-18 forebody for wind-tunnel tests. Flight tests occurred at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California, using the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle. Wind-tunnel tests were conducted in the 30- by 60-ft wind tunnel at the NASA LaRC, Hampton, Virginia. The sensor consisted of 23 flush-mounted pressure ports arranged in concentric circles and located within 1.75 in. of the tip of the nosecap. An overdetermined mathematical model was used to relate the pressure measurements to the local airdata quantities. The mathematical model was based on potential flow over a sphere and was empirically adjusted based on flight and wind-tunnel data. For quasi-steady maneuvering, the mathematical model worked well throughout the subsonic, transonic, and low supersonic flight regimes. The model also worked well throughout the angles-of-attack and -sideslip regions studied.

  2. Similarity for high angle-of-attack subsonic/transonic slender-body aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    The work of Sychev (1960) is extended to sharp-edged wings and smooth bodies. A simple fit to the correlations based on the Polhamus (1966) suction analogy is shown for several affine families of bodies with elliptical cross sections. The results suggest that simple models for nonlinear subsonic/transonic flows over not-so-slender wings and bodies can be obtained from a combination of well-known linear-theory models for the attached flow and slender-body concepts for the vortical flow.

  3. The effects of angle-of-attack indication on aircraft control in the event of an airspeed indicator malfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesser, Claas Tido

    Analysis of accident data by the Federal Aviation Administration, the National Transportation Safety Board, and other sources show that loss of control is the leading cause of aircraft accidents. Further evaluation of the data indicates that the majority of loss of control accidents are caused by the aircraft stalling. In response to these data, the Federal Aviation Administration and the General Aviation Joint Steering Committee emphasize the importance of stall and angle-of-attack awareness during flight. The high-profile crash of Air France Flight 447, in which pilots failed to recover from a self-induced stall, reinforced concerns over the need for improved stall and angle-of-attack awareness and reinvigorated interest in the debate over the effectiveness of angle-of-attack information displays. Further support for aerodynamic information in the form of an angle-of-attack indicator comes from core cognitive engineering principles. These principles argue for the provision of information about system functioning and dynamics as a means to ensure a human is always in position to recover a system when technology is unable. The purpose of this research was to empirically evaluate the importance of providing pilots with feedback about fundamental aircraft aerodynamics, especially during non-standard situations and unexpected disturbances. An experiment was conducted using a flight simulator to test the effects of in-cockpit angle-of-attack indication on aircraft control following an airspeed indicator malfunction on final approach. Participants flew a final approach with a target airspeed range of 60 to 65 knots. Once participants slowed the aircraft for final approach, the airspeed indicator needle would be stuck at an indication of 70 knots. One group of participants flew the final approach with an angle-of-attack indicator while the other group lacked such an instrument. Examination of aircraft performance data along the final approach showed that, when confronted

  4. Evaluation of a flow direction probe and a pitot-static probe on the F-14 airplane at high angles of attack and sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement performance of a hemispherical flow-angularity probe and a fuselage-mounted pitot-static probe was evaluated at high flow angles as part of a test program on an F-14 airplane. These evaluations were performed using a calibrated pitot-static noseboom equipped with vanes for reference flow direction measurements, and another probe incorporating vanes but mounted on a pod under the fuselage nose. Data are presented for angles of attack up to 63, angles of sideslip from -22 deg to 22 deg, and for Mach numbers from approximately 0.3 to 1.3. During maneuvering flight, the hemispherical flow-angularity probe exhibited flow angle errors that exceeded 2 deg. Pressure measurements with the pitot-static probe resulted in very inaccurate data above a Mach number of 0.87 and exhibited large sensitivities with flow angle.

  5. An experimental investigation of thrust vectoring two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles installed in a twin-engine fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Mason, Mary L.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine thrust vectoring capability of subscale 2-D convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles installed on a twin engine general research fighter model. Pitch thrust vectoring was accomplished by downward rotation of nozzle upper and lower flaps. The effects of nozzle sidewall cutback were studied for both unvectored and pitch vectored nozzles. A single cutback sidewall was employed for yaw thrust vectoring. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers ranging from 0 to 1.20 and at angles of attack from -2 to 35 deg. High pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust and provide values of nozzle pressure ratio up to 9.

  6. Investigation of the asymmetric aerodynamic characteristics of cylindrical bodies of revolution with variations in nose geometry and rotational orientation at angles of attack to 58 degrees and Mach numbers to 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, R. L.; Keener, E. R.; Chapman, G. T.; Claser, G.

    1979-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were conducted to investigate the side forces and yawing moments that can occur at high angles of attack and zero sideslip for cylindrical bodies of revolution. Two bodies having several tangent ogive forebodies with fineness ratios of 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 were tested. The forebodies with fineness ratios of 2.5 and 3.5 had several bluntnesses. The cylindrical afterbodies had fineness ratios of 7 and 13. The model components - tip, forebody, and afterbody - were tested in various rotational positions about their axes of symmetry. Most of the tests were conducted at a Mach number of 0.25, a Reynolds number of 0.32 x 10 to the 6th power, and with the afterbody that had a fineness ratio of 7 and with selected forebodies. The effect of Mach number was determined with the afterbody that had a fineness ratio of 13 and with selected forebodies at mach numbers from 0.25 to 2 at Reynolds number = 0.32 X 10 to the 6th power. Maximum angle of attack was 58 deg.

  7. Large-scale wind tunnel tests of a sting-supported V/STOL fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoll, F.; Minter, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A new sting model support has been developed for the NASA/Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. This addition to the facility permits testing of relatively large models to large angles of attack or angles of yaw depending on model orientation. An initial test on the sting is described. This test used a 0.4-scale powered V/STOL model designed for testing at angles of attack to 90 deg and greater. A method for correcting wake blockage was developed and applied to the force and moment data. Samples of this data and results of surface-pressure measurements are presented.

  8. Ultrasonic anemometer angle of attack errors under turbulent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, T.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements of eddy fluxes are premised on the assumption that wind speeds are measured accurately by an ultrasonic anemometer. Recently, ultrasonic anemometers have been shown to suffer errors depending on the angle of attack, which is the angle between the wind vector and the horizontal. The correction of these errors resulted in general increases in eddy fluxes. However, since the check of the angle of attack dependent error was carried out in the wind tunnel experiment, which would be under the condition of nearly laminar flow, the applicability of this correction to the field data under turbulent conditions has been questioned. In this study, angle of attack dependencies of wind speeds measured by Gill Windmaster ultrasonic anemometers were assessed by field experiment over meadow, considered to be turbulent conditions. By using five identical anemometers, two pairs of systems were prepared: two anemometers for references and one between them for tilt. The dependencies of (co)sine responses of anemometers on angles of attack of 0 to -90 degrees in 10-degree steps and 45 degrees were checked, and clarified that the angle of attack dependent errors occur also under turbulent conditions, with results similar to the wind tunnel experiments. Sine responses of vertical wind speeds depended not only on vertical angle of attack but also on horizontal wind direction, which had not been considered in previous studies. For more robust correction, alternative calibration functions were obtained empirically so as to reasonably explain our field experimental results. Applying this new correction, eddy fluxes increased substantially even over meadow, which is somewhat aerodynamically smooth compared with forests or agricultural fields.

  9. Three-dimensional flows about simple components at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, D. J.; Tobak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The structures of three dimensional separated flow about some chosen aerodynamic components at angle of attack are synthesized, holding strictly to the notion that streamlines in the external flow (viscous plus inviscid) and skin friction lines on the body surface may be considered as trajectories having properties consistent with those of continuous vector fields. Singular points in the fields are of limited number and are classified as simple nodes and saddles. Analogous flow structures at high angles of attack about blunt and pointed bodies, straight and swept wings, etc., are discussed, highlighting the formation of spiral nodes (foci) in the pattern of the skin friction lines. How local and global three dimensional separation lines originate and form is addressed, and the characteristics of both symmetric and asymmetric leeward wakes are described.

  10. Experimental aerodynamic characteristics for slender bodies with thin wings and tail at angles of attack from 0 deg to 58 deg and Mach numbers from 0.6 to 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, L. H.; Nelson, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted by wind tunnel to measure the static aerodynamic characteristics for bodies of circular and elliptic cross section with various thin flat plate wings and a thin tail consisting of horizontal and vertical parts. The wings had aspect ratios of 4 and taper ratios of about 0, 0.25, and 0.5. Two additional wings, which had taper ratios near 0.25 and aspect ratios of about 3 and 5, were also tested in combination with the bodies and tail. All wings had about the same planform area. The exposed area of the horizontal portion of the tail was about 33 to 36 percent of the exposed area of the wings. The exposed area of the vertical tail fin was about 22 to 24 percent of the exposed area of the wings. The elliptic body, with an a/b = 2 cross section, had the same length and axial distribution of cross sectional area as the circular body. The circular body had a cylindrical aftersection of fineness ratio 7, and it was tested with the wings and tail in combination with tangent ogive noses that had fineness ratios of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 5.0. In addition, an ogive nose with a rounded tip and an ogive nose with two different nose strake arrangements were used. Nineteen configuration combinations were tested at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, 1.5, and 2.0 at angles of attack from 0 to 58 deg. The Reynolds numbers, based on body base diameter, were about 4.3 X 100,000.

  11. Analysis of the longitudinal handling qualities and pilot-induced-oscillation tendencies of the High-Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA High-Angle-of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV), a modified F-18 aircraft, experienced handling qualities problems in recent flight tests at NASA Dryden Research Center. Foremost in these problems was the tendency of the pilot-aircraft system to exhibit a potentially dangerous phenomenon known as a pilot-induced oscillation (PIO). When they occur, PIO's can severely restrict performance, sharply dimish mission capabilities, and can even result in aircraft loss. A pilot/vehicle analysis was undertaken with the goal of reducing these PIO tendencies and improving the overall vehicle handling qualities with as few changes as possible to the existing feedback/feedforward flight control laws. Utilizing a pair of analytical pilot models developed by the author, a pilot/vehicle analysis of the existing longitudinal flight control system was undertaken. The analysis included prediction of overall handling qualities levels and PIO susceptability. The analysis indicated that improvement in the flight control system was warranted and led to the formulation of a simple control stick command shaping filter. Analysis of the pilot/vehicle system with the shaping filter indicated significant improvements in handling qualities and PIO tendencies could be achieved. A non-real time simulation of the modified control system was undertaken with a realistic, nonlinear model of the current HARV. Special emphasis was placed upon those details of the command filter implementation which could effect safety of flight. The modified system is currently awaiting evaluation in the real-time, pilot-in-the-loop, Dual-Maneuvering-Simulator (DMS) facility at Langley.

  12. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. 1: Low-wing model A. [fluid flow and vortices data for general aviation aircraft to determine aerodynamic characteristics for various designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultberg, R. S.; Mulcay, W.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a rotational flow environment utilizing a rotary balance are presented in plotted form for a 1/5 scale, single engine, low-wing, general aviation airplane model. The configuration tested included the basic airplane, various control deflections, tail designs, fuselage shapes, and wing leading edges. Data are presented without analysis for an angle of attack range of 8 to 90 deg and clockwise and counterclockwise rotations covering a range from 0 to 0.85.

  13. A CFD Database for Airfoils and Wings at Post-Stall Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrilli, Justin; Paul, Ryan; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Frink, Neal T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents selected results from an ongoing effort to develop an aerodynamic database from Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational analysis of airfoils and wings at stall and post-stall angles of attack. The data obtained from this effort will be used for validation and refinement of a low-order post-stall prediction method developed at NCSU, and to fill existing gaps in high angle of attack data in the literature. Such data could have potential applications in post-stall flight dynamics, helicopter aerodynamics and wind turbine aerodynamics. An overview of the NASA TetrUSS CFD package used for the RANS computational approach is presented. Detailed results for three airfoils are presented to compare their stall and post-stall behavior. The results for finite wings at stall and post-stall conditions focus on the effects of taper-ratio and sweep angle, with particular attention to whether the sectional flows can be approximated using two-dimensional flow over a stalled airfoil. While this approximation seems reasonable for unswept wings even at post-stall conditions, significant spanwise flow on stalled swept wings preclude the use of two-dimensional data to model sectional flows on swept wings. Thus, further effort is needed in low-order aerodynamic modeling of swept wings at stalled conditions.

  14. Wind-tunnel investigation of effects of wing-leading-edge modifications on the high angle-of-attack characteristics of a T-tail low-wing general-aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted in the NASA-Langley Research Center's 12-Foot Low-Speed wind Tunnel to evaluate the application of wing-leading-edge devices on the stall-departure and spin resistance characteristics of a 1/6-scale model of a T-tail general-aviation aircraft. The model was force tested with an internal strain-gauge balance to obtain aerodynamic data on the complete configuration and with a separate wing balance to obtain aerodynamic data on the outer portion of the wing. The addition of the outboard leading-edge droop eliminated the abrupt stall of the windtip and maintained or increased the resultant-force coefficient up to about alpha = 32 degrees. This change in slope of the resultant-force coefficient curve with angle of attack has been shown to be important for eliminating autorotation and for providing spin resistance.

  15. Test data report, low speed wind tunnel tests of a full scale lift/cruise-fan inlet, with engine, at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shain, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A low speed wind tunnel test of a fixed lip inlet with engine, was performed. The inlet was close coupled to a Hamilton Standard 1.4 meter, variable pitch fan driven by a lycoming T55-L-11A engine. Tests were conducted with various combinations of inlet angle of attack freestream velocities, and fan airflows. Data were recorded to define the inlet airflow separation boundaries, performance characteristics, and fan blade stresses. The test model, installation, instrumentation, test, data reduction and final data are described.

  16. Vibration Amplitude of a Flexible Filament Changes Non-Monotonically with Angle of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaydin, H. Dogus; Voesenek, Cees J.; Lentink, David; Lentink Lab Team

    2013-11-01

    Certain animals exploit the interaction of their flexible, foil-like appendages with vortices to propel themselves effectively in surrounding fluids. The interaction is reciprocal because the fluid forces deform the appendage while the appendage alters the flow. As the flow separates from a foil-like structure, it rolls-up into a vortex with a low-pressure core, which deforms the structure until the vortex is shed into the wake. A control over this interaction can provide a robust aerodynamic performance. To identify the salient parameters that control fluid-structure interactions on a deformable structure, we varied the thickness, length and angle of attack of a rubber filament in a quasi-two-dimensional flow generated using a soap-film tunnel. We resolved fluid-structure interaction by simultaneously measuring deformation of the filament and motion of particles in the fluid using high-speed cameras. We show that increasing length or decreasing diameter of the filament increases its vibration amplitude monotonically. In stark contrast, the angle of attack of the filament may alter the amplitude of vibrations in a non-monotonic way: Within a certain range of angle of attack, the filament motion and vortex shedding lock-in, i.e. become synchronized, and result in a violent flapping behavior. This response can therefore be ceased not only by decreasing but also by increasing the angle of attack at the leading edge. Such an insight can help us engineer more effective bio-inspired robots, energy harvesters, and flow control devices with vibration control.

  17. Aerothermal tests of a 12.5 percent cone at Mach 6.7 for various Reynolds numbers, angles of attack and nose shapes. [conducted in Langley 8-foot high temperature tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, R. J.; Albertson, C. W.; Hunt, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of free-stream unit Reynolds number, angle of attack, and nose shape on the aerothermal environment of a 3-ft basediameter, 12.5 deg half-angle cone were investigated in the Langley 8-foot high temperature tunnel at Mach 6.7. The average total temperature was 3300 R, the freestream unit Reynolds number ranged from 400,000 to 1,400,000 per foot, and the angle of attack ranged from 0 deg to 10 deg. Three nose configurations were tested on the cone: a 3-in-radius tip, a 1-in-radius tip on an ogive frustum, and a sharp tip on an ogive frustum. Surface-pressure and cold-wall heating-rate distributions were obtained for laminar, transitional temperature in the shock layer were obtained. The location of the start of transition moved forward both on windward and leeward sides with increasing free-stream Reynolds numbers, increasing angle of attack, and decreasing nose bluntness.

  18. Angle-of-Attack-Modulated Terminal Point Control for Neptune Aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Eric M.

    2004-01-01

    An aerocapture guidance algorithm based on a calculus of variations approach is developed, using angle of attack as the primary control variable. Bank angle is used as a secondary control to alleviate angle of attack extremes and to control inclination. The guidance equations are derived in detail. The controller has very small onboard computational requirements and is robust to atmospheric and aerodynamic dispersions. The algorithm is applied to aerocapture at Neptune. Three versions of the controller are considered with varying angle of attack authority. The three versions of the controller are evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations with expected dispersions.

  19. Angle of Attack Modulation for Mars Entry Terminal State Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafleur, Jarret M.; Cerimele, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    From the perspective of atmospheric entry, descent, and landing (EDL), one of the most foreboding destinations in the solar system is Mars due in part to its exceedingly thin atmosphere. To benchmark best possible scenarios for evaluation of potential Mars EDL system designs, a study is conducted to optimize the entry-to-terminal-state portion of EDL for a variety of entry velocities and vehicle masses, focusing on the identification of potential benefits of enabling angle of attack modulation. The terminal state is envisioned as one appropriate for the initiation of terminal descent via parachute or other means. A particle swarm optimizer varies entry flight path angle, ten bank profile points, and ten angle of attack profile points to find maximum-final-altitude trajectories for a 10 30 m ellipsled at 180 different combinations of values for entry mass, entry velocity, terminal Mach number, and minimum allowable altitude. Parametric plots of maximum achievable altitude are shown, as are examples of optimized trajectories. It is shown that appreciable terminal state altitude gains (2.5-4.0 km) over pure bank angle control may be possible if angle of attack modulation is enabled for Mars entry vehicles. Gains of this magnitude could prove to be enabling for missions requiring high-altitude landing sites. Conclusions are also drawn regarding trends in the bank and angle of attack profiles that produce the optimal trajectories in this study, and directions for future work are identified.

  20. Aerodynamic Force Characteristics of a Series of Lifting Cone and Cone-Cylinder Configurations at a Mach Number of 6.83 and Angles of Attack up to 130 Deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penland, Jim A.

    1961-01-01

    Force tests of a series of right circular cones having semivertex angles ranging from 5 deg to 45 deg and a series of right circular cone-cylinder configurations having semivertex angles ranging from 5 deg to 20 deg and an afterbody fineness ratio of 6 have been made in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 6.83, a Reynolds number of 0.24 x 10.6 per inch, and angles of attack up to 130 deg. An analysis of the results made use of the Newtonian and modified Newtonian theories and the exact theory. A comparison of the experimental data of both cone and cone-cylinder configurations with theoretical calculations shows that the Newtonian concept gives excellent predictions of trends of the force characteristics and the locations with respect to angle of attack of the points of maximum lift, maximum drag, and maximum lift-drag ratio. Both the Newtonian a.nd exact theories give excellent predictions of the sign and value of the initial lift-curve slope. The maximum lift coefficient for conical bodies is nearly constant at a value of 0.5 based on planform area for semivertex angles up to 30 deg. The maximum lift-drag ratio for conical bodies can be expected to be not greater than about 3.5, and this value might be expected only for slender cones having semivertex angles of less than 5 deg. The increments of angle of attack and lift coefficient between the maximum lift-drag ratio and the maximum lift coefficient for conical bodies decrease rapidly with increasing semivertex angles as predicted by the modified Newtonian theory.

  1. Engineering flowfield method with angle-of-attack applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Simmonds, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An approximate inviscid flowfield method has been extended to include heat-transfer predictions using a technique to account for variable-entropy edge conditions. The engineering code computes the flowfield over hyperboloids, ellipsoids, paraboloids, and sphere cones at 0 deg angle of attack (AOA). For angle-of-attack applications, an approximation to sphere-cone streamline-spreading effects on the heat transfer along the windward and leeward rays and an empirical circumferential heating technique have been incorporated also in the method. The present engineering calculations yield good comparisons with existing pressure and heating data over sphere cones even at high incidence values with the restriction that the sonic-line location remain on the spherical cap.

  2. An optical angle of attack sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, T. Kevin; Owen, F. Kevin

    A major source of transonic and supersonic wind-tunnel test data uncertainty is due to angle of attack (alpha) measurement errors caused by unknown sting and balance deflections under load. A novel laser-based instrument has been developed to enable continuous time-dependent alpha measurements to be made without signal dropout. Detectors capable of 0.01-deg resolution over an 18-deg range and 0.03-deg resolution over a 44-deg range with time-dependent outputs of 60 Hz have been developed. This capability is sufficient to provide accurate real-time alpha information for correlation with model balance measurements during transport and fighter model testing. Proof-of-concept experiments, along with the results of recent measurements conducted at the NASA Ames 9 x 7-ft supersonic wind tunnel, are presented. Experiments were also conducted to determine the reliable range, sensitivity, and long-term stability of the instrument.

  3. Experimental static aerodynamic forces and moments at high subsonic speeds on a missile model during simulated launching from the midsemispan location of a 45 degree sweptback wing-fuselage-pylon combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, William J; King, Thomas, Jr

    1957-01-01

    An investigation was made at high subsonic speeds in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the static aerodynamic forces and moments on a missile model during simulated launching from the midsemispan location of a 45 degree sweptback wing-fuselage-pylon combination. The results indicated significant variations in all the aerodynamic components with changes in chordwise location of the missile. Increasing the angle of attack caused increases in the induced effects on the missile model because of the wing-fuselage-pylon combination. Increasing the Mach number had little effect on the variations of the missile aerodynamic characteristics with angle of attack except that nonlinearities were incurred at smaller angles of attack for the higher Mach numbers. The effects of finite wing thickness on the missile characteristics, at zero angle of attack, increase with increasing Mach number. The effects of the pylon on the missile characteristics were to causeincreases in the rolling-moment variation with angle of attack and a negative displacement of the pitching-moment curves at zero angle of attack. The effects of skewing the missile in the lateral direction relative to and sideslipping the missile with the wing-fuselage-pylon combination were to cause additional increments in side force at zero angle of attack. For the missile yawing moments the effects of changes in skew or sideslip angles were qualitatively as would be expected from consideration of the isolated missile characteristics, although there existed differences in theyawing-moment magnitudes.

  4. The effect of turbulence models on the numerical prediction of the flowfield about a prolate spheroid at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Cummings, Russell M.; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1990-01-01

    The F3D thin-layer Navier-Stokes code presently used to numerically investigate the three-dimensional separated flow about a prolate spheroid at high incidence analyzes the effect of different turbulence models on the flowfield solution and the characteristics of the predicted flow. The Johnson-King (1984) model is applied in order to evaluate the importance of modeling nonequilibrium effects in predicting flow about a slender body at high incidence; the computations in question are for steady-state, fully turbulent flow. Insight is gained into the effects of turbulence models on flow characteristics, and model effects on the accurate prediction of highly separated and vortical flows about a slender body are demonstrated.

  5. Yaw Control At High Angles Of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Rao, Dhanvada M.

    1988-01-01

    Hinged, conformal forebody strakes provide control when rudders become ineffective. Device consists of symmetric pair of longitudinally hinged strakes designed to fold completely into forebody contour. Strakes rotate individually out into external flow. Asymmetric flow produced by deployed strake generates sideward force causing aircraft to yaw.

  6. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Hull, G F; Dryden, H L

    1925-01-01

    This report deals with an experimental investigation of the aerodynamical characteristics of airfoils at high speeds. Lift, drag, and center of pressure measurements were made on six airfoils of the type used by the air service in propeller design, at speeds ranging from 550 to 1,000 feet per second. The results show a definite limit to the speed at which airfoils may efficiently be used to produce lift, the lift coefficient decreasing and the drag coefficient increasing as the speed approaches the speed of sound. The change in lift coefficient is large for thick airfoil sections (camber ratio 0.14 to 0.20) and for high angles of attack. The change is not marked for thin sections (camber ratio 0.10) at low angles of attack, for the speed range employed. At high speeds the center of pressure moves back toward the trailing edge of the airfoil as the speed increases. The results indicate that the use of tip speeds approaching the speed of sound for propellers of customary design involves a serious loss in efficiency.

  7. Sensor for measuring instantaneous angle of attack of helicopter blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    Systematic investigations were performed on a variety of probes to determine their potential for possible application as sensors attached to helicopter blades to measure both the instantaneous angle of attack as well as the dynamic head during actual flight operations. After some preliminary considerations a sensor of essentially spherical shape, about 30 mm in diameter, was designed. The sensor was provided with three pressure ports, and it housed two pressure transducers required for sensing the prevailing pressures acting outside on the surface. The sensors were subsequently tested in the laboratory under a variety of flow conditions to determine their aerodynamic characteristics. Two series of tests were performed: in the first series the sensor was fixed in space while exposed to steady uniform flow, while in the second series the sensor was made to oscillate, thus simulating the cyclic pitch change of the helicopter blades. While the cyclic pitch frequencies were of about the same magnitude as encountered in flight, the flow velocities during tests fell well below those experienced in a rotating blade. The tests showed that the sensors performed satisfactorily under low subsonic flow conditions with frequencies not exceeding five Hz.

  8. Supersonic flow around circular cones at angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, Antonio

    1951-01-01

    The properties of conical flow without axial symmetry are analyzed. The flow around cones of circular cross section at small angles of attack is determined by correctly considering the effect of the entropy gradients in the flow.

  9. Hypersonic slender-wedge analysis with gradual change in angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Joshi, S. P.; Rodkiewicz, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of a narrow cross-section wedge wing moving at a high Mach number and subjected to an angle of attack changing exponentially with time is investigated. This type of wedge wing is commonly employed as a lifting surface in hypersonic vehicles. The time history of wall shear, heat transfer, displacement thickness, and viscous induced pressure are determined. Results show that for the same change in angle of attack, the flow attains the final steady state much faster when the change is exponential than when the change is made impulsively. In addition, the unsteady character of the flow is primarily confined to the initial stages of the change in the angle of attack.

  10. Angle-of-attack validation of a new zonal CFD method for airfoil simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, Sungyul; Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.

    1990-01-01

    The angle-of-attack validation of a new concept suggested by Summa (1990) for coupling potential and viscous flow methods has been investigated for two-dimensional airfoil simulations. The fully coupled potential/Navier-Stokes code, ZAP2D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program 2D), has been used to compute the flow field around an NACA 0012 airfoil for a range of angles of attack up to stall at a Mach number of 0.3 and a Reynolds number of 3 million. ZAP2D calculation for various domain sizes from 25 to 0.12 chord lengths are compared with the ARC2D large domain solution as well as with experimental data.

  11. Fourth High Alpha Conference, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the Fourth High Alpha Conference was to focus on the flight validation of high angle-of-attack technologies and provide an in-depth review of the latest high angle-of-attack activities. Areas that were covered include: high angle-of-attack aerodynamics, propulsion and inlet dynamics, thrust vectoring, control laws and handling qualities, tactical utility, and forebody controls.

  12. Fourth High Alpha Conference, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the Fourth High Alpha Conference, held at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center on July 12-14, 1994, was to focus on the flight validation of high angle of attack technologies and provide an in-depth review of the latest high angle of attack activities. Areas that were covered include high angle of attack aerodynamics, propulsion and inlet dynamics, thrust vectoring, control laws and handling qualities, and tactical utility.

  13. Fourth High Alpha Conference, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Thie goal of this conference was to focus on the flight validation of high-angle-of-attack technologies and provide an in-depth review of the latest high-angle-of-attack activities. Areas covered include: (1) high-angle-of-attack aerodynamics; (2) propulsion and inlet dynamics; (3) thrust vectoring; (4) control laws and handling qualities; (5) tactical utility; and (6) forebody controls.

  14. Impact of high-alpha aerodynamics on dynamic stability parameters of aircraft and missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malcolm, G. N.

    1981-01-01

    The aerodynamic phenomena associated with high angles of attack and their effects on the dynamic stability characteristics of airplane and missile configurations are examined. Information on dynamic effects is limited. Steady flow phenomena and their effects on the forces and moments are reviewed. The effects of asymmetric vortices and of vortex bursting on the dynamic response of flight vehicles are reviewed with respect to their influence on: (1) nonlinearity of aerodynamic coefficients with attitude, rates, and accelerations; (2) cross coupling between longitudinal and lateral directional models of motion; (3) time dependence and hysteresis effects; (4) configuration dependencey; and (5) mathematical modeling of the aerodynamics.

  15. Determination of an angle of attack sensor correction for a general aviation airplane at large angles of attack as determined from wind tunnel and flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moul, T. M.; Taylor, L. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation into the flow correction for an angle of attack sensor mounted ahead of the wing tip of a general aviation research airplane has been conducted at the Langley Research Center. This correction has been determined in wind tunnels using a full-scale model up to angles of attack of 45 deg and a 1/5-scale model up to 80 deg angle of attack. The flow correction has also been obtained in flight by using a standard technique at low angles of attack and in spinning flight at larger angles of attack, by using both a simple approximate technique and a parameter estimation technique. The results show the correction is significant, reaching 10 deg at a measured angle of attack of about 90 deg. The flow correction was sensitive to the angle of sideslip at measured angles of attack greater than 60 deg and was not influenced by wing leading-edge modifications or aileron deflections.

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics of a propeller powered high lift semispan wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takallu, M. A.; Gentry, G. L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the engine/airframe integration aerodynamics for potential high-lift aircraft configurations. The model consisted of a semispan wing with a double-isolated flap system and a Krueger leading edge device. The advanced propeller and the powered nacelle were tested and aerodynamic characteristics of the combined system are presented. It was found that the lift coefficient of the powered wing could be increased by the propeller slipstream when the rotational speed was increased and high-lift devices were deployed. Moving the nacelle/propeller closer to the wing in the vertical direction indicated higher lift augmentation than a shift in the longitudinal direction. A pitch-down nacelle inclination enhanced the lift performance of the system much better than vertical and horizontal variation of the nacelle locations and showed that the powered wing can sustain higher angles of attack near maximum lift performance.

  17. High-attitude low-speed static aerodynamic characteristics of an F-4D fighter airplane model with leading edge slats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monfort, J. C.; Whitcomb, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of two-position leading edge slats on the low speed aerodynamic characteristics of a swept wing twin-jet supersonic fighter airplane model at high angle of attack and various Reynolds numbers. The investigation was performed at a Mach number of 0.20 over a range of angle of attack from 19 deg to 90 deg and angles of slideslip from -10 deg to 30 deg and Reynolds numbers from 1.97 to 13.12 million per meter.

  18. Technical evaluation report on the fluid dynamics panel Symposium on High Angle of attack aerodynamics. [slender wings, bodies of revolution, and body-wing configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    An overview is presented of 32 formal papers and 7 open session papers. Topics covered include: (1) studies of configurations of practical interest; (2) mathematical modelling and supporting investigations of slender wings, bodies of revolution, and body-wing configurations; (3) design methods; and (4) air intakes.

  19. Prediction of Unsteady Blade Surface Pressures on an Advanced Propeller at an Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The numerical solution of the unsteady, three-dimensional, Euler equations is considered in order to obtain the blade surface pressures of an advanced propeller at an angle of attack. The specific configuration considered is the SR7L propeller at cruise conditions with a 4.6 deg inflow angle corresponding to the plus 2 deg nacelle tilt of the Propeller Test Assessment (PTA) flight test condition. The results indicate nearly sinusoidal response of the blade loading, with angle of attack. For the first time, detailed variations of the chordwise loading as a function of azimuthal angle are presented. It is observed that the blade is lightly loaded for part of the revolution and shocks appear from hub to about 80 percent radial station for the highly loaded portion of the revolution.

  20. Prediction of unsteady blade surface pressures on an advanced propeller at an angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The paper considers the numerical solution of the unsteady, three-dimensional, Euler equations to obtain the blade surface pressures of an advanced propeller at an angle of attack. The specific configuration considered is the SR7L propeller at cruise conditions with a 4.6 deg inflow angle corresponding to the +2 deg nacelle tilt of the Propeller Test Assessment (PTA) flight test condition. The results indicate nearly sinusoidal response of the blade loading, with angle of attack. For the first time, detailed variations of the chordwise loading as a function of azimuthal angle are presented. It is observed that the blade is lightly loaded for part of the revolution and shocks appear from hub to about 80 percent radial station for the highly loaded portion of the revolution.

  1. Potential flow past axisymmetric bodies at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Shu, J.-Y.

    1984-01-01

    The Karamcheti (1966) suggestion concerning the use of higher order singularity techniques has been developed for the calculation of incompressible flow past an axisymmetric body at angle of attack. Attention is given to the results of a convergence study using this axial singularity method, where solution accuracy has been investigated for ellipsoids of slenderness ratio in the 1-10 range for both axial and inclined flow. Effects of singularity type, element number and size distribution, and singularity line inset distance, are noted, and a paneling scheme is developed which yields accurate results for the class of axisymmetric bodies having continuous body slopes with discontinuous curvature jumps.

  2. Applications of low lift to drag ratio aerobrakes using angle of attack variation for control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Several applications of low lift to drag ratio aerobrakes are investigated which use angle of attack variation for control. The applications are: return from geosynchronous or lunar orbit to low Earth orbit; and planetary aerocapture at Earth and Mars. A number of aerobrake design considerations are reviewed. It was found that the flow impingement behind the aerobrake and the aerodynamic heating loads are the primary factors that control the sizing of an aerobrake. The heating loads and other loads, such as maximum acceleration, are determined by the vehicle ballistic coefficient, the atmosphere entry conditions, and the trajectory design. Several formulations for defining an optimum trajectory are reviewed, and the various performance indices that can be used are evaluated. The 'nearly grazing' optimal trajectory was found to provide the best compromise between the often conflicting goals of minimizing the vehicle propulsive requirements and minimizing vehicle loads. The relationship between vehicle and trajectory design is investigated further using the results of numerical simulations of trajectories for each aerobrake application. The data show the sensitivity of the trajectories to several vehicle parameters and atmospheric density variations. The results of the trajectory analysis show that low lift to drag ratio aerobrakes, which use angle of attack variation for control, can potentially be used for a wide range of aerobrake applications.

