Science.gov

Sample records for high dose x-ray

  1. High-dose-rate pulse x-ray detection using a multipixel photon counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hitomi, Keitaro; Nomiya, Seiichiro; Onabe, Hideaki; Shoji, Tadayoshi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Kawai, Toshiaki; Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2007-09-01

    Detection of high-dose-rate pulse x-rays from a samarium plasma flash x-ray generator utilizing a multipixel photon counter is described. Monochromatic K-series characteristic x-rays are detected by a plastic scintillator, and fluorescent lights are lead to the photon counter through a 10-m-length plastic fiber. The reverse bias was 70.0 V, and x-ray outputs were recorded by a digital storage scope. The samarium plasma flash x-ray generator is useful for performing high-speed enhanced K-edge angiography using cone beams because K-series characteristic x-rays from the samarium target are absorbed effectively by iodine-based contrast media. In the flash x-ray generator, a 150 nF condenser is charged up to 80 kV by a power supply, and flash x-rays are produced by the discharging. Since the electric circuit of the high-voltage pulse generator employs a cable transmission line, the high-voltage pulse generator produces twice the potential of the condenser charging voltage. At a charging voltage of 80 kV, the estimated maximum tube voltage and current are approximately 160 kV and 40 kA, respectively. When the charging voltage was increased, the K-series characteristic x-ray intensities of samarium increased. Bremsstrahlung x-ray intensity rate decreased with increasing the charging voltage, and K lines were produced with a charging voltage of 80 kV. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 100 ns, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity had a value of approximately 500 μGy at 1.0 m from the x-ray source with a charging voltage of 80 kV. Angiography was performed using a filmless computed radiography (CR) system and iodine-based contrast media. In the angiography of nonliving animals, we observed fine blood vessels of approximately 100 μm with high contrasts.

  2. Dose estimation and shielding calculation for X-ray hazard at high intensity laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bo; James, C. Liu; Sayed, H. Rokni; Michael, B. Woods; Li, Jun-Li

    2014-12-01

    An ionizing radiation hazard produced from the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets has been observed. Laser-plasma interactions create “hot” electrons, which generate bremsstrahlung X-rays when they interact with ions in the target. However, up to now only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this paper, the physical process and characteristics of the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets are analyzed. The parameters of the radiation sources are discussed, including the energy conversion efficiency from laser to hot electrons, hot electron energy spectrum and electron temperature, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray energy spectrum produced by hot electrons. Based on this information, the X-ray dose generated with high-Z targets for laser intensities between 1014 and 1020 W/cm2 is estimated. The shielding effects of common shielding items such as the glass view port, aluminum chamber wall and concrete wall are also studied using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This study provides a reference for the dose estimation and the shielding design of high intensity laser facilities.

  3. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, C D; Bohndiek, S E; Royle, G; Blue, A; Liang, H X; Clark, A; Prydderch, M; Turchetta, R; Speller, R

    2007-12-01

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525 x 525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25 x 25 microm pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10(5) electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 microm, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at approximately 0.44 microC/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a: Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled

  4. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitis, C. D.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Royle, G.; Blue, A.; Liang, H. X.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Speller, R.

    2007-12-15

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525x525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25x25 {mu}m pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10{sup 5} electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 {mu}m, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at {approx}0.44 {mu}C/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a:Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled to

  5. Image quality and dose efficiency of high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging: Phantom studies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to perform an image quality comparison of high energy phase sensitive imaging with low energy conventional imaging at similar radiation doses. The comparison was performed with the following phantoms: American College of Radiology (ACR), contrast-detail (CD), acrylic edge and tissue-equivalent. Visual comparison of the phantom images indicated comparable or improved image quality for all phantoms. Quantitative comparisons were performed through ACR and CD observer studies, both of which indicated higher image quality in the high energy phase sensitive images. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of high energy phase sensitive imaging to overcome existing challenges with the clinical implementation of phase contrast imaging and improve the image quality for a similar radiation dose as compared to conventional imaging near typical mammography energies. In addition, the results illustrate the capability of phase sensitive imaging to sustain the image quality improvement at high x-ray energies and for – breast – simulating phantoms, both of which indicate the potential to benefit fields such as mammography. Future studies will continue to investigate the potential for dose reduction and image quality improvement provided by high energy phase sensitive contrast imaging. PMID:24865208

  6. Suitability of laser stimulated TLD arrays as patient dose monitors in high dose x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Geise, R A; Schueler, B A; Lien, W; Jones, S C

    1997-10-01

    Skin entrance doses of patients undergoing interventional x-ray procedures are capable of causing skin damage and should be monitored routinely. Single TLD chips are not suitable because the location of maximum skin exposure cannot be predicted. Most photographic films are too sensitive at diagnostic x-ray energies for dosimetry, exhibit temporal changes in response, and require special packaging by the user. We have investigated the suitability of laser heated MgB4O7 TLDs in a polyimide binder in the range of 0.2-20 Gy. These are available in radioluscent arrays up to 30 x 30 cm for direct measurement of patient skin dose. Dose response was compared with a calibrated ion chamber dosimeter. Exposures were made at 60, 90, and 120 kVp, at low (fluoroscopy) and high (DSA) dose rates, and at different beam incidence angles. Longitudinal reproducibility and response to temperature changes during exposure were also checked. The dose response is linear below approximately 6 Gy where the slope starts to increase 2% per Gy. Errors were less than +/- 2% over a 0-80 degrees range of beam incidence angles; less than +/- 3% for both dose rate variations and kVp differences between 70 and 120 kVp. The response was unaffected by temperature changes between 20 and 37 degrees C. Reproducibility is current +/- 7%. MgB4O7 TLD arrays are suitable for patient dosimetry in high dose fluoroscopy procedures if appropriate calibrations are used. Uncertainty in skin dose measurement is less than 10%, which is substantially better than film dosimetry. PMID:9350720

  7. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P; Crosbie, J C; Cornelius, I; Berkvens, P; Donzelli, M; Clavel, A H; Rosenfeld, A B; Petasecca, M; Lerch, M L F; Bräuer-Krisch, E

    2016-07-21

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency's TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called 'current ramping' method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials. PMID:27366861

  8. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, P.; Crosbie, J. C.; Cornelius, I.; Berkvens, P.; Donzelli, M.; Clavel, A. H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.

    2016-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency’s TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called ‘current ramping’ method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials.

  9. High-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomography for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunzhe; Brun, Emmanuel; Coan, Paola; Huang, Zhifeng; Sztrókay, Aniko; Diemoz, Paul Claude; Liebhardt, Susanne; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Miao, Jianwei; Bravin, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Mammography is the primary imaging tool for screening and diagnosis of human breast cancers, but ~10-20% of palpable tumors are not detectable on mammograms and only about 40% of biopsied lesions are malignant. Here we report a high-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomographic method for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers. By combining phase contrast X-ray imaging with an image reconstruction method known as equally sloped tomography, we imaged a human breast in three dimensions and identified a malignant cancer with a pixel size of 92 μm and a radiation dose less than that of dual-view mammography. According to a blind evaluation by five independent radiologists, our method can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time by ~74% relative to conventional phase contrast X-ray tomography, while maintaining high image resolution and image contrast. These results demonstrate that high-resolution 3D diagnostic imaging of human breast cancers can, in principle, be performed at clinical compatible doses. PMID:23091003

  10. Dose and detectability improvements with high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging in comparison to low energy conventional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Yan, Aimin; Ghani, Muhammad; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential benefits of using high energy x-rays for phase sensitive breast imaging through a comparison with conventional mammography imaging. We compared images of a contrast-detail (CD) phantom acquired on a prototype phase sensitive x-ray imaging system with images acquired on a commercial flat panel digital mammography unit. The phase contrast images were acquired using a micro-focus x-ray source with a 50 μm focal spot at 120 kVp and 4.5 mAs, with a magnification factor of 2.46 and a 50 μm pixel pitch. A phase attenuation duality (PAD)-based phase retrieval algorithm that requires only a single phase contrast image was applied. Conventional digital mammography images were acquired at 27 kVp, 131 mAs and 28 kVp, 54 mAs. For the same radiation dose, both the observer study and SNR/FOM comparisons indicated a large improvement by the phase retrieved image as compared to the clinical system for the larger disk sizes, but the improvement was not enough to detect the smallest disks. Compared to the double dose image acquired with the clinical system, the observer study also indicated that the phase retrieved image provided improved detection capabilities for all disk sizes except the smallest disks. Thus the SNR improvement provided by phase contrast imaging is not yet enough to offset the noise reduction provided by the clinical system at the doubled dose level. However, the potential demonstrated by this study for high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging to improve lesion detection and reduce radiation dose in mammography warrants further investigation of this technique. PMID:24732108

  11. Dose and detectability improvements with high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging in comparison to low energy conventional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan Wong, Molly; Yan, Aimin; Ghani, Muhammad; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential benefits of using high energy x-rays for phase sensitive breast imaging through a comparison with conventional mammography imaging. We compared images of a contrast-detail phantom acquired on a prototype phase sensitive x-ray imaging system with images acquired on a commercial flat panel digital mammography unit. The phase contrast images were acquired using a micro-focus x-ray source with a 50 µm focal spot at 120 kVp and 4.5 mAs, with a magnification factor of 2.46 and a 50 µm pixel pitch. A phase attenuation duality-based phase retrieval algorithm that requires only a single phase contrast image was applied. Conventional digital mammography images were acquired at 27 kVp, 131 mAs and 28 kVp, 54 mAs. For the same radiation dose, both the observer study and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)/figure of merit comparisons indicated a large improvement by the phase retrieved image as compared to the clinical system for the larger disc sizes, but the improvement was not enough to detect the smallest discs. Compared to the double dose image acquired with the clinical system, the observer study also indicated that the phase retrieved image provided improved detection capabilities for all disc sizes except the smallest discs. Thus the SNR improvement provided by phase contrast imaging is not yet enough to offset the noise reduction provided by the clinical system at the doubled dose level. However, the potential demonstrated by this study for high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging to improve lesion detection and reduce radiation dose in mammography warrants further investigation of this technique.

  12. Dose in x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalender, Willi A.

    2014-02-01

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment.

  13. Dose in x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A

    2014-02-01

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment. PMID:24434792

  14. X-ray storage performance of KCl:Eu2+ with high cumulated dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Rachael A.; Xiao, Zhiyan; Zhang, Lei; Li, H. Harold

    2014-05-01

    The effects of high cumulative radiation dose on the luminescence properties of KCl:Eu2+ are investigated. Pellet samples of KCl:Eu2+ were given doses of up to 200 kGy at the Louisiana State University Synchrotron facility. After synchrotron irradiation, samples were optically bleached and given a clinical dose of 2 Gy from a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. Optical properties were evaluated using photostimulated luminescence (PSL), photoluminescence (PL), and temperature-dependent PSL measurements. For a cumulated dose of up to 5-10 kGy, the PSL emission intensity increased by 15% compared to the PSL signal with no radiation history. For doses higher than 10 kGy, the PSL emission intensity retained at least 70% of the original intensity. Spatial correlation of the charge storage centers increased for doses up to 5 kGy and then decreased for higher cumulative doses. Emission band at 975 nm was attributed to transitions of Eu1+. PL spectra showed an intense peak centered at 420 nm for all cumulative doses. The results of this work show that KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphors are excellent reusable materials for radiation therapy dosimetry.

  15. Scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout for low dose x-ray imaging: Lag

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei; Nanba, Masakazu; Egami, Norifomi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A new concept of indirect conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated. It is referred to as scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The present work investigates the temporal performance, i.e., lag, of SAPHIRE. Methods: Since the temporal performance of the x-ray detection materials, i.e., the structured scintillator and avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor, has been studied previously, the investigation is focused on lag due to the FEA readout method. The principle of FEA readout is similar to that of scanning electron beam readout used in camera tubes, where the dominant source of lag is the energy spread of electrons. Since the principles of emission and beam focusing methods for FEA are different from thermionic emission used in camera tubes, its electron beam energy spread and hence lag is expected to be different. In the present work, the energy spread of the electrons emitted from a FEA was investigated theoretically by analyzing different contributing factors due to the FEA design and operations: The inherent energy spread of field emission, the FEA driving pulse delay, and the angular distribution of emitted electrons. The electron energy spread determined the beam acceptance characteristic curve of the photoconductive target, i.e., the accepted beam current (Ia) as a function of target potential (Vt), from which lag could be calculated numerically. Lag calculation was performed using FEA parameters of two prototype HARP-FEA image sensors, and the results were compared with experimental measurements. Strategies for reducing lag in SAPHIRE were proposed and analyzed. Results: The theoretical analysis shows that the dominant factor for lag is the angular distribution of electrons emitted from the FEA. The first frame lags for two prototype sensors with 4 and 25 μm HARP layer thicknesses were 62.1% and 9.1%, respectively. A

  16. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei

    2008-01-01

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator∕HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 μm. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 μm×50 μm pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 μm. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity. PMID:18697540

  17. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dan; Zhao Wei

    2008-07-15

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 {mu}m. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 {mu}mx50 {mu}m pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 {mu}m. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  18. Ultra low dose X-ray spinal examinations.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Pierre; Prevot, Guy; Hilt, B

    2002-01-01

    The study and treatment of spinal deformities may lead to excessive doses of radiation for patients (especially children) examined by conventional X-ray radiology apparatus. In order to avoid this very crucial problem, a new X-ray radiology system has been devised. The new apparatus uses a high efficiency linear solid-state detector and highly sensitive electronics, operating in single X-ray counting mode (quantum mode). The scan parameters and image filtering are computer controlled. Data is acquired in real time by a high speed VME system. In this paper, the first images recorded using this new apparatus are shown. The main conclusion of the preliminary comparative dosimetric analysis is that it is possible to divide the patient's dose by a factor of at least ten to one hundred with the quantum X-ray radiology apparatus. PMID:15456030

