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Sample records for high carbon content

  1. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  2. Eutectic Syntheses of Graphitic Carbon with High Pyrazinic Nitrogen Content.

    PubMed

    Fechler, Nina; Zussblatt, Niels P; Rothe, Regina; Schlögl, Robert; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Chmelka, Bradley F; Antonietti, Markus

    2016-02-10

    Mixtures of phenols/ketones and urea show eutectic behavior upon gentle heating. These mixtures possess liquid-crystalline-like phases that can be processed. The architecture of phenol/ketone acts as structure-donating motif, while urea serves as melting-point reduction agent. Condensation at elevated temperatures results in nitrogen-containing carbons with remarkably high nitrogen content of mainly pyrazinic nature. PMID:26178584

  3. Carbon: Eutectic Syntheses of Graphitic Carbon with High Pyrazinic Nitrogen Content (Adv. Mater. 6/2016).

    PubMed

    Fechler, Nina; Zussblatt, Niels P; Rothe, Regina; Schlögl, Robert; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Chmelka, Bradley F; Antonietti, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Starting from a powder mixture of ketones/urea, gentle heating results in liquefaction below the melting point of the respective components. The back-cover image shows a polarized optical microscopy image of a liquid-crystalline eutectic mixture in the supercooled liquidus, as discussed on page 1287 by N. Fechler and co-workers. This indicates the coupling of the monomers toward larger, preorganized assemblies. From this precursor system, "C2N" carbon is synthesized. PMID:26849666

  4. Three-dimensional porous carbon composites containing high sulfur nanoparticle content for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoxing; Sun, Jinhua; Hou, Wenpeng; Jiang, Shidong; Huang, Yong; Geng, Jianxin

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur is a promising cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries because of its high theoretical capacity (1,675 mA h g-1) however, its low electrical conductivity and the instability of sulfur-based electrodes limit its practical application. Here we report a facile in situ method for preparing three-dimensional porous graphitic carbon composites containing sulfur nanoparticles (3D S@PGC). With this strategy, the sulfur content of the composites can be tuned to a high level (up to 90 wt%). Because of the high sulfur content, the nanoscale distribution of the sulfur particles, and the covalent bonding between the sulfur and the PGC, the developed 3D S@PGC cathodes exhibit excellent performance, with a high sulfur utilization, high specific capacity (1,382, 1,242 and 1,115 mA h g-1 at 0.5, 1 and 2 C, respectively), long cycling life (small capacity decay of 0.039% per cycle over 1,000 cycles at 2 C) and excellent rate capability at a high charge/discharge current.

  5. Three-dimensional porous carbon composites containing high sulfur nanoparticle content for high-performance lithium–sulfur batteries

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoxing; Sun, Jinhua; Hou, Wenpeng; Jiang, Shidong; Huang, Yong; Geng, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur is a promising cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries because of its high theoretical capacity (1,675 mA h g−1); however, its low electrical conductivity and the instability of sulfur-based electrodes limit its practical application. Here we report a facile in situ method for preparing three-dimensional porous graphitic carbon composites containing sulfur nanoparticles (3D S@PGC). With this strategy, the sulfur content of the composites can be tuned to a high level (up to 90 wt%). Because of the high sulfur content, the nanoscale distribution of the sulfur particles, and the covalent bonding between the sulfur and the PGC, the developed 3D S@PGC cathodes exhibit excellent performance, with a high sulfur utilization, high specific capacity (1,382, 1,242 and 1,115 mA h g−1 at 0.5, 1 and 2 C, respectively), long cycling life (small capacity decay of 0.039% per cycle over 1,000 cycles at 2 C) and excellent rate capability at a high charge/discharge current. PMID:26830732

  6. Novel technique to suppress hydrocarbon contamination for high accuracy determination of carbon content in steel by FE-EPMA

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Takako; Tanaka, Yuji; Yagoshi, Masayasu; Ishida, Kiyohito

    2016-01-01

    In multiphase steels, control of the carbon contents in the respective phases is the most important factor in alloy design for achieving high strength and high ductility. However, it is unusually difficult to determine the carbon contents in multiphase structures with high accuracy by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) due to the unavoidable effect of hydrocarbon contamination during measurements. We have investigated new methods for suppressing hydrocarbon contamination during field emission (FE) EPMA measurements as well as a conventional liquid nitrogen trap. Plasma cleaner inside the specimen chamber results in a improvement of carbon-content determination by point analysis, increasing precision tenfold from the previous 0.1 mass%C to 0.01 mass%C. Stage heating at about 100 °C dramatically suppresses contamination growth during continuous point measurement and mapping. By the combination of above two techniques, we successfully visualized the two-dimensional carbon distribution in a dual-phase steel. It was also noted that the carbon concentrations at the ferrite/martensite interfaces were not the same across all interfaces, and local variation was observed. The developed technique is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms of mechanical properties and microstructural evolution, thereby contributing to the design of new steel products with superior properties. PMID:27431281

  7. Novel technique to suppress hydrocarbon contamination for high accuracy determination of carbon content in steel by FE-EPMA.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takako; Tanaka, Yuji; Yagoshi, Masayasu; Ishida, Kiyohito

    2016-01-01

    In multiphase steels, control of the carbon contents in the respective phases is the most important factor in alloy design for achieving high strength and high ductility. However, it is unusually difficult to determine the carbon contents in multiphase structures with high accuracy by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) due to the unavoidable effect of hydrocarbon contamination during measurements. We have investigated new methods for suppressing hydrocarbon contamination during field emission (FE) EPMA measurements as well as a conventional liquid nitrogen trap. Plasma cleaner inside the specimen chamber results in a improvement of carbon-content determination by point analysis, increasing precision tenfold from the previous 0.1 mass%C to 0.01 mass%C. Stage heating at about 100 °C dramatically suppresses contamination growth during continuous point measurement and mapping. By the combination of above two techniques, we successfully visualized the two-dimensional carbon distribution in a dual-phase steel. It was also noted that the carbon concentrations at the ferrite/martensite interfaces were not the same across all interfaces, and local variation was observed. The developed technique is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms of mechanical properties and microstructural evolution, thereby contributing to the design of new steel products with superior properties. PMID:27431281

  8. Novel technique to suppress hydrocarbon contamination for high accuracy determination of carbon content in steel by FE-EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takako; Tanaka, Yuji; Yagoshi, Masayasu; Ishida, Kiyohito

    2016-07-01

    In multiphase steels, control of the carbon contents in the respective phases is the most important factor in alloy design for achieving high strength and high ductility. However, it is unusually difficult to determine the carbon contents in multiphase structures with high accuracy by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) due to the unavoidable effect of hydrocarbon contamination during measurements. We have investigated new methods for suppressing hydrocarbon contamination during field emission (FE) EPMA measurements as well as a conventional liquid nitrogen trap. Plasma cleaner inside the specimen chamber results in a improvement of carbon-content determination by point analysis, increasing precision tenfold from the previous 0.1 mass%C to 0.01 mass%C. Stage heating at about 100 °C dramatically suppresses contamination growth during continuous point measurement and mapping. By the combination of above two techniques, we successfully visualized the two-dimensional carbon distribution in a dual-phase steel. It was also noted that the carbon concentrations at the ferrite/martensite interfaces were not the same across all interfaces, and local variation was observed. The developed technique is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms of mechanical properties and microstructural evolution, thereby contributing to the design of new steel products with superior properties.

  9. Reduction in the earthworm metabolomic response after phenanthrene exposure in soils with high soil organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    McKelvie, Jennifer R; Whitfield Åslund, Melissa; Celejewski, Magda A; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated the correlation between soil organic carbon (OC) content and metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to phenanthrene (58 ± 3 mg/kg) spiked into seven artificial soils with OC contents ranging from 1 to 27% OC. Principal component analysis of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of aqueous extracts identified statistically significant differences in the metabolic profiles of control and phenanthrene-exposed E. fetida in the 1% OC soil only. Partial least squares analysis identified a metabolic response in the four soils with OC values ≤11% which was well correlated to estimated phenanthrene porewater concentrations. The results suggest that the higher sorption capability of high OC soils decreased the bioavailability of phenanthrene and the subsequent metabolic response of E. fetida. PMID:23337355

  10. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-01-01

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications. PMID:27488268

  11. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-08-01

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications.

  12. One-Step Synthesis of Microporous Carbon Monoliths Derived from Biomass with High Nitrogen Doping Content for Highly Selective CO2 Capture

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Zhen; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Lv, Hong; Li, Bing; Wu, Haobin; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Cunman

    2016-01-01

    The one-step synthesis method of nitrogen doped microporous carbon monoliths derived from biomass with high-efficiency is developed using a novel ammonia (NH3)-assisted activation process, where NH3 serves as both activating agent and nitrogen source. Both pore forming and nitrogen doping simultaneously proceed during the process, obviously superior to conventional chemical activation. The as-prepared nitrogen-doped active carbons exhibit rich micropores with high surface area and high nitrogen content. Synergetic effects of its high surface area, microporous structure and high nitrogen content, especially rich nitrogen-containing groups for effective CO2 capture (i.e., phenyl amine and pyridine-nitrogen) lead to superior CO2/N2 selectivity up to 82, which is the highest among known nanoporous carbons. In addition, the resulting nitrogen-doped active carbons can be easily regenerated under mild conditions. Considering the outstanding CO2 capture performance, low production cost, simple synthesis procedure and easy scalability, the resulting nitrogen-doped microporous carbon monoliths are promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 in industrial applications. PMID:27488268

  13. Effect of carbon content on high temperature tensile properties of Fe{sub 3}Al based intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baligidad, R.G.; Prakash, U.; Radhakrishna, A.; Rao, V.R.; Rao, P.K.; Ballal, N.B.

    1997-01-01

    Ordered intermetallic alloys based on the iron aluminide Fe{sub 3}Al are being considered for high temperature structural applications. Though these alloys exhibit poor room temperature ductility and low fracture toughness, significant improvement in these respects can be achieved by alloying addition and process control. Most of the reported literature is on compositions with very low (<0.01 wt.%) carbon contents because carbon is known to embrittle these alloys causing significant reduction in ductility. However, no reasons have been ascribed to this loss in ductility. Recently the authors have reported that addition of carbon in the range of 0.14 to 0.50 wt.% significantly increases the room temperature strength of Fe-16 wt.% (28 at.%)Al alloys. These alloys also exhibited good room temperature by the interstitial carbon, as well as precipitation hardening due to the presence of Fe{sub 3}AlC precipitates. Here, the authors report elevated temperature tensile properties of these alloys.

  14. Nitrogen-doped carbon and high-content alumina containing bi-active cobalt oxides for efficient storage of lithium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bibo; Zhang, Shilin; Yao, Feng; Huo, Ruijie; Zhang, Fazhi; Xu, Sailong

    2016-01-15

    Low-content ultrathin coating of non-active alumina (Al2O3) has been extensively utilized as one of the most effective strategies to improve electrochemical performances of electrodes for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), however, typically by employing expensive atomic layer deposition equipment. We herein demonstrate a simple preparation of high-content and well-dispersed Al2O3 (24.33wt.%)-containing multi-component composite (CoO/Co3O4/N-C/Al2O3) by calcination of melamine/CoAl-layered double hydroxide (CoAl-LDH) mixture. The resulting composite bundles the advantages expected to improve electrochemical performances: (i) bi-active CoO/Co3O4, (ii) highly conductive N-doped carbon, and (iii) N-doped carbon and high-content non-active Al2O3 as buffering reagents, as well as (iv) good distribution of bi- and non-active components resulted from the lattice orientation and confinement effect of the LDH layers. Electrochemical evaluation shows that the composite electrode delivers a highly enhanced reversible capacity of 1078mAhg(-1) after 50cycles at 100mAg(-1), compared with the bi-active CoO/Co3O4 mixtures with and without non-active Al2O3. Transmission electron microscopy/scanning electron microscopy observations and electrochemical impedance spectra experimentally provide the information on the good distributions of multiple components and the improved conductivity underlying the enhancements, respectively. Our LDH precursor-based preparation route may be extended to design and prepare various multi-component transition metal oxides for efficient lithium storage. PMID:26454377

  15. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  16. Gel spinning of PVA composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yizhe; Lai, Dengpan; Zou, Liming; Ling, Xinlong; Lu, Hongwei; Xu, Yongjing

    2015-07-01

    In this report, poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide (MWCNTs-GO) hybrids were prepared by gel spinning, and were characterized by TGA, DSC, SEM, XL-2 yarn strength tester and electrical conductivity measurement. The total content of MWCNTs-GO hybrids in the PVA composite fibers, which is up to 25 wt%, was confirmed by TGA analysis. The DSC measurement shows that the melting and crystallization peaks decreased after the addition of nano-fillers. This is due to the reason that the motion of PVA chains is completely confined by strong hydrogen bonding interaction between PVA and nano-fillers. After the addtion of GO, the dispersibility of MWCNTs in composite fibers improved slightly. And the tensile strength and Young's modulus increased by 38% and 67%, respectively. This is caused by the increased hydrogen bonding interaction and synergistic effect through hybridization of MWCNTs and GO. More significantly, the electrical conductivity of PVA/MWCNTs/GO composite fibers enhanced by three orders of magnitude with the addition of GO.

  17. Zinc oxide nanorod assisted rapid single-step process for the conversion of electrospun poly(acrylonitrile) nanofibers to carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nain, Ratyakshi; Singh, Dhirendra; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for immobilization of polymer chains and assisted in uniform heat distribution. This facilitated rapid and efficient conversion of the polymer structure to the ladder, and subsequently, the graphitized structure. At the end of the process, the ZnO nanorods were found to completely separate from the carbonized fibers yielding pure carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content and surface area. The approach could be used to eliminate the slow, energy intensive stabilization step and achieve fast conversion of randomly laid carbon nanofiber webs in a single step to carbon nanofibers without the application of external tension or internal templates usually employed to achieve a high graphitic content in such systems.The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for

  18. Variable carbon contents of lunar soil 74220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Moore, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Total carbon, sulfur, and inorganic gas release studies have been carried out on an additional split of orange soil 74220. The total carbon content was found to be 4 plus or minus 3 ppm C for this sample as compared to an earlier reported value of 100 plus or minus 10 ppm C. Gas release studies on the two splits of 74220 indicate that the carbon may be present as a surface condensate on the sample showing the higher carbon content. The 'surface condensate' evolves CO2 upon heating to temperatures below 400 C.

  19. Jellyfish Body Plans Provide Allometric Advantages beyond Low Carbon Content

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Kylie A.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Lucas, Cathy H.; Sutherland, Kelly R.; Condon, Robert H.; Mianzan, Hermes; Purcell, Jennifer E.; Robinson, Kelly L.; Uye, Shin-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Jellyfish form spectacular blooms throughout the world’s oceans. Jellyfish body plans are characterised by high water and low carbon contents which enables them to grow much larger than non-gelatinous animals of equivalent carbon content and to deviate from non-gelatinous pelagic animals when incorporated into allometric relationships. Jellyfish have, however, been argued to conform to allometric relationships when carbon content is used as the metric for comparison. Here we test the hypothesis that differences in allometric relationships for several key functional parameters remain for jellyfish even after their body sizes are scaled to their carbon content. Data on carbon and nitrogen contents, rates of respiration, excretion, growth, longevity and swimming velocity of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were assembled. Allometric relationships between each variable and the equivalent spherical diameters of jellyfish and other pelagic animals were compared before and after sizes of jellyfish were standardised for their carbon content. Before standardisation, the slopes of the allometric relationships for respiration, excretion and growth were the same for jellyfish and other pelagic taxa but the intercepts differed. After standardisation, slopes and intercepts for respiration were similar but excretion rates of jellyfish were 10× slower, and growth rates 2× faster than those of other pelagic animals. Longevity of jellyfish was independent of size. The slope of the allometric relationship of swimming velocity of jellyfish differed from that of other pelagic animals but because they are larger jellyfish operate at Reynolds numbers approximately 10× greater than those of other pelagic animals of comparable carbon content. We conclude that low carbon and high water contents alone do not explain the differences in the intercepts or slopes of the allometric relationships of jellyfish and other pelagic animals and that the evolutionary longevity of jellyfish and

  20. Versatile and Biomass Synthesis of Iron-based Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Matrix with High Iron Content and Tunable Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dongmao; Shi, Sheldon Q; Jiang, Dongping; Che, Wen; Gai, Zheng; Howe, Jane Y; More, Karren Leslie; Arockiasamy, Antonyraj

    2012-01-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles supported on carbon (FeNPs{at}C) have enormous potential for environmental applications. Reported is a biomass-based method for FeNP{at}C synthesis that involves pyrolysis of bleached wood fiber pre-mixed with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. This method allows synthesis of iron-based nanoparticles with tunable chemical reactivity by changing the pyrolysis temperature. The FeNP{at}C synthesized at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 C (FeNP{at}C-500) reacts violently (pyrophoric) when exposed to air, while FeNP{at}C prepared at 800 C (FeNP{at}C-800) remains stable in ambient condition for at least 3 months. The FeNPs in FeNP{at}C-800 are mostly below 50 nm in diameter and are surrounded by carbon. The immediate carbon layer (within 5-15 nm radius) on the FeNPs is graphitized. Proof-of-concept environmental applications of FeNPs{at}C-800 were demonstrated by Rhodamine 6G and arsenate (V) removal from water. This biomass-based method provides an effective way for iron-based nanoparticle fabrication and biomass utilization.

  1. Oligomers matrix-assisted dispersion of high content of carbon nanotubes into monolithic column for online separation and enrichment of proteins from complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chanyuan; Du, Zhuo; Li, Gongke; Zhang, Yukui; Cai, Zongwei

    2013-10-01

    In this work, a new oligomer matrix-assisted dispersion (OMAD) method for the preparation of homogeneous dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) incorporated monolithic column was developed. Oligomers matrix as a scaffold could allow MWNTs to entangle with it instead of self-aggregation, so the MWNTs remain in the polymer network followed by in situ self-solidification. The OMAD method not only greatly enlarged the BET surface area of MWNTs incorporated monolithic column from 13.8 m(2) g(-1) to 85.5 m(2) g(-1) without a significant effect on the surface chemistry of the MWNTs, but also improved the dispersion of MWNTs making its content up to 5 wt% (with respect to monomers). The synthesized materials combine the favorable attributes of both high permeability and large surface area, making them excellent candidates for on-line separation and enrichment of proteins. The oligomer matrix-assisted dispersion MWNTs incorporated monolithic columns (OMAD-MMC) exhibited higher enrichment factors and the adsorption capacity is about 5-fold for basic proteins compared with MWNTs incorporated monolithic columns (MMC) prepared by the conventional in situ polymerization. The practical application of OMAD-MMC was proven by selective extraction of hemoglobin in human whole blood samples with SDS-PAGE. On the basis of the results, OMAD as a simple and effective method for dispersion high content MWNTs into monolithic columns shows great promise. PMID:23917344

  2. Carbon content on perturbed wetlands of Yucatan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Ojeda, S. M.; Orellana, R.; Herrera Silveira, J.

    2013-05-01

    The north coast of Yucatan Peninsula is a karstic scenario where the water flows mainly underground through the so called "cenotes"-ring system ("sink holes") toward the coast. This underground water system enhances the connection between watershed condition and coastal ecosystem health. Inland activities such as livestock, agriculture and urban development produce changes in the landscape, hydrological connectivity and in the water quality that can decrease wetland coverage specially mangroves and seagrasses. We conducted studies on the description of structure, biomass and carbon content of the soil, above and below ground of four different types of wetland in a perturbed region. The wetland ecological types were freshwater (Typha domingensis), dwarf mangroves (Avicenia germinans), grassland (Cyperacea) and Seagrasses. Due to the area is mainly covered by mangroves, they represent the most important carbon storage nevertheless the condition of the structure determine the carbon content in soil. Through GIS tools we explore the relationships between land use and costal condition in order to determine priority areas for conservation within the watershed that could be efficient to preserve the carbon storage of this area.

  3. High recall document content extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Chang; Baird, Henry S.

    2011-01-01

    We report methodologies for computing high-recall masks for document image content extraction, that is, the location and segmentation of regions containing handwriting, machine-printed text, photographs, blank space, etc. The resulting segmentation is pixel-accurate, which accommodates arbitrary zone shapes (not merely rectangles). We describe experiments showing that iterated classifiers can increase recall of all content types, with little loss of precision. We also introduce two methodological enhancements: (1) a multi-stage voting rule; and (2) a scoring policy that views blank pixels as a "don't care" class with other content classes. These enhancements improve both recall and precision, achieving at least 89% recall and at least 87% precision among three content types: machine-print, handwriting, and photo.

  4. Electrically conductive LCP-carbon composite with low carbon content for bipolar plate application in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, H.; Willert-Porada, M.

    Lightweight polymer-carbon composites with high specific electrical conductivity at a carbon content below 40 vol.% were developed. The electrical and mechanical properties and the hydrogen permeability of carbon fiber and particle reinforced liquid crystalline polymers were examined. Vectra ® A 950, SIGRAFIL ® carbon fibers and Vulcan ® XC 72 R carbon black were employed. The composites are found to have sufficient mechanical properties and a hydrogen permeability low enough to be utilised as bipolar plate material in fuel cell applications. The density of the new composite is 20% lower than the density of commercial bipolar plates made from carbon reinforced polymeric composite materials, due to the lower carbon content. The current density at 0.5 V in an operating fuel cell is only 20% lower compared to commercial materials with more than 80 vol.% carbon content and meets the requirements for bipolar plate application.

  5. Salinity and nutrient contents of tidal water affects soil respiration and carbon sequestration of high and low tidal flats of Jiuduansha wetlands in different ways.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu; Wang, Lei; Fu, Xiaohua; Yan, Jianfang; Wu, Jihua; Tsang, Yiufai; Le, Yiquan; Sun, Ying

    2016-09-15

    Soils were collected from low tidal flats and high tidal flats of Shang shoal located upstream and Xia shoal located downstream with different tidal water qualities, in the Jiuduansha wetland of the Yangtze River estuary. Soil respiration (SR) in situ and soil abiotic and microbial characteristics were studied to clarify the respective differences in the effects of tidal water salinity and nutrient levels on SR and soil carbon sequestration in low and high tidal flats. In low tidal flats, higher total nitrogen (TN) and lower salinity in the tidal water of Shang shoal resulted in higher TN and lower salinity in its soils compared with Xia shoal. These would benefit β-Proteobacteria and Anaerolineae in Shang shoal soil, which might have higher heterotrophic microbial activities and thus soil microbial respiration and SR. In low tidal flats, where soil moisture was high and the major carbon input was active organic carbon from tidal water, increasing TN was a more important factor than salinity and obviously enhanced soil microbial heterotrophic activities, soil microbial respiration and SR. While, in high tidal flats, higher salinity in Xia shoal due to higher salinity in tidal water compared with Shang shoal benefited γ-Proteobacteria which might enhance autotrophic microbial activity, and was detrimental to β-Proteobacteria in Xia shoal soil. These might have led to lower soil microbial respiration and thus SR in Xia shoal compared with Shang shoal. In high tidal flats, where soil moisture was relatively lower and the major carbon input was plant biomass that was difficult to degrade, soil salinity was the major factor restraining microbial activities, soil microbial respiration and SR. PMID:27208721

  6. A Reassessment of Carbon Content in Tropical Trees

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adam R.; Thomas, Sean C.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of carbon (C) content in live wood is essential for quantifying tropical forest C stocks, yet generic assumptions (such as biomass consisting of 50% carbon on a weight/weight basis) remain widely used despite being supported by little chemical analysis. Empirical data from stem cores of 59 Panamanian rainforest tree species demonstrate that wood C content is highly variable among co-occurring species, with an average (47.4±2.51% S.D.) significantly lower than widely assumed values. Prior published values have neglected to account for volatile C content of tropical woods. By comparing freeze- and oven-dried wood samples, we show that volatile C is non-negligible, and excluding the volatile fraction underestimates wood C content by 2.48±1.28% (S.D.) on average. Wood C content varied substantially among species (from 41.9–51.6%), but was neither strongly phylogenetically conserved, nor correlated to ecological (i.e. wood density, maximum tree height) or demographic traits (i.e. relative growth rate, mortality rate). Overall, assuming generic C fractions in tropical wood overestimates forest C stocks by ∼3.3–5.3%, a non-trivial margin of error leading to overestimates of 4.1–6.8 Mg C ha−1 in a 50-ha forest dynamics plot on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. In addition to addressing other sources of error in tropical forest C accounting, such as uncertainties in allometric models and belowground biomass, compilation and use of species-specific C fractions for tropical tree species would substantially improve both local and global estimates of terrestrial C stocks and fluxes. PMID:21858157

  7. Modelling and mapping the topsoil organic carbon content for Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempen, Bas; Kaaya, Abel; Ngonyani Mhaiki, Consolatha; Kiluvia, Shani; Ruiperez-Gonzalez, Maria; Batjes, Niels; Dalsgaard, Soren

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC), held in soil organic matter, is a key indicator of soil health and plays an important role in the global carbon cycle. The soil can act as a net source or sink of carbon depending on land use and management. Deforestation and forest degradation lead to the release of vast amounts of carbon from the soil in the form of greenhouse gasses, especially in tropical countries. Tanzania has a high deforestation rate: it is estimated that the country loses 1.1% of its total forested area annually. During 2010-2013 Tanzania has been a pilot country under the UN-REDD programme. This programme has supported Tanzania in its initial efforts towards reducing greenhouse gas emission from forest degradation and deforestation and towards preserving soil carbon stocks. Formulation and implementation of the national REDD strategy requires detailed information on the five carbon pools among these the SOC pool. The spatial distribution of SOC contents and stocks was not available for Tanzania. The initial aim of this research, was therefore to develop high-resolution maps of the SOC content for the country. The mapping exercise was carried out in a collaborative effort with four Tanzanian institutes and data from the Africa Soil Information Service initiative (AfSIS). The mapping exercise was provided with over 3200 field observations on SOC from four sources; this is the most comprehensive soil dataset collected in Tanzania so far. The main source of soil samples was the National Forest Monitoring and Assessment (NAFORMA). The carbon maps were generated by means of digital soil mapping using regression-kriging. Maps at 250 m spatial resolution were developed for four depth layers: 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm, and 0-30 cm. A total of 37 environmental GIS data layers were prepared for use as covariates in the regression model. These included vegetation indices, terrain parameters, surface temperature, spectral reflectances, a land cover map and a small

  8. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, S.; Morono, Y.; Littmann, S.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Lomstein, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Into the seafloor, a radical decline in nutrient and energy availability poses strong metabolic demands to any residing life. However, a sedimentary microbial ecosystem seems to maintain itself close to what we understand to be the energetic limit of life. Since a complex sediment matrix is interfering with the analysis of whole cells and sub-cellular compounds such as cell wall and membrane molecules, little is known about the physiological properties of cells in the deep biosphere. Here we focus on the size and carbon content of cells from a 90-m sediment drill core retrieved in October 2013 at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea, in 437 meters water depth. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via fluorescence microscopy (FM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography after cells had additionally been purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Cell-carbon turnover times were estimated using an amino acid racemization model that is based on the built-in molecular clock of aspartic acid, which due to racemization alternates between the D- and L-isomeric configurations over timescales of thousands of years at low in-situ temperatures (≈4˚C). We find that the majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or rod-shaped morphology, and that absolute values for cell volume are strongly dependent on the method used, spanning three orders of magnitude from approximately 0.001 to 1 µm3 for both coccoid and rod-shaped cells. From the surface to the deepest sample measured (≈60 mbsf), cell volume decreases by an order of magnitude, and carbon content is in the lower range (<20 fg C cell-1) of what has been reported in the literature as conversion factors. Cell-carbon is turned over approximately

  9. Soil carbon content and CO2 flux along a hydrologic gradient in a High-Arctic tundra lake basin, Northwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, J.; Klein, E. S.; Welker, J. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Franklin, M.

    2015-12-01

    High Arctic landscapes are composed of watershed basins that vary in size and ecohydrology, but typically have a plant community complex that ranges from dry tundra to moist tundra to wet sedge systems along water body shorelines. The spatial extent of these plant communities reflects mean annual soil moisture and temperature, and is vulnerable to changes in climate conditions. Soil moisture and temperature significantly influence organic matter microbial activity and decomposition, and can affect the fate of soil carbon in tundra soils. Consequently, due to the unique soil carbon differences between tundra plant communities, shifts in their spatial extent may drive future High Arctic biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Understanding this terrestrial-atmosphere trace gas feedback, however, requires quantification of the rates and patterns of CO2 exchange along soil moisture gradients and the associated soil properties. In summer of 2015, soil CO2 flux rate, soil moisture and temperature were measured along a soil moisture gradient spanning three vegetation zones (dry tundra, wet tundra, and wet grassland) in a snow melt-fed lake basin near Thule Greenland. Mean soil temperature during the 2015 growing season was greater in dry tundra than in wet tundra and wet grassland (13.0 ± 1.2, 7.8 ± 0.8, and 5.5 ± 0.9°C, respectively). Mean volumetric soil moisture differed among all three vegetation zones where the soil moisture gradient ranged from 9 % (dry tundra) to 34 % (wet tundra) to 51 % (wet grassland). Mean soil CO2 flux was significantly greater in the wet grassland (1.7 ± 0.1 μmol m-2 s-1) compared to wet tundra (0.9 ± 0.2 μmol m-2 s-1) and dry tundra (1.2 ± 0.2 μmol m-2 s-1). Soil CO2 flux increased and decreased with seasonal warming and cooling of soil temperature. Although soil temperature was an important seasonal driver of soil CO2 flux rates, differences in mean seasonal soil CO2 flux rates among vegetation zones appeared to be a function of the

  10. Pesticide sorption on geologic material of varying organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, D C; Wood, A L

    1988-09-01

    Sorption of three pesticides on geologic material ranging in organic carbon content from 0.33 to 6.9 g kg-1 was measured in soil columns using a miscible displacement technique. An octanol-water partitioning model was shown to be inappropriate for predicting sorption of the less hydrophobic pesticides on the low organic carbon materials. PMID:3255290

  11. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  12. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; David Harvey; M. Dutta; V. Colbow; S. Wessel

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150 C and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metallic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  13. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Harvey, David; Dutta, Monica; Colbow, Vesna

    2011-07-01

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150oC and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metalic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  14. Ultrasonic determination of carbon content in uranium metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncelow, J.; Morrell, J.; Olson, D. L.; Mishra, B.

    2012-05-01

    A nondestructive method to determine solute content of carbon in polycrystalline uranium by ultrasonic techniques is currently being developed. The problem is approached by considering first theories developed in the field of physical acoustics applicable to variation in attenuation and elasticity with respect to interstitial and second-phase contents. Attention is given to the physical metallurgy of uranium, specifically phase stability and the effects of carbon concentration on physical properties. Experimental verification of theory is provided using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) and pulse-echo time of flight measurements, the former yielding elastic moduli and quality factors and the latter supplying attenuation and velocity information.

  15. Estimation of black carbon content for biomass burning aerosols from multi-channel Raman lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Marmureanu, Luminita; Nicolae, Doina

    2015-04-01

    Biomass burning due to natural processes (forest fires) or anthropical activities (agriculture, thermal power stations, domestic heating) is an important source of aerosols with a high content of carbon components (black carbon and organic carbon). Multi-channel Raman lidars provide information on the spectral dependence of the backscatter and extinction coefficients, embedding information on the black carbon content. Aerosols with a high content of black carbon have large extinction coefficients and small backscatter coefficients (strong absorption), while aerosols with high content of organic carbon have large backscatter coefficients (weak absorption). This paper presents a method based on radiative calculations to estimate the black carbon content of biomass burning aerosols from 3b+2a+1d lidar signals. Data is collected at Magurele, Romania, at the cross-road of air masses coming from Ukraine, Russia and Greece, where burning events are frequent during both cold and hot seasons. Aerosols are transported in the free troposphere, generally in the 2-4 km altitude range, and reaches the lidar location after 2-3 days. Optical data are collected between 2011-2012 by a multi-channel Raman lidar and follows the quality assurance program of EARLINET. Radiative calculations are made with libRadTran, an open source radiative model developed by ESA. Validation of the retrievals is made by comparison to a co-located C-ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Keywords: Lidar, aerosols, biomass burning, radiative model, black carbon Acknowledgment: This work has been supported by grants of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project no. 39/2012 - SIAFIM, and by Romanian Partnerships in priority areas PNII implemented with MEN-UEFISCDI support, project no. 309/2014 - MOBBE

  16. Inferring Absorbing Organic Carbon Content from AERONET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Schuster, G.; Myhre, G.; Kazadzis, S.; Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Black carbon, light-absorbing organic carbon (often called brown carbon) and mineral dust are the major light-absorbing aerosols. Currently the sources and formation of brown carbon aerosol in particular are not well understood. In this study we estimated globally the amount of light absorbing organic carbon and black carbon from AERONET measurements. We find that the columnar absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon) levels in biomass burning regions of South-America and Africa are relatively high (about 15-20 magnesium per square meters during biomass burning season), while the concentrations are significantly lower in urban areas in US and Europe. However, we estimated significant absorbing organic carbon amounts from the data of megacities of newly industrialized countries, particularly in India and China, showing also clear seasonality with peak values up to 30-35 magnesium per square meters during the coldest season, likely caused by the coal and biofuel burning used for heating. We also compared our retrievals with the modeled organic carbon by global Oslo CTM for several sites. Model values are higher in biomass burning regions than AERONET-based retrievals, while opposite is true in urban areas in India and China.