  3. Numerical simulation of the effects of variation of angle of attack and sweep angle on vortex breakdown over delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekaterinaris, J. A.; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1990-01-01

    In the present investigation of the vortical flowfield structure over delta wings at high angles of attack, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical simulations were conducted to predict the complex leeward flowfield characteristics; these encompass leading-edge separation, secondary separation, and vortex breakdown. Attention is given to the effect on solution accuracy of circumferential grid-resolution variations in the vicinity of the wing leading edge, and well as to the effect of turbulence modeling on the solutions. When a critical angle-of-attack was reached, bubble-type vortex breakdown was found. With further angle-of-attack increase, a change from bubble-type to spiral-type vortex breakdown was predicted by the numerical solution.

  4. High speed aerodynamics of upper surface blowing aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Larry D.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the high speed aerodynamics of Upper Surface Blowing (USB) aircraft configurations has been conducted to accurately define the magnitude and causes of the powered configuration cruise drag. A highly instrumented wind tunnel model of a realistic USB configuration was used which permitted parametric variations in the number and spanwise location of the nacelles and was powered with two turbofan engine simulators. The tests conducted in the Ames 14 Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel examined 10 different configurations at Mach numbers from 0.5 to 0.775, fan nozzle pressure ratios from 1.1 to 2.1 and angles of attack from -4 to 6 degrees. Measured force data is presented which indicates the cruise drag penalty associated with each configuration and surface pressure contour plots are used to illustrate the underlying flowfield physics. It was found that all of the tested configurations suffered from a severe drag penalty which increased with freestream Mach number, power setting and angle of attack and was associated with the presence of strong shocks and regions of separated flow in the wing/nacelle junction regions.

  5. Comparison of Angle of Attack Measurements for Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas, W.; Hoppe, John C.

    2001-01-01

    Two optical systems capable of measuring model attitude and deformation were compared to inertial devices employed to acquire wind tunnel model angle of attack measurements during the sting mounted full span 30% geometric scale flexible configuration of the Northrop Grumman Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) installed in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The overall purpose of the test at TDT was to evaluate smart materials and structures adaptive wing technology. The optical techniques that were compared to inertial devices employed to measure angle of attack for this test were: (1) an Optotrak (registered) system, an optical system consisting of two sensors, each containing a pair of orthogonally oriented linear arrays to compute spatial positions of a set of active markers; and (2) Video Model Deformation (VMD) system, providing a single view of passive targets using a constrained photogrammetric solution whose primary function was to measure wing and control surface deformations. The Optotrak system was installed for this test for the first time at TDT in order to assess the usefulness of the system for future static and dynamic deformation measurements.

  6. Fourier functional analysis for unsteady aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Chin, Suei

    1991-01-01

    A method based on Fourier analysis is developed to analyze the force and moment data obtained in large amplitude forced oscillation tests at high angles of attack. The aerodynamic models for normal force, lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients are built up from a set of aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions at different frequencies. Based on the aerodynamic models of harmonic data, the indicial responses are formed. The final expressions for the models involve time integrals of the indicial type advocated by Tobak and Schiff. Results from linear two- and three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic theories as well as test data for a 70-degree delta wing are used to verify the models. It is shown that the present modeling method is accurate in producing the aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions and the ramp type motions. The model also produces correct trend for a 70-degree delta wing in harmonic motion with different mean angles-of-attack. However, the current model cannot be used to extrapolate data to higher angles-of-attack than that of the harmonic motions which form the aerodynamic model. For linear ramp motions, a special method is used to calculate the corresponding frequency and phase angle at a given time. The calculated results from modeling show a higher lift peak for linear ramp motion than for harmonic ramp motion. The current model also shows reasonably good results for the lift responses at different angles of attack.

  7. Low-Speed Tests of Semispan-Wing Models at Angles of Attack from 0 to 180 degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, David G.

    1959-01-01

    Semispan-wing models were tested at angles of attack from 0 to 180 deg at low subsonic speeds. Eight plan forms were considered, both swept and unswept with aspect ratios ranging from 2 to 6. Except for a delta-wing model of aspect ratio 2. all models had a taper ratio of 0.5 and an NACA 64AO10 airfoil section. The delta-wing model had an NACA 0005 (modified) airfoil section. With two exceptions, the models were tested both with and without a full-span trailing-edge flap deflected 25 deg. The Reynolds numbers based on the mean aerodynamic chord were between 1.5 and 2.2 million. Lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are presented as functions of angle of attack. Approximate corrections for the effects of blockage were applied to the data.

  8. Tactical missile aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J. (Editor); Nielsen, Jack N. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on tactical missile aerodynamics discusses autopilot-related aerodynamic design considerations, flow visualization methods' role in the study of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics, low aspect ratio wing behavior at high angle-of-attack, supersonic airbreathing propulsion system inlet design, missile bodies with noncircular cross section and bank-to-turn maneuvering capabilities, 'waverider' supersonic cruise missile concepts and design methods, asymmetric vortex sheding phenomena from bodies-of-revolution, and swept shock wave/boundary layer interaction phenomena. Also discussed are the assessment of aerodynamic drag in tactical missiles, the analysis of supersonic missile aerodynamic heating, the 'equivalent angle-of-attack' concept for engineering analysis, the vortex cloud model for body vortex shedding and tracking, paneling methods with vorticity effects and corrections for nonlinear compressibility, the application of supersonic full potential method to missile bodies, Euler space marching methods for missiles, three-dimensional missile boundary layers, and an analysis of exhaust plumes and their interaction with missile airframes.

  9. Flight Investigation of a Roll-stabilized Missile Configuration at Varying Angles of Attack at Mach Numbers Between 0.8 and 1.79

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarovsky, Jacob; Gardiner, Robert A

    1957-01-01

    A missile research model was flown at supersonic speed to determine the quality of automatic roll stabilization at varying angles of attack. Aerodynamic rolling and pitching derivatives were determined from the flight record. It was concluded that the combination of the gyro-actuated automatic pilot with wing-tip ailerons provided adequate roll stabilization under conditions encountered in flight.

  10. Progress in high-lift aerodynamic calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.

    1993-01-01

    The current work presents progress in the effort to numerically simulate the flow over high-lift aerodynamic components, namely, multi-element airfoils and wings in either a take-off or a landing configuration. The computational approach utilizes an incompressible flow solver and an overlaid chimera grid approach. A detailed grid resolution study is presented for flow over a three-element airfoil. Two turbulence models, a one-equation Baldwin-Barth model and a two equation k-omega model are compared. Excellent agreement with experiment is obtained for the lift coefficient at all angles of attack, including the prediction of maximum lift when using the two-equation model. Results for two other flap riggings are shown. Three-dimensional results are presented for a wing with a square wing-tip as a validation case. Grid generation and topology is discussed for computing the flow over a T-39 Sabreliner wing with flap deployed and the initial calculations for this geometry are presented.

  11. Rotary balance data for a single engine general aviation design having a high aspect-ratio canard for an angle-of-attack range of 30 deg to 90 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulcay, W. J.; Rose, R.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a helical flow environment utilizing a rotary balance located in the Langley spin tunnel are presented in plotted form. The configurations tested included the basic airplane, various control deflections, two canard locations, and wing leading edge modifications, as well as airplane components.

  12. Review of Research On Angle-of-Attack Indicator Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vie, Lisa R.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a literature review to determine the potential benefits of a display of angle-of-attack (AoA) on the flight deck of commercial transport that may aid a pilot in energy state awareness, upset recovery, and/or diagnosis of air data system failure. This literature review encompassed an exhaustive list of references available and includes studies on the benefits of displaying AoA information during all phases of flight. It also contains information and descriptions about various AoA indicators such as dial, vertical and horizontal types as well as AoA displays on the primary flight display and the head up display. Any training given on the use of an AoA indicator during the research studies or experiments is also included for review

  13. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. 2: Influence of horizontal tail location for Model D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, B.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of horizontal tail location on the rotational flow aerodynamics is discussed for a 1/6-scale general aviation airplane model. The model was tested using various horizontal tail positions, with both a high and a low-wing location and for each of two body lengths. Data were measured, using a rotary balance, over an angle-of-attack range of 8 to 90 deg, and for clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations covering an Omega b/2V range of 0 to 0.9.

  14. Prediction of noise field of a propfan at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1991-01-01

    A method for predicting the noise field of a propfan operating at an angle of attack to the oncoming flow is presented. The method takes advantage of the high-blade-count of the advanced propeller designs to provide an accurate and efficient formula for predicting their noise field. The formula, which is written in terms of the Airy function and its derivative, provides a very attractive alternative to the use of numerical integration. A preliminary comparison shows rather favorable agreement between the predictions from the present method and the experimental data.

  15. High supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of five irregular planform wings with systematically varying wing fillet geometry tested in the NASA/LaRC 4-foot UPWT (LEG 2) (LA45A/B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical aerodynamic program to develop predesign guides for irregular planform wings is reported. The benefits are linearization of subsonic lift curve slope to high angles of attack and avoidance of subsonic pitch instabilities at high lift by proper tailoring of the planform fillet wing combination while providing the desired hypersonic trim angle and stability. The two prime areas of concern are to optimize shuttle orbiter landing and entry characteristics. Basic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics at high supersonic speeds are developed.

  16. Numerical analysis on the effect of angle of attack on evaluating radio-frequency blackout in atmospheric reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Minseok; Kihara, Hisashi; Abe, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Yusuke

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation model that considers the effect of the angle of attack was developed to evaluate plasma flows around reentry vehicles. In this simulation model, thermochemical nonequilibrium of flowfields is considered by using a four-temperature model for high-accuracy simulations. Numerical simulations were performed for the orbital reentry experiment of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and the results were compared with experimental data to validate the simulation model. A comparison of measured and predicted results showed good agreement. Moreover, to evaluate the effect of the angle of attack, we performed numerical simulations around the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator of the European Space Agency by using an axisymmetric model and a three-dimensional model. Although there were no differences in the flowfields in the shock layer between the results of the axisymmetric and the three-dimensional models, the formation of the electron number density, which is an important parameter in evaluating radio-frequency blackout, was greatly changed in the wake region when a non-zero angle of attack was considered. Additionally, the number of altitudes at which radio-frequency blackout was predicted in the numerical simulations declined when using the three-dimensional model for considering the angle of attack.

  17. Effect of angle of attack on rotor trailing-edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, S.-T.; George, A. R.

    1984-12-01

    Previous analyses of boundary layer trailing edge noise for large rotors have used zero blade angle of attack as input data. Attention is presently given to the important effects of blade angle of attack changes on rotor trailing edge noise in the case of a UH-1 helicopter. The primary effect is in the low to mid-frequency range, where noise level increases with angle of attack.

  18. Effect of underwing aft-mounted nacelles on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a high-wing transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeyounis, W. K.; Patterson, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a propulsion/airframe integration program, tests were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the longitudinal aerodynamic effects of installing flow through engine nacelles in the aft underwing position of a high wing transonic transfer airplane. Mixed flow nacelles with circular and D-shaped inlets were tested at free stream Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.85 and angles of attack from -2.5 deg to 4.0 deg. The aerodynamic effects of installing antishock bodies on the wing and nacelle upper surfaces as a means of attaching and supporting nacelles in an extreme aft position were investigated.

  19. F-15 rotary balance data for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, B.

    1982-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a rotational flow environment, utilizing a rotary balance are presented in plotted form for a 1/12 scale F-15 airplane model. The configurations tested included the buildup of airplane components and the basic airplane with various control deflections. Data are presented for all configurations without analysis for an angle of attack range of 8 to 90 deg, and clockwise and counterclockwise rotations covering an omega b/2V range from 0 to 0.4. Selected configurations are presented over an extended omega b/2V range from 0 to 0.9.

  20. Trailing Edge Noise-- Effect of Angle of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goody, Michael

    2003-03-01

    The broadband sound radiated by turbulent pressures that are convected past a sharp edge (i.e. trailing edge) can be estimated in three basic steps: (1) estimate the mean flow field and boundary layer development, (2) use this information to estimate the turbulent pressure fluctuations at the edge, and (3) use a Greens function to transform the convected pressure into the scattered pressure that is radiated as broadband sound. Moderately changing the angle of attack of a hydrofoil modifies the first two steps of this estimation process. Several methods, of varying level of complexity (and cost), for handling these modifications are presented for a NACA 0017 hydrofoil in water. The mean flow and boundary layer development are estimated (a) by assuming that the airfoil behaves as a flat plate and using standard boundary layer empirical formulas, (b) by using a panel method for the mean flow field and a simple boundary layer code to estimate the boundary layer development, and (c) by performing a RANS simulation of the flow field and boundary layer development. The turbulent pressure fluctuations are estimated using (a) an empirical model and (b) a statistical model. The performance of each method is discussed.

  1. Tests of Aerodynamically Heated Multiweb Wing Structures in a Free Jet at Mach Number 2: Five Aluminum-Alloy Models of 20-Inch Chord with 0.064-Inch-Thick Skin, 0.025-Inch-Thick Webs, and Various Chordwise Stiffening at 2 deg Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trussell, Donald H.; Thomson, Robert G.

    1960-01-01

    An experimental study was made on five 2024-T3 aluminum-alloy multiweb wing structures (MW-2-(4), MW-4-(3), mw-16, MW-17, and MW-18), at a Mach number of 2 and an angle of attack of 2 deg under simulated supersonic flight conditions. These models, of 20-inch chord and semi-span and 5-percent-thick circular-arc airfoil section, were identical except for the type and amount of chordwise stiffening. One model with no chordwise ribs between root and tip bulkhead fluttered and failed dynamically partway through its test. Another model with no chordwise ribs (and a thinner tip bulkhead) experienced a static bending type of failure while undergoing flutter. The three remaining models with one, two, or three chordwise ribs survived their tests. The test results indicate that the chordwise shear rigidity imparted to the models by the addition of even one chordwise rib precludes flutter and subsequent failure under the imposed test conditions. This paper presents temperature and strain data obtained from the tests and discusses the behavior of the models.

  2. Post-Stall Aerodynamic Modeling and Gain-Scheduled Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Fen; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Kim, Sungwan

    2005-01-01

    A multidisciplinary research e.ort that combines aerodynamic modeling and gain-scheduled control design for aircraft flight at post-stall conditions is described. The aerodynamic modeling uses a decambering approach for rapid prediction of post-stall aerodynamic characteristics of multiple-wing con.gurations using known section data. The approach is successful in bringing to light multiple solutions at post-stall angles of attack right during the iteration process. The predictions agree fairly well with experimental results from wind tunnel tests. The control research was focused on actuator saturation and .ight transition between low and high angles of attack regions for near- and post-stall aircraft using advanced LPV control techniques. The new control approaches maintain adequate control capability to handle high angle of attack aircraft control with stability and performance guarantee.

  3. Investigation of load prediction on the Mexico rotor using the technique of determination of the angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wenzhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Zhu, Weijun

    2012-05-01

    Blade element moment (BEM) is a widely used technique for prediction of wind turbine aerodynamics performance, the reliability of airfoil data is an important factor to improve the prediction accuracy of aerodynamic loads and power using a BEM code. The method of determination of angle of attack on rotor blades developed by SHEN, et al is successfully used to extract airfoil data from experimental characteristics on the MEXICO (Model experiments in controlled conditions) rotor. Detailed surface pressure and particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow fields at different rotor azimuth positions are examined to determine the sectional airfoil data. The present technique uses simultaneously both PIV data and blade pressure data that include the actual flow conditions (for example, tunnel effects), therefore it is more advantageous than other techniques which only use the blade loading (pressure data). The extracted airfoil data are put into a BEM code, and the calculated axial and tangential forces are compared to both computations using BEM with Glauert's and SHEN's tip loss correction models and experimental data. The comparisons show that the present method of determination of angle of attack is correct, and the re-calculated forces have good agreements with the experiment.

  4. Inviscid Flow Computations of the Shuttle Orbiter for Mach 10 and 15 and Angle of Attack 40 to 60 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Sutton, Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report documents the results of a computational study done to compute the inviscid longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of the Space Shuttle Orbiter for Mach numbers 10 and 15 at angles of attack of 40, 50, 55, and 60 degrees. These computations were done to provide limited aerodynamic data in support of the Orbiter contingency abort task. The Orbiter had all the control surfaces in the undeflected position. The unstructured grid software FELISA was used for these computations with the equilibrium air option. Normal and axial force coefficients and pitching moment coefficients were computed. The hinge moment coefficients of the body flap and the inboard and outboard elevons were also computed. These results were compared with Orbiter Air Data Book (OADB) data and those computed using GASP. The comparison with the GASP results showed very good agreement in Cm and Ca at all the points. The computed axial force coefficients were smaller than those computed by GASP. There were noticeable differences between the present results and those in the OADB at angles of attack greater than 50 degrees.

  5. Micro air vehicle motion tracking and aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, Daniel V.

    exhibited quasi-steady effects caused by small variations in the angle of attack. The quasi-steady effects, or small unsteady effects, caused variations in the aerodynamic characteristics (particularly incrementing the lift curve), and the magnitude of the influence depended on the angle-of-attack rate. In addition to nominal gliding flight, MAVs in general are capable of flying over a wide flight envelope including agile maneuvers such as perching, hovering, deep stall and maneuvering in confined spaces. From the captured motion trajectories, the aerodynamic characteristics during the numerous unsteady flights were gathered without the complexity required for unsteady wind tunnel tests. Experimental results for the MAVs show large flight envelopes that included high angles of attack (on the order of 90 deg) and high angular rates, and the aerodynamic coefficients had dynamic stall hysteresis loops and large values. From the large number of unsteady high angle-of-attack flights, an aerodynamic modeling method was developed and refined for unsteady MAV flight at high angles of attack. The method was based on a separation parameter that depended on the time history of the angle of attack and angle-of-attack rate. The separation parameter accounted for the time lag inherit in the longitudinal characteristics during dynamic maneuvers. The method was applied to three MAVs and showed general agreement with unsteady experimental results and with nominal gliding flight results. The flight tests with the MAVs indicate that modern motion tracking systems are capable of capturing the flight trajectories, and the captured trajectories can be used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics. From the captured trajectories, low Reynolds number MAV flight is explored in both nominal gliding flight and unsteady high angle-of-attack flight. Building on the experimental results, a modeling method for the longitudinal characteristics is developed that is applicable to the full flight

  6. Missile aerodynamics; Proceedings of the Conference, Monterey, CA, Oct. 31-Nov. 2, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, M.R.; Nixon, D.; Dillenius, M.F.E.

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses the development status of predictive capabilities for missile aerodynamic characteristics, the application of experimental techniques to missile-release problems, prospective high-performance missile designs, the use of lateral jet controls for missile guidance, and the integration of stores on modern tactical aircraft. Also discussed are semiempirical aerodynamic methods for preliminary design, high angle-of-attack behavior for an advanced missile, and the dynamic derivatives of missiles and fighter-type configurations at high angles-of-attack.

  7. Flow Control of the Stingray UAV at Low Angles of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, John; Vaccaro, John; Amitay, Michael

    2007-11-01

    The effectiveness of active flow control, via synthetic jets and steady blowing jets, on the aerodynamic performance of the Stingray UAV was investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel. Global flow measurements were conducted using a six component sting balance, static pressure, and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Using active control for trimming the Stingray UAV in pitch and roll at low angles of attack has similar effects to those with conventional control effectors. The synthetic jets were able to alter the local streamlines through the formation of a quasi-steady interaction region on the suction surface of the vehicle's wing. Phase locked data were acquired to provide insight into the growth, propagation, and decay of the synthetic jet impulse and its interaction with the cross-flow. The changes induced on the moments and forces can be proportionally controlled by either changing the momentum coefficient or by driving the synthetic jets with a pulse modulation waveform. This can lead the way for future development of closed-loop control models.

  8. Measurements of the unsteady vortex flow over a wing-body at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debry, Benoit; Komerath, Narayanan M.; Liou, Shiuh-Guang; Caplin, J.; Lenakos, Jason

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the unsteady vortex flow over a wing-body at high angles of attack were carried out on a generic test model of a pointed body of revolution with double-delta wings. Vortex patterns and trajectories were quantified from digitized laser sheet video images. The velocity-field measurements showed the jetlike flow in the unburst vortex, unsteady secondary structures below the primary core, and then the reversed flow in the burst vortex. Results of hot-film anemometry revealed the presence of peak frequencies in the velocity spectra over the wing and near the trailing edge, which varied linearly with freestream speed and increased as the measurement point moved upstream. Good Strouhal correlation was found with previous results obtained for a smaller generic wing-body model.

  9. Design of a two-element airfoil in a range of angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abzalilov, D. F.

    2008-11-01

    A numerical-analytical solution of an inverse boundary-value problem of aerohydrodynamics is obtained for a two-element airfoil in the full formulation, based on the velocity distribution defined on the sought airfoil contours in a range of angles of attack. It is demonstrated that flow separation does not occur in the entire range considered for a specified non-separated velocity distribution on the upper surfaces at the maximum angle of attack and on the lower surface at the minimum angle of attack. An example of constructing a sectional airfoil is given; verification of the results obtained is performed with the use of the Fluent software package.

  10. Hypersonic crossflow instability and transition on a circular cone at angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Christopher A. C.

    To investigate the effect of Reynolds number, tunnel noise and surface roughness on the crossflow instability, a 7° half-angle cone was tested at 6° angle of attack with temperature-sensitive paint. All tests were performed in the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. The temperature-sensitive paint was successfully used to qualitatively visualize boundary-layer transition and stationary crossflow vortices. Tunnel noise was found to have a significant effect on the crossflow instability, promoting transition when the tunnel noise was high. Transition was never realized under fully quiet flow. Increasing Reynolds number also proved to have an effect on the crossflow instability. Under quiet flow, an increase in Reynolds number created larger amplitude stationary vortices, while under noisy flow the increase in Reynolds number caused transition to move upstream. The effect of surface roughness on the crossflow instability was also studied. This surface roughness effect was studied in two ways: by varying the frustum roughness and by varying the nosetip roughness. The frustum roughness was varied by altering the finish of the temperature-sensitive paint. The nosetip roughness was varied by polishing the stainless steel nosetip. For both cases, it was found that the magnitude and the azimuthal variations of the forward-facing step at the nosetip-frustum junction was most likely dominating the formation of the streamwise vorticity. Thus, before the effect of distributed surface roughness can be studied, the forward-facing step needs to be rendered negligible. Preliminary tests were also performed with the 7° half-angle cone placed at 0° angle of attack in order to validate a procedure for obtaining quantitative heat transfer from temperature-sensitive paint. However, this effort is not yet successful.

  11. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Hu, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    A Fourier analysis method was developed to analyze harmonic forced-oscillation data at high angles of attack as functions of the angle of attack and its time rate of change. The resulting aerodynamic responses at different frequencies are used to build up the aerodynamic models involving time integrals of the indicial type. An efficient numerical method was also developed to evaluate these time integrals for arbitrary motions based on a concept of equivalent harmonic motion. The method was verified by first using results from two-dimensional and three-dimensional linear theories. The developed models for C sub L, C sub D, and C sub M based on high-alpha data for a 70 deg delta wing in harmonic motions showed accurate results in reproducing hysteresis. The aerodynamic models are further verified by comparing with test data using ramp-type motions.

  12. Dependence of propeller efficiency on angle of attack of propeller blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borck, Hermann

    1921-01-01

    In order to determine the maximum and the most favorable pitch for a propeller, it was found desirable to investigate the dependence of propeller efficiency on the angle of attack of the propeller blade. The results of a few experiments are given to show that propeller blades conduct themselves just like airplane wings with reference to the dependence of their efficiency on their angle of attack.

  13. Wind-tunnel calibration and requirements for in-flight use of fixed hemispherical head angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were conducted with three different fixed pressure-measuring hemispherical head sensor configurations which were strut-mounted on a nose boom. The tests were performed at free-stream Mach numbers from 0.2 to 3.6. The boom-angle-of-attack range was -6 to 15 deg, and the angle-of-sideslip range was -6 to 6 deg. The test Reynolds numbers were from 3.28 million to 65.6 million per meter. The results were used to obtain angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip calibration curves for the configurations. Signal outputs from the hemispherical head sensor had to be specially processed to obtain accurate real-time angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip measurements for pilot displays or aircraft systems. Use of the fixed sensors in flight showed them to be rugged and reliable and suitable for use in a high temperature environment.

  14. Increase in the maximum lift of an airplane wing due to a sudden increase in its effective angle of attack resulting from a gust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Max

    1932-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests are described, in which the angle of attack of a wing model was suddenly increased (producing the effect of a vertical gust) and the resulting forces were measured. It was found that the maximum lift coefficient increases in proportion to the rate of increase in the angle of attack. This fact is important for the determination of the gust stresses of airplanes with low wing loading. The results of the calculation of the corrective factor are given for a high-performance glider and a light sport plane of conventional type.

  15. Effect of location of aft-mounted nacelles on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a high-wing transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeyounis, William K.; Patterson, James C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a propulsion/airframe integration program at Langley Research Center, tests were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of locating flow-through mixed flow engine nacelles in several aft underwing positions on the longitudinal aerodynamics of a high wing transport airplane. D-shaped inlet nacelles were used in the test. Some configurations with antishock bodies and with nacelle toe-in were also tested. Data were obtained for a free stream Mach number range of 0.70 to 0.85 and a model angle-of-attack range from -2.5 to 4.0 degrees.

  16. Rotary balance data and analysis for the X-29A airplane for an angle-of-attack range of 0 deg to 90 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralston, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    The rotational aerodynamic characteristics are discussed for a 1/8 scale model of the X-29A airplane. The effects of rotation on the aerodynamics of the basic model were determined, as well as the influence of airplane components, various control deflections, and several forebody modifications. These data were measured using a rotary balance, over an angle of attack range of 0 to 90 deg, for clockwise and counter clockwise rotations covering an omega b/2V range of 0 to 0.4.

  17. Theoretical Evaluation of the Pressures, Forces, and Moments at Hypersonic Speeds Acting on Arbitrary Bodies of Revolution Undergoing Separate and Combined Angle-of-attack and Pitching Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Kenneth

    1961-01-01

    Equations based on Newtonian impact theory have been derived and a computational procedure developed with the aid of several design-type charts which enable the determination of the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on arbitrary bodies of revolution undergoing either separate or combined angle-of-attack and pitching motions. Bodies with axially increasing and decreasing cross-sectional area distributions are considered; nose shapes may be sharp, blunt, or flat faced. The analysis considers variations in angle of attack from -90 degrees to 90 degrees and allows for both positive and negative pitching rates of arbitrary magnitude. The results are also directly applicable to bodies in either separate or combined sideslip and yawing maneuvers.

  18. Assessment of aerodynamic performance of V/STOL and STOVL fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of V/STOL and STOVL fighter/attack aircraft was assessed. Aerodynamic and propulsion/airframe integration activities are described and small-and large-scale research programs are considered. Uncertainties affecting aerodynamic performance that are associated with special configuration features resulting from the V/STOL requirement are addressed. Example uncertainties related to minimum drag, wave drag, high angle of attack characteristics, and power-induced effects. Engine design configurations from several aircraft manufacturers are reviewed.

  19. Assessment of aerodynamic performance of V/STOL and STOVL fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of V/STOL and STOVL fighter/attack aircraft was assessed. Aerodynamic and propulsion/airframe integration activities are described and small and large scale research programs are considered. Uncertainties affecting aerodynamic performance that are associated with special configuration features resulting from the V/STOL requirement are addressed. Example uncertainties relate to minimum drag, wave drag, high angle of attack characteristics, and power induced effects.

  20. Lateral aerodynamic parameters extracted from flight data for the F-8C airplane in maneuvering flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suit, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    Flight test data are used to extract the lateral aerodynamic parameters of the F-8C airplane at moderate to high angles of attack. The data were obtained during perturbations of the airplane from steady turns with trim normal accelerations from 1.5g to 3.0g. The angle-of-attack variation from trim was negligible. The aerodynamic coefficients extracted from flight data were compared with several other sets of coefficients, and the extracted coefficients resulted in characteristics for the Dutch roll mode (at the highest angles of attack) similar to those of a set of coefficients that have been the basis of several simulations of the F-8C.

  1. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  2. Effect of angle of attack on an optimized vortex induced vibrated energy harvester: A numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Md. Rejaul; Chowdhury, M. Arshad Zahangir; Goswami, Anjan

    2016-07-01

    A two-dimensional numerical study of flow induced vibration is reported in this paper to investigate flow over a semi-cricular D-shaped bluff body oriented at different angles-of-attack to determine an optimized design for energy harvesting. Bluff body structure governs fluid streamlines; therefore obtaining a suitable range of "lock in frequency" for energy harvesting purpose is dependent on refining and optimizing bluff body's shape and structure. A cantilever based novel energy harvester design incorporates the suitable angle-of-attack for optimized performance. This optimization was done by performing computations for 30°, 60° and 90° angles-of-attack. The frequency of vibration of the body was calculated at different Reynolds Number. A Fast Fourier Transformation yielded frequency of vortex shedding. From the wake velocity profile, lift oscillation and frequency of vortex shedding is estimated. Strouhal numbers of the body were analyzed at different angles-of-attack. A higher synchronized bandwidth of shedding frequencies is an indication of an optimized harvester design at different Reynolds number. The `D' shaped bluff bodies (with angle of attack of 30°,60° and 90°) are more suitable than that of cylindrical shaped bluff bodies. The research clearly stated that, bluff bodies shape has a prominent influence on vortex induced vibration and semicircular bluff body gives the highest vibration or energy under stated conditions.

  3. Flight Dynamics of an Aeroshell Using an Attached Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Axdahl, Erik; Wilhite, Alan

    2009-01-01

    An aeroelastic analysis of the behavior of an entry vehicle utilizing an attached inflatable aerodynamic decelerator during supersonic flight is presented. The analysis consists of a planar, four degree of freedom simulation. The aeroshell and the IAD are assumed to be separate, rigid bodies connected with a spring-damper at an interface point constraining the relative motion of the two bodies. Aerodynamic forces and moments are modeled using modified Newtonian aerodynamics. The analysis includes the contribution of static aerodynamic forces and moments as well as pitch damping. Two cases are considered in the analysis: constant velocity flight and planar free flight. For the constant velocity and free flight cases with neutral pitch damping, configurations with highly-stiff interfaces exhibit statically stable but dynamically unstable aeroshell angle of attack. Moderately stiff interfaces exhibit static and dynamic stability of aeroshell angle of attack due to damping induced by the pitch angle rate lag between the aeroshell and IAD. For the free-flight case, low values of both the interface stiffness and damping cause divergence of the aeroshell angle of attack due to the offset of the IAD drag force with respect to the aeroshell center of mass. The presence of dynamic aerodynamic moments was found to influence the stability characteristics of the vehicle. The effect of gravity on the aeroshell angle of attack stability characteristics was determined to be negligible for the cases investigated.

  4. Development of a method of analysis and computer program for calculating the inviscid flow about the windward surfaces of space shuttle configurations at large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslen, S. H.

    1974-01-01

    A general method developed for the analysis of inviscid hypersonic shock layers is discussed for application to the case of the shuttle vehicle at high (65 deg) angle of attack. The associated extensive subsonic flow region caused convergence difficulties whose resolution is discussed. It is required that the solution be smoother than anticipated.

  5. Effects of Angle of Attack and Velocity on Trailing Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2006-01-01

    Trailing edge (TE) noise measurements for a NACA 63-215 airfoil model are presented, providing benchmark experimental data for a cambered airfoil. The effects of flow Mach number and angle of attack of the airfoil model with different TE bluntnesses are shown. Far-field noise spectra and directivity are obtained using a directional microphone array. Standard and diagonal removal beamforming techniques are evaluated employing tailored weighting functions for quantitatively accounting for the distributed line character of TE noise. Diagonal removal processing is used for the primary database as it successfully removes noise contaminates. Some TE noise predictions are reported to help interpret the data, with respect to flow speed, angle of attack, and TE bluntness on spectral shape and peak levels. Important findings include the validation of a TE noise directivity function for different airfoil angles of attack and the demonstration of the importance of the directivity function s convective amplification terms.

  6. A two camera video imaging system with application to parafoil angle of attack measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Bennett, Mark S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a two-camera, video imaging system for the determination of three-dimensional spatial coordinates from stereo images. This system successfully measured angle of attack at several span-wise locations for large-scale parafoils tested in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Measurement uncertainty for angle of attack was less than 0.6 deg. The stereo ranging system was the primary source for angle of attack measurements since inclinometers sewn into the fabric ribs of the parafoils had unknown angle offsets acquired during installation. This paper includes discussions of the basic theory and operation of the stereo ranging system, system measurement uncertainty, experimental set-up, calibration results, and test results. Planned improvements and enhancements to the system are also discussed.