  19. [X-ray exposure dose control for x-ray CT system].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Shortening scan time of CT scanner system has been evolved and increase in number of CT examinations has also been remarkable. This has been resulted from global recognition of usefulness of the CT examination, contrary to this merit, however, it is important to recognize the risk of x-ray exposure dose. Japan Industry Association of Radiological Systems (JIRA) in which CT manufacturers join has issued the concrete countermeasure and guidance for reduction in x-ray exposure dose in response to the ICRP90 Recommendation. Current CT scanner systems provide the data related to x-ray exposure dose such as CTDI(w) for setting CT scan parameters. To reduce x-ray exposure dose against infant patient, the scan parameters specified to infant patient (CT infant protocol) can be provided. Exposure dose by x-ray CT can be measured by the measurement method corresponding to IEC-60601-2-44 and by using phantom. CTDI measurement is made by CTDI(100) that measures in a range of 100mm for all slice thicknesses, and absorbed radiation dose is converted to that of air. Dose profile is measured by using multiple thermoluminescence dosimeter (TDL) chips. CT exposure dose data including CTDI(100) and Dose profile are well-defined, and Dose Information Guide conforming to IEC-60601-2-44 is provided to user for the purpose of reducing x-ray exposure dose. Studies by low dose (2.5 approximately 3mA) simulation for the purpose of reducing x-ray exposure dose in screening CT examination of lung cancer and development of ROI scan to reduce x-ray exposure dose in puncture under CT fluoroscopy have also been conducted. PMID:12766284

  20. Effects of X-Ray Dose On Rhizosphere Studies Using X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zappala, Susan; Helliwell, Jonathan R.; Tracy, Saoirse R.; Mairhofer, Stefan; Sturrock, Craig J.; Pridmore, Tony; Bennett, Malcolm; Mooney, Sacha J.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a non-destructive imaging technique originally designed for diagnostic medicine, which was adopted for rhizosphere and soil science applications in the early 1980s. X-ray CT enables researchers to simultaneously visualise and quantify the heterogeneous soil matrix of mineral grains, organic matter, air-filled pores and water-filled pores. Additionally, X-ray CT allows visualisation of plant roots in situ without the need for traditional invasive methods such as root washing. However, one routinely unreported aspect of X-ray CT is the potential effect of X-ray dose on the soil-borne microorganisms and plants in rhizosphere investigations. Here we aimed to i) highlight the need for more consistent reporting of X-ray CT parameters for dose to sample, ii) to provide an overview of previously reported impacts of X-rays on soil microorganisms and plant roots and iii) present new data investigating the response of plant roots and microbial communities to X-ray exposure. Fewer than 5% of the 126 publications included in the literature review contained sufficient information to calculate dose and only 2.4% of the publications explicitly state an estimate of dose received by each sample. We conducted a study involving rice roots growing in soil, observing no significant difference between the numbers of root tips, root volume and total root length in scanned versus unscanned samples. In parallel, a soil microbe experiment scanning samples over a total of 24 weeks observed no significant difference between the scanned and unscanned microbial biomass values. We conclude from the literature review and our own experiments that X-ray CT does not impact plant growth or soil microbial populations when employing a low level of dose (<30 Gy). However, the call for higher throughput X-ray CT means that doses that biological samples receive are likely to increase and thus should be closely monitored. PMID:23840640

  1. Enhancement of X-ray dose absorption for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara; Montenegro, Maximiliano; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil; Barth, Rolf; Nakkula, Robin; Bell, Erica; Yu, Yan

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of high-Z (HZ) elements with X-rays occurs efficiently at specific resonant energies. Cross sections for photoionization rapidly decrease after the K-edge; higher energy X-rays are mostly Compton-scattered. These features restrict the energy range for the use of HZ moities for radiosensitization in cancer therapy. Conventional X-ray sources such as linear accelerators (LINAC) used in radiotherapy emit a broad spectrum up to MeV energies. We explore the dichotomy between X-ray radiotherapy in two ranges: (i) E < 100 keV including HZ sensitization, and (ii) E > 100 keV where sensitization is inefficient. We perform Monte Carlo numerical simulations of tumor tissue embedded with platinum compounds and gold nanoparticles and compute radiation dose enhancement factors (DEF) upon irradiation with 100 kV, 170 kV and 6 MV sources. Our results demonstrate that the DEF peak below 100 keV and fall sharply above 200 keV to very small values. Therefore most of the X-ray output from LINACs up to the MeV range is utilized very inefficiently. We also describe experimental studies for implementation of option (i) using Pt and Au reagents and selected cancer cell lines. Resultant radiation exposure to patients could be greatly reduced, yet still result in increased tumoricidal ability.

  2. High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sachindra

    2016-07-01

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) are interesting objects that provide a wide range of observational probes to the nature of the two stellar components, accretion process, stellar wind and orbital parameters of the systems. Most of the transient HMXBs are found to Be/X-ray binaries (~67%), consisting of a compact object (neutron star) in orbit around the companion Be star. The orbit of the compact object around the Be star is wide and highly eccentric. Be/X-ray binaries are generally quiescent in X-ray emission. The transient X-ray outbursts seen in these objects are known to be due to interaction between the compact object and the circumstellar disk surrounding the Be star. In the recent years, another class of transient HMXBs have been found which have supergiant companions and show shorter X-ray outbursts. X-ray, infrared and optical observations of these HMXBs provide vital information regarding these systems. The timing and broad-band X-ray spectral properties of a few HMXB pulsars, mainly Be/X-ray binary pulsars during regular X-ray outbursts will be discussed.

  3. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray.

  4. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray. PMID:27189746

  5. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray. PMID:27189746

  6. Low Dose High Energy X-ray In-Line Phase Sensitive Imaging Prototype: Investigation of Optimal Geometric Conditions and Design Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Muhammad. U.; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly. D.; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 µm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 µm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 µm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  7. Low dose high energy x-ray in-line phase sensitive imaging prototype: Investigation of optimal geometric conditions and design parameters.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Muhammad U; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly D; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 μm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 μm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 μm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  8. High-Precision Radiosurgical Dose Delivery by Interlaced Microbeam Arrays of High-Flux Low-Energy Synchrotron X-Rays

    PubMed Central

    Serduc, Raphaël; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik A.; Bouchet, Audrey; Pouyatos, Benoit; Carron, Romain; Pannetier, Nicolas; Renaud, Luc; Berruyer, Gilles; Nemoz, Christian; Brochard, Thierry; Rémy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Bravin, Alberto; Le Duc, Géraldine; Depaulis, Antoine; Estève, François; Laissue, Jean A.

    2010-01-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is a preclinical form of radiosurgery dedicated to brain tumor treatment. It uses micrometer-wide synchrotron-generated X-ray beams on the basis of spatial beam fractionation. Due to the radioresistance of normal brain vasculature to MRT, a continuous blood supply can be maintained which would in part explain the surprising tolerance of normal tissues to very high radiation doses (hundreds of Gy). Based on this well described normal tissue sparing effect of microplanar beams, we developed a new irradiation geometry which allows the delivery of a high uniform dose deposition at a given brain target whereas surrounding normal tissues are irradiated by well tolerated parallel microbeams only. Normal rat brains were exposed to 4 focally interlaced arrays of 10 microplanar beams (52 µm wide, spaced 200 µm on-center, 50 to 350 keV in energy range), targeted from 4 different ports, with a peak entrance dose of 200Gy each, to deliver an homogenous dose to a target volume of 7 mm3 in the caudate nucleus. Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up of rats showed a highly localized increase in blood vessel permeability, starting 1 week after irradiation. Contrast agent diffusion was confined to the target volume and was still observed 1 month after irradiation, along with histopathological changes, including damaged blood vessels. No changes in vessel permeability were detected in the normal brain tissue surrounding the target. The interlacing radiation-induced reduction of spontaneous seizures of epileptic rats illustrated the potential pre-clinical applications of this new irradiation geometry. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations performed on a human-sized head phantom suggested that synchrotron photons can be used for human radiosurgical applications. Our data show that interlaced microbeam irradiation allows a high homogeneous dose deposition in a brain target and leads to a confined tissue necrosis while sparing surrounding tissues. The use of

  9. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  10. Dose optimization in cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; McMillan, Catherine; Cowen, Arnold R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to optimize x-ray image quality to dose ratios in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined independently the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp), copper (Cu), and gadolinium (Gd) x-ray beam filtration on the image quality to radiation dose balance for adult patient sizes.Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms representing two adult patient sizes were captured using a modern flat panel detector based x-ray imaging system. Tin and copper test details were used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium and stents/guide wires respectively, which are used in clinical procedures. Noise measurement for a flat field image and test detail contrast were used to calculate the contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose. This FOM determined the dose efficiency of x-ray spectra investigated. Images were captured with 0.0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm Cu filtration and with a range of gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S) filtration.Results: Optimum x-ray spectra were the same for the tin and copper test details. Lower peak tube voltages were generally favored. For the 20 cm phantom, using 2 Lanex Fast Back Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S screens as x-ray filtration at 65 kVp provided the highest FOM considering ESD and effective dose. Considering ESD, this FOM was only marginally larger than that from using 0.4 mm Cu at 65 kVp. For the 30 cm phantom, using 0.25 mm copper filtration at 80 kVp was most optimal; considering effective dose the FOM was highest with no filtration at 65 kVp.Conclusions: These settings, adjusted for x-ray tube loading limits and clinically acceptable image quality, should provide a useful option for optimizing patient dose to image quality in cardiac x-ray imaging. The same optimal x-ray beam spectra were found for both the tin and copper details, suggesting

  11. Dose distributions using kilovoltage x-rays and dose enhancement from iodine contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, A. V.; Norman, A.; Solberg, T. D.; Demarco, J. J.; Smathers, J. B.

    1999-08-01

    In x-ray phototherapy of brain tumours, the tumour is loaded with iodine and exposed to kilovoltage x-rays. Due to the high photoelectric cross sections of iodine, substantial photoelectric interactions occur. The flux of photoelectrons, characteristic x-rays and Auger electrons produce a localized dose enhancement. A modified computed tomography scanner, CTRx, can be used both for tumour localization and delivery of the dose enhancement therapy. Monte Carlo methods were employed to simulate the treatment of iodinated brain tumours with a CTRx. The calculated results reveal the effect of tumour iodine concentration on dose distribution, the degree of skull bone sparing with the application of multiple arcs, and the homogeneity of tumour dose distribution versus iodine concentration. A comparison with 10 MV stereotactic radiosurgery treatment shows the potential of CTRx treatment relative to conventional treatment modalities.

  12. High-resolution x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Brissenden, Roger J.; Davis, William N.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Elvis, Martin S.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Jerius, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Murray, Stephen S.; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Saha, Timo; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Wolk, Scott; Zhang, William W.

    2010-08-01

    High-energy astrophysics is a relatively young scientific field, made possible by space-borne telescopes. During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, the sensitivity of focusing x-ray telescopes-through finer angular resolution and increased effective area-has improved by a factor of a 100 million. This technological advance has enabled numerous exciting discoveries and increasingly detailed study of the high-energy universe-including accreting (stellarmass and super-massive) black holes, accreting and isolated neutron stars, pulsar-wind nebulae, shocked plasma in supernova remnants, and hot thermal plasma in clusters of galaxies. As the largest structures in the universe, galaxy clusters constitute a unique laboratory for measuring the gravitational effects of dark matter and of dark energy. Here, we review the history of high-resolution x-ray telescopes and highlight some of the scientific results enabled by these telescopes. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility-the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility-Generation X. The scientific objectives of such a mission will require very large areas (about 10000 m2) of highly-nested lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsecond) angular resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  13. Feasibility study for application of the compressed-sensing framework to interior computed tomography (ICT) for low-dose, high-accurate dental x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, U. K.; Cho, H. M.; Cho, H. S.; Park, Y. O.; Park, C. K.; Lim, H. W.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, G. A.; Park, S. Y.; Woo, T. H.; Choi, S. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new/next-generation type of CT examinations, the so-called Interior Computed Tomography (ICT), which may presumably lead to dose reduction to the patient outside the target region-of-interest (ROI), in dental x-ray imaging. Here an x-ray beam from each projection position covers only a relatively small ROI containing a target of diagnosis from the examined structure, leading to imaging benefits such as decreasing scatters and system cost as well as reducing imaging dose. We considered the compressed-sensing (CS) framework, rather than common filtered-backprojection (FBP)-based algorithms, for more accurate ICT reconstruction. We implemented a CS-based ICT algorithm and performed a systematic simulation to investigate the imaging characteristics. Simulation conditions of two ROI ratios of 0.28 and 0.14 between the target and the whole phantom sizes and four projection numbers of 360, 180, 90, and 45 were tested. We successfully reconstructed ICT images of substantially high image quality by using the CS framework even with few-view projection data, still preserving sharp edges in the images.

  14. Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Hernandez, Michael

    2013-04-19

    X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

  15. Treatment of foods with high-energy X rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Meissner, J.; Herer, A. S.; Beers, E. W.

    2001-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing energy in the form of gamma rays, accelerated electrons, and X rays can produce beneficial effects, such as inhibiting the sprouting in potatoes, onions, and garlic, controlling insects in fruits, vegetables, and grains, inhibiting the growth of fungi, pasteurizing fresh meat, poultry, and seafood, and sterilizing spices and food additives. After many years of research, these processes have been approved by regulatory authorities in many countries and commercial applications have been increasing. High-energy X rays are especially useful for treating large packages of food. The most attractive features are product penetration, absorbed dose uniformity, high utilization efficiency and short processing time. The ability to energize the X-ray source only when needed enhances the safety and convenience of this technique. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron accelerators, which can be used as X-ray generators, makes it feasible to process large quantities of food economically. Several industrial accelerator facilities already have X-ray conversion equipment and several more will soon be built with product conveying systems designed to take advantage of the unique characteristics of high-energy X rays. These concepts will be reviewed briefly in this paper.