  17. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  18. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziglo, M. J.; Nelson, A. E.; Heo, G.; Major, P. W.

    2009-05-01

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm -2) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation ( p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  19. Carbon cycling in high-latitude ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Alan; Frolking, Stephen; Holland, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    The carbon-rich soils and peatlands of high-latitude ecosystems could substantially influence atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and CH4 in a changing climate. Currently, cold, often waterlogged conditions retard decomposition, and release of carbon back to the atmosphere may be further slowed by physical protection of organic matter in permafrost. As a result, many northern ecosystems accumulate carbon over time (Billings et al., 1982; Poole and Miller, 1982), and although such rates of accumulation are low, thousands of years of development have left Arctic ecosystems with an extremely high soil carbon content; Schlesinger's (1984) average value of 20.4 kg C/m(sup 2) leads to a global estimate of 163 x 10(exp 15) g C. All GCM simulations of a doubled CO2 climate predict the greatest warming to occur in the polar regions (Dickinson, 1986; Mitchell, 1989). Given the extensive northern carbon pools and the strong sensitivity of decomposition processes to temperature, even a slight warming of the soil could dramatically alter the carbon balance of Arctic ecosystems. If warming accelerates rates of decomposition more than rates of primary production, a sizeable additional accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere could occur. Furthermore, CH4 produced in anaerobic soils and peatlands of the Arctic already composes a good percentage of the global efflux (Cicerone and Oremlund, 1988); if northern soils become warmer and wetter as a whole, CH4 emissions could dramatically rise. A robust understanding of the primary controls of carbon fluxes in Arctic ecosystems is critical. As a framework for a systematic examination of these controls, we discussed a conceptual model of regional-scale Arctic carbon turnover, including CH4 production, and based upon the Century soil organic matter model.

  20. High C and H Contents of Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanon, P.; Chaussidon, M.; Robert, F.

    1996-03-01

    Carbon and hydrogen concentrations (reported hereafter as in ppm C and [H] in ppm H2O) of 33 chondrules of all petrological types and sizes, and belonging to some of the least altered and metamorphosed chondrites were determined with the CRPG Nancy ion-microprobe. Special care was taken in order to efficiently get rid of the terrestrial contamination. Before analysis, each sampling area (0~25 micrometers and ~50 micrometers for the smaller chondrules) was sputtered by the O^2- primary beam (20nA) for 5 minutes. Precise chemical concentrations for H and C were obtained for a -60V offset applied to the sample, along with an energy filtering of +/- 10V. Mass resolution (M/Delta M) of 1800 is sufficient to discriminate the 24Mg++ signal from the 12C+. Mid-ocean ridge basalts were used for calibration of C and H. Major element concentrations in phases were obtained by electron probe analysis. Then, in each chondrule, phase proportions were visually estimated allowing the calculation of a bulk concentration for the major elements. [C] and [H] were obtained by two methods : 1) using internal chondrule correlations between individual ion-probe spots for carbon (or H) and major elements contents or 2) by averaging all ion-probe [C] and [H] determinations. _

  1. Carbon content of common airborne fungal species and fungal contribution to aerosol organic carbon in a subtropical city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jessica Y. W.; Chan, Chak K.; Lee, C.-T.; Lau, Arthur P. S.

    Interest in the role and contribution of fungi to atmospheric aerosols and processes grows in the past decade. Substantial data or information such as fungal mass or carbon loading to ambient aerosols is however still lacking. This study aimed to quantify the specific organic carbon content (OC per spore) of eleven fungal species commonly found airborne in the subtropics, and estimated their contribution to organic carbon in aerosols. The specific OC contents showed a size-dependent relationship ( r = 0.64, p < 0.05) and ranged from 3.6 to 201.0 pg carbon per spore or yeast cell, giving an average of 6.0 pg carbon per spore (RSD 51%) for spore or cell size less than 10 μm. In accounting for natural variations in the composition and abundance of fungal population, weighted-average carbon content for field samples was adopted using the laboratory determined specific OC values. An average of 5.97 pg carbon per spore (RSD 3.8%) was enumerated from 28 field samples collected at the university campus. The mean fungal OC concentration was 3.7, 6.0 and 9.7 ng m -3 in PM 2.5, PM 2.5-10 and PM 10, respectively. These corresponded to 0.1%, 1.2% and 0.2% of the total OC in PM 2.5, PM 2.5-10 and PM 10, respectively. In the study period, rain provided periods with low total OC but high fungal prevalence and fungi contributed 7-32% OC in PM 2.5-10 or 2.4-7.1% OC in PM 10. More extensive studies are deserved to better understand the spatial-, temporal- and episodic dependency on the fungal OC contribution to the atmospheric aerosols.

  2. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang; Guo, Jun

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  3. The Stable and Radio- Carbon Isotopic Content of Labile and Refractory Carbon in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichol, A. P.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Gerlach, D. S.; Hayes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of the isotopic content of atmospheric particulate matter are hampered by difficulties in chemically defining the pools of carbon and analytically isolating the different pools. We are conducting studies on reference materials and atmospheric aerosol samples to develop a method to measure stable and radio- carbon isotopes on the labile and refractory carbon. We are using a flow-through combustion system that allows us to combust, collect and measure the isotopic content of the gases produced at all stages of heating/oxidizing. We compare our results to those measured using a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO) (Gustafsson et al., 2001). In this method, refractory carbon is defined as the material remaining after pre- combusting a sample at 375°C in the presence of oxygen for 24 hours. The reference materials are diesel soot, apple leaves and a hybrid of the two (DiesApple), all from NIST. These provide carbon with two well-defined fractions -- the soot provides refractory carbon that is radiocarbon dead and the apple leaves provide organic carbon that is radiocarbon modern. Radiocarbon results from DiesApple indicate that the "refractory" carbon defined by the CTO method is actually a mixture of old and modern carbon that contains over 25% modern carbon. This suggests that charred material formed from the apples leaves during the pre-combustion step is contributing to the fraction we identify as refractory carbon. We are studying this by analyzing the individual materials and the mixture using our flow-through system. First results with this system indicate that the refractory fraction trapped from the DiesApple contains much less modern carbon than the CTO method, less than 7%. We will present detailed concentration and isotopic results of the generation of carbon dioxide during programmed combustion of each of the reference materials. We studied the radiocarbon content of both the total carbon (TC) and refractory carbon in the fine particulate matter (PM

  4. Microstructural characterization of high-carbon ferrochromium

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, A.; Navara, E.

    1996-04-01

    Light optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for high-carbon ferrochromium microstructural analysis. Different microstructures were observed for industrially and laboratory-produced ferroalloys. Primary carbides of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} with chromium ferrite were found in the industrially produced, slowly solidified, and cooled ferroalloy, while primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides accompanied a eutectic mixture of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides and chromium ferrite in the laboratory-melted and in the water-solidified and water-cooled materials. Different microstructural arrangements are directly related to the friability properties of this material, which characterizes its resistance to abrasion on handling and impact. In ferrochromium upgraded by carbon content reduction, the eutectic M{sub 7}C{sub 3} hexagonal carbides are partly replaced by M{sub 23}C{sub 6} dendritic carbides. The presence of dendritic carbides in the ferrochromium eutectic microstructure can be interpreted as a proof of a lower carbon content, raising the commercial value of the ferroalloy. The hexagonal M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides exhibited a central hollow along the longitudinal axis, and on metallographic samples they looked like screw nuts. A model of the solidification mechanism for such crystals is proposed.

  5. High dielectric permittivity and improved mechanical and thermal properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride) composites with low carbon nanotube content: effect of composite processing on phase behavior and dielectric properties.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Sudheer; Vishnupriya, D; Chary, K Suresh; Patro, T Umasankar

    2016-09-23

    The composite processing technique and nanofiller concentration and its functionalization significantly alter the properties of polymer nanocomposites. To realize this, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) were dispersed in a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) matrix at carefully selected CNT concentrations by two illustrious methods, such as solution-cast and melt-mixing. Notwithstanding the processing method, CNTs induced predominantly the γ-phase in PVDF, instead of the commonly obtained β-phase upon nanofiller incorporation, and imparted significant improvements in dielectric properties. Acid-treatment of CNT improved its dispersion and interfacial adhesion significantly with PVDF, and induced a higher γ-phase content and better dielectric properties in PVDF as compared to pristine CNT. Further, the γ-phase content was found to be higher in solution-cast composites than that in melt-mixed counterparts, most likely due to solvent-induced crystallization in a controlled environment and slow solvent evaporation in the former case. However, interestingly, the melt-mixed composites showed a significantly higher dielectric constant at the onset of the CNT networked-structure as compared to the solution-cast composites. This suggests the possible role of CNT breakage during melt-mixing, which might lead to higher space-charge polarization at the polymer-CNT interface, and in turn an increased number of pseudo-microcapacitors in these composites than the solution-cast counterparts. Notably, PVDF with 0.13 vol% (volume fraction, f c  = 0.0013) of acid-treated CNTs, prepared by melt-mixing, displayed the relative permittivity of ∼217 and capacitance of ∼5430 pF, loss tangent of ∼0.4 at 1 kHz and an unprecedented figure of merit of ∼10(5). We suggest a simple hypothesis for the γ-phase formation and evolution of the high dielectric constant in these composites. Further, the high-dielectric composite film showed marked improvements in mechanical and thermal

  6. High dielectric permittivity and improved mechanical and thermal properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride) composites with low carbon nanotube content: effect of composite processing on phase behavior and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer Kumar, G.; Vishnupriya, D.; Chary, K. Suresh; Umasankar Patro, T.

    2016-09-01

    The composite processing technique and nanofiller concentration and its functionalization significantly alter the properties of polymer nanocomposites. To realize this, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) were dispersed in a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) matrix at carefully selected CNT concentrations by two illustrious methods, such as solution-cast and melt-mixing. Notwithstanding the processing method, CNTs induced predominantly the γ-phase in PVDF, instead of the commonly obtained β-phase upon nanofiller incorporation, and imparted significant improvements in dielectric properties. Acid-treatment of CNT improved its dispersion and interfacial adhesion significantly with PVDF, and induced a higher γ-phase content and better dielectric properties in PVDF as compared to pristine CNT. Further, the γ-phase content was found to be higher in solution-cast composites than that in melt-mixed counterparts, most likely due to solvent-induced crystallization in a controlled environment and slow solvent evaporation in the former case. However, interestingly, the melt-mixed composites showed a significantly higher dielectric constant at the onset of the CNT networked-structure as compared to the solution-cast composites. This suggests the possible role of CNT breakage during melt-mixing, which might lead to higher space-charge polarization at the polymer–CNT interface, and in turn an increased number of pseudo-microcapacitors in these composites than the solution-cast counterparts. Notably, PVDF with 0.13 vol% (volume fraction, f c = 0.0013) of acid-treated CNTs, prepared by melt-mixing, displayed the relative permittivity of ∼217 and capacitance of ∼5430 pF, loss tangent of ∼0.4 at 1 kHz and an unprecedented figure of merit of ∼105. We suggest a simple hypothesis for the γ-phase formation and evolution of the high dielectric constant in these composites. Further, the high-dielectric composite film showed marked improvements in mechanical and thermal

  7. Computer vision for high content screening.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Oren Z; Frey, Brendan J

    2016-01-01

    High Content Screening (HCS) technologies that combine automated fluorescence microscopy with high throughput biotechnology have become powerful systems for studying cell biology and drug screening. These systems can produce more than 100 000 images per day, making their success dependent on automated image analysis. In this review, we describe the steps involved in quantifying microscopy images and different approaches for each step. Typically, individual cells are segmented from the background using a segmentation algorithm. Each cell is then quantified by extracting numerical features, such as area and intensity measurements. As these feature representations are typically high dimensional (>500), modern machine learning algorithms are used to classify, cluster and visualize cells in HCS experiments. Machine learning algorithms that learn feature representations, in addition to the classification or clustering task, have recently advanced the state of the art on several benchmarking tasks in the computer vision community. These techniques have also recently been applied to HCS image analysis. PMID:26806341

  8. Reduction of carbon content in waste-tire combustion ashes by bio-thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.C.; Lee, W.J.; Shih, S.I.; Mou, J.L.

    2009-07-01

    Application of bio-catalyst (NOE-7F) in thermal treatment can adequately dispose dark-black fly ashes from co-combustion of both waste tires and coal. After thermal treatment of fly ashes by adding 10% NOE-7F, the carbon contents reduced by 37.6% and the weight losses increased by 405%, compared with the fly ashes without mixing with NOE-7F. The combustion behaviors of wasted tires combustion fly ashes with NOE-7F were also investigated by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results verify that NOE-7F has positive effects on the combustion of residual carbon and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the energy release and reduce the toxicity during the process of thermal treatment. Furthermore, using NOE-7F to dispose high-carbon content fly ashes did improve the compressive strength of fly ashes and concrete mixtures. Therefore, NOE-7F is a promising additive which could decrease treatment cost of high-carbon content fly ashes and reduce the amount of survival toxic PAHs.

  9. Caffeine content of prepackaged national-brand and private-label carbonated beverages.

    PubMed

    Chou, K-H; Bell, L N

    2007-08-01

    Caffeine is a well-known stimulant that is added as an ingredient to various carbonated soft drinks. Due to its stimulatory and other physiological effects, individuals desire to know the exact amount of caffeine consumed from these beverages. This study analyzed the caffeine contents of 56 national-brand and 75 private-label store-brand carbonated beverages using high-performance liquid chromatography. Caffeine contents ranged from 4.9 mg/12 oz (IGA Cola) to 74 mg/12 oz (Vault Zero). Some of the more common national-brand carbonated beverages analyzed in this study with their caffeine contents were Coca-Cola (33.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Coke (46.3 mg/12 oz), Pepsi (38.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Pepsi (36.7 mg/12 oz), Dr Pepper (42.6 mg/12 oz), Diet Dr Pepper (44.1 mg/12 oz), Mountain Dew (54.8 mg/12 oz), and Diet Mountain Dew (55.2 mg/12 oz). The Wal-Mart store-brand beverages with their caffeine contents were Sam's Cola (12.7 mg/12 oz), Sam's Diet Cola (13.3 mg/12 oz), Dr Thunder (30.6 mg/12 oz), Diet Dr Thunder (29.9 mg/12 oz), and Mountain Lightning (46.5 mg/12 oz). Beverages from 14 other stores were also analyzed. Most store-brand carbonated beverages were found to contain less caffeine than their national-brand counterparts. The wide range of caffeine contents in carbonated beverages indicates that consumers would benefit from the placement of caffeine values on food labels. PMID:17995675

  10. Elevated carbon dioxide and ozone alter productivity and ecosystem carbon content in northern temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Talhelm, Alan F; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Kubiske, Mark E; Zak, Donald R; Campany, Courtney E; Burton, Andrew J; Dickson, Richard E; Hendrey, George R; Isebrands, J G; Lewin, Keith F; Nagy, John; Karnosky, David F

    2014-08-01

    Three young northern temperate forest communities in the north-central United States were exposed to factorial combinations of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and tropospheric ozone (O3 ) for 11 years. Here, we report results from an extensive sampling of plant biomass and soil conducted at the conclusion of the experiment that enabled us to estimate ecosystem carbon (C) content and cumulative net primary productivity (NPP). Elevated CO2 enhanced ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas elevated O3 decreased ecosystem C content by 9%. There was little variation in treatment effects on C content across communities and no meaningful interactions between CO2 and O3 . Treatment effects on ecosystem C content resulted primarily from changes in the near-surface mineral soil and tree C, particularly differences in woody tissues. Excluding the mineral soil, cumulative NPP was a strong predictor of ecosystem C content (r(2) = 0.96). Elevated CO2 enhanced cumulative NPP by 39%, a consequence of a 28% increase in canopy nitrogen (N) content (g N m(-2) ) and a 28% increase in N productivity (NPP/canopy N). In contrast, elevated O3 lowered NPP by 10% because of a 21% decrease in canopy N, but did not impact N productivity. Consequently, as the marginal impact of canopy N on NPP (∆NPP/∆N) decreased through time with further canopy development, the O3 effect on NPP dissipated. Within the mineral soil, there was less C in the top 0.1 m of soil under elevated O3 and less soil C from 0.1 to 0.2 m in depth under elevated CO2 . Overall, these results suggest that elevated CO2 may create a sustained increase in NPP, whereas the long-term effect of elevated O3 on NPP will be smaller than expected. However, changes in soil C are not well-understood and limit our ability to predict changes in ecosystem C content. PMID:24604779

  11. Investigating the Role of Carbonate Ion Concentration on the Magnesium Content of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, C.; Dove, P. M.; Han, N.

    2011-12-01

    The fields of biomineralization and carbonate geochemistry are undergoing a paradigm shift with the realization that the formation of calcite with diverse compositions and textures can be understood within the framework of multiple pathways to mineralization. Many organisms do not form their skeletons via the classical step-growth process, but instead mineralization occurs through a mesocrystal pathway that begins with the formation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), which subsequently transforms to calcite. Little is known about factors that regulate this type of calcification because the last 50 years of research have focused almost entirely on step-growth processes. In particular, new findings indicate that the chemical signatures and properties of calcites that form via an amorphous pathway are significantly different. Variable temperature has been shown to influence the amount of magnesium that is incorporated into ACC, but the effect of alkalinity has not been constrained. Here, a flow-through method was developed to produce ACC within a geochemically relevant pH range and with a constant supersaturation, and to determine the effect of carbonate ion concentration on magnesium uptake. The experimental approach uses a high precision syringe pump to prepare ACC under specified and constant chemical conditions. This study used two syringes that contained: 1) 100 ml of MgCl2?6H2O and CaCl2?2H2O such that the Mg/Ca ratio is fixed at 5:1 (modern seawater), and 2) 100 ml of 60mM - 400mM NaHCO3. The initial sodium bicarbonate solutions were buffered to a pH of 9.75 using NaOH, and upon mixing with the 5:1 Mg/Ca solution the resulting pH range was 9.2 - 9.7. All experiments were performed at temperatures between 21.5 and 23 degrees Celsius. Solution and solids were collected on 0.20 micron filter paper with a vacuum pump running continuously. Experiments were typically conducted for an hour and a half and all samples were rinsed with distilled deionized water before

  12. Water, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, carbon-13, and oxygen-18 content of selected lunar material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.; Gleason, J.D.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    The water content of the breccia is 150 to 455 ppm, with a ??D from -580 to -870 per mil. Hydrogen gas content is 40 to 53 ppm with a ??D of -830 to -970 per mil. The CO2 is 290 to 418 ppm with S 13C = + 2.3 to + 5.1 per mil and ??18O = 14.2 to 19.1 per mil. Non-CO2 carbon is 22 to 100 ppm, ??18C = -6.4 to -23.2 per mil. Lunar dust is 810 ppm H2O (D = 80 ppm) and 188 ppm total carbon (??13C = -17.6 per mil). The 18O analyses of whole rocks range from 5.8 to 6.2 per mil. The temperature of crystallization of type B rocks is 1100?? to 1300??C, based on the oxygen isotope fractionation between coexisting plagioclase and ilmenite.

  13. Determining water content in activated carbon for double-layer capacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Minato; Izumi, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Morita, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    Karl-Fisher titration is used to estimate water contents in activated carbon and the distribution of impurity-level water in an activated carbon-solvent system. Normalization of the water content of activated carbon is attempted using vacuum drying after immersion in water was controlled. Although vacuum drying at 473 K and 24 h can remove large amounts of water, a substantial amount of water remains in the activated carbon. The water release to propylene carbonate is less than that to acetonitrile. The degradation of capacitor cell capacitance for activated carbon with some amount of water differs according to the electrolyte solvent type: acetonitrile promotes greater degradation than propylene carbonate does.

  14. Soils of the Tiksi area and their carbon contents; Northeastern Siberia, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antcibor, Iuliia; Zubrzycki, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    Significant differences for the total organic carbon (TOC) contents in the surface horizons were found between all sites of the Tiksi area and the Lena River Delta region (Mann Whitney U, P < 0.05) suggesting higher carbon contents in the hinterland area. Since the soils of the Tiksi area were poorly studied in the past and are significantly different to soils of the well-studied Lena River Delta, this investigation was performed. Here we present preliminary results with interesting insights. All investigated soil profiles of the Tiksi area have developed on eluvial argillaceous shale. Most soil profile depths were relatively shallow (20 - 30 cm). Only several soil profiles, located to the north from Tiksi settlement, reached the depth of 40 cm and deeper. The Tiksi area was characterized by a variety of soil types. According to US Soils Taxonomy most of soils having developed in depressed micro-relief forms were described as Orthels and Histels. Soils of slopes and elevated forms of a micro relief belonged to Turbel suborder. The surface soil horizons were generally enriched by organic matter which likely reflects the inclusion of the vegetation. Minimum carbon content in surface soils amounted to 8 - 12 %. Surface soils of southern sites (remote from Tiksi settlement) were characterized by the lowest carbon content, whereas the surface horizons of eastern and western sites had particularly high in carbon. The median value of total organic carbon for these sites was 28 %. At the northern sites B-horizons were characterized by higher median values of carbon content. Similar results were found for the nitrogen content in the surface and B-horizons. The highest median values of nitrogen were found in surface soils for groups of eastern and western sites amounted to 1.2 % and 1.5 %, respectively. The highest median value of nitrogen in B-horizon was observed for soils of the northern sites group. Generally, the C/N ratio for all groups of investigation sites was

  15. Dissolved Carbonate Species in Mixed-Volatile Rhyolitic melts: Carbon Speciation Correlates with Dissolved H2O Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G.; Roggensack, K.; Holloway, J.

    2006-12-01

    The solubility and speciation of volatiles (H2O, CO2) in silicate melts play an important role in determining magma behavior and properties (e.g. volcanic degassing, viscosity, density, glass transition temperature). Carbon dioxide is an important volatile component to consider because of its abundance in volcanic systems, its potential effect on melt behavior, and its low solubility (relative to H2O) that makes it the primary bubble former at high pressures. In previous volatile solubility and spectroscopic work, carbon dioxide has been observed to dissolve as a molecular CO2 unit in silicic melts (e.g. Blank and Holloway, 1994; Tamic et al, 2001), as a carbonate ion in mafic melts (Fine and Stolper, 1986), while intermediate magma compositions such as andesites contain both species (King et al, 2002). FTIR spectroscopic results from low pressure (400- 600 MPa) piston-cylinder experiments show that a calc-alkaline rhyolite melt saturated with a mixed (H2O + CO2) fluid of known composition, has both molecular CO2 and carbonate species present. Dissolved carbonate is not observed in glasses with less than ~2.5 wt% H2O, but its abundance increases linearly with increasing water content thereafter to ~80% carbonate (relative to total dissolved CO2) at ~6 wt% H2O. These results are consistent with H2O depolymerizing the rhyolite (i.e. making it more basalt-like), thereby favoring the formation of the carbonate species. We speculate that the reasons previous mixed volatile studies on rhyolites (e.g. Tamic et al, 2001; Liu et al, 2004) have not observed dissolved carbonate may include bulk compositional differences (i.e. more or less network modifiers present), different P-T conditions, and/or differing quench rates for the experimental apparatus used. These observations have significant implications for understanding the processes occuring during volatile degassing of explosive rhyolitic volcanic systems that contain both H2O and CO2.

  16. High-content screening for biofilm assays.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fubing; Hoek, Eric M V; Damoiseaux, Robert

    2010-08-01

    The authors describe a novel high-throughput screening platform that provides rapid, reliable, quantitative assessment of biofilm formation and removal on engineered surfaces. Unlike traditional biofilm assays based on plate readers, this assay platform is based on high-content screening, which allows for multiplexing to simultaneously quantify the number of bacterial adhesions per unit area and the viability of adhered cells using fluorescent dye combinations. This platform is fully automated and has a throughput of more than 10,000 wells per day. The authors used this platform to examine the influence of different assay buffer systems on bacterial adhesion, viability, and removal on cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol coating films synthesized directly onto the bottoms of 384-well plates. The results indicated that water chemistry, bacteria cell type, and film chemistry combine to govern biofilm formation. In general, both reversible and irreversible bacterial adhesion increased with the extent of cross-linking in coating films, which correlates strongly with coating film cross-linking degree and hydrophobicity, which is closely related. The high-throughput platform offers a powerful tool for rapid evaluation of fouling-resistant coating films in addition to elucidation of fundamental mechanisms governing bacterial adhesion. PMID:20639506

  17. Effect of carbon content on friction and wear of cast irons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with cast irons and wrought steels containing various amounts of carbon in the alloy structure in contact with 52100 steel. Gray cast irons were found to exhibit lower friction and wear characteristics than white cast irons. Further, gray cast iron wear was more sensitive to carbon content than was white. Wear with gray cast iron was linearly related to load, and friction was found to be sensitive to relative humidity and carbon content. The form, in which the carbon is present in the alloy, is more important, as the carbon content and no strong relationship seems to exist between hardness of these ferrous alloys and wear.

  18. High rates of organic carbon burial in fjord sediments globally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Richard W.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Allison, Mead; Savage, Candida; Galy, Valier

    2015-06-01

    The deposition and long-term burial of organic carbon in marine sediments has played a key role in controlling atmospheric O2 and CO2 concentrations over the past 500 million years. Marine carbon burial represents the dominant natural mechanism of long-term organic carbon sequestration. Fjords--deep, glacially carved estuaries at high latitudes--have been hypothesized to be hotspots of organic carbon burial, because they receive high rates of organic material fluxes from the watershed. Here we compile organic carbon concentrations from 573 fjord surface sediment samples and 124 sediment cores from nearly all fjord systems globally. We use sediment organic carbon content and sediment delivery rates to calculate rates of organic carbon burial in fjord systems across the globe. We estimate that about 18 Mt of organic carbon are buried in fjord sediments each year, equivalent to 11% of annual marine carbon burial globally. Per unit area, fjord organic carbon burial rates are one hundred times as large as the global ocean average, and fjord sediments contain twice as much organic carbon as biogenous sediments underlying the upwelling regions of the ocean. We conclude that fjords may play an important role in climate regulation on glacial-interglacial timescales.

  19. Influence of moisture content and temperature on degree of carbonation and the effect on Cu and Cr leaching from incineration bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenlin Yvonne; Heng, Kim Soon; Sun, Xiaolong; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the influence of moisture content and temperature on the degree of carbonation of municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration bottom ash (IBA) from two different incineration plants in Singapore. The initial rate of carbonation was affected by the nominal moisture content used. Carbonation temperature seemed to play a part in changing the actual moisture content of IBA during carbonation, which in turn affected the degree of carbonation. Results showed that 2h of carbonation was sufficient for the samples to reach a relatively high degree of carbonation that was close to the degree of carbonation observed after 1week of carbonation. Both Cu and Cr leaching also showed significant reduction after only 2h of carbonation. Therefore, the optimum moisture content and temperature were selected based on 2h of carbonation. The optimum moisture content was 15% for both incineration plants while the optimum temperature was different for the two incineration plants, at 35°C and 50°C. The effect on Cu and Cr leaching from IBA after accelerated carbonation was evaluated as a function of carbonation time. Correlation coefficient, Pearson's R, was used to determine the dominant leaching mechanism. The reduction in Cu leaching was found to be contributed by both formation of carbonate mineral and reduction of DOC leaching. On the other hand, Cr leaching seemed to be dominantly controlled by pH. PMID:26077229

  20. Fructose content and composition of commercial HFCS-sweetened carbonated beverages

    PubMed Central

    White, J S; Hobbs, L J; Fernandez, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The obesigenic and related health effects of caloric sweeteners are subjects of much current research. Consumers can properly adjust their diets to conform to nutritional recommendations only if the sugars composition of foods and beverages is accurately measured and reported, a matter of recent concern. We tested the hypothesis that high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) used in commercial carbonated beverages conforms to commonly assumed fructose percentages and industry technical specifications, and fulfills beverage product label regulations and Food Chemicals Codex-stipulated standards. Design: A high-pressure liquid chromatography method was developed and verified for analysis of sugars in carbonated beverages sweetened with HFCS-55. The method was used to measure percent fructose in three carbonated beverage categories. Method verification was demonstrated by acceptable linearity (R2>0.99), accuracy (94–104% recovery) and precision (RSD<2%). Result: Fructose comprised 55.58% of total sugars (95% confidence interval 55.51–55.65%), based on 160 total measurements by 2 independent laboratories of 80 randomly selected carbonated beverages sweetened with HFCS-55. The difference in fructose measurements between laboratories was significant but small (0.1%), and lacked relevance. Differences in fructose by product category or by product age were not statistically significant. Total sugars content of carbonated beverages showed close agreement within product categories (95% confidence interval=0.01–0.54%). Conclusions: Using verified analytical methodology for HFCS-sweetened carbonated beverages, this study confirmed the hypothesis that fructose as a percentage of total sugars is in close agreement with published specifications in industry technical data sheets, published literature values and governmental standards and requirements. Furthermore, total sugars content of commercial beverages is consistent with common industry practices for canned and

  1. Increasing carbon content of fly ash: Consequences and recovery of lost value

    SciTech Connect

    Willauer, C.S.; Gasiorowski, S.A.

    1999-07-01

    In response to Phase 2 of the Clean Air Act of 1990, US electric utilities operating coal fired power plants are currently installing low NO {sub x} equipment to meet new air emissions requirements. As these plants begin to operate under the lower NO{sub x} requirements, more carbon remains in the plant's fly ash (a by-product of coal combustion) often exceeding the maximum allowable carbon content of 6% for use in concrete. The carbon content of the fly ash can be further elevated by alternate fuel strategies. As utilities continue to seek improvements in fuel economies by purchase of foreign coals and alternate fuels such as petroleum coke, the resulting carbon level of the fly ash can increase dramatically due to the combustion characteristics of these materials. While considerable reduction in fuel costs are possible, the variable, high-carbon fly ash must be disposed in landfills or used in low value, non-concrete applications. For utilities that have become accustomed to marketing the majority of their coal combustion products (CCPs) land filling is a highly unsatisfactory alternative. Recently, the American Coal Ash Association conducted a survey of electric-utilities to determine the impact of NOx reduction strategies on the marketability of rendered unusable for concrete markets. Shortage of fly ash, particularly fly ashes derived from eastern bituminous coals (Class F-ash) have occurred in the eastern US. This fact combined with the increased demand for cement in the same region has pushed prices higher for concrete grade, high-quality fly ash. Renewed interest has thus developed in processes to restore the value of the high-LOI fly ash.

  2. Detection and determination of solute carbon in grain interior to correlate with the overall carbon content and grain size in ultra-low-carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiling; He, Yinsheng; Lee, Chan-Gyu; Lee, Byungho; Yoon, Jeongbong; Shin, Keesam

    2013-08-01

    In this study, every effort was exerted to determine and accumulate data to correlate microstructural and compositional elements in ultra-low-carbon (ULC) steels to variation of carbon content (12-44 ppm), manganese (0.18-0.36%), and sulfur (0.0066-0.001%). Quantitative analysis of the ULC steel using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and three-dimensional atom probe revealed the decrease of grain size and dislocation density with the increase of carbon contents and/or increase of the final delivery temperature. For a given carbon content, the grain interior carbon concentration increases as the grain size increases. PMID:23920177

  3. Effect of carbon content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of superfine Ti(C, N)-based cermets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ning Liu Xuesong; Zhang Xiaobo; Zhu Longwei

    2008-10-15

    As a new kind of tool materials which appeared in the seventies last century, the Ti (C, N)-based cermets have been widely used in recent years due to many of its good properties. The microstructure of Ti(C, N)-based cermets with various carbon content were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Vickers hardness and transverse rupture strength (TRS) were also measured. An increased carbon content resulted in the finer grain size, decreased solution strength of tungsten and molybdenum in the binder phase, and a higher volume fraction of heavy (Ti, Mo, W)(C,N) cores. If the addition of carbon content is too little or too much, the phase composition of material will deviate from the normal dual phase section and lead to the formation of the third phase: {eta}-phase if the carbon content is too low or dissociative carbon if the carbon content is too high. And the formation of the third phase will remarkably deteriorate the mechanical properties of cermets.