  7. Effects of Angle of Attack and Velocity on Trailing Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    Trailing edge (TE) noise measurements for a NACA 63-215 airfoil model are presented, providing benchmark experimental data for a cambered airfoil. The effects of flow Mach number and angle of attack of the airfoil model with different TE bluntnesses are shown. Far-field noise spectra and directivity are obtained using a directional microphone array. Standard and diagonal removal beamforming techniques are evaluated employing tailored weighting functions for quantitatively accounting for the distributed line character of TE noise. Diagonal removal processing is used for the primary database as it successfully removes noise contaminates. Some TE noise predictions are reported to help interpret the data, with respect to flow speed, angle of attack, and TE bluntness on spectral shape and peak levels. Important findings include the validation of a TE noise directivity function for different airfoil angles of attack and the demonstration of the importance of the directivity function s convective amplification terms.

  8. Aerodynamic performance of osculating-cones waveriders at high altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Rick Evan

    The steady-state aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional waverider configurations immersed in hypersonic rarefied flows are investigated. Representative geometries are generated using an inverse design procedure, the method of osculating cones, which defines an exit plane shock shape and approximates the flow properties of the compression surface by assuming that each spanwise station along the shock profile lies within a region of locally conical flow. Vehicle surface and flow field properties are predicted using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, a probabilistic numerical scheme in which simulated molecules are followed through representative collisions with each other and solid surfaces, and subsequent deterministic displacement. The aerodynamic properties of high- and low-Reynolds number waverider geometries, optimized for maximum lift-to-drag ratio and subject to mission-oriented constraints, are contrasted with results from reference caret and delta wings with similar internal volumes to quantify the relevance and advantage of the waverider concept at high altitudes. The high-Reynolds number waverider, optimized for the continuum regime at Minfinity = 4 and Reinfinity = 250 million, was the focus of recent wind tunnel testing for near on-design and off-design conditions, including low subsonic speeds. The present work extends the previous analyses into the high-altitude regime. The low-Reynolds number waverider, optimized at Minfinity = 20 and Reinfinity = 2.5 million, is studied to determine if optimization potential exists for a high-Mach number waverider at high altitudes. A characteristic length of 5 m is assumed for both waverider configurations, representative of a hypersonic missile concept. The geometries are aerodynamically evaluated over a parametric space consisting of an altitude variation of 95 km to 150 km and an angle of attack range of --5° to 10°. The effect of off-design Mach number on the performance of the high

  9. Improved Correction System for Vibration Sensitive Inertial Angle of Attack Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Bradley L.; Finley, Tom D.

    2000-01-01

    Inertial angle of attack (AoA) devices currently in use at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) are subject to inaccuracies due to centrifugal accelerations caused by model dynamics, also known as sting whip. Recent literature suggests that these errors can be as high as 0.25 deg. With the current AoA accuracy target at LaRC being 0.01 deg., there is a dire need for improvement. With other errors in the inertial system (temperature, rectification, resolution, etc.) having been reduced to acceptable levels, a system is currently being developed at LaRC to measure and correct for the sting-whip-induced errors. By using miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometers and magnetohydrodynamic rate sensors, not only can the total centrifugal acceleration be measured, but yaw and pitch dynamics in the tunnel can also be characterized. These corrections can be used to determine a tunnel's past performance and can also indicate where efforts need to be concentrated to reduce these dynamics. Included in this paper are data on individual sensors, laboratory testing techniques, package evaluation, and wind tunnel test results on a High Speed Research (HSR) model in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel.

  10. Investigation on the movement of vortex burst position with dynamically changing angle of attack for a schematic deltawing in a watertunnel with correlation to similar studies in windtunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolffelt, Karl W.

    1987-06-01

    The requirements for modern military aircraft to maintain good handling qualities at very high angles of attack is one of many reasons why an increased knowledge is necessary regarding the aerodynamic behavior of vortex flows at nonstationary conditions. Linearized theory as it has been utilized in flight mechanics simulation using damping derivatives derived from forced oscillation technique, for example, may no longer be valid at such conditions. With this background some investigations have been made by SAAB-SCANIA with the aim to study the hysteresis effects for nonstationary vortex flows. A schematic delta-wing model which could also be equipped with a similar canard wing has been tested in a water tunnel. The model was supported in the tunnel by a simple mechanism by which it could be forced to move in one of four different modes, pitching or plunging with either ramp or harmonic motion. The flow over the model was visualized with air bubbles and sequences were recorded on videotape. The sequences were analyzed and the movements of the leading edge vortex burst have been studied with the main interest focused on the hysteresis effects.

  11. Impingement of Water Droplets on NACA 65A004 Airfoil at 8 deg Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brun, R. J.; Gallagher, H. M.; Vogt, D. E.

    1954-01-01

    The trajectories of droplets in the air flowing past an NACA 65AO04 airfoil at an angle of attack of 8 deg were determined.. The amount of water in droplet form impinging on the airfoil, the area of droplet impingement, and the rate of droplet impingement per unit area on the airfoil surface were calculated from the trajectories and presented to cover a large range of flight and atmospheric conditions. These impingement characteristics are compared briefly with those previously reported for the same airfoil at an angle of attack of 4 deg.

  12. Tactical missile aerodynamics - General topics. Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics. Vol. 141

    SciTech Connect

    Hemsch, M.J. )

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses the development history of tactical missile airframes, aerodynamic considerations for autopilot design, a systematic method for tactical missile design, the character and reduction of missile observability by radar, the visualization of high angle-of-attack flow phenomena, and the behavior of low aspect ratio wings at high angles of attack. Also discussed are airbreathing missile inlets, 'waverider' missile configurations, bodies with noncircular cross-sections and bank-to-turn missiles, asymmetric flow separation and vortex shedding on bodies-of-revolution, unsteady missile flows, swept shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions, pylon carriage and separation of stores, and internal stores carriage and separation.

  13. Wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P G; Miller, L S; Quandt, G A

    1995-04-01

    Five trailing-edge devices were investigated to determine their potential as wind-turbine aerodynamic brakes, and for power modulation and load alleviation. Several promising configurations were identified. A new device, called the spoiler-flap, appears to be the best alternative. It is a simple device that is effective at all angles of attack. It is not structurally intrusive, and it has the potential for small actuating loads. It is shown that simultaneous achievement of a low lift/drag ratio and high drag is the determinant of device effectiveness, and that these attributes must persist up to an angle of attack of 45{degree}. It is also argued that aerodynamic brakes must be designed for a wind speed of at least 45 m/s (100 mph).

  14. The N.A.C.A. Recording Tachometer and Angle of Attack Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, H J E

    1923-01-01

    This note contains photos and descriptions of airplane flight apparatus for use in conjunction with a recording galvanometer. In measuring the angle of attack a variable resistance is used, being controlled by a vane in the airstream. Thus it is only necessary to measure the change of resistance.

  15. Wind tunnel force tests in wing systems through large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Harris, Thomas A

    1928-01-01

    Force tests on a systematic series of wing systems over a range of angle of attack from minus forty-five degrees to plus ninety degrees are covered in this report. The investigation was made on monoplane and biplane wing models to determine the effects of variations of tip shape, aspect ratio, flap setting, stagger, gap, decalage, sweepback, and airfoil profile.

  16. Heat transfer characteristics of staggered wing-shaped tubes bundle at different angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Ibrahiem, Emad Z.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2014-08-01

    An experimental and numerical study has been conducted to clarify heat transfer characteristics and effectiveness of a cross-flow heat exchanger employing staggered wing-shaped tubes at different angels of attack. The water-side Rew and the air-side Rea were at 5 × 102 and at from 1.8 × 103 to 9.7 × 103, respectively. The tubes arrangements were employed with various angles of attack θ1,2,3 from 0° to 330° at the considered Rea range. Correlation of Nu, St, as well as the heat transfer per unit pumping power (ɛ) in terms of Rea and design parameters for the studied bundle were presented. The temperature fields around the staggered wing-shaped tubes bundle were predicted by using commercial CFD FLUENT 6.3.26 software package. Results indicated that the heat transfer increased with the angle of attack in the range from 0° to 45°, while the opposite was true for angles of attack from 135° to 180°. The best thermal performance and hence the efficiency η of studied bundle occurred at the lowest Rea and/or zero angle of attack. Comparisons between the experimental and numerical results of the present study and those, previously, obtained for similar available studies showed good agreements.

  17. Rotary balance data for an F-15 model with conformal fuel tanks for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, B.

    1982-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a rotational flow environment, utilizing a rotary balance, are presented in plotted form for a 1/12 scale conformal fuel tank equipped F-15 airplane model. The configurations tested included in the buildup of airplane components and the basic airplane with various control deflections. Data are presented for all configurations without analysis for an angle of attack range of 8 to 90 deg, and clockwise and counterclockwise rotations covering an omega b/2V range from 0 to 0.4. Selected configurations are presented over an extended omega b/2V range from 0 to 0.9.

  18. Rotary balance data for a single-engine agricultural airplane configuration for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulcay, W. J.; Chu, J.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a helical flow environment utilizing a rotary balance located in the Langley spin tunnel are presented in plotted form for a 1/10 scale single engine agricultural airplane model. The configurations tested include the basic airplane, various wing leading edge and wing tip devices, elevator, aileron, and rudder control settings, and other modifications. Data are presented without analysis for an angle of attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg, and clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations covering a spin coefficient range from 0 to .9.

  19. Analysis of flight data from a High-Incidence Research Model by system identification methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, James G.; Klein, Vladislav

    1989-01-01

    Data partitioning and modified stepwise regression were applied to recorded flight data from a Royal Aerospace Establishment high incidence research model. An aerodynamic model structure and corresponding stability and control derivatives were determined for angles of attack between 18 and 30 deg. Several nonlinearities in angles of attack and sideslip as well as a unique roll-dominated set of lateral modes were found. All flight estimated values were compared to available wind tunnel measurements.

  20. Three-dimensional compressible laminar boundary layers on sharp and blunt circular cones at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinski, Z.; Davis, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    A method for solving the three-dimensional compressible laminar boundary layer equations for the case of a circular cone and a sphere-cone body at an angle of attack is presented. The governing equations are modified by a similarity type transformation and then transformed into a Crocco-type form. The resulting set of equations is solved simultaneously by an iterative method using an implicit finite difference scheme by means of an efficient algorithm for equations of tridiagonal form. The effects of streamline swallowing on a sharp cone are included by introducing the true inviscid edge conditions at the distance from the wall equal to the boundary layer thickness. The validity of the approach was established by comparison of the computational results with similar results by other methods and with experimental data. It was concluded that at sufficiently high Mach number and moderate to large angles of attack, the streamline swallowing effects on a sharp cone result in higher values of skin friction and heat transfer as compared with the classical results for constant entropy.

  1. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 42 deg swept high-wing model having a double-slotted flap system and a supercritical airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, P. G.; Goodson, K. W.

    1974-01-01

    A low-speed investigation was conducted over an angle-of-attack range from about -4 deg to 20 deg in the Langley V/STOL tunnel to determine the effects of a double-slotted flap, high-lift system on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 42 deg swept high-wing model having a supercritical airfoil. The wing had an aspect ratio of 6.78 and a taper ratio of 0.36; the double-slotted flap consisted of a 35-percent-chord flap with a 15-percent-chord vane. The model was tested with a 15-percent-chord leading-edge slat.

  2. Introductory remarks. [fluid mechanics research for the National Transonic Facility: theoretical aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessow, A.

    1977-01-01

    Suggested fluid mechanics research to be conducted in the National Transonic Facility include: wind tunnel calibration; flat plate skin friction, flow visualization and measurement techniques; leading edge separation; high angle of attack separation; shock-boundary layer interaction; submarine shapes; low speed studies of cylinder normal to flow; and wall interference effects. These theoretical aerodynamic investigations will provide empirical inputs or validation data for computational aerodynamics, and increase the usefulness of existing wind tunnels.

  3. Low-speed longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of the X-31 configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Gatlin, Gregory M.; Paulson, John W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a 19 pct. scale model of the X-31 configuration was completed in the Langley 14 x 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This study was performed to determine the static low speed aerodynamic characteristics of the basic configuration over a large range of angle of attack and sideslip and to study the effects of strakes, leading-edge extensions (wing-body strakes), nose booms, speed-brake deployment, and inlet configurations. The ultimate purpose was to optimize the configuration for high angle of attack and maneuvering-flight conditions. The model was tested at angles of attack from -5 to 67 deg and at sideslip angles from -16 to 16 deg for speeds up to 190 knots (dynamic pressure of 120 psf).

  4. Time-marching transonic flutter solutions including angle-of-attack effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.; Bennett, R. M.; Whitlow, W., Jr.; Seidel, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Transonic aeroelastic solutions based upon the transonic small perturbation potential equation were studied. Time-marching transient solutions of plunging and pitching airfoils were analyzed using a complex exponential modal identification technique, and seven alternative integration techniques for the structural equations were evaluated. The HYTRAN2 code was used to determine transonic flutter boundaries versus Mach number and angle-of-attack for NACA 64A010 and MBB A-3 airfoils. In the code, a monotone differencing method, which eliminates leading edge expansion shocks, is used to solve the potential equation. When the effect of static pitching moment upon the angle-of-attack is included, the MBB A-3 airfoil can have multiple flutter speeds at a given Mach number.

  5. Doppler radiation sensing of Shuttle angle of attack and TAS during entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foale, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    Space Shuttle true airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip angle are currently derived from inertial guidance information. A new method is proposed which offers a potential improvement in Shuttle safety during entry. Angle of attack, sideslip angle and true airspeed could be measured directly at heights from 120 km down to 20 km by Doppler sensing three independent true airspeeds along the Shuttle body axes. Two types of Doppler measurement sensors, employing either passive detection of atmospheric radiation or coherent detection of scattered laser light are discussed. The proposed technique is essentially solid-state and robust, and is well suited for use in future small hypersonic vehicles that require flight control in the Upper Atmosphere of the earth or in probes destined for the other planets.

  6. Investigation of nose bluntness and angle of attack effects on slender bodies in viscous hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehgal, A. K.; Tiwari, S. N.; Singh, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Hypersonic flows over cones and straight biconic configurations are calculated for a wide range of free stream conditions in which the gas behind the shock is treated as perfect. Effect of angle of attack and nose bluntness on these slender cones in air is studied extensively. The numerical procedures are based on the solution of complete Navier-Stokes equations at the nose section and parabolized Navier-Stokes equations further downstream. The flow field variables and surface quantities show significant differences when the angle of attack and nose bluntness are varied. The complete flow field is thoroughly analyzed with respect to velocity, temperature, pressure, and entropy profiles. The post shock flow field is studied in detail from the contour plots of Mach number, density, pressure, and temperature. The effect of nose bluntness for slender cones persists as far as 200 nose radii downstream.

  7. Laser velocimeter survey about a NACA 0012 wing at low angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, D. R.; Meyers, J. F.; Young, W. H., Jr.; Hepner, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel with a laser velocimeter to obtain measurements of airflow velocities about a wing at low angles of attack. The applicability of the laser velocimeter technique for this purpose in the V/STOL tunnel was demonstrated in this investigation with measurement precision bias calculated at -1.33 percent to 0.91 percent and a random uncertainty calculated at + or - 0.47 percent. Free stream measurements were obtained with this device and compared with velocity calculations from pitot static probe data taken near the laser velocimeter measurement location. The two measurements were in agreement to within 1 percent. Velocity measurement results about the centerline at 0.6 degrees angle of attack were typically those expected. At 4.75 degrees, the velocity measurements indicated that a short laminar separation bubble existed near the leading edge with an oscillating shear layer.

  8. Formation of asymmetric separated flow past slender bodies of revolution at large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goman, M. G.; Khrabrov, A. N.

    1986-01-01

    The paper examines the problem of determining stationary positions of pairs of vortices of unequal intensity in the flow behind a cylinder modeling the axisymmetric separated flow past a slender body at large angles of attack. The possible asymmetric stationary positions of two vortices are calculated, and their stability with respect to small perturbations is determined. Bifurcations of the flow field with changes in vortex intensity are analyzed.

  9. Evaluation of electrolytic tilt sensors for measuring model angle of attack in wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a laboratory evaluation of electrolytic tilt sensors as potential candidates for measuring model attitude or angle of attack in wind tunnel tests are presented. The performance of eight electrolytic tilt sensors was compared with that of typical servo accelerometers used for angle-of-attack measurements. The areas evaluated included linearity, hysteresis, repeatability, temperature characteristics, roll-on-pitch interaction, sensitivity to lead-wire resistance, step response time, and rectification. Among the sensors being evaluated, the Spectron model RG-37 electrolytic tilt sensors have the highest overall accuracy in terms of linearity, hysteresis, repeatability, temperature sensitivity, and roll sensitivity. A comparison of the sensors with the servo accelerometers revealed that the accuracy of the RG-37 sensors was on the average about one order of magnitude worse. Even though a comparison indicates that the cost of each tilt sensor is about one-third the cost of each servo accelerometer, the sensors are considered unsuitable for angle-of-attack measurements. However, the potential exists for other applications such as wind tunnel wall-attitude measurements where the errors resulting from roll interaction, vibration, and response time are less and sensor temperature can be controlled.

  10. Comparison of theoretically predicted lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics with full-scale wind tunnel data on the ATLIT airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griswold, M.; Roskam, J.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for predicting lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of light twin engine propeller-driven airplanes. This method is applied to the Advanced Technology Light Twin Engine airplane. The calculated characteristics are correlated against full-scale wind tunnel data. The method predicts the sideslip derivatives fairly well, although angle of attack variations are not well predicted. Spoiler performance was predicted somewhat high but was still reasonable. The rudder derivatives were not well predicted, in particular the effect of angle of attack. The predicted dynamic derivatives could not be correlated due to lack of experimental data.

  11. Wind tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of symmetrically deflected ailerons of the F-8C airplane. [conducted in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gera, J.

    1977-01-01

    A .042-scale model of the F-8C airplane was investigated in a transonic wind tunnel at high subsonic Mach numbers and a range of angles of attack between-3 and 20 degrees. The effect of symmetrically deflected ailerons on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics was measured. Some data were also obtained on the lateral control effectiveness of asymmetrically deflected horizontal tail surfaces.

  12. Effect of nozzle lateral spacing, engine interfairing shape, and angle of attack on the performance of a twin-jet afterbody model with cone plug nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.

    1973-01-01

    Twin-jet afterbody models were investigated by using two balances to measure separately the thrust minus total axial force and the afterbody drag at Mach numbers from 0 to 1.3. Angle of attack was varied from minus 2 deg to 8.5 deg. Translating shroud cone plug nozzles were tested at dry-power and maximum-afterburning-power settings with a high-pressure air system used to provide jet total-pressure ratios up to 9.0. Two nozzle lateral spacings were studied by using afterbodies with several interfairing shapes. The close- and wide-spaced afterbodies had identical cross-sectional area distributions when similar interfairings were installed on each. The results show that the highest overall performance was obtained with the close-spaced afterbody and basic interfairings. Increasing angle of attack decreased performance for all configurations and conditions investigated.

  13. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle-of-attack range of 20 to 90 deg. 3: Influence of control deflection on predicted model D spin modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralston, J. N.; Barnhart, B. P.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of control deflections on the rotational flow aerodynamics and on predicted spin modes is discussed for a 1/6-scale general aviation airplane model. The model was tested for various control settings at both zero and ten degree sideslip angles. Data were measured, using a rotary balance, over an angle-of-attack range of 30 deg to 90 deg, and for clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations covering an omegab/2V range of 0 to 0.5.

  14. GASP- General Aviation Synthesis Program. Volume 3: Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D.

    1978-01-01

    Aerodynamics calculations are treated in routines which concern moments as they vary with flight conditions and attitude. The subroutines discussed: (1) compute component equivalent flat plate and wetted areas and profile drag; (2) print and plot low and high speed drag polars; (3) determine life coefficient or angle of attack; (4) determine drag coefficient; (5) determine maximum lift coefficient and drag increment for various flap types and flap settings; and (6) determine required lift coefficient and drag coefficient in cruise flight.

  15. Reynolds number effects on the transonic aerodynamics of a slender wing-body configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.; Cundiff, Jeffrey S.

    1989-01-01

    Aerodynamic forces and moments for a slender wing-body configuration are summarized from an investigation in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The results include both longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic properties as well as slideslip derivatives. Results were selected to emphasize Reynolds number effects at a transonic speed although some lower speed results are also presented for context. The data indicate nominal Reynolds number effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients and more pronounced effects for the lateral-directional aerodynamic coefficients. The Reynolds number sensitivities for the lateral-directional coefficients were limited to high angles of attack.

  16. Hypersonic Laminar Viscous Flow Past Spinning Cones at Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh; Rakich, John V.

    1982-01-01

    Computational results are presented for hypersonic viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones of angle of attack, obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flowfield resulting from spinning motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, cross-flow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, cross-flow separation, and vortex structure. The Magnus force and moments are also computed. Comparisons are made with other theoretical analyses based on boundary-layer and boundary-region equations, and an anomaly is discovered in the displacement thickness contribution to the Magnus force when compared with boundary-layer results.

  17. Miniature On-Board Angle of Attack Measurement System for Hypersonic Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Bradley L.; Rhode, Matthew N.

    2006-01-01

    The most prevalent method of establishing model angle of attack (AoA) in hypersonic wind tunnel facilities is using an encoder in the model support system then calculating sting/balance deflections based on balance output. This method has been shown to be less accurate than on-board methods in subsonic and transonic facilities and preliminary indications, as compared to optical methods, show large discrepancies in a hypersonic facility as well. With improvements in Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometer technology more accurate onboard AoA measurement systems are now available for the small models usually found in hypersonic research facilities.

  18. Tables for Supersonic Flow of Helium Around Right Circular Cones at Zero Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The results of the calculation of supersonic flow of helium about right circular cones at zero angle of attack are presented in tabular form. The calculations were performed using the Taylor-Maccoll theory. Numerical integrations were performed using a Runge-Kutta method for second-order differential equations. Results were obtained for cone angles from 2.5 to 30 degrees in regular increments of 2.5 degrees. In all calculations the desired free-stream Mach number was obtained to five or more significant figures.

  19. A Method for Integrating Thrust-Vectoring and Actuated Forebody Strakes with Conventional Aerodynamic Controls on a High-Performance Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, Frederick J.; Davidson, John B.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1998-01-01

    A method, called pseudo controls, of integrating several airplane controls to achieve cooperative operation is presented. The method eliminates conflicting control motions, minimizes the number of feedback control gains, and reduces the complication of feedback gain schedules. The method is applied to the lateral/directional controls of a modified high-performance airplane. The airplane has a conventional set of aerodynamic controls, an experimental set of thrust-vectoring controls, and an experimental set of actuated forebody strakes. The experimental controls give the airplane additional control power for enhanced stability and maneuvering capabilities while flying over an expanded envelope, especially at high angles of attack. The flight controls are scheduled to generate independent body-axis control moments. These control moments are coordinated to produce stability-axis angular accelerations. Inertial coupling moments are compensated. Thrust-vectoring controls are engaged according to their effectiveness relative to that of the aerodynamic controls. Vane-relief logic removes steady and slowly varying commands from the thrust-vectoring controls to alleviate heating of the thrust turning devices. The actuated forebody strakes are engaged at high angles of attack. This report presents the forward-loop elements of a flight control system that positions the flight controls according to the desired stability-axis accelerations. This report does not include the generation of the required angular acceleration commands by means of pilot controls or the feedback of sensed airplane motions.

  20. The aerodynamic forces and pressure distribution of a revolving pigeon wing

    PubMed Central

    Usherwood, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving dried pigeon wing and a flat card replica were measured with a propeller rig, effectively simulating a wing in continual downstroke. Two methods were adopted: direct measurement of the reaction vertical force and torque via a forceplate, and a map of the pressures along and across the wing measured with differential pressure sensors. Wings were tested at Reynolds numbers up to 108,000, typical for slow-flying pigeons, and considerably above previous similar measurements applied to insect and hummingbird wing and wing models. The pigeon wing out-performed the flat card replica, reaching lift coefficients of 1.64 compared with 1.44. Both real and model wings achieved much higher maximum lift coefficients, and at much higher geometric angles of attack (43°), than would be expected from wings tested in a windtunnel simulating translating flight. It therefore appears that some high-lift mechanisms, possibly analogous to those of slow-flying insects, may be available for birds flapping with wings at high angles of attack. The net magnitude and orientation of aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving pigeon wing can be determined from the differential pressure maps with a moderate degree of precision. With increasing angle of attack, variability in the pressure signals suddenly increases at an angle of attack between 33° and 38°, close to the angle of highest vertical force coefficient or lift coefficient; stall appears to be delayed compared with measurements from wings in windtunnels. PMID:22736891

  1. The aerodynamic forces and pressure distribution of a revolving pigeon wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usherwood, James R.

    The aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving dried pigeon wing and a flat card replica were measured with a propeller rig, effectively simulating a wing in continual downstroke. Two methods were adopted: direct measurement of the reaction vertical force and torque via a forceplate, and a map of the pressures along and across the wing measured with differential pressure sensors. Wings were tested at Reynolds numbers up to 108,000, typical for slow-flying pigeons, and considerably above previous similar measurements applied to insect and hummingbird wing and wing models. The pigeon wing out-performed the flat card replica, reaching lift coefficients of 1.64 compared with 1.44. Both real and model wings achieved much higher maximum lift coefficients, and at much higher geometric angles of attack (43°), than would be expected from wings tested in a windtunnel simulating translating flight. It therefore appears that some high-lift mechanisms, possibly analogous to those of slow-flying insects, may be available for birds flapping with wings at high angles of attack. The net magnitude and orientation of aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving pigeon wing can be determined from the differential pressure maps with a moderate degree of precision. With increasing angle of attack, variability in the pressure signals suddenly increases at an angle of attack between 33° and 38°, close to the angle of highest vertical force coefficient or lift coefficient; stall appears to be delayed compared with measurements from wings in windtunnels.

  2. The aerodynamic forces and pressure distribution of a revolving pigeon wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usherwood, James R.

    2009-05-01

    The aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving dried pigeon wing and a flat card replica were measured with a propeller rig, effectively simulating a wing in continual downstroke. Two methods were adopted: direct measurement of the reaction vertical force and torque via a forceplate, and a map of the pressures along and across the wing measured with differential pressure sensors. Wings were tested at Reynolds numbers up to 108,000, typical for slow-flying pigeons, and considerably above previous similar measurements applied to insect and hummingbird wing and wing models. The pigeon wing out-performed the flat card replica, reaching lift coefficients of 1.64 compared with 1.44. Both real and model wings achieved much higher maximum lift coefficients, and at much higher geometric angles of attack (43°), than would be expected from wings tested in a windtunnel simulating translating flight. It therefore appears that some high-lift mechanisms, possibly analogous to those of slow-flying insects, may be available for birds flapping with wings at high angles of attack. The net magnitude and orientation of aerodynamic forces acting on a revolving pigeon wing can be determined from the differential pressure maps with a moderate degree of precision. With increasing angle of attack, variability in the pressure signals suddenly increases at an angle of attack between 33° and 38°, close to the angle of highest vertical force coefficient or lift coefficient; stall appears to be delayed compared with measurements from wings in windtunnels.

  3. Effect of a rotating propeller on the separation angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Iek, C.; Hwang, D. P.; Larkin, M.; Schweiger, P.

    1993-01-01

    The present study represents an extension of an earlier wind tunnel experiment performed with the P&W 17-in. Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) Simulator operating at Mach 0.2. In order to study the effects of a rotating propeller on the inlet flow, data were obtained in the UTRC 10- by 15-Foot Large Subsonic Wind Tunnel with the same hardware and instrumentation, but with the propellar removed. These new tests were performed over a range of flow rates which duplicated flow rates in the powered simulator program. The flow through the inlet was provided by a remotely located vacuum source. A comparison of the results of this flow-through study with the previous data from the powered simulator indicated that in the conventional inlet the propeller produced an increase in the separation angle of attack between 4.0 deg at a specific flow of 22.4 lb/sec-sq ft to 2.7 deg at a higher specific flow of 33.8 lb/sec-sq ft. A similar effect on separation angle of attack was obtained by using stationary blockage rather than a propeller.

  4. HYSHOT-2 Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, T.; Owen, R.; Walton, C.

    2005-02-01

    The scramjet flight test Hyshot-2, flew on the 30 July 2002. The programme, led by the University of Queensland, had the primary objective of obtaining supersonic combustion data in flight for comparison with measurements made in shock tunnels. QinetiQ was one of the sponsors, and also provided aerodynamic data and trajectory predictions for the ballistic re-entry of the spinning sounding rocket. The unconventional missile geometry created by the nose-mounted asymmetric-scramjet in conjunction with the high angle of attack during re-entry makes the problem interesting. This paper presents the wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamic calculations used as input for the trajectory prediction. Indirect comparison is made with data obtained in the Hyshot-2 flight using a 6 degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation.

  5. Analytical aerodynamic model of a high alpha research vehicle wind-tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Jichang; Garrett, Frederick, Jr.; Hoffman, Eric; Stalford, Harold

    1990-01-01

    A 6 DOF analytical aerodynamic model of a high alpha research vehicle is derived. The derivation is based on wind-tunnel model data valid in the altitude-Mach flight envelope centered at 15,000 ft altitude and 0.6 Mach number with Mach range between 0.3 and 0.9. The analytical models of the aerodynamics coefficients are nonlinear functions of alpha with all control variable and other states fixed. Interpolation is required between the parameterized nonlinear functions. The lift and pitching moment coefficients have unsteady flow parts due to the time range of change of angle-of-attack (alpha dot). The analytical models are plotted and compared with their corresponding wind-tunnel data. Piloted simulated maneuvers of the wind-tunnel model are used to evaluate the analytical model. The maneuvers considered are pitch-ups, 360 degree loaded and unloaded rolls, turn reversals, split S's, and level turns. The evaluation finds that (1) the analytical model is a good representation at Mach 0.6, (2) the longitudinal part is good for the Mach range 0.3 to 0.9, and (3) the lateral part is good for Mach numbers between 0.6 and 0.9. The computer simulations show that the storage requirement of the analytical model is about one tenth that of the wind-tunnel model and it runs twice as fast.

  6. An evaluation of several methods of determining the local angle of attack on wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guntur, S.; Sørensen, N. N.

    2014-12-01

    Several methods of determining the angles of attack (AOAs) on wind turbine blades are discussed in this paper. A brief survey of the methods that have been used in the past are presented, and the advantages of each method are discussed relative to their application in the BEM theory. Data from existing as well as new full rotor CFD computations of the MEXICO rotor are used in this analysis. A more accurate estimation of the AOA is possible from 3D full rotor CFD computations, but when working with experimental data, pressure measurements and sectional forces are often the only data available. The aim of this work is to analyse the reliability of some of the simpler methods of estimating the 3D effective AOA compared some of the more rigorous CFD based methods.

  7. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 3: Angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A review of optical sensors that are capable of accurate angle of attack measurements in wind tunnels was conducted. These include sensors being used or being developed at NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers, Boeing Airplane Company, McDonald Aircraft Company, Arnold Engineering Development Center, National Aerospace Laboratory of the Netherlands, National Research Council of Canada, and the Royal Aircraft Establishment of England. Some commercial sensors that may be applicable to accurate angle measurements were also reviewed. It was found that the optical sensor systems were based on interferometers, polarized light detector, linear or area photodiode cameras, position sensing photodetectors, and laser scanners. Several of the optical sensors can meet the requirements of the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Two of these, the Boeing interferometer and the Complere lateral effect photodiode sensors are being developed for the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel.

  8. Evaluation of electrolytic tilt sensors for wind tunnel model angle-of-attack (AOA) measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a laboratory evaluation of three types of electrolytic tilt sensors as potential candidates for model attitude or angle of attack (AOA) measurements in wind tunnel tests are presented. Their performance was also compared with that from typical servo accelerometers used for AOA measurements. Model RG-37 electrolytic tilt sensors were found to have the highest overall accuracy among the three types. Compared with the servo accelerometer, their accuracies are about one order of magnitude worse and each of them cost about two-thirds less. Therefore, the sensors are unsuitable for AOA measurements although they are less expensive. However, the potential for other applications exists where the errors resulting from roll interaction, vibration, and response time are less, and sensor temperature can be controlled.

  9. Lock-in of elastically mounted airfoils at a 90° angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrmann, R. S.; Loftin, K. M.; Johnson, S.; White, E. B.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of elastically mounted cylinders has applications to petroleum, nuclear, and civil engineering. One simple method is streamlining the cylinder into an airfoil shape. However, if flow direction changes, an elastic airfoil could experience similar oscillations with even more drag. To better understand a general airfoil's response, three elastically mounted airfoil shapes are tested at a 90° angle of attack in a 3 ft by 4 ft wind tunnel. The shapes are a NACA 0018, a sharp leading- and trailing-edge (sharp-sharp) model, and a round leading- and trailing-edge (round-round) model. Mass-damping ranges from 0.96 to 1.44. For comparison to canonical VIV research, a cylinder is also tested. Since lock-in occurs near Rec=125×103, the models are also tested with a trip strip. The NACA 0018 and sharp-sharp configuration show nearly identical responses. The cylinder and round-round airfoil have responses five to eight times larger. Thus, the existence of a single sharp edge is sufficient to greatly reduce VIV at 90° angle of attack. Whereas the cylinder and round-round maximum response amplitudes are similar, cylinder lock-in occurs over a velocity range three times larger than the round-round. The tripped cylinder and round-round models' response is attenuated by 70% compared to their respective clean configurations. Hysteresis is only observed in the circular cylinder and round-round models. Hotwire data indicates the clean cylinder has a unique vortex pattern compared to the other configurations.