  16. High power distributed x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frutschy, Kris; Neculaes, Bogdan; Inzinna, Lou; Caiafa, Antonio; Reynolds, Joe; Zou, Yun; Zhang, Xi; Gunturi, Satish; Cao, Yang; Waters, Bill; Wagner, Dave; De Man, Bruno; McDevitt, Dan; Roffers, Rick; Lounsberry, Brian; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2010-04-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a distributed x-ray source with up to 60kW demonstrated instantaneous power. Component integration and test results are shown for the dispenser cathode electron gun, fast switching controls, high voltage stand-off insulator, brazed anode, and vacuum system. The current multisource prototype has been operated for over 100 hours without failure, and additional testing is needed to discover the limiting component. Example focal spot measurements and x-ray radiographs are included. Lastly, future development opportunities are highlighted.

  17. Thermoluminescent dosimeters for low dose X-ray measurements.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S Del Sol; García-Salcedo, R; Sánchez-Guzmán, D; Ramírez-Rodríguez, G; Gaona, E; de León-Alfaro, M A; Rivera-Montalvo, T

    2016-01-01

    The response of TLD-100, CaSO4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P for a range of X-ray low dose was measured. For calibration, the TLDs were arranged at the center of the X-ray field. The dose output of the X-ray machine was determined using an ACCU-Gold. All dosimeters were exposed at the available air kerma values of 14.69 mGy within a field 10×10 cm(2) at 80 cm of SSD. Results of LiF:Mg,Cu,P X-ray irradiated showed 4.8 times higher sensitivity than TLD-100. Meanwhile, TL response of CaSO4:Dy exposed at the same dose was 5.6 time higher than TLD-100. Experimental results show for low dose X-ray measurements a better linearity for LiF:Mg,Cu,P compared with that of TLD-100. CaSO4:Dy showed a linearity from 0.1 to 60 mGy. PMID:26609683

  18. Miniaturized, High-Speed, Modulated X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Kenyon, Steve; Spartana, Nick

    2013-01-01

    A low-cost, miniature x-ray source has been developed that can be modulated in intensity from completely off to full intensity on nanosecond timescales. This modulated x-ray source (MXS) has no filaments and is extremely rugged. The energy level of the MXS is adjustable from 0 to more than 100 keV. It can be used as the core of many new devices, providing the first practical, arbitrarily time-variable source of x-rays. The high-speed switching capability and miniature size make possible many new technologies including x-ray-based communication, compact time-resolved x-ray diffraction, novel x-ray fluorescence instruments, and low- and precise-dose medical x-rays. To make x-rays, the usual method is to accelerate electrons into a target material held at a high potential. When the electrons stop in the target, x-rays are produced with a spectrum that is a function of the target material and the energy to which the electrons are accelerated. Most commonly, the electrons come from a hot filament. In the MXS, the electrons start off as optically driven photoelectrons. The modulation of the x-rays is then tied to the modulation of the light that drives the photoelectron source. Much of the recent development has consisted of creating a photoelectrically-driven electron source that is robust, low in cost, and offers high intensity. For robustness, metal photocathodes were adopted, including aluminum and magnesium. Ultraviolet light from 255- to 350-nm LEDs (light emitting diodes) stimulated the photoemissions from these photocathodes with an efficiency that is maximized at the low-wavelength end (255 nm) to a value of roughly 10(exp -4). The MXS units now have much higher brightness, are much smaller, and are made using a number of commercially available components, making them extremely inexpensive. In the latest MXS design, UV efficiency is addressed by using a high-gain electron multiplier. The photocathode is vapor-deposited onto the input cone of a Burle Magnum

  19. X-ray microtomography at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesher, C. E.; Wang, Y.; Gaudio, S.; Clark, A.; Yamada, A.; Sanehira, T.; Rivers, M.

    2009-05-01

    X-ray microtomography at high pressure is now possible with the rotating anvil apparatus (RAA) on the 13-BM- D beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Lab). The high-pressure X-ray tomography microscope (HPXTM) can be used to determine densities of amorphous materials (glasses and melts) and in situ characterization of 3D microstructure of multiphase materials subject to temperature and shear deformation [1, 2]. Densities may be obtained directly by volume rendering or from X-ray absorption. The rotating anvil apparatus is compressed by a 250-ton hydraulic press between concentric thrust bearings. Toroidal and truncated cylindrical (Drickamer) anvils can be accommodated. The latter anvils perform well up to 11.5 GPa and 1873K, using boron epoxy/diamond epoxy gaskets and X-ray transparent aluminum or polytherimide plastic containment rings. Differential rotation allows for controlled sample deformation. Pressure is determined by energy dispersive diffraction of an internal standard by convenient switching from monochromatic and polychromatic radiation. In-situ calibrations of linear attenuation coefficient permit bracketing of natural basalt density to better than 1 percent relative, while [2] used volume rendering to determine the compressibility of magnesium silicate glasses and supercooled liquid. The utility of the RRA to characterize microstructural evolution will be discussed. [1] Wang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum., 76, 073709, 2005. [2] Lesher et al., PEPI, in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.pepi.2008.10.023, 2009

  20. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy using microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Holt, S. S.; Madejski, G. M.; Moseley, S. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of microcalorimeters for high-resolution, high quantum efficiency, nondispersive X-ray spectroscopy has been demonstrated over the past few years. In this paper, the principles of X-ray calorimetry are reviewed, and the results of ongoing X-ray tests using microcalorimetry are summarized. An approach to building an X-ray calorimeter spectrometer is discussed.

  1. Low dose, limited energy spectroscopic x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson Weker, Johanna; Li, Yiyang; Chueh, William C.

    2015-09-01

    In order to achieve high quality in situ spectroscopic X-ray microscopy of complex systems far from equilibrium, such as lithium ion batteries under standard electrochemical cycling, careful consideration of the total number of energy points is required. Enough energy points are need to accurately determine the per pixel chemical information; however, total radiation dose needs to be limited to avoid damaging the system which would produce misleading results. Here we consider the number of energy points need to accurately reproduce the state of charge maps of a LiFePO2 electrode recorded during electrochemical cycling. We observe very good per pixel agreement using only 13 energy points. Additionally, we find the quality of the agreement is heavily dependent on the number of energy points used in the post edge fit during normalization of the spectra rather than the total number of energies used. Finally, we suggest a straightforward protocol for determining the minimum number of energy points needed prior to initiating any in situ spectroscopic X-ray microscopy experiment.

  2. High-Resolution X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, Stephen L.; Brissenden, Roger J.; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald F.; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terry; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental needs for future x-ray telescopes: a) Sharp images => excellent angular resolution. b) High throughput => large aperture areas. Generation-X optics technical challenges: a) High resolution => precision mirrors & alignment. b) Large apertures => lots of lightweight mirrors. Innovation needed for technical readiness: a) 4 top-level error terms contribute to image size. b) There are approaches to controlling those errors. Innovation needed for manufacturing readiness. Programmatic issues are comparably challenging.

  3. Enhancement of X-ray dose absorption for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Barth, R.

    2013-05-01

    A promising technique for cancer treatment is radiation therapy with high-Z (HZ) nanomoities acting as radio-sensitizers attached to tumor cells and irradiated with X-rays. But the efficacy of radiosenstization is highly energy dependent. We study the physical effects in using platinum (Pt) as the radio-sensitizing agent, coupled with commonly employed broadband x-ray sources with mean energies around 100 keV, as opposed to MeV energies produced by clinical linear accelerators (LINAC) used in radiation therapy. Numerical calculations, in vitro, and in vivo studies of F98 rat glioma (brain cancer) demonstrate that irradiation from a medium energy X-ray (MEX) 160 kV source is far more effective than from a high energy x-ray (HEX) 6 MV LINAC. We define a parameter to quantify photoionization by an x-ray source, which thereby provides a measure of subsequent Auger decays. The platinum (Z = 78) results are also relevant to ongoing studies on x-ray interaction with gold (Z = 79) nanoparticles, widely studied as an HZ contrast agent. The present study should be of additional interest for a combined radiation plus chemotherapy treatment since Pt compounds such cis-Pt and carbo-Pt are commonly used in chemotherapy.

  4. Dose optimization in pediatric cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason, Amber J.; Davies, Andrew G.; Cowen, Arnold R.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to explore x-ray beam parameters with intent to optimize pediatric x-ray settings in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp) and of copper (Cu) x-ray beam filtration independently on the image quality to dose balance for pediatric patient sizes. The impact of antiscatter grid removal on the image quality to dose balance was also investigated. Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate phantoms approximating chest sizes typical of pediatric patients were captured using a modern flat-panel receptor based x-ray imaging system. Tin was used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium used in clinical procedures. Measurements of tin detail contrast and flat field image noise provided the contrast to noise ratio. Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose (E) measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose, which evaluated the dose efficiency of the x-ray parameters investigated. The kVp, tube current (mA), and pulse duration were set manually by overriding the system's automatic dose control mechanisms. Images were captured with 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm added Cu filtration, for 50, 55, 60, 65, and 70 kVp with the antiscatter grid in place, and then with it removed. Results: For a given phantom thickness, as the Cu filter thickness was increased, lower kVp was favored. Examining kVp alone, lower values were generally favored, more so for thinner phantoms. Considering ESD, the 8.5 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration. The 12 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.9 mm Cu, and the 16 cm phantom had highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.4 mm Cu. With regard to E, the 8.5 and 12 cm phantoms had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration, and the 16 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.25 mm Cu. Antiscatter grid removal improved the FOM for a given set of x-ray

  5. Order of magnitude reduction of fluoroscopic x-ray dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Abhinav; Robert, Normand; Machan, Lindsay; Deutsch, Meir; Kisselgoff, David; Babyn, Paul; Rowlands, John A.

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroscopic imaging is critical for diagnostic and image guided therapy. However, fluoroscopic imaging can require significant radiation leading to increased cancer risk and non-stochastic effects such as radiation burns. Our purpose is to reduce the exposure and dose to the patient by an order of magnitude in these procedures by use of the region of interest method. Method and Materials: Region of interest fluoroscopy (ROIF) uses a partial attenuator. The central region of the image has full exposure while the image periphery, there to provide context only, has a reduced exposure rate. ROIF using a static partial attenuator has been shown in our previous studies to reduce the dose area product (DAP) to the patient by at least 2.5 times. Significantly greater reductions in DAP would require improvements in flat panel detectors performance at low x-ray exposures or a different x-ray attenuation strategy. Thus we have investigated a second, dynamic, approach. We have constructed an x-ray shutter system allowing a normal x-ray exposure in the region of interest while reducing the number of x-ray exposures in the periphery through the rapid introduction, positioning and removal of an x-ray attenuating shutter to block radiation only for selected frames. This dynamic approach eliminates the DQE(0) loss associated with the use of static partial attenuator applied to every frame thus permitting a greater reduction in DAP. Results: We have compared the two methods by modeling and determined their fundamental limits.

  6. Dual-gate photo thin-film transistor: a “smart” pixel for high- resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Since its emergence a decade ago, amorphous silicon flat panel X-ray detector has established itself as a ubiquitous platform for an array of digital radiography modalities. The fundamental building block of a flat panel detector is called a pixel. In all current pixel architectures, sensing, storage, and readout are unanimously kept separate, inevitably compromising resolution by increasing pixel size. To address this issue, we hereby propose a “smart” pixel architecture where the aforementioned three components are combined in a single dual-gate photo thin-film transistor (TFT). In other words, the dual-gate photo TFT itself functions as a sensor, a storage capacitor, and a switch concurrently. Additionally, by harnessing the amplification effect of such a thin-film transistor, we for the first time created a single-transistor active pixel sensor. The proof-of-concept device had a W/L ratio of 250μm/20μm and was fabricated using a simple five-mask photolithography process, where a 130nm transparent ITO was used as the top photo gate, and a 200nm amorphous silicon as the absorbing channel layer. The preliminary results demonstrated that the photocurrent had been increased by four orders of magnitude due to light-induced threshold voltage shift in the sub-threshold region. The device sensitivity could be simply tuned by photo gate bias to specifically target low-level light detection. The dependence of threshold voltage on light illumination indicated that a dynamic range of at least 80dB could be achieved. The "smart" pixel technology holds tremendous promise for developing high-resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging and may potentially lower the cancer risk imposed by radiation, especially among paediatric patients.

  7. High-spatial-resolution nanoparticle x-ray fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Jakob C.; Vâgberg, William; Vogt, Carmen; Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence tomography (XFCT) has potential for high-resolution 3D molecular x-ray bio-imaging. In this technique the fluorescence signal from targeted nanoparticles (NPs) is measured, providing information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the NPs inside the object. However, present laboratory XFCT systems typically have limited spatial resolution (>1 mm) and suffer from long scan times and high radiation dose even at high NP concentrations, mainly due to low efficiency and poor signal-to-noise ratio. We have developed a laboratory XFCT system with high spatial resolution (sub-100 μm), low NP concentration and vastly decreased scan times and dose, opening up the possibilities for in-vivo small-animal imaging research. The system consists of a high-brightness liquid-metal-jet microfocus x-ray source, x-ray focusing optics and an energy-resolving photon-counting detector. By using the source's characteristic 24 keV line-emission together with carefully matched molybdenum nanoparticles the Compton background is greatly reduced, increasing the SNR. Each measurement provides information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the Mo nanoparticles. A filtered back-projection method is used to produce the final XFCT image.