  4. Contemporary carbon content of bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in butter.

    PubMed

    Tong, T; Ondov, J M; Buchholz, B A; VanDerveer, M C

    2016-01-01

    The fraction of naturally produced bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a ubiquitous plasticizer known to contaminate packaged foods, was determined for each of five 1.10 kg samples of unsalted market butter by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). After extraction and concentration enrichment with liquid-liquid extraction, flash column chromatography, and preparative-scale high performance liquid chromatography, each sample provided ≈ 250 μg extracts of DEHP with carbon purity ranging from 92.5 ± 1.2% (n = 3, 1σ) to 97.1 ± 0.8% (n = 3, 1σ) as measured with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). After corrections for method blank DEHP, co-eluting compounds, and unidentified carbon, the mean fraction of naturally produced DEHP in butter was determined to be 0.16 ± 0.12 (n = 5, 1σ). To our knowledge, this is the first report of the contemporary fraction of DEHP isolated from market butter in the U.S. PMID:26213077

  5. Relating black carbon content to reduction of snow albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, R. E.; Warren, S. G.; Clarke, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    In remote snow of the Northern Hemisphere, the levels of soot pollution are in the parts-per-billion (ppb) range, where the effect on albedo is at the level of a few percent. A reduction of albedo by 1-2% is significant for climate but is difficult to detect experimentally, because snow albedo depends on several other variables. In our work to quantify the climatic effect of black carbon (BC) in snow, we therefore do not directly measure the albedo reduction. Instead, we use a two-step procedure: (1) We collect snow samples, melt and filter them, and analyze the filters spectrophotometrically for BC concentration. (2) We use the BC amount from the filter measurement, together with snow grain size, in a radiative transfer model to compute the albedo reduction. Our radiative transfer model uses the discrete ordinates algorithm DISORT 2.0. We have chosen a representative BC size distribution and optical constants, and have incorporated those of mineral dust as well. While a given mass of BC causes over an order of magnitude more snow albedo reduction compared to dust, a snowpack containing dust mutes the albedo-reducing effect of BC. Because the computed reduction of snow albedo is model-based, it requires experimental verification. We doubt that direct measurement of albedo-reduction will be feasible in nature, because of the vertical variation of both snow grain size and soot content, and because the natural soot content is small. We conclude that what is needed is an artificial snowpack, with uniform grain size and large uniform soot content (ppm not ppb), to produce a large signal on albedo. We have chosen to pursue this experiment outdoors rather than in the laboratory, for the following reasons: (1) The snowpack in the field of view is uniformly illuminated if the source of radiation is the Sun. (2) Visible radiation penetrates into the snow, so photons emerge horizontally distant from where they entered. In the limited width of a laboratory snowpack, radiation

  6. Digital mapping of soil organic carbon contents and stocks in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Hartemink, Alfred E; Minasny, Budiman; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette B; Greve, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of carbon contents and stocks are important for carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and national carbon balance inventories. For Denmark, we modeled the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and bulk density, and mapped its spatial distribution at five standard soil depth intervals (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60 and 60-100 cm) using 18 environmental variables as predictors. SOC distribution was influenced by precipitation, land use, soil type, wetland, elevation, wetness index, and multi-resolution index of valley bottom flatness. The highest average SOC content of 20 g kg(-1) was reported for 0-5 cm soil, whereas there was on average 2.2 g SOC kg(-1) at 60-100 cm depth. For SOC and bulk density prediction precision decreased with soil depth, and a standard error of 2.8 g kg(-1) was found at 60-100 cm soil depth. Average SOC stock for 0-30 cm was 72 t ha(-1) and in the top 1 m there was 120 t SOC ha(-1). In total, the soils stored approximately 570 Tg C within the top 1 m. The soils under agriculture had the highest amount of carbon (444 Tg) followed by forest and semi-natural vegetation that contributed 11% of the total SOC stock. More than 60% of the total SOC stock was present in Podzols and Luvisols. Compared to previous estimates, our approach is more reliable as we adopted a robust quantification technique and mapped the spatial distribution of SOC stock and prediction uncertainty. The estimation was validated using common statistical indices and the data and high-resolution maps could be used for future soil carbon assessment and inventories. PMID:25137066

  7. Digital Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon Contents and Stocks in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Hartemink, Alfred E.; Minasny, Budiman; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette B.; Greve, Mogens H.

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of carbon contents and stocks are important for carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and national carbon balance inventories. For Denmark, we modeled the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and bulk density, and mapped its spatial distribution at five standard soil depth intervals (0−5, 5−15, 15−30, 30−60 and 60−100 cm) using 18 environmental variables as predictors. SOC distribution was influenced by precipitation, land use, soil type, wetland, elevation, wetness index, and multi-resolution index of valley bottom flatness. The highest average SOC content of 20 g kg−1 was reported for 0−5 cm soil, whereas there was on average 2.2 g SOC kg−1 at 60−100 cm depth. For SOC and bulk density prediction precision decreased with soil depth, and a standard error of 2.8 g kg−1 was found at 60−100 cm soil depth. Average SOC stock for 0−30 cm was 72 t ha−1 and in the top 1 m there was 120 t SOC ha−1. In total, the soils stored approximately 570 Tg C within the top 1 m. The soils under agriculture had the highest amount of carbon (444 Tg) followed by forest and semi-natural vegetation that contributed 11% of the total SOC stock. More than 60% of the total SOC stock was present in Podzols and Luvisols. Compared to previous estimates, our approach is more reliable as we adopted a robust quantification technique and mapped the spatial distribution of SOC stock and prediction uncertainty. The estimation was validated using common statistical indices and the data and high-resolution maps could be used for future soil carbon assessment and inventories. PMID:25137066

  8. High density carbon dispersion fuels program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvesen, R. H.; Lavid, M.

    1980-01-01

    High density carbon dispersion fuels were studied. Promising results were obtained which indicate stable carbon loaded fuels with a minimum of 180,000 Btu per gallon can be made and successfully burned in prototype turbine combustors components. Tests were completed which provide insights to obtaining a better understanding of what types of carbon can be successfully formulated and combusted.

  9. Molecular indicators for palaeoenvironmental change in a Messinian evaporitic sequence (Vena del Gesso, Italy). II: High-resolution variations in abundances and 13C contents of free and sulphur-bound carbon skeletons in a single marl bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenig, F.; Damste, J. S.; Frewin, N. L.; Hayes, J. M.; De Leeuw, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    The extractable organic matter of 10 immature samples from a marl bed of one evaporitic cycle of the Vena del Gesso sediments (Gessoso-solfifera Fm., Messinian, Italy) was analyzed quantitatively for free hydrocarbons and organic sulphur compounds. Nickel boride was used as a desulphurizing agent to recover sulphur-bound lipids from the polar and asphaltene fractions. Carbon isotopic compositions (delta vs PDB) of free hydrocarbons and of S-bound hydrocarbons were also measured. Relationships between these carbon skeletons, precursor biolipids, and the organisms producing them could then be examined. Concentrations of S-bound lipids and free hydrocarbons and their delta values were plotted vs depth in the marl bed and the profiles were interpreted in terms of variations in source organisms, 13 C contents of the carbon source, and environmentally induced changes in isotopic fractionation. The overall range of delta values measured was 24.7%, from -11.6% for a component derived from green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae) to -36.3% for a lipid derived from purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae). Deconvolution of mixtures of components deriving from multiple sources (green and purple sulphur bacteria, coccolithophorids, microalgae and higher plants) was sometimes possible because both quantitative and isotopic data were available and because either the free or S-bound pool sometimes appeared to contain material from a single source. Several free n-alkanes and S-bound lipids appeared to be specific products of upper-water-column primary producers (i.e. algae and cyanobacteria). Others derived from anaerobic photoautotrophs and from heterotrophic protozoa (ciliates), which apparently fed partly on Chlorobiaceae. Four groups of n-alkanes produced by algae or cyanobacteria were also recognized based on systematic variations of abundance and isotopic composition with depth. For hydrocarbons probably derived from microalgae, isotopic variations are well correlated with

  10. High performance carbon nanocomposites for ultracapacitors

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to composite electrodes for electrochemical devices, particularly to carbon nanotube composite electrodes for high performance electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors.

  11. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel; Aslan, Hüsnü; Dong, Mingdong; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of a microbial ecosystem in ocean sediments has evoked interest in life under extreme energy limitation and its role in global element cycling. However, fundamental parameters such as the size and the amount of biomass of sub-seafloor microbial cells are poorly constrained. Here we determined the volume and the carbon content of microbial cells from a marine sediment drill core retrieved by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), Expedition 347, at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via epifluorescence microscopy (FM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after cells had been purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or slightly elongated morphology. From the sediment surface to the deepest investigated sample (~60 m below the seafloor), the cell volume of both coccoid and elongated cells decreased by an order of magnitude from ~0.05 to 0.005 μm3. The cell-specific carbon content was 19–31 fg C cell−1, which is at the lower end of previous estimates that were used for global estimates of microbial biomass. The cell-specific carbon density increased with sediment depth from about 200 to 1000 fg C μm−3, suggesting that cells decrease their water content and grow small cell sizes as adaptation to the long-term subsistence at very low energy availability in the deep biosphere. We present for the first time depth-related data on the cell volume and carbon content of sedimentary microbial cells buried down to 60 m below the seafloor. Our data enable estimates of volume- and biomass-specific cellular rates of energy metabolism in the deep biosphere and will improve global estimates of microbial biomass.

  12. High-Melt Carbon-Carbon Coating for Nozzle Extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies, Inc. (C-CAT), has developed a high-melt coating for use in nozzle extensions in next-generation spacecraft. The coating is composed primarily of carbon-carbon, a carbon-fiber and carbon-matrix composite material that has gained a spaceworthy reputation due to its ability to withstand ultrahigh temperatures. C-CAT's high-melt coating embeds hafnium carbide (HfC) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2) within the outer layers of a carbon-carbon structure. The coating demonstrated enhanced high-temperature durability and suffered no erosion during a test in NASA's Arc Jet Complex. (Test parameters: stagnation heat flux=198 BTD/sq ft-sec; pressure=.265 atm; temperature=3,100 F; four cycles totaling 28 minutes) In Phase I of the project, C-CAT successfully demonstrated large-scale manufacturability with a 40-inch cylinder representing the end of a nozzle extension and a 16-inch flanged cylinder representing the attach flange of a nozzle extension. These demonstrators were manufactured without spalling or delaminations. In Phase II, C-CAT worked with engine designers to develop a nozzle extension stub skirt interfaced with an Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10 engine. All objectives for Phase II were successfully met. Additional nonengine applications for the coating include thermal protection systems (TPS) for next-generation spacecraft and hypersonic aircraft.

  13. Effect of Charcoal Volatile Matter Content and Feedstock on Soil Microbe-Carbon-Nitrogen Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, T.; Deenik, J. L.; Hockaday, W. C.; Campbell, S.; Antal, M. J., Jr.

    2010-12-01

    Charcoal has important biogeochemical implications in soil—first as a means to sequester carbon, and second as a soil conditioner to potentially enhance soil quality and fertility. Volatile matter (VM) content is a property of charcoal which describes its degree of thermal alteration, or carbonization. Results from greenhouse experiments have shown that plant growth can be negatively affected by charcoals with high VM content (20-35%), with and without fertilizer supplements, whereas low VM charcoal (6-9%) increased plant growth when combined with fertilizer. We conducted two laboratory studies to characterize the VM content of charcoals derived from two feedstocks (corncob and kiawe) and relate observed differences to key aspects of soil fertility. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), total phenol content (using a Prussian blue colorimetric assay), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we found that the VM content of charcoal primarily consisted of alkanes, oxygen-substituted alkanes, and phenolic compounds. However, the GC-MS data indicated that charcoals can differ vastly in their extractable fraction, depending upon both VM content and feedstock. In a second set of experiments, we examined the effect of VM content and feedstock on soil microbial activity, available nitrogen (N), and soluble carbon (C). High VM corncob charcoals significantly enhanced microbial activity, coupled with net reduction in available N and soluble C. For a given feedstock, the extent of this effect was dependent upon VM content. However, the overall effect of VM content on microbial dynamics was apparently related to the composition of the acetone-extractable fraction, which was particularly important when comparing two charcoals derived from different feedstocks but with the equivalent VM contents. Removing the acetone-extractable fraction from the 23% VM corncob charcoal significantly reduced the enhancement of

  14. Gas-phase photoacoustic determination of the total carbon content of aerosol deposits.

    PubMed

    Pleil, J D; Russwurm, G M; McClenny, W A

    1982-01-01

    A prototype system was constructed to determine the total carbon content of ambient aerosols trapped on quartz fiber filters. The measurement technique is based on carbon combustion to CO(2), cryogenic precon-centration, and subsequent photoacoustic monitoring of produced CO(2). A common sample set was independently analyzed by two established combustion method instruments and the photoacoustic system. Statistical comparison of data showed good agreement with accepted carbon values indicating feasibility for photoacoustic application to routine carbon analysis. PMID:20372416

  15. Bicarbonate content of groundwater in carbonate rock in eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trainer, F.W.; Heath, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    In carbonate-rock terrane the most effective solution occurs where soil and vegetative cover facilitate biogenic production and storage of CO2 in the soil until part of it is carried downward in percolating water. Bicarbonate data for groundwater in eastern North America are examined in the light of these conditions, of the CO2 content of soil gas, and of the timing of groundwater recharge relative to seasonal changes in soil temperature. There appears to be no well-marked relation between latitude and bicarbonate content of groundwater in this region. Interplay of all the factors listed above, and of lithology and soil types, is evidently such that under optimum conditions the amount of solution of carbonate rock is roughly comparable, per unit of groundwater recharge, over the region from Ohio to Florida (and, perhaps, to Puerto Rico and Yucatan). Relatively low HCO3 concentrations observed in much of the southern United States are attributed to low production and storage of CO2 in sandy soil that is poor in organic matter. On the other hand, concentrations observed in Ontario, New York and Michigan are markedly higher than is to be expected from interrelations of the factors considered. These high values, apparently anomalous, are attributed in part to solution of granular glacial drift derived largely from carbonate rock. ?? 1976.

  16. Estimating Forest Floor Carbon Content in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C. H.; Domke, G. M.; Wilson, B. T.; Woodall, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    The USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program conducts an annual forest inventory which includes measurements of forest floor and soil carbon content. Samples are collected on a systematic nation-wide array of approximately 7,800 plots where each one may represent up to 38,850 ha. Between 10 and 20 percent of these plots are measured on a recurring basis, and soil sampling includes measurements of both the forest floor and mineral soil (0-10 and 10-20 cm). In the United States, the current method of reporting for C stocks to international parties includes mathematical models of forest floor and mineral soil C. Forest type maps are combined with STATSGO soil survey data to generate soil C storage by forest types, but STATSGO possesses known shortcomings, particularly with respect to forest C estimation. STATSGO data are based largely on agricultural soils, so the data consistently underestimate C storage in forest floors. FIA's national-scale inventory data represent an opportunity to significantly improve our modeling and reporting capabilities because data are directly linked to forest cover and other geospatial information. Also, the FIA survey is unique in that sampling is not predicated on land use (e.g., hardwood versus softwoods, old-growth stand versus reverted agriculture) or soil type, so it is an equal probability sample of all forested soils. Given these qualities, FIA's field-observations should be used to evaluate these estimates if not replace them. Here we combined forest floor measurements with other forest inventory observations to impute forest floor C storage across the United States using nonparametric k-nearest neighbor techniques; resampling methods were used to generate estimates of uncertainty. Other predictors of forest floor formation (e.g., climate, topography, and landscape position) will be used to impute these values to satellite pixels for mapping. The end result is an estimate of landscape-level forest floor C

  17. TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF AEROSOL CARBON CONTENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes two different techniques for total and elemental carbon analysis developed under this grant. Both methods are totally instrumental, automated, and non-destructive. Total carbon is determined using the gamma ray analysis of light elements (GRALE) technique. Th...

  18. Impact of carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of microscale zerovalent iron particles on its reactivity towards chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Larsson, Per-Olof; Simons, Queenie; Bastiaens, Leen

    2013-11-01

    Zerovalent iron (ZVI) abiotically degrades several chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) via reductive dechlorination, which offers perspectives for in situ groundwater remediation applications. The difference in reactivity between ZVI particles is often linked with their specific surface area. However, other parameters may influence the reactivity as well. Earlier, we reported for a set of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles the disappearance kinetic of different CAHs which were collected under consistent experimental conditions. In the present study, these kinetic data were correlated with the carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of mZVI particles. It was confirmed that not only the specific surface area affects the disappearance kinetic of CAHs, but also the chemical composition of the mZVI particles. The chemical composition, in addition, influences CAHs removal mechanism inducing sorption onto mZVI particles instead of dechlorination. Generally, high disappearance kinetic of CAHs was observed for particles containing less oxygen. A high carbon content, on the other hand, induced nonreactive sorption of the contaminants on the mZVI particles. To obtain efficient remediation of CAHs by mZVI particles, this study suggested that the carbon and oxygen content should not exceed 0.5% and 1% respectively. Finally, the efficiency of the mZVI particles may be improved to some extent by enriching them with sulfur. However, the impact of sulfur content on the reactivity of mZVI particles is less pronounced than that of the carbon and oxygen content. PMID:23962383

  19. Facile synthesis of carbon supported copper nanoparticles from alginate precursor with controlled metal content and catalytic NO reduction properties.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Sergios K; Favvas, Evangelos P; Sapalidis, Andreas A; Romanos, George E; Katsaros, Fotios K

    2011-05-15

    A copper-nanoparticle-doped carbon was prepared from an alginate based precursor in a one step carbonisation-reduction procedure based on the modified polyol process. The ion exchange capacity of the precursor as well as the porosity, metal content, thermal properties, of the final product, were investigated. The preparation route leads to a porous carbon/copper composite with predefined metal loading reaching up to over 30% (w/w) of finely dispersed Cu nanoparticles of fairly uniform size. NO catalytic abatement evaluation showed high efficiency even at low temperatures compared to other recently reported carbon supported catalysts. PMID:21398027

  20. Topsoil organic carbon content of Europe, a new map based on a generalised additive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brogniez, Delphine; Ballabio, Cristiano; Stevens, Antoine; Jones, Robert J. A.; Montanarella, Luca; van Wesemael, Bas

    2014-05-01

    There is an increasing demand for up-to-date spatially continuous organic carbon (OC) data for global environment and climatic modeling. Whilst the current map of topsoil organic carbon content for Europe (Jones et al., 2005) was produced by applying expert-knowledge based pedo-transfer rules on large soil mapping units, the aim of this study was to replace it by applying digital soil mapping techniques on the first European harmonised geo-referenced topsoil (0-20 cm) database, which arises from the LUCAS (land use/cover area frame statistical survey) survey. A generalized additive model (GAM) was calibrated on 85% of the dataset (ca. 17 000 soil samples) and a backward stepwise approach selected slope, land cover, temperature, net primary productivity, latitude and longitude as environmental covariates (500 m resolution). The validation of the model (applied on 15% of the dataset), gave an R2 of 0.27. We observed that most organic soils were under-predicted by the model and that soils of Scandinavia were also poorly predicted. The model showed an RMSE of 42 g kg-1 for mineral soils and of 287 g kg-1 for organic soils. The map of predicted OC content showed the lowest values in Mediterranean countries and in croplands across Europe, whereas highest OC content were predicted in wetlands, woodlands and in mountainous areas. The map of standard error of the OC model predictions showed high values in northern latitudes, wetlands, moors and heathlands, whereas low uncertainty was mostly found in croplands. A comparison of our results with the map of Jones et al. (2005) showed a general agreement on the prediction of mineral soils' OC content, most probably because the models use some common covariates, namely land cover and temperature. Our model however failed to predict values of OC content greater than 200 g kg-1, which we explain by the imposed unimodal distribution of our model, whose mean is tilted towards the majority of soils, which are mineral. Finally, average

  1. High Calcium (~80mol%) Late Stage Carbonate in ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildea, K. J.; Holland, G.; Lyon, I. C.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.; Burgess, R.

    2006-03-01

    Brief petrological, chemical and textural description of previously undescribed high Ca late stage carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001. This carbonate surrounds Mg rich carbonates and rosette fragments.

  2. Relationship of subseafloor microbial diversity to sediment age and organic carbon content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, E. A.; Kirkpatrick, J. B.; Sogin, M. L.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Our tag pyrosequencing investigation of four globally distant sites reveals sediment age and total organic carbon content to be significant components in understanding subseafloor diversity. Our sampling locations include two sites from high-productivity regions (Indian Ocean and Bering Sea) and two from moderate-productivity (eastern and central equatorial Pacific Ocean). Sediment from the high-productivity sites has much higher TOC than sediment from the moderate-productivity equatorial sites. We applied a high-resolution 16S V4-V6 tag pyrosequencing approach to 24 bacterial and 17 archaeal samples, totaling 602,502 reads. We identified1,291 archaeal and 15,910 bacterial OTUs (97%) from these reads. We analyzed bacterial samples from all four sites in addition to archaeal samples from our high productivity sites. These high productivity, high TOC sites have a pronounced methane-rich sulfate-free zone at depth from which archaea have been previously considered to dominate (Biddle et al., 2006). At all four locations, microbial diversity is highest near the seafloor and drops rapidly to low but stable values with increasing sediment depth. The depth at which diversity stabilizes varies greatly from site to site, but the age at which it stabilizes is relatively constant. At all four sites, diversity reaches low stable values a few hundred thousand years after sediment deposition. The sites with high total organic carbon (high productivity sites) generally exhibit higher diversity at each sediment age than the sites with lower total organic carbon (moderate-productivity sites). Archaeal diversity is lower than bacterial diversity at every sampled depth. Biddle, J.F., Lipp, J.S., Lever, M.A., Lloyd, K.G., Sørensen, K.B., Anderson, R. et al. (2006) Heterotrophic Archaea dominate sedimentary subsurface ecosystems off Peru. PNAS 103: 3846-3851.

  3. A New Route for Unburned Carbon Concentration Measurements Eliminating Mineral Content and Coal Rank Effects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Zhen; Yu, Hai-Tong

    2014-01-01

    500 million tons of coal fly ash are produced worldwide every year with only 16% of the total amount utilized. Therefore, potential applications using fly ash have both environmental and industrial interests. Unburned carbon concentration measurements are fundamental to effective fly ash applications. Current on-line measurement accuracies are strongly affected by the mineral content and coal rank. This paper describes a char/ash particle cluster spectral emittance method for unburned carbon concentration measurements. The char/ash particle cluster spectral emittance is predicted theoretically here for various unburned carbon concentrations to show that the measurements are sensitive to unburned carbon concentration but insensitive to the mineral content and coal rank at short wavelengths. The results show that the char/ash particle cluster spectral emittance method is a novel and promising route for unburned carbon concentration on-line measurements without being influenced by mineral content or coal rank effects. PMID:24691496

  4. Research on carbon content in fly ash from circulating fluidized bed boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Xianbin Xiao; Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Junfu Lu; Guangxi Yue

    2005-08-01

    The carbon content in the fly ash from most Chinese circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers is much higher than expected, which directly influences the combustion efficiency. In the present paper, carbon burnout was investigated in both field tests and laboratory experiments. The effect of coal property, operation condition, gas-solid mixing, char deactivation, residence time, and cyclone performance are analyzed seriatim based on a large amount of experimental results. A coal index is proposed to describe the coal rank, having a strong effect on the char burnout. Bad gas-solid mixing in the furnace is another important reason of the higher carbon content in the fly ash. Some chars in the fly ash are deactivated during combustion of large coal particles and have very low carbon reactivity. Several suggestions are made about design, operation, and modification to reduce the carbon content in the fly ash. 14 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Content Delivery for a Virtual High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, W. Joy

    2003-01-01

    In the fall of 2002, Visions In Education, a charter school for home-schooled and independent-study children, opened Visions High School Academy (www.visions academy.org), a virtual project-based high school. The five educators who started the program--Mark Jackson, Fred Lamora, Celine Darby, Jennifer Russell and the author--identified three…

  6. Oxy-combustion of high water content fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Fei

    As the issues of global warming and the energy crisis arouse extensive concern, more and more research is focused on maximizing energy efficiency and capturing CO2 in power generation. To achieve this, in this research, we propose an unconventional concept of combustion - direct combustion of high water content fuels. Due to the high water content in the fuels, they may not burn under air-fired conditions. Therefore, oxy-combustion is applied. Three applications of this concept in power generation are proposed - direct steam generation for the turbine cycle, staged oxy-combustion with zero flue gas recycle, and oxy-combustion in a low speed diesel-type engine. The proposed processes could provide alternative approaches to directly utilize fuels which intrinsically have high water content. A large amount of energy to remove the water, when the fuels are utilized in a conventional approach, is saved. The properties and difficulty in dewatering high water content fuels (e.g. bioethanol, microalgae and fine coal) are summarized. These fuels include both renewable and fossil fuels. In addition, the technique can also allow for low-cost carbon capture due to oxy-combustion. When renewable fuel is utilized, the whole process can be carbon negative. To validate and evaluate this concept, the research focused on the investigation of the flame stability and characteristics for high water content fuels. My study has demonstrated the feasibility of burning fuels that have been heavily diluted with water in a swirl-stabilized burner. Ethanol and 1-propanol were first tested as the fuels and the flame stability maps were obtained. Flame stability, as characterized by the blow-off limit -- the lowest O2 concentration when a flame could exist under a given oxidizer flow rate, was determined as a function of total oxidizer flow rate, fuel concentration and nozzle type. Furthermore, both the gas temperature contour and the overall ethanol concentration in the droplets along the

  7. Thermoelectrics: Carbon nanotubes get high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crispin, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Waste heat can be converted to electricity by thermoelectric generators, but their development is hindered by the lack of cheap materials with good thermoelectric properties. Now, carbon-nanotube-based materials are shown to have improved properties when purified to contain only semiconducting species and then doped.

  8. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  9. Soil total carbon content, aggregation, bulk density, and penetration resistance of croplands and nearby grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Converting native grassland (NGL) to cropland (CL) decreases soil organic matter contents (components of soil total carbon contents, STCCs), which often leads to soil degradation. Reestablishing grass on CL generally increases soil organic matter, which improves soil conditions. This study was condu...

  10. Feasibility of measuring soil moisture content using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) carbon analyzer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of soil carbon (C) and moisture contents is vital for crop and soil management. Current techniques for measuring these components require independent techniques that could be labor intensive and time consuming. The prospect of simultaneously measuring the soil C and moisture content in rea...

  11. Carbonate formation in Wyoming montmorillonite under high pressure carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Tae-Bong; Baltrus, John P.; Howard, Bret H.; Harbert, William P.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.

    2013-03-01

    Carbonation reaction with silicate minerals that are common components of the host rock and cap rock within geological storage reservoirs and the associated structural deformation were investigated for better understanding of the geochemical reactions associated with geologic CO2 storage. Exposure of a model expanding clay, Wyoming montmorillonite, SWy-2, to high-pressure CO2 resulted in the formation of a mineral carbonate phase via dry CO2–clay mineral interactions at two different temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that the properties of CO2 fluid at 70 °C provide more favorable conditions for carbonate formation at the clay surface less accessible to CO2 at 22 °C. The carbonation reaction occurred predominantly within the first couple of days of exposure to the fluid and then proceeded slower with continuing exposure. As compared to the as-received clay under the same ambient conditions, the (0 0 1) basal spacing of the clay bearing carbonates (after the CO2 exposure) was slightly expanded at a relative humidity (RH) level of 12% but it was slightly collapsed at the RH level of 40%. Finally, experimental observations suggest that the carbonation reaction occurs at the external surface as well as internal surface (interlayer) of the clay particles.

  12. High-resolution spatial patterns of Soil Organic Carbon content derived from low-altitude aerial multi-band imagery on the Broadbalk Wheat Experiment at Rothamsted,UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldana Jague, Emilien; Goulding, Keith; Heckrath, Goswin; Macdonald, Andy; Poulton, Paul; Stevens, Antoine; Van Wesemael, Bas; Van Oost, Kristof

    2014-05-01

    patterns of SOC at a very high spatial resolution (< 10cm) (ii) to quantify the uncertainties on the predictions and potential of the method for monitoring SOC changes in experimental plots. This study used multi-band images with wavelengths between 450-1000nm taken at low altitude and at the landscape scale with a Tetracam Mini-MCA6. Images were taken of plots on section 9 on Broadbalk (continuous wheat) in November 2013 using a UAV-platform (Octocopter) at an altitude of 120m. The different images obtained were corrected for vignetting, noise and geometric deformation then stitched and georeferenced; the radiance was converted for reflectance with white calibration panels. Also, the vegetation effect (a cover mean of 10%) was removed by linear spectral unmixing. Finally, the spectra was calibrated and validated with SOC (0-5cm) measurements from 57 soil samples (37 calibration samples and 20 for the validation) taken along transect. The resulting map of SOC contents has a resolution of 10cm and an associated error of about the same magnitude as that for routine laboratory analyses (i.e. 0.2%). The map shows clear differences between plots relating to the different long-term fertilizer and organic manure inputs.

  13. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Nitrogen Content for Spatially Explicit Carbon and Water Cycle Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Miller, J. R.; Chen, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Foliage nitrogen concentration is a determinant of photosynthetic capacity of leaves, thereby an important input to ecological models for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. Recently, spectrally continuous airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery has proven to be useful for retrieving an important related parameter, total chlorophyll content at both leaf and canopy scales. Thus remote sensing of vegetation biochemical parameters has promising potential for improving the prediction of global carbon and water balance patterns. In this research, we explored the feasibility of estimating leaf nitrogen content using hyperspectral remote sensing data for spatially explicit estimation of carbon and water budgets. Multi-year measurements of leaf biochemical contents of seven major boreal forest species were carried out in northeastern Ontario, Canada. The variation of leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen content in response to various growth conditions, and the relationship between them,were investigated. Despite differences in plant type (deciduous and evergreen), leaf age, stand growth conditions and developmental stages, leaf nitrogen content was strongly correlated with leaf chlorophyll content on a mass basis during the active growing season (r2=0.78). With this general correlation, leaf nitrogen content was estimated from leaf chlorophyll content at an accuracy of RMSE=2.2 mg/g, equivalent to 20.5% of the average measured leaf nitrogen content. Based on this correlation and a hyperspectral remote sensing algorithm for leaf chlorophyll content retrieval, the spatial variation of leaf nitrogen content was inferred from the airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery acquired by Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). A process-based ecological model Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) was used for estimating terrestrial carbon and water budgets. In contrast to the scenario with leaf nitrogen content assigned as a constant value without

  14. Influence of carbon content on cold rolling and recrystallization texture in polycrystalline 3% Si-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, M.; Shingaki, Y.; Imamura, T.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of carbon content on cold rolling and recrystallization texture in polycrystalline 3%Si-Fe under the relatively high rolling reduction condition has been investigated. The main component of recrystallization texture was {554}<225> orientation in ultra low carbon (ULC) 3%Si-Fe and {411}<148> orientation in low carbon (LC) 3%Si-Fe. The origin of {411}<148> recrystallization texture development in LC 3%Si-Fe is discussed in terms of the rotation of deformation twin from {100}<011> to {411}<148> orientation with the generation of the slip bands inside the neighboring matrix grain {111}<011>. The rotation axis of this crystal rotation was estimated <112> axis. Assuming the single slip system activation in BCC metal, crystal rotation around <112> axis indicates an activation of {110}<111> slip system. In terms of Schmid factor, {112}<111> slip system must be activated in {100}<011> matrix. This is not in agreement with the estimation of {110}<111> slip system activation. Detailed observation on the cold rolled sample revealed that common slip plane passed through the deformation twin and surrounding deformed matrix grains. It is considered that slip plane matching (SPM) with neighboring grains activates the lower Schmid factor slip system in deformation twin. These results suggest that not only Schmid factor but also SPM with neighboring grains should be considered to decide the active slip systems in polycrystalline metals.