  10. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  11. Aerodynamic design on high-speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, San-San; Li, Qiang; Tian, Ai-Qin; Du, Jian; Liu, Jia-Li

    2016-04-01

    Compared with the traditional train, the operational speed of the high-speed train has largely improved, and the dynamic environment of the train has changed from one of mechanical domination to one of aerodynamic domination. The aerodynamic problem has become the key technological challenge of high-speed trains and significantly affects the economy, environment, safety, and comfort. In this paper, the relationships among the aerodynamic design principle, aerodynamic performance indexes, and design variables are first studied, and the research methods of train aerodynamics are proposed, including numerical simulation, a reduced-scale test, and a full-scale test. Technological schemes of train aerodynamics involve the optimization design of the streamlined head and the smooth design of the body surface. Optimization design of the streamlined head includes conception design, project design, numerical simulation, and a reduced-scale test. Smooth design of the body surface is mainly used for the key parts, such as electric-current collecting system, wheel truck compartment, and windshield. The aerodynamic design method established in this paper has been successfully applied to various high-speed trains (CRH380A, CRH380AM, CRH6, CRH2G, and the Standard electric multiple unit (EMU)) that have met expected design objectives. The research results can provide an effective guideline for the aerodynamic design of high-speed trains.

  12. Low Speed Analysis of Mission Adaptive Flaps on a High Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    1999-01-01

    Thin-layer Navier-Stokes analyses were done on a high speed civil transport configuration with mission adaptive leading-edge flaps. The flow conditions simulated were Mach = 0.22 and Reynolds number of 4.27 million for angles-of-attack ranging from 0 to 18 degrees. Two turbulence closure models were used. Analyses were done exclusively with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model at low angle-of-attack conditions. At high angles-of-attack where considerable flow separation and vortices occurred the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model was also considered. The effects of flow transition were studied. Predicted aerodynamic forces, moment, and pressure are compared to experimental data obtained in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at NASA Langley. The forces and moments correlated well with experimental data in terms of trends. Drag and pitching moment were consistently underpredicted. Predicted surface pressures compared well with experiment at low angles-of-attack. Above 10 angle-of-attack the pressure comparisons were not as favorable. The two turbulent models affected the pressures on the flap considerably and neither produced correct results at the high angles-of-attack.

  13. Design of a Normal Acceleration and Angle of Attack Control System for a Missile Having Front and Rear Control Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, Yoshimasa

    Precise normal acceleration control is essential for missile guidance. Missiles with both front and rear control surfaces have a higher ability to control normal acceleration than missiles with front or rear control surfaces only. From the viewpoint of control, however, the control problem becomes a two-input-one-output problem, where generally control input cannot be determined uniquely. This paper proposes controlling angle of attack as well as normal acceleration, which makes the problem a two-input-two-output one and determines the controls uniquely. Normal acceleration command is given by a guidance system, but angle of attack command must be generated in accordance to the acceleration command without affecting the normal acceleration control. This paper also proposes such a command generator for angle of attack. Computer simulation is conducted using a nonlinear missile model to investigate the effectiveness of the control system along with control systems designed using three other methods.

  14. Approximate heating analysis for the windward-symmetry plane of Shuttle-like bodies at large angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.

    1981-01-01

    An engineering method has been developed for computing the windward-symmetry plane convective heat-transfer rates on Shuttle-like vehicles at large angles of attack. The engineering code includes an approximate inviscid flowfield technique, laminar and turbulent heating-rate expressions, an approximation to account for the variable-entropy effects on the surface heating and the concept of an equivalent axisymmetric body to model the windward-ray flowfields of Shuttle-like vehicles at angles of attack from 25 to 45 degrees. The engineering method is validated by comparing computed heating results with corresponding experimental data measured on Shuttle and advanced transportation models over a wide range of flow conditions and angles of attack from 25 to 40 degrees and also with results of existing prediction techniques. The comparisons are in good agreement.

  15. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Suei; Lan, C. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Due to the requirement of increased performance and maneuverability, the flight envelope of a modern fighter is frequently extended to the high angle-of-attack regime. Vehicles maneuvering in this regime are subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The nonlinearities are due mainly to three-dimensional separated flow and concentrated vortex flow that occur at large angles of attack. Accurate prediction of these nonlinear airloads is of great importance in the analysis of a vehicle's flight motion and in the design of its flight control system. A satisfactory evaluation of the performance envelope of the aircraft may require a large number of coupled computations, one for each change in initial conditions. To avoid the disadvantage of solving the coupled flow-field equations and aircraft's motion equations, an alternate approach is to use a mathematical modeling to describe the steady and unsteady aerodynamics for the aircraft equations of motion. Aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a rapidly maneuvering aircraft are, in general, nonlinear functions of motion variables, their time rate of change, and the history of maneuvering. A numerical method was developed to analyze the nonlinear and time-dependent aerodynamic response to establish the generalized indicial function in terms of motion variables and their time rates of change.

  16. Rarefield-Flow Shuttle Aerodynamics Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1994-01-01

    A model of the Shuttle Orbiter rarefied-flow aerodynamic force coefficients has been derived from the ratio of flight acceleration measurements. The in-situ, low-frequency (less than 1Hz), low-level (approximately 1 x 10(exp -6) g) acceleration measurements are made during atmospheric re-entry. The experiment equipment designed and used for this task is the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), one of the sensor packages in the Orbiter Experiments Program. To date, 12 HiRAP re-entry mission data sets spanning a period of about 10 years have been processed. The HiRAP-derived aerodynamics model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as function of angle of attack, body-flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle of attack are also presented, along with flight-derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made between the aerodynamics model, data from the latest Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book, applicable computer simulations, and wind-tunnel data.

  17. Flowfield computations over the Space Shuttle Orbiter with a proposed canard at a Mach number of 5.8 and 50 degrees angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, William H.; Buning, Pieter G.; Hobson, Garth V.

    1993-01-01

    An effective control canard design to provide enhanced controllability throughout the flight regime is described which uses a 3D, Navier-Stokes computational solution. The use of canard by the Space Shuttle Orbiter in both hypersonic and subsonic flight regimes can enhance its usefullness by expanding its payload carrying capability and improving its static stability. The canard produces an additional nose-up pitching moment to relax center-of-gravity constraint and alleviates the need for large, lift-destroying elevon deflections required to maintain the high angles of attack for effective hypersonic flight.

  18. Mach 6 experimental and theoretical stability and performance of a cruciform missile at angles of attack up to 65 degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edward R.; Johnston, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control of an axisymmetric cruciform-finned missile has been conducted at Mach 6. The angle-of-attack range extended from 20 to 65 deg to encompass maximum lift. Longitudinal stability, performance, and trim could be accurately predicted with the fins at a fin roll angle of 0 deg but not when the fins were at a fin roll angle of 45 deg. At this roll angle, windward fin choking occurred at angles of attack above 50 deg and reduced the effectiveness of the fins and caused pitch-up.

  19. Effects of vortex flaps on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of an arrow wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, L. P.; Murri, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley 12-foot low-speed wind-tunnel to determine the longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic effects of plain and tabbed vortex flaps on a flat-plate, highly swept arrow-wing model. Flow-visualization studies were made using a helium-bubble technique. Static forces and moments were measured over an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg to 50deg for sideslip angles of 0 deg and + or - 4 deg.

  20. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will design, build, and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604BOO02G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate the aerodynamic flight database for the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. Al these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  1. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  2. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database i n the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  3. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime, The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  4. Aerodynamic-structural model of offwind yacht sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairs, Christopher M.

    An aerodynamic-structural model of offwind yacht sails was created that is useful in predicting sail forces. Two sails were examined experimentally and computationally at several wind angles to explore a variety of flow regimes. The accuracy of the numerical solutions was measured by comparing to experimental results. The two sails examined were a Code 0 and a reaching asymmetric spinnaker. During experiment, balance, wake, and sail shape data were recorded for both sails in various configurations. Two computational steps were used to evaluate the computational model. First, an aerodynamic flow model that includes viscosity effects was used to examine the experimental flying shapes that were recorded. Second, the aerodynamic model was combined with a nonlinear, structural, finite element analysis (FEA) model. The aerodynamic and structural models were used iteratively to predict final flying shapes of offwind sails, starting with the design shapes. The Code 0 has relatively low camber and is used at small angles of attack. It was examined experimentally and computationally at a single angle of attack in two trim configurations, a baseline and overtrimmed setting. Experimentally, the Code 0 was stable and maintained large flow attachment regions. The digitized flying shapes from experiment were examined in the aerodynamic model. Force area predictions matched experimental results well. When the aerodynamic-structural tool was employed, the predictive capability was slightly worse. The reaching asymmetric spinnaker has higher camber and operates at higher angles of attack than the Code 0. Experimentally and computationally, it was examined at two angles of attack. Like the Code 0, at each wind angle, baseline and overtrimmed settings were examined. Experimentally, sail oscillations and large flow detachment regions were encountered. The computational analysis began by examining the experimental flying shapes in the aerodynamic model. In the baseline setting, the

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics of a propeller-powered high-lift semispan wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Takallu, M. A.; Applin, Zachary T.

    1994-01-01

    A small-scale semispan high-lift wing-flap system equipped under the wing with a turboprop engine assembly was tested in the LaRC 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Experimental data were obtained for various propeller rotational speeds, nacelle locations, and nacelle inclinations. To isolate the effects of the high lift system, data were obtained with and without the flaps and leading-edge device. The effects of the propeller slipstream on the overall longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of the wing-propeller assembly were examined. Test results indicated that the lift coefficient of the wing could be increased by the propeller slipstream when the rotational speed was increased and high-lift devices were deployed. Decreasing the nacelle inclination (increased pitch down) enhanced the lift performance of the system much more than varying the vertical or horizontal location of the nacelle. Furthermore, decreasing the nacelle inclination led to higher lift curve slope values, which indicated that the powered wing could sustain higher angles of attack near maximum lift performance. Any lift augmentation was accompanied by a drag penalty due to the increased wing lift.

  6. Liftoff and Transition Aerodynamics of the Ares I (A106) Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Paulson, John W., Jr.; Erickson, Gary E.

    2011-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22- Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to obtain the liftoff and transition aerodynamics of the Ares I (A106) Crew Launch Vehicle. Data were obtained in free-air at angles of attack from 10 to 90 at various roll angles and at roll angles of 0 to 360 at various angles of attack. In addition, tower effects were assessed by testing with and without a mobile launcher/tower at all wind azimuth angles and at various model heights to simulate the rise of the vehicle as it clears the tower on launch. The free-air data will be used for low speed high angle of attack flight simulation and as a bridge to the low angle of attack ascent database (0.5 < Mach < 5.0) being developed with data from the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel and Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel. The Ares I Database Development Team will add incremental tower effects data to the free-air data to develop the database for tower clearance.

  7. Effect of Varying the Angle of Attack of the Scales on a Biomimetic Shark Skin Model on Embedded Vortex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelus, Jennifer; Lang, Amy; Bradshaw, Michael; Jones, Emily; Afroz, Farhana; Motta, Philip; Habegger, Maria

    2012-11-01

    The skin of fast-swimming sharks is proposed to have mechanisms to reduce drag and delay flow separation. The skin of fast-swimming and agile sharks is covered with small teeth-like denticles on the order of 0.2 mm. The shortfin mako is one of the fastest and most agile ocean predators creating the need to minimize its pressure drag by controlling flow separation. Biological studies of the shortfin mako skin have shown the passive bristling angle of their denticles to exceed 50 degrees in areas on the flank corresponding to the locations likely to experience separation first. It has been shown that for an angle of attack of 90 degrees, vortices form within these cavities and impose a partial slip condition at the surface of the cavity. This experiment focuses on smaller angles of attack for denticle bristling, closer to the range thought to be achieved on real shark skin. A 3-D bristled shark skin model with varying angle of attack, embedded below a boundary layer, was used to study the formation of cavity vortices through fluorescent dye visualization and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The effect of varying angle of attack on vortex formation will be discussed.

  8. Pressure Distribution Tests on PW-9 Wing Models from -18 Degree Through 90 Degree Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeser, Oscar E , Jr

    1929-01-01

    At the request of the Army Air Corps, an investigation of the pressure distribution over PW-9 wing models was conducted in the atmospheric wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The primary purpose of these tests was to obtain wind-tunnel data on the load distribution on the cellule to be correlated with similar information obtained in flight tests, both to be used for design purposes. Because of the importance of the conditions beyond the stall as affecting the control and stability, this investigation was extended through 90 degree angle of attack. The results for the range of normal flight have been given in NACA Technical Report No. 271. The present paper presents the same results in a different form and includes, in addition, those over the greater range of angle of attack, -18 degrees through 90 degrees. The results show that: (1) at angles of attack above maximum lift, the biplane upper wing pressures are decreased by the shielding action of the lower wing. (2) the burble of the biplane lower wing, with respect to the angle of attack, is delayed, due to the shielding action of the lower wing. (3) the center of pressure of the biplane upper wing (semispan) is, in general, displaced forward and outward with reference to that of the wing as a monoplane, while for the lower wing there is but slight difference for both conditions. (4) the overhanging portion of the upper wing is little affected by the presence of the lower wing.

  9. Impingement of Water Droplets on an NACA 65(sub 1) -212 Airfoil at an Angle of Attack of 4 Deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brun, Rinaldo J.; Serafini, John S.; Moshos, George J.

    1952-01-01

    The trajectories of droplets in the air flowing past an NACA 651-212 airfoil at an angle of attack of 40 were determined. The collection efficiency, the area of droplet impingement, and the rate of droplet impingement were calculated from the trajectories and are presented herein.

  10. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. 2: Low-wing model B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihrle, W., Jr.; Hultberg, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a rotational flow environment utilizing a rotary balance located in the spin tunnel are presented in plotted form for a 1/6.5 scale, single engine, low wing, general aviation airplane model. The configurations tested included the basic airplane, various wing leading-edge devices, tail designs, and rudder control settings as well as airplane components. Data are presented without analysis for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg and clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations covering an (omega)(b)/2V range from 0 to 0.85.

  11. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle of attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. 1: Low wing model C. [wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulcay, W. J.; Rose, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a helical flow environment utilizing a rotary balance located in the Langley spin tunnel are presented in plotted form for a 1/6 scale, single engine, low wing, general aviation model (model C). The configurations tested included the basic airplane and control deflections, wing leading edge and fuselage modification devices, tail designs and airplane components. Data are presented without analysis for an angle of attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg and clockwise and counter clockwise rotations covering an omega b/2v range from 0 to .9.

  12. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. 1: Influence of airplane components for model D. [Langley spin tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralston, J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of airplane components, as well as wing location and tail length, on the rotational flow aerodynamics is discussed for a 1/6 scale general aviation airplane model. The airplane was tested in a built-up fashion (i.e., body, body-wing, body-wing-vertical, etc.) in the presence of two wing locations and two body lengths. Data were measured, using a rotary balance, over an angle-of-attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg, and for clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations covering an omega b/2V range of 0 to 0.9.

  13. Tonal noise of a controlled-diffusion airfoil at low angle of attack and Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Padois, Thomas; Laffay, Paul; Idier, Alexandre; Moreau, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    The acoustic signature of a controlled-diffusion airfoil immersed in a flow is experimentally characterized. Acoustic measurements have been carried out in an anechoic open-jet-wind-tunnel for low Reynolds numbers (from 5 × 10(4) to 4.3 × 10(5)) and several angles of attack. As with the NACA0012, the acoustic spectrum is dominated by discrete tones. These tonal behaviors are divided into three different regimes. The first one is characterized by a dominant primary tone which is steady over time, surrounded by secondary peaks. The second consists of two unsteady primary tones associated with secondary peaks and the third consists of a hump dominated by several small peaks. A wavelet study allows one to identify an amplitude modulation of the acoustic signal mainly for the unsteady tonal regime. This amplitude modulation is equal to the frequency interval between two successive tones. Finally, a bispectral analysis explains the presence of tones at higher frequencies. PMID:27475199

  14. Crossflow transition at Mach 6 on a cone at low angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Ryan O.

    Experiments on a sharp 7-degree cone at low angles of attack were conducted at Mach 6 to understand the stationary and traveling modes of crossflow disturbances, the interaction between them, and the development of other instabilities that can lead to transition. Using the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT), pressure and temperature measurements were collected to better describe crossflow characteristics. Noisy and quiet flow conditions were compared to understand crossflow development. Temperature Sensitive Paint (TSP) was used to measure the global surface temperatures on the model. Schmidt-Boelter (SB) gauges were used to convert the surface temperatures to heat transfer. The global heat transfer then allowed the stationary crossflow to be visualized and quantified in terms of heat flux. Integrating heat fluxes azimuthally, the amplitudes of the stationary crossflow vortices were compared. against the amplitudes of the traveling waves. PCB 132A31 and Kulite XCQ-062-15A transducers were used to measure pressure fluctuations over a broad range of frequencies. The traveling crossflow instability, the second-mode instability, and possibly the secondary-instability of the stationary crossflow mode were found at certain tunnel conditions. A grouping of Kulites was used to determine traveling wave speed and direction. Roughness elements were added to the model to excite discrete stationary vortices. The roughness elements provided a method to alter the strength of the stationary vortices. This technique allowed traveling-mode amplitudes to be compared to varying stationary-mode amplitudes.

  15. Near-field noise of a single-rotation propfan at an angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Envia, E.; Clark, B. J.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    The near field noise characteristics of a propfan operating at an angle of attack are examined utilizing the unsteady pressure field obtained from a 3-D Euler simulation of the propfan flowfield. The near field noise is calculated employing three different procedures: a direct computation method in which the noise field is extracted directly from the Euler solution, and two acoustic-analogy-based frequency domain methods which utilize the computed unsteady pressure distribution on the propfan blades as the source term. The inflow angles considered are -0.4, 1.6, and 4.6 degrees. The results of the direct computation method and one of the frequency domain methods show qualitative agreement with measurements. They show that an increase in the inflow angle is accompanied by an increase in the sound pressure level at the outboard wing boom locations and a decrease in the sound pressure level at the (inboard) fuselage locations. The trends in the computed azimuthal directivities of the noise field also conform to the measured and expected results.

  16. Stability of Hypersonic Boundary Layers on a Cone at an Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; Owens, Lewis R.

    2010-01-01

    The stability and receptivity of a three-dimensional hypersonic boundary layer over a 7deg half-angle straight cone at an angle of attack of 6deg is numerically investigated at a freestream Mach number of 6.0 and a Reynolds number of 10.4x10(exp 6)/m. The generation and evolution of stationary crossflow vortices are also investigated by performing simulations with three-dimensional roughness elements located on the surface of the cone. The flow fields with and without the roughness elements are obtained by solving the full Navier- Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates using a fifth-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for spatial discretization and a third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for temporal integration. Stability computations produced azimuthal wavenumbers in the range of m approx. 20-50 for the most amplified traveling disturbances and in the range of m approx.30-70 for the stationary disturbances. The frequency of the unstable second-mode ranges from 400 kHz to 900 kHz along the windward ray. The N-Factor computations predicted transition would occur more forward on the sides of the cone as compared to the transition fronts near the windward and the leeward rays. The simulations also show the crossflow vortices originating from the nose region propagate towards the leeward ray. No perturbations were observed toward the windward half of the cone.

  17. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 9th, Baltimore, MD, Sept. 23-25, 1991, Technical Papers. Vols. 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The present conference on aplied aerodynamics encompasses computational fluid dynamics, drag prediction/analysis, experimental aerodynamics, high angles of attack, rotor/propeller aerodynamics, super/hypersonic aerodynamics, unsteady aerodynamics, vortex physics, high-speed civil-transport aeroacoustics, and airfoil/wing aerodynamics. Specific issues addressed include high-speed civil-transport air-breathing propulsion, generic hypersonic inlet-module analysis, an investigation on spoiler effects, high-alpha vehicle dynamics, space-station resource node flow-field analysis, a numerical simulation of sabot discard aerodynamics, and vortex control using pneumatic blowing. Also addressed are Navier-Stokes solutions for the F/A-18 Wing-LEX fuselage, tail venting for enhanced yaw damping at spinning conditions, an investigation of rotor wake interactions with a body in low-speed forward flight, and multigrid calculations of 3D viscous cascade flows.

  18. Computer Simulation of Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, Mamoru

    1989-01-01

    The role of Ames Research Center in conducting basic aerodynamics research through computer simulations is described. The computer facilities, including supercomputers and peripheral equipment that represent the state of the art, are described. The methodology of computational fluid dynamics is explained briefly. Fundamental studies of turbulence and transition are being pursued to understand these phenomena and to develop models that can be used in the solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Four applications of computer simulations for aerodynamics problems are described: subsonic flow around a fuselage at high angle of attack, subsonic flow through a turbine stator-rotor stage, transonic flow around a flexible swept wing, and transonic flow around a wing-body configuration that includes an inlet and a tail.

  19. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 10th, Palo Alto, CA, June 22-24, 1992, Technical Papers. Pts. 1 AND 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to vortex physics and aerodynamics; supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamics; STOL/VSTOL/rotors; missile and reentry vehicle aerodynamics; CFD as applied to aircraft; unsteady aerodynamics; supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamics; low-speed/high-lift aerodynamics; airfoil/wing aerodynamics; measurement techniques; CFD-solvers/unstructured grid; airfoil/drag prediction; high angle-of-attack aerodynamics; and CFD grid methods. Particular attention is given to transonic-numerical investigation into high-angle-of-attack leading-edge vortex flow, prediction of rotor unsteady airloads using vortex filament theory, rapid synthesis for evaluating the missile maneuverability parameters, transonic calculations of wing/bodies with deflected control surfaces; the static and dynamic flow field development about a porous suction surface wing; the aircraft spoiler effects under wind shear; multipoint inverse design of an infinite cascade of airfoils, turbulence modeling for impinging jet flows; numerical investigation of tail buffet on the F-18 aircraft; the surface grid generation in a parameter space; and the flip flop nozzle extended to supersonic flows.

  20. Installed F/A-18 inlet flow calculations at 30 degrees angle-of-attack: A comparative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. Frederic; Podleski, Steve D.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Lewis is currently engaged in a research effort as a team member of the High Alpha Technology Program (HATP) within NASA. This program utilizes a specially equipped F/A-18, the High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), in an ambitious effort to improve the maneuverability of high-performance military aircraft at low subsonic speed, high angle of attack conditions. The overall objective of the Lewis effort is to develop inlet technology that will ensure efficient airflow delivery to the engine during these maneuvers. One part of the Lewis approach utilizes computational fluid dynamics codes to predict the installed performance of inlets for these highly maneuverable aircraft. Full Navier-Stokes (FNS) calculations on the installed F/A-18 inlet at 30 degrees angle of attack, 0 degrees yaw, and a freestream Mach number of 0.2 have been obtained in this study using an algebraic turbulence model with two grids (original and revised). Results obtained with the original grid were used to determine where further grid refinements and additional geometry were needed. In order to account properly for the external effects, the forebody, leading edge extension (LEX), ramp, and wing were included with inlet geometry. In the original grid, the diverter, LEX slot, and leading edge flap were not included due to insufficient geometry definition, but were included in a revised grid. In addition, a thin-layer Navier-Stokes (TLNS) code is used with the revised grid and the numerical results are compared to those obtained with the FNS code. The TLNS code was used to evaluate the effects on the solution using a code with more recent CFD developments such as upwinding with TVD schemes versus central differencing with artificial dissipation. The calculations are compared to a limited amount of available experimental data. The predicted forebody/fuselage surface static pressures compared well with data of all solutions. The predicted trajectory of the vortex generated under the LEX was

  1. Rarefied-flow Shuttle aerodynamics model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1993-01-01

    A rarefied-flow shuttle aerodynamic model spanning the hypersonic continuum to the free molecule-flow regime was formulated. The model development has evolved from the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) experiment conducted on the Orbiter since 1983. The complete model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as functions of angle-of-attack, body flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle-of-attack are presented, along with flight derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made with data from the Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book (OADDB), applicable wind-tunnel data, and recent flight data from STS-35 and STS-40. The flight-derived model aerodynamic force coefficient ratio is in good agreement with the wind-tunnel data and predicts the flight measured force coefficient ratios on STS-35 and STS-40. The model is not, however, in good agreement with the OADDB. But, the current OADDB does not predict the flight data force coefficient ratios of either STS-35 or STS-40 as accurately as the flight-derived model. Also, the OADDB differs with the wind-tunnel force coefficient ratio data.

  2. Effects of wing leading-edge radius and Reynolds number on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of highly swept wing-body configurations at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, W. P.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley low turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the effects of wing leading edge radius and Reynolds number on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a series of highly swept wing-body configurations. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers below 0.30, angles of attack up to 16 deg, and Reynolds numbers per meter from 6.57 million to 43.27 million. The wings under study in this investigation had leading edge sweep angles of 61.7 deg, 64.61 deg, and 67.01 deg in combination with trailing edge sweep angles of 0 deg and 40.6 deg. The leading edge radii of each wing planform could be varied from sharp to nearly round.

  3. Computation of the inviscid supersonic flow about cones at large angles of attack by a floating discontinuity approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daywitt, J.; Kutler, P.; Anderson, D.

    1977-01-01

    The technique of floating shock fitting is adapted to the computation of the inviscid flowfield about circular cones in a supersonic free stream at angles of attack that exceed the cone half-angle. The resulting equations are applicable over the complete range of free-stream Mach numbers, angles of attack and cone half-angles for which the bow shock is attached. A finite difference algorithm is used to obtain the solution by an unsteady relaxation approach. The bow shock, embedded cross-flow shock, and vortical singularity in the leeward symmetry plane are treated as floating discontinuities in a fixed computational mesh. Where possible, the flowfield is partitioned into windward, shoulder, and leeward regions with each region computed separately to achieve maximum computational efficiency. An alternative shock fitting technique which treats the bow shock as a computational boundary is developed and compared with the floating-fitting approach. Several surface boundary condition schemes are also analyzed.

  4. Mitigation of Helical Vortex Separation of a 5:1 Prolate Spheroid at an Angle of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulmeister, James; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Ocean and air vehicle maneuvering performance is determined by the balance between a vehicle's capacity to exert large lateral forces and its fluid dynamic resistance. The flow past a 5:1 prolate spheroid at an angle of attack is representative of many maneuvering hull forms where cross-flow separation creates helical vortices that dramatically increase drag during maneuvers. We investigate a shape modification to a 5:1 prolate spheroid that streamlines the spheroid in the cross-flow direction in order to mitigate vortex separation. We conduct a series of experiments with models towed at angles of attack between 5 and 30 degrees at a Reynolds number by length equal to 100,000. Reconstructions of the helical vortex separation from cross-flow particle image velocimetry measurements show that modest streamlining significantly reduces the size and circulation of separated vortices, indicating drag reduction.

  5. Assessing Uncertainties in Boundary Layer Transition Predictions for HIFiRE-1 at Non-zero Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, Lindsay C.

    2011-01-01

    Boundary layer stability was analyzed for the HIFiRE-1 flight vehicle geometry for ground tests conducted at the CUBRC LENS I hypersonic shock test facility and the Langley Research Center (LaRC) 20- inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Boundary layer stability results were compared to transition onset location obtained from discrete heat transfer measurements from thin film gauges during the CUBRC test and spatially continuous heat transfer measurements from thermal phosphor paint data during the LaRC test. The focus of this analysis was on conditions at non-zero angles of attack as stability analysis has already been performed at zero degrees angle of attack. Also, the transition onset data obtained during flight testing was at nonzero angles of attack, so this analysis could be expanded in the future to include the results of the flight test data. Stability analysis was performed using the 2D parabolized stability software suite STABL (Stability and Transition Analysis for Hypersonic Boundary Layers) developed at the University of Minnesota and the mean flow solutions were computed using the DPLR finite volume Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. A center line slice of the 3D mean flow solution was used for the stability analysis to incorporate the angle of attack effects while still taking advantage of the 2D STABL software suite. The N-factors at transition onset and the value of Re(sub theta)/M(sub e), commonly used to predict boundary layer transition onset, were compared for all conditions analyzed. Ground test data was analyzed at Mach 7.2 and Mach 6.0 and angles of attack of 1deg, 3deg and 5deg. At these conditions, the flow was found to be second mode dominant for the HIFiRE-1 slender cone geometry. On the leeward side of the vehicle, a strong trend of transition onset location with angle of attack was observed as the boundary layer on the leeward side of the vehicle developed inflection points at streamwise positions on the vehicle that correlated to

  6. Lee surface flow phenomena over space shuttle at large angles of attack at M sub infinity equal 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakkay, V.; Miyazawa, M.; Wang, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    Surface pressure and heat transfer, flow separation, flow field, and oil flow patterns on the leeward side of a space shuttle orbiter model are investigated at a free stream Mach number of 6. The free stream Reynolds numbers are between 1.64 times 10 to the 7th power and 1.31 times 10 to the 8th power per meter, and the angle of attack is varied between 0 deg and 40 deg for the present experiments. The stagnation temperatures for the tests are approximately 500 K and the wall temperature is maintained at 290 K. Existing numerical methods of three-dimensional inviscid supersonic flow theory and compressible boundary layer theory are used to predict the present experimental measurements. Results of the present tests indicate two distinct types of flow separation and surface peak heating depending on the angle of attack.

  7. Design of airfoils providing the absence of separation in a compressible flow in a specified range of angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunaeva, O. S.; Il'Inskii, N. B.

    2008-11-01

    A problem of modification of the classical airfoils that ensure the absence of separation in a subsonic ideal-gas flow in a specified range of angles of attack is solved by a numerical-analytical method based on the quasi-solution of inverse boundary-value problems of aerohydrodynamics and Kármán-Jiang formulas. Loitsyanskii’s criterion of the non-separated flow is used to determine the boundary-layer separation point.

  8. Method of Estimating the Incompressible-flow Pressure Distribution of Compressor Blade Sections at Design Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, John R; Yacobi, Laura A

    1953-01-01

    A method was devised for estimating the incompressible-flow pressure distribution over compressor blade sections at design angle of attack. The theoretical incremental velocities due to camber and thickness of the section as an isolated airfoil are assumed proportional to the average passage velocity and are modified by empirically determined interference factors. Comparisons were made between estimated and test pressure distributions of NACA 65-series sections for typical conditions. Good agreement was obtained.

  9. Theoretical lift due to wing incidence of slender wing-body-tail combinations at zero angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacks, Alvin H

    1956-01-01

    The theoretical lift of a cylindrical afterbody at zero angle of attack due to incidence of the wing is calculated by means of slender-body theory. It is assumed that the vortex sheet becomes fully rolled up ahead of the tail, and the vortex paths in the presence of the body are determined analytically. The total lift of a variety of slender wing-body-tail combinations due to wing incidence is also calculated.

  10. The method of characteristics for the determination of supersonic flow over bodies of revolution at small angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, Antonio

    1951-01-01

    The method of characteristics has been applied for the determination of the supersonic-flow properties around bodies of revolution at a small angle of attack. The system developed considers the effect of the variation of entropy due to the curved shock and determines a flow that exactly satisfies the boundary conditions in the limits of the simplifications assumed. Two practical methods for numerical calculations are given. (author)

  11. Design of high performance multivariable control systems for supermaneuverable aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valavani, Lena

    1995-01-01

    The main motivation for the work under the present grant was to use nonlinear feedback linearization methods to further enhance performance capabilities of the aircraft, and robustify its response throughout its operating envelope. The idea was to use these methods in lieu of standard Taylor series linearization, in order to obtain a well behaved linearized plant, in its entire operational regime. Thus, feedback linearization was going to constitute an 'inner loop', which would then define a 'design plant model' to be compensated for robustness and guaranteed performance in an 'outer loop' application of modern linear control methods. The motivation for this was twofold; first, earlier work had shown that by appropriately conditioning the plant through conventional, simple feedback in an 'inner loop', the resulting overall compensated plant design enjoyed considerable enhancement of performance robustness in the presence of parametric uncertainty. Second, the nonlinear techniques did not have any proven robustness properties in the presence of unstructured uncertainty; a definition of robustness (and performance) is very difficult to achieve outside the frequency domain; to date, none is available for the purposes of control system design. Thus, by proper design of the outer loop, such properties could still be 'injected' in the overall system.

  12. Nonlinear lift control at high speed and high angle of attack using vortex flow technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    Nonlinear lift control at subsonic, transonic and low supersonic speeds owes its origin to the separated but organized vortical flows interacting with the wing upper surface. Since most of this flow originates near the wing or control-surface leading-edge, a variety of devices have been studied experimentally which interact with and/or control this flow in order to gain a beneficial effect. The benefits (effects) originally studied were only associated with lift enhancement. Whereas, now the studied benefits encompass performance increase, attention to changes in trimmed conditions and longitudinal stability, improvements in lateral stability, and the attendant variation with changing Mach number. For those devices that can be theoretically modeled, state-of-the-art computer codes have been used for device design and/or analysis. Comparisons at design and off-design conditions are presented for validation purposes.

  13. Nonlinear lift control at high speed and high angle of attack using vortex flow technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear lift control at subsonic, transonic and low supersonic speeds owes its origin to the separated but organized vortical flows interacting with the wing upper surface. Since most of this flow originates near the wing or control-surface leading edge, a variety of devices has been studied experimentally which interact with and/or control this flow in order to gain a beneficial effect. The benefits (effects) originally studied were associated only with lift enhancement. Whereas, now the studied benefits encompass performance increase, attention to changes in trimmed conditions and longitudinal stability, improvements in lateral stability, and the attendant variation with changing Mach number. For those devices that can be theoretically modeled, state-of-the-art computer codes have been used for device design and/or analysis. Comparisons at design and off-design conditions are presented for validation purposes.