  8. An investigation of dose changes for therapeutic kilovoltage x-ray beams with underlying lead shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Robin; Healy, Brendan; Holloway, Lois; Baldock, Clive

    2007-07-15

    Kilovoltage x-ray beams are used to treat cancer on or close to the skin surface. Many clinical cases use high atomic number materials as shielding to reduce dose to underlying healthy tissues. In this work, we have investigated the effect on both the surface dose and depth doses in a water phantom with lead shielding at depth in the phantom. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the water phantom and to calculate the surface doses and depth doses using primary x-ray beam spectra derived from an analytical model. The x-ray beams were in the energy range of 75-135 kVp with field sizes of 2, 5 and 8 cm diameter. The lead sheet was located beneath the water surface at depths ranging from 0.5-7.5 cm. The surface dose decreased as the lead was positioned closer to the water surface and as the field size was increased. The variation in surface dose as a function of x-ray beam energy was only small but the maximum reduction occurred for the 100 kVp x-ray beam. For the 8 cm diameter field with the lead at 1 cm depth and using the 100 kVp x-ray beam, the surface dose was reduced to 0.898 of the surface dose in the water phantom only. Measured surface dose changes, using a Farmer-type ionization chamber, agreed with the Monte Carlo calculated doses. Calculated depth doses in water with a lead sheet positioned below the surface showed that the dose fall-off increased as the lead was positioned closer to the water surface as compared to the depth dose in the water phantom only. Monte Carlo calculations of the total x-ray beam spectrum at the water surface showed that the total fluence decreased due to a reduction in backscatter from within the water and very little backscatter from the lead. The mean energy of the x-ray spectrum varied less than 1 keV, with the lead at 1 cm beneath the water phantom surface. As the Monte Carlo calculations showed good agreement with the measured results, this method can be used to verify surface dose changes in clinical situations

  9. X-ray and radioiodine dose to thyroid follicular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Faw, R.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Radiation doses to the epithelial cells of thyroid follicles have been calculated for internal exposure by radionuclides of iodine and by secondary radiations created as a result of interactions of externally administered x rays with iodine naturally occurring in the thyroid. Calculations were performed for the thyroids of subjects ranging from the newborn to the adult male. Results for internal radionuclides are reported as the dose rate to follicular-cell nuclei per unit specific activity of the radionuclide in the thyroid as a whole, i.e., as the specific S value'' as used in the MIRD method for internal dosimetry. Results for x rays are reported as the response function, i.e., the absorbed dose per unit fluence of primary x rays. Dose rates are subdivided into internal and external components, the former from radiations emitted within the colloid volume of any one follicle, and the latter from radiations emitted throughout the thyroid in follicles surrounding that one follicle. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. The superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars in high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-01

    There exists a special class of X-ray pulsars that exhibit very slow pulsation of P spin > 1000 s in the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). We have studied the temporal and spectral properties of these superslow pulsation neutron star binaries in hard X-ray bands with INTEGRAL observations. Long-term monitoring observations find spin period evolution of two sources: spin-down trend for 4U 2206+54 (P spin ~ 5560 s with Ṗ spin ~ 4.9 × 10-7 s s-1) and long-term spin-up trend for 2S 0114+65 (P spin ~ 9600 s with Ṗ spin ~ -1 × 10-6 s s-1) in the last 20 years. A Be X-ray transient, SXP 1062 (P spin ~ 1062 s), also showed a fast spin-down rate of Ṗ spin ~ 3 × 10-6 s s-1 during an outburst. These superslow pulsation neutron stars cannot be produced in the standard X-ray binary evolution model unless the neutron star has a much stronger surface magnetic field (B > 1014 G). The physical origin of the superslow spin period is still unclear. The possible origin and evolution channels of the superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars are discussed. Superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars could be younger X-ray binary systems, still in the fast evolution phase preceding the final equilibrium state. Alternatively, they could be a new class of neutron star system - accreting magnetars.

  11. Evaluation of the medical exposure doses regarding dental examinations with different X-ray instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Chi; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing; Hsu, Fang-Yuh

    2015-11-01

    Modern dental X-ray examination that consists of traditional form, panorama, and cone-beamed 3D technologies is one of the most frequent diagnostic applications nowadays. This study used the Rando Phantom and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) to measure the absorbed doses of radiosensitive organs recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and whole body effective doses which were delivered due to dental X-ray examination performed with different types of X-ray instrument. Besides, enamel samples which performed reading with Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) procedure were also used to estimate the tooth doses. EPR is a dose reconstruction method of measuring free radicals induced by radiation exposure to the calcified tissue (mainly in the tooth enamel or bone) to evaluate the accepted high dose. The tooth doses estimated by TLD and EPR methods were compared. Relationships between the tooth doses and effective doses by dental X-ray examinations with different types of X-ray equipment were investigated in this work.

  12. Absorbed dose assessment in newborns during x-ray examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taipe, Patricia K.; Berrocal, Mariella J.; Carita, Raúl F.

    2012-02-01

    Often a newborn presents breathing problems during the early days of life, i.e. bronchopneumonia, wich are caused in most of cases, by aspirating a mixture of meconium and amniotic fluid. In these cases, it is necessary to make use of a radiograph, requested by the physician to reach a diagnosis. This paper seeks to evaluate the absorbed doses in neonates undergoing a radiograph. For this reason we try to simulate the real conditions in a X-ray room from Lima hospitals. With this finality we perform a simulation made according a questionnaire related to technical data of X-ray equipment, distance between the source and the neonate, and its position to be irradiated. The information obtained has been used to determine the absorbed dose by infants, using the MCNP code. Finally, the results are compared with reference values of international health agencies.

  13. SU-D-BRF-02: In Situ Verification of Radiation Therapy Dose Distributions From High-Energy X-Rays Using PET Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q; Kai, L; Wang, X; Hua, B; Chui, L; Wang, Q; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the possibility of in situ verification of radiation therapy dose distributions using PET imaging based on the activity distribution of 11C and 15O produced via photonuclear reactions in patient irradiated by 45MV x-rays. Methods: The method is based on the photonuclear reactions in the most elemental composition {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O in body tissues irradiated by bremsstrahlung photons with energies up to 45 MeV, resulting primarily in {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O, which are positron-emitting nuclei. The induced positron activity distributions were obtained with a PET scanner in the same room of a LA45 accelerator (Top Grade Medical, Beijing, China). The experiments were performed with a brain phantom using realistic treatment plans. The phantom was scanned at 20min and 2-5min after irradiation for {sup 11}C and {sup 15}, respectively. The interval between the two scans was 20 minutes. The activity distributions of {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O within the irradiated volume can be separated from each other because the half-life is 20min and 2min for {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O, respectively. Three x-ray energies were used including 10MV, 25MV and 45MV. The radiation dose ranged from 1.0Gy to 10.0Gy per treatment. Results: It was confirmed that no activity was detected at 10 MV beam energy, which was far below the energy threshold for photonuclear reactions. At 25 MV x-ray activity distribution images were observed on PET, which needed much higher radiation dose in order to obtain good quality. For 45 MV photon beams, good quality activation images were obtained with 2-3Gy radiation dose, which is the typical daily dose for radiation therapy. Conclusion: The activity distribution of {sup 15}O and {sup 11}C could be used to derive the dose distribution of 45MV x-rays at the regular daily dose level. This method can potentially be used to verify in situ dose distributions of patients treated on the LA45 accelerator.

  14. Effective dose and risks from medical X-ray procedures.

    PubMed

    Balonov, M I; Shrimpton, P C

    2012-01-01

    The radiation risks from a range of medical x-ray examinations (radiography, fluoroscopy, and computed tomography) were assessed as a function of the age and sex of the patient using risk models described in Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007) and UNSCEAR (2006, Annex A). Such estimates of risk based on typical organ doses were compared with those derived from effective doses using the International Commission on Radiological Protection's nominal risk coefficients. Methodologically similar but not identical dose and risk calculations were performed independently at the Institute of Radiation Hygiene (Russia) and the Health Protection Agency (UK), and led to similar conclusions. The radiogenic risk of stochastic health effects following various x-ray procedures varied significantly with the patient's age and sex, but to differing degrees depending on which body organs were irradiated. In general, the risks of radiation-induced stochastic health effects in children are estimated to be higher (by a factor of ≤ 4) than in adults, and risks in senior patients are lower by a factor of ≥ 10 relative to younger people. If risks are assessed on the basis of effective dose, they are underestimated for children of both sexes by a factor of ≤ 4. This approach overestimates risks by a factor of ≤ 3 for adults and about an order of magnitude for senior patients. The significant sex and age dependence of radiogenic risk for different cancer types is an important consideration for radiologists when planning x-ray examinations. Whereas effective dose was not intended to provide a measure of risk associated with such examinations, it may be sufficient to make simple adjustments to the nominal risk per unit effective dose to account for age and sex differences. PMID:23089012

  15. High speed x-ray beam chopper

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Armon; Mills, Dennis M.

    2002-01-01

    A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

  16. Image quality based x-ray dose control in cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Andrew G.; Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Gislason-Lee, Amber J.

    2015-03-01

    An automated closed-loop dose control system balances the radiation dose delivered to patients and the quality of images produced in cardiac x-ray imaging systems. Using computer simulations, this study compared two designs of automatic x-ray dose control in terms of the radiation dose and quality of images produced. The first design, commonly in x-ray systems today, maintained a constant dose rate at the image receptor. The second design maintained a constant image quality in the output images. A computer model represented patients as a polymethylmetacrylate phantom (which has similar x-ray attenuation to soft tissue), containing a detail representative of an artery filled with contrast medium. The model predicted the entrance surface dose to the phantom and contrast to noise ratio of the detail as an index of image quality. Results showed that for the constant dose control system, phantom dose increased substantially with phantom size (x5 increase between 20 cm and 30 cm thick phantom), yet the image quality decreased by 43% for the same thicknesses. For the constant quality control, phantom dose increased at a greater rate with phantom thickness (>x10 increase between 20 cm and 30 cm phantom). Image quality based dose control could tailor the x-ray output to just achieve the quality required, which would reduce dose to patients where the current dose control produces images of too high quality. However, maintaining higher levels of image quality for large patients would result in a significant dose increase over current practice.

  17. Editorial: Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian; Gruebel, Gerhard; Mochrie, Simon

    2010-03-01

    This editorial serves as the preface to a special issue of New Journal of Physics, which collects together solicited papers on a common subject, x-ray beams with high coherence. We summarize the issue's content, and explain why there is so much current interest both in the sources themselves and in the applications to the study of the structure of matter and its fluctuations (both spontaneous and driven). As this collection demonstrates, the field brings together accelerator physics in the design of new sources, particle physics in the design of detectors, and chemical and materials scientists who make use of the coherent beams produced. Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence Contents Femtosecond pulse x-ray imaging with a large field of view B Pfau, C M Günther, S Schaffert, R Mitzner, B Siemer, S Roling, H Zacharias, O Kutz, I Rudolph, R Treusch and S Eisebitt The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent x-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system and applications E Allaria, C Callegari, D Cocco, W M Fawley, M Kiskinova, C Masciovecchio and F Parmigiani Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium dynamics in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Anders Madsen, Robert L Leheny, Hongyu Guo, Michael Sprung and Orsolya Czakkel The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Sébastien Boutet and Garth J Williams Dynamics and rheology under continuous shear flow studied by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Andrei Fluerasu, Pawel Kwasniewski, Chiara Caronna, Fanny Destremaut, Jean-Baptiste Salmon and Anders Madsen Exploration of crystal strains using coherent x-ray diffraction Wonsuk Cha, Sanghoon Song, Nak Cheon Jeong, Ross Harder, Kyung Byung Yoon, Ian K Robinson and Hyunjung Kim Coherence properties of the European XFEL G Geloni, E Saldin, L Samoylova, E Schneidmiller, H Sinn, Th Tschentscher and M Yurkov Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging: treatment and analysis of data G J

  18. X-ray induced Sm3+ to Sm2+ conversion in fluorophosphate and fluoroaluminate glasses for the monitoring of high-doses in microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahedi, Shahrzad; Okada, Go; Morrell, Brian; Muzar, Edward; Koughia, Cyril; Edgar, Andy; Varoy, Chris; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean; Kasap, Safa

    2012-10-01

    Fluorophosphate and fluoroaluminate glasses doped with trivalent samarium were evaluated as sensors of x-ray radiation for microbeam radiation therapy at the Canadian Light Source using the conversion of trivalent Sm3+ to the divalent form Sm2+. Both types of glasses show similar conversion rates and may be used as a linear sensor up to ˜150 Gy and as a nonlinear sensor up to ˜2400 Gy, where saturation is reached. Experiments with a multi-slit collimator show high spatial resolution of the conversion pattern; the pattern was acquired by a confocal fluorescence microscopy technique. The effects of previous x-ray exposure may be erased by annealing at temperatures exceeding the glass transition temperature Tg while annealing at TA < Tg enhances the Sm conversion. This enhancement is explained by a thermally stimulated relaxation of host glass ionic matrix surrounding x-ray induced Sm2+ ions. In addition, some of the Sm3+-doped glasses were codoped with Eu2+-ions but the results show that there is no marked improvement in the conversion efficiency by the introduction of Eu2+.