  15. Superelastic carbon spheres under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen; Guo, Junjie; Xu, Bingshe

    2013-03-01

    We report a superelastic deformation behavior of carbon spheres by the in situ Raman spectroscopy in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. The carbon spheres produced by arc discharging in toluene have a mean diameter of 200 nm and an onion-like multilayer graphitic structure. We find that the elastic coefficients, during both the compression and decompression processes, remain a constant up to 10 GPa, indicating a superior high-pressure structural stability. Such superelastic behavior is related to the isotropic and concentric configuration of carbon spheres and provides additional insight into improving the microscopic mechanical properties of small-scale particles.

  16. Determination of the organic carbon content in bog and river waters of the taiga zone based on their optical density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, T. T.; Sekretenko, O. P.; Efremov, S. P.

    2014-08-01

    Based on the data of long-term studies of bog and river waters in the taiga zone of Western Siberia, highly significant linear regression models for the relationships between the organic matter content and optical density of the water were developed. The parameters of the relationships obtained are proposed to be used for the determination of the water-soluble carbon content. The inclusion only of the optical density values into the calculated formulas makes them convenient for practical application. Regression models were developed on the basis of the data on determining the carbon content using the bichromate method, which is widely used in soil and hydrochemical studies. The calculated method forms prerequisites for the operational monitoring of the water-soluble organic substances, since the obtained results can be comparable with the earlier published data on the carbon content determined by the same method. These regression models seem to also be suitable for the determination of the organic carbon in the water extracts of organic soils.

  17. Carbon in iron phases under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Skorodumova, N. V.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Johansson, B.; Ahuja, R.

    2005-11-01

    The influence of carbon impurities on the properties of iron phases (bcc, hcp, dhcp, fcc) has been studied using the first-principles projector augmented-wave (PAW) method for a wide pressure range. It is shown that the presence of ~6 at. % of interstitial carbon has a little effect on the calculated structural sequence of the iron phases under high pressure. The bcc -> hcp transition both for pure iron and iron containing carbon takes place around 9 GPa. According to the enthalpies comparison, the solubility of carbon into the iron solid is decreased by high pressure. The coexistence of iron carbide (Fe3C) + pure hcp Fe is most stable phase at high pressure compared with other phases. Based on the analysis of the pressure-density dependences for Fe3C and hcp Fe, we suggest that there might be some fraction of iron carbide present in the core.

  18. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  19. Oxy-combustion of high water content fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Fei

    As the issues of global warming and the energy crisis arouse extensive concern, more and more research is focused on maximizing energy efficiency and capturing CO2 in power generation. To achieve this, in this research, we propose an unconventional concept of combustion - direct combustion of high water content fuels. Due to the high water content in the fuels, they may not burn under air-fired conditions. Therefore, oxy-combustion is applied. Three applications of this concept in power generation are proposed - direct steam generation for the turbine cycle, staged oxy-combustion with zero flue gas recycle, and oxy-combustion in a low speed diesel-type engine. The proposed processes could provide alternative approaches to directly utilize fuels which intrinsically have high water content. A large amount of energy to remove the water, when the fuels are utilized in a conventional approach, is saved. The properties and difficulty in dewatering high water content fuels (e.g. bioethanol, microalgae and fine coal) are summarized. These fuels include both renewable and fossil fuels. In addition, the technique can also allow for low-cost carbon capture due to oxy-combustion. When renewable fuel is utilized, the whole process can be carbon negative. To validate and evaluate this concept, the research focused on the investigation of the flame stability and characteristics for high water content fuels. My study has demonstrated the feasibility of burning fuels that have been heavily diluted with water in a swirl-stabilized burner. Ethanol and 1-propanol were first tested as the fuels and the flame stability maps were obtained. Flame stability, as characterized by the blow-off limit -- the lowest O2 concentration when a flame could exist under a given oxidizer flow rate, was determined as a function of total oxidizer flow rate, fuel concentration and nozzle type. Furthermore, both the gas temperature contour and the overall ethanol concentration in the droplets along the

  20. High performance pitch-based carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Tadokoro, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Hirotaka; Furuyama, Masatoshi

    1996-12-31

    The high performance pitch-based carbon fiber with smaller diameter, six micro in developed by Nippon Graphite Fiber Corporation. This fiber possesses high tensile modulus, high tensile strength, excellent yarn handle ability, low thermal expansion coefficient, and high thermal conductivity which make it an ideal material for space applications such as artificial satellites. Performance of this fiber as a reinforcement of composites was sufficient. With these characteristics, this pitch-based carbon fiber is expected to find wide variety of possible applications in space structures, industrial field, sporting goods and civil infrastructures.

  1. Carbon nanofibers grafted on activated carbon as an electrode in high-power supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Śliwak, Agata; Béguin, François

    2013-08-01

    A hybrid electrode material for high-power supercapacitors was fabricated by grafting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) onto the surface of powdered activated carbon (AC) through catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). A uniform thin layer of disentangled CNFs with a herringbone structure was deposited on the carbon surface through the decomposition of propane at 450 °C over an AC-supported nickel catalyst. CNF coating was controlled by the reaction time and the nickel content. The superior CNF/AC composite displays excellent electrochemical performance in a 0.5 mol L(-1) solution of K2 SO4 due to its unique structure. At a high scan rate (100 mV s(-1) ) and current loading (20 A g(-1) ), the capacitance values were three- and fourfold higher than those for classical AC/carbon black composites. Owing to this feature, a high energy of 10 Wh kg(-1) was obtained over a wide power range in neutral medium at a voltage of 0.8 V. The significant enhancement of charge propagation is attributed to the presence of herringbone CNFs, which facilitate the diffusion of ions in the electrode and play the role of electronic bridges between AC particles. An in situ coating of AC with short CNFs (below 200 nm) is a very attractive method for producing the next generation of carbon composite materials with a high power performance in supercapacitors working in neutral medium. PMID:23794416

  2. High voltage spark carbon fiber detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The pulse discharge technique was used to determine the length and density of carbon fibers released from fiber composite materials during a fire or aircraft accident. Specifications are given for the system which uses the ability of a carbon fiber to initiate spark discharge across a high voltage biased grid to achieve accurate counting and sizing of fibers. The design of the system was optimized, and prototype hardware proved satisfactory in laboratory and field tests.

  3. Joining Carbon-Carbon Composites and High-Temperature Materials with High Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Daniel; Singler, Robert

    1998-01-01

    1. Program goals addressed during this period. Experimental work was directed at formation of a low-stress bond between carbon- carbon and aluminum, with the objective of minimizing the heating of the aluminum substrate, thereby minimizing stresses resulting from the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) difference between the aluminum and carbon-carbon. A second objective was to form a bond between carbon-carbon and aluminum with good thermal conductivity for electronic thermal management (SEM-E) application. 2. Substrates and joining materials selected during this period. Carbon-Carbon Composite (CCC) to Aluminum. CCC (Cu coated) to Aluminum. Soldering compounds based on Sn/Pb and Sn/Ag/Cu/Bi compositions. 3. Soldering experiments performed. Conventional techniques. High Energy Electron Beam (HEEB) process.

  4. Enhancing Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Potentials of Antidesma thwaitesianum by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction.

    PubMed

    Poontawee, Warut; Natakankitkul, Surapol; Wongmekiat, Orawan

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has increasingly gained attention as an alternative technique for extraction of natural products without leaving toxic residues in extracts. Antidesma thwaitesianum Muell. Arg. (Phyllanthaceae), or ma mao, has been reported to exhibit antioxidant health benefits due to its phenolic constituents. To determine whether SFE technique could impact on phenolic contents and associated antioxidant potentials, ripe fruits of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae) were extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and conventional solvents (ethanol, water). The results showed that the SC-CO2 extract contained significantly higher yield, total phenolic, flavonoid, and proanthocyanidin contents than those obtained from ethanol and water. It also demonstrated the greatest antioxidant activities as assessed by ABTS radical cation decolorization, DPPH radical scavenging, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Further analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC-DAD/MSD) revealed the presence of catechin as a major phenolic compound of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae), with the maximum amount detected in the SC-CO2 extract. These data indicate that SFE technology improves both quantity and quality of Antidesma thwaitesianum fruit extract. The findings added more reliability of using this technique to produce high added value products from this medicinal plant. PMID:25977832

  5. Enhancing Phenolic Contents and Antioxidant Potentials of Antidesma thwaitesianum by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Poontawee, Warut; Natakankitkul, Surapol; Wongmekiat, Orawan

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has increasingly gained attention as an alternative technique for extraction of natural products without leaving toxic residues in extracts. Antidesma thwaitesianum Muell. Arg. (Phyllanthaceae), or ma mao, has been reported to exhibit antioxidant health benefits due to its phenolic constituents. To determine whether SFE technique could impact on phenolic contents and associated antioxidant potentials, ripe fruits of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae) were extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and conventional solvents (ethanol, water). The results showed that the SC-CO2 extract contained significantly higher yield, total phenolic, flavonoid, and proanthocyanidin contents than those obtained from ethanol and water. It also demonstrated the greatest antioxidant activities as assessed by ABTS radical cation decolorization, DPPH radical scavenging, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Further analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC-DAD/MSD) revealed the presence of catechin as a major phenolic compound of Antidesma thwaitesianum (Phyllanthaceae), with the maximum amount detected in the SC-CO2 extract. These data indicate that SFE technology improves both quantity and quality of Antidesma thwaitesianum fruit extract. The findings added more reliability of using this technique to produce high added value products from this medicinal plant. PMID:25977832

  6. High-resolution electron microscopy study of synthetic carbonate and aluminum containing apatites.

    PubMed

    Layani, J D; Cuisinier, F J; Steuer, P; Cohen, H; Voegel, J C; Mayer, I

    2000-05-01

    Aluminum (Al)-containing calcium-deficient carbonated hydroxyapatites were produced by a precipitation method from aqueous solution with carbonate (0-6.1%) and aluminum (0.1-0.5%) concentrations close to those found in biological materials. Two series of apatites were prepared: one at pH 7.0 and another at pH 9. 0. High-resolution electron microscopy has shown that many of them possess structural defects such as screw dislocations, grain boundaries, and central defects. Samples with high carbonate content and high water and high Al(3+) content had a high amount of structural defects. Accordingly, a sample (7Al1) with a relatively high carbonate content (6.1%) and a sample (7Al6) without carbonate but with a relatively high water (2.0 mol) and Al(3+) content (0. 39%) presented the highest amount of structural defects, 54% and 47%, respectively. A sample (7Al13) with a low level of crystalline water (1 mol) and low carbonate (2.5%) showed a small amount of defects. The presence of water associated with Al(3+) induced a high number of crystals having a central defect with a great similarity to the so-called water layer of octacalcium phosphate (OCP). Observed images of all these crystals have shown good correspondence with the computer-simulated image based on the crystal structure of hydroxyapatite, indicating that the addition of Al(3+) and carbonate does not perturb the apatitic structure. PMID:10679685

  7. Slow bainite: an opportunity to determine the carbon content of the bainitic ferrite during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, Francesca G.; Miller, Michael K; Garcia-Mateo, C.

    2011-01-01

    The amount of carbon in solid solution in bainitic ferrite at the early stage of transformation has been directly determined by atom probe tomography at 200 C, taking advantage of the extremely slow transformation kinetics of a novel nanocrystalline steel. Results demonstrated that the original bainitic ferrite retains much of the carbon content of the parent austenite providing strong evidence that bainite transformation is essentially displacive in nature. In this work, the carbon content of the bainitic ferrite away from any carbon-enriched regions has been determined by atom probe tomography as the bainite transformation progresses at 200 C in this nanocrystalline steel. Results provide experimental evidence for the mechanism controlling bainitic ferrite growth in steels.

  8. Factors and processes governing the C-14 content of carbonate in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundson, Ronald; Wang, Yang; Chadwick, Oliver; Trumbore, Susan; Mcfadden, Leslie; Mcdonald, Eric; Wells, Steven; Deniro, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented describing the factors and processes which determine the measured C-14 ages of soil calcium carbonate. Pedogenic carbonate forms in isotopic equilium with soil CO2. Carbon dioxide in soils is a mixture of CO2 derived from two biological sources: respiration by living plant roots and respiration of microorganisms decomposing soil humus. The relative proportion of these two CO2 sources can greatly affect the initial C-14 content of pedogenic carbonate: the greater the contribution of humus-derived CO2, the greater the initial C-14 age of the carbonate mineral. For any given mixture of CO2 sources, the steady-state (14)CO2 distribution vs. soil depth can be described by a production/diffusion model. As a soil ages, the C-14 age of soil humus increases, as does the steady-state C-14 age of soil CO2 and the initial C-14 age of any pedogenic carbonate which forms. The mean C-14 age of a complete pedogenic carbonate coating or nodule will underestimate the true age of the soil carbonate. This discrepancy increases the older a soil becomes. Partial removal of outer (and younger) carbonate coatings greatly improves the relationship between measured C-14 age and true age. Although the production/diffusion model qualitatively explains the C-14 age of pedogenic carbonate vs. soil depth in many soils, other factors, such as climate change, may contribute to the observed trends, particularily in soils older than the Holocene.

  9. [Relationship between organic carbon and water content in four type wetland sediments in Sanjiang Plain].

    PubMed

    Tong, Cheng-li; Zhang, Wen-ju; Wang, Hong-qing; Tang, Guo-yong; Yang, Gai-ren; Wu, Jin-shui

    2005-11-01

    Characteristic and relationship were analyzed between organic carbon and water content in four types of wetlands (one cultivated wetland and three typical natural wetlands including fen, marsh and marshy meadow) in Sanjiang Plain of Northeastern China. Results show that there are distinct differences in the depths of organic carbon deposition, the organic carbon and water content in sediment profiles of these four type wetlands. There are significant positive correlations between organic carbon and water content in sediment profiles of the same type wetland (p < 0.01; R2 = 0.8276, 0.9917, 0.9916 and 0.9782 for cultivated wetland, fen, marsh and marshy meadow, respectively). The trend for evolution of ecological and environmental functions of wetland ecosystems is discussed based on the analysis of the relationship between soil organic carbon and water content. The results further illustrate the viewpoint that the protection and restoration of wetlands could lessen the global climate change caused by the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration. PMID:16447426

  10. Effect of Alloying, Heat Treatment and Carbon Content on White Layer Formation in Machining of Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sangil; Melkote, Shreyes N; Riester, Laura

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of the effects of alloying, carbon content, and heat treatment on white layer formation in machining of steels. The investigation is carried out by machining steels that differ in alloying, heat treatment and carbon content, via orthogonal cutting tests performed with low cBN content tools. The depth of white layer and its hardness are measured for every case. Specifically, the thickness and hardness of white layer produced in cutting AISI 1045 and AISI 4340 annealed steels are compared to determine the effect of alloying on white layer formation. The effect of heat treatment on white layer formation and its hardness are investigated by machining annealed and hardened (53 HRC) AISI 4340 steels. The effect of carbon content on white layer formation is investigated by cutting hardened AISI 52100 and AISI 4340 steels of the same hardness (53 HRC). The results of the study show that alloying, heat treatment, and carbon content influence white layer formation and its hardness.

  11. Electrical properties of multiphase composites based on carbon nanotubes and an optimized clay content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egiziano, Luigi; Lamberti, Patrizia; Spinelli, Giovanni; Tucci, Vincenzo; Guadagno, Liberata; Vertuccio, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    The experimental results concerning the characterization of a multiphase nanocomposite systems based on epoxy matrix, loaded with different amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an optimized Hydrotalcite (HT) clay content (i.e. 0.6 wt%), duly identified by an our previous theoretical study based on Design of Experiment (DoE), are presented. Dynamic-mechanical analysis (DMA) reveal that even the introduction of higher HT loading (up to 1%wt) don't affect significantly the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites while morphological investigations show an effective synergy between clay and carbon nanotubes that leads to peculiar micro/nanostructures that favor the creation of the electrical conductive network inside the insulating resin. An electrical characterization is carried out in terms of DC electrical conductivity, percolation threshold (EPT) and frequency response in the range 10Hz-1MHz. In particular, the measurements of the DC conductivity allow to obtain the typical "percolation" curve also found for classical CNT-polymer mixtures and a value of about 2 S/m for the electrical conductivity is achieved at the highest considered CNTs concentration (i.e. 1 wt%). The results suggest that multiphase nanocomposites obtained incorporating dispersive nanofillers, in addition to the conductive one, may be a valid alternative to the polymer blends, to improve the properties of the polymeric materials thus able to meet high demands, particularly concerning their mechanical and thermal stability and electrical features required in the aircraft engineering.

  12. Equilibrated moisture content of several carbon phenolics and their relationship to resin, fiber, and interface properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between relative humidity and the equilibrated moisture content of several variants of two distinctly different carbon phenolic composites. One of the materials gives a typical exponential relationship between RH and equilibrated moisture content while the second gives an inverse sigmoidal relationship with the largest increase in moisture between 45-60 percent relative humidity. The possible relationship between the shape of the curves and the nature of the material constituents is discussed.

  13. The influence of carbon content in the borided Fe-alloys on the microstructure of iron borides

    SciTech Connect

    Kulka, M. . E-mail: coolka@sol.put.poznan.pl; Pertek, A. . E-mail: pertek@sol.put.poznan.pl; Klimek, L. . E-mail: kemilk@p.lodz.pl

    2006-04-15

    This paper presents the results of Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the borided layers produced on substrate of varying carbon content. Two types of materials were investigated: borided Armco iron of very low carbon content and borocarburized chromium- and nickel-based steels of high carbon content beneath iron borides. The tetragonal phase Fe{sub 2}B was identified in all materials studied. It was difficult to obtain an EBSD pattern from iron boride (FeB) because of its presence at low depths below the surface, and because of the rounded corners of the specimens. EBSD provided information on the orientation of Fe{sub 2}B crystals. In case of the low-carbon Armco iron the crystallographic orientation was constant along the full length of the Fe{sub 2}B needle. The EBSPs obtained from borocarburized steel indicate that the crystallographic orientation of the Fe{sub 2}B phase changes along the length of the needle. This is the result of hindered boron diffusion due to boriding of the carburized substrate. The increased resistance to friction wear of borocarburized layers arises from two reasons. One is the decreased microhardness gradient between the iron borides and the substrate, which causes a decrease in the brittleness of the iron borides and an improved distribution of internal stresses in the diffusion layer. The second is the changeable crystallographic orientation of iron borides, which leads to the lower texture and porosity of borided layers. These advantageous properties of the borocarburized layer can be obtained if the carbon content beneath the iron borides is no more than about 1.0-1.2 wt.% C.

  14. Simple and Precise Quantification of Iron Catalyst Content in Carbon Nanotubes Using UV/Visible Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Agustina, Elsye; Goak, Jeungchoon; Lee, Suntae; Seo, Youngho; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Naesung

    2015-01-01

    Iron catalysts have been used widely for the mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high yield. In this study, UV/visible spectroscopy was used to determine the Fe catalyst content in CNTs using a colorimetric technique. Fe ions in solution form red–orange complexes with 1,10-phenanthroline, producing an absorption peak at λ=510 nm, the intensity of which is proportional to the solution Fe concentration. A series of standard Fe solutions were formulated to establish the relationship between optical absorbance and Fe concentration. Many Fe catalysts were microscopically observed to be encased by graphitic layers, thus preventing their extraction. Fe catalyst dissolution from CNTs was investigated with various single and mixed acids, and Fe concentration was found to be highest with CNTs being held at reflux in HClO4/HNO3 and H2SO4/HNO3 mixtures. This novel colorimetric method to measure Fe concentrations by UV/Vis spectroscopy was validated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, indicating its reliability and applicability to asses Fe content in CNTs. PMID:26491641

  15. LOW NOX STRATEGY FOR COMBUSTING HIGH NITROGEN CONTENT FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of a multistaged combustion urner (designed for in-furnace NOx control and high combustion efficieiicy) for [high nitrogen content fuel and waste incineration application in a 1.0 MW package boiler. simulator. A low NOx precombustion cham...

  16. Creep of carbon-yarn and carbon-carbon composites at high temperatures and high stresses. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sines, G.; Yang, Z.; Vickers, B.D.

    1988-05-01

    To better understand the creep-behavior of carbon yarn and carbon-carbon composites, creep experiments were developed that permitted testing at high temperatures (up to 2500 C) and at high stresses (up to 850 MPa) on specially prepared, uniaxial specimens that had a known gage length. Using a Dorn-type power-law relation to model steady-state creep, the apparent activation energy for the carbon-yarn and carbon-composite specimens was determined to be 1082 kj/mol. This value represents a single thermally activated process, vacancy diffusion, that compares favorably with the various types of graphitizable carbon. The value determined for the stress exponent was 7.5. It too was found to be independent of the carbon-matrix's presence and independent of the specimens' loading history. Values of the pre-exponential constant for the carbon yarn and carbon composites were also calculated. The carbon matrix greatly improves the creep resistance of the carbon composite. This improvement was attributed to the matrix's microstructure. It distributes applied loads more evenly and it may also impose a triaxial stress state in the yarns's filaments. It is proposed that such a stress state may inhibit the flux of vacancies, thus accounting in part for this increase in creep resistance.

  17. Evaluation of the substitutional carbon content in annealed Si/SiGeC superlattices by dark-field electron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denneulin, T.; Rouvière, J. L.; Béché, A.; Py, M.; Barnes, J. P.; Hartmann, J. M.; Cooper, D.

    2011-11-01

    Si/SiGeC superlattices can be used as core structure for the fabrication of new microelectronic architectures with enhanced electrical properties such as multichannel transistors. The introduction of carbon in SiGe allows for compensation of the compressive strain and to avoid plastic relaxation. However, the formation of incoherent β-SiC clusters during annealing at high temperature limits the processability of SiGeC. This precipitation leads to a strong modification of the stress in the alloy due to the reduction of the substitutional carbon content. Here, we investigated the variation of the substitutional C content in annealed Si/SiGeC superlattices using a comparison of dark-field electron holography and finite element simulations.

  18. Effects of long-term compost application on carbon content and soil physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Marie; Houot, Sabine

    2013-04-01

    Biological treatment through composting of organic wastes fulfils multiple purposes: it not only reduces the amount of waste stored in landfills but can also provide agricultural soils with organic amendments, which affect physicochemical soil properties and reduce the use of mineral fertilizers. However, the impacts of different types of amendments are not yet fully understood, as quantity and quality of the exogenous organic matter (EOM) applied vary greatly and numerous other parameters are affected as well, such as pH, heavy metal content, or nutrient availability. The objective of this project was to investigate the effect of different organic amendments - via simulations - on water holding capacity (WHC) and particularly plant available water (PAW), in regard to irrigation needs. The long-term field experiment "Qualiagro" (INRA - Veolia Environment collaboration) was established in Feucherolles, France in 1998, where five treatments were designed, each with two levels of mineral nitrogen (N) addition: minimal and optimal. Farmyard manure (FYM) and three types of compost - all applied every other year at a rate of 4 t carbon ha-1 - gave rise to varying organic carbon (OC) contents and were compared to a control treatment. The treatments changed the soil's OC content from initially ~10.5 g kg-1 to a range of 9.35 to 15.58 g kg-1. An increased OC content can enhance WHC by increasing total porosity/ reducing bulk density. The PAW - the difference between field capacity (FC) and permanent wilting point (WP); predicted with pedotransfer functions related to OC - increases, if the increase at FC is larger than that at WP. With a higher amount of PAW, the need to irrigate fields - to ensure sufficient water availability for plant growth - decreases. At the same time, soil bulk density (ρd) affects root growth; denser soils can lead to reduced rooting depth. Both of these effects were considered when employing a simple soil water balance model (BUDGET; http

  19. Effects of Carbon Content on the Electrochemical Performances of MoS2-C Nanocomposites for Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weiyi; Hu, Zhe; Wang, Caiyun; Tao, Zhanliang; Chou, Shu-Lei; Kang, Yong-Mook; Liu, Hua-Kun

    2016-08-31

    Molybdenum disulfide is popular for rechargeable batteries, especially in Li-ion batteries, because of its layered structure and relatively high specific capacity. In this paper, we report MoS2-C nanocomposites that are synthesized by a hydrothermal process, and their use as anode material for Li-ion batteries. Ascorbic acid is used as the carbon source, and the carbon contents can be tuned from 2.5 wt % to 16.2 wt %. With increasing of carbon content, the morphology of MoS2-C nanocomposites changes from nanoflowers to nanospheres, and the particle size is decreased from 200 to 60 nm. This change is caused by the chemical complex interaction of ascorbic acid. The MoS2-C nanocomposite with 8.4 wt % C features a high capacity of 970 mAh g(-1) and sustains a capacity retention ratio of nearly 100% after 100 cycles. When the current increases to 1000 mA g(-1), the capacity still reaches 730 mAh g(-1). The above manifests that the carbon coating layer does not only accelerate the charge transfer kinetics to supply quick discharging and charging, but also hold the integrity of the electrode materials as evidenced by the long cycling stability. Therefore, MoS2-based nanocomposites could be used as commercial anode materials in Li-ion batteries. PMID:27502442

  20. carbonate solid solution at high pressures up to 55 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, Anna; Solopova, Natalia; Cerantola, Valerio; Bykova, Elena; Zakharchenko, Egor; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Litvin, Yuriy

    2014-09-01

    Magnesite, siderite and ferromagnesites Mg1- x Fe x CO3 ( x = 0.05, 0.09, 0.2, 0.4) were characterized using in situ Raman spectroscopy at high pressures up to 55 GPa. For the Mg-Fe-carbonates, the Raman peak positions of six modes (T, L, ν4, ν1, ν3 and 2ν2) in the dependence of iron content in the carbonates at ambient conditions are presented. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy shows that siderite undergoes a spin transition at ~40 GPa. The examination of the solid solutions with compositions Mg0.6Fe0.4CO3, Mg0.8Fe0.2CO3, Mg0.91Fe0.09CO3 and Mg0.95Fe0.05CO3 indicates that with increase in the amount of the Fe spin transition pressure increases up to ~45 GPa.

  1. Residue removal and climatic effects on soil carbon content of no-till soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While no-till management practices usually result in increased soil organic carbon (SOC) contents, the effect of residue removal with no-till is not well understood, especially in warmer climates. A multi-year study was conducted at six locations having a wide range of climatic conditions in centra...

  2. Co-substitution of carbonate and fluoride in hydroxyapatite: Effect on substitution type and content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qing-Xia; Li, Ya-Ming; Han, Dan

    2015-04-01

    The nanosized hydroxyapatite substituted by fluoride and carbonate ions (CFHA) had been synthesized by aqueous precipitation method. CFHA had been considered as potential bone graft material for orthopedic and dental applications. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of simultaneously incorporated CO{3/2-} and F- on the substitution type and content. The morphologies of CFHAs were observed by TEM. The carbonate substitution type and content were characterized by FTIR. The fluoride contents were determined by F-selective electrode. The phase compositions and crystallinity of the samples were investigated by XRD. The fluoride and carbonate contents of CFHA increase with the dopant concentrations nonlinearly. The carbonate substitution has much more obvious effect on morphology compared with the fluoride substitution. The co-existence of CO{3/2-} and F- ions can influence the corresponding substitution fraction. The isomorphic substitution of sodium for calcium in the substitution process of CO{3/2-} can improve crystal degree and favor the B-type substitutions. Due to the closeness of the ion radii and equivalent substitution of F- and OH-, F- will occupy the OH- sites of HA crystals more easily, compelling most of the CO{3/2-} to be located in the B sites.

  3. Superconductivity in highly disordered dense carbon disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Ranga P.; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Kim, Minseob; Muramatsu, Takaki; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    High pressure plays an increasingly important role in both understanding superconductivity and the development of new superconducting materials. New superconductors were found in metallic and metal oxide systems at high pressure. However, because of the filled close-shell configuration, the superconductivity in molecular systems has been limited to charge-transferred salts and metal-doped carbon species with relatively low superconducting transition temperatures. Here, we report the low-temperature superconducting phase observed in diamagnetic carbon disulfide under high pressure. The superconductivity arises from a highly disordered extended state (CS4 phase or phase III[CS4]) at ∼6.2 K over a broad pressure range from 50 to 172 GPa. Based on the X-ray scattering data, we suggest that the local structural change from a tetrahedral to an octahedral configuration is responsible for the observed superconductivity. PMID:23818624

  4. High temperature desulfurization using molten salt carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Nobuhiro; Iwahashi, Takashi; Kosaka, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Kunio; Yamashita, Keijiro; Murata, Keiji; Hori, Michio

    1998-07-01

    A new desulfurization process using molten salt carbonate as an absorber is proposed. Main feature of this process is its high operating temperature (600{approximately}800 C) as well as the possibility of simultaneous desulfurization and dechlorination. Some chemical equilibrium calculations and basic experiments of this process have been done as the first step of basic theoretical investigations for this new gas cleanup concept. It is confirmed from this calculation that this new gas cleanup concept has enough ability of desulfurization and regeneration of molten salt carbonate.

  5. Denitrification of high nitrate concentration wastewater using alternative carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Nava, Y; Marañón, E; Soons, J; Castrillón, L

    2010-01-15

    The use of different organic carbon sources in the denitrification of wastewater containing 2500 mg nitrates/L in a SBR was studied. Three alternative sources of carbon were tested: wastewater from a sweet factory, a residue from a soft drinks factory and a residue from a dairy plant. The first two are sugar-rich, whereas the third presents a high content in lactic acid. Maximum specific denitrification rates of between 42 and 48 mg NO(3)-N/g VSS h were obtained. The effluents were nitrate-free and very low COD concentrations were obtained in 4-6h reaction time, especially with the sugar-rich carbon sources. The values of the denitrifier net yield coefficient were higher than when using methanol (0.93-1.75 g VSS(formed)/g NO(x)-N(reduced)). The lowest value was obtained using the lactic acid-rich residue. The optimum COD/N ratios varied between 4.6 for the lactic acid-rich carbon source and 5.5-6.5 for the sugar-rich carbon sources. PMID:19782470

  6. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-01-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>105 km3) within short time span (<1–3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB. PMID:27143196

  7. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-05-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>105 km3) within short time span (<1–3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB.

  8. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-01-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>10(5) km(3)) within short time span (<1-3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB. PMID:27143196

  9. Microstructures and Hardness/Wear Performance of High-Carbon Stellite Alloys Containing Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Yao, J. H.; Zhang, Q. L.; Yao, M. X.; Collier, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Conventional high-carbon Stellite alloys contain a certain amount of tungsten which mainly serves to provide strengthening to the solid solution matrix. These alloys are designed for combating severe wear. High-carbon molybdenum-containing Stellite alloys are newly developed 700 series of Stellite family, with molybdenum replacing tungsten, which are particularly employed in severe wear condition with corrosion also involved. Three high-carbon Stellite alloys, designated as Stellite 706, Stellite 712, and Stellite 720, with different carbon and molybdenum contents, are studied experimentally in this research, focusing on microstructure and phases, hardness, and wear resistance, using SEM/EDX/XRD techniques, a Rockwell hardness tester, and a pin-on-disk tribometer. It is found that both carbon and molybdenum contents influence the microstructures of these alloys significantly. The former determines the volume fraction of carbides in the alloys, and the latter governs the amount of molybdenum-rich carbides precipitated in the alloys. The hardness and wear resistance of these alloys are increased with the carbide volume fraction. However, with the same or similar carbon content, high-carbon CoCrMo Stellite alloys exhibit worse wear resistance than high-carbon CoCrW Stellite alloys.

  10. Low-Temperature Fluorination of Soft-Templated Mesoporous Carbons for a High-Power Lithium/Carbon Fluoride Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, Pasquale F; Dai, Sheng; Guo, Bingkun; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Mayes, Richard T; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Veith, Gabriel M; Brown, Suree; Adcock, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    Soft-templated mesoporous carbons and activated mesoporous carbons were fluorinated using elemental fluorine between room temperature and 235 C. The mesoporous carbons were prepared via self-assembly synthesis of phloroglucinol formaldehyde as a carbon precursor in the presence of triblock ethylene oxide propylene oxide ethylene oxide copolymer BASF Pluronic F127 as the template. The F/C ratios ranged from 0.15 to 0.75 according to gravimetric, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Materials have mesopore diameters up to 11 nm and specific surface areas as high as 850 m2 g 1 after fluorination as calculated from nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 196 C. Furthermore, the materials exhibit higher discharge potentials and energy and power densities as well as faster reaction kinetics under high current densities than commercial carbon fluorides with similar fluorine contents when tested as cathodes for Li/CFx batteries.