  14. Effect of milling machine roughness and wing dihedral on the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a highly swept wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, Christine M.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to assess the effect of surface finish on the longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics of a highly-swept wing at supersonic speeds. A study of the effects of wing dihedral was also made. Included in the tests were four wing models: three models having 22.5 degrees of outboard dihedral, identical except for surface finish, and a zero-dihedral, smooth model of the same planform for reference. Of the three dihedral models, two were taken directly from the milling machine without smoothing: one having a maximum scallop height of 0.002 inches and the other a maximum scallop height of 0.005 inches. The third dihedral model was handfinished to a smooth surface. Tests were conducted in Test Section 1 of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at NASA-Langley over a range of Mach numbers from 1.8 to 2.8, a range of angle of attack from -5 to 8 degrees, and at a Reynolds numbers per foot of 2 x 10(6). Selected data were also taken at a Reynolds number per foot of 6 x 10(6). Drag coefficient increases, with corresponding lift-drag ratio decreases were the primary aerodynamic effects attributed to increased surface roughness due to milling machine grooves. These drag and lift-drag ratio increments due to roughness increased as Reynolds number increased.

  15. Flight transition data for angles of attack at Mach 22 with correlations of the data. [reentry effects - turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Darden, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Boundary-layer transition data for angles of attack from 2.5 to 47 deg from a flight experiment with a cone that reentered at angles of attack up to 75 deg were analyzed and their local flow conditions are presented. The transition data were obtained from both acoustic and electrostatic sensors. The data from the acoustic and electrostatic sensors were correlated by use of three different sets of correlating parameters. For each set of correlating parameters, the transitional and turbulent data from the acoustic and electrostatic sensors were plotted separately. Each of the correlations was compared with a linear curve fit of previous cone-flight data at near zero angle of attack. Results indicate that the data from acoustic sensors falls below the linear curve fits to the flight data and indicates the sensitivity of the sensors. It is shown that the transition data from the electrostatic sensors tends to scatter much more than the data from the acoustic sensors. However, the data from the electrostatic sensors tends to scatter about the linear curve fits based on previous flight data.

  16. Development of an Apparatus for Wind Tunnel Dynamic Experiments at High-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedreiro, Nelson

    1997-01-01

    A unique experimental apparatus that allows a wind tunnel model two degrees of freedom has been designed and built. The apparatus was developed to investigate the use of new methods to augment aircraft control in the high angle of attack regime. The model support system provides a platform in which the roll-yaw coupling at high angles of attack can be studied in a controlled environment. Active cancellation of external effects is used to provide a system in which the dynamics are dominated by the aerodynamic loads acting on the wind tunnel model.

  17. Linearized Poststall Aerodynamic and Control Law Models of the X-31A Aircraft and Comparison with Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoliker, Patrick C.; Bosworth, John T.; Georgie, Jennifer

    1997-01-01

    The X-31A aircraft has a unique configuration that uses thrust-vector vanes and aerodynamic control effectors to provide an operating envelope to a maximum 70 deg angle of attack, an inherently nonlinear portion of the flight envelope. This report presents linearized versions of the X-31A longitudinal and lateral-directional control systems, with aerodynamic models sufficient to evaluate characteristics in the poststall envelope at 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg angle of attack. The models are presented with detail sufficient to allow the reader to reproduce the linear results or perform independent control studies. Comparisons between the responses of the linear models and flight data are presented in the time and frequency domains to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of the ability to predict high-angle-of-attack flight dynamics using linear models. The X-31A six-degree-of-freedom simulation contains a program that calculates linear perturbation models throughout the X-31A flight envelope. The models include aerodynamics and flight control system dynamics that are used for stability, controllability, and handling qualities analysis. The models presented in this report demonstrate the ability to provide reasonable linear representations in the poststall flight regime.

  18. Determination of slender body aerodynamics using discrete vortex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebert, G. A.

    1994-03-01

    Current aerodynamic interest has turned to the study of supermaneuverable fighters and weapon performance when launched in extreme flight conditions. The evaluation of design missile performance requires multiple runs of six degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) simulations, analyzing the missile behavior for a variety of launch and flight conditions. Before wind-tunnel tests, it is necessary to produce the aerodynamic loading of candidate missiles for 6-DOF analyses. Since semi-empirical formulas fail in regions of nonlinear aerodynamics, and solutions to the full Navier-Stokes equations are too costly and time consuming, an alternative method of discrete vortex analysis is re-examined. The present theory examines the three-dimensional nature of the shed vorticity and generalizes previous discrete vortex analyses. Consequently, the results demonstrate relative user independence in determining all slender-body loading at angles of attack from 0 to 70 deg. The rapid calculations of the discrete vortex method makes it a prime candidate for the determinations of high angle-of-attack aerodynamic databases.

  19. Computational Aerodynamic Analysis of a Micro-CT Based Bio-Realistic Fruit Fly Wing

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Joshua; Doig, Graham; Tsafnat, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic features of a bio-realistic 3D fruit fly wing in steady state (snapshot) flight conditions were analyzed numerically. The wing geometry was created from high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) of the fruit fly Drosophila virilis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of the wing were conducted at ultra-low Reynolds numbers ranging from 71 to 200, and at angles of attack ranging from -10° to +30°. It was found that in the 3D bio-realistc model, the corrugations of the wing created localized circulation regions in the flow field, most notably at higher angles of attack near the wing tip. Analyses of a simplified flat wing geometry showed higher lift to drag performance values for any given angle of attack at these Reynolds numbers, though very similar performance is noted at -10°. Results have indicated that the simplified flat wing can successfully be used to approximate high-level properties such as aerodynamic coefficients and overall performance trends as well as large flow-field structures. However, local pressure peaks and near-wing flow features induced by the corrugations are unable to be replicated by the simple wing. We therefore recommend that accurate 3D bio-realistic geometries be used when modelling insect wings where such information is useful. PMID:25954946

  20. Hypersonic boundary-layer transition measurements at Mach 10 on a large seven-degree cone at angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Ciprian G.

    The ability to predict the onset of boundary-layer transition is critical for hypersonic flight vehicles. The development of prediction methods depends on a thorough comprehension of the mechanisms that cause transition. In order to improve the understanding of hypersonic boundary-layer transition, tests were conducted on a large 7° half-angle cone at Mach 10 in the Arnold Engineering Development Complex Wind Tunnel 9. Twenty-four runs were performed at varying unit Reynolds numbers and angles of attack for sharp and blunt nosetip configurations. Heat-transfer measurements were used to determine the start of transition on the cone. Increasing the unit Reynolds number caused a forward movement of transition on the sharp cone at zero angle of attack. Increasing nosetip radius delayed transition up to a radius of 12.7 mm. Larger nose radii caused the start of transition to move forward. At angles of attack up to 10°, transition was leeside forward for nose radii up to 12.7 mm and windside forward for nose radii of 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm. Second-mode instability waves were measured on the sharp cone and cones with small nose radii. At zero angle of attack, waves at a particular streamwise location on the sharp cone were in earlier stages of development as the unit Reynolds number was decreased. The same trend was observed as the nosetip radius was increased. No second-mode waves were apparent for the cones with large nosetip radii. As the angle of attack was increased, waves at a particular streamwise location on the sharp cone moved to earlier stages of growth on the windward ray and later stages of growth on the leeward ray. RMS amplitudes of second-mode waves were computed. Comparison between maximum second-mode amplitudes and edge Mach numbers showed good correlation for various nosetip radii and unit Reynolds numbers. Using the e N method, initial amplitudes were estimated and compared to freestream noise in the second-mode frequency band. Correlations indicate

  1. Effect of wing sweep, angle of attack, Reynolds number, and wing root fillet on the interference heating to the wing windward surface of an entry vehicle configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    The phase-change-coating technique was used to study the interference heating to the windward surface of 14 deg, 25 deg, and 50 deg swept wings of an entry vehicle configuration. One wing root of each model was faired to the fuselage with a fillet. Tests were made at Mach 8 at angles of attack of 0 deg, 20 deg, 40 deg, and 60 deg and at free-stream Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.47 and 1.7 million. Bow shock impingement heating was found to increase in magnitude and affected area with increasing angle of attack until at a higher angle of attack it decreases; this angle of attack is lower for a 50 deg swept wing. Wing root interference heating was found to increase with angle of attack up to 40 deg and then to remain approximately constant. Consequently, wing root interference heating becomes the major type of interference heating at large angles of attack, and this occurs at a lower angle of attack for the highest sweep angle. A wing leading-edge root fillet reduces the peak in wing root interference heating near the leading edge, and increasing Reynolds number increases the level of interference heating.

  2. Verification of the Shear-Stress Transfer Model and its Modifications in the Calculation of a Turbulent Flow Around a Semicircular Airfoil with a Zero Angle of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Baranov, P. A.; Zhukova, Yu. V.; Kalinin, E. I.; Miau, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    A comparative analysis of different versions of the Menter shear-stress transfer model, including with correction for the curvature of streamlines, has been performed as applied to a periodic flow around a semicircular airfoil with a zero angle of attack at Re = 45,000. A comparison of the calculated aerodynamic coefficients Cx and Cy and the surface distribution of the pressure coefficient, averaged over the period of oscillations of the lift coefficient Cy, with the corresponding experimental data has shown that the Menter shear-stress transfer model modified within the framework of the Rody-Leshtsiner-Isaev approach with the use of the inverse function of the Richardson number correcting the eddy viscosity of a flow with a semiempirical Isaev-Kharchenko-Usachov constant equal to 0.02 is preferred compared to the other versions of this model. The errors of the calculations performed with the use of the multiblock computational technologies based on intersecting structured meshes of different scales were analyzed. The interrelation between the evolution of the structure of the periodic flow around the semicircular airfoil and the distribution of its integral force characteristics in the period of Cy oscillations is discussed.

  3. 1.5 μm lidar anemometer for true air speed, angle of sideslip, and angle of attack measurements on-board Piaggio P180 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augere, B.; Besson, B.; Fleury, D.; Goular, D.; Planchat, C.; Valla, M.

    2016-05-01

    Lidar (light detection and ranging) is a well-established measurement method for the prediction of atmospheric motions through velocity measurements. Recent advances in 1.5 μm Lidars show that the technology is mature, offers great ease of use, and is reliable and compact. A 1.5 μm airborne Lidar appears to be a good candidate for airborne in-flight measurement systems. It allows measurements remotely, outside aircraft aerodynamic disturbance, and absolute air speed (no need for calibration) with great precision in all aircraft flight domains. In the framework of the EU AIM2 project, the ONERA task has consisted of developing and testing a 1.5 μm anemometer sensor for in-flight airspeed measurements. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that the 1.5 μm Lidar sensor can increase the quality of the data acquisition procedure for aircraft flight test certification. This article presents the 1.5 μm anemometer sensor dedicated to in-flight airspeed measurements and describes the flight tests performed successfully on-board the Piaggio P180 aircraft. Lidar air data have been graphically compared to the air data provided by the aircraft flight test instrumentation (FTI) in the reference frame of the Lidar sensor head. Very good agreement of true air speed (TAS) by a fraction of ms‑1, angle of sideslip (AOS), and angle of attack (AOA) by a fraction of degree were observed.

  4. Effect of twist and camber on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a powered close-coupled wing-canard configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, J. W., Jr.; Thomas, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    A series of wind-tunnel tests were conducted in a V/STOL tunnel to determine the low-speed longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a powered close-coupled wing/canard fighter configuration. The data was obtained for a high angle-of-attack maneuvering configuration and a takeoff and landing configuration. The data presented in tabulated form are intended for reference purposes.

  5. Flow-field surveys on the windward side of the NASA 040A space shuttle orbiter at 31 deg angle of attack and Mach 20 in helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, G. C., Jr.; Helms, V. T., III

    1977-01-01

    Pitot pressure and flow angle distributions in the windward flow field of the NASA 040A space shuttle orbiter configuration and surface pressures were measured, at a Mach number of 20 and an angle of attack of 31 deg. The free stream Reynolds number, based on model length, was 5.39 x 10 to the 6th power. Results show that cores of high pitot pressure, which are related to the body-shock-wing-shock intersections, occur on the windward plane of symmetry in the vicinity of the wing-body junction and near midspan on the wing. Theoretical estimates of the flow field pitot pressures show that conical flow values for the windward plane of symmetry surface are representative of the average level over the entire lower surface.

  6. Modeling of turbulent separated flows for aerodynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Steady, high speed, compressible separated flows modeled through numerical simulations resulting from solutions of the mass-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on benchmark flows that represent simplified (but realistic) aerodynamic phenomena. These include impinging shock waves, compression corners, glancing shock waves, trailing edge regions, and supersonic high angle of attack flows. A critical assessment of modeling capabilities is provided by comparing the numerical simulations with experiment. The importance of combining experiment, numerical algorithm, grid, and turbulence model to effectively develop this potentially powerful simulation technique is stressed.

  7. Preliminary Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Performance of Republic F-105 Wing-Root Inlet Configurations at Various Angles of Attack and a Mach Number of 2.01. [Coord. No. AF-163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouyoumjian, W. L.

    1957-01-01

    A 1/13-scale model of the forebody of the Republic F-105 with twin-duct wing-root inlets was tested in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel through a range of angle of attack from -4 deg to 15 deg at a Mach number of 2.01 and a Reynolds number of approximately 3.4 x 10(exp 6) per foot. The tests were made with four configurations which incorporated varying amounts of sweep and stagger of the inlet leading edges, modifications to the areas of the boundary-layer diverter floor plate, and modifications to the area of the boundary-layer diverter bleed slots. The highest overall pressure recovery at an angle of attack of 0 deg (average total-pressure recovery, 0.84 mass-flow ratio, 0.98) was achieved with configuration having an inlet leading-edge sweep angle of 58 deg with no leading-edge stagger. Stagger was found to improve the angle-of- attack performance, but at a sacrifice in inlet efficiency for an angle of attack of 0 deg. The boundary-layer diverter floor height, of the order of one boundary-layer thickness, was satisfactory for bypassing the fuselage boundary layer. The boundary-layer diverter-plate bleed slots were effective in increasing the total-pressure recovery of the inlet. The total-pressure-recovery contour plots, taken at the compressor-face station, indicate the existence of high-velocity "cores" throughout the inlet operating range.

  8. Modeling and Simulation of Aerodynamic Single Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Dmitri; Font, Gabriel

    2008-11-01

    This work presents different approaches to modeling of the plasma actuator, an electrical flow control device, which is now widely used in aerodynamics for separation control, lift enhancement, drag reduction and flight control without moving surfaces. Study of the physics of the discharge in air at atmospheric pressure was performed using particle (PIC-DSMC) and fluid plasma simulations. Based on the experimentally obtained data electro-static and lumped-element circuit models were developed for engineering purposes. Numerical flow simulations were performed to study the effect of the plasma body force on the neutral fluid. The results agreed well with the experiments. An application of the plasma actuators to the leading-edge separation control on the NACA 0021 airfoil was studied numerically. The results were obtained for a range of angles of attack. Improvement in the airfoil characteristics was observed in numerical simulations at high angles of attack in cases with plasma actuation.

  9. Unsteady Thick Airfoil Aerodynamics: Experiments, Computation, and Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangfeld, C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Mueller-Vahl, H.; Greenblatt, D.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental, computational and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamic loads acting on a relatively thick NACA 0018 airfoil when subjected to pitching and surging, individually and synchronously. Both pre-stall and post-stall angles of attack were considered. Experiments were carried out in a dedicated unsteady wind tunnel, with large surge amplitudes, and airfoil loads were estimated by means of unsteady surface mounted pressure measurements. Theoretical predictions were based on Theodorsen's and Isaacs' results as well as on the relatively recent generalizations of van der Wall. Both two- and three-dimensional computations were performed on structured grids employing unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS). For pure surging at pre-stall angles of attack, the correspondence between experiments and theory was satisfactory; this served as a validation of Isaacs theory. Discrepancies were traced to dynamic trailing-edge separation, even at low angles of attack. Excellent correspondence was found between experiments and theory for airfoil pitching as well as combined pitching and surging; the latter appears to be the first clear validation of van der Wall's theoretical results. Although qualitatively similar to experiment at low angles of attack, two-dimensional URANS computations yielded notable errors in the unsteady load effects of pitching, surging and their synchronous combination. The main reason is believed to be that the URANS equations do not resolve wake vorticity (explicitly modeled in the theory) or the resulting rolled-up un- steady flow structures because high values of eddy viscosity tend to \\smear" the wake. At post-stall angles, three-dimensional computations illustrated the importance of modeling the tunnel side walls.

  10. The development of a capability for aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Cambell, Bryan A.; Melson, W. Edward

    1989-01-01

    A research technique to obtain large-scale aerodynamic data in a simulated natural rain environment has been developed. A 10-ft chord NACA 64-210 wing section wing section equipped with leading-edge and trailing-edge high-lift devices was tested as part of a program to determine the effect of highly-concentrated, short-duration rainfall on airplane performance. Preliminary dry aerodynamic data are presented for the high-lift configuration at a velocity of 100 knots and an angle of attack of 18 deg. Also, data are presented on rainfield uniformity and rainfall concentration intensity levels obtained during the calibration of the rain simulation system.

  11. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  12. Crossflow instability and transition on a circular cone at angle of attack in a Mach-6 quiet tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Christopher A. C.

    To investigate the effect of roughness on the stationary crossflow vortices, roughness elements 2 inches from the nosetip were created in a Torlon insert section of a 7-deg half-angle cone at 6-deg angle of attack in the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Roughness elements with depths and diameters on the order of 500 microns were found to have a significant effect on the generation of the stationary vortices and the location of crossflow-induced transition under quiet flow. Crossflow-induced transition was measured under fully quiet flow. The controlled roughness elements also appeared to dominate the generation of the vortices, overwhelming the effect that the random roughness of the cone had on the stationary vortices. It was surprising that the stationary vortices did not break down until close to the lee ray, disagreeing with linear stability computations. The roughness elements had the biggest effect on the stationary vortices at approximately 150-deg to 180-deg from the windward ray, depending on conditions. The roughness elements had a minimal impact on boundary-layer transition under noisy flow. The travelling crossflow waves were measured with Kulite pressure transducers under both noisy and quiet flow. The wave properties agreed well with computations by Texas A&M and experiments by TU Braunschweig under similar conditions. The amplitude of the waves was reduced by approximately 20 times when the noise levels in the BAM6QT were reduced from noisy to quiet. An interaction between the stationary and travelling crossflow waves was observed. When large stationary waves were induced with either controlled or uncontrolled roughness and the stationary waves passed near or over a fast pressure transducer, this fast pressure transducer measured a damped or distorted travelling crossflow wave. The nature of this stationary-travelling wave interaction is poorly understood but it may be a significant factor in crossflow-induced transition. A high

  13. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  14. Effects of wing deformation on aerodynamic performance of a revolving insect wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Ryusuke; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Flexible wings of insects and bio-inspired micro air vehicles generally deform remarkably during flapping flight owing to aerodynamic and inertial forces, which is of highly nonlinear fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems. To elucidate the novel mechanisms associated with flexible wing aerodynamics in the low Reynolds number regime, we have built up a FSI model of a hawkmoth wing undergoing revolving and made an investigation on the effects of flexible wing deformation on aerodynamic performance of the revolving wing model. To take into account the characteristics of flapping wing kinematics we designed a kinematic model for the revolving wing in two-fold: acceleration and steady rotation, which are based on hovering wing kinematics of hawkmoth, Manduca sexta. Our results show that both aerodynamic and inertial forces demonstrate a pronounced increase during acceleration phase, which results in a significant wing deformation. While the aerodynamic force turns to reduce after the wing acceleration terminates due to the burst and detachment of leading-edge vortices (LEVs), the dynamic wing deformation seem to delay the burst of LEVs and hence to augment the aerodynamic force during and even after the acceleration. During the phase of steady rotation, the flexible wing model generates more vertical force at higher angles of attack (40°-60°) but less horizontal force than those of a rigid wing model. This is because the wing twist in spanwise owing to aerodynamic forces results in a reduction in the effective angle of attack at wing tip, which leads to enhancing the aerodynamics performance by increasing the vertical force while reducing the horizontal force. Moreover, our results point out the importance of the fluid-structure interaction in evaluating flexible wing aerodynamics: the wing deformation does play a significant role in enhancing the aerodynamic performances but works differently during acceleration and steady rotation, which is mainly induced by

  15. A Synthesis of Hybrid RANS/LES CFD Results for F-16XL Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Park, Michael A.; Hitzel, Stephan M.; Jirasek, Adam; Lofthouse, Andrew J.; Morton, Scott A.; McDaniel, David R.; Rizzi, Arthur M.

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis is presented of recent numerical predictions for the F-16XL aircraft flow fields and aerodynamics. The computational results were all performed with hybrid RANS/LES formulations, with an emphasis on unsteady flows and subsequent aerodynamics, and results from five computational methods are included. The work was focused on one particular low-speed, high angle-of-attack flight test condition, and comparisons against flight-test data are included. This work represents the third coordinated effort using the F-16XL aircraft, and a unique flight-test data set, to advance our knowledge of slender airframe aerodynamics as well as our capability for predicting these aerodynamics with advanced CFD formulations. The prior efforts were identified as Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International, with the acronyms CAWAPI and CAWAPI-2. All information in this paper is in the public domain.

  16. Two-Dimensional High-Lift Aerodynamic Optimization Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenman, Roxana M.

    1998-01-01

    The high-lift performance of a multi-element airfoil was optimized by using neural-net predictions that were trained using a computational data set. The numerical data was generated using a two-dimensional, incompressible, Navier-Stokes algorithm with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Because it is difficult to predict maximum lift for high-lift systems, an empirically-based maximum lift criteria was used in this study to determine both the maximum lift and the angle at which it occurs. The 'pressure difference rule,' which states that the maximum lift condition corresponds to a certain pressure difference between the peak suction pressure and the pressure at the trailing edge of the element, was applied and verified with experimental observations for this configuration. Multiple input, single output networks were trained using the NASA Ames variation of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for each of the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, drag and moment). The artificial neural networks were integrated with a gradient-based optimizer. Using independent numerical simulations and experimental data for this high-lift configuration, it was shown that this design process successfully optimized flap deflection, gap, overlap, and angle of attack to maximize lift. Once the neural nets were trained and integrated with the optimizer, minimal additional computer resources were required to perform optimization runs with different initial conditions and parameters. Applying the neural networks within the high-lift rigging optimization process reduced the amount of computational time and resources by 44% compared with traditional gradient-based optimization procedures for multiple optimization runs.

  17. The Effect of Aspect Ratio and Angle of Attack on the Transition Regions of the Inverted Flag Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosse, Julia; Sader, John; Fan, Boyu; Kim, Daegyoum; Gharib, Mory

    2014-11-01

    The inverted flag instability occurs when a pliable plate is held parallel to a free-stream, with the leading edge free to move and the trailing edge clamped. Large-amplitude flapping is observed across a slim band of non-dimensional wind speeds. This specific boundaries of this flapping band vary greatly, depending on both the aspect ratio and the angle of attack of the plate with respect to the incoming flow. In addition, both periodic and aperiodic flapping modes exist. The frequency of the plate motion was analyzed and was found to be consistent with vortex-induced vibration. This research is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  18. Effects of nose bluntness, roughness, and surface perturbations on the asymmetric flow past slender bodies at large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskovitz, Cary A.; Dejarnette, F. R.; Hall, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of such geometric perturbations as variations of model-tip sharpness and roughness, as well as discrete surface perturbations, on the asymmetric flow past slender bodies is experimentally investigated for the cases of a cone/cylinder model having a 10-deg semiapex angle and a 3.0-caliber tangent ogive model. Both models have base diameters of 3.5 inches, and were tested in laminar flow conditions at angles-of-attack in the 30-60 deg range. Single, discrete roughness elements were represented by beads; bead effectiveness was judged on the basis of the extent to which they affected the flowfield in various conditions.

  19. Design of an all-attitude flight control system to execute commanded bank angles and angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgin, G. H.; Eggleston, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    A flight control system for use in air-to-air combat simulation was designed. The input to the flight control system are commanded bank angle and angle of attack, the output are commands to the control surface actuators such that the commanded values will be achieved in near minimum time and sideslip is controlled to remain small. For the longitudinal direction, a conventional linear control system with gains scheduled as a function of dynamic pressure is employed. For the lateral direction, a novel control system, consisting of a linear portion for small bank angle errors and a bang-bang control system for large errors and error rates is employed.

  20. Advanced Aerodynamic Design of Passive Porosity Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Viken, Sally A.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes aerodynamic design work aimed at developing a passive porosity control effector system for a generic tailless fighter aircraft. As part of this work, a computational design tool was developed and used to layout passive porosity effector systems for longitudinal and lateral-directional control at a low-speed, high angle of attack condition. Aerodynamic analysis was conducted using the NASA Langley computational fluid dynamics code USM3D, in conjunction with a newly formulated surface boundary condition for passive porosity. Results indicate that passive porosity effectors can provide maneuver control increments that equal and exceed those of conventional aerodynamic effectors for low-speed, high-alpha flight, with control levels that are a linear function of porous area. This work demonstrates the tremendous potential of passive porosity to yield simple control effector systems that have no external moving parts and will preserve an aircraft's fixed outer mold line.

  1. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 1 publication covers configuration aerodynamics.

  2. Transonic-supersonic high Reynolds number stability and control characteristics of a 0.015-scale (remotely controlled elevon) model 44-0 of the space shuttle orbiter tested in the VSD high speed wind tunnel (LA67)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A detailed aerodynamic data base which can be used to substantiate the aerodynamic design data book for the current shuttle orbiter configuration was generated. Special attention was directed to definition of non-linear aerodynamic characteristics by taking data at small increments in the angle of attack, angle of sideslip, Mach number, and elevon position. Six-component aerodynamic force and moment and elevon position data were recorded over an angle-of-attack range from -2 deg to as high as 32 deg at angles of sideslip of 0 deg, 1 deg, and +2 deg. The test Mach numbers were 0.60, 0.80, 0.90, 1.2, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.6. The effects of Reynolds number were investigated and covered a range from 5.0 to 16.0 million per foot.

  3. High speed civil transport aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of work in support of the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) element of the Federal HPCC program. Specifically, CFD and aerodynamic optimization are being performed on parallel computers. The long-range goal of this work is to facilitate teraflops-rate multidisciplinary optimization of aerospace vehicles. This year's work is targeted for application to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), one of four CAS grand challenges identified in the HPCC FY 1995 Blue Book. This vehicle is to be a passenger aircraft, with the promise of cutting overseas flight time by more than half. To meet fuel economy, operational costs, environmental impact, noise production, and range requirements, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer, controls, and perhaps other disciplines. The fundamental goal of this project is to contribute to improved design tools for U.S. industry, and thus to the nation's economic competitiveness.

  4. Vortex flow structures and interactions for the optimum thrust efficiency of a heaving airfoil at different mean angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Alcántara, A.; Fernandez-Feria, R.; Sanmiguel-Rojas, E.

    2015-07-01

    The thrust efficiency of a two-dimensional heaving airfoil is studied computationally for a low Reynolds number using a vortex force decomposition. The auxiliary potentials that separate the total vortex force into lift and drag (or thrust) are obtained analytically by using an elliptic airfoil. With these auxiliary potentials, the added-mass components of the lift and drag (or thrust) coefficients are also obtained analytically for any heaving motion of the airfoil and for any value of the mean angle of attack α. The contributions of the leading- and trailing-edge vortices to the thrust during their down- and up-stroke evolutions are computed quantitatively with this formulation for different dimensionless frequencies and heave amplitudes (Stc and Sta) and for several values of α. Very different types of flows, periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic described as Stc, Sta, and α, are varied. The optimum values of these parameters for maximum thrust efficiency are obtained and explained in terms of the interactions between the vortices and the forces exerted by them on the airfoil. As in previous numerical and experimental studies on flapping flight at low Reynolds numbers, the optimum thrust efficiency is reached for intermediate frequencies (Stc slightly smaller than one) and a heave amplitude corresponding to an advance ratio close to unity. The optimal mean angle of attack found is zero. The corresponding flow is periodic, but it becomes chaotic and with smaller average thrust efficiency as |α| becomes slightly different from zero.

  5. Effect of a rotating propeller on the separation angle of attack and distortion in ducted propeller inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Iek, C.; Hwang, D. P.; Larkin, M.; Schweiger, P.

    1993-01-01

    The present study represents an extension of an earlier wind tunnel experiment performed with the P&W 17-in. Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) Simulator operating at Mach 0.2. In order to study the effects of a rotating propeller on the inlet flow, data were obtained in the UTRC 10- by 15-Foot Large Subsonic Wind Tunnel with the same hardware and instrumentation, but with the propeller removed. These new tests were performed over a range of flow rates which duplicated flow rates in the powered simulator program. The flow through the inlet was provided by a remotely located vacuum source. A comparison of the results of this flow-through study with the previous data from the powered simulator indicated that in the conventional inlet the propeller produced an increase in the separation angle of attack between 4.0 deg at a specific flow of 22.4 lb/sec-sq ft to 2.7 deg at a higher specific flow of 33.8 lb/sec-sq ft. A similar effect on separation angle of attack was obtained by using stationary blockage rather than a propeller.

  6. Experimental investigation of a new device to control the asymmetric flowfield on forebodies at large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskovitz, Cary A.; Hall, Robert M.; Dejarnette, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    An exploratory experimental investigation of a new device to control the asymmetric flowfield on forebodies at large angles of attack has been conducted. The device is a rotatable forebody tip, which varies in cross section from circular at its base to elliptic at its tip. The device itself extends over a small portion of the aircraft or missile forebody. The device provides two important improvements. First, it replaced the normally random behavior of the nose side force as a function of nose tip orientation with a predictable and generally sinusoidal distribution and, second, the device showed promise for use as part of a vehicle control system, to be deflected in a prescribed manner to provide additional directional control for the vehicle. The device was tested on a cone/cylinder model having a 10 deg semiapex angle and on a 3.0 caliber tangent ogive model, each with a base diameter of 3.5 in, for angles of attack from 30 to 60 deg. Data were taken from 3 circumferential rows of pressure taps on each model at a Reynolds number of 84,000 based on cylinder diameter and by a helium-bubble flow visualization technique at a Reynolds number of 24,000.

  7. Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

  8. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in area of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodyamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  9. A study of aerodynamic heating distributions on a tip-fin controller installed on a Space Shuttle Orbiter model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittliff, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The aerodynamic heating of a tip-fin controller mounted on a Space Shuttle Orbiter model was studied experimentally in the Calspan Advanced Technology Center 96 inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel. A 0.0175 scale model was tested at Mach numbers from 10 to 17.5 at angles of attack typical of a shuttle entry. The study was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 testing a thermographic phosphor technique was used to qualitatively determine the areas of high heat-transfer rates. Based on the results of this phase, the model was instrumented with 40 thin-film resistance thermometers to obtain quantitative measurements of the aerodynamic heating. The results of the phase 2 testing indicate that the highest heating rates, which occur on the leading edge of the tip-fin controller, are very sensitive to angle of attack for alpha or = 30 deg. The shock wave from the leading edge of the orbiter wing impinges on the leading edge of the tip-fin controller resulting in peak values of h/h(Ref) in the range from 1.5 to 2.0. Away from the leading edge, the heat-transfer rates never exceed h/h(Ref) = 0.25 when the control surface, is not deflected. With the control surface deflected 20 deg, the heat-transfer rates had a maximum value of h/h(Ref) = 0.3. The heating rates are quite nonuniform over the outboard surface and are sensitive to angle of attack.

  10. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Feathered Dinosaur Measured Using Physical Models. Effects of Form on Static Stability and Control Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Dennis; Cardona, Griselda; Guenther-Gleason, Eric; Huynh, Tony; Kwong, Austin; Marks, Dylan; Ray, Neil; Tisbe, Adrian; Tse, Kyle; Koehl, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    We report the effects of posture and morphology on the static aerodynamic stability and control effectiveness of physical models based on the feathered dinosaur, Microraptor gui, from the Cretaceous of China. Postures had similar lift and drag coefficients and were broadly similar when simplified metrics of gliding were considered, but they exhibited different stability characteristics depending on the position of the legs and the presence of feathers on the legs and the tail. Both stability and the function of appendages in generating maneuvering forces and torques changed as the glide angle or angle of attack were changed. These are significant because they represent an aerial environment that may have shifted during the evolution of directed aerial descent and other aerial behaviors. Certain movements were particularly effective (symmetric movements of the wings and tail in pitch, asymmetric wing movements, some tail movements). Other appendages altered their function from creating yaws at high angle of attack to rolls at low angle of attack, or reversed their function entirely. While M. gui lived after Archaeopteryx and likely represents a side experiment with feathered morphology, the general patterns of stability and control effectiveness suggested from the manipulations of forelimb, hindlimb and tail morphology here may help understand the evolution of flight control aerodynamics in vertebrates. Though these results rest on a single specimen, as further fossils with different morphologies are tested, the findings here could be applied in a phylogenetic context to reveal biomechanical constraints on extinct flyers arising from the need to maneuver. PMID:24454820

  11. Preliminary aerodynamic design considerations for advanced laminar flow aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph L., Jr.; Yip, Long P.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Modern composite manufacturing methods have provided the opportunity for smooth surfaces that can sustain large regions of natural laminar flow (NLF) boundary layer behavior and have stimulated interest in developing advanced NLF airfoils and improved aircraft designs. Some of the preliminary results obtained in exploratory research investigations on advanced aircraft configurations at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed. Results of the initial studies have shown that the aerodynamic effects of configuration variables such as canard/wing arrangements, airfoils, and pusher-type and tractor-type propeller installations can be particularly significant at high angles of attack. Flow field interactions between aircraft components were shown to produce undesirable aerodynamic effects on a wing behind a heavily loaded canard, and the use of properly designed wing leading-edge modifications, such as a leading-edge droop, offset the undesirable aerodynamic effects by delaying wing stall and providing increased stall/spin resistance with minimum degradation of laminar flow behavior.