  19. The high energy X-ray universe

    PubMed Central

    Giacconi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Since its beginning in the early 1960s, the field of X-ray astronomy has exploded, experiencing a ten-billion-fold increase in sensitivity, which brought it on par with the most advanced facilities at all wavelengths. I will briefly describe the revolutionary first discoveries prior to the launch of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories, present some of the current achievements, and offer some thoughts about the future of this field. PMID:20404148

  20. Medical x-ray exposure doses as contaminants of atomic bomb doses.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, O; Antoku, S; Russell, W J; Fujita, S; Sawada, S

    1988-03-01

    Since 1967 at the times of their biennial ABCC/RERF radiological examinations, all Adult Health Study (AHS) subjects have been interviewed to determine the exposures to medical x-rays they experienced in institutions other than RERF in order to estimate the numbers of examinations and corresponding doses which they received. These data have been stored on computer tapes together with the doses these subjects received during their radiological examinations in the ABCC/RERF Department of Radiology. Thus, their medical x-ray doses are available along with their atomic bomb doses (tentative 1965 doses revised, T65DR) for assessment of the role of ionizing radiation in the development of diseases. The medical x-ray doses incurred at RERF were assessed by means of phantom dosimetry. Those at other institutions were determined using phantom dosimetry data and results of surveys for trends in radiological examinations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. By the end of 1982, the average medical x-ray doses to the active bone marrow were 12.04 mGy for A-bomb exposed groups and 8.92 mGy for control groups (not-in-cities); to the male gonads, 2.26 mGy and 1.89 mGy, respectively; and to the female gonads, 17.45 mGy and 12.58 mGy, respectively. Results for Hiroshima and Nagasaki were similar. The main impact of medical x-ray doses was in the lowest T65DR group. Medical x-ray active bone marrow doses ranged from 0.05-500% (mean, 35%) of A-bomb doses in the 10-99 mGy T65DR group. In the 100-999 mGy T65DR group, medical x-ray active bone marrow doses ranged from 0.005-50% (mean, 5%) of their T65DR. In the greater than 1,000-mGy T65DR group, medical x-ray exposures were proportionally less. Female active bone marrow and gonad doses were similar in magnitude to the male active bone marrow doses. Medical x-ray exposures produced smaller doses to the gonads of males than to those of the females. The use of medical x-rays is steadily increasing. Careful consideration of doses from medical sources

  1. X-ray framing camera for pulsed, high current, electron beam x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Failor, B. H.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Riordan, J. C.; Lojewski, D. Y.

    2007-07-01

    High power x-ray sources built for nuclear weapons effects testing are evolving toward larger overall diameters and smaller anode cathode gaps. We describe a framing camera developed to measure the time-evolution of these 20-50 ns pulsed x-ray sources produced by currents in the 1.5-2.5 MA range and endpoint voltages between 0.2 and 1.5 MV. The camera has up to 4 frames with 5 ns gate widths; the frames are separated by 5 ns. The image data are recorded electronically with a gated intensified CCD camera and the data are available immediately following a shot. A fast plastic scintillator (2.1 ns decay time) converts the x-rays to visible light and, for high sensitivity, a fiber optic imaging bundle carries the light to the CCD input. Examples of image data are shown.

  2. High-resolution x-ray characterization of mosaic crystals for hard x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Claudio; Buffagni, Elisa; Marchini, Laura; Zappettini, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    GaAs, Cu, CdTe, and CdZnTe crystals have been studied as optical elements for lenses for hard x-ray astronomy. High-resolution x-ray diffraction at 8 keV in Bragg geometry and at synchrotron at energies up to 500 keV in Laue geometry has been used. A good agreement was found between the mosaicity evaluated in Bragg geometry at 8 keV with x-ray penetration of the order of few tens of micrometers and that derived at synchrotron in transmission Laue geometry at higher x-ray energies. Mosaicity values in a range between a few to 150 arcsec were found in all the samples but, due to the presence of crystal grains in the cm range, CdTe and CdZnTe crystals were found not suitable. Cu crystals exhibit a mosaicity of the order of several arcmin; they indeed were found to be severely affected by cutting damage which could only be removed with a very deep etching. The full width at half maximum of the diffraction peaks decreased at higher x-ray energies showing that the peak broadening is affected by crystallite size. GaAs crystals grown by Czochralski method showed a mosaic spread up to 30 arcsec and good diffraction efficiency up to energies of 500 keV. The use of thermal treatments as a possible method to increase the mosaic spread was also evaluated.

  3. Dose responses of diamond detectors to monoenergetic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Z.; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Green, S.; Beddoe, A. H.

    2004-01-01

    The characterisation of a detectors response in the kilovoltage range is necessary to understand its response to scattered radiation in the megavoltage range. Scattered radiation is absorbed in the detector by the highly Z-dependent photoelectric process. Measurements of diamond detector response to highly filtered quasi-monoenergetic X-rays and synchrotron-generated monoenergetic photons have been performed revealing effects that relate to the presence of copper and silver used to form electrical contact with the crystal. A three-component model of energy absorption, utilizing tabulated cross-sections for C, Cu and Ag, is proposed and a calculation of phantom scatter factors for diamond detector is given.

  4. High Resolution X-ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster

    2002-01-01

    NAG5-5020 covered a period of 7.5 years during which a great deal of progress was made in x-ray optical techniques under this grant. We survived peer review numerous times during the effort to keep the grant going. In 1994, when the grant started we were actively pursuing the application of spherical mirrors to improving x-ray telescopes. We had found that x-ray detectors were becoming rapidly more sophisticated and affordable, but that x-ray telescopes were only being improved through the intense application of money within the AXAF program. Clearly new techniques for the future were needed. We were successful in developing and testing at the HELSTF facility in New Mexico a four reflection coma-corrected telescope made from spheres. We were able to demonstrate 0.3 arcsecond resolution, almost to the diffraction limit of the system. The community as a whole was, at that time, not particularly interested in looking past AXAF (Chandra) and the effort needed to evolve. Since we had reached the diffraction limit using non-Wolter optics we then decided to see if we could build an x-ray interferometer in the laboratory. In the lab the potential for improved resolution was substantial. If synthetic aperture telescopes could be built in space, then orders of magnitude improvement would become feasible. In 1998 NASA, under the direction of Dr. Nick White of Goddard, started a study to assess the potential and feasibility of x-ray interferometry in space. My work became of central interest to the committee because it indicated that such was possible. In early 1999 we had the breakthrough that allowed us build a practical interferometer. By using flats and hooking up with the Marshall Space Flight Center facilities we were able to demonstrate fringes at 1.25keV on a one millimeter baseline. This actual laboratory demonstration provided the solid proof of concept that NASA needed.

  5. High Resolution X-ray Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster

    2002-01-01

    NAG5-5020 covered a period of 7.5 years during which a great deal of progress was made in x-ray optical techniques under this grant. We survived peer review numerous times during the effort to keep the grant going. In 1994, when the grant started we were actively pursuing the application of spherical mirrors to improving x-ray telescopes. We had found that x-ray detectors were becoming rapidly more sophisticated and affordable, but that x-ray telescopes were only being improved through the intense application of money within the AXAF program. Clearly new techniques for the future were needed. We were successful in developing and testing at the HELSTF facility in New Mexico a four reflection coma-corrected telescope made from spheres. We were able to demonstrate 0.3 arcsecond resolution, almost to the diffraction limit of the system. The community as a whole was, at that time, not particularly interested in looking past AXAF (Chandra) and the effort needed to evolve. Since we had reached the diffraction limit using non-Wolter optics we then decided to see if we could build an x-ray interferometer in the laboratory. In the lab the potential for improved resolution was substantial. If synthetic aperture telescopes could be built in space, then orders of magnitude improvement would become feasible. In 1998 NASA, under the direction of Dr Nick White of Goddard, started a study to assess the potential and feasibility of x-ray interferometry in space. My work became of central interest to the committee because it indicated that such was possible. In early 1999 we had the breakthrough that allowed us build a practical interferometer. By using flats and hooking up with the Marshall Space Flight Center facilities we were able to demonstrate fringes at 1.25keV on a one millimeter baseline. This actual laboratory demonstration provided the solid proof of concept that NASA needed. As the year progressed the future of x-ray astronomy jelled around the Maxim program. Maxim is a

  6. Low-dose performance of wafer-scale CMOS-based X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Willem H.; Peters, Inge M.; Smit, Chiel; Kessener, Yves; Bosiers, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Compared to published amorphous-silicon (TFT) based X-ray detectors, crystalline silicon CMOS-based active-pixel detectors exploit the benefits of low noise, high speed, on-chip integration and featuring offered by CMOS technology. This presentation focuses on the specific advantage of high image quality at very low dose levels. The measurement of very low dose performance parameters like Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) and Noise Equivalent Dose (NED) is a challenge by itself. Second-order effects like defect pixel behavior, temporal and quantization noise effects, dose measurement accuracy and limitation of the x-ray source settings will influence the measurements at very low dose conditions. Using an analytical model to predict the low dose behavior of a detector from parameters extracted from shot-noise limited dose levels is presented. These models can also provide input for a simulation environment for optimizing the performance of future detectors. In this paper, models for predicting NED and the DQE at very low dose are compared to measurements on different CMOS detectors. Their validity for different sensor and optical stack combinations as well as for different x-ray beam conditions was validated.

  7. [High-Performance Active Pixel X-Ray Sensors for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautz, Mark; Suntharalingam, Vyshnavi

    2005-01-01

    The subject grants support development of High-Performance Active Pixel Sensors for X-ray Astronomy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Center for Space Research and at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory. This memo reports our progress in the second year of the project, from April, 2004 through the present.

  8. Repetitive flash x-ray generator operated at low-dose rates for a medical x-ray television system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kei; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1991-04-01

    The fundamental studies for the repetitive flash x-ray generator operated at lowdose rates for a medical x-ray television system are described. This x-ray generator consisted of the following components: a high-voltage power supply, an energy storage condenser of lOOnF, a coaxial cable condenser with a capacity of l000pF, a repetitive impulse switching system, a turbo molecular pump, and an x-ray tube having a cold cathode. The condenser was charged from 40 to 70kV by a power supply, and the electric charges stored in the condenser were discharged repetitively by using a trigger electrode operated by an impulse switching system. The x-ray tube was of the triode-type which was connected to the turbo molecular pump and had a large discharge impedance in order to prevent the damped oscillations of the tube current and voltage. The maximum tube voltage was equivalent to the initial charged voltage, and the peak current was less than 70A. The durations were about 2ps, and the x-ray intensities were less than 1. OpC/kg at 0. 5m per pulse. The repetition frequency was less than 50Hz, and the effective focal spot size was equivalent to the anode diameter of 3. 0mm. For the x-ray television system used in conjunction with this repetitive pulsed x-ray generator, since the electromagnetic noise primarily caused by the high tube current was decreased, noise-free stroboscopic radiography performed by the television system could be realized.

  9. An adaptive gating approach for x-ray dose reduction during cardiac interventional procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Malek, A.; Yassa, F.; Bloomer, J. )

    1994-03-01

    The increasing number of cardiac interventional procedures has resulted in a tremendous increase in the absorbed x-ray dose by radiologists as well as patients. A new method is presented for x-ray dose reduction which utilizes adaptive tube pulse-rate scheduling in pulsed fluoroscopic systems. In the proposed system, pulse-rate scheduling depends on the heart muscle activity phase determined through continuous guided segmentation of the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG). Displaying images generated at the proposed adaptive nonuniform rate is visually unacceptable; therefore, a frame-filling approach is devised to ensure a 30 frame/sec display rate. The authors adopted two approaches for the frame-filling portion of the system depending on the imaging mode used in the procedure. During cine-mode imaging (high x-ray dose), collected image frame-to-frame pixel motion is estimated using a pel-recursive algorithm followed by motion-based pixel interpolation to estimate the frames necessary to increase the rate to 30 frames/sec. The other frame-filling approach is adopted during fluoro-mode imaging (low x-ray dose), characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio images. This approach consists of simply holding the last collected frame for as many frames as necessary to maintain the real-time display rate.

  10. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  11. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  12. Generation of High Brightness X-rays with the PLEIADES Thomson X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LeSage, G P; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M; Rosenzweig, J B; Gibson, D J

    2003-05-28

    The use of short laser pulses to generate high peak intensity, ultra-short x-ray pulses enables exciting new experimental capabilities, such as femtosecond pump-probe experiments used to temporally resolve material structural dynamics on atomic time scales. PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron InterAction for Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) is a next generation Thomson scattering x-ray source being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Ultra-fast picosecond x-rays (10-200 keV) are generated by colliding an energetic electron beam (20-100 MeV) with a high intensity, sub-ps, 800 nm laser pulse. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm2/mrad2. Simulations of the electron beam production, transport, and final focus are presented. Electron beam measurements, including emittance and final focus spot size are also presented and compared to simulation results. Measurements of x-ray production are also reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  13. High resolution x-ray microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, C. K.; Park, H.; Lombardo, L. W.; Piestrup, M. A.; Cremer, J. T.; Pantell, R. H.; Dudchik, Y. I.

    2007-04-30

    The authors present x-ray images of grid meshes and biological material obtained using a microspot x-ray tube with a multilayer optic and a 92-element parabolic compound refractive lens (CRL) made of a plastic containing only hydrogen and carbon. Images obtained using this apparatus are compared with those using an area source with a spherical lens and a spherical lens with multilayer condenser. The authors found the best image quality using the multilayer condenser with a parabolic lens, compared to images with a spherical lens and without the multilayer optics. The resolution was measured using a 155-element parabolic CRL and a multilayer condenser with the microspot tube. The experiment demonstrates about 1.1 {mu}m resolution.

  14. High energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Moncton, D.E.; Fujii

    1984-01-01

    A brief review is presented of various aspects of high energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering based on synchrotron sources. We show what kinematical advantages are provided by the photon probe and propose mirror and monochromator designs to achieve an optically efficient beam line for inelastic x-ray scattering.