  11. Estimating the soil organic carbon content for European NUTS2 regions based on LUCAS data collection.

    PubMed

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Yigini, Yusuf; Dunbar, Martha B

    2013-01-01

    Under the European Union Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection, the European Commission Directorate-General for the Environment and the European Environmental Agency (EEA) identified a decline in soil organic carbon and soil losses by erosion as priorities for the collection of policy relevant soil data at European scale. Moreover, the estimation of soil organic carbon content is of crucial importance for soil protection and for climate change mitigation strategies. Soil organic carbon is one of the attributes of the recently developed LUCAS soil database. The request for data on soil organic carbon and other soil attributes arose from an on-going debate about efforts to establish harmonized datasets for all EU countries with data on soil threats in order to support modeling activities and display variations in these soil conditions across Europe. In 2009, the European Commission's Joint Research Centre conducted the LUCAS soil survey, sampling ca. 20,000 points across 23 EU member states. This article describes the results obtained from analyzing the soil organic carbon data in the LUCAS soil database. The collected data were compared with the modeled European topsoil organic carbon content data developed at the JRC. The best fitted comparison was performed at NUTS2 level and showed underestimation of modeled data in southern Europe and overestimation in the new central eastern member states. There is a good correlation in certain regions for countries such as the United Kingdom, Slovenia, Italy, Ireland, and France. Here we assess the feasibility of producing comparable estimates of the soil organic carbon content at NUTS2 regional level for the European Union (EU27) and draw a comparison with existing modeled data. In addition to the data analysis, we suggest how the modeled data can be improved in future updates with better calibration of the model. PMID:23178783

  12. Modelling global change impacts on soil carbon contents of agro-silvo-pastoral Mediterranean systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-García, Beatriz; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Parras-Alcántara, Luis

    2016-04-01

    total of 38 sampling points were selected under two management practices and six different land uses: (1) MEOW-dehesa (D); (2) MEOW-dehesa + some pine trees (D+P); (3) MEOW-dehesa + some cork oaks (D+C); (4) MEOW-dehesa + some gall oaks (D + G); (5) MEOW-dehesa after a clarified process and transformed to olive grove but maintaining isolated oaks (OG) and (6) MEOW-dehesa after a clarified process and transformed to cereal pasture with isolated oaks (C). Preliminary results showed a high heterogeneity of SOC contents along the soil profile for different climate and land use scenarios. The methods used here can be easily implemented in other Mediterranean areas with available information on climate, site, soil and land use. Keywords: CarboSOIL model, land use change, climate change, soil depth, dehesa References: Abd-Elmabod, S.K., Muñoz-Rojas, M., Jordán, A., Anaya-Romero, M., De la Rosa, D., 2014. Modelling soil organic carbon stocks along topographic transects under climate change scenarios using CarboSOIL. Geophys. Res. Abstr. vol. 16 EGU2014-295-1, EGU General Assembly.) Álvaro-Fuentes, J., Easter, M., Paustian, K., 2012. Climate change effects on organic carbon storage in agricultural soils of northeastern Spain. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 155, 87-94. Corral-Fernández, R., Parras-Alcántara, L., Lozano-García, B. 2013. Stratification ratio of soil organic C, N and C:N in Mediterranean evergreen oak woodland with conventional and organic tillage. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 164, 252-259. Francaviglia, R., Coleman, K., Whitmore, A.P., Doro, L., Urracci, G., Rubino, M., Ledda, L., 2012. Changes in soil organic carbon and climate change - application of the RothC model in agrosilvo-pastoral Mediterranean systems. Agric. Syst. 112, 48- 54. IPCC, 2007. Technical summary. In: Climate Change 2007. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change http://www.ipcc.ch/. Lozano-García, B., Parras-Alcántara, L

  13. High Density Methane Storage in Nanoporous Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Soo, Yuchoong; Maland, Brett; Doynov, Plamen; Lin, Yuyi; Pfeifer, Peter; Mriglobal Collaboration; All-Craft Team

    2014-03-01

    Development of low-pressure, high-capacity adsorbent based storage technology for natural gas (NG) as fuel for advanced transportation (flat-panel tank for NG vehicles) is necessary in order to address the temperature, pressure, weight, and volume constraints present in conventional storage methods (CNG & LNG.) Subcritical nitrogen adsorption experiments show that our nanoporous carbon hosts extended narrow channels which generate a high surface area and strong Van der Waals forces capable of increasing the density of NG into a high-density fluid. This improvement in storage density over compressed natural gas without an adsorbent occurs at ambient temperature and pressures ranging from 0-260 bar (3600 psi.) The temperature, pressure, and storage capacity of a 40 L flat-panel adsorbed NG tank filled with 20 kg of nanoporous carbon will be featured.

  14. [XPS and Raman spectral analysis of nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C : N) films with different nitrogen content].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wang-Shou; Zhu, Jia-Qi; Han, Jie-Cai; Tian, Gui; Tan, Man-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C : N) films were prepared on the polished C--Si substrates by introducing highly pure nitrogen gas into the cathode region and the depositing chamber synchronously using filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology. The nitrogen content in the films was controlled by changing the flow rate of nitrogen gas. The configuration of ta-C : N films was investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and visible Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the nitrogen content in the films increased from 0.84 at% to 5.37 at% monotonously when the nitrogen flow rate was varied from 2 seem to 20 sccm. The peak position of C (1s) core level moved towards higher binding energy with the increase in nitrogen content. The shift of C (1s) peak position could be ascribed to the chemical bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms even though more three-fold coordinated sp2 configuration as in graphite was formed when the films were doped with more nitrogen atoms. Additionally, the half width of C(1s) peak gradually was also broadened with increasing nitrogen content. In order to discover clearly the changing regularities of the microstructure of the films, the XPS C(1s) spectra and Raman spectra were deconvoluted using a Gaussian-Lorentzian mixed lineshape. It was shown that the tetrahedral hybridization component was still dominant even though the ratio of sp2/sp3 obtained from C(1s) spectra rose with the increase in nitrogen content. The Raman measurements demonstrated that the G peak position shifted towards higher frequency from 1,561 to 1,578 cm(-1) and the ratio of ID/IG also rose with the increase in nitrogen content. Both results indicated that the graphitizing tendency could occur with the increase in nitrogen content in the films. PMID:19385255

  15. Effects of carbon dioxide, water supply, and seasonality on terpene content and emission by Rosmarinus officinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Penuelas, J.; Llusia, J.

    1997-04-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. plants were grown under carbon dioxide concentrations of 350 and 700 {mu}mol (atmospheric CO{sub 2} and elevated CO{sub 2}) and under two levels of irrigation (high water and low water) from October 1, 1994 to May 31, 1996. Elevated CO{sub 2} led on increasingly larger monthly growth rates than the atmospheric CO{sub 2} treatments. The increase was 9.5% in spring 1995, 23% in summer 1995, and 53% in spring 1996 in the high-water treatments, whereas in low-water treatments the growth response to elevated CO{sub 2} was constrained until the second year spring, when there was a 47% increase. The terpene concentrations was slightly larger in the elevated CO{sub 2} treatments than in atmospheric CO{sub 2} treatments and reached a maximum 37% difference in spring 1996. There was no significant effect of water treatment, likely as a result of a mild low water treatment for a Mediterranean plant. Terpene concentrations increased throughout the period of study, indicating possible age effects. The most abundant terpenes were {alpha}-pinene, cineole, camphor, borneol, and verbenone, which represented about 75% of the total. No significant differences were found in the terpene composition of the plants in the different treatments or seasons. The emission of volatile terpenes was much larger in spring (about 75 {mu}g/dry wt/hr) than in autumn (about 10 {mu}g/dry wt/hr), partly because of higher temperature and partly because of seasonal effect, but no significant differences was found because of CO{sub 2} or water treatment. The main terpene emitted was {alpha}-pinene, which represented about 50% of the total. There was no clear correlation between content and emission, either quantitatively or qualitatively. More volatile terpenes were proportionally more important in the total emission than in total content and in autumn than in spring.

  16. Content-Based Curriculum for High-Ability Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanTassel-Baska, Joyce, Ed.; Little, Catherine A., Ed.

    The 14 chapters in this volume are intended to facilitate differentiated curriculum development for gifted students that is substantive, rigorous, and in keeping with disciplinary structures. The chapters are: (1) "Content-Based Curriculum for High Ability Learners: An Introduction" (Joyce VanTassel-Baska); (2) "Accelerating Learning Experiences…

  17. Content Based Language Instruction at Ylojarvi High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karvonen, Raimo

    An innovative high school curriculum in Finland is designed so that the year is divided into six 6-week periods. In an experiment begun in fall 1989, English second language instruction was provided to second-year students in the form of content-area instruction in computer science, chemistry, and physics at one of two levels. Each course lasted…

  18. Developing putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing putative AOPs from high content data Shannon M. Bell1,2, Stephen W. Edwards2 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education 2 Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development,...

  19. Variation of total organic carbon content along the stream Harsit, Eastern Black Sea Basin, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Adem; Önsoy, Hizir; Akinci, Görkem; Bulut, Volkan Numan

    2011-11-01

    The TOC in surface waters and wastewater is an important analytical parameter describing the total content of all organic substances containing carbon. In practice, the TOC originated from natural and anthropogenic sources, and even if it is not directly responsible for dangers on human health, its determination is important for any kind of water that is used by public. The aim of this study was to determine variation of total organic carbon (TOC) and total carbon (TC) content in the stream Harsit, which courses in Eastern Black Sea Region, Turkey. Sampling was fortnightly conducted in each of the four seasons between March 2009 and February 2010. A total of 230 water samples were collected from ten sampling stations along the main branch of the stream Harsit with 143 km of length. Obtained TOC values were evaluated and used to classify the water quality of stream Harsit, according to the Turkish Water Pollution Control Regulation (TWPCR). The annual average TOC content values for the stations were found between 2.33 and 6.97 mg/L. It was seen that the TOC content have increased along the streamcourse of Harsit until the fourth station, where reaches its maximum value. The TOC content, then, has decreased and the minimum value was observed in the eighth station. The results showed that, except in winter season, maximum TOC content observed in many of the water samples were above Class I water standard indicated in TWPCR, which classifies the water resources according to the different area of uses. It was also found that TOC has a small contribution to TC and the highest TOC content in stream waters were measured in Gumushane station where direct discharge of city wastewaters and solid waste dumping to the stream were observed. PMID:21229304

  20. Physicochemical and sorption properties of thermally-treated sediments with high organic matter content.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bo; Huang, Ping; Wu, Min; Wang, Zhenyu; Wang, Peng; Jiao, Xingchun; Xing, Baoshan

    2012-01-01

    Sediment samples with high organic carbon contents (22.04% and 8.46%) were collected and thermally-treated using a method analogous to biochar production. The obtained thermally-treated sediments (TTSs) showed a much higher degree of carbon capture in comparison to biochar derived from common biomass, indicating potential use of TTSs in soil amendment and carbon sequestration. Their sorption with organic contaminants was also investigated using sulfamethoxazole (SMX) as a model sorbate. SMX sorption increased greatly with pyrolytic temperature. Desorption ratio of the adsorbed SMX in TTSs generally decreased with increased pyrolytic temperature and with decreased solid-phase concentrations. The thermodynamic analysis showed that the higher entropy increase (positive ΔS) was well related with the decreased desorption ratio with increased solid-phase concentration for the original sediments. The fate-controlling effect of contaminants in TTS application for soil amendment should be evaluated combining sorption/desorption and sorption thermodynamic studies. PMID:22033373

  1. Effect of sulfur content in a sulfur-activated carbon composite on the electrochemical properties of a lithium/sulfur battery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Changhyeon; Ryu, Ho-Suk; Cho, Gyu-Bong; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Kim, Ki-Won; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Wang, Guoxiu; Ahn, Jae-Pyeung; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The content of sulfur in activated carbon was controlled by solution process. • The sulfur electrode with low sulfur content shows the best performance. • The Li/S battery has capacity of 1360 mAh/g at 1 C and 702 mAh/g at 10 C. - Abstract: The content of sulfur in sulfur/activated carbon composite is controlled from 32.37 wt.% to 55.33 wt.% by a one-step solution-based process. When the sulfur content is limited to 41.21 wt.%, it can be loaded into the pores of an activated carbon matrix in a highly dispersed state. On the contrary, when the sulfur content is 55.33 wt.%, crystalline sulfur can be detected on the surface of the activated carbon matrix. The best electrochemical performance can be obtained for a sulfur electrode with the lowest sulfur content. The sulfur/activated carbon composite with 32.37 wt.% sulfur afforded the highest first discharge capacity of 1360 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 C rate and a large reversible capacity of 702 mAh g{sup −1} at 10 C (16.75 A/g)

  2. High nitrogen-containing cotton derived 3D porous carbon frameworks for high-performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li-Zhen; Chen, Tian-Tian; Song, Wei-Li; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shichao

    2015-10-01

    Supercapacitors fabricated by 3D porous carbon frameworks, such as graphene- and carbon nanotube (CNT)-based aerogels, have been highly attractive due to their various advantages. However, their high cost along with insufficient yield has inhibited their large-scale applications. Here we have demonstrated a facile and easily scalable approach for large-scale preparing novel 3D nitrogen-containing porous carbon frameworks using ultralow-cost commercial cotton. Electrochemical performance suggests that the optimal nitrogen-containing cotton-derived carbon frameworks with a high nitrogen content (12.1 mol%) along with low surface area 285 m2 g-1 present high specific capacities of the 308 and 200 F g-1 in KOH electrolyte at current densities of 0.1 and 10 A g-1, respectively, with very limited capacitance loss upon 10,000 cycles in both aqueous and gel electrolytes. Moreover, the electrode exhibits the highest capacitance up to 220 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 and excellent flexibility (with negligible capacitance loss under different bending angles) in the polyvinyl alcohol/KOH gel electrolyte. The observed excellent performance competes well with that found in the electrodes of similar 3D frameworks formed by graphene or CNTs. Therefore, the ultralow-cost and simply strategy here demonstrates great potential for scalable producing high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors in the industry.

  3. High nitrogen-containing cotton derived 3D porous carbon frameworks for high-performance supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Zhen; Chen, Tian-Tian; Song, Wei-Li; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shichao

    2015-01-01

    Supercapacitors fabricated by 3D porous carbon frameworks, such as graphene- and carbon nanotube (CNT)-based aerogels, have been highly attractive due to their various advantages. However, their high cost along with insufficient yield has inhibited their large-scale applications. Here we have demonstrated a facile and easily scalable approach for large-scale preparing novel 3D nitrogen-containing porous carbon frameworks using ultralow-cost commercial cotton. Electrochemical performance suggests that the optimal nitrogen-containing cotton-derived carbon frameworks with a high nitrogen content (12.1 mol%) along with low surface area 285 m(2) g(-1) present high specific capacities of the 308 and 200 F g(-1) in KOH electrolyte at current densities of 0.1 and 10 A g(-1), respectively, with very limited capacitance loss upon 10,000 cycles in both aqueous and gel electrolytes. Moreover, the electrode exhibits the highest capacitance up to 220 F g(-1) at 0.1 A g(-1) and excellent flexibility (with negligible capacitance loss under different bending angles) in the polyvinyl alcohol/KOH gel electrolyte. The observed excellent performance competes well with that found in the electrodes of similar 3D frameworks formed by graphene or CNTs. Therefore, the ultralow-cost and simply strategy here demonstrates great potential for scalable producing high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors in the industry. PMID:26472144

  4. High nitrogen-containing cotton derived 3D porous carbon frameworks for high-performance supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Zhen; Chen, Tian-Tian; Song, Wei-Li; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shichao

    2015-01-01

    Supercapacitors fabricated by 3D porous carbon frameworks, such as graphene- and carbon nanotube (CNT)-based aerogels, have been highly attractive due to their various advantages. However, their high cost along with insufficient yield has inhibited their large-scale applications. Here we have demonstrated a facile and easily scalable approach for large-scale preparing novel 3D nitrogen-containing porous carbon frameworks using ultralow-cost commercial cotton. Electrochemical performance suggests that the optimal nitrogen-containing cotton-derived carbon frameworks with a high nitrogen content (12.1 mol%) along with low surface area 285 m2 g−1 present high specific capacities of the 308 and 200 F g−1 in KOH electrolyte at current densities of 0.1 and 10 A g−1, respectively, with very limited capacitance loss upon 10,000 cycles in both aqueous and gel electrolytes. Moreover, the electrode exhibits the highest capacitance up to 220 F g−1 at 0.1 A g−1 and excellent flexibility (with negligible capacitance loss under different bending angles) in the polyvinyl alcohol/KOH gel electrolyte. The observed excellent performance competes well with that found in the electrodes of similar 3D frameworks formed by graphene or CNTs. Therefore, the ultralow-cost and simply strategy here demonstrates great potential for scalable producing high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors in the industry. PMID:26472144

  5. Electric double-layer capacitors based on highly graphitized nanoporous carbons derived from ZIF-67.

    PubMed

    Torad, Nagy L; Salunkhe, Rahul R; Li, Yunqi; Hamoudi, Hicham; Imura, Masataka; Sakka, Yoshio; Hu, Chi-Chang; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-06-23

    Nanoporous carbons (NPCs) have large specific surface areas, good electrical and thermal conductivity, and both chemical and mechanical stability, which facilitate their use in energy storage device applications. In the present study, highly graphitized NPCs are synthesized by one-step direct carbonization of cobalt-containing zeolitic imidazolate framework-67 (ZIF-67). After chemical etching, the deposited Co content can be completely removed to prepare pure NPCs with high specific surface area, large pore volume, and intrinsic electrical conductivity (high content of sp(2) -bonded carbons). A detailed electrochemical study is performed using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. Our NPC is very promising for efficient electrodes for high-performance supercapacitor applications. A maximum specific capacitance of 238 F g(-1) is observed at a scan rate of 20 mV s(-1) . This value is very high compared to previous works on carbon-based electric double layer capacitors. PMID:24788922

  6. Relation between PAH and black carbon contents in size fractions of Norwegian harbor sediments.

    PubMed

    Oen, Amy M P; Cornelissen, Gerard; Breedveld, Gijs D

    2006-05-01

    Distributions of total organic carbon (TOC), black carbon (BC), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were investigated in different particle size fractions for four Norwegian harbor sediments. The total PAH (16-EPA) concentrations ranged from 2 to 113 mg/kg dry weight with the greatest fraction of PAH mass in the sand fraction for three of the four sediments. TOC contents ranged from 0.84% to 14.2% and BC contents from 0.085% to 1.7%. This corresponds to organic carbon (OC = TOC - BC) contents in the range of 0.81-14% and BC:TOC ratios of 1.3-18.1%. PAH isomer ratios suggested that the PAH in all four sediments were of pyrogenic origin. Furthermore, stronger correlations between PAH versus BC (r2 = 0.85) than versus OC (r2 = 0.15) were found. For all size fractions and bulk sediments, the PAH-to-BC ratios for the total PAHs were on average 6+/-3 mg PAH/g BC. These results suggest that PAH distributions were dominated by the presence of BC, rather than OC. As sorption to BC is much stronger than sorption to OC, this may result in significantly lower dissolved concentrations of PAH than expected on the basis of organic carbon partitioning alone. PMID:16249047

  7. Building high dimensional imaging database for content based image search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qinpei; Sun, Jianyong; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Mingqing; Yang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jianguo

    2016-03-01

    In medical imaging informatics, content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques are employed to aid radiologists in the retrieval of images with similar image contents. CBIR uses visual contents, normally called as image features, to search images from large scale image databases according to users' requests in the form of a query image. However, most of current CBIR systems require a distance computation of image character feature vectors to perform query, and the distance computations can be time consuming when the number of image character features grows large, and thus this limits the usability of the systems. In this presentation, we propose a novel framework which uses a high dimensional database to index the image character features to improve the accuracy and retrieval speed of a CBIR in integrated RIS/PACS.

  8. Impact of organosulfur content on diesel fuel stability and implications for carbon steel corrosion.

    PubMed

    Lyles, Christopher N; Aktas, Deniz F; Duncan, Kathleen E; Callaghan, Amy V; Stevenson, Bradley S; Suflita, Joseph M

    2013-06-01

    Ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel has been integrated into the worldwide fuel infrastructure to help meet a variety of environmental regulations. However, desulfurization alters the properties of diesel fuel in ways that could potentially impact its biological stability. Fuel desulfurization might predispose ULSD to biodeterioration relative to sulfur-rich fuels and in marine systems accelerate rates of sulfate reduction, sulfide production, and carbon steel biocorrosion. To test such prospects, an inoculum from a seawater-compensated ballast tank was amended with fuel from the same ship or with refinery fractions of ULSD, low- (LSD), and high sulfur diesel (HSD) and monitored for sulfate depletion. The rates of sulfate removal in incubations amended with the refinery fuels were elevated relative to the fuel-unamended controls but statistically indistinguishable (∼50 μM SO4/day), but they were found to be roughly twice as fast (∼100 μM SO4/day) when the ship's own diesel was used as a source of carbon and energy. Thus, anaerobic hydrocarbon metabolism likely occurred in these incubations regardless of fuel sulfur content. Microbial community structure from each incubation was also largely independent of the fuel amendment type, based on molecular analysis of 16S rRNA sequences. Two other inocula known to catalyze anaerobic hydrocarbon metabolism showed no differences in fuel-associated sulfate reduction or methanogenesis rates between ULSD, LSD, and HSD. These findings suggest that the stability of diesel is independent of the fuel organosulfur compound status and reasons for the accelerated biocorrosion associated with the use of ULSD should be sought elsewhere. PMID:23614475

  9. Tillage, Cropping Sequence, and Nitrogen Fertilization Effects on Dryland Soil Carbon Dioxide Emission and Carbon Content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management practices are needed to reduce dryland soil CO2 emission and increase C sequestration that can influence global warming. We evaluated the effects of tillage and cropping sequence combination and N fertilization on dryland soil surface CO2 flux, temperature and water content at the 0- to 1...

  10. Carbon content variation in boles of mature sugar maple and giant sequoia.

    PubMed

    Lamlom, Sabah H; Savidge, Rodney A

    2006-04-01

    At present, a carbon (C) content of 50% (w/w) in dry wood is widely accepted as a generic value; however, few wood C measurements have been reported. We used elemental analysis to investigate C content per unit of dry matter and observed that it varied both radially and vertically in boles of two old-growth tree species: sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) and giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl.) Bucholz). In sugar maple there was considerable variation in tree ring widths among four radii for particular annual layers of xylem, revealing that the annual rate of C assimilation differs around the circumference and from the base of each tree to its top, but the observed variation in C content was unrelated to diameter growth rate and strongly related to the calendar year when the wood was formed. Carbon content in sugar maple wood increased in an approximately linear fashion, from < 50 to 51% from pith to cambium, at both the base and top of the boles. In giant sequoia, C was essentially constant at > 55% across many hundreds of years of heartwood, but it declined abruptly at the sapwood-heartwood boundary and remained lower in all sapwood samples, an indication that heartwood formation involves anabolic metabolism. Factors that may be responsible for the different C contents and trends with age between sugar maple and sequoia trees are considered. Tree-ring data from this study do not support some of the key assumptions made by dendrochronology. PMID:16414925

  11. Adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixtures in porous carbons: effect of surface chemistry, water content, and pore disorder.

    PubMed

    Billemont, Pierre; Coasne, Benoit; De Weireld, Guy

    2013-03-12

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixtures in nanoporous carbons in the presence of water is studied using experiments and molecular simulations. Both the experimental and numerical samples contain polar groups that account for their partially hydrophilicity. For small amounts of adsorbed water, although the shape of the adsorption isotherms remain similar, both the molecular simulations and experiments show a slight decrease in the CO2 and CH4 adsorption amounts. For large amounts of adsorbed water, the experimental data suggest the formation of methane or carbon dioxide clathrates in agreement with previous work. In contrast, the molecular simulations do not account for the formation of such clathrates. Another important difference between the simulated and experimental data concerns the number of water molecules that desorb upon increasing the pressure of carbon dioxide and methane. Although the experimental data indicate that water remains adsorbed upon carbon dioxide and methane adsorption, the molecular simulations suggest that 40 to 75% of the initial amount of adsorbed water desorbs with carbon dioxide or methane pressure. Such discrepancies show that differences between the simulated and experimental samples are crucial to account for the rich phase behavior of confined water-gas systems. Our simulations for carbon dioxide-methane coadsorption in the presence of water suggest that the pore filling is not affected by the presence of water and that adsorbed solution theory can be applied for pressures as high as 15 MPa. PMID:23346958

  12. Bonding and hardness in nonhydrogenated carbon films with moderate sp{sup 3} content

    SciTech Connect

    Gago, R.; Jimenez, I.; Albella, J. M.; Climent-Font, A.; Caceres, D.; Vergara, I.; Banks, J. C.; Doyle, B. L.; Terminello, L. J.

    2000-06-01

    Amorphous carbon films with an sp{sup 3} content up to 25% and a negligible amount of hydrogen have been grown by evaporation of graphite with concurrent Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. The sp{sup 3} content is maximized for Ar{sup +} energies between 200 and 300 eV following a subplantation mechanism. Higher ion energies deteriorate the film due to sputtering and heating processes. The hardness of the films increases in the optimal assisting range from 8 to 18 GPa, and is explained by crosslinking of graphitic planes through sp{sup 3} connecting sites. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. High electrical resistivity carbon/graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, F. L.; Forsman, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon/graphite fibers were chemically oxidized in the liquid phase to fibers of graphite oxide. Resistivity increases as high as 10,000 times were obtained, the oxidized fiber decomposed on exposure to atmosphere. A factor of 1,000 remained as a stable increment. The largest change observed was 1,000,000 times. Best results were obtained on the most highly graphitized fibers. Electrochemical oxidation yielded a lower increase--about 10 times, but provided a controllable method of synthesis and insight to the mechanism of reaction. Tensile tests indicated that the strength of the fiber on oxidation was decreased by no more than 25 percent.

  14. Kirishites, a new type of natural high-carbon compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Yu. B.; Skublov, G. T.; Yushkin, N. P.

    2010-01-01

    On the right-hand bank of the Volkhov River, in the natural area of tektite-like glasses (Volkhovites), fragments of shungites and slags with bunches of hairlike dark brownish enclosures were found. The filament thickness ranged from 20 to 100 μm, and separate “hairlines” were 3 cm in length. The composition of shungites and “hairlines” was found to be identical, which allowed us to consider the latter as aposhungite carbon formations. The high-carbon hairline structures associated with volkhovites are called kirishites. Kirishites are a new type of high-carbon structures that formed simultaneously with volkhovites in the case of explosion-type delivery of carbon slag and shungite fragments to the daylight surface during Holocene explosive activity. Under sharply reductive conditions, the slags partially melted, the melts were segregated, and carbonaceous-silicate and carbonaceous-ferriferous glasses formed with subsequent decompression-explosive liberation of carbon-supersaturated structures, which were extruded from shungite and slag fragments in the form of a resinoid mass. The “hairlines” were found to be zonal in structure: the central axial zones are composed of high-nitrogen hydrocarbon compounds, and peripheral regions are essentially carbonaceous with a high content of organic-mineral compounds and numerous microanomalies of petrogenic, volatile, rare, and ore elements. Infrared spectroscopy identified in kirishites proteinlike compounds, diagnosed in absorption bands (in cm-1) 600-720 (Amid V), 1200-1300 (Amid III), 1480-1590 (Amid II), 1600-1700 (Amid I), 3000-3800 (vibrations in NH2 and II groups). Gas chromatography, with the possibility of differentiation of left- and right-handed forms, revealed a broad spectrum of amino acids in kirishites, with their total content found to be the absolutely highest record for natural bitumens, an order of magnitude higher than the largest amino acid concentrations ever revealed in fibrous high

  15. High-temperature carbonates in the Stillwater Complex, Montana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, H. M.; Boudreau, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    The processes involved in the petrogenesis of the sulphide-hosted platinum-group-element (PGE) deposits of the Stillwater Complex are controversial, with theories ranging from the purely magmatic to those involving an aqueous fluid. To further constrain these models, we have been examining the trace phase assemblages in rocks away from the ore zones. High-temperature carbonates have been observed in association with sulphide minerals below the platiniferous J-M Reef of the Stillwater Complex. The carbonate assemblage consists of dolomite with exsolved calcite and is found in contact with sulphide minerals: chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite in the Peridotite Zone; and pyrrhotite with pentlandite, pyrite and chalcopyrite in Gabbronorite I of the Lower Banded Series. The minimal silicate alteration and the lack of greenschist minerals in association with the mineral assemblage are consistent with a high-temperature origin for the carbonates. The calcite-dolomite geothermometer [1] yields a minimum formation temperature of ~900°C for the unmixed assemblages. A reaction rim surrounds the carbonate-sulphide assemblages, showing an alteration of the host orthopyroxene to a more Ca-enriched, Fe-depleted composition. This is consistent with diffusive exchange between carbonates and pyroxenes at high temperatures, mediated by an aqueous fluid. The highly variable molar MnO/FeO ratios in both the high-temperature carbonates and their associated altered pyroxene rims also imply their interaction with a fluid. The carbonate assemblages are consistent with Stillwater fluid inclusion studies [2], showing that fluids comprising coexisting Cl-rich brine and carbonic fluid were trapped in pegmatitic quartz at 700-715°C, some of which also contained "accidental" calcite inclusions. The high Cl-content of apatite [3] found below the platiniferous J-M Reef is further evidence that a Cl-rich fluid was migrating through the rocks beneath the Reef. Carbonates have been shown to be stabilized

  16. Lower mitochondrial DNA content relates to high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Huang, Wei; Yu, Qin; Cheng, Yao-Ting; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is crucial to mitochondria in energy production and other physiological functions. When lowlanders arrive at high altitude, the mitochondrial content tends to decrease. However, the mtDNA content of native highlanders share the same feature as lowlanders remains unknown. It is also interesting to dissect the other changes in blood plasma that might accompany the change of mtDNA content. To address these issues, we recruited 241 Tibetan subjects in Tibet and 220 Han subjects in Shaanxi province. Relative mtDNA copy number and blood biochemical indexes were measured. Results show that relative mtDNA copy number in Tibetans is significantly lower as compared to Han subjects; sex, age, blood glucose, triglyceride and total cholesterol show no influence on mtDNA content, but carbon dioxide combining power is negatively correlated with mtDNA content. These results indicate that an increase in CO2 combining power along with lower mtDNA content may provide adaptive potential. PMID:24845439

  17. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  18. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Methods Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Results Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. Conclusions All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium. PMID:24103160

  19. [Characteristics of high solid content sludge with microwave irradiation].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wei; Wang, Wei; Xun, Rui; Zhou, Gang; Wan, Xiao; Xia, Zhou

    2008-06-01

    This paper focus on changes of high solid content sludge (7%, 9% and 13%) hydrolysis with microwave irradiation also anaerobic biodegradation of treated sludge was tested by biochemical methane potential (BMP) procedure. Results showed that microwave irradiation provided a rapid temperature increasing. Hydrolysis accelerated the solubilization of volatile suspended solid (VSS) and suspended solid (SS). COD, TOC, NH4+-N, TN, and TP concentration of liquor sludge increased, while pH decreased. Sludge solid content was found to be the most influential parameter. VSS and SS dissolving ratio of sludge with 13% solid content were lower than sludge with 7% and 9% solid content. 23% of VSS and 18% of SS dissolved for 9% sludge at 170 degrees C with 5 min, SCOD of liquor was 41 g/L, and concentration of TOC and NH4+-N were 30 g/L and 1 g/L respectively. Biodegradation of treated sludge improved. Methane production of 9% sludge at 170 degrees C with 5 min and 10 min were 27% and 30.8% higher than that of untreated sludge. Hydrolysis time increasing from 5 min to 10 min brought an improvement of 4%, 3.6% and 5.7% methane production at 120 degrees C, 150 degrees C and 170 degrees C. PMID:18763510

  20. Rheological properties of polyolefin composites highly filled with calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Jakubowska, Paulina; Sterzynski, Tomasz

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the rheological properties of highly filled polyolefin composites (HFPCs) have been investigated. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3), with stearic acid modified surface, was used as filler. Ternary compounds have been obtained by the inclusion of a CaCO3/polypropylene master batch into the high density polyethylene matrix. The highly filled polyolefin composites with CaCO3 content in the range between 40 and 64 wt% have been prepared in the molten state using a single-screw extruder, the temperature of the extrusion die was set at 230°C. The melt rheological properties of the HFPCs have been extensively investigated both in oscillatory and steady shear flow.