  12. Assessment of the aerodynamic characteristics of thick airfoils in high Reynolds and moderate Ma numbers using CFD modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospathopoulos, John M.; Papadakis, Giorgos; Sieros, Giorgos; Voutsinas, Spyros G.; Chaviaropoulos, Takis K.; Diakakis, Kostas

    2014-06-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of thick airfoils in high Reynolds number is assessed using two different CFD RANS solvers: the compressible MaPFlow and the incompressible CRES-flowNS-2D both equipped with the k-ω SST turbulence model. Validation is carried out by comparing simulations against existing high Reynolds experimental data for the NACA 63-018 airfoil in the range of -10° to 20°. The use of two different solvers aims on one hand at increasing the credibility in the results and on the other at quantifying the compressibility effects. Convergence of steady simulations is achieved within a mean range of -10° to 14° which refers to attached or light stall conditions. Over this range the simulations from the two codes are in good agreement. As stall gets deeper, steady convergence ceases and the simulations must switch to unsteady. Lift and drag oscillations are produced which increase in amplitude as the angle of attack increases. Finally in post stall, the average CL is found to decrease up to ~24° or 32° for the FFA or the NACA 63-018 airfoils respectively, and then recover to higher values indicating a change in the unsteady features of the flow.

  13. Stability Analysis of a mortar cover ejected at various Mach numbers and angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Jane; Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel; Andrejczyk, Joe; Kandis, Mike

    2011-11-01

    This study utilized CFD software to predict the aerodynamic coefficient of a wedge-shaped mortar cover which is ejected from a spacecraft upon deployment of its Parachute Recovery System (PRS). Concern over recontact or collision between the mortar cover and spacecraft served as the impetus for this study in which drag and moment coefficients were determined at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 1.6 at 30-degree increments. These CFD predictions were then used as inputs to a two-dimensional, multi-body, three-DoF trajectory model to calculate the relative motion of the mortar cover and spacecraft. Based upon those simulations, the study concluded a minimal/zero risk of collision with either the spacecraft or PRS. Sponsored by Pioneer Aerospace.

  14. Effect of tail size reductions on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a three surface F-15 model with nonaxisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frassinelli, Mark C.; Carson, George T., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of horizontal and vertical tail size reductions on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a modified F-15 model with canards and 2-D convergent-divergent nozzles. Quantifying the drag decrease at low angles of attack produced by tail size reductions was the primary focus. The model was tested at Mach numbers of 0.40, 0.90, and 1.20 over an angle of attack of -2 degree to 10 degree. The nozzle exhaust flow was simulated using high pressure air at nozzle pressure ratios varying from 1.0 (jet off) to 7.5. Data were obtained on the baseline configuration with and without tails as well as with reduced horizontal and/or vertical tail sizes that were 75, 50, and 25 percent of the baseline tail areas.

  15. Aerodynamics of High-Speed Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetz, Joseph A.

    This review highlights the differences between the aerodynamics of high-speed trains and other types of transportation vehicles. The emphasis is on modern, high-speed trains, including magnetic levitation (Maglev) trains. Some of the key differences are derived from the fact that trains operate near the ground or a track, have much greater length-to-diameter ratios than other vehicles, pass close to each other and to trackside structures, are more subject to crosswinds, and operate in tunnels with entry and exit events. The coverage includes experimental techniques and results and analytical and numerical methods, concentrating on the most recent information available.

  16. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1 m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  17. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  18. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 2 publication covers the design optimization and testing sessions.

  19. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry HighSpeed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of. Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  20. Flight Investigation at Low Angles of Attack to Determine the Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of the Sidewinder Missile at Mach Numbers from 1.2 to 2.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clarence A.

    1955-01-01

    At the request of the Bureau of Ordnance, Department of the Navy, the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Division has initiated a program to investigate the general aerodynamic characteristics of the Naval Ordnance Test Station's SIDEWINDER missile. The model used in the flight test presented herein was a full-scale, rocket-propelled test vehicle. This paper presents the results from a flight test investigation using the pulsed-control technique to determine the static and dynamic longitudinal stability and control derivatives and drag data for a canard-missile configuration. The methods for obtaining these data are presented in references 1 and 2. This investigation was conducted at a small angle-of-attack range and for a Mach number range of 1.2 to 2.1. The model used in this investigation was flight-tested at the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Station at Wallops Island, Va.

  1. Summary of Inlet Characteristics of the F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Kevin; Steenken, William; Williams, John

    1998-01-01

    Effects of high-angle-of-attack flight on aircraft inlet aerodynamic characteristics were investigated at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center as part of NASA's High Alpha Technology Program. The highly instrumented F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle was used for this research. A newly designed inlet total-pressure rake was installed in front of the right-hand F404-GE-400 engine to measure inlet recovery and distortion characteristics. Objectives included: (1) determining the inlet total-pressure characteristics at steady high-angle-of-attack conditions; (2) assessing if inlet distortion is significantly different between rapid angle-of-attack maneuvers and corresponding steady aerodynamic conditions; (3) assessing inlet characteristics during aircraft departures; (4) providing data for developing and verifying computational fluid dynamic codes; and (5) calculating engine airflow using four methods for comparison with a reference method. This paper describes the results obtained from this investigation. These data and the associated database were rigorously validated to establish the foundation for understanding inlet characteristics at high angle of attack.

  2. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients using Neural Networks for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip with vehicle lateral symmetry and compressibility effects. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. In this paper a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network. The training data for the neural network is derived from wind tunnel test and numerical simulations. The coefficients of lift, drag, pitching moment are expressed as a function of alpha (angle of attack) and Mach number. The results produced from preliminary neural network analysis are very good.

  3. Coherent structure dynamics and sediment erosion mechanisms around an in-stream rectangular cylinder at low and moderate angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W. Y.; Constantinescu, George; Tsai, W. F.; Lien, H. C.

    2011-12-01

    Local scour around elongated in-stream structures (e.g., high-aspect ratio rectangular bridge piers) is mainly driven by the interactions between the erodible bed and the large-scale coherent structures generated by the presence of the flow obstruction. The present investigation uses eddy-resolving numerical simulations to study the mean flow and turbulence structure around a high-aspect ratio rectangular cylinder placed in a flat bed channel. Simulations are conducted for three angles of attack (α = 0°, 15°, and 30°) at a channel Reynolds number of 2.4 × 105. This paper focuses on the dynamics of the large-scale coherent structures forming around the rectangular cylinder and their role in controlling sediment entrainment at conditions corresponding to the start of the scour process. Simulation results show that most of the sediment is entrained from the bed by the eddies shed inside the separated shear layers (SSLs), by the legs of the necklace vortices, and by the strongly accelerated flow on the outer side of the SSLs. For α = 0° and 15°, the horseshoe vortex (HV) system plays a relatively minor role in the entrainment of sediment in front of the cylinder, and the passage of the wake vortices (rollers) results in a small amplification of the bed friction velocity. In contrast, for α = 30°, the unsteady dynamics of the main necklace vortices part of the HV system and of the roller vortices results in a significant amplification of the instantaneous bed friction velocity. The mean flux of sediment entrained from the bed calculated on the basis of the mean flow field is found to underestimate by 2-3 times the same quantity when estimated more correctly on the basis of the instantaneous flow fields. The primary reason for this underestimation is sediment entrainment in regions where the mean flow bed friction velocity is smaller than the critical value for entrainment. Quantitative information on the extent of the regions of high values of the bed friction

  4. Calculation of the flow field including boundary layer effects for supersonic mixed compression inlets at angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The flow field in supersonic mixed compression aircraft inlets at angle of attack is calculated. A zonal modeling technique is employed to obtain the solution which divides the flow field into different computational regions. The computational regions consist of a supersonic core flow, boundary layer flows adjacent to both the forebody/centerbody and cowl contours, and flow in the shock wave boundary layer interaction regions. The zonal modeling analysis is described and some computational results are presented. The governing equations for the supersonic core flow form a hyperbolic system of partial differential equations. The equations for the characteristic surfaces and the compatibility equations applicable along these surfaces are derived. The characteristic surfaces are the stream surfaces, which are surfaces composed of streamlines, and the wave surfaces, which are surfaces tangent to a Mach conoid. The compatibility equations are expressed as directional derivatives along streamlines and bicharacteristics, which are the lines of tangency between a wave surface and a Mach conoid.

  5. Vortex flow structures and interactions for the optimum thrust efficiency of a heaving airfoil at different mean angles of attack

    SciTech Connect

    Martín-Alcántara, A.; Fernandez-Feria, R.

    2015-07-15

    The thrust efficiency of a two-dimensional heaving airfoil is studied computationally for a low Reynolds number using a vortex force decomposition. The auxiliary potentials that separate the total vortex force into lift and drag (or thrust) are obtained analytically by using an elliptic airfoil. With these auxiliary potentials, the added-mass components of the lift and drag (or thrust) coefficients are also obtained analytically for any heaving motion of the airfoil and for any value of the mean angle of attack α. The contributions of the leading- and trailing-edge vortices to the thrust during their down- and up-stroke evolutions are computed quantitatively with this formulation for different dimensionless frequencies and heave amplitudes (St{sub c} and St{sub a}) and for several values of α. Very different types of flows, periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic described as St{sub c}, St{sub a}, and α, are varied. The optimum values of these parameters for maximum thrust efficiency are obtained and explained in terms of the interactions between the vortices and the forces exerted by them on the airfoil. As in previous numerical and experimental studies on flapping flight at low Reynolds numbers, the optimum thrust efficiency is reached for intermediate frequencies (St{sub c} slightly smaller than one) and a heave amplitude corresponding to an advance ratio close to unity. The optimal mean angle of attack found is zero. The corresponding flow is periodic, but it becomes chaotic and with smaller average thrust efficiency as |α| becomes slightly different from zero.

  6. CFD Simulations in Support of Shuttle Orbiter Contingency Abort Aerodynamic Database Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, Periklis E.; Prabhu, Dinesh; Wright, Michael; Davies, Carol; McDaniel, Ryan; Venkatapathy, E.; Wercinski, Paul; Gomez, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Modern Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques were used to compute aerodynamic forces and moments of the Space Shuttle Orbiter in specific portions of contingency abort trajectory space. The trajectory space covers a Mach number range of 3.5-15, an angle-of-attack range of 20deg-60deg, an altitude range of 100-190 kft, and several different settings of the control surfaces (elevons, body flap, and speed brake). Presented here are details of the methodology and comparisons of computed aerodynamic coefficients against the values in the current Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Data Book (OADB). While approximately 40 cases have been computed, only a sampling of the results is provided here. The computed results, in general, are in good agreement with the OADB data (i.e., within the uncertainty bands) for almost all the cases. However, in a limited number of high angle-of-attack cases (at Mach 15), there are significant differences between the computed results, especially the vehicle pitching moment, and the OADB data. A preliminary analysis of the data from the CFD simulations at Mach 15 shows that these differences can be attributed to real-gas/Mach number effects. The aerodynamic coefficients and detailed surface pressure distributions of the present simulations are being used by the Shuttle Program in the evaluation of the capabilities of the Orbiter in contingency abort scenarios.

  7. X-34 Vehicle Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    1998-01-01

    The X-34, being designed and built by the Orbital Sciences Corporation, is an unmanned sub-orbital vehicle designed to be used as a flying test bed to demonstrate key vehicle and operational technologies applicable to future reusable launch vehicles. The X-34 will be air-launched from an L-1011 carrier aircraft at approximately Mach 0.7 and 38,000 feet altitude, where an onboard engine will accelerate the vehicle to speeds above Mach 7 and altitudes to 250,000 feet. An unpowered entry will follow, including an autonomous landing. The X-34 will demonstrate the ability to fly through inclement weather, land horizontally at a designated site, and have a rapid turn-around capability. A series of wind tunnel tests on scaled models was conducted in four facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the X-34. Analysis of these test results revealed that longitudinal trim could be achieved throughout the design trajectory. The maximum elevon deflection required to trim was only half of that available, leaving a margin for gust alleviation and aerodynamic coefficient uncertainty. Directional control can be achieved aerodynamically except at combined high Mach numbers and high angles of attack, where reaction control jets must be used. The X-34 landing speed, between 184 and 206 knots, is within the capabilities of the gear and tires, and the vehicle has sufficient rudder authority to control the required 30-knot crosswind.

  8. Aerodynamic Design of Wing based on Humpback Whale Flipper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, Saif; Baig, Faisal

    2013-11-01

    The tubercles provide a bio-inspired design that has commercial viability for wing-like structures. Wind tunnel tests at low speeds of model humpback flippers with leading-edge tubercles have demonstrated improvements tubercles make, such as a staggering 32% reduction in drag, 8% improvement in lift, and a 40% increase in angle of attack over smooth flippers before stalling. The tubercles on the leading edge act as a passive-flow control device that improves the performance and maneuverability of the flipper. Possible fluid-dynamic mechanisms for improved performance include delay of stall through generation of a vortex and modification of the boundary layer, and increase in effective span by reduction of both spanwise flow and strength of the tip vortex. In the present work, numerical investigation of a 3D wing with scalloped leading edge inspired by the humpback whale flipper is carried out at high subsonic speeds with variation in angle of attack from 0 to 25 degrees. The effect of using different turbulence models is also investigated in order to attain a better understanding of mechanism(s) responsible for improved aerodynamic performance. This new understanding of humpback whale flipper aerodynamics has strong implications for wing design.

  9. Transonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a variable sweep wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, P. M.; Guruswamy, G. P.; Ide, H.; Miller, G.

    1985-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low-sweep and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 and 67.5 deg., respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg sweep case and also for small angles of attack at the 67.5 deg sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading edge separation vortices and are not due to shock wave motion as was previously proposed.

  10. Transonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a variable sweep wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, P. M.; Guruswamy, G. P.; Ide, H.; Miller, G.

    1985-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low-sweep and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 deg. and 67.5 deg., respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg. sweep case and also for small angles of attack at the 67.5 deg. sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading edge separation vortices and are not due to shock wave motion as was previously proposed.

  11. Recent CFD Simulations of Shuttle Orbiter Contingency Abort Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, Periklis; Prabhu, Dinesh; Wright, Michael; Davies, Carol; McDaniel, Ryan; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wersinski, Paul; Gomez, Reynaldo; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques were used to compute aerodynamic forces and moments of the Space Shuttle Orbiter in specific portions of contingency abort trajectory space. The trajectory space covers a Mach number range of 3.5-15, an angle-of-attack range of 20-60 degrees, an altitude range of 100-190 kft, and several different settings of the control surfaces (elevons, body flap, and speed brake). While approximately 40 cases have been computed, only a sampling of the results is presented here. The computed results, in general, are in good agreement with the Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Data Book (OADB) data (i.e., within the uncertainty bands) for almost all the cases. However, in a limited number of high angle-of-attack cases (at Mach 15), there are significant differences between the computed results, especially the vehicle pitching moment, and the OADB data. A preliminary analysis of the data from the CFD simulations at Mach 15 shows that these differences can be attributed to real-gas/Mach number effects.

  12. Improvements to the missile aerodynamic prediction code DEMON3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillenius, Marnix F. E.; Johnson, David L.; Lesieutre, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The computer program DEMON3 was developed for the aerodynamic analysis of nonconventional supersonic configurations comprising a body with noncircular cross section and up to two wing or fin sections. Within a wing or fin section, the lifting surfaces may be cruciform, triform, planar, or low profile layouts; the planforms of the lifting surfaces allow for breaks in sweep. The body and fin sections are modeled by triplet and constant u-velocity panels, respectively, accounting for mutual body-fin interference. Fin thickness effects are included for the use of supersonic planar source panels. One of the unique features of DEMON3 is the modeling of high angle of attack vortical effects associated with the lifting surfaces and the body. In addition, shock expansion and Newtonian pressure calculation methods can be optionally engaged. These two dimensional nonlinear methods are augmented by aerodynamic interference determined from the linear panel methods. Depending on the geometric details of the body, the DEMON3 program can be used to analyze nonconventional configurations at angles of attack up to 25 degrees for Mach numbers from 1.1 to 6. Calculative results and comparisons with experimental data demonstrate the capabilities of DEMON3. Limitations and deficiencies are listed.

  13. Hypersonic and Supersonic Static Aerodynamics of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyakonov, Artem A.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Vannorman, John W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of continuum static aerodynamics of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry vehicle (EV). The method is derived from earlier work for Mars Exploration Rover (MER) and Mars Path Finder (MPF) and the appropriate additions are made in the areas where physics are different from what the prior entry systems would encounter. These additions include the considerations for the high angle of attack of MSL EV, ablation of the heatshield during entry, turbulent boundary layer, and other aspects relevant to the flight performance of MSL. Details of the work, the supporting data and conclusions of the investigation are presented.

  14. Ares I Aerodynamic Testing at the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Hanke, Jeremy L.; Tomek, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout three full design analysis cycles, the Ares I project within the Constellation program has consistently relied on the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel (PSWT) for aerodynamic testing of the subsonic, transonic and supersonic portions of the atmospheric flight envelope (Mach=0.5 to 4.5). Each design cycle required the development of aerodynamic databases for the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) forces and moments, as well as distributed line-loads databases covering the full range of Mach number, total angle-of-attack, and aerodynamic roll angle. The high fidelity data collected in this facility has been consistent with the data collected in NASA Langley s Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at the overlapping condition ofMach=1.6. Much insight into the aerodynamic behavior of the launch vehicle during all phases of flight was gained through wind tunnel testing. Important knowledge pertaining to slender launch vehicle aerodynamics in particular was accumulated. In conducting these wind tunnel tests and developing experimental aerodynamic databases, some challenges were encountered and are reported as lessons learned in this paper for the benefit of future crew launch vehicle aerodynamic developments.

  15. The aerodynamics of insect flight.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P

    2003-12-01

    The flight of insects has fascinated physicists and biologists for more than a century. Yet, until recently, researchers were unable to rigorously quantify the complex wing motions of flapping insects or measure the forces and flows around their wings. However, recent developments in high-speed videography and tools for computational and mechanical modeling have allowed researchers to make rapid progress in advancing our understanding of insect flight. These mechanical and computational fluid dynamic models, combined with modern flow visualization techniques, have revealed that the fluid dynamic phenomena underlying flapping flight are different from those of non-flapping, 2-D wings on which most previous models were based. In particular, even at high angles of attack, a prominent leading edge vortex remains stably attached on the insect wing and does not shed into an unsteady wake, as would be expected from non-flapping 2-D wings. Its presence greatly enhances the forces generated by the wing, thus enabling insects to hover or maneuver. In addition, flight forces are further enhanced by other mechanisms acting during changes in angle of attack, especially at stroke reversal, the mutual interaction of the two wings at dorsal stroke reversal or wing-wake interactions following stroke reversal. This progress has enabled the development of simple analytical and empirical models that allow us to calculate the instantaneous forces on flapping insect wings more accurately than was previously possible. It also promises to foster new and exciting multi-disciplinary collaborations between physicists who seek to explain the phenomenology, biologists who seek to understand its relevance to insect physiology and evolution, and engineers who are inspired to build micro-robotic insects using these principles. This review covers the basic physical principles underlying flapping flight in insects, results of recent experiments concerning the aerodynamics of insect flight, as well

  16. Analysis of extremal lift behavior of a semicircular airfoil in a turbulent airflow at a near-zero angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Miau, J.-J.; Sudakov, A. G.; Usachov, A. E.

    2015-08-01

    The experimentally discovered phenomenon of lift drop for a semicircular airfoil in a turbulent airflow at a near-zero angle of attack has been numerically analyzed with multiblock computational technologies using a shear-stress-transfer model modified with allowance for the curvature of flow lines.

  17. Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Stability Experiments on a Flared-Cone Model at Angle of Attack in a Quiet Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, Glen P.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of angle of attack on hypersonic boundary-layer stability on a flared-cone model was conducted in the low-disturbance Mach-6 Nozzle-Test Chamber Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. This unique facility provided a 'quiet' flow test environment which is well suited for stability experiments because the low levels of freestream 'noise' minimize artificial stimulation of flow-disturbance growth. Surface pressure and temperature measurements documented the adverse-pressure gradient and transition-onset location. Hot-wire anemometry diagnostics were applied to identify the instability mechanisms which lead to transition. In addition, the mean flow over the flared-cone geometry was modeled by laminar Navier-Stokes computations. Results show that the boundary layer becomes more stable on the windward ray and less stable on the leeward ray relative to the zero-degree angle-of-attack case. The second-mode instability dominates the transition process at a zero-degree angle of attack, however, on the windward ray at an angle of attack this mode was completely stabilized. The less-dominant first-mode instability was slightly destabilized on the windward ray. Non-linear mechanisms such as saturation and harmonic generation are identified from the flow-disturbance bispectra.

  18. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficient using Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Wind tunnels use scale models to characterize aerodynamic coefficients, Wind tunnel testing can be slow and costly due to high personnel overhead and intensive power utilization. Although manual curve fitting can be done, it is highly efficient to use a neural network to define the complex relationship between variables. Numerical simulation of complex vehicles on the wide range of conditions required for flight simulation requires static and dynamic data. Static data at low Mach numbers and angles of attack may be obtained with simpler Euler codes. Static data of stalled vehicles where zones of flow separation are usually present at higher angles of attack require Navier-Stokes simulations which are costly due to the large processing time required to attain convergence. Preliminary dynamic data may be obtained with simpler methods based on correlations and vortex methods; however, accurate prediction of the dynamic coefficients requires complex and costly numerical simulations. A reliable and fast method of predicting complex aerodynamic coefficients for flight simulation I'S presented using a neural network. The training data for the neural network are derived from numerical simulations and wind-tunnel experiments. The aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of the flow characteristics and the control surfaces of the vehicle. The basic coefficients of lift, drag and pitching moment are expressed as functions of angles of attack and Mach number. The modeled and training aerodynamic coefficients show good agreement. This method shows excellent potential for rapid development of aerodynamic models for flight simulation. Genetic Algorithms (GA) are used to optimize a previously built Artificial Neural Network (ANN) that reliably predicts aerodynamic coefficients. Results indicate that the GA provided an efficient method of optimizing the ANN model to predict aerodynamic coefficients. The reliability of the ANN using the GA includes prediction of aerodynamic

  19. Control research in the NASA high-alpha technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, William P.; Nguyen, Luat T.; Gera, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    NASA is conducting a focused technology program, known as the High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program, to accelerate the development of flight-validated technology applicable to the design of fighters with superior stall and post-stall characteristics and agility. A carefully integrated effort is underway combining wind tunnel testing, analytical predictions, piloted simulation, and full-scale flight research. A modified F-18 aircraft has been extensively instrumented for use as the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle used for flight verification of new methods and concepts. This program stresses the importance of providing improved aircraft control capabilities both by powered control (such as thrust-vectoring) and by innovative aerodynamic control concepts. The program is accomplishing extensive coordinated ground and flight testing to assess and improve available experimental and analytical methods and to develop new concepts for enhanced aerodynamics and for effective control, guidance, and cockpit displays essential for effective pilot utilization of the increased agility provided.

  20. Experimental Aerodynamic Characteristics of the Pegasus Air-Launched Booster and Comparisons with Predicted and Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, M. N.; Engelund, Walter C.; Mendenhall, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics were obtained for the Pegasus and Pegasus XL configurations over a Mach number range from 1.6 to 6 and angles of attack from -4 to +24 degrees. Angle of sideslip was varied from -6 to +6 degrees, and control surfaces were deflected to obtain elevon, aileron, and rudder effectiveness. Experimental data for the Pegasus configuration are compared with engineering code predictions performed by Nielsen Engineering & Research, Inc. (NEAR) in the aerodynamic design of the Pegasus vehicle, and with results from the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS) code. Comparisons of experimental results are also made with longitudinal flight data from Flight #2 of the Pegasus vehicle. Results show that the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of the Pegasus and Pegasus XL configurations are similar, having the same lift-curve slope and drag levels across the Mach number range. Both configurations are longitudinally stable, with stability decreasing towards neutral levels as Mach number increases. Directional stability is negative at moderate to high angles of attack due to separated flow over the vertical tail. Dihedral effect is positive for both configurations, but is reduced 30-50 percent for the Pegasus XL configuration because of the horizontal tail anhedral. Predicted longitudinal characteristics and both longitudinal and lateral-directional control effectiveness are generally in good agreement with experiment. Due to the complex leeside flowfield, lateral-directional characteristics are not as well predicted by the engineering codes. Experiment and flight data are in good agreement across the Mach number range.

  1. SANDRAG: a computer code for predicting drag of bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack in incompressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1985-04-01

    A design method is presented for calculating the flow field and drag of bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack in compressible flow. The body pressure distribution, viscous shear stress, and boundary layer separation point are calculated by a combination of a potential flow method and boundary layer techniques. The potential solution is obtained by modeling the body with an axial distribution of source/sink elements whose strengths vary linearly along their length. Both the laminar and turbulent boundary layer solutions use momentum integral techniques which have been modified to account for the effects of surface roughness. An existing technique for estimating the location of transition was also modified to include surface roughness. Empirical correlations are developed to estimate the base pressure coefficient on a wide variety of geometries. Body surface pressure distributions and drag predictions are compared with experimental data for artillery projectiles, conical, and flared bodies. Very good agreement between the present method and experiment is obtained. 30 refs., 31 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Investigation of wall temperature and angle of attack effects on boundary layer stability over a blunt cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Liang; Xinliang, Li

    2014-11-01

    A new PSE (parabolized stability equations) method based on the general orthogonal curvilinear system of coordinates is developed. Combined with DNS data, the PSE method is used to investigate the effects of wall temperature and angle of attack (AOA) on stability of the boundary layer over a blunt cone. Results indicate that cooling the surface leads to higher wave number appearing in streamwise for a given frequency disturbance wave. Cooling the surface induces stronger harmonic and 3D disturbances comparing to the adiabatic wall case, which further accelerates the growth of multi disturbance modes in blunt cone boundary layer. Thus finally decreases the transition Reynolds number. Although the non-parallelism is markedly in conical flow, the non-parallel effects on the evolution characteristic of disturbance is not so obviously. So the PSE approach is a useful method in analysis of the hypersonic boundary layer stability over a blunt cone. The combined effects of the wall temperature and the AOA on the transition over the blunt cone are further to be studied in our present work. Many new nonmonotonic changes of transition position versus above variables have been found. This work was supported by the NSFC Projects (11372330, 11072248), the 863 Program (No. 2012AA01A304) and the CAS Program (Nos. KJCX2-EW-J01, XXH12503-02-02-04).

  3. Flight Test Results of an Angle of Attack and Angle of Sideslip Calibration Method Using Output-Error Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siu, Marie-Michele; Martos, Borja; Foster, John V.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a joint partnership between the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) and the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI), research on advanced air data calibration methods has been in progress. This research was initiated to expand a novel pitot-static calibration method that was developed to allow rapid in-flight calibration for the NASA Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) facility. This approach uses Global Positioning System (GPS) technology coupled with modern system identification methods that rapidly computes optimal pressure error models over a range of airspeed with defined confidence bounds. Subscale flight tests demonstrated small 2-s error bounds with significant reduction in test time compared to other methods. Recent UTSI full scale flight tests have shown airspeed calibrations with the same accuracy or better as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) accepted GPS 'four-leg' method in a smaller test area and in less time. The current research was motivated by the desire to extend this method for inflight calibration of angle of attack (AOA) and angle of sideslip (AOS) flow vanes. An instrumented Piper Saratoga research aircraft from the UTSI was used to collect the flight test data and evaluate flight test maneuvers. Results showed that the output-error approach produces good results for flow vane calibration. In addition, maneuvers for pitot-static and flow vane calibration can be integrated to enable simultaneous and efficient testing of each system.

  4. A Transonic Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Model of the Lockheed XF-104 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hieser, Gerald; Reid, Charles F.

    1954-01-01

    The transonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.0858-scale model of the Lockheed XF-104 airplane have been obtained from tests at the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. The results of the investigation provide some general information applicable to the transonic properties of thin, low-aspect-ratio, unswept wing configurations utilizing a high horizontal tail . The model employs a horizontal tail mounted at the top of the vertical tail and a wing with an aspect ratio of 2.5, a taper ratio of 0.385, and 3.4-percent-thick airfoil sections. The lift, drag, and static longitudinal pitching moment were measured at Mach numbers from 0.80 t o 1.09 and angles of attack from -2.5 deg to 22.5 deg. Some of the dynamic longitudinal stability properties of the airplane have been predicted from the test results. In addition, some visual flow studies on the wing surfaces obtained at Mach numbers of 0.80 and 1.00 are included. Results of the investigation show that the transonic rise in drag coefficient at zero lift is about 0.030. At high angles of attack, the model becomes longitudinally unstable at Mach numbers from 0.80 t o 0.90, whereas a reduction in static stability is experienced when very high angles of attack are reached at Mach numbers above 0.90. Longitudinal dynamic stability calculations show that the longitudinal control is good at angles of attack below the unstable break in the static pitching-moment curves, but a typical corrective control applied after the occurrence of neutral stability has little effect in averting pitch-up.

  5. Unstructured Grid Viscous Flow Simulation Over High-Speed Research Technology Concept Airplane at High-Lift Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Numerical viscous solutions based on an unstructured grid methodology are presented for a candidate high-speed civil transport configuration, designated as the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA), within the High-Speed Research (HSR) program. The numerical results are obtained on a representative TCA high-lift configuration that consisted of the fuselage and the wing, with deflected full-span leading-edge and trailing-edge flaps. Typical on-and off-surface flow structures, computed at high-lift conditions appropriate for the takeoff and landing, indicated features that are generally plausible. Reasonable surface pressure correlations between the numerical results and the experimental data are obtained at free-stream Mach number M(sub infinity) = 0.25 and Reynolds number based on bar-c R(sub c) = 8 x 10(exp 6) for moderate angles of attack of 9.7 deg. and 13.5 deg. However, above and below this angle-of-attack range, the correlation between computed and measured pressure distributions starts to deteriorate over the examined angle-of-attack range. The predicted longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are shown to correlate very well with existing experimental data across the examined angle-of-attack range. An excellent agreement is also obtained between the predicted lift-to-drag ratio and the experimental data over the examined range of flow conditions.

  6. Unsteady Aerodynamic Modeling in Roll for the NASA Generic Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Klein, Vladislav; Frink, Neal T.

    2012-01-01

    Reducing the impact of loss-of-control conditions on commercial transport aircraft is a primary goal of the NASA Aviation Safety Program. One aspect in developing the supporting technologies is to improve the aerodynamic models that represent these adverse conditions. Aerodynamic models appropriate for loss of control conditions require a more general mathematical representation to predict nonlinear unsteady behaviors. In this paper, a more general mathematical model is proposed for the subscale NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) that covers both low and high angles of attack. Particular attention is devoted to the stall region where full-scale transports have demonstrated a tendency for roll instability. The complete aerodynamic model was estimated from dynamic wind-tunnel data. Advanced computational methods are used to improve understanding and visualize the flow physics within the region where roll instability is a factor.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary layer transition over a blunt cone with a small angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinliang; Fu, Dexun; Ma, Yanwen

    2010-02-01

    The direct numerical simulation of boundary layer transition over a 5° half-cone-angle blunt cone is performed. The free-stream Mach number is 6 and the angle of attack is 1°. Random wall blow-and-suction perturbations are used to trigger the transition. Different from the authors' previous work [Li et al., AIAA J. 46, 2899 (2008)], the whole boundary layer flow over the cone is simulated (while in the author's previous work, only two 45° regions around the leeward and the windward sections are simulated). The transition location on the cone surface is determined through the rapid increase in skin fraction coefficient (Cf). The transition line on the cone surface shows a nonmonotonic curve and the transition is delayed in the range of 20°≤θ≤30° (θ =0° is the leeward section). The mechanism of the delayed transition is studied by using joint frequency spectrum analysis and linear stability theory (LST). It is shown that the growth rates of unstable waves of the second mode are suppressed in the range of 20°≤θ≤30°, which leads to the delayed transition location. Very low frequency waves (VLFWs) are found in the time series recorded just before the transition location, and the periodic times of VLFWs are about one order larger than those of ordinary Mack second mode waves. Band-pass filter is used to analyze the low frequency waves, and they are deemed as the effect of large scale nonlinear perturbations triggered by LST waves when they are strong enough.