  15. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  16. Dictionary learning based low-dose x-ray CT reconstruction using a balancing principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xuanqin; Wu, Junfeng; Bai, Ti; Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    The high utility and wide applicability of x-ray imaging has led to a rapidly increased number of CT scans over the past years, and at the same time an elevated public concern on the potential risk of x-ray radiation to patients. Hence, a hot topic is how to minimize x-ray dose while maintaining the image quality. The low-dose CT strategies include modulation of x-ray flux and minimization of dataset size. However, these methods will produce noisy and insufficient projection data, which represents a great challenge to image reconstruction. Our team has been working to combine statistical iterative methods and advanced image processing techniques, especially dictionary learning, and have produced excellent preliminary results. In this paper, we report recent progress in dictionary learning based low-dose CT reconstruction, and discuss the selection of regularization parameters that are crucial for the algorithmic optimization. The key idea is to use a "balancing principle" based on a model function to choose the regularization parameters during the iterative process, and to determine a weight factor empirically for address the noise level in the projection domain. Numerical and experimental results demonstrate the merits of our proposed reconstruction approach.

  17. The High Energy Astronomy Observatory X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.; Austin, G.; Koch, D.; Jagoda, N.; Kirchner, T.; Dias, R.

    1978-01-01

    The High Energy Astronomy Observatory-Mission B (HEAO-B) is a satellite observatory for the purpose of performing a detailed X-ray survey of the celestial sphere. Measurements will be made of stellar radiation in the range 0.2 through 20 keV. The primary viewing requirement is to provide final aspect solution and internal alignment information to correlate an observed X-ray image with the celestial sphere to within one-and-one-half arc seconds. The Observatory consists of the HEAO Spacecraft together with the X-ray Telescope. The Spacecraft provides the required attitude control and determination system, data telemetry system, space solar power system, and interface with the launch vehicle. The X-ray Telescope includes a high resolution mirror assembly, optical bench metering structure, X-ray detectors, detector positioning system, detector electronics and aspect sensing system.

  18. X-ray characterization of CMOS imaging detector with high resolution for fluoroscopic imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Kim, Cho Rong; Jeon, Seongchae; Kim, Ryun Kyung; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Heo, Duchang; Lee, Tae-Bum; Shin, Min-Seok; Kim, Jong-Boo; Kwon, Oh-Kyung

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS)-based X-ray imaging detectors with high spatial resolution for medical imaging application. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS imaging sensor has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1 Poly 4 Metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 24×96 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 9.6 mm×2.4 mm. The 14.3-bit extend counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. Both thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were used as converters for incident X-rays to visible light photons. The optical property and X-ray imaging characterization such as X-ray to light response as a function of incident X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution and X-ray images of objects were measured under different X-ray energy conditions. The measured results suggest that our developed CMOS-based X-ray imaging detector has the potential for fluoroscopic imaging and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging applications.

  19. Advanced High Brilliance X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Walter M.

    1998-01-01

    The possibility to dramatically increase the efficiency of laboratory based protein structure measurements through the use of polycapillary X-ray optics was investigated. This project initiated April 1, 1993 and concluded December 31, 1996 (including a no cost extension from June 31, 1996). This is a final report of the project. The basis for the project is the ability to collect X-rays from divergent electron bombardment laboratory X-ray sources and redirect them into quasiparallel or convergent (focused) beams. For example, a 0.1 radian (approx. 6 deg) portion of a divergent beam collected by a polycapillary collimator and transformed into a quasiparallel beam of 3 millradian (0.2 deg) could give a gain of 6(exp 2)/0.2(exp 2) x T for the intensity of a diffracted beam from a crystal with a 0.2 deg diffraction width. T is the transmission efficiency of the polycapillary diffraction optic, and for T=0.5, the gain would be 36/0.04 x O.5=45. In practice, the effective collection angle will depend on the source spot size, the input focal length of the optic (usually limited by the source spot-to-window distance on the x-ray tube) and the size of the crystal relative to the output diameter of the optic. The transmission efficiency, T, depends on the characteristics (fractional open area, surface roughness, shape and channel diameter) of the polycapillary optic and is typically in the range 0.2-0.4. These effects could substantially reduce the expected efficiency gain. During the course of this study, the possibility to use a weakly focused beam (0.5 deg convergence) was suggested which could give an additional 10-20 X efficiency gain for small samples . Weakly focused beams from double focusing mirrors are frequently used for macromolecular crystallography studies. Furthermore the crystals are typically oscillated by as much as 2 deg during each X-ray exposure in order to increase the reciprocal space (number of crystal planes) sampled and use of a slightly convergent

  20. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Eric H.; Legros, Mark; Madden, Norm W.; Goulding, Fred; Landis, Don

    1998-01-01

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  1. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  2. Miniaturized High-Speed Modulated X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith C. (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor); Kenyon, Steven J. (Inventor); Spartana, Nick Salvatore (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized high-speed modulated X-ray source (MXS) device and a method for rapidly and arbitrarily varying with time the output X-ray photon intensities and energies. The MXS device includes an ultraviolet emitter that emits ultraviolet light, a photocathode operably coupled to the ultraviolet light-emitting diode that emits electrons, an electron multiplier operably coupled to the photocathode that multiplies incident electrons, and an anode operably coupled to the electron multiplier that is configured to produce X-rays. The method for modulating MXS includes modulating an intensity of an ultraviolet emitter to emit ultraviolet light, generating electrons in response to the ultraviolet light, multiplying the electrons to become more electrons, and producing X-rays by an anode that includes a target material configured to produce X-rays in response to impact of the more electrons.

  3. A ROSAT high resolution x ray image of NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, J.

    1993-01-01

    The soft x ray properties of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 are a crucial test of the 'hidden Seyfert 1' model. It is important to determine whether the soft x rays come from the nucleus, or from a number of other possible regions in the circumnuclear starburst disk. We present preliminary results of a ROSAT HRI observation of NGC 1068 obtained during the verification phase. The fraction of x rays that can be attributed to the nucleus is about 70 percent so the 'soft x ray problem' remains. There is also significant diffuse x ray flux on arcminute scales, which may be related to the 'diffuse ionized medium' seen in optical emission lines, and the highly ionized Fe K(alpha) emission seen by BBXRT.

  4. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with

  5. Small-dose-sensitive X-ray image pixel with HgI2 photoconductor and amorphous oxide thin-film transistor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Chul; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Kim, Jin Sung; Im, Seongil

    2015-01-01

    A new X-ray image sensor is demonstrated with an oxide thin-film transistor backplane and HgI2 sensing material. It displays outstanding image quality under a low X-ray exposure and a low electric field. It is promising as a state-of-the-art device to realize highly resolved images at a low X-ray dose for a variety of medical X-ray imaging applications. PMID:24753443

  6. High-resolution X-ray Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Martynov, V.V.; Platonov, Yu.; Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D.H.

    2004-05-12

    Two new approaches are taken in multilayer fabrication to help bridge the gap in bandwidth between traditional multilayers (1 to 2%) and perfect crystals (0.01%). The first approach is based on creating many layers of low-contrast Al2O3/ B4C materials. The second approach is based on using multilayer structures with a small d-spacing using traditional W/B4C and Mo/B4C materials. With 8 keV x-rays on the Chess A2 beamline, we measured a bandwidth of 0.27% with a reflectivity of 40% and a Darwin width of 17 arc seconds from a 26 A d-spacing multilayer with 800 bi-layers of Al2O3/B4C using the low-contrast approach. On the other hand, the short period approach with a W/B4C multilayer and a 14.8 A d-spacing showed a resolution of 0.5 % and a reflectivity of 58.5%. Two more Mo/B4C samples with d-spacings of 15 A and 20 A showed energy resolutions of 0.25% and 0.52% with corresponding reflectivities of 39% and 66%. Thus we observe that both methods can produce useful x-ray optical components.

  7. Development of high throughput X-ray telescopes for X-ray imaging and dispersive spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the technical approach to the realization of a high throughput Kirkpatrick-Baez X-ray mirror became better defined in terms of construction methodology and factors which affect maximum size. More progress was made than anticipated in the area of automatic figure formation. However, effort to improve the resolution of float glass by simple techniques were not successful. Mirror development, spectroscopy, all sky telescope, and explorer concept studies are discussed.

  8. Construction of an ionization chamber for the measurement of dose of low energy x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Y. B. Alcantara; Jimenez, F. J. Ramirez

    2008-08-11

    We designed and constructed the prototype of an ionization chamber to measure the dose of an X-ray tube with Molybdenum anode. This X-ray tube is located in the Physics department at CINVESTAV and is used for medical physics purposes in the imaging area. The ionization chamber is designed to measure doses on biological samples exposed to X-rays and will be applied in radiation protection studies.

  9. Microbeam X-Ray Standing Wave and High Resolution Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D.H.; Huang, R.; Sirenko, A.

    2004-05-12

    Post-focusing collimating optics are introduced as a tool to condition X-ray microbeams for the use in high-resolution X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques. As an example, a one-bounce imaging capillary and miniature Si(004) channel-cut crystal were used to produce a microbeam with 10 {mu}m size and an ultimate angular resolution of 2.5 arc sec. This beam was used to measure the strain in semiconductor microstructures by using X-ray high resolution diffraction and standing wave techniques to {delta}d/d < 5x10-4.

  10. Resonant Auger Effect at High X-Ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Rohringer, N; Santra, R

    2008-03-27

    The resonant Auger effect of atomic neon exposed to high-intensity x-ray radiation in resonance with the 1s {yields} 3p transition is discussed. High intensity here means that the x-ray peak intensity is sufficient ({approx} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) to induce Rabi oscillations between the neon ground state and the 1s{sup -1}3p ({sup 1}P) state within the relaxation lifetime of the inner-shell vacancy. For the numerical analysis presented, an effective two-level model, including a description of the resonant Auger decay process, is employed. Both coherent and chaotic x-ray pulses are treated. The latter are used to simulate radiation from x-ray free-electron lasers based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission. Observing x-ray-driven atomic population dynamics in the time domain is challenging for chaotic pulse ensembles. A more practical option for experiments using x-ray free-electron lasers is to measure the line profiles in the kinetic energy distribution of the resonant Auger electron. This provides information on both atomic population dynamics and x-ray pulse properties.

  11. Soft X-ray spectral observations of quasars and high X-ray luminosity Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Krolik, J. H.; Holt, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 28 Einstein SSS observations of 15 high X-ray luminosity (L(x) 10 to the 435 power erg/s) quasars and Seyfert type 1 nuclei are presented. The 0.75-4.5 keV spectra are in general well fit by a simple model consisting of a power law plus absorption by cold gas. The averager spectral index alpha is 0.66 + or - .36, consistent with alpha for the spectrum of these objects above 2 keV. In all but one case, no evidence was found for intrinsic absorption, with an upper limit of 2 x 10 to the 21st power/sq cm. Neither was evidence found for partial covering of the active nucleus by dense, cold matter (N(H) 10 to the 22nd power/sq cm; the average upper limit on the partial covering fraction is 0.5. There is no obvious correlation between spectral index and 0175-4.5 keV X-ray luminosity (which ranges from 3 x 10 to the 43rd to 47th powers erg/s or with other source properties. The lack of intrinsic X-ray absorption allows us to place constraints on the density and temperature of the broad-line emission region, and narrow line emission region, and the intergalactic medium.

  12. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The physical processes occurring in plasma focus devices were investigated with particular emphasis on X-ray emission. Topics discussed include: trajectories of high energy electrons; detection of ion trajectories; spatial distribution of neutron emission; space and time resolved emission of hard X-rays from a plasma focus; the staged plasma focus as a variation of the hypocloidal pinch; formation of current sheets in a staged plasma focus; and X-ray and neutron emission from a staged plasma focus. The possibility of operating dense plasma-focus type devices in multiple arrays beyond the scaling law for a single gun is discussed.

  13. Patient and staff doses for some complex x-ray examinations.

    PubMed

    Olgar, T; Bor, D; Berkmen, G; Yazar, T

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure patient and staff doses simultaneously for some complex x-ray examinations. Measurements of dose-area product (DAP) and entrance skin dose (ESD) were carried out in a sample of 107 adult patients who underwent different x-ray examinations such as double contrast barium enema (DCBE), single contrast barium enema (SCBE), barium swallow, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), and various orthopaedic surgical procedures. Dose measurements were made separately for each projection, and DAP, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD), film dosimetry and tube output measurement techniques were used. Staff doses were measured simultaneously with patient doses for these examinations, with the exception of barium procedures. The measured mean DAP values were found to be 8.33, 90.24, 79.96 Gy cm(2) for barium swallow, SCBE and DCBE procedures with the fluoroscopy times of 3.1, 4.43 and 5.86 min, respectively. The calculated mean DAP was 26.33 Gy cm(2) for diagnostic and 89.76 Gy cm(2) therapeutic ERCP examinations with the average fluoroscopy times of 1.9 and 5.06 min respectively. Similarly, the calculated mean DAP was 97.53 Gy cm(2) with a corresponding fluoroscopy time of 6.1 min for PTC studies. The calculated mean entrance skin dose (ESD) was 172 mGy for the orthopaedic surgical studies. Maximum skin doses were measured as 324, 891, 1218, 750, 819 and 1397 mGy for barium swallow, SCBE, DCBE, ERCP, PTC and orthopaedic surgical procedures, respectively. The high number of radiographs taken during barium enema examinations, and the high x-ray outputs of the fluoroscopic units used in ERCP, were the main reasons for high doses, and some corrective actions were immediately taken. PMID:19690354

  14. Low dose hard x-ray contact microscopy assisted by a photoelectric conversion layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gomella, Andrew; Martin, Eric W.; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wen, Han; Morgan, Nicole Y.