  1. Effects of oxygen and carbon content on nitrogen removal capacities in landfill bioreactors and response of microbial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiqing; Wu, Dong; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xinghua; Xie, Bing

    2016-07-01

    In this study, landfill bioreactors were tested to treat the recalcitrant leachate-nitrogen and the impacts of relevant operational parameters on its conversion were comprehensively investigated. We found that the highly diverse microbial community in landfill bioreactors could be substantially affected by increasing biodegradable carbon and oxygen content, which led to the whole system's intrinsic nitrogen removal capacity increasing from 50 to 70 %, and meanwhile, the contribution of anammox was detected less than 20 %. The sequencing and q-PCR results showed that microbial community in bioreactor was dominated by Proteobacteria (∼35 %) and Acidobacteria (~20 %) during the whole experiment. The abundance of anammox functioning bacteria (Amx) kept at a stable level (-2.5 to -2.2 log (copies/16S rRNA)) and was not statistically correlated to the abundance of anammox bacteria. However, significant linear correlation (p < 0.05) was determined between the abundance of nirS and Proteobacteria; amoA and AOB. Redundancy analysis (RDA) suggested that although oxygen and biodegradable carbon can both impose effects on microbial community structure, only biodegradable carbon content is the determinant in the total nitrogen removal. PMID:27005414

  2. Strong and moldable cellulose magnets with high ferrite nanoparticle content.

    PubMed

    Galland, Sylvain; Andersson, Richard L; Ström, Valter; Olsson, Richard T; Berglund, Lars A

    2014-11-26

    A major limitation in the development of highly functional hybrid nanocomposites is brittleness and low tensile strength at high inorganic nanoparticle content. Herein, cellulose nanofibers were extracted from wood and individually decorated with cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles and then for the first time molded at low temperature (<120 °C) into magnetic nanocomposites with up to 93 wt % inorganic content. The material structure was characterized by TEM and FE-SEM and mechanically tested as compression molded samples. The obtained porous magnetic sheets were further impregnated with a thermosetting epoxy resin, which improved the load-bearing functions of ferrite and cellulose material. A nanocomposite with 70 wt % ferrite, 20 wt % cellulose nanofibers, and 10 wt % epoxy showed a modulus of 12.6 GPa, a tensile strength of 97 MPa, and a strain at failure of ca. 4%. Magnetic characterization was performed in a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the coercivity was unaffected and that the saturation magnetization was in proportion with the ferrite content. The used ferrite, CoFe2O4, is a magnetically hard material, demonstrated by that the composite material behaved as a traditional permanent magnet. The presented processing route is easily adaptable to prepare millimeter-thick and moldable magnetic objects. This suggests that the processing method has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial use for the preparation of a new subcategory of magnetic, low-cost, and moldable objects based on cellulose nanofibers. PMID:25331121

  3. Organic carbon and nitrogen content associated with colloids and suspended particulates from the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; Daniel, S.R.

    1997-01-01

    Suspended material samples were collected at 16 sites along the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries during July-August 1991, October-November 1991, and April-May 1992, and separated into colloid and particulate fractions to determine the organic carbon content of these two fractions of suspended material. Sample collection involved centrifugation to isolate the suspended particulate fraction and ultrafiltration to isolate the colloid fraction. For the first time, particulate and colloid concentrations and organic carbon and nitrogen content were investigated along the entire reach of the Mississippi River from above Minneapolis, Minnesota, to below New Orleans, Louisiana. Organic carbon content of the colloid (15.2 percent) was much higher than organic carbon content of the particulate material (4.8 percent). Carbon/nitrogen ratios of colloid and particulate phases were more similar to ratios for microorganisms than to ratios for soils, humic materials, or plants.Suspended material samples were collected at 16 sites along the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries during July-August 1991, October-November 1991, and April-May 1992, and separated into colloid and particulate fractions to determine the organic carbon content of these two fractions of suspended material. Sample collection involved centrifugation to isolate the suspended particulate fraction and ultrafiltration to isolate the colloid fraction. For the first time, particulate and colloid concentrations and organic carbon and nitrogen content were investigated along the entire reach of the Mississippi River from above Minneapolis, Minnesota, to below New Orleans, Louisiana. Organic carbon content of the colloid (15.2 percent) was much higher than organic carbon content of the particulate material (4.8 percent). Carbon/nitrogen ratios of colloid and particulate phases were more similar to ratios for microorganisms than to ratios for soils, humic materials, or plants.

  4. Corrosion Performance of Inconel 625 in High Sulphate Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Azzura

    2016-05-01

    Inconel 625 (UNS N06625) is a type of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with excellent corrosion resistance in a wide range of corrosive media, being especially resistant to pitting and crevice corrosion. However, in aggressive environment, Inconel 625 will suffer corrosion attack like other metals. This research compared the corrosion performance of Inconel 625 when exposed to higher sulphate content compared to real seawater. The results reveal that Inconel 625 is excellent in resist the corrosion attack in seawater. However, at increasing temperature, the corrosion resistance of this metal decrease. The performance is same in seawater with high sulphate content at increasing temperature. It can be concluded that sulphate promote perforation on Inconel 625 and become aggressive agents that accelerate the corrosion attack.

  5. Development of High Misalignment Carbon Seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobek, Lou; Pescosolido, Alessio; Szymborski, George; Caromile, Seb

    2002-10-01

    The Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program is a NASA-funded program to develop and demonstrate technology for quiet, fuel-efficient, low-emissions next generation commercial gas turbine engines. An essential role for achieving lower noise levels and higher fuel efficiency is played by the power transmission gear system connected to the fan. Geared systems driving the fan will be subjected to inertia and gyroscopic forces resulting in extremely high angular and radial misalignments. Because of the high misalignment levels, compartment seals capable of accommodating angularities and eccentricities are required. Pratt & Whitney and Stein Seal Company selected the segmented circumferential carbon seal as the best candidate seal type to operate at highly misaligned conditions and developed a test program to determine misalignment limits of current segmented circumferential seals. The long-term goal is to determine a seal design able to withstand the required misalignment levels and provide design guidelines. A technical approach is presented, including design modification to a "baseline" seal, carbon grade selection, test rig configuration, test plan and data acquisition. Near term research plans and back-up seal designs are also presented.

  6. A key parameter on the adsorption of diluted aniline solutions with activated carbons: The surface oxygen content.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Beatrice; Ferrer, Nabí; Sempere, Julià; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    A total of 11 different commercial activated carbons (AC) with well characterized textural properties and oxygen surface content were tested as adsorbents for the removal of aniline as a target water pollutant. The maximum adsorption capacity of aniline for the studied AC was from 138.9 to 257.9 mg g(-1) at 296.15 K and it was observed to be strongly related to the textural properties of the AC, mainly with the BET surface area and the micropore volume. It was not observed any influence of the oxygen surface content of the AC on the maximum adsorption capacity. However, it was found that at low aniline aqueous concentration, the presence of oxygen surface groups plays a dominant role during the adsorption. A high concentration of oxygen surface groups, mainly carboxylic and phenolic groups, decreases the aniline adsorption regardless of the surface area of the AC. PMID:27497348

  7. Method for manufacturing high quality carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A non-catalytic process for the production of carbon nanotubes includes supplying an electric current to a carbon anode and a carbon cathode which have been securely positioned in the open atmosphere with a gap between them. The electric current creates an electric arc between the carbon anode and the carbon cathode, which causes carbon to be vaporized from the carbon anode and a carbonaceous residue to be deposited on the carbon cathode. Inert gas is pumped into the gap to flush out oxygen, thereby preventing interference with the vaporization of carbon from the anode and preventing oxidation of the carbonaceous residue being deposited on the cathode. The anode and cathode are cooled while electric current is being supplied thereto. When the supply of electric current is terminated, the carbonaceous residue is removed from the cathode and is purified to yield carbon nanotubes.

  8. Exploring the multiplicity of soil-human interactions: organic carbon content, agro-forest landscapes and the Italian local communities.

    PubMed

    Salvati, Luca; Barone, Pier Matteo; Ferrara, Carlotta

    2015-05-01

    Topsoil organic carbon (TOC) and soil organic carbon (SOC) are fundamental in the carbon cycle influencing soil functions and attributes. Many factors have effects on soil carbon content such as climate, parent material, land topography and the human action including agriculture, which sometimes caused a severe loss in soil carbon content. This has resulted in a significant differentiation in TOC or SOC at the continental scale due to the different territorial and socioeconomic conditions. The present study proposes an exploratory data analysis assessing the relationship between the spatial distribution of soil organic carbon and selected socioeconomic attributes at the local scale in Italy with the aim to provide differentiated responses for a more sustainable use of land. A strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis contributed to understand the effectiveness of local communities responses for an adequate comprehension of the role of soil as carbon sink. PMID:25903408

  9. Lightweight Carbon-Carbon High-Temperature Space Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W.O.; Shih, Wei

    2008-01-01

    A document summarizes the development of a carbon-carbon composite radiator for dissipating waste heat from a spacecraft nuclear reactor. The radiator is to be bonded to metal heat pipes and to operate in conjunction with them at a temperature approximately between 500 and 1,000 K. A goal of this development is to reduce the average areal mass density of a radiator to about 2 kg/m(exp 2) from the current value of approximately 10 kg/m(exp 2) characteristic of spacecraft radiators made largely of metals. Accomplishments thus far include: (1) bonding of metal tubes to carbon-carbon material by a carbonization process that includes heating to a temperature of 620 C; (2) verification of the thermal and mechanical integrity of the bonds through pressure-cycling, axial-shear, and bending tests; and (3) construction and testing of two prototype heat-pipe/carbon-carbon-radiator units having different radiator areas, numbers of heat pipes, and areal mass densities. On the basis of the results achieved thus far, it is estimated that optimization of design could yield an areal mass density of 2.2 kg/m (exp 2) close to the goal of 2 kg/m(exp 2).

  10. Recent transient tracer distributions in the Fram Strait: estimation of anthropogenic carbon content and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöven, T.; Tanhua, T.; Hoppema, M.; von Appen, W.-J.

    2015-09-01

    The storage of anthropogenic carbon in the ocean's interior is an important process which modulates the increasing carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere. The polar regions are expected to be net sinks for anthropogenic carbon. Transport estimates of dissolved inorganic carbon and the anthropogenic offset can thus provide information about the magnitude of the corresponding storage processes. Here we present a transient tracer, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) data set along 78°50' N sampled in the Fram Strait in 2012. A theory on tracer relationships is introduced which allows for an application of the Inverse Gaussian - Transit Time Distribution (IG-TTD) at high latitudes and the estimation of anthropogenic carbon concentrations. Current velocity measurements along the same section were used to estimate the net flux of DIC and anthropogenic carbon through the Fram Strait. The new theory explains the differences between the theoretical (IG-TTD based) tracer age relationship and the specific tracer age relationship of the field data by saturation effects during water mass formation and/or the deliberate release experiment of SF6 in the Greenland Sea in 1996 rather than by different mixing or ventilation processes. Based on this assumption, a maximum SF6 excess of 0.5-0.8 fmol kg-1 was determined in the Fram Strait at intermediate depths (500-1600 m). The anthropogenic carbon concentrations are 50-55 μmol kg-1 in the Atlantic Water/Recirculating Atlantic Water, 40-45 μmol kg-1 in the Polar Surface Water/warm Polar Surface Water and between 10-35 μmol kg-1 in the deeper water layers, with lowest concentrations in the bottom layer. The net DIC and anthropogenic carbon fluxes through the Fram Strait indicate a balanced exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic, although with high uncertainties.

  11. Modelling global change impacts on soil carbon contents of agro-silvo-pastoral Mediterranean systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-García, Beatriz; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Parras-Alcántara, Luis

    2016-04-01

    total of 38 sampling points were selected under two management practices and six different land uses: (1) MEOW-dehesa (D); (2) MEOW-dehesa + some pine trees (D+P); (3) MEOW-dehesa + some cork oaks (D+C); (4) MEOW-dehesa + some gall oaks (D + G); (5) MEOW-dehesa after a clarified process and transformed to olive grove but maintaining isolated oaks (OG) and (6) MEOW-dehesa after a clarified process and transformed to cereal pasture with isolated oaks (C). Preliminary results showed a high heterogeneity of SOC contents along the soil profile for different climate and land use scenarios. The methods used here can be easily implemented in other Mediterranean areas with available information on climate, site, soil and land use. Keywords: CarboSOIL model, land use change, climate change, soil depth, dehesa References: Abd-Elmabod, S.K., Muñoz-Rojas, M., Jordán, A., Anaya-Romero, M., De la Rosa, D., 2014. Modelling soil organic carbon stocks along topographic transects under climate change scenarios using CarboSOIL. Geophys. Res. Abstr. vol. 16 EGU2014-295-1, EGU General Assembly.) Álvaro-Fuentes, J., Easter, M., Paustian, K., 2012. Climate change effects on organic carbon storage in agricultural soils of northeastern Spain. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 155, 87-94. Corral-Fernández, R., Parras-Alcántara, L., Lozano-García, B. 2013. Stratification ratio of soil organic C, N and C:N in Mediterranean evergreen oak woodland with conventional and organic tillage. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 164, 252-259. Francaviglia, R., Coleman, K., Whitmore, A.P., Doro, L., Urracci, G., Rubino, M., Ledda, L., 2012. Changes in soil organic carbon and climate change - application of the RothC model in agrosilvo-pastoral Mediterranean systems. Agric. Syst. 112, 48- 54. IPCC, 2007. Technical summary. In: Climate Change 2007. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change http://www.ipcc.ch/. Lozano-García, B., Parras-Alcántara, L

  12. Tillage, cropping sequence, and nitrogen fertilization effects on dryland soil carbon dioxide emission and carbon content.

    PubMed

    Sainju, Upendra M; Jabro, Jalal D; Caesar-Tonthat, Thecan

    2010-01-01

    Management practices are needed to reduce dryland soil CO(2) emissions and to increase C sequestration. We evaluated the effects of tillage and cropping sequence combinations and N fertilization on dryland crop biomass (stems + leaves) and soil surface CO(2) flux and C content (0- to 120-cm depth) in a Williams loam from May to October, 2006 to 2008, in eastern Montana. Treatments were no-tilled continuous malt barley (Hordeum vulgaris L.) (NTCB), no-tilled malt barley-pea (Pisum sativum L.) (NTB-P), no-tilled malt barley-fallow (NTB-F), and conventional-tilled malt barley-fallow (CTB-F), each with 0 and 80 kg N ha(-1). Measurements were made both in Phase I (malt barley in NTCB, pea in NTB-P, and fallow in NTB-F and CTB-F) and Phase II (malt barley in all sequences) of each cropping sequence in every year. Crop biomass varied among years, was greater in the barley than in the pea phase of the NTB-P treatment, and greater in NTCB and NTB-P than in NTB-F and CTB-F in 2 out of 3 yr. Similarly, biomass was greater with 80 than with 0 kg N ha(-1) in 1 out of 3 yr. Soil CO(2) flux increased from 8 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in early May to 239 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in mid-June as temperature increased and then declined to 3 mg C m(-2) h(-1) in September-October. Fluxes peaked immediately following substantial precipitation (>10 mm), especially in NTCB and NTB-P. Cumulative CO(2) flux from May to October was greater in 2006 and 2007 than in 2008, greater in cropping than in fallow phases, and greater in NTCB than in NTB-F. Tillage did not influence crop biomass and CO(2) flux but N fertilization had a variable effect on the flux in 2008. Similarly, soil total C content was not influenced by treatments. Annual cropping increased CO(2) flux compared with crop-fallow probably by increasing crop residue returns to soils and root and rhizosphere respiration. Inclusion of peas in the rotation with malt barley in the no-till system, which have been known to reduce N fertilization rates and

  13. Land abandonment, fire recurrence and soil carbon content in the Macizo del Caroig, Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá, A.; González Peñaloza, F.; Santín, C.; Doerr, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    During the last 50 years two main forces have driven the fate of Mediterranean landscapes: land abandonment and forest fires (MacDonald et al., 2000; Moreira et al., 2001). Due to the economical changes suffered by the of the Mediterranean countries after the Second World War, the population migrated from the rural to the urban areas, and from South to North Europe. The land abandonment allowed the vegetation to recover and, as a consequence, an increase in forest fire took place. The soils of the abandoned land recovered the vegetation and litter layers, and consequently changes in soil properties have being found. One of these changes is the increase of soil carbon content, which is due both to vegetation recovery and to fire occurrence that increases the ash and pyrogenic carbon content in soils. Twenty plots were selected in the Macizo del Caroig in Eastern Spain on soils developed on limestone. The period of abandonment and the forest fires that had affected each plot were determined by interviews with the owners, farmers and shepherds. In addition, six (three + three) plots were selected as forest (no plough) and cultivated control plots. Each plot was sampled (10 random samples) and the organic carbon content determined. The results show that the cultivated plots have organic matter contents of 1.02 %, and the forest (Quercus ilex sp.) plots reach the highest value: 14.98 %. Within those we found values that range from 2.34 %, in the recently abandoned plots (10 year abandonment), to values of 8.23 % in the 50 year old abandoned fields.The results demonstrate that there is a recovery of the organic carbon in abandoned soils and that the forest fires do no affect this trend. The increase of soil organic matter after abandonment is a result of the recovery of vegetation(Debussche et al., 2001), which is the consequence of the end of the disturbance of forest that have affected the Mediterranean for millennia (Barbero et al., 1990). The colonization of the

  14. Developmental toxicity assay using high content screening of zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lantz-McPeak, Susan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Cuevas, Elvis; Dumas, Melanie; Newport, Glenn D.; Ali, Syed F.; Paule, Merle G.; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Typically, time-consuming standard toxicological assays using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model evaluate mortality and teratogenicity after exposure during the first 2 days post-fertilization. Here we describe an automated image-based high content screening (HCS) assay to identify the teratogenic/embryotoxic potential of compounds in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated image acquisition was performed using a high content microscope system. Further automated analysis of embryo length, as a statistically quantifiable endpoint of toxicity, was performed on images post-acquisition. The biological effects of ethanol, nicotine, ketamine, caffeine, dimethyl sulfoxide and temperature on zebrafish embryos were assessed. This automated developmental toxicity assay, based on a growth-retardation endpoint should be suitable for evaluating the effects of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants in a high throughput manner. This approach can significantly expedite the screening of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants, thereby improving the current risk assessment process by decreasing analysis time and required resources. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:24871937

  15. Cohesion of wet grains at high liquid content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raux, Pascal; Bocquet, Lyderic; Biance, Anne-Laure

    2015-11-01

    Adding liquid to a granular medium highly increases its cohesion, due to the creation of capillary bridges between grains. From the paste obtained by mixing a large amount of water to spherical glass beads (~ 100 μm), we cast a compact beam. We study its rupture under its own weight, then deduce the cohesive strength, which increases with water content. This behavior diverges from what is expected from individual capillary bridges, suggesting a role of the liquid repartition in the granular medium. Curently at the Universidad Adolfo Ibañez (Chile).

  16. Variations of the total content of carbon monoxide over Moscow megapolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitin, V. S.; Fokeeva, E. V.; Grechko, E. I.; Dzhola, A. V.; Kuznetsov, R. D.

    2011-02-01

    The results of the carbon monoxide total content measurements over Moscow and Zvenigorod for 2005-2008 are compared with the same data sets for Moscow 1986-2005 and Beijing, 1992-2007. Two identical medium resolution diffraction spectrometers (resolution 0.2 cm-1) with solar tracking system were used. The CO total content measured simultaneously over the city and over Zvenigorod Scientific Station (ZSS) of the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (60 km west from Moscow). This method allows to isolate an urban part of CO content. The acoustic locator SODAR LATAN-3 measurements permitted us to study the influence of the carbon monoxide ventilation conditions upon level of pollution. Correlation coefficients between the urban part of CO content and average wind speed for cold and warm seasons were obtained. The data sets analysis showed a preeminent effect of the wind within boundary layer (up to 300 m) over the CO ventilation. The urban part of the CO content hasn't increased in spite of more than quintuple increase of the motor-vehicles number in Moscow. An increase of the rural CO total column for the 1970-1985 has transformed into its virtually stable amount in between of 1986 to 2000, changed then to a decrease for 2001-2008. We noted the 2008 as "the year of the CO total column minimum" over the past decade. The effect of urban CO sources influence on the CO total column in rural area is small, i.e. on a level of 3% of the total number of measurements. The number of extremal daily values for Moscow is estimated as 5%, and 20% for Beijing.

  17. Influence of carbon content on the copper-telluride phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior of carbon alloyed Cu-Te conductive bridge random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Devulder, Wouter De Schutter, Bob; Detavernier, Christophe; Opsomer, Karl; Franquet, Alexis; Meersschaut, Johan; Muller, Robert; Van Elshocht, Sven; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Goux, Ludovic; Belmonte, Attilio

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of the carbon content on the Cu-Te phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior in carbon alloyed Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4} based conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) cells. Carbon alloying of copper-tellurium inhibits the crystallization, while attractive switching behavior is preserved when using the material as Cu-supply layer in CBRAM cells. The phase formation is first investigated in a combinatorial way. With increasing carbon content, an enlargement of the temperature window in which the material stays amorphous was observed. Moreover, if crystalline phases are formed, subsequent phase transformations are inhibited. The electrical switching behavior of memory cells with different carbon contents is then investigated by implementing them in 580 μm diameter dot TiN/Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4}-C/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si memory cells. Reliable switching behavior is observed for carbon contents up to 40 at. %, with a resistive window of more than 2 orders of magnitude, whereas for 50 at. % carbon, a higher current in the off state and only a small resistive window are present after repeated cycling. This degradation can be ascribed to the higher thermal and lower drift contribution to the reset operation due to a lower Cu affinity towards the supply layer, leading cycle-after-cycle to an increasing amount of Cu in the switching layer, which contributes to the current. The thermal diffusion of Cu into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under annealing also gives an indication of the Cu affinity of the source layer. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to investigate this migration depth in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} before and after annealing, showing a higher Cu, Te, and C migration for high carbon contents.

  18. Carbide Formation and Dissolution in Biomedical Co-Cr-Mo Alloys with Different Carbon Contents during Solution Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineta, Shingo; Namba, Shigenobu; Yoneda, Takashi; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki

    2010-08-01

    The microstructures of as-cast and heat-treated biomedical Co-Cr-Mo (ASTM F75) alloys with four different carbon contents were investigated. The as-cast alloys were solution treated at 1473 to 1548 K for 0 to 43.2 ks. The precipitates in the matrix were electrolytically extracted from the as-cast and heat-treated alloys. An M23C6 type carbide and an intermetallic σ phase (Co(Cr,Mo)) were detected as precipitates in the as-cast Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.12C alloy; an M23C6 type carbide, a σ phase, an η phase (M6C-M12C type carbide), and a π phase (M2T3X type carbide with a β-manganese structure) were detected in the as-cast Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.15C alloy; and an M23C6 type carbide and an η phase were detected in the as-cast Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.25C and Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.35C alloys. After solution treatment, complete precipitate dissolution occurred in all four alloys. Under incomplete precipitate dissolution conditions, the phase and shape of precipitates depended on the heat-treatment conditions and the carbon content in the alloys. The π phase was detected in the alloys with carbon contents of 0.15, 0.25, and 0.35 mass pct after heat treatment at high temperature such as 1548 K for a short holding time of less than 1.8 ks. The presence of the π phase in the Co-Cr-Mo alloys has been revealed in this study for the first time.

  19. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  20. Calibrating Carbon Measurements in Basaltic Glass Using SIMS and FTIR: The Effect of Variable H2O Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervig, R. L.; Moore, G. M.; Roggensack, K.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of mixed volatiles (H2O + CO2) dissolved in basaltic glass on the calibrations of Fourier transform infra-red spectrometry (FTIR) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for H2O and CO2 is assessed. A series of mixed volatile-bearing calc-alkaline basalts were synthesized and analyzed using high-T vacuum manometry, FTIR, and SIMS. No significant deviations from the single volatile component calibrations were found for the FTIR method. The SIMS analyses of these well-characterized basaltic glasses were conducted in three different analytical modes: 1) using a Cs+ primary beam and detection of negative secondary ions shows that the yield of negative carbon ions shows minor (if any) change for H2O contents up to ~3 wt.% but decreases by nearly two-fold in glasses containing ≥5.5 wt.% H2O, 2) using an O- primary beam and detection of negative or positive secondary ions provides linear calibrations for CO2 concentrations in basalts and does not show a significant effect of H2O on the carbon ion yield. Testing the above SIMS approaches for determining H2O in mixed-volatile basaltic glasses shows: a) no effect of carbon on the yield of hydrogen ions, and b) the lowest background levels are achieved by using Cs+ or O- primary beams and detection of negative secondary ions. The analyses using O- primary beams and detection of negative secondary ions results in high session-to-session reproducibility and are also very simple, allowing visitors to SIMS laboratories to obtain high-quality microanalyses for H and C (and F & Cl) with minimal training. Analyses for carbon using positive secondary ions shows low sensitivity, and requires operation of the SIMS at high enough mass resolving power to eliminate interfering 24Mg2+ ions, but does represent an approach for adding C measurements to SIMS analyses of lithophile elements in melt inclusions.

  1. A High Content Assay to Assess Cellular Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Antczak, Christophe; Mahida, Jeni P.; Singh, Chanpreet; Calder, Paul A.; Djaballah, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    A universal process in experimental biology is the use of engineered cells; more often, stably or transiently transfected cells are generated for the purpose. Therefore, it is important that cell health assessment is conducted to check for stress mediated by induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps). For this purpose, we have developed an integrated platform that would enable a direct assessment of transfection efficiency (TE) combined with cellular toxicity and stress response. We make use of automated microscopy and high content analysis to extract from the same well a multiplexed readout to assess and determine optimal chemical transfection conditions. As a proof of concept, we investigated seven commercial reagents, in a matrix of dose and time, to study transfection of an EGFP DNA plasmid into HeLa cells and their consequences on health and fitness; where we scored for cellular proliferation, EGFP positive cells, and induction of Hsp10 and Hsp70 as makers of stress responses. FuGENE HD emerged as the most optimal reagent with no apparent side effects suitable for performing microtiter based miniaturized transfection for both chemical and RNAi screening. In summary, we report on a high content assay method to assess cellular overall fitness upon chemical transfection. PMID:23957721

  2. [Impact of laser energy on measurement of fly ash carbon content].

    PubMed

    Yao, Shun-Chun; Lu, Ji-Dong; Xie, Cheng-Li; Li, Jie; Pan, Sheng-Hua; He, Ze-Xiong

    2009-08-01

    A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy-based apparatus for the analysis of element, employing a 532 nm laser and a multi-channel optical spectrometer with a non-intensified CCD array, has been built and tested. It was applied to analyze the carbon content of coal fly ash. Seven groups of pulse laser in the range of 35 to 98 mJ were used to ablate the fly ash samples. The electron densities and plasma temperatures with different laser energy were determined, and the influence of laser energy on the intensity of analysis carbon lines was also analyzed. The results show that carbon line intensity increases slowly with the increase in laser energy in the range of 35 to 46 mJ, and increases fast in the range of 46 to 78 mJ, then trends to saturation and has a little drop. At the same time, air breakdown has increased significantly, and has an obvious effect on sample plasma. Furthermore, the electron density and plasma temperature increase with the laser energy until 78 mJ and then begin to decrease. It indicates that a proper laser energy can enhance the plasma emission signal, and avoid the negative impact of air breakdown that prevent the pulse laser from reaching the surface of sample and ablating it. In this experiment situation, the measurement accuracy of the carbon line can be improved. PMID:19839299

  3. Runaway electron dynamics in tokamak plasmas with high impurity content

    SciTech Connect

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-09-15

    The dynamics of high energy runaway electrons is analyzed for plasmas with high impurity content. It is shown that modified collision terms are required in order to account for the collisions of the relativistic runaway electrons with partially stripped impurity ions, including the effect of the collisions with free and bound electrons, as well as the scattering by the full nuclear and the electron-shielded ion charge. The effect of the impurities on the avalanche runaway growth rate is discussed. The results are applied, for illustration, to the interpretation of the runaway electron behavior during disruptions, where large amounts of impurities are expected, particularly during disruption mitigation by massive gas injection. The consequences for the electron synchrotron radiation losses and the resulting runaway electron dynamics are also analyzed.

  4. Runaway electron dynamics in tokamak plasmas with high impurity content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of high energy runaway electrons is analyzed for plasmas with high impurity content. It is shown that modified collision terms are required in order to account for the collisions of the relativistic runaway electrons with partially stripped impurity ions, including the effect of the collisions with free and bound electrons, as well as the scattering by the full nuclear and the electron-shielded ion charge. The effect of the impurities on the avalanche runaway growth rate is discussed. The results are applied, for illustration, to the interpretation of the runaway electron behavior during disruptions, where large amounts of impurities are expected, particularly during disruption mitigation by massive gas injection. The consequences for the electron synchrotron radiation losses and the resulting runaway electron dynamics are also analyzed.

  5. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of 0.2mass% Carbon content steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollabimazraehno, Sajjad; Commenda, Christian; Hesser, Guenter; Pichler, Andreas; Hingerl, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    The The microstructures of low carbon content steel are comprised of bainite, martensite, tempered martensite and retained autenite. These structures are obtained by different heat treatments. The effect of heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated using X-ray diffraction, focused ion beam - scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and nanoindentation. The experimental misorientation distribution revealed most grain boundaries had misorientation range between 50^o and 60^o. The lattice relation between bainite and parent austenite is Kurdjomov-Sachs (<111> || <110>). FIB-SEM images and nanoindentation were revealed the grain size can influence the hardness.

  6. The carbon isotopes ratio and trace metals content determinations in some Transylvanian fruit juices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehelean, A.; Magdas, D. A.; Cristea, G.

    2012-02-01

    This work presents a preliminary study on the carbon isotope signature and trace metal content investigated on the soil-plant-fruit pulp chain. The samples were collected from two Transylvanian areas namely Alba and Salaj. The average value of the δ13C at the soil surface was around δ13C ≈ -27%° and important differences of the δ13C values between the two studied areas were not observed. Meanwhile, differences between fruit pulp of grape juice and the pulp of pear juice relived a difference of about 1.5%° for δ13C values.

  7. Determination of groundwater mercury (II) content using a disposable gold modified screen printed carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Somé, Issa Touridomon; Sakira, Abdoul Karim; Mertens, Dominique; Ronkart, Sebastien N; Kauffmann, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-15

    Mercury (II) measurements were performed thanks to a newly developed electrochemical method using a disposable gold modified screen printed carbon electrode. The method has a wide dynamic range (1-100 µg/L), a good accuracy and a limit of detection in compliance with WHO standards. The application of the method to several groundwater samples made it possible to identify, for the first time, mercury content higher than the recommended WHO standard value in a gold mining activity area in the northern part of Burkina Faso. The accuracy of the assay was checked by ICP/MS. PMID:26992529

  8. Confident methods for the evaluation of the hydrogen content in nanoporous carbon microfibers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nanoporous carbon microfibers were grown by chemical vapor deposition in the vapor-liquid solid mode using different fluid hydrocarbons as precursors in different proportions. The as-grown samples were further treated in argon and hydrogen atmospheres at different pressure conditions and annealed at several temperatures in order to deduce the best conditions for the incorporation and re-incorporation of hydrogen into the microfibers through the nanopores. Since there are some discrepancies in the results on the hydrogen content obtained under vacuum conditions, in this work, we have measured the hydrogen content in the microfibers using several analytical methods in ambient conditions: surface tension, mass density, and Raman measurements. A discussion on the validity of the results obtained through the correlation between them is the purpose of the present work. PMID:23095321

  9. Boriding of high carbon high chromium cold work tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, W.

    2014-06-01

    High-carbon high-chromium cold work tool steels are widely used for blanking and cold forming of punches and dies. It is always advantageous to obtain an increased wear resistant surface to improve life and performance of these steels. In this connection boriding of a high-carbon high-chromium cold work die steel, D3, was conducted in a mixture of 30% B4C, 70% borax at 950 °C for two, four and six hours. Case depth of the borided layer obtained was between 40 to 80 μm. After boriding, the surface hardness achieved was between 1430 to 1544 HV depending upon the process time. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the formation of a duplex compound layer consisting of FeB and Fe2B. It is generally considered that FeB is undesirable because of its inherent brittleness. Post boriding treatment (homogenization) transformed the compound layer into single-phase layer of Fe2B, while surface hardness decreased to 1345-1430 HV. Pin-on-disc wer test showed that wear resistance of the borided samples was superior as compared to non-borided material and increased with boriding time.

  10. Effects of Forest Management Intensity on Carbon and Nitrogen Content in Different Soil Size Fractions of a North Florida Spodosol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pine plantations of the southeastern US are regional carbon sinks. In spite of huge increases in woody biomass, studies have shown little or even negative effects on the carbon content of the extremely sandy soils of this region. Hence, it is important to understand the mechanisms that determine the...