  8. Pigeons produce aerodynamic torques through changes in wing trajectory during low speed aerial turns.

    PubMed

    Ros, Ivo G; Badger, Marc A; Pierson, Alyssa N; Bassman, Lori C; Biewener, Andrew A

    2015-02-01

    The complexity of low speed maneuvering flight is apparent from the combination of two critical aspects of this behavior: high power and precise control. To understand how such control is achieved, we examined the underlying kinematics and resulting aerodynamic mechanisms of low speed turning flight in the pigeon (Columba livia). Three birds were trained to perform 90 deg level turns in a stereotypical fashion and detailed three-dimensional (3D) kinematics were recorded at high speeds. Applying the angular momentum principle, we used mechanical modeling based on time-varying 3D inertia properties of individual sections of the pigeon's body to separate angular accelerations of the torso based on aerodynamics from those based on inertial effects. Directly measured angular accelerations of the torso were predicted by aerodynamic torques, justifying inferences of aerodynamic torque generation based on inside wing versus outside wing kinematics. Surprisingly, contralateral asymmetries in wing speed did not appear to underlie the 90 deg aerial turns, nor did contralateral differences in wing area, angle of attack, wingbeat amplitude or timing. Instead, torso angular accelerations into the turn were associated with the outside wing sweeping more anteriorly compared with a more laterally directed inside wing. In addition to moving through a relatively more retracted path, the inside wing was also more strongly pronated about its long axis compared with the outside wing, offsetting any difference in aerodynamic angle of attack that might arise from the observed asymmetry in wing trajectories. Therefore, to generate roll and pitch torques into the turn, pigeons simply reorient their wing trajectories toward the desired flight direction. As a result, by acting above the center of mass, the net aerodynamic force produced by the wings is directed inward, generating the necessary torques for turning. PMID:25452503

  9. Aerodynamics and vortical structures in hovering fruitflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xue Guang; Sun, Mao

    2015-03-01

    We measure the wing kinematics and morphological parameters of seven freely hovering fruitflies and numerically compute the flows of the flapping wings. The computed mean lift approximately equals to the measured weight and the mean horizontal force is approximately zero, validating the computational model. Because of the very small relative velocity of the wing, the mean lift coefficient required to support the weight is rather large, around 1.8, and the Reynolds number of the wing is low, around 100. How such a large lift is produced at such a low Reynolds number is explained by combining the wing motion data, the computed vortical structures, and the theory of vorticity dynamics. It has been shown that two unsteady mechanisms are responsible for the high lift. One is referred as to "fast pitching-up rotation": at the start of an up- or downstroke when the wing has very small speed, it fast pitches down to a small angle of attack, and then, when its speed is higher, it fast pitches up to the angle it normally uses. When the wing pitches up while moving forward, large vorticity is produced and sheds at the trailing edge, and vorticity of opposite sign is produced near the leading edge and on the upper surface, resulting in a large time rate of change of the first moment of vorticity (or fluid impulse), hence a large aerodynamic force. The other is the well known "delayed stall" mechanism: in the mid-portion of the up- or downstroke the wing moves at large angle of attack (about 45 deg) and the leading-edge-vortex (LEV) moves with the wing; thus, the vortex ring, formed by the LEV, the tip vortices, and the starting vortex, expands in size continuously, producing a large time rate of change of fluid impulse or a large aerodynamic force.

  10. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Slender Cone-cylinder Body of Revolution at a Mach Number of 3.85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, John R

    1951-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the aerodynamics of a slender cone-cylinder body of revolution was conducted at a Mach number of 3.85 for angles of attack of 0 degree to 10 degrees and a Reynolds number of 3.85x10(exp 6). Boundary-layer measurements at zero angle of attack are compared with the compressible-flow formulations for predicting laminar boundary-layer characteristics. Comparison of experimental pressure and force values with theoretical values showed relatively good agreement for small angles of attack. The measured mean skin-friction coefficients agreed well with theoretical values obtained for laminar flow over cones.

  11. Hovering flight in the honeybee Apis mellifera: kinematic mechanisms for varying aerodynamic forces.

    PubMed

    Vance, Jason T; Altshuler, Douglas L; Dickson, William B; Dickinson, Michael H; Roberts, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    During hovering flight, animals can increase the wing velocity and therefore the net aerodynamic force per stroke by increasing wingbeat frequency, wing stroke amplitude, or both. The magnitude and orientation of aerodynamic forces are also influenced by the geometric angle of attack, timing of wing rotation, wing contact, and pattern of deviation from the primary stroke plane. Most of the kinematic data available for flying animals are average values for wing stroke amplitude and wingbeat frequency because these features are relatively easy to measure, but it is frequently suggested that the more subtle and difficult-to-measure features of wing kinematics can explain variation in force production for different flight behaviors. Here, we test this hypothesis with multicamera high-speed recording and digitization of wing kinematics of honeybees (Apis mellifera) hovering and ascending in air and hovering in a hypodense gas (heliox: 21% O2, 79% He). Bees employed low stroke amplitudes (86.7° ± 7.9°) and high wingbeat frequencies (226.8 ± 12.8 Hz) when hovering in air. When ascending in air or hovering in heliox, bees increased stroke amplitude by 30%-45%, which yielded a much higher wing tip velocity relative to that during simple hovering in air. Across the three flight conditions, there were no statistical differences in the amplitude of wing stroke deviation, minimum and stroke-averaged geometric angle of attack, maximum wing rotation velocity, or even wingbeat frequency. We employed a quasi-steady aerodynamic model to estimate the effects of wing tip velocity and geometric angle of attack on lift and drag. Lift forces were sensitive to variation in wing tip velocity, whereas drag was sensitive to both variation in wing tip velocity and angle of attack. Bees utilized kinematic patterns that did not maximize lift production but rather maintained lift-to-drag ratio. Thus, our data indicate that, at least for honeybees, the overall time course of wing angles is

  12. Determination of corrections to flow direction sensor measurements over an angle-of-attack range from 0 degree to 85 degrees. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., August 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moul, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted into the nature of corrections for angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip measurements obtained with sensors mounted in front of each wingtip of a general aviation airplane. These flow corrections have been obtained from both wind-tunnel and flight tests over an angle-of-attack range from 0 to 85 deg. Both the angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip flow corrections were found to be substantial. The corrections were a function of the angle of attack and angle of sideslip and were fairly insensitive to configuration changes and rotational effects. The angle-of-attack flow correction determined from the static wind-tunnel tests agreed reasonably well with the correction determined from flight tests.

  13. Aerodynamic window for high precision laser drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Steffen; Dausinger, Friedrich; Berger, Peter; Hügel, Helmuth

    2007-05-01

    High precision laser drilling is getting more and more interesting for industry. Main applications for such holes are vaporising and injection nozzles. To enhance quality, the energy deposition has to be accurately defined by reducing the pulse duration and thereby reducing the amount of disturbing melting layer. In addition, an appropriate processing technology, for example the helical drilling, yields holes in steel at 1 mm thickness and diameters about 100 μm with correct roundness and thin recast layers. However, the processing times are still not short enough for industrial use. Experiments have shown that the reduction of the atmospheric pressure down to 100 hPa enhances the achievable quality and efficiency, but the use of vacuum chambers in industrial processes is normally quite slow and thus expensive. The possibility of a very fast evacuation is given by the use of an aerodynamic window, which produces the pressure reduction by virtue of its fluid dynamic features. This element, based on a potential vortex, was developed and patented as out-coupling window for high power CO II lasers by IFSW 1, 2, 3. It has excellent tightness and transmission properties, and a beam deflection is not detectable. The working medium is compressed air, only. For the use as vacuum element for laser drilling, several geometrical modifications had to be realized. The prototype is small enough to be integrated in a micromachining station and has a low gas flow. During the laser pulse, which is focussed through the potential flow, a very high fluence is reached, but the measurements have not shown any beam deflection or focal shifting. The evacuation time is below 300 ms so that material treatment with changing ambient pressure is possible, too. Experimental results have proven the positive effect of the reduced ambient pressure on the drilling process for the regime of nano- and picosecond laser pulses. Plasma effects are reduced and, because of the less absorption, the

  14. Studying transient motion modes with respect to the landing module angle of attack with the restoring moment triharmonic characteristic on entering the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinova, E. V.; Timbai, I. A.

    2015-05-01

    A change in the angle of attack oscillation amplitude in the spatial motion of an uncontrolled landing module at the restoring moment, described by the odd Fourier series with respect to the angle of attack with the first three harmonics, is considered. Phase trajectory evolution is studied based on an analysis of the action integral, for which the analytical expressions have been found. The formula for the time of appearance of additional equilibrium positions on the phase portrait and for the time of transition between different phase plane regions has been found. The formulas for determining the probability of capture in any region have been found for situations of motion when a phase point can fall in different oscillation regions when crossing the separatrix.

  15. Aerodynamic tests of Darrieus wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Walters, R.E.; Wolfe, W.P.

    1983-03-01

    An indoor facility for the aerodynamic testing of Darrieus turbine blades was developed. Lift, drag, and moment coefficients were measured for two blades whose angle of attack and chord-to-radius ratio were varied. The first blade used an NACA 0015 airfoil section; the second used a 15% elliptical cross section with a modified circular arc trailing edge. Blade aerodynamic coefficients were corrected to section coefficients for comparison to published rectilinear flow data. Although the airfoil sections were symmetrical, moment coefficients were not zero and the lift and drag curves were asymmetrical about zero lift coefficient and angle of attack. These features verified the predicted virtual camber and incidence phenomena. Boundary-layer centrifugal effects were manifested by discontinuous lift curves and large differences in the angle of zero lift between th NACA 0015 and elliptical airfoils. It was concluded that rectilinear flow aerodynamic data are not applicable to Darrieus turbine blades, even for small chord-to-radius ratios.

  16. Forebody Aerodynamics of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle with Actuated Forebody Strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2001-01-01

    Extensive pressure measurements and off-surface flow visualization were obtained on the forebody and strakes of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) equipped with actuated forebody strakes. Forebody yawing moments were obtained by integrating the circumferential pressures on the forebody and strakes. Results show that large yawing moments can be generated with forebody strakes. At a 50 deg-angle-of-attack, deflecting one strake at a time resulted in a forebody yawing moment control reversal for small strake deflection angles. However, deflecting the strakes differentially about a 20 deg symmetric strake deployment eliminated the control reversal and produced a near linear variation of forebody yawing moment with differential strake deflection. At an angle of attack of 50 deg and for 0 deg and 20 deg symmetric strake deployments, a larger forebody yawing moment was generated by the forward fuselage (between the radome and the apex of the leading-edge extensions) than on the radome where the actuated forebody strakes were located. Cutouts on the flight vehicle strakes that were not on the wind tunnel models are believed to be responsible for deficits in the suction peaks on the flight radome pressure distributions and differences in the forebody yawing moments.

  17. Forebody Aerodynamics of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle with Actuated Forebody Strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2003-01-01

    Extensive pressure measurements and off-surface flow visualization were obtained on the forebody and strakes of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) equipped with actuated forebody strakes. Forebody yawing moments were obtained by integrating the circumferential pressures on the forebody and strakes. Results show that large yawing moments can be generated with forebody strakes. At a 50 -angle-of-attack, deflecting one strake at a time resulted in a forebody yawing moment control reversal for small strake deflection angles. However, deflecting the strakes differentially about a 20 symmetric strake deployment eliminated the control reversal and produced a near linear variation of forebody yawing moment with differential strake deflection. At an angle of attack of 50 and for 0 and 20 symmetric strake deployments, a larger forebody yawing moment was generated by the forward fuselage (between the radome and the apex of the leading-edge extensions) than on the radome where the actuated forebody strakes were located. Cutouts on the flight vehicle strakes that were not on the wind tunnel models are believed to be responsible for deficits in the suction peaks on the flight radome pressure distributions and differences in the forebody yawing moments.

  18. Effects of leading-edge devices on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a highly-swept arrow-wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, S. J.; Nicks, O. W.; Imbrie, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Texas A&M University 7 by 10 foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel to provide a direct comparison of the effect of several leading edge devices on the aerodynamic performance of a highly swept wing configuration. Analysis of the data indicates that for the configuration with undeflected leading edges, vortex separation first occurs on the outboard wing panel for angles of attack of approximately 2, and wing apex vorticies become apparent for alpha or = 4 deg. However, the occurrence of the leading edge vortex flow may be postponed with leading edge devices. Of the devices considered, the most promising were a simple leading edge deflection of 30 deg and a leading edge slat system. The trailing edge flap effectiveness was found to be essentially the same for the configuration employing either of these more promising leading edge devices. Analysis of the lateral directional data showed that for all of the concepts considered, deflecting leading edge downward in an attempt to postpone leading edge vortex flows, has the favorable effect of reducing the effective dihedral.

  19. Aerodynamics for the Mars Phoenix Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Desai, Prasun N.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Pre-flight aerodynamics data for the Mars Phoenix entry capsule are presented. The aerodynamic coefficients were generated as a function of total angle-of-attack and either Knudsen number, velocity, or Mach number, depending on the flight regime. The database was constructed using continuum flowfield computations and data from the Mars Exploration Rover and Viking programs. Hypersonic and supersonic static coefficients were derived from Navier-Stokes solutions on a pre-flight design trajectory. High-altitude data (free-molecular and transitional regimes) and dynamic pitch damping characteristics were taken from Mars Exploration Rover analysis and testing. Transonic static coefficients from Viking wind tunnel tests were used for capsule aerodynamics under the parachute. Static instabilities were predicted at two points along the reference trajectory and were verified by reconstructed flight data. During the hypersonic instability, the capsule was predicted to trim at angles as high as 2.5 deg with an on-axis center-of-gravity. Trim angles were predicted for off-nominal pitching moment (4.2 deg peak) and a 5 mm off-axis center-ofgravity (4.8 deg peak). Finally, hypersonic static coefficient sensitivities to atmospheric density were predicted to be within uncertainty bounds.

  20. Low subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of five irregular planform wings with systematically varying wing fillet geometry tested in the NASA/Ames 12 foot pressure tunnel (LA65)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, J. W.; Watson, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical aerodynamic program to develop predesign guides for irregular planform wings (also referred to as cranked leading edge or double delta wings is reported; the benefits are linearization of subsonic lift curve slope to high angles of attack and avoidance of subsonic pitch instabilities at high lift by proper tailoring of the planform-fillet-wing combination while providing the desired hypersonic trim angle and stability. Because subsonic and hypersonic conditions were the two prime areas of concern in the initial application of this program to optimize shuttle orbiter landing and entry characteristics, the study was designated the Subsonic/Hypersonic Irregular Planforms Study (SHIPS).

  1. LTSTAR- SUPERSONIC WING NON-LINEAR AERODYNAMICS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Supersonic Wing Nonlinear Aerodynamics computer program, LTSTAR, was developed to provide for the estimation of the nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics of a wing at supersonic speeds. This corrected linearized-theory method accounts for nonlinearities in the variation of basic pressure loadings with local surface slopes, predicts the degree of attainment of theoretical leading-edge thrust forces, and provides an estimate of detached leading-edge vortex loadings that result when the theoretical thrust forces are not fully realized. Comparisons of LTSTAR computations with experimental results show significant improvements in detailed wing pressure distributions, particularly for large angles of attack and for regions of the wing where the flow is highly three-dimensional. The program provides generally improved predictions of the wing overall force and moment coefficients. LTSTAR could be useful in design studies aimed at aerodynamic performance optimization and for providing more realistic trade-off information for selection of wing planform geometry and airfoil section parameters. Input to the LTSTAR program includes wing planform data, freestream conditions, wing camber, wing thickness, scaling options, and output options. Output includes pressure coefficients along each chord, section normal and axial force coefficients, and the spanwise distribution of section force coefficients. With the chordwise distributions and section coefficients at each angle of attack, three sets of polars are output. The first set is for linearized theory with and without full leading-edge thrust, the second set includes nonlinear corrections, and the third includes estimates of attainable leading-edge thrust and vortex increments along with the nonlinear corrections. The LTSTAR program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 150K (octal) of 60 bit words. The LTSTAR

  2. Transition aerodynamics for close-coupled wing-canard configuration. [V/STOL operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, J. W., Jr.; Thomas, J. L.; Winston, M. M.

    1979-01-01

    A series of wind-tunnel tests have been conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel to investigate the low-speed longitudinal aerodynamics of two powered close-coupled wing-canard fighter configurations. A brief review is provided of the high angle-of-attack data for the two wing-canard configurations tested showing the benefits and problem areas of powered lift. A takeoff and landing analysis is presented which defines the area in which a fighter-type aircraft must operate in order to achieve 305-m field lengths. The wing-canard configuration data are analyzed in detail showing the problems of obtaining high lift, high drag, and trimmed moments. Assuming that power will be used to trim the aircraft, data are presented comparing the transition aerodynamics of the wing-canard configuration using a nose jet with several V/STOL configurations.

  3. Low-speed longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics through poststall for 21 novel planform shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Mcgrath, Brian E.

    1995-01-01

    To identify planform characteristics which have promise for a highly maneuverable vehicle, an investigation was conducted in the Langley Subsonic Basic Research Tunnel to determine the low-speed longitudinal aerodynamics of 21 planform geometries. Concepts studied included twin bodies, double wings, cutout wings, and serrated forebodies. The planform models tested were all 1/4-in.-thick flat plates with beveled edges on the lower surface to ensure uniform flow separation at angle of attack. A 1.0-in.-diameter cylindrical metric body with a hemispherical nose was used to house the six-component strain gauge balance for each configuration. Aerodynamic force and moment data were obtained across an angle-of-attack range of 0 to 70 deg with zero sideslip at a free-stream dynamic pressure of 30 psf. Surface flow visualization studies were also conducted on selected configurations using fluorescent minitufts. Results from the investigation indicate that a cutout wing planform can improve lift characteristics; however, cutout size, shape, and position and wing leading-edge sweep will all influence the effectiveness of the cutout configuration. Tests of serrated forebodies identified this concept as an extremely effective means of improving configuration lift characteristics; increases of up to 25 percent in the value of maximum lift coefficient were obtained.

  4. Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Transport-type Airfoil in a Simulated Heavy Rain Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of simulated heavy rain on the aerodynamic characteristics of an NACA 64-210 airfoil section equipped with leading-and trailing-edge high-lift devices were investigated in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The model had a chord of 2.5 ft, a span of 8 ft, and was mounted on the tunnel centerline between two large endplates. Aerodynamic measurements in and out of the simulated rain environment were obtained for dynamic pressures of 30 and 50 psf and an angle-of-attack range of 0 to 20 degrees for the cruise configuration. The rain intensity was varied to produce liquid water contents ranging from 16 to 46 gm/cu m. The results obtained for various rain intensity levels and tunnel speeds showed significant losses in maximum lift capability and increases in drag for a given lift as the liquid water content was increased. The results obtained on the landing configuration also indicate a progressive decrease in the angle of attack at which maximum lift occurred and an increase in the slope of the pitching-moment curve as the liquid water content was increased. The sensitivity of test results to the effects of the water surface tension was also investigated. A chemical was introduced into the rain environment that reduced the surface tension of water by a factor of 2. The reduction in the surface tension of water did not significantly alter the level of performance losses for the landing configuration.

  5. F-18 high alpha research vehicle: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.; Regenie, Victoria A.; Flick, Bradley C.

    1994-01-01

    The F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle has proven to be a useful research tool with many unique capabilities. Many of these capabilities are to assist in characterizing flight at high angles of attack, while some provide significant research in their own right. Of these, the thrust vectoring system, the unique ability to rapidly reprogram flight controls, the reprogrammable mission computer, and a reprogrammable onboard excitation system have allowed an increased utility and versatility of the research being conducted. Because of this multifaceted approach to research in the high angle of attack regime, the capabilities of the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle were designed to cover as many high alpha technology bases as the program would allow. These areas include aerodynamics, controls, handling qualities, and propulsion.

  6. Computer programs for the calculation of dual sting pitch and roll angles required for an articulated sting to obtain angles of attack and sideslip on wind-tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two programs were developed to calculate the pitch and roll position of the conventional sting drive and the pitch of a high angle articulated sting to position a wind tunnel model at the desired angle of attack and sideslip and position the model as near as possible to the centerline of the tunnel. These programs account for the effects of sting offset angles, sting bending angles, and wind-tunnel stream flow angles. In addition, the second program incorporates inputs form on-board accelerometers that measure model pitch and roll with respect to gravity. The programs are presented and a description of the numerical operation of the programs with a definition of the variables used in the programs is given.

  7. Effects of spanwise nozzle geometry and location on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing configuration at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.; Yip, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    A V/STOL tunnel study was performed to determine the effects of spanwise blowing on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a model using a vectored-over-wing powered lift concept. The effects of spanwise nozzle throat area, internal and external nozzle geometry, and vertical and axial location were investigated. These effects were studied at a Mach number of 0.186 over an angle-of-attack range from 14 deg to 40 deg. A high pressure air system was used to provide jet-exhaust simulation. Engine nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to approximately 3.75.

  8. Wind tunnel investigation of aerodynamic and tail buffet characteristics of leading-edge extension modifications to the F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Gautam H.

    1991-01-01

    The impact of leading-edge extension (LEX) modifications on aerodynamic and vertical tail buffet characteristics of a 16-percent scale F/A-18 model has been investigated in the NASA Langley 30-foot by 60-foot tunnel. Modifications under consideration include variations in LEX chord and span, addition of upper surface fences, and removal of the LEX. Both buffeting and high-angle-of-attack aerodynamics are found to be strongly dependent upon the LEX geometry, which directly influences the strength, position, and breakdown characteristics of the vortex flow field. Concepts aimed at influencing the development of vortical flow field are considered to have much greater potential in design application than those geared toward altering already established flow fields. It is recommended that configuration effects on structural and aerodynamic characteristics be evaluated in parallel, so that trade-off studies can be conducted to ensure adequate structural fatigue life and desired high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics in the design of future high performance aircraft.

  9. Aerodynamic Characteristics and Development of the Aerodynamic Database of the X-34 Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi , Bandu N.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the aerodynamic characteristics and the process of developing the preflight aerodynamic database of the NASA/ Orbital X-34 reusable launch vehicle is presented in this paper. Wind tunnel tests from subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers including ground effect tests at low subsonic speeds were conducted in various facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. The APAS (Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System) code was used for engineering level analysis and to fill the gaps in the wind tunnel test data. This aerodynamic database covers the range of Mach numbers, angles of attack, sideslip and control surface deflections anticipated in the complete flight envelope.

  10. FLOW FIELD IN SUPERSONIC MIXED-COMPRESSION INLETS AT ANGLE OF ATTACK USING THE THREE DIMENSIONAL METHOD OF CHARACTERISTICS WITH DISCRETE SHOCK WAVE FITTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the flow field in the supersonic portion of a mixed-compression aircraft inlet at non-zero angle of attack. This approach is based on the method of characteristics for steady three-dimensional flow. The results of this program agree with those produced by the two-dimensional method of characteristics when axisymmetric flow fields are calculated. Except in regions of high viscous interaction and boundary layer removal, the results agree well with experimental data obtained for threedimensional flow fields. The flow field in a variety of axisymmetric mixed compression inlets can be calculated using this program. The bow shock wave and the internal shock wave system are calculated using a discrete shock wave fitting procedure. The internal flow field can be calculated either with or without the discrete fitting of the internal shock wave system. The influence of molecular transport can be included in the calculation of the external flow about the forebody and in the calculation of the internal flow when internal shock waves are not discretely fitted. The viscous and thermal diffussion effects are included by treating them as correction terms in the method of characteristics procedure. Dynamic viscosity is represented by Sutherland's law and thermal conductivity is represented as a quadratic function of temperature. The thermodynamic model used is that of a thermally and calorically perfect gas. The program assumes that the cowl lip is contained in a constant plane and that the centerbody contour and cowl contour are smooth and have continuous first partial derivatives. This program cannot calculate subsonic flow, the external flow field if the bow shock wave does not exist entirely around the forebody, or the internal flow field if the bow flow field is injected into the annulus. Input to the program consists of parameters to control execution, to define the geometry, and the vehicle orientation. Output consists of a list of parameters

  11. Aerodynamic characteristics of a feathered dinosaur measured using physical models. Effects of form on static stability and control effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Dennis; Cardona, Griselda; Guenther-Gleason, Eric; Huynh, Tony; Kwong, Austin; Marks, Dylan; Ray, Neil; Tisbe, Adrian; Tse, Kyle; Koehl, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    We report the effects of posture and morphology on the static aerodynamic stability and control effectiveness of physical models based on the feathered dinosaur, [Formula: see text]Microraptor gui, from the Cretaceous of China. Postures had similar lift and drag coefficients and were broadly similar when simplified metrics of gliding were considered, but they exhibited different stability characteristics depending on the position of the legs and the presence of feathers on the legs and the tail. Both stability and the function of appendages in generating maneuvering forces and torques changed as the glide angle or angle of attack were changed. These are significant because they represent an aerial environment that may have shifted during the evolution of directed aerial descent and other aerial behaviors. Certain movements were particularly effective (symmetric movements of the wings and tail in pitch, asymmetric wing movements, some tail movements). Other appendages altered their function from creating yaws at high angle of attack to rolls at low angle of attack, or reversed their function entirely. While [Formula: see text]M. gui lived after [Formula: see text]Archaeopteryx and likely represents a side experiment with feathered morphology, the general patterns of stability and control effectiveness suggested from the manipulations of forelimb, hindlimb and tail morphology here may help understand the evolution of flight control aerodynamics in vertebrates. Though these results rest on a single specimen, as further fossils with different morphologies are tested, the findings here could be applied in a phylogenetic context to reveal biomechanical constraints on extinct flyers arising from the need to maneuver. PMID:24454820

  12. Tactical missile aerodynamics - Prediction methodology. Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics. Vol. 142

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, M.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses tactical missile aerodynamic drag, drag-prediction methods for axisymmetric missile bodies, an aerodynamic heating analysis for supersonic missiles, a component buildup method for engineering analysis of missiles at low-to-high angles of attack, experimental and analytical methods for missiles with noncircular fuselages, and a vortex-cloud model for body vortex shedding and tracking. Also discussed are panel methods with vorticity effects and corrections for nonlinear compressibility, supersonic full-potential methods for missile body analysis, space-marching Euler solvers, the time-asymptotic Euler/Navier-Stokes methods for subsonic and transonic flows, 3D boundary layers on missiles, Navier-Stokes analyses of flows over slender airframes, and the interaction of exhaust plumes with missile airframes.

  13. Dynamic response of a forward-swept-wing model at angles of attack up to 15 deg at a Mach number of 0.8. [Langley transonic dynamics tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Ricketts, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Root mean square (rms) bending moments for a dynamically scaled, aeroelastic wing of a proposed forward swept wing, flight demonstrator airplane are presented for angles of attack up to 15 deg at a Mach number of 0.8 The 0.6 size semispan model had a leading edge forward sweep of 44 deg and was constructed of composite material. In addition to broad band responses, individual rms responses and total damping ratios are presented for the first two natural modes. The results show that the rms response increases with angle of attack and has a peak value at an angle of attack near 13 deg. In general, the response was characteristic of buffeting and similar to results often observed for aft swept wings. At an angle of attack near 13 deg, however, the response had characteristics associated with approaching a dynamic instability, although no instability was observed over the range of parameters investigated.

  14. Evidence that aerodynamic effects, including dynamic stall, dictate HAWT structural loads and power generation in highly transient time frames

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, D.E.; Miller, M.S.; Robinson, M.C.; Luttges, M.W.; Simms, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    Aerodynamic data collected from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s Combined Experiment have shown three distinct performance regimes when the turbine is operated under relatively steady flow conditions. Operating at blade angles of attack below static stall, excellent agreement is achieved with two-dimensional wind tunnel data. Around the static stall angle, the cycle average normal force produced is greater than the static test data. Span locations near the hub produce extremely large values of normal force coefficient, well in excess of the two-dimensional data results. These performance regimes have been shown to be a function of the three-dimensional flow structure and cycle averaged dynamic stall effects. Power generation and root bending moments have also been shown to be directly dependent on the inflow wind velocity. Aerodynamic data, including episodes of dynamic stall, have been correlated on a cycle by cycle basis with the structural and power generation characteristics of a horizontal axis wind turbine. Instantaneous unsteady forces and resultant power generation indicate that peak transient levels can significantly exceed cycle averaged values. Strong coupling between transient aerodynamic and resonant response of the turbine was also observed. These results provide some initial insight into the contribution of unsteady aerodynamics on undesirable turbine structural response and fatigue life.

  15. Evidence that aerodynamic effects, including dynamic stall, dictate HAWT structural loads and power generation in highly transient time frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, D. E.; Miller, M. S.; Robinson, M. C.; Luttges, M. W.; Simms, D. A.

    1994-08-01

    Aerodynamic data collected from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Combined Experiment have shown three distinct performance regimes when the turbine is operated under relatively steady flow conditions. Operating at blade angles of attack below static stall, excellent agreement is achieved with two-dimensional wind tunnel data. Around the static stall angle, the cycle average normal force produced is greater than the static test data. Span locations near the hub produce extremely large values of normal force coefficient, well in excess of the two-dimensional data results. These performance regimes have been shown to be a function of the three-dimensional flow structure and cycle averaged dynamic stall effects. Power generation and root bending moments have also been shown to be directly dependent on the inflow wind velocity. Aerodynamic data, including episodes of dynamic stall, have been correlated on a cycle by cycle basis with the structural and power generation characteristics of a horizontal axis wind turbine. Instantaneous unsteady forces and resultant power generation indicate that peak transient levels can significantly exceed cycle averaged values. Strong coupling between transient aerodynamic and resonant response of the turbine was also observed. These results provide some initial insight into the contribution of unsteady aerodynamics on undesirable turbine structural response and fatigue life.

  16. Aerodynamics of high aspect-ratio sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, Andrew; Gerritsen, Margot

    2003-11-01

    Experiments studying the aerodynamics of a 25circular-arc sail section (representative of an AC gennaker cross-section) have been undertaken in the 7x10 ft tunnels at NASA-Ames and Georgia Tech. The aims of the study are to gain a deeper physical understanding of the flow past downwind sails at various angles of incidence and Reynolds numbers, and to create a comprehensive database for validation of numerical models and turbulence models used by the yacht research community and competitive sailing industry. The reason for testing a rectangular planform sail with no spanwise variation in twist or cross-section is to first provide a detailed understanding of the flow topology around generic sail sections. Currently, data of sufficient accuracy to be used for CFD validation are not available. 3D experiments with realistic sail planforms and twisted onset flow are planned for the future. Two models have been tested, one with an AR of 15 and constructed from steel and the other with an AR of 10 and constructed from carbon-fiber and foam. The latter model has pressure tappings, whilst the former was coated with PSP. Pressure distributions, surface flow visualization and PIV reveal the details of the changing flow patterns and separation types with varying angle of incidence.

  17. Experimental Study of the Effects of Finite Surface Disturbances and Angle of Attack on the Laminar Boundary Layer of an NACA 64A010 Airfoil with Area Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, Milton A; Braslow, Albert L

    1952-01-01

    A Langley low-turbulence wind-tunnel investigation of a porous NACA 64A010 airfoil section has been made to determine the effectiveness of area suction in maintaining full-chord laminar flow behind finite disturbances and at angles of attacks other than 0 degrees. Aero suction resulted in only a small increase in the size of a finite disturbance required to cause premature boundary-layer transition as compared with that for the airfoil without suction. Combined wake and suction drags lower than the drag of the plain airfoil were obtained through a range of low lift coefficient by the use of area suction.

  18. Computer programs for calculation of sting pitch and roll angles required to obtain angles of attack and sideslip on wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Two programs have been developed to calculate the pitch and roll angles of a wind-tunnel sting drive system that will position a model at the desired angle of attack and and angle of sideslip in the wind tunnel. These programs account for the effects of sting offset angles, sting bending angles and wind-tunnel stream flow angles. In addition, the second program incorporates inputs from on-board accelerometers that measure model pitch and roll with respect to gravity. The programs are presented in the report and a description of the numerical operation of the programs with a definition of the variables used in the programs is given.

  19. Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach 6 of a hypersonic research airplane concept having a 70 deg swept delta wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. E.; Richie, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    The hypersonic aerodynamic characteristics of an air-launched, delta-wing research aircraft concept were investigated at Mach 6. The effect of various components such as nose shape, wing camber, wing location, center vertical tail, wing tip fins, forward delta wing, engine nacelle, and speed brakes was also studied. Tests were conducted with a 0.021 scale model at a Reynolds number, based on model length, of 10.5 million and over an angel of attack range from -4 deg to 20 deg. Results show that most configurations with a center vertical tail have static longitudinal stability at trim, static directional stability at angles of attack up to 12 deg, and static lateral stability throughout the angle of attack range. Configurations with wing tip fins generally have static longitudinal stability at trim, have lateral stability at angles of attack above 8 deg, and are directionally unstable over the angle of attack range.

  20. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 2; High Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag, prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executives summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  1. Biological and aerodynamic problems with the flight of animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, E. V.; Kuchemann, D.

    1980-01-01

    Biological and aerodynamic considerations related to birds and insects are discussed. A wide field is open for comparative biological, physiological, and aerodynamic investigations. Considerable mathematics related to the flight of animals is presented, including 20 equations. The 15 figures included depict the design of bird and insect wings, diagrams of propulsion efficiency, thrust, lift, and angles of attack and photographs of flapping wing free flying wing only models which were built and flown.

  2. Wind-tunnel research comparing lateral control devices, particularly at high angles of attack I : ordinary ailerons on rectangular wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weick, Fred E; Wenzinger, Carl J

    1933-01-01

    This report is the first in a series in which it is intended to compare the relative merits of all ordinary and some special forms of ailerons and other lateral control devices in regard to their effect on lateral controllability, lateral stability, and airplane performance. The comparisons are based on wind-tunnel test data, all the control devices being fitted to model wings having the same span, area, and airfoil section, and being subjected to the same series of force and rotation tests. The results are given for five different aileron movements: one with equal up-and-down deflection, one with average and one with extreme differential motion, one with upward deflection only, and one with the ailerons arranged to float with respect to the wing.