    2013-04-15

    Hard x-ray contact microscopy provides images of dense samples at resolutions of tens of nanometers. However, the required beam intensity can only be delivered by synchrotron sources. We report on the use of a gold photoelectric conversion layer to lower the exposure dose by a factor of 40 to 50, allowing hard x-ray contact microscopy to be performed with a compact x-ray tube. We demonstrate the method in imaging the transmission pattern of a type of hard x-ray grating that cannot be fitted into conventional x-ray microscopes due to its size and shape. Generally the method is easy to implement and can record images of samples in the hard x-ray region over a large area in a single exposure, without some of the geometric constraints associated with x-ray microscopes based on zone-plate or other magnifying optics.

  15. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    The physical processes occurring in plasma focus devices were studied. These devices produce dense high temperature plasmas, which emit X rays of hundreds of KeV energy and one to ten billion neutrons per pulse. The processes in the devices seem related to solar flare phenomena, and would also be of interest for controlled thermonuclear fusion applications. The high intensity, short duration bursts of X rays and neutrons could also possibly be used for pumping nuclear lasers.

  16. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements.

    PubMed

    Seidler, G T; Mortensen, D R; Remesnik, A J; Pacold, J I; Ball, N A; Barry, N; Styczinski, M; Hoidn, O R

    2014-11-01

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ∼5 keV to ∼10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10(6)-10(7) photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species. PMID:25430123

  17. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Seidler, G. T. Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-15

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ∼5 keV to ∼10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  18. The Radiation Dose Determination of the Pulsed X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I.; Stuchebrov, S.; Zhaksybayeva, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the radiation dose measurement technique of the pulsed X-ray source RAP-160-5 is described. The dose rate measurement results from the pulsed X-ray beams at the different distance between the pulsed X-ray source focus and the detector obtained with the help of the thermoluminescent detectors DTL-02, the universal dosimeter UNIDOS E equipped with the plane-parallel ionization chamber type 23342, the dosimeter-radiometer DKS-96 and the radiation dosimeter AT 1123 are demonstrated. The recommendations for the dosimetry measurements of the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 under different radiation conditions are proposed.

  19. Broadband high-resolution X-ray frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaletto, Stefano M.; Harman, Zoltán; Ott, Christian; Buth, Christian; Pfeifer, Thomas; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2014-07-01

    Optical frequency combs have had a remarkable impact on precision spectroscopy. Enabling this technology in the X-ray domain is expected to result in wide-ranging applications, such as stringent tests of astrophysical models and quantum electrodynamics, a more sensitive search for the variability of fundamental constants, and precision studies of nuclear structure. Ultraprecise X-ray atomic clocks may also be envisaged. In this work, an X-ray pulse-shaping method is proposed to generate a comb in the absorption spectrum of an ultrashort high-frequency pulse. The method employs an optical-frequency-comb laser, manipulating the system's dipole response to imprint a comb on an excited transition with a high photon energy. The described scheme provides higher comb frequencies and requires lower optical-comb peak intensities than currently explored methods, preserves the overall width of the optical comb, and may be implemented using currently available X-ray technology.

  20. Low dose digital X-ray imaging with avalanche amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Léveillé, Sébastien; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Active Matrix Flat Panel Imagers (AMFPI) based on an array of thin film transistors (TFT) have become the dominant technology for digital x-ray imaging. In low dose applications, the performance of both direct and indirect conversion detectors are limited by the electronic noise associated with the TFT array. New concepts of direct and indirect detectors have been proposed using avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se), referred to as high gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP). The indirect detector utilizes a planar layer of HARP to detect light from an x-ray scintillator and amplify the photogenerated charge. The direct detector utilizes separate interaction (non-avalanche) and amplification (avalanche) regions within the a-Se to achieve depth-independent signal gain. Both detectors require the development of large area, solid state HARP. We have previously reported the first avalanche gain in a-Se with deposition techniques scalable to large area detectors. The goal of the present work is to demonstrate the feasibility of large area HARP fabrication in an a-Se deposition facility established for commercial large area AMFPI. We also examine the effect of alternative pixel electrode materials on avalanche gain. The results show that avalanche gain > 50 is achievable in the HARP layers developed in large area coaters, which is sufficient to achieve x-ray quantum noise limited performance down to a single x-ray photon per pixel. Both chromium (Cr) and indium tin oxide (ITO) have been successfully tested as pixel electrodes.

  1. Chandra X-Ray Observatory High Resolution Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph shows the mirrors of the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), being assembled in the Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, New York. The AXAF was renamed CXO in 1999. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It observes x-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as hot gas in the remnants of exploded stars. The HRMA, the heart of the telescope system, is contained in the cylindrical 'telescope' portion of the observatory. Since high-energy x-rays would penetrate a normal mirror, special cylindrical mirrors were created. The two sets of four nested mirrors resemble tubes within tubes. Incoming x-rays graze off the highly polished mirror surface and are furneled to the instrument section for detection and study. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission.

  2. High performance x-ray anti-scatter grid

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1995-01-01

    An x-ray anti-scatter grid for x-ray imaging, particularly for screening mammography, and method for fabricating same, x-rays incident along a direct path pass through a grid composed of a plurality of parallel or crossed openings, microchannels, grooves, or slots etched in a substrate, such as silicon, having the walls of the microchannels or slots coated with a high opacity material, such as gold, while x-rays incident at angels with respect to the slots of the grid, arising from scatter, are blocked. The thickness of the substrate is dependent on the specific application of the grid, whereby a substrate of the grid for mammography would be thinner than one for chest radiology. Instead of coating the walls of the slots, such could be filed with an appropriate liquid, such as mercury.

  3. High performance x-ray anti-scatter grid

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1995-05-23

    Disclosed are an x-ray anti-scatter grid for x-ray imaging, particularly for screening mammography, and method for fabricating same, x-rays incident along a direct path pass through a grid composed of a plurality of parallel or crossed openings, microchannels, grooves, or slots etched in a substrate, such as silicon, having the walls of the microchannels or slots coated with a high opacity material, such as gold, while x-rays incident at angels with respect to the slots of the grid, arising from scatter, are blocked. The thickness of the substrate is dependent on the specific application of the grid, whereby a substrate of the grid for mammography would be thinner than one for chest radiology. Instead of coating the walls of the slots, such could be filed with an appropriate liquid, such as mercury. 4 Figs.

  4. Towards high-resolution ptychographic x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko

    2011-06-01

    Ptychographic x-ray diffraction microscopy is a lensless imaging technique with a large field of view and high spatial resolution, which is also useful for characterizing the wavefront of an x-ray probe. The performance of this technique is degraded by positioning errors due to the drift between the sample and illumination optics. We propose an experimental approach for correcting the positioning errors and demonstrate success by two-dimensionally reconstructing both the wavefront of the focused x-ray beam and the complex transmissivity of the weakly scattering objects at the pixel resolution of better than 10 nm in the field of view larger than 5 {mu}m. This method is applicable to not only the observation of organelles inside cells or nano-mesoscale structures buried within bulk materials but also the characterization of probe for single-shot imaging with x-ray free electron lasers.

  5. Progress in high-resolution x-ray holographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Howells, M.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.

    1987-07-01

    Among the various types of x-ray microscopes that have been demonstrated, the holographic microscope has had the largest gap between promise and performance. The difficulties of fabricating x-ray optical elements have led some to view holography as the most attractive method for obtaining the ultimate in high resolution x-ray micrographs; however, we know of no investigations prior to 1987 that clearly demonstrated submicron resolution in reconstructed images. Previous efforts suffered from problems such as limited resolution and dynamic range in the recording media, low coherent x-ray flux, and aberrations and diffraction limits in visible light reconstruction. We have addressed the recording limitations through the use of an undulator x-ray source and high-resolution photoresist recording media. For improved results in the readout and reconstruction steps, we have employed metal shadowing and transmission electron microscopy, along with numerical reconstruction techniques. We believe that this approach will allow holography to emerge as a practical method of high-resolution x-ray microscopy. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  6. High Resolution X-Ray Explorer (HIREX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1999-01-01

    SAO has carried out a study to determine the feasibility of building an orbiting telescope capable of resolving 7 km structure on the Sun. In order to achieve the required imaging the telescope must have a resolution 0.01 arcsec. This fact challenges the state of the art of orbiting telescopes in several areas: mirror figuring; optical metrology; optical mounting; mirror figure control; system alignment; optical stability; observatory pointing; and image stability image stability. The telescope design concept is based on a 0.6m Cassegrain-style telescope with a 240 meter effective focal length. This is achieved with 2 mirrors supported at opposite ends of a 27 m space-deployable boom. The telescope mirrors are coated with multilayers designed to reflect a broad XUV passband. A third, small mirror, near the focal plane performs the function of selecting the narrow band that is finally imaged. Image stabilization to the 0.005 a,rcsec level is achieved by active control of the secondary mirror. The primary mirror is held unadjustably to the spacecraft, its pointing set by the space- craft orientation. The secondary mirror is mounted on a 6-axis stage that permits its position to be changed to align the telescope in space. The stage is intended for intermittent adjustment, both because of its speed of travel, and the TBD alignment procedure. The third mirror is called the TXI (Tuneable X-ray Imager). It is mounted on a gimbal that permits it to be tipped over a 60 degree range, selecting between the individual wavelengths in the initial bandpass. It can also rotated completely out of the way to allow the full, broadband EUV flux to strike the focal plane.

  7. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating

  8. The High Energy X-ray Imager Technology (HEXITEC) for Solar Hard X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Excessively over-sampling the PSF will increase readout noise and require more processing with no appreciable increase in image quality. An appropriate level of over-sampling is to have 3 pixels within the HPD. For current high resolution X-ray mirrors, the HPD is about 25 arcsec. Over a 6-m focal length this converts to 750 µm, the optimum pixel size is around 250 µm. Annother requirement are that the detectors must also have high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power requirements, and low sensitivity to radiation damage. For solar observations, the ability to handle high counting rates is also extremely desirable. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK has been developing the electronics for such a detector. Dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology, this Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), to create a fine (250 µm pitch) HXR detector. The NASA Marshall Space Flight CenterMSFC and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been working with RAL over the past few years to develop these detectors to be used with HXR focusing telescopes. We present on recent results and capabilities as applied to solar observations.

  9. Superiority of Low Energy 160 KV X-Rays Compared to High Energy 6 MV X-Rays in Heavy Element Radiosensitization for Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Barth, Rolf F.; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J.; Palmer, Alycia; Turro, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    High energy X-rays in the MeV range are generally employed in conventional radiation therapy from linear accelerators (LINAC) to ensure sufficient penetration depths. However, lower energy X-rays in the keV range may be more effective when coupled with heavy element (high-Z or HZ) radiosensitizers. Numerical simulations of X-ray energy deposition for tumor phantoms sensitized with HZ radiosensitizers were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The results showed enhancement in energy deposition to radiosensitized phantoms relative to unsensitized phantoms for low energy X-rays in the keV range. In contrast, minimal enhancement was seen using high energy X-rays in the MeV range. Dose enhancement factors (DEFs) were computed and showed radiosensitization only in the low energy range < 200 keV, far lower than the energy of the majority of photons in the LINAC energy range. In vitro studies were carried to demonstrate the tumoricidal effects of HZ sensitized F98 rat glioma cells following irradiation with both low energy 160 kV and high energy 6 MV X-ray sources. The platinum compound, pyridine terpyridine Pt(II) nitrate, was initially used because it was 7x less toxic that an equivalent amount of carboplatin in vitro studies. This would allow us to separate the radiotoxic and the chemotoxic effects of HZ sensitizers. Results from this study showed a 10-fold dose dependent reduction in surviving fractions (SF) of radiosensitized cells treated with low energy 160 kV X-rays compared to those treated with 6 MV X-rays. This is in agreement with our simulations that show an increase in dose deposition in radiosensitized tumors for low energy X-rays. Due to unforeen in vivo toxicity, however, another in vitro study was performed using the commonly used, Pt-based chemotherapeutic drug carboplatin which confirmed earlier results. This lays the ground work for a planned in vivo study using F98 glioma bearing rats. This study demonstrates that while high energy X-rays are

  10. Tentative study on high-photon-energy quasi-x-ray laser generator by forming plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Ichimaru, Toshio; Mori, Hidezo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Sakamaki, Kimio; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    2001-04-01

    Tentative study on high-photon-energy quasi-x-ray-laser generator by forming plasma x-ray source is described. The generator employs a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line, a high-voltage condenser with a capacity of about 200 nF, a turbo-molecular pump, a thyristor pulse generator as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser is charged up to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The flash x-rays are then produced. The x-ray tube is of a demountable triode that is connected to the turbo molecular pump with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. As the electron flows from the cathode electrode are roughly converged to the copper target by the electric field in the tube, the plasma x- ray source, which consists of metal ions and electrons, forms by the target evaporating. Both the tube voltage and current displayed damped oscillations, and their peak values increased according to increases in the charging voltage. In the present work, the peak tube voltage was much higher than the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. When the charging voltage was increased, the plasma x-ray source formed, and the characteristic x-ray intensities of K-series lines increased. When the plate target was employed, we observed high-intensity characteristic x-rays from the axial direction of the linear plasma x-ray source. In the case where the rod target was employed, we detected higher-intensity characteristic x-rays.