  11. Multidimensional fluorescence studies of the phenolic content of dissolved organic carbon in humic substances.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Todd; Ross, Annemarie D; Chiarelli, Joseph; Kenny, Jonathan E

    2012-03-01

    Indicators suggest that the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in natural waters may be increasing. Climate change has been proposed as a potential contributor to the trend, and under such a mechanism, the phenolic content of DOC may also be increasing. This study explores the assessment of the phenolic character of DOC using multidimensional fluorescence spectroscopy as a more convenient alternative to traditional wet chemistry methods. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) is applied to fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) of humic samples to analyze inherent phenolic content. The PARAFAC results are correlated with phenol concentrations derived from the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent-based method. The reagent-based method reveals that the phenolic content of five International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) samples varies from approximately 5.2 to 22 ppm Tannic Acid Equivalents (TAE). A four-component PARAFAC fit is applied to the EEMs of the IHSS sample dataset and it is determined by PARAFAC score correlations with phenol concentrations from the reagent-based method that components C2, C3, and C4 have the highest probability of containing phenolic groups. The results show the potential for PARAFAC analysis of multidimensional fluorescence data for monitoring the phenolic content of DOC. PMID:22278717

  12. Soluble and insoluble carbon content in fog: a 16 year long study in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, C.; Giulianelli, L.; Gilardoni, S.

    2015-12-01

    Fog samples have been collected throughout the fall-winter season during each dense fog episode since 1989 at the field station of San Pietro Capofiume (Bologna, Italy) located in a rural area in the south-eastern part of the Po Valley. Since the fall-winter season 1997/98 both soluble and insoluble carbon content was also measured and now a sixteen years long dataset is available. Carbonaceous matter accounts for a significant fraction of the insoluble material suspended in fog water. The sum of EC and water insoluble organic mass accounts on average for 46%-56% of the mass of total suspended material. Insoluble carbonaceous material is composed mainly by organic matter, EC accounting on average only for 17% of the total insoluble carbon. A good correlation observed between EC and OC through the different years, suggests that anthropogenic combustion processes, which represent the main source of EC, are also the most important source of OC in fog droplets. Recent results also show that a potential important contribution to WSOC in for water is derived by aqueous secondary organic aerosol from biomass burning emissions. The water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) represents on average 25% of the total solute mass and its contribution to the total organic carbon (TOC) ranges from 52 to 95% with an average of 86%. The high amount of carbonaceous compounds in the Po Valley fog detected and the simultaneous decrease of the main inorganic species concentration (Giulianelli et al., 2014) in the last two decades highlight the potential influence of organics on the decrease of fog frequency. Giulianelli L., Gilardoni S., Tarozzi L., Rinaldi M., Decesari S, Carbone C., Facchini M.C. and Fuzzi S., Atmos. Environ. 98, 394-401.

  13. Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbons for high performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Liu, Qiming

    2016-08-01

    The mesoporous carbons have been synthesized by using α-D(+)-Glucose, D-Glucosamine hydrochloride or their mixture as carbon precursors and mesoporous silicas (SBA-15 or MCF) as hard templates. The as-prepared products show a large pore volume (0.59-0.97 cm3 g-1), high surface areas (352.72-1152.67 m2 g-1) and rational nitrogen content (ca. 2.5-3.9 wt.%). The results of electrochemical tests demonstrate that both heteroatom doping and suitable pore structure play a decisive role in the performance of supercapacitors. The representative sample of SBA-15 replica obtained using D-Glucosamine hydrochloride only exhibits high specific capacitance (212.8 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1) and good cycle durability (86.1% of the initial capacitance after 2000 cycles) in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, which is attributed to the contribution of double layer capacitance and pseudo-capacitance. The excellent electrochemical performance makes it a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  14. The Antihyperlipidemic Mechanism of High Sulfate Content Ulvan in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Huimin; Sheng, Jiwen

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that hyperlipidemia is closely linked to cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible antihyperlipidemia mechanism of HU (high sulfate content of ulvan) in high-cholesterol fed rats. Wistar rats were made hyperlipidemic by feeding with a high-cholesterol diet. HU was administered to these hyperlipidemia rats for 30 days. Lipid levels and the mRNA expressions of FXR, LXR and PPARγ in liver were measured after 30 days of treatment. In the HU-treated groups, the middle dosage group of male rats (total cholesterol (TC): p < 0.01) and the low-dosage group of female rats (TC, LDL-C: p < 0.01) showed stronger activity with respect to antihyperlipidemia. Moreover, some HU groups could upregulate the mRNA expression of FXR and PPARγ and downregulate the expression of LXR. For the male rats, compared with the hyperlipidemia group, the middle dosage HU had the most pronounced effect on increasing the mRNA levels of FXR (p < 0.01); low- and high-dosage HU showed a significant inhibition of the mRNA levels of LXR (p < 0.01). All HU female groups could upregulate the mRNA expression of PPARγ in a concentration-dependent manner. In summary, HU could improve lipid profiles through upregulation of FXR and PPARγ and downregulation of LXR. PMID:26035020

  15. Soil Iron Content as a Predictor of Carbon and Nutrient Mobilization in Rewetted Fens.

    PubMed

    Emsens, Willem-Jan; Aggenbach, Camiel J S; Schoutens, Ken; Smolders, Alfons J P; Zak, Dominik; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Rewetted, previously drained fens often remain sources rather than sinks for carbon and nutrients. To date, it is poorly understood which soil characteristics stimulate carbon and nutrient mobilization upon rewetting. Here, we assess the hypothesis that a large pool of iron in the soil negatively affects fen restoration success, as flooding-induced iron reduction (Fe3+ to Fe2+) causes a disproportionate breakdown of organic matter that is coupled with a release of inorganic compounds. We collected intact soil cores in two iron-poor and two iron-rich drained fens, half of which were subjected to a rewetting treatment while the other half was kept drained. Prolonged drainage led to the mobilization of nitrate (NO3-, > 1 mmol L-1) in all cores, regardless of soil iron content. In the rewetted iron-rich cores, a sharp increase in pore water iron (Fe) concentrations correlated with concentrations of inorganic carbon (TIC, > 13 mmol L-1) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, > 16 mmol L-1). Additionally, ammonium (NH4+) accumulated up to phytotoxic concentrations of 1 mmol L-1 in the pore water of the rewetted iron-rich cores. Disproportionate mobilization of Fe, TIC, DOC and NH4+ was absent in the rewetted iron-poor cores, indicating a strong interaction between waterlogging and iron-mediated breakdown of organic matter. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (P) rose slightly in all cores upon rewetting, but remained low throughout the experiment. Our results suggest that large pools of iron in the top soil of drained fens can hamper the restoration of the fen's sink-service for ammonium and carbon upon rewetting. We argue that negative effects of iron should be most apparent in fens with fluctuating water levels, as temporary oxygenation allows frequent regeneration of Fe3+. We conclude that rewetting of iron-poor fens may be more feasible for restoration. PMID:27050837

  16. Soil Iron Content as a Predictor of Carbon and Nutrient Mobilization in Rewetted Fens

    PubMed Central

    Emsens, Willem-Jan; Aggenbach, Camiel J. S.; Schoutens, Ken; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Zak, Dominik; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Rewetted, previously drained fens often remain sources rather than sinks for carbon and nutrients. To date, it is poorly understood which soil characteristics stimulate carbon and nutrient mobilization upon rewetting. Here, we assess the hypothesis that a large pool of iron in the soil negatively affects fen restoration success, as flooding-induced iron reduction (Fe3+ to Fe2+) causes a disproportionate breakdown of organic matter that is coupled with a release of inorganic compounds. We collected intact soil cores in two iron-poor and two iron-rich drained fens, half of which were subjected to a rewetting treatment while the other half was kept drained. Prolonged drainage led to the mobilization of nitrate (NO3-, > 1 mmol L-1) in all cores, regardless of soil iron content. In the rewetted iron-rich cores, a sharp increase in pore water iron (Fe) concentrations correlated with concentrations of inorganic carbon (TIC, > 13 mmol L-1) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, > 16 mmol L-1). Additionally, ammonium (NH4+) accumulated up to phytotoxic concentrations of 1 mmol L-1 in the pore water of the rewetted iron-rich cores. Disproportionate mobilization of Fe, TIC, DOC and NH4+ was absent in the rewetted iron-poor cores, indicating a strong interaction between waterlogging and iron-mediated breakdown of organic matter. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (P) rose slightly in all cores upon rewetting, but remained low throughout the experiment. Our results suggest that large pools of iron in the top soil of drained fens can hamper the restoration of the fen’s sink-service for ammonium and carbon upon rewetting. We argue that negative effects of iron should be most apparent in fens with fluctuating water levels, as temporary oxygenation allows frequent regeneration of Fe3+. We conclude that rewetting of iron-poor fens may be more feasible for restoration. PMID:27050837

  17. Continuous air Agglomeration Method for high Carbon fly ash Beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    1998-09-29

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carbon-free mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  18. Structure and Crystallization Behavior of Nylong 66/Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites at Low Carbon Nanotube Contents

    SciTech Connect

    Li,L.; Li, C.; Ni, C.; Rong, L.; Hsiao, B.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were modified with poly(hexamethylene adipamide) (also known as Nylon 66) via a controlled polymer solution crystallization method. A 'nanohybrid shish kebab' (NHSK) structure was found wherein the MWNT resembled the shish while Nylon 66 lamellar crystals formed the kebabs. These Nylon 66-functionalized MWNTs were used as precursors to prepare polymer/MWNT nanocomposites. Excellent dispersion was revealed by optical and electron microscopies. Nitric acid etching of the nanocomposites showed that MWNT formed a robust network in Nylon 66. Non-isothermal DSC results showed multiple melting peaks, which can be attributed to lamellar thickness changes upon heating. The crystallite sizes L{sub 100} and L{sup 010} of Nylon 66, determined by WAXD, decreased with increasing MWNT contents. Isothermal DSC results showed that crystallization kinetics increased first and then decreased with increasing MWNT contents in Nylon 66. This study showed that the effect of MWNTs on Nylon 66 crystallization is twofold: MWNTs provide heterogeneous nucleation sites for Nylon 66 crystallization while the tube network structure hinders large crystal growth.

  19. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOEpatents

    Marschman, S.C.; Davis, N.C.

    1989-10-03

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]-Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4] oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm[sup [minus]1] cm[sup [minus]1]. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  20. High content analysis of the biocompatibility of nickel nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Fiona; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Whelan, Aine; Mohamed, Bashir M.; Davies, Anthony; Gun'ko, Yurii K.; Coey, J. M. D.; Volkov, Yuri

    2009-05-01

    Nickel nanowires, 20 μm long and 200 nm in diameter, were fabricated by electrodeposition into alumina templates, and characterised by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Biocompatibility studies of nickel nanowires with differentiated THP-1 cell line-derived macrophages were carried out. From a multiparametric assay, using high content analysis (HCA), the critical time points and concentrations of nickel nanowires on THP-1 cellular response were identified. The nanowires displayed little or no toxic effects on THP-1 cells over short incubation times (10 h), and at low concentrations (<100 nanowires per cell). Our findings indicate the potential suitability of these wires for biological and clinical applications.

  1. High-Content Screening for Quantitative Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Mattiazzi Usaj, Mojca; Styles, Erin B; Verster, Adrian J; Friesen, Helena; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J

    2016-08-01

    High-content screening (HCS), which combines automated fluorescence microscopy with quantitative image analysis, allows the acquisition of unbiased multiparametric data at the single cell level. This approach has been used to address diverse biological questions and identify a plethora of quantitative phenotypes of varying complexity in numerous different model systems. Here, we describe some recent applications of HCS, ranging from the identification of genes required for specific biological processes to the characterization of genetic interactions. We review the steps involved in the design of useful biological assays and automated image analysis, and describe major challenges associated with each. Additionally, we highlight emerging technologies and future challenges, and discuss how the field of HCS might be enhanced in the future. PMID:27118708

  2. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOEpatents

    Marschman, Steven C.; Davis, Norman C.

    1989-01-01

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 -Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm.sup.-1 cm.sup.-1. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  3. REMOTE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-TRITIUM-CONTENT WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; Raymond Sigg, R; Leah Arrigo, L; Donald Pak, D

    2007-08-07

    Systems to safely analyze for tritium in moisture collected from glovebox atmospheres are being developed for use at Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities. Analysis results will guide whether the material contains sufficient tritium for economical recovery, or whether it should be stabilized for disposal as waste. In order to minimize potential radiation exposures that could occur in handling and diluting high-tritium-content water, SRS sought alternatives to the process laboratory's routine analysis by liquid-scintillation counting. The newer systems determine tritium concentrations by measuring bremsstrahlung radiation induced by low-energy beta interactions. One of the systems determines tritium activity in liquid streams, the other determines tritium activity in water vapor. Topics discussed include counting results obtained by modeling and laboratory testing and corrections that are made for low-energy photon attenuation.

  4. [High content screening in chemical biology: overview and main challenges].

    PubMed

    Brodin, Priscille; DelNery, Elaine; Soleilhac, Emmanuelle

    2015-02-01

    The last two decades have seen the development of high content screening (HCS) methodology and its adaptation for the evaluation of small molecules as drug candidates or their use as chemical tools for research purpose. HCS was initially set-up for the understanding of the mechanism of action of compounds by testing them on cell based-assays for pharmacological and toxicological studies. Since the last decade, the use of HCS has been extended to academic research laboratories and this technology has become the starting point for numerous projects aiming at the identification of molecular targets and cellular pathways for a given disease on which novel type of drugs could act. This screening approach relies on image capture of fluorescently labeled cells therefore generating a large amount of data that must be handled by appropriate automated image analysis methods and storage instrumentation. These latter in addition to the integration and data sharing are current challenges that HCS must still tackle. PMID:25744266

  5. High-strength porous carbon and its multifunctional applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, Marek A; Rubenstein, Eric P; Serio, Michael A; Cosgrove, Joseph E

    2013-12-31

    High-strength porous carbon and a method of its manufacture are described for multifunctional applications, such as ballistic protection, structural components, ultracapacitor electrodes, gas storage, and radiation shielding. The carbon is produced from a polymer precursor via carbonization, and optionally by surface activation and post-treatment.

  6. Variations in pore characteristics in high volatile bituminous coals: Implications for coal bed gas content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Drobniak, A.; Strapoc, D.; Solano-Acosta, W.; Rupp, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Seelyville Coal Member of the Linton Formation (Pennsylvanian) in Indiana was studied to: 1) understand variations in pore characteristics within a coal seam at a single location and compare these variations with changes occurring between the same coal at different locations, 2) elaborate on the influence of mineral-matter and maceral composition on mesopore and micropore characteristics, and 3) discuss implications of these variations for coal bed gas content. The coal is high volatile bituminous rank with R0 ranging from 0.57% to 0.60%. BET specific surface areas (determined by nitrogen adsorption) of the coals samples studied range from 1.8 to 22.9??m2/g, BJH adsorption mesopore volumes from 0.0041 to 0.0339??cm3/g, and micropore volumes (determined by carbon dioxide adsorption) from 0.0315 to 0.0540??cm3/g. The coals that had the largest specific surface areas and largest mesopore volumes occur at the shallowest depths, whereas the smallest values for these two parameters occur in the deepest coals. Micropore volumes, in contrast, are not depth-dependent. In the coal samples examined for this study, mineral-matter content influenced both specific surface area as well as mesopore and micropore volumes. It is especially clear in the case of micropores, where an increase in mineral-matter content parallels the decrease of micropore volume of the coal. No obvious relationships were observed between the total vitrinite content and pore characteristics but, after splitting vitrinite into individual macerals, we see that collotelinite influences both meso- and micropore volume positively, whereas collodetrinite contributes to the reduction of mesopore and micropore volumes. There are large variations in gas content within a single coal at a single location. Because of this variability, the entire thickness of the coal must be desorbed in order to determine gas content reliably and to accurately calculate the level of gas saturation. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All

  7. Effect of chloride content of molten nitrate salt on corrosion of A516 carbon steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Clift, W. Miles

    2010-11-01

    The corrosion behavior of A516 carbon steel was evaluated to determine the effect of the dissolved chloride content in molten binary Solar Salt. Corrosion tests were conducted in a molten salt consisting of a 60-40 weight ratio of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} at 400{sup o}C and 450{sup o}C for up to 800 hours. Chloride concentrations of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% were investigated to determine the effect on corrosion of this impurity, which can be present in comparable amounts in commercial grades of the constituent salts. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses, corrosion morphology was examined by metallographic sectioning, and the types of corrosion products were determined by x-ray diffraction. Corrosion proceeded by uniform surface scaling and no pitting or intergranular corrosion was observed. Corrosion rates increased significantly as the concentration of dissolved chloride in the molten salt increased. The adherence of surface scales, and thus their protective properties, was degraded by dissolved chloride, fostering more rapid corrosion. Magnetite was the only corrosion product formed on the carbon steel specimens, regardless of chloride content or temperature.

  8. The role of clay content during earthquake propagation in carbonate-hosted faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paola, N.; Bullock, R. J.; Holdsworth, R.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate faults often contain small amounts of phyllosilicate in their slip zone. To assess the effect of phyllosilicate content on earthquake propagation in carbonate faults, we performed friction experiments at seismic slip rate (v = 1.3 m/s) on gouges of calcite, phyllosilicate (montmorillonite and illite-smectite) and mixed calcite/phyllosilicate compositions. Experiments were carried out at 9 MPa normal load and under both room-humidity (dry) and water-saturated (wet) conditions. All dry gouges, regardless of clay content, plus the wet calcite, produce a friction evolution curve, comprising an initial slip-hardening phase, during which friction evolves to peak values f = 0.60-0.76, followed by a dramatic slip-weakening phase, during which f decreases to a constant steady-state value of 0.19-0.33 over a distance which ranges from 0.2 m for clay-bearing gouges up to 0.6 m for pure calcite. Conversely, wet gouges with phyllosilicate content ≥ 10 wt.% show negligible slip-hardening, and the attainment of steady-state sliding almost immediately at the onset of slip, with f = 0.05-0.26. Dry gouges show slip localization and grain size reduction within a narrow (<65 microns) principal slip zone, accompanied by microstructural evidence for thermal decomposition of calcite (although only when clay content is ≤ 50 wt.%). Wet gouges are characterized by distributed deformation and grain size reduction, with no microstructural evidence for thermal decomposition of calcite. We interpret that slip initiates within the wet gouges along interconnected networks of weak phyllosilicates, formed during axial loading compaction prior to shear. This can explain the: 1) measured lack of slip-hardening and peak friction; 2) observed distributed nature of deformation and grain size reduction; 3) lack of evidence for thermally activated processes, due to low frictional heating in accord with small values of friction and lack of slip localization. Our findings imply that small

  9. Whole-genome validation of high-information-content fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Nelson, William M; Bharti, Arvind K; Butler, Ed; Wei, Fusheng; Fuks, Galina; Kim, Hyeran; Wing, Rod A; Messing, Joachim; Soderlund, Carol

    2005-09-01

    Fluorescent-based high-information-content fingerprinting (HICF) techniques have recently been developed for physical mapping. These techniques make use of automated capillary DNA sequencing instruments to enable both high-resolution and high-throughput fingerprinting. In this article, we report the construction of a whole-genome HICF FPC map for maize (Zea mays subsp. mays cv B73), using a variant of HICF in which a type IIS restriction enzyme is used to generate the fluorescently labeled fragments. The HICF maize map was constructed from the same three maize bacterial artificial chromosome libraries as previously used for the whole-genome agarose FPC map, providing a unique opportunity for direct comparison of the agarose and HICF methods; as a result, it was found that HICF has substantially greater sensitivity in forming contigs. An improved assembly procedure is also described that uses automatic end-merging of contigs to reduce the effects of contamination and repetitive bands. Several new features in FPC v7.2 are presented, including shared-memory multiprocessing, which allows dramatically faster assemblies, and automatic end-merging, which permits more accurate assemblies. It is further shown that sequenced clones may be digested in silico and located accurately on the HICF assembly, despite size deviations that prevent the precise prediction of experimental fingerprints. Finally, repetitive bands are isolated, and their effect on the assembly is studied. PMID:16166258

  10. Diel changes in the near-surface biomass of zooplankton and the carbon content of vertical migrants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Graeme C.; Harris, Roger P.; Head, Robert N.

    Zooplankton biomass and the carbon content of vertical migrants were measured in the NE Atlantic (36.5°N, 19.2°W) between 11 and 18 July 1996 as part of the Plankton Reactivity in the Marine Environment (PRIME) programme. The increase in zooplankton biomass near the surface (0-100 m) at night compared to during the day suggested that diel vertical migration was an important feature at this site. For three species of vertically migrant copepods, Pleuromamma pisekii, P. gracilis and P. abdominalis, the carbon content of individuals collected at dusk was significantly less than for individuals collected at dawn, with this reduction being 6.2, 7.3 and 14.8%, respectively. This dawn-dusk reduction in carbon content is consistent with the diel pattern of feeding and fasting exhibited by vertical migrants and supports the suggestion that migrating zooplankton will cause an active export of carbon from the surface layers.

  11. Seasonal controls of canopy chlorophyll content on forest carbon uptake: Implications for GPP modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Chen, J. M.; Froelich, N. J.; Chen, B.; Staebler, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    Forested ecosystems represent an important part of the global carbon cycle, with accurate estimates of gross primary productivity (GPP) crucial for understanding ecosystem response to environmental controls and improving global carbon models. This research investigated the relationships between leaf area index (LAI) and leaf chlorophyll content (ChlLeaf) with forest carbon uptake. Ground measurements of LAI and ChlLeaf were taken approximately every 9 days across the 2013 growing season from day of year (DOY) 130 to 290 at Borden Forest, Ontario. These biophysical measurements were supported by on-site eddy covariance flux measurements. Differences in the temporal development of LAI and ChlLeaf were considerable, with LAI reaching maximum values within approximately 10 days of bud burst at DOY 141. In contrast, ChlLeaf accumulation only reached maximum values at DOY 182. This divergence has important implications for GPP models which use LAI to represent the fraction of light absorbed by a canopy (fraction of absorbed photosynthetic active radiation (fAPAR)). Daily GPP values showed the strongest relationship with canopy chlorophyll content (ChlCanopy; R2 = 0.69, p < 0.001), with the LAI and GPP relationship displaying nonlinearity at the start and end of the growing season (R2 = 0.55, p < 0.001). Modeled GPP derived from LAI × PAR and ChlCanopy × PAR was tested against measured GPP, giving R2 = 0.63, p < 0.001 and R2 = 0.82, p < 0.001, respectively. This work demonstrates the importance of considering canopy pigment status in deciduous forests, with models that use fAPARLAI rather than fAPARChl neglecting to account for the importance of leaf photosynthetic potential.

  12. Transient tracer distributions in the Fram Strait in 2012 and inferred anthropogenic carbon content and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöven, Tim; Tanhua, Toste; Hoppema, Mario; von Appen, Wilken-Jon

    2016-02-01

    The storage of anthropogenic carbon in the ocean's interior is an important process which modulates the increasing carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere. The polar regions are expected to be net sinks for anthropogenic carbon. Transport estimates of dissolved inorganic carbon and the anthropogenic offset can thus provide information about the magnitude of the corresponding storage processes. Here we present a transient tracer, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) data set along 78°50' N sampled in the Fram Strait in 2012. A theory on tracer relationships is introduced, which allows for an application of the inverse-Gaussian-transit-time distribution (IG-TTD) at high latitudes and the estimation of anthropogenic carbon concentrations. Mean current velocity measurements along the same section from 2002-2010 were used to estimate the net flux of DIC and anthropogenic carbon by the boundary currents above 840 m through the Fram Strait. The new theory explains the differences between the theoretical (IG-TTD-based) tracer age relationship and the specific tracer age relationship of the field data, by saturation effects during water mass formation and/or the deliberate release experiment of SF6 in the Greenland Sea in 1996, rather than by different mixing or ventilation processes. Based on this assumption, a maximum SF6 excess of 0.5-0.8 fmol kg-1 was determined in the Fram Strait at intermediate depths (500-1600 m). The anthropogenic carbon concentrations are 50-55 µmol kg-1 in the Atlantic Water/Recirculating Atlantic Water, 40-45 µmol kg-1 in the Polar Surface Water/warm Polar Surface Water and between 10 and 35 µmol kg-1 in the deeper water layers, with lowest concentrations in the bottom layer. The net fluxes through the Fram Strait indicate a net outflow of ˜ 0.4 DIC and ˜ 0.01 PgC yr-1 anthropogenic carbon from the Arctic Ocean into the North Atlantic, albeit with high uncertainties.

  13. Pheophytinase Knockdown Impacts Carbon Metabolism and Nutraceutical Content Under Normal Growth Conditions in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Lira, Bruno Silvestre; Rosado, Daniele; Almeida, Juliana; de Souza, Amanda Pereira; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Purgatto, Eduardo; Guyer, Luzia; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Freschi, Luciano; Rossi, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Although chlorophyll (Chl) degradation is an essential biochemical pathway for plant physiology, our knowledge regarding this process still has unfilled gaps. Pheophytinase (PPH) was shown to be essential for Chl breakdown in dark-induced senescent leaves. However, the catalyzing enzymes involved in pigment turnover and fruit ripening-associated degreening are still controversial. Chl metabolism is closely linked to the biosynthesis of other isoprenoid-derived compounds, such as carotenoids and tocopherols, which are also components of the photosynthetic machinery. Chls, carotenoids and tocopherols share a common precursor, geranylgeranyl diphosphate, produced by the plastidial methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Additionally, the Chl degradation-derived phytol can be incorporated into tocopherol biosynthesis. In this context, tomato turns out to be an interesting model to address isoprenoid-metabolic cross-talk since fruit ripening combines degreening and an intensely active MEP leading to carotenoid accumulation. Here, we investigate the impact of PPH deficiency beyond senescence by the comprehensive phenotyping of SlPPH-knockdown tomato plants. In leaves, photosynthetic parameters indicate altered energy usage of excited Chl. As a mitigatory effect, photosynthesis-associated carotenoids increased while tocopherol content remained constant. Additionally, starch and soluble sugar profiles revealed a distinct pattern of carbon allocation in leaves that suggests enhanced sucrose exportation. The higher levels of carbohydrates in sink organs down-regulated carotenoid biosynthesis. Additionally, the reduction in Chl-derived phytol recycling resulted in decreased tocopherol content in transgenic ripe fruits. Summing up, tocopherol and carotenoid metabolism, together with the antioxidant capacity of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic fractions, were differentially affected in leaves and fruits of the transgenic plants. Thus, in tomato, PPH plays a role beyond

  14. Quantifying the Uncertainties in the Carbon Content of the Terrestrial Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A. K.; Yang, X.

    2003-12-01

    According to the IPCC (2001), the 1980s estimates for all major terms in the global carbon budget are subject to uncertainties. However, uncertainties in land use changes and terrestrial sinks are the largest, up to 200%. Here, we quantify the uncertainties in regional land use emissions as well as net terrestrial flux over the period 1765-2000. Using the terrestrial carbon cycle component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) coupled with observed atmospheric CO2, temperature and precipitation data, the effects of different land cover data sets on the response of plant and soil carbon stocks are assessed. This geographically-explicit implementation of ISAM simulates the carbon fluxes to and from different compartments of the terrestrial biosphere with 0.5-by-0.5 degree spatial resolution. Each grid cell contains at least one of the thirteen land coverage classifications, which represent both highly managed land uses and less managed biomes. Changes in the areal extent of land cover classifications are driven by shifts in land use related to agriculture, afforestation, deforestation, and reforestation. Within each grid cell and land-coverage classification, the modeled carbon cycle includes feedback processes such as CO2 fertilization and temperature effects on photosynthesis, and respiration. ISAM model simulations indicate that uncertainties in net terrestrial fluxes during the 1980s is mainly due to the large uncertainties in land cover change data for tropical Africa and south and south east Asia.

  15. High-Throughput/High-Content Screening Assays with Engineered Nanomaterials in ToxCast

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput and high-content screens are attractive approaches for prioritizing nanomaterial hazards and informing targeted testing due to the impracticality of using traditional toxicological testing on the large numbers and varieties of nanomaterials. The ToxCast program a...

  16. Process for reducing the total sulfur content of a high CO/sub 2/-content feed gas

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, H.J.; Schilk, J.A.

    1982-10-26

    In the process for reducing the total sulfur content of a high CO/sub 2/-content feed gas stream, the feed gas is first passed to an absorption column. The unabsorbed, high CO/sub 2/-content gas is then routed to a reduction step where it is combined with Claus offgases and the sulfur compounds are reduced to H/sub 2/S. The treated gas is then passed to a second absorption column and the unabsorbed gas is vented to the atmosphere. The fat solvent from both absorption columns is stripped in a common stripper and the stripped gas is passed to a Claus unit for conversion to elemental sulfur.

  17. High-Content Profiling of Cell Responsiveness to Graded Substrates Based on Combinatorially Variant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Er; Treiser, Matthew D.; Patel, Hiral; Sung, Hak-Joon; Roskov, Kristen E.; Kohn, Joachim; Becker, Matthew L.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach combining high information and high throughput analysis to characterize cell adhesive responses to biomaterial substrates possessing gradients in surface topography. These gradients were fabricated by subjecting thin film blends of tyrosine-derived polycarbonates, i.e. poly(DTE carbonate) and poly(DTO carbonate) to a gradient temperature annealing protocol. Saos-2 cells engineered with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter for farnesylation (GFP-f) were cultured on the gradient substrates to assess the effects of nanoscale surface topology and roughness that arise during the phase separation process on cell attachment and adhesion strength. The high throughput imaging approach allowed us to rapidly identify the “global” and “high content” structure-property relationships between cell adhesion and biomaterial properties such as polymer chemistry and topography. This study found that cell attachment and spreading increased monotonically with DTE content and were significantly elevated at the position with intermediate regions corresponding to the highest “gradient” of surface roughness, while GFP-f farnesylation intensity descriptors were sensitively altered by surface roughness, even in cells with comparable levels of spreading. PMID:19531022

  18. Negative-ion production on carbon materials in hydrogen plasma: influence of the carbon hybridization state and the hydrogen content on H- yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Pardanaud, Cédric; Carrère, Marcel; Layet, Jean-Marc; Gicquel, Alix; Kumar, Pravin; Eon, David; Jaoul, Cédric; Engeln, Richard; Cartry, Gilles

    2014-02-01

    Highly oriented polycrystalline graphite (HOPG), boron-doped diamond (BDD), nanocrystalline diamond, ultra-nanocrystalline diamond and diamond-like carbon surfaces are exposed to low-pressure hydrogen plasma in a 13.56 MHz plasma reactor. Relative yields of surface-produced H- ions due to bombardment of positive ions from the plasma are measured by an energy analyser cum quadrupole mass spectrometer. Irrespective of plasma conditions (0.2 and 2 Pa), HOPG surfaces show the highest yield at room temperature (RT), while at high temperature (HT), the highest yield (˜3-5 times compared to HOPG surface at RT) is observed on BDD surfaces. The shapes of ion distribution functions are compared at RT and HT to demonstrate the mechanism of ion generation at the surface. Raman spectroscopy analyses of the plasma-exposed samples reveal surface modifications influencing H- production yields, while further analyses strongly suggest that the hydrogen content of the material and the sp3/sp2 ratio are the key parameters in driving the surface ionization efficiency of carbon materials under the chosen plasma conditions.