  3. High capacity aerodynamic air bearing (HCAB) for laser scanning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Sean M.

    2005-08-01

    A high capacity aerodynamic air bearing (HCAB) has been developed for the laser scanning market. The need for increasing accuracies in the prepress and print plate-making market is causing a shift from ball bearing to air bearing scanners. Aerostatic air bearings are a good option to meet this demand for better performance however, these bearings tend to be expensive and require an additional air supply, filtering and drying system. Commercially available aerodynamic bearings have been typically limited to small mirrors, on the order of 3.5" diameter and less than 0.5" thick. A large optical facet, hence a larger mirror, is required to generate the high number of pixels needed for this type of application. The larger optic necessitated the development of a high capacity 'self-generating' or aerodynamic air bearing that would meet the needs of the optical scanning market. Its capacity is rated up to 6.0" diameter and 1.0" thick optics. The performance of an aerodynamic air bearing is better than a ball bearing and similar to an aerostatic air bearing. It retains the low costs while eliminating the need for ancillary equipment required by an aerostatic bearing.

  4. Orion Aerodynamics for Hypersonic Free Molecular to Continuum Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Greene, Francis A.; Boyles, Katie A.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed for the Orion Crew Module, previously known as the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Command Module, to characterize its aerodynamics during the high altitude portion of its reentry into the Earth's atmosphere, that is, from free molecular to continuum hypersonic conditions. The focus is on flow conditions similar to those that the Orion Crew Module would experience during a return from the International Space Station. The bulk of the calculations are performed with two direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes, and these data are anchored with results from both free molecular and Navier-Stokes calculations. Results for aerodynamic forces and moments are presented that demonstrate their sensitivity to rarefaction, that is, for free molecular to continuum conditions (Knudsen numbers of 111 to 0.0003). Also included are aerodynamic data as a function of angle of attack for different levels of rarefaction and results that demonstrate the aerodynamic sensitivity of the Orion CM to a range of reentry velocities (7.6 to 15 km/s).

  5. Aerodynamic flow control of a high lift system with dual synthetic jet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alstrom, Robert Bruce

    Implementing flow control systems will mitigate the vibration and aeroacoustic issues associated with weapons bays; enhance the performance of the latest generation aircraft by reducing their fuel consumption and improving their high angle-of-attack handling qualities; facilitate steep climb out profiles for military transport aircraft. Experimental research is performed on a NACA 0015 airfoil with a simple flap at angle of attack of 16o in both clean and high lift configurations. The results of the active control phase of the project will be discussed. Three different experiments were conducted; they are Amplitude Modulated Dual Location Open Loop Control, Adaptive Control with Amplitude Modulation using Direct Sensor Feedback and Adaptive Control with Amplitude Modulation using Extremum Seeking Control. All the closed loop experiments are dual location. The analysis presented uses the spatial variation of the root mean square pressure fluctuations, power spectral density estimates, Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs), and time frequency analysis which consists of the application of the Morlet and Mexican Hat wavelets. Additionally, during the course of high speed testing in the wind tunnel, some aeroacoustic phenomena were uncovered; those results will also be presented. A cross section of the results shows that the shape of the RMS pressure distributions is sensitive to forcing frequency. The application of broadband excitation in the case adaptive control causes the flow to select a frequency to lock in to. Additionally, open loop control results in global synchronization via switching between two stable states and closed loop control inhibits the switching phenomena, but rather synchronizes the flow about multiple stable shedding frequencies.

  6. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Effect of Angle of Attack and Flapping-Hinge Offset on Periodic Bending Moments and Flapping of a Small Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, John Locke; Brooks, George W.; Maglieri, Domenic J.

    1959-01-01

    A two-blade rotor having a diameter of 4 feet and a solidity of 0.037 was tested in the Langley 300-MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel to obtain information on the effect of certain rotor variables on the blade periodic bending moments and flapping angles during the various stages of transformation between the helicopter and autogiro configuration. Variables studied included collective pitch angle, flapping-hinge offset, rotor angle of attack, and tip-speed ratio. The results show that the blade periodic bending moments generally increase with tip-speed ratio up into the transition region, diminish over a certain range of tip-speed ratio, and increase again at higher tip-speed ratios. Above the transition region, the bending moments increase with collective pitch angle and rotor angle of attack. The absence of a flapping hinge results in a significant amplification of the periodic bending moments, the magnitudes of which increase with tip-speed ratio. When the flapping hinge is used, an increase in flapping-hinge offset results in reduced period bending moments. The aforementioned trends exhibited by the bending moments for changes in the variables are essentially duplicated by the periodic flapping motions. The existence of substantial amounts of blade stall increased both the periodic bending moments and the flapping angles. Harmonic analysis of the bending moments shows significant contributions of the higher harmonics, particularly in the transition region.

  7. Experimental study of heat transfer enhancement in solar air heater with different angle of attack of V-down continuous ribs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istanto, Tri; Danardono, Dominicus; Yaningsih, Indri; Wijayanta, Agung Tri

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an experimental study on the effect of angle attack in V-down continuous ribs on heat transfer and friction factor in an artificially roughened air heater duct is presented. The electric heater with a constant heat flux as a simulation of the indoor testing solar air heater is used to heat the roughened part of rectangular duct while other parts were insulated. The system and operating conditions were used to decide the range of parameters for the study. The ratio of the width to height of the duct (W/H) was 12, the relative roughness pitch (p/e) was 10, the relative roughness height (e/Dh) was 0.033 and the angle of attack of flow (α) was 30-80°. The air flow rate corresponded to Reynolds number between 3500 -10,000. The result of heat transfer and friction factor had been compared to those for smooth duct under similar flow and thermal boundary condition. The thermo-hydraulic performance also had been considered. As a result, the maximum enhancement of Nusselt number (Nu) and friction factor(f) were 2.34 and 2.45 times, respectively. For each variation of angle attack of flow, the thermo-hydraulic performance has been compared and the result shows that a V-down continuous rib with the angle of attack of flow as 60° gave the best thermo-hydraulic performance.

  8. STEP and STEPSPL: Computer programs for aerodynamic model structure determination and parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    The successful parametric modeling of the aerodynamics for an airplane operating at high angles of attack or sideslip is performed in two phases. First the aerodynamic model structure must be determined and second the associated aerodynamic parameters (stability and control derivatives) must be estimated for that model. The purpose of this paper is to document two versions of a stepwise regression computer program which were developed for the determination of airplane aerodynamic model structure and to provide two examples of their use on computer generated data. References are provided for the application of the programs to real flight data. The two computer programs that are the subject of this report, STEP and STEPSPL, are written in FORTRAN IV (ANSI l966) compatible with a CDC FTN4 compiler. Both programs are adaptations of a standard forward stepwise regression algorithm. The purpose of the adaptation is to facilitate the selection of a adequate mathematical model of the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients of an airplane from flight test data. The major difference between STEP and STEPSPL is in the basis for the model. The basis for the model in STEP is the standard polynomial Taylor's series expansion of the aerodynamic function about some steady-state trim condition. Program STEPSPL utilizes a set of spline basis functions.

  9. Parachute Aerodynamics From Video Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Queen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.

    2005-01-01

    A new data analysis technique for the identification of static and dynamic aerodynamic stability coefficients from wind tunnel test video data is presented. This new technique was applied to video data obtained during a parachute wind tunnel test program conducted in support of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. Total angle-of-attack data obtained from video images were used to determine the static pitching moment curve of the parachute. During the original wind tunnel test program the static pitching moment curve had been determined by forcing the parachute to a specific total angle-of -attack and measuring the forces generated. It is shown with the new technique that this parachute, when free to rotate, trims at an angle-of-attack two degrees lower than was measured during the forced-angle tests. An attempt was also made to extract pitch damping information from the video data. Results suggest that the parachute is dynamically unstable at the static trim point and tends to become dynamically stable away from the trim point. These trends are in agreement with limit-cycle-like behavior observed in the video. However, the chaotic motion of the parachute produced results with large uncertainty bands.

  10. AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, 8th, Portland, OR, Aug. 20-22, 1990, Technical Papers. Parts 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in CFD methods and their validation, vortices and vortical flows, STOL/VSTOL aerodynamics, boundary layer transition and separation, wing airfoil aerodynamics, laminar flow, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics, CFD for wing airfoil and nacelle applications, wind tunnel testing, flight testing, missile aerodynamics, unsteady flow, configuration aerodynamics, and multiple body/interference flows. Attention is given to the numerical simulation of vortical flows over close-coupled canard-wing configuration, propulsive lift augmentation by side fences, road-vehicle aerodynamics, a shock-capturing method for multidimensional flow, transition-detection studies in a cryogenic environment, a three-dimensional Euler analysis of ducted propfan flowfields, multiple vortex and shock interaction at subsonic and supersonic speeds, and a Navier-Stokes simulation of waverider flowfields. Also discussed are the induced drag of crescent-shaped wings, the preliminary design aerodynamics of missile inlets, finite wing lift prediction at high angles-of-attack, optimal supersonic/hypersonic bodies, and adaptive grid embedding for the two-dimensional Euler equations.

  11. A computational examination of directional stability for smooth and chined forebodies at high-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, Ramakrishnan; Mason, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used to study aircraft forebody flowfields at low-speed, angle-of-attack conditions with sideslip. The purpose is to define forebody geometries which provide good directional stability characteristics under these conditions. The flows over the experimentally investigated F-5A forebody and chine type configuration, previously computed by the authors, were recomputed with better grid topology and resolution. The results were obtained using a modified version of CFL3D (developed at NASA Langley) to solve either the Euler equations or the Reynolds equations employing the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model with the Degani-Schiff modification to account for massive crossflow separation. Based on the results, it is concluded that current CFD methods can be used to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies to achieve desirable high angle-of-attack characteristics. An analytically defined generic forebody model is described, and a parametric study of various forebody shapes was then conducted to determine which shapes promote a positive contribution to directional stability at high angle-of-attack. An unconventional approach for presenting the results is used to illustrate how the positive contribution arises. Based on the results of this initial parametric study, some guidelines for aerodynamic design to promote positive directional stability are presented.

  12. Benefits of high aerodynamic efficiency to orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. G.; Norris, R. B.; Paris, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    The benefits and costs of high aerodynamic efficiency on aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTV) are analyzed. Results show that a high lift to drag (L/D) AOTV can achieve significant velocity savings relative to low L/D aerobraked OTV's when traveling round trip between low Earth orbits (LEO) and alternate orbits as high as geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Trajectory analysis is used to show the impact of thermal protection system technology and the importance of lift loading coefficient on vehicle performance. The possible improvements in AOTV subsystem technologies are assessed and their impact on vehicle inert weight and performance noted. Finally, the performance of high L/D AOTV concepts is compared with the performances of low L/D aeroassisted and all propulsive OTV concepts to assess the benefits of aerodynamic efficiency on this class of vehicle.

  13. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 13.1-percent-thick, high-lift airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivier, K. R.; Ormsbee, A. I.; Awker, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Low speed sectional characteristics of a high lift airfoil are studied and a comparison is made of those characteristics with the predictions of the theoretical methods used in the airfoil's design. The 13.1 percent-thick, UI-1720 airfoil was found to achieve the predicted maximum lift coefficient of nearly 2.0. No upper-surface, flow separation was found below the stall angle of attack of 16 degrees; it appeared that stall was due to an abrupt leading edge flow separation.

  14. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 13.1-percent-thick, high-lift airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivier, K. R.; Ormsbee, A. I.; Awker, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental study of the low-speed, sectional characteristics of a high-lift airfoil, and comparison of these characteristics with the predictions of the theoretical methods used in the airfoil's design. The 13.1% thick UI-1720 airfoil was found to achieve the predicted maximum lift coefficient of nearly 2.0. No upper-surface flow separation was found below the stall angle of attack of 16 deg; it appeared that stall was due to an abrupt leading-edge flow separation.

  15. Preparations for flight research to evaluate actuated forebody strakes on the F-18 high-alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Shah, Gautam H.; Dicarlo, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP), flight tests are currently being conducted with a multi-axis thrust vectoring system applied to the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). A follow-on series of flight tests with the NASA F-18 HARV will be focusing on the application of actuated forebody strake controls. These controls are designed to provide increased levels of yaw control at high angles of attack where conventional aerodynamic controls become ineffective. The series of flight tests are collectively referred to as the Actuated Nose Strakes for Enhanced Rolling (ANSER) Flight Experiment. The development of actuated forebody strake controls for the F-18 HARV is discussed and a summary of the ground tests conducted in support of the flight experiment is provided. A summary of the preparations for the flight tests is also provided.

  16. Aerodynamic and acoustic performance of high Mach number inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumsdaine, E.; Clark, L. R.; Cherng, J. C.; Tag, I.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental results were obtained for two types of high Mach number inlets, one with a translating centerbody and one with a fixed geometry (collapsing cowl) without centerbody. The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of these inlets was examined. The effects of several parameters such as area ratio and length-diameter ratio were investigated. The translating centerbody inlet was found to be superior to the collapsing cowl inlet both acoustically and aerodynamically, particularly for area ratios greater than 1.5. Comparison of length-diameter ratio and area ratio effects on performance near choked flow showed the latter parameter to be more significant. Also, greater high frequency noise attenuation was achieved by increasing Mach number from low to high subsonic values.

  17. Aerodynamic Control using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    The global aerodynamic loads on a stationary and pitching airfoil at angles of attack beyond the static and dynamic stall margins, respectively are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using regulated distributed bleed driven by surface pressure differences. High-speed PIV and proper orthogonal decomposition of the vorticity flux on the static airfoil show that the bleed engenders trains of discrete vortices that advect along the surface and are associated with a local instability that is manifested by a time-averaged bifurcation of the vorticity layer near the bleed outlets and alters the vorticity flux over the airfoil and thereby the aerodynamic loads. Active bleed is used on a dynamically pitching airfoil (at reduced frequencies up to k = 0.42) to modulate the evolution of vorticity concentrations during dynamic stall. Time-periodic bleed improved the pitch stability by reducing adverse pitching moment (``negative damping'') that can precipitate structural instabilities. At the same time, the maintains the cycle-average loads to within 5% of the base flow levels by segmenting the vorticity layer during upstroke and promoting early flow attachment during downstroke segments of the pitch cycle. Supported by Georgia Tech VLRCOE.

  18. Use of a Viscous Flow Simulation Code for Static Aeroelastic Analysis of a Wing at High-Lift Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akaydin, H. Dogus; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Nguyen, Nhan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a static aeroelastic analysis of a wind tunnel test model of a wing in high-lift configuration using a viscous flow simulation code. The model wing was tailored to deform during the tests by amounts similar to a composite airliner wing in highlift conditions. This required use of a viscous flow analysis to predict the lift coefficient of the deformed wing accurately. We thus utilized an existing static aeroelastic analysis framework that involves an inviscid flow code (Cart3d) to predict the deformed shape of the wing, then utilized a viscous flow code (Overflow) to compute the aerodynamic loads on the deformed wing. This way, we reduced the cost of flow simulations needed for this analysis while still being able to predict the aerodynamic forces with reasonable accuracy. Our results suggest that the lift of the deformed wing may be higher or lower than that of the non-deformed wing, and the washout deformation of the wing is the key factor that changes the lift of the deformed wing in two distinct ways: while it decreases the lift at low to moderate angles of attack simply by lowering local angles of attack along the span, it increases the lift at high angles of attack by alleviating separation.

  19. Aerodynamic and directional acoustic performance of a scoop inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, J. M.; Dietrich, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic and directional acoustic performances of a scoop inlet were studied. The scoop inlet is designed with a portion of the lower cowling extended forward to direct upward any noise that is propagating out the front of the engine toward the ground. The tests were conducted in an anechoic wind tunnel facility at free stream velocities of 0, 18, 41, and 61 m/sec and angles of attack from -10 deg to 120 deg. Inlet throat Mach number was varied from 0.30 to 0.75. Aerodynamically, at a free stream velocity of 41 m/sec, the design throat Mach number (0.63), and an angle of attack of 50 deg, the scoop inlet total pressure recovery was 0.989 and the total pressure distortion was 0.15. The angles of attack where flow separation occurred with the scoop inlet were higher than those for a conventional symmetric inlet. Acoustically, the scoop inlet provided a maximum noise reduction of 12 to 15 db below the inlet over the entire range of throat Mach number and angle of attack at a free-stream velocity of 41 m/sec.

  20. Effect of helicopter blade dynamics on blade aerodynamic and structural loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffernan, Ruth M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of rotor blade dynamics on aerodynamic and structural loads is examined for a conventional, main-rotor helicopter using a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis (CAMRAD) and flight-test data. The impact of blade dynamics on blade section lift-coefficient time histories is studied by comparing predictions from a rigid-blade analysis and an elastic-blade analysis with helicopter flight test data. The elastic blade analysis better predicts high-frequency behavior of section lift. In addition, components of the blade angle of attack such as elastic blade twist, blade flap rate, blade slope velocity, and inflow are examined as a function of blade mode. Elastic blade motion changed blade angle of attack by a few tenths of a degree, and up to the sixth rotor harmonic. A similar study of the influence of blade dynamics on bending and torsion moments was also conducted. A correlation study comparing predictions from several elastic-blade analyses with flight-test data revealed that an elastic-blade model consisting of only three elastic bending modes (first and second flap and first lag), and two elastic torsion modes was sufficient for good correlation.

  1. Effect of Helicopter Blade Dynamics on Blade Aerodynamic and Structural Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffernan, Ruth M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of rotor blade dynamics on aerodynamic and structural loads is examined for a conventional, main- rotor helicopter using both a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis (CAMRAD) and night test data. The impact of blade dynamics on blade section lift-coefficient time histories is studied by comparing predictions from both a rigid blade analysis and an elastic blade analysis with helicopter flight test data. The elastic blade analysis better predicts high-frequency behavior of section lift. In addition, components of the blade angle of attack, such as elastic blade twist, blade nap rate, blade slope velocity, and inflow, are examined as a function of blade mode. Elastic blade motion affects the blade angle of attack by a few tenths of a degree, and up to the sixth rotor harmonic. A similar study of the influence of blade dynamics on bending and torsion moments was also conducted. The modal analysis of the predicted blade structural loads suggested that five elastic bending deg of freedom (four flap and one lag) and three elastic torsion deg of freedom contributed to calculations of the blade structural loads. However, when structural bending load predictions from several elastic blade analyses were compared with flight test data, an elastic blade model consisting of only three elastic bending modes (first and second flap, and first lag), and two elastic torsion modes was found to be sufficient for maximum correlation.

  2. What Was Learned in Predicting Slender Airframe Aerodynamics with the F16-XL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Arthur; Lucking, James M.

    2014-01-01

    The CAWAPI-2 coordinated project has been underway to improve CFD predictions of slender airframe aerodynamics. The work is focused on two flow conditions and leverages a unique flight data set obtained with the F-16XL aircraft for comparison and verification. These conditions, a low-speed high angle-of-attack case and a transonic low angle-of-attack case, were selected from a prior prediction campaign wherein the CFD failed to provide acceptable results. In re-visiting these two cases, approaches for improved results include better, denser grids using more grid adaptation to local flow features as well as unsteady higher-fidelity physical modeling like hybrid RANS/URANS-LES methods. The work embodies predictions from multiple numerical formulations that are contributed from multiple organizations where some authors investigate other possible factors that could explain the discrepancies in agreement, e.g. effects due to deflected control surfaces during the flight tests, as well as static aeroelastic deflection of the outer wing. This paper presents the synthesis of all the results and findings and draws some conclusions that lead to an improved understanding of the underlying flow physics, and finally making the connections between the physics and aircraft features.

  3. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 2; High Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among die scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 2/Part 2 publication covers the tools and methods development session.

  4. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 2; High Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  5. Simulation of iced wing aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Bragg, M. B.; Kwon, O. J.; Sankar, L. N.

    1991-01-01

    The sectional and total aerodynamic load characteristics of moderate aspect ratio wings with and without simulated glaze leading edge ice were studied both computationally, using a three dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes solver, and experimentally. The wing has an untwisted, untapered planform shape with NACA 0012 airfoil section. The wing has an unswept and swept configuration with aspect ratios of 4.06 and 5.0. Comparisons of computed surface pressures and sectional loads with experimental data for identical configurations are given. The abrupt decrease in stall angle of attack for the wing, as a result of the leading edge ice formation, was demonstrated numerically and experimentally.

  6. Thin-layer and full Navier-Stokes calculations for turbulent supersonic flow over a cone at an angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Crawford F.; Podleski, Steve D.

    1993-01-01

    The proper use of a computational fluid dynamics code requires a good understanding of the particular code being applied. In this report the application of CFL3D, a thin-layer Navier-Stokes code, is compared with the results obtained from PARC3D, a full Navier-Stokes code. In order to gain an understanding of the use of this code, a simple problem was chosen in which several key features of the code could be exercised. The problem chosen is a cone in supersonic flow at an angle of attack. The issues of grid resolution, grid blocking, and multigridding with CFL3D are explored. The use of multigridding resulted in a significant reduction in the computational time required to solve the problem. Solutions obtained are compared with the results using the full Navier-Stokes equations solver PARC3D. The results obtained with the CFL3D code compared well with the PARC3D solutions.

  7. Surface pressure data on a series of conical forebodies at Mach numbers from 1.70 to 4.50 and combined angles of attack and sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Collins, I. K.; Howell, D. T.; Hayes, C.

    1979-01-01

    Tabulated surface pressure data for a series of forebodies which have analytically defined cross sections and are based on a 20 degs half-angle cone are presented without analysis. Five of the cross sections were ellipses having axis ratios of 3/1, 2/1, 1/1, 1/2, and 1/3. The sixth cross section was defined by a curve having a single lobe. The data generally cover angles of attack from -5 degs to 20 degs at angles of sideslip from 0 degs to 5 degs for Mach numbers of 1.70, 2.50, 3.95, and 4.50 at a constant Reynolds number.

  8. Normal- and oblique-shock flow parameters in equilibrium air including attached-shock solutions for surfaces at angles of attack, sweep, and dihedral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Souders, S. W.

    1975-01-01

    Normal- and oblique-shock flow parameters for air in thermochemical equilibrium are tabulated as a function of shock angle for altitudes ranging from 15.24 km to 91.44 km in increments of 7.62 km at selected hypersonic speeds. Post-shock parameters tabulated include flow-deflection angle, velocity, Mach number, compressibility factor, isentropic exponent, viscosity, Reynolds number, entropy difference, and static pressure, temperature, density, and enthalpy ratios across the shock. A procedure is presented for obtaining oblique-shock flow properties in equilibrium air on surfaces at various angles of attack, sweep, and dihedral by use of the two-dimensional tabulations. Plots of the flow parameters against flow-deflection angle are presented at altitudes of 30.48, 60.96, and 91.44 km for various stream velocities.

  9. A computer program for the calculation of the flow field including boundary layer effects for mixed-compression inlets at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    A computer program was developed which is capable of calculating the flow field in the supersonic portion of a mixed compression aircraft inlet operating at angle of attack. The supersonic core flow is computed using a second-order three dimensional method-of-characteristics algorithm. The bow shock and the internal shock train are treated discretely using a three dimensional shock fitting procedure. The boundary layer flows are computed using a second-order implicit finite difference method. The shock wave-boundary layer interaction is computed using an integral formulation. The general structure of the computer program is discussed, and a brief description of each subroutine is given. All program input parameters are defined, and a brief discussion on interpretation of the output is provided. A number of sample cases, complete with data listings, are provided.

  10. A vectorized code for calculating laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows about blunt axisymmetric bodies at zero and small angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A user's guide is provided for a computer code which calculates the laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows about blunt axisymmetric bodies, such as spherically blunted cones, hyperboloids, etc., at zero and small angles of attack. The code is written in STAR FORTRAN language for the CDC-STAR-100 computer. Time-dependent, viscous-shock-layer-type equations are used to describe the flow field. These equations are solved by an explicit, two-step, time asymptotic, finite-difference method. For the turbulent flow, a two-layer, eddy-viscosity model is used. The code provides complete flow-field properties including shock location, surface pressure distribution, surface heating rates, and skin-friction coefficients. This report contains descriptions of the input and output, the listing of the program, and a sample flow-field solution.

  11. Canard-body-tail missile test at angles of attack to 50 deg in the Ames 11-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. Q.; Schwind, R. G.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1978-01-01

    Blunted ogive cylinder missile models with a length-to-diameter ratio of 10.4 were tested at transonic speeds and large angles of attack in an 11 foot transonic wind tunnel. The configurations are: body, body with tail panels, body with canards, and body with canards and tails. Forces and moments from the entire model and each of the eight fins were measured over the pitch range of 20 deg to 50 deg, and roll angles of 0 deg to 45 deg and canard deflection angles between 0 deg and 15 deg. The Reynolds number ranged from 3.9 x 10 to the 6th power per meter. Large side forces and yawing moments were observed for some of the test cases involving a symmetric geometry.

  12. Aerodynamics of heat exchangers for high-altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drela, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Reduction of convective beat transfer with altitude dictates unusually large beat exchangers for piston- engined high-altitude aircraft The relatively large aircraft drag fraction associated with cooling at high altitudes makes the efficient design of the entire heat exchanger installation an essential part of the aircraft's aerodynamic design. The parameters that directly influence cooling drag are developed in the context of high-altitude flight Candidate wing airfoils that incorporate heat exchangers are examined. Such integrated wing-airfoil/heat-exchanger installations appear to be attractive alternatives to isolated heat.exchanger installations. Examples are drawn from integrated installations on existing or planned high-altitude aircraft.

  13. X-33 Computational Aeroheating/Aerodynamic Predictions and Comparisons With Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Thompson, Richard A.; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alter, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    This report details a computational fluid dynamics study conducted in support of the phase II development of the X-33 vehicle. Aerodynamic and aeroheating predictions were generated for the X-33 vehicle at both flight and wind-tunnel test conditions using two finite-volume, Navier-Stokes solvers. Aerodynamic computations were performed at Mach 6 and Mach 10 wind-tunnel conditions for angles of attack from 10 to 50 with body-flap deflections of 0 to 20. Additional aerodynamic computations were performed over a parametric range of free-stream conditions at Mach numbers of 4 to 10 and angles of attack from 10 to 50. Laminar and turbulent wind-tunnel aeroheating computations were performed at Mach 6 for angles of attack of 20 to 40 with body-flap deflections of 0 to 20. Aeroheating computations were performed at four flight conditions with Mach numbers of 6.6 to 8.9 and angles of attack of 10 to 40. Surface heating and pressure distributions, surface streamlines, flow field information, and aerodynamic coefficients from these computations are presented, and comparisons are made with wind-tunnel data.

  14. Wind-tunnel investigation of aerodynamic loading on a 0.237-scale model of a remotely piloted research vehicle with a thick, high-aspect-ratio supercritical wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrdsong, T. A.; Brooks, C. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Wind-tunnel measurements were made of the wing-surface static-pressure distributions on a 0.237 scale model of a remotely piloted research vehicle equipped with a thick, high-aspect-ratio supercritical wing. Data are presented for two model configurations (with and without a ventral pod) at Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.92 at angles of attack from -4 deg to 8 deg. Large variations of wing-surface local pressure distributions were developed; however, the characteristic supercritical-wing pressure distribution occurred near the design condition of 0.80 Mach number and 2 deg angle of attack. The significant variations of the local pressure distributions indicated pronounced shock-wave movements that were highly sensitive to angle of attack and Mach number. The effect of the vertical pod varied with test conditions; however at the higher Mach numbers, the effects on wing flow characteristics were significant at semispan stations as far outboard as 0.815. There were large variations of the wing loading in the range of test conditions, both model configurations exhibited a well-defined peak value of normal-force coefficient at the cruise angle of attack (2 deg) and Mach number (0.80).

  15. Results of a study of Mach number and Reynolds number effects on the lee side vortex flow field characteristics of an ogive-cylinder-frustum-cylinder at angles of attack to 25 degrees, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to survey the lee side vortex flow field about an ogive-cylinder-frustum-cylinder at angles of attack to 25 degrees for two Reynolds numbers at Mach number 0.8, and one Reynolds number at Mach number 1.96. The data were obtained using miniature 5-port conical pressure probes calibrated for angle of attack and roll angle over a Mach number range of 0.6 to 3.0. The results are presented here as local flow field properties and circulation strengths for various body stations.

  16. Advanced High-Temperature Flexible TPS for Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelCorso, Joseph A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Bruce, Walter E., III; Hughes, Stephen J.; Calomino, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    Typical entry vehicle aeroshells are limited in size by the launch vehicle shroud. Inflatable aerodynamic decelerators allow larger aeroshell diameters for entry vehicles because they are not constrained to the launch vehicle shroud diameter. During launch, the hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (HIAD) is packed in a stowed configuration. Prior to atmospheric entry, the HIAD is deployed to produce a drag device many times larger than the launch shroud diameter. The large surface area of the inflatable aeroshell provides deceleration of high-mass entry vehicles at relatively low ballistic coefficients. Even for these low ballistic coefficients there is still appreciable heating, requiring the HIAD to employ a thermal protection system (TPS). This TPS must be capable of surviving the heat pulse, and the rigors of fabrication handling, high density packing, deployment, and aerodynamic loading. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of flexible TPS tests and results, conducted over the last three years. This paper also includes an overview of each test facility, the general approach for testing flexible TPS, the thermal analysis methodology and results, and a comparison with 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel, Laser-Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory, and Panel Test Facility test data. Results are presented for a baseline TPS layup that can withstand a 20 W/cm2 heat flux, silicon carbide (SiC) based TPS layup, and polyimide insulator TPS layup. Recent work has focused on developing material layups expected to survive heat flux loads up to 50 W/cm2 (which is adequate for many potential applications), future work will consider concepts capable of withstanding more than 100 W/cm2 incident radiant heat flux. This paper provides an overview of the experimental setup, material layup configurations, facility conditions, and planned future flexible TPS activities.

  17. Reaction jet and aerodynamics compound control missile autopilot design based on adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenhui; Dong, Chaoyang

    2006-11-01

    Because of nonlinearity and strong coupling of reaction-jet and aerodynamics compound control missile, a missile autopilot design method based on adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control (AFSMC) is proposed in this paper. The universal approximation ability of adaptive fuzzy system is used to approximate the nonlinear function in missile dynamics equation during the flight of high angle of attack. And because the sliding mode control is robustness to external disturbance strongly, the sliding mode surface of the error system is constructed to overcome the influence of approximation error and external disturbance so that the actual overload can track the maneuvering command with high precision. Simulation results show that the missile autopilot designed in this paper not only can track large overload command with higher precision than traditional method, but also is robust to model uncertainty and external disturbance strongly.

  18. Recent Dynamic Measurements and Considerations for Aerodynamic Modeling of Fighter Airplane Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Foster, John V.

    1998-01-01

    As airplane designs have trended toward the expansion of flight envelopes into the high angle of attack and high angular rate regimes, concerns regarding modeling the complex unsteady aerodynamics for simulation have arisen. Most current modeling methods still rely on traditional body axis damping coefficients that are measured using techniques which were intended for relatively benign flight conditions. This paper presents recent wind tunnel results obtained during large-amplitude pitch, roll and yaw testing of several fighter airplane configurations. A review of the similitude requirements for applying sub-scale test results to full-scale conditions is presented. Data is then shown to be a strong function of Strouhal number - both the traditional damping terms, but also the associated static stability terms. Additionally, large effects of sideslip are seen in the damping parameter that should be included in simulation math models. Finally, an example of the inclusion of frequency effects on the data in a simulation is shown.

  19. Aerodynamic effects of five lift-fan pod arrangements on an unpowered V/STOL transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. L.; Hoad, D. R.; Croom, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel to determine the effect of longitudinally oriented wing-mounted pods on the longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics in the cruise flight condition of a high-wing V/STOL transport model. Five pod arrangements were tested - three configurations with in-line pods at 20, 40, or 60 percent semispan and two split pod configurations with rear pods at 20 percent semispan and front pods at 40 or 60 percent semispan. In general, addition of the pods to the model decreased the stability, increased the lift-curve slope, and alleviated the abrupt stall of the basic model. The configuration with pods at 20 percent semispan had an abrupt instability at 10 deg angle of attack, All the configurations had lateral stability at sideslip angles from 5 to -5 deg. Very little difference in results existed between the configurations with pods at 40 and 60 percent semispan. Of the split pod configurations, the configuration with front pods at 40 percent semispan offered the best trimmed lift and lift-induced drag characteristics at high angles of attack. The configuration with in-line pods at 40 or 60 percent semispan provided the best cruise characteristics of all the pod configurations.

  20. Space shuttle: Determination of the aerodynamic interference between the space shuttle orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket booster on a 0.004 scale ascent configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, P. E.; Buchholz, R.; Allen, E. C. JR.; Dehart, J.

    1973-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the aerodynamic interference between the space shuttle orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket booster on a 0.004 scale ascent configuration. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded over an angle of attack range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees at zero degree sideslip. A sideslip range of minus 10 to plus 10 degrees at zero degree angle of attack was also tested. The Mach number range was varied from 0.6 to 4.96 with Reynolds number varying between 4.9 and 6.8 times one million per foot.