  19. Aerobic biodegradation of sludge with high hydrocarbon content generated by a Mexican natural gas processing facility.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Carrillo, T; Castorena-Cortés, G; Zapata-Peñasco, I; Reyes-Avila, J; Olguín-Lora, P

    2012-03-01

    The biodegradation of oil sludge from Mexican sour gas and petrochemical facilities contaminated with a high content of hydrocarbons, 334.7 ± 7.0 g kg(-1) dry matter (dm), was evaluated. Studies in microcosm systems were carried out in order to determine the capacity of the native microbiota in the sludge to reduce hydrocarbon levels under aerobic conditions. Different carbon/nitrogen/phosphorous (C/N/P) nutrient ratios were tested. The systems were incubated at 30 °C and shaken at 100 rpm. Hydrocarbon removals from 32 to 51% were achieved in the assays after 30 days of incubation. The best assay had C/N/P ratio of 100/1.74/0.5. The results of the Microtox(®) and Ames tests indicated that the original sludge was highly toxic and mutagenic, whereas the best assay gave a final product that did not show toxicity or mutagenicity. PMID:21600691

  20. Characterization of the Carbon and Retained Austenite Distributions in Martensitic Medium Carbon, High Silicon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Donald H.; Cross, Steven M.; Kim, Sangho; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2007-08-01

    The retained austenite content and carbon distribution in martensite were determined as a function of cooling rate and temper temperature in steel that contained 1.31 at. pct C, 3.2 at. pct Si, and 3.2 at. pct noniron metallic elements. Mössbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), transmission synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atom probe tomography were used for the microstructural analyses. The retained austenite content was an inverse, linear function of cooling rate between 25 and 560 K/s. The elevated Si content of 3.2 at. pct did not shift the start of austenite decomposition to higher tempering temperatures relative to SAE 4130 steel. The minimum tempering temperature for complete austenite decomposition was significantly higher (>650 °C) than for SAE 4130 steel (˜300 °C). The tempering temperatures for the precipitation of transition carbides and cementite were significantly higher (>400 °C) than for carbon steels (100 °C to 200 °C and 200 °C to 350 °C), respectively. Approximately 90 pct of the carbon atoms were trapped in Cottrell atmospheres in the vicinity of the dislocation cores in dislocation tangles in the martensite matrix after cooling at 560 K/s and aging at 22 °C. The 3.2 at. pct Si content increased the upper temperature limit for stable carbon clusters to above 215 °C. Significant autotempering occurred during cooling at 25 K/s. The proportion of total carbon that segregated to the interlath austenite films decreased from 34 to 8 pct as the cooling rate increased from 25 to 560 K/s. Developing a model for the transfer of carbon from martensite to austenite during quenching should provide a means for calculating the retained austenite. The maximum carbon content in the austenite films was 6 to 7 at. pct, both in specimens cooled at 560 K/s and at 25 K/s. Approximately 6 to 7 at. pct carbon was sufficient to arrest the transformation of austenite to martensite. The chemical potential of carbon is the same in

  1. High-strength carbon nanotube fibre-like ribbon with high ductility and high electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, J N; Luo, X G; Wu, T; Chen, Y

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic fibres made up of carbon nanotubes exhibit properties far below theoretical predictions and even much lower than those for conventional carbon fibres. Here we report improvements of mechanical and electrical properties by more than one order of magnitude by pressurized rolling. Our carbon nanotubes self-assemble to a hollow macroscopic cylinder in a tube reactor operated at high temperature and then condense in water or ethanol to form a fibre, which is continually spooled in an open-air environment. This initial fibre is densified by rolling under pressure, leading to a combination of high tensile strength (3.76-5.53 GPa), high tensile ductility (8-13%) and high electrical conductivity ((1.82-2.24) × 10(4) S cm(-1)). Our study therefore demonstrates strategies for future performance maximization and the very considerable potential of carbon nanotube assemblies for high-end uses. PMID:24964266

  2. Effects of chlorine content and carbon chain length in the bioaccumulation of chlorinated paraffins by juvenile rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, A.T.; Cymbalisty, C.; Muir, D.C.G.; Bergman, A.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are C{sub 10{minus}30} chlorinated n-alkanes used as high pressure lubricants, flame retardants and plasticizers. Relatively little is known about their chemical-physical properties or bioaccumulation potential. Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to three dietary concentrations (approximately 0, 20 and 200 ng/g) of two {sup 14}C- dodecane (56 and 69% Cl) and hexadecane (35 and 69% Cl) CPs. Assimilation efficiencies ranged from a mean of 11.3 {+-} 3.1 % for the high chlorinated hexadecane to 49.2 {+-} 27.8% for the low chlorinated dodecane. Half-lives varied from a mean of 21 {+-} 1.6 days in the low chlorinated dodecane to 404 {+-} 289 days in the high chlorinated dodecane. The high chlorinated dodecane was found to have a biomagnification factor (BMF) of 14.8 and 2.5 for the low and high concentration treatments respectively, implying a potential to biomagnify. Chlorine content and carbon chain length both appear to effect bioaccumulation. Higher chlorination was associated with longer half lives and lower elimination rates. Longer carbon chain lengths produced lower assimilation efficiencies and BMF values. Low assimilation efficiencies (8.2 to 1 4.4%) and elimination rate constants (0.008 to 0.009 days-{minus}) found for the high chlorinated hexadecane may be attributed to the large size (MW 668) of this molecule. Short chain, highly chlorinated CPs are the most likely to bioaccumulate, and need further assessment of risk to the aquatic environment.

  3. High efficient preparation of carbon nanotube-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenxin; Wang, Yanxiang; Wang, Chengguo; Chen, Jiqiang; Wang, Qifen; Yuan, Yan; Niu, Fangxu

    2016-02-01

    An innovative technique has been developed to obtain the uniform catalyst coating on continuously moving carbon fibers. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted carbon fibers with significantly improved tensile strength have been succeeded to produce by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) when compared to the tensile strength of untreated carbon fibers. The critical requirements for preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with high tensile strength have been found, mainly including (i) the obtainment of uniform coating of catalyst particles with small particle size, (ii) the low catalyst-induced and mechano-chemical degradation of carbon fibers, and (iii) the high catalyst activity which could facilitate the healing and strengthening of carbon fibers during the growth of CNTs. The optimum growth temperature was found to be about 500 °C, and the optimum catalyst is Ni due to its highest activity, there is a pronounced increase of 10% in tensile strength of carbon fibers after CNT growth at 500 °C by using Ni catalyst. Based on the observation from HRTEM images, a healing and crosslink model of neighboring carbon crystals by CNTs has been formulated to reveal the main reason that causes an increase in tensile strength of carbon fibers after the growth of CNTs. Such results have provided the theoretical and experimental foundation for the large-scale preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength, significantly promoting the development of CNT-grafted carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  4. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahon L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  5. Junior High Business Education. Arkansas Public School Course Content Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This course content guide was developed in accordance with the Standards for Accreditation of Public Schools adopted by the Arkansas State Board of Education. The guide is offered as a framework upon which a curriculum can be built. Within the subject area and at each grade level, the content guide identifies skills at three instructional levels:…

  6. Metadata management for high content screening in OMERO

    PubMed Central

    Li, Simon; Besson, Sébastien; Blackburn, Colin; Carroll, Mark; Ferguson, Richard K.; Flynn, Helen; Gillen, Kenneth; Leigh, Roger; Lindner, Dominik; Linkert, Melissa; Moore, William J.; Ramalingam, Balaji; Rozbicki, Emil; Rustici, Gabriella; Tarkowska, Aleksandra; Walczysko, Petr; Williams, Eleanor; Allan, Chris; Burel, Jean-Marie; Moore, Josh; Swedlow, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    High content screening (HCS) experiments create a classic data management challenge—multiple, large sets of heterogeneous structured and unstructured data, that must be integrated and linked to produce a set of “final” results. These different data include images, reagents, protocols, analytic output, and phenotypes, all of which must be stored, linked and made accessible for users, scientists, collaborators and where appropriate the wider community. The OME Consortium has built several open source tools for managing, linking and sharing these different types of data. The OME Data Model is a metadata specification that supports the image data and metadata recorded in HCS experiments. Bio-Formats is a Java library that reads recorded image data and metadata and includes support for several HCS screening systems. OMERO is an enterprise data management application that integrates image data, experimental and analytic metadata and makes them accessible for visualization, mining, sharing and downstream analysis. We discuss how Bio-Formats and OMERO handle these different data types, and how they can be used to integrate, link and share HCS experiments in facilities and public data repositories. OME specifications and software are open source and are available at https://www.openmicroscopy.org. PMID:26476368

  7. Metadata management for high content screening in OMERO.

    PubMed

    Li, Simon; Besson, Sébastien; Blackburn, Colin; Carroll, Mark; Ferguson, Richard K; Flynn, Helen; Gillen, Kenneth; Leigh, Roger; Lindner, Dominik; Linkert, Melissa; Moore, William J; Ramalingam, Balaji; Rozbicki, Emil; Rustici, Gabriella; Tarkowska, Aleksandra; Walczysko, Petr; Williams, Eleanor; Allan, Chris; Burel, Jean-Marie; Moore, Josh; Swedlow, Jason R

    2016-03-01

    High content screening (HCS) experiments create a classic data management challenge-multiple, large sets of heterogeneous structured and unstructured data, that must be integrated and linked to produce a set of "final" results. These different data include images, reagents, protocols, analytic output, and phenotypes, all of which must be stored, linked and made accessible for users, scientists, collaborators and where appropriate the wider community. The OME Consortium has built several open source tools for managing, linking and sharing these different types of data. The OME Data Model is a metadata specification that supports the image data and metadata recorded in HCS experiments. Bio-Formats is a Java library that reads recorded image data and metadata and includes support for several HCS screening systems. OMERO is an enterprise data management application that integrates image data, experimental and analytic metadata and makes them accessible for visualization, mining, sharing and downstream analysis. We discuss how Bio-Formats and OMERO handle these different data types, and how they can be used to integrate, link and share HCS experiments in facilities and public data repositories. OME specifications and software are open source and are available at https://www.openmicroscopy.org. PMID:26476368

  8. Disinfection associated spoilage of high water content ionic matrix hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sack, R A; Harvey, H; Nunes, I

    1989-01-01

    Chemical analysis was carried out on clinically obtained hazy white hydrogel lenses that had been exposed to hydrogen peroxide disinfection. Analysis revealed that hazing was a surface phenomenon limited to high water content ionic matrix hydrogels (type IV), the type associated with the deposition of large amounts of lysozyme. We subjected unworn lenses to cycling studies involving doping in a variable artificial tear solution followed by exposure to disinfectant; this allowed us to duplicate the clinical situation and to derive a mechanism for this phenomenon. Hazing proved independent of the presence of hydrogen peroxide but dependent on the interaction of lens-bound lysozyme and stannate anion, the latter derived from sodium stannate present in the disinfectant as a stabilizing agent. Hazing is restricted to the type IV hydrogels because only these polymers have a sufficient number of anionic binding sites and are of sufficient porosity to allow the penetration and binding of a thick layer of lysozyme. Lysozyme is essential to hazing. No other tear protein is small enough to penetrate the hydrogel matrix or basic enough to have a marked affinity for the lens and to provide binding sites for stannate anion. These findings highlight the unique vulnerability of the type IV hydrogel to interaction with trace or transient ionic constituents in tears and lens care solutions. PMID:2720948

  9. Open access to high-content clonogenic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Fernanda; Subramanian, Aishwarya; Wade, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Image-processing programs are used to identify and classify eukaryotic cell colonies as spots following seeding at low density on dishes or in multiwell plates. The output from such approaches, however, is generally limited to 1-2 parameters, and there is no ability to extract phenotypic information at the single colony level. Furthermore, there is a lack of user-friendly pipelines for analysis of clonogenicity in the context of high-content analysis. This article describes an experimental and multiparametric image analysis workflow for clonogenic assays in multiwell format, named the Colony Assay Toolbox (CAT). CAT incorporates a cellular-level resolution of individual colonies and facilitates the extraction of phenotypic information, including the number and size of colonies and nuclei, as well as morphological parameters associated with each structure. Furthermore, the pipeline is capable of discriminating between colonies composed of senescent and nonsenescent cells. We demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of CAT by interrogating the effects of 2 preclinical compounds, Nutlin-3a and ABT-737, on the growth of human osteosarcoma cells. CAT is accessible to virtually all laboratories because it uses common wide-field fluorescent microscopes, the open-source CellProfiler program for colony image analysis, and a single fluorescent dye for all the segmentation steps. PMID:25381257

  10. Structure Evolution of Ordered Mesoporous Carbons Induced by Water Content of Mixed Solvents Water/Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Liang, Shujun; Li, Zhenzhong; Zhai, Yan; Song, Yan

    2016-12-01

    In this work, mesostructure evolution of ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) from the 2-D hexagonal (space group p6mm) to the discontinuous cubic [Formula: see text], then towards the face-centered cubic lattice [Formula: see text], and finally, to the simple cubic Pm3n is achieved by simply adjusting the cosolvent water content of the mixed solvents water/ethanol in the presence of a reverse nonionic triblock copolymer and low molecular resin by evaporation-induced self-assembly method. Experimental results demonstrate that both the cosolvent and the reverse triblock copolymer play a key role in the mesophase transitions of OMCs. Furthermore, the OMCs with Pm3n symmetry are reported for the first time. Finally, the mechanism of mesostructure transition was discussed and proposed. PMID:27518232

  11. The Impact of Buried Horizons and Deep Soil Pedogenesis on Soil Carbon Content and Vertical Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. N.; Dietzen, C.; Harrison, R. B.; Gross, C.; Kirpach, A.

    2015-12-01

    The lower boundary of soil has been a point of contention among soil scientists for decades. Recent evidence suggests that soil is much deeper than is measured by many ecological studies and that arbitrary definitions of maximum soil depth unnecessarily exclude important regions of the soil profile. This paper provides illustrated examples of soil profiles that have important deep soil characteristics or buried horizons. Soil pits were excavated with a backhoe to at least 2.5 m depth at 35 sites throughout the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) ecoregion of the Pacific Northwest. These soils cover four orders - Andisol, Inceptisol, Alfisol, and Ultisol - and highlight the hidden diversity of subsoil characteristics throughout the region. The roots of trees and understory species often extended deep into the C horizons of soil. Despite experiencing less pedogenic development than surface horizons, C horizons are important as the frontier of soil formation, as an important resource for plant growth, and as a repository of diffuse but significant carbon storage. On average, there was 188.1 Mg C ha-1 total across all 35 sites, of which 76.3 Mg ha-1 (40.5%) was found below 0.5 m and 44.4 Mg ha-1 (23.6%) was found below 1 m. There was substantial variability in the vertical distribution of C with as little as 8.0% and as much as 58.0% of total C below 1 m. In some cases, B horizons are far deeper than the 1 or 2 m depth arbitrarily assumed to represent the whole soil. In other cases, subsoil hides buried profiles that can significantly impact total soil carbon stocks as well as aboveground plant growth. These buried horizons are important repositories of nutrients and carbon that are poorly understood and rarely sampled. Ignoring subsoil precludes incorporating soil burial or deep soil processes into biogeochemical and global carbon cycle models, and limits mechanistic understanding of carbon sequestration and mobilization in soil.

  12. Calculations of Gas-liquid Equilibrium in Wellbore with High Carbon dioxide Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiaming; Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Liu, Kai; Gao, Yue

    2014-05-01

    Carbon dioxide injection not only enhances the oil recovery dramatically, but also it will reduce the greenhouse effect, therefore, Carbon dioxide injection technique is applied extensively. During the process of carbon dioxide displacement, when carbon dioxide breaks though into oil production wells, carbon dioxide content will impacts the phase state and physical properties of the mixed liquor in the wellbore, as a result, it will affect the calculation of temperature and pressure in oil production wells. Applying the conventional black-oil model to calculate the phase state of the miscible fluids is unacceptable. To tackle the problem, this paper uses the gas-liquid flash theory and component model to program software, so that the phase state (gas, liquid or gas-liquid) and physical properties of the mixed liquor (including hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and hydrocarbon) under initial conditions is calculated, moreover, the impact of carbon dioxide content on the physical properties(mainly including density, viscosity, specific heat at const pressure, surface tension, etc) of mixed liquor in oil production wells is analyzed in this paper. The comparison of the results shows that this model can meet the engineering needs with high accuracy.

  13. High-performance membrane-electrode assembly with an optimal polytetrafluoroethylene content for high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Gisu; Kim, MinJoong; Han, Junyoung; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Shul, Yong-Gun; Cho, EunAe

    2016-08-01

    Although high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) have a high carbon monoxide tolerance and allow for efficient water management, their practical applications are limited due to their lower performance than conventional low-temperature PEMFCs. Herein, we present a high-performance membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) with an optimal polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) content for HT-PEMFCs. Low or excess PTFE content in the electrode leads to an inefficient electrolyte distribution or severe catalyst agglomeration, respectively, which hinder the formation of triple phase boundaries in the electrodes and result in low performance. MEAs with PTFE content of 20 wt% have an optimal pore structure for the efficient formation of electrolyte/catalyst interfaces and gas channels, which leads to high cell performance of approximately 0.5 A cm-2 at 0.6 V.

  14. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    PubMed

    Yang, X M; Drury, C F; Reynolds, W D; Yang, J Y

    2016-01-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2-53 μm) and sand (53-2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg(-1) soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg(-1), but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation. PMID:27251365

  15. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X. M.; Drury, C. F.; Reynolds, W. D.; Yang, J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2–53 μm) and sand (53–2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg−1 soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg−1, but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation. PMID:27251365

  16. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. M.; Drury, C. F.; Reynolds, W. D.; Yang, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2–53 μm) and sand (53–2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg‑1 soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg‑1, but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation.

  17. Low-Temperature Fluorination of Soft-Templated Mesoporous Carbons for a High-Power Lithium/Carbon Fluoride Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Brown, Suree S.; Adcock, Jamie; Mayes, Richard T.; Guo, Bingkun; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Mahurin, Shannon M.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng

    2011-09-29

    Soft-templated mesoporous carbons and activated mesoporous carbons were fluorinated using elemental fluorine between room temperature and 235 °C. The mesoporous carbons were prepared via self-assembly synthesis of phloroglucinol–formaldehyde as a carbon precursor in the presence of triblock ethylene oxide–propylene oxide–ethylene oxide copolymer BASF Pluronic F127 as the template. The F/C ratios ranged from ~0.15 to 0.75 according to gravimetric, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Materials have mesopore diameters up to 11 nm and specific surface areas as high as 850 m² g⁻¹ after fluorination as calculated from nitrogen adsorption isotherms at -196 °C. Furthermore, the materials exhibit higher discharge potentials and energy and power densities as well as faster reaction kinetics under high current densities than commercial carbon fluorides with similar fluorine contents when tested as cathodes for Li/CFx batteries.

  18. Flexible high-performance carbon nanotube integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong-ming; Timmermans, Marina Y; Tian, Ying; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Mizutani, Takashi; Ohno, Yutaka

    2011-03-01

    Carbon nanotube thin-film transistors are expected to enable the fabrication of high-performance, flexible and transparent devices using relatively simple techniques. However, as-grown nanotube networks usually contain both metallic and semiconducting nanotubes, which leads to a trade-off between charge-carrier mobility (which increases with greater metallic tube content) and on/off ratio (which decreases). Many approaches to separating metallic nanotubes from semiconducting nanotubes have been investigated, but most lead to contamination and shortening of the nanotubes, thus reducing performance. Here, we report the fabrication of high-performance thin-film transistors and integrated circuits on flexible and transparent substrates using floating-catalyst chemical vapour deposition followed by a simple gas-phase filtration and transfer process. The resulting nanotube network has a well-controlled density and a unique morphology, consisting of long (~10 µm) nanotubes connected by low-resistance Y-shaped junctions. The transistors simultaneously demonstrate a mobility of 35 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on/off ratio of 6 × 10(6). We also demonstrate flexible integrated circuits, including a 21-stage ring oscillator and master-slave delay flip-flops that are capable of sequential logic. Our fabrication procedure should prove to be scalable, for example, by using high-throughput printing techniques. PMID:21297625

  19. Evaluation of microwave acid digestion for determination of fiber-volume contents in carbon-epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, M.C.; McLaughlin, V.N.; El-Amin, L.; Ilias, S.

    1995-06-01

    The analysis of carbon-epoxy composites for fiber-volume contents is significant in determining the quality and strength of a given composite. The method commonly being used is acid digestion in a hot water bath, which takes about 2.5 hours for digestion alone. A study has been done using a new technique, what is known as Microwave Acid Digestion (MAD) for quick determination of fiber-volume contents of carbon-epoxy composites. This technique uses a specially designed teflon bomb for digestion. The bomb allows for temperatures up to 250 C and pressures up to 1,200 psi. Under such operating conditions, the MAD technique reduces digestion time to about 70 seconds. The study demonstrated that the microwave acid digestion (MAD) is an efficient means for determination of fiber-volume contents of carbon-epoxy composites.

  20. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy study of carbon deposited on the NiO/MgO solid solution catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.H.; Ruckenstein, E.

    1999-05-15

    The carbon deposition due to the CH{sub 4} decomposition at 790 C over NiO/MgO catalysts was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. While no deposits could be detected over the catalysts with a NiO content smaller than 9.1 wt%, they were detected over the catalysts with NiO contents of 23 and 50 wt%. The carbon deposits are composed of platelets located at distances of about 0.34 nm, corresponding to the graphitic carbon. Various structures of the deposited carbon were observed: (a) carbon consisting of platelets parallel to the surface of the particle, which covers a catalyst particle, (b) nanotubes composed of platelets parallel to their axis, and (c) carbon vortexes consisting of platelets parallel to their axis.

  1. Amorphous diamond: A high-pressure superhard carbon allotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yu; Zhang, Li; Mao, Ho Kwang; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Baldini, Maria; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Wendy L.

    2011-01-01

    Compressing glassy carbon above 40 GPa, we have observed a new carbon allotrope with a fully sp³-bonded amorphous structure and diamondlike strength. Synchrotron x-ray Raman spectroscopy revealed a continuous pressure-induced sp²-to-sp³ bonding change, while x-ray diffraction confirmed the perseverance of noncrystallinity. The transition was reversible upon releasing pressure. Used as an indenter, the glassy carbon ball demonstrated exceptional strength by reaching 130 GPa with a confining pressure of 60 GPa. Such an extremely large stress difference of >70 GPa has never been observed in any material besides diamond, indicating the high hardness of this high-pressure carbon allotrope.

  2. Adsorption of tetracycline from aqueous solutions onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes with different oxygen contents

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Ma, Jie; Han, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different oxygen contents were investigated for the adsorption of tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solutions. As the surface oxygen content of the MWCNTs increased, the maximum adsorption capacity and adsorption coefficient of TC increased to the largest values and then decreased. The relation can be attributed to the interplay between the nanotubes' dispersibility and the water cluster formation upon TC adsorption. The overall adsorption kinetics of TC onto CNTs-3.2%O might be dependent on both intra-particle diffusion and boundary layer diffusion. The maximum adsorption capacity of TC on CNTs-3.2%O was achieved in the pH range of 3.3–8.0 due to formation of water clusters or H-bonds. Furthermore, the presence of Cu2+ could significantly enhanced TC adsorption at pH of 5.0. However, the solution ionic strength did not exhibit remarkable effect on TC adsorption. In addition, when pH is beyond the range (3.3–8.0), the electrostatic interactions caused the decrease of TC adsorption capacity. Our results indicate that surface properties and aqueous solution chemistry play important roles in TC adsorption on MWCNTs. PMID:24937315

  3. A controlled snowmaking experiment testing the relation between black carbon content and reduction of snow albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Richard E.; Warren, Stephen G.; Clarke, Antony D.

    2011-04-01

    Radiative transfer modeling of the reduction of snow albedo by black carbon (BC) requires experimental verification. In natural snow the albedo reduction is at most a few percent, and even with accurate measurements, attribution is ambiguous because snow albedo depends on other variables. In this experiment, artificial snowpacks are made by freezing of water droplets produced by a snowmaking machine in an open field, using water with and without added soot, in amounts about 100 times natural background soot levels, so as to obtain a large signal on albedo. The optically effective snow grain size is determined from the measured near-infrared albedo; matching the measured visible albedo then requires addition of BC to the radiative transfer model. The BC content of the artificial snowpacks is measured by filtering the meltwater; the filters are analyzed by a laboratory spectrophotometer as is done for filters from samples of natural snow. The BC content indicated by the filters agrees with that required in the model to match the observed albedo, but significant uncertainties remain, so further experiments are needed.

  4. Adsorption of tetracycline from aqueous solutions onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes with different oxygen contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fei; Ma, Jie; Han, Sheng

    2014-06-01

    Oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different oxygen contents were investigated for the adsorption of tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solutions. As the surface oxygen content of the MWCNTs increased, the maximum adsorption capacity and adsorption coefficient of TC increased to the largest values and then decreased. The relation can be attributed to the interplay between the nanotubes' dispersibility and the water cluster formation upon TC adsorption. The overall adsorption kinetics of TC onto CNTs-3.2%O might be dependent on both intra-particle diffusion and boundary layer diffusion. The maximum adsorption capacity of TC on CNTs-3.2%O was achieved in the pH range of 3.3-8.0 due to formation of water clusters or H-bonds. Furthermore, the presence of Cu2+ could significantly enhanced TC adsorption at pH of 5.0. However, the solution ionic strength did not exhibit remarkable effect on TC adsorption. In addition, when pH is beyond the range (3.3-8.0), the electrostatic interactions caused the decrease of TC adsorption capacity. Our results indicate that surface properties and aqueous solution chemistry play important roles in TC adsorption on MWCNTs.

  5. Carbon tetrachloride degradation: Effect of microbial growth substrate and vitamin B{sub 12} content

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, S.; Stensel, H.D.; Ferguson, J.F.

    2000-05-01

    Microbial degradation kinetics of carbon tetrachloride (CT) under reducing conditions were investigated for different cultures, fed with 1,2-propanediol, dextrose, propionalde-hyde, or acetate and nitrate, in the anaerobic step of an anaerobic/aerobic operation sequence. Methanogenesis was inhibited due to the aerobic step. CT biodegradation rates followed first-order kinetics with respect to CT concentration and biomass and were not affected by the presence of growth substrate. CT degradation rates increased linearly with higher intracellular vitamin B{sub 12} content. The culture fed 1,2-propanediol had the highest vitamin B{sub 12} content, which was 3.8, 4.7, and 16 times that of the propionaldehyde-,dextrose-, and acetate-fed cultures, respectively, and its first-order degradation rate constant was 2.8, 4.5, 6.0 times that for those cultures, respectively. No CT degradation occurred with culture liquid, suggesting that intracellular factors were responsible for CT degradation. The propanediol culture was able to sustain a constant CT degradation rate for a 16-day test period without substrate addition. Compared to a propanediol-fed culture grown only under anaerobic conditions, the propanediol culture grown under the sequential anaerobic/aerobic condition resulted in more biomass growth and a greater CT degradation rate per unit of propanediol fed, although its CT degradation rate per unit of biomass was lower.

  6. Structure of carbonate melts at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, J.; Sanloup, C.; Cochain, B.; Konopkova, Z.; Afonina, V.; Morgenroth, W.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate melts are rare magmas with only a single active volcano (Oldoinyo Lengai,Tanzania [1]). They are of fundamental interest for their role in the Earth's deep carbon cycle and are of immense economic importance due to their affinity for REE strategic metals (niobium, uranium, tantalum, etc). They have remarkable physical properties such as very low viscosity [2] and magmatic temperatures for alkaline carbonate lavas [3] and it has been predicted that their compressibility could be significantly higher than that of silicate melts [4,5]. Despite the atomic structure of carbonate melts being fundamental for controlling their physical and chemical behavior in natural systems, very few structural studies have been reported and these have been largely computational. Here we present initial structural investigations of carbonate melts at mantle pressures using in situ x-ray diffraction in diamond anvil cells. The structure factor S(Q) is transformed to obtain the real space pair distribution function G(R) which describes the local and intermediate range atomic ordering allowing bond length and coordination number changes with pressure to be determined. [1] Krafft and Keller, Science 245:168-170, 1989 [2] Yono et al., Nat. Commun. 5:5091, 2014 [3] Dobson et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 143:207-215, 1996 [4] Genge et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 131:225-238, 1995 [5] Jones et al., Rev. Mineral. Geochem. 75:289-322, 2013

  7. Regional prediction of soil organic carbon content over croplands using airborne hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Gilliot, Jean-Marc; Bel, Liliane; Lefebvre, Josias; Chehdi, Kacem

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out in the framework of the Prostock-Gessol3 and the BASC-SOCSENSIT projects, dedicated to the spatial monitoring of the effects of exogenous organic matter land application on soil organic carbon storage. It aims at identifying the potential of airborne hyperspectral AISA-Eagle data for predicting the topsoil organic carbon (SOC) content of bare cultivated soils over a large peri-urban area (221 km2) with both contrasted soils and SOC contents, located in the western region of Paris, France. Soils comprise hortic or glossic luvisols, calcaric, rendzic cambisols and colluvic cambisols. Airborne AISA-Eagle data (400-1000 nm, 126 bands) with 1 m-resolution were acquired on 17 April 2013 over 13 tracks which were georeferenced. Tracks were atmospherically corrected using a set of 22 synchronous field spectra of both bare soils, black and white targets and impervious surfaces. Atmospherically corrected track tiles were mosaicked at a 2 m-resolution resulting in a 66 Gb image. A SPOT4 satellite image was acquired the same day in the framework of the SPOT4-Take Five program of the French Space Agency (CNES) which provided it with atmospheric correction. The land use identification system layer (RPG) of 2012 was used to mask non-agricultural areas, then NDVI calculation and thresholding enabled to map agricultural fields with bare soil. All 18 sampled sites known to be bare at this very date were correctly included in this map. A total of 85 sites sampled in 2013 or in the 3 previous years were identified as bare by means of this map. Predictions were made from the mosaic spectra which were related to topsoil SOC contents by means of partial least squares regression (PLSR). Regression robustness was evaluated through a series of 1000 bootstrap data sets of calibration-validation samples. The use of the total sample including 27 sites under cloud shadows led to non-significant results. Considering 43 sites outside cloud shadows only, median

  8. The soil organic carbon content of anthropogenically altered organic soils effects the dissolved organic matter quality, but not the dissolved organic carbon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stefan; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bechtold, Michel; Lücke, Andreas; Bol, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important link between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This is especially true for peatlands which usually show high concentrations of DOC due to the high stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC). Most previous studies found that DOC concentrations in the soil solution depend on the SOC content. Thus, one would expect low DOC concentrations in peatlands which have anthropogenically been altered by mixing with sand. Here, we want to show the effect of SOC and groundwater level on the quantity and quality of the dissolved organic matter (DOM). Three sampling sites were installed in a strongly disturbed bog. Two sites differ in SOC (Site A: 48%, Site B: 9%) but show the same mean annual groundwater level of 15 and 18 cm below ground, respectively. The SOC content of site C (11%) is similar to Site B, but the groundwater level is much lower (-31 cm) than at the other two sites. All sites have a similar depth of the organic horizon (30 cm) and the same land-use (low-intensity sheep grazing). Over two years, the soil solution was sampled bi-weekly in three depths (15, 30 and 60 cm) and three replicates. All samples were analyzed for DOC and selected samples for dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and delta-13C and delta-15N. Despite differences in SOC and groundwater level, DOC concentrations did not differ significantly (A: 192 ± 62 mg/L, B: 163 ± 55 mg/L and C: 191 ± 97 mg/L). At all sites, DOC concentrations exceed typical values for peatlands by far and emphasize the relevance even of strongly disturbed organic soils for DOC losses. Individual DOC concentrations were controlled by the temperature and the groundwater level over the preceding weeks. Differences in DOM quality were clearer. At site B with a low SOC content, the DOC:DON ratio of the soil solution equals the soil's C:N ratio, but the DOC:DON ratio is much higher than the C:N ratio at site A. In all cases, the DOC:DON ratio strongly correlates with delta-13C. There is no

  9. Respiratory Effects of Inhaled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Role of Particle Morphology and Iron Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madl, Amy Kathleen

    Nanotechnology provides promise for significant advancements in a number of different fields including imaging, electronics, and therapeutics. With worldwide production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exceeding over 500 metric tons annually and industry growth expecting to double over the next 5 yr, there are concerns our understanding of the hazards of these nanomaterials may not be keeping pace with market demand. The physicochemical properties of CNTs may delineate the key features that determine either toxicity or biocompatibility and assist in evaluating the potential health risks posed in industrial and consumer product settings. We hypothesized that the iron content and morphology of inhaled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) influences the extent of cellular injury and alters homeostasis in the lung. To address this hypothesis, (1) an aerosol system was developed to deliver carbon-based nanomaterials in a manner of exposure that is physiologically and environmentally relevant (e.g., inhalation), (2) acute (1 d) and subacute (10 d) nose-only inhalation studies to a well-characterized aerosol of iron-containing (FeSWCNT) versus cleaned (iron removed, cSWCNTs) SWCNTs were conducted to evaluate the time-course patterns of possible injury through measurement of markers of cytotoxicity, inflammation, and cellular remodeling/homeostasis, and (3) the effects of SWCNTs were compared to other well-studied materials (e.g. non-fibrous, low-iron content ultrafine carbon black and fibrous, high-iron content, highly persistent, durable and potent carcinogen crocidolite) to offer insights into the relative toxicity of these nanomaterials as well as the possible mechanisms by which the effects occur. Rats (SD) were exposed to either aerosolized SWCNTs (raw FeSWCNT or purified cSWCNT), carbon black (CB), crocidolite, or fresh air via nose-only inhalation. Markers of inflammation and cytotoxicity in lung lavage, mucin in different airway generations, and collagen in the

  10. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Charles David; Das, Sujit; Jeon, Dr. Saeil

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.