  11. Biphasic and triphasic dose responses in zebrafish embryos to low-dose 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Eva Yi; Cheng, Shuk Han; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo low-dose responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness were examined through the number of apoptotic events revealed at 24 h post fertilization by vital dye acridine orange staining. Our results suggested that a triphasic dose response was likely a common phenomenon in living organisms irradiated by X-rays, which comprised an ultra-low-dose inhibition, low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition. Our results also suggested that the hormetic zone (or the stimulation zone) was shifted towards lower doses with application of filters. The non-detection of a triphasic dose response in previous experiments could likely be attributed to the use of hard X-rays, which shifted the hormetic zone into an unmonitored ultra-low-dose region. In such cases where the subhormetic zone was missed, a biphasic dose response would be reported instead. PMID:26951078

  12. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis. PMID:26979685

  13. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-01

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  14. Simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of GX 339-4 in an X-ray high state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makishima, K.; Mitsuda, K.; Maejima, Y.; Bradt, H. V.; Remillard, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Optical emission, soft X-rays, and hard X-rays have been observed simultaneously from the black hole candidate GX 3339-4 in a typical high state. Each of these components is interpreted as arising from a characteristic region of the accretion disk. Considered as a black hole, GX 339-4 lacks the variable 2 keV blackbody component that would be emitted from the 'solid' surface of a neutron star in the low-mass neutron star binaries. The X-ray emission in the high state is therefore extremely soft and stable in time. The intermediate disk region is optically thick and geometrically thin. The observed soft X-ray component with a 'disk blackbody' spectrum comes from this region. The innermost disk region is dynamically unstable due to the effect of general relativity and possibly due to radiation pressure. This region is responsible for the generation of the hard X-ray tail through Comptonization.

  15. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility high resolution camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen S.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the X-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft X-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15th ergs/sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  16. The Astro-E High Resolution X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Audley, Michael D.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Breon, Susan R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Gendreau, Keith C.; Holt, Stephen S.; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; McCammon, Dan; Mihara, Tatehiro

    1999-01-01

    The Astro-E High Resolution X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) was developed jointly by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Japan. The instrument is based on a new approach to spectroscopy, the X-ray microcalorimeter. This device senses the energies of individual X-ray photons as heat with extreme precision. A 32 channel array of microcalorimeters is being employed, each with an energy resolution of about 12 eV at 6 keV (the Fe-K region). This will provide spectral resolving power 10 times higher than any other non-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The instrument incorporates a three stage cooling system capable of operating the array at 60 mK for about two years in orbit. The array sits at the focus of a grazing incidence conical mirror. The quantum efficiency of the microcalorimeters and the reflectivity of the X-ray mirror system combine to give high throughput over the 0.3-12 keV energy band. This new capability will enable the study of a wide range of high-energy astrophysical sources with unprecedented spectral sensitivity. This paper presents the basic design requirements and implementation of the XRS, and also describes the instrument parameters and performance.

  17. Effects of High-Energy X-Ray Radiation on MoS2 FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Amritesh; Thoutam, Laxman; Zhang, Wei; Kovi, Kiran; Banerjee, Sanjay; Das, Saptarshi

    FETs based on semiconducting MoS2 nanosheets are currently being extensively explored for various nanoelectronic device applications. In real-life, several of these applications mandate the exposure of devices to X-ray radiation. In this study, we investigate the effects of high-energy X-ray radiation on few-layer MoS2 transistors. Back-gated MoS2 FETs on SiO2 substrates were fabricated and exposed to X-ray radiation in an enclosed X-ray tube utilizing tungsten as the X-ray source. The devices were exposed to successive radiation doses up to a cumulative dose of 1500 kilorads (Krads). Even after high radiation doses, the devices maintained acceptable electrical performance with high ION/IOFF ratios and good current saturation. The subthreshold swing remained similar to initial values. There was, however, a slight reduction in the ON-currents after each successive radiation, concomitant with a positive threshold voltage shift that can be attributed to the formation of negative-fixed charges in the substrate. Moreover, the maximum transconductance (gm) of the devices decreased slightly with increasing radiation dose. Finally, Raman spectroscopy revealed practically no change in the in-plane and out-of-plane Raman modes of MoS2 after radiation.

  18. ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, R.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Woods, M.; Xia, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-03-21

    Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

  19. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore » freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  20. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  1. High resolution collimator system for X-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Cain, Dallas E.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution in an X-ray computerized tomography (CT) inspection system is achieved by using a collimator/detector combination to limit the beam width of the X-ray beam incident on a detector element to the desired resolution width. In a detector such as a high pressure Xenon detector array, a narrow tapered collimator is provided above a wide detector element. The collimator slits have any desired width, as small as a few mils at the top, the slit width is easily controlled, and they are fabricated on standard machines. The slit length determines the slice thickness of the CT image.

  2. High intensity line source for x-ray spectrometer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Thoe, R.S.

    1986-06-01

    A high intensity electron-impact x-ray source using a one-dimensional Pierce lens has been built for the purpose of calibrating a bent crystal x-ray spectrometer. This source focuses up to 100 mA of 20-keV electrons to a line on a liquid-cooled anode. The line (which can serve as a virtual slit for the spectrometer) measures approximately 800 ..mu.. x 2 cm. The source is portable and therefore adaptable to numerous types of spectrometer applications. One particular application, the calibration of a high resolution (r = 10/sup 4/) time-resolved cyrstal spectrometer, will be discussed in detail.

  3. Compressed-sensing (CS)-based 3D image reconstruction in cone-beam CT (CBCT) for low-dose, high-quality dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Cho, H. S.; Hong, D. K.; Je, U. K.; Oh, J. E.; Park, Y. O.; Lee, S. H.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.

    2013-09-01

    The most popular reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is based on the computationally-inexpensive filtered-backprojection (FBP) method. However, that method usually requires dense projections over the Nyquist samplings, which imposes severe restrictions on the imaging doses. Moreover, the algorithm tends to produce cone-beam artifacts as the cone angle is increased. Several variants of the FBP-based algorithm have been developed to overcome these difficulties, but problems with the cone-beam reconstruction still remain. In this study, we considered a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm for low-dose, high-quality dental CBCT images that exploited the sparsity of images with substantially high accuracy. We implemented the algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. CBCT images of high quality were successfully reconstructed by using the built-in CS-based algorithm, and the image qualities were evaluated quantitatively in terms of the universal-quality index (UQI) and the slice-profile quality index (SPQI).We expect the reconstruction algorithm developed in the work to be applicable to current dental CBCT systems, to reduce imaging doses, and to improve the image quality further.

  4. 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT vs chest X-ray

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray.

  5. High speed hydraulic scanner for deep x-ray lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, J.C.; Johnson, E.D.

    1997-07-01

    From their research and development in hard x-ray lithography, the authors have found that the conventional leadscrew driven scanner stages do not provide adequate scan speed or travel. These considerations have led the authors to develop a scanning system based on a long stroke hydraulic drive with 635 mm of travel and closed loop feedback to position the stage to better than 100 micrometers. The control of the device is through a PC with a custom LabView interface coupled to simple x-ray beam diagnostics. This configuration allows one to set a variety of scan parameters, including target dose, scan range, scan rates, and dose rate. Results from the prototype system at beamline X-27B are described as well as progress on a production version for the X-14B beamline.

  6. X-ray lasers and high-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The improved reliability, high brightness, and short wavelength of x-ray lasers make them ideally suited for studying large, high-density plasmas of interest to the laser-fusion research community. We have been developing the neonlike yttrium x-ray laser as a probe, together with the necessary multilayer mirrors and beam splitters, to image plasmas produced at the Nova laser facility and to measure electron density. With its short-wavelength (15.5-nm) light, we can use the yttrium x-ray laser to probe plasma densities up to 10{sup 23} cm{sup {minus}3}. At the highest magnification (30?), the spatial resolution of our imaging system is better than 1 {mu}m. Using the technique of moire deflectometry, we have measured density gradients of plasmas. Using the technique of interferometry, we have probed 3-mm-long plasmas with electron densities up to 3? 10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}. Temporal blurring of plasma images remains the main limitation of our approach. Thus, we are continuing to improve our theoretical and experimental understanding of laboratory x-ray lasers. We are currently working on techniques to reduce the blurring of images by shortening the x-ray laser pulse to durations approaching about 20 ps. In the future, this important research tool can be applied to study high-density plasmas produced at the proposed National Ignition Facility. Other important applications of the x-ray laser include biological imaging of whole, live cells and other structures at resolutions superior to those obtainable by conventional optical microscopy.

  7. X-ray radiography with highly charged ions

    DOEpatents

    Marrs, Roscoe E.

    2000-01-01

    An extremely small (1-250 micron FWHM) beam of slow highly charged ions deexciting on an x-ray production target generates x-ray monochromatic radiation that is passed through a specimen and detected for imaging. The resolution of the x-ray radiograms is improved and such detection is achieved with relatively low dosages of radiation passing through the specimen. An apparatus containing an electron beam ion trap (and modifications thereof) equipped with a focusing column serves as a source of ions that generate radiation projected onto an image detector. Electronic and other detectors are able to detect an increased amount of radiation per pixel than achieved by previous methods and apparati.

  8. Highly porous nanoberyllium for X-ray beam speckle suppression.

    PubMed

    Goikhman, Alexander; Lyatun, Ivan; Ershov, Petr; Snigireva, Irina; Wojda, Pawel; Gorlevsky, Vladimir; Semenov, Alexander; Sheverdyaev, Maksim; Koletskiy, Viktor; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports a special device called a `speckle suppressor', which contains a highly porous nanoberyllium plate squeezed between two beryllium windows. The insertion of the speckle suppressor in an X-ray beam allows manipulation of the spatial coherence length, thus changing the effective source size and removing the undesirable speckle structure in X-ray imaging experiments almost without beam attenuation. The absorption of the nanoberyllium plate is below 1% for 1 mm thickness at 12 keV. The speckle suppressor was tested on the ID06 ESRF beamline with X-rays in the energy range from 9 to 15 keV. It was applied for the transformation of the phase-amplitude contrast to the pure amplitude contrast in full-field microscopy. PMID:25931099

  9. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T.

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  10. High-Transmission Planar X-Ray Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Salditt, T.; Krueger, S. P.; Fuhse, C.; Baehtz, C.

    2008-05-09

    We have studied the propagation of hard x rays in a planar x-ray waveguide with a sub-20 nm guiding layer. To optimize the transmission and to minimize absorption losses, a novel waveguide design based on a two-component cladding was implemented. Optimized transmission is achieved by placing an appropriate interlayer between the cladding and the guiding core. The experimental results along with simulations of field propagation show that high transmission values can be obtained in waveguide optics at parameters relevant for x-ray imaging. These are small beam diameters below 20 nm and the relatively long guiding length necessary for efficient blocking of multi-keV photon energy beams.

  11. Radiation processing with high-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Stichelbaut, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    The radiation processing of materials and commercial products with high-energy X-rays, which are also identified by the German term bremsstrahlung, can produce beneficial changes that are similar to those obtained by irradiation with nuclear gamma rays emitted by cobalt-60 sources. Both X-rays and gamma rays are electromagnetic radiations with short wavelengths and high photon energies that can stimulate chemical reactions by creating ions and free radicals in irradiated materials. Nevertheless, there are some physical differences in these energy sources that can influence the choice for practical applications. The English translation of bremsstrahlung is braking radiatiorn or deceleration radiation. It is produced when energetic electrons are deflected by the strong electric field near an atomic nucleus. The efficiency for producing this kind of electromagnetic energy increases with the kinetic energy of the electrons and the atomic number of the target material. The energy spectrum of the emitted X-ray photons is very broad and extends up to the maximum energy of the incident electrons. In contrast, a cobalt-60 nucleus emits two gamma rays simultaneously, which have well-defined energies. Another significant difference is the angular distribution of the radiation. Nuclear gamma rays are emitted in all directions, but high-energy bremsstrahlung photons are concentrated in the direction of the incident electrons when they strike the target material. This property enables an X-ray processing facility to be more compact than a gamma-ray processing facility with similar throughput capacity, and it increases the penetration and the efficiency for absorbing the emitted X-ray energy in the irradiated material. Recent increases in the electron energy and the electron beam power from modern industrial accelerators have increased the throughput rates in X-ray processing facilities, so that this irradiation method is now economically competitive with large cobalt-60

  12. Measurement of effects of nasal and facial shields on delivered radiation dose for superficial x-ray treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peter K. N.; Butson, Martin J.

    2013-03-01

    Kilovoltage x-ray beams are used for the treatment of facial cancers when located on the patient's skin or subcutaneous tissue. This is of course due to the sharp depth dose characteristics of these beams delivering much lower doses at depth, than high energy x-ray beams. When treatment is performed, lead shields are often used within the nasal passage, or behind the lips and ears. These shields affect the backscattering patterns of the x-ray beams producing perturbations to upstream dose thus reducing delivered dose to the tumour. Experimental results using radiochromic films have shown that up to 10.5% ± 1.9% reduction in tumour dose can occur for field sizes less than 5 cm circle diameter for x-ray beams of 50 to 150 kVp. These results were confirmed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo techniques. Clinically more than 70% of treatments used fields of diameters less than 3 cm where the reductions were up to 6% ± 1.3%. Using a 1 cm diameter field, which can be used for skin cancer treatment on the nose, reductions up to 2.5% ± 1.3% were seen. Thus corrections need to be applied for dose calculations when underlying lead shields are used clinically in kilovoltage x-rays. The size of the reduction was also found to be dependent on the depth of the shield which will normally clinically vary from approximately 0.5 cm for nasal shields or behind eye lobes and up to approximately 1 cm for lips or cheek areas. We recommend that clinics utilize data for corrections to delivered dose in kilovoltage x-ray beams when lead shields are used in nasal passages, behind lips or behind ears for dose reduction. This can be easily and accurately measured with EBT2 Gafchromic film.

  13. Measurement of effects of nasal and facial shields on delivered radiation dose for superficial x-ray treatments.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter K N; Butson, Martin J

    2013-03-01

    Kilovoltage x-ray beams are used for the treatment of facial cancers when located on the patient's skin or subcutaneous tissue. This is of course due to the sharp depth dose characteristics of these beams delivering much lower doses at depth, than high energy x-ray beams. When treatment is performed, lead shields are often used within the nasal passage, or behind the lips and ears. These shields affect the backscattering patterns of the x-ray beams producing perturbations to upstream dose thus reducing delivered dose to the tumour. Experimental results using radiochromic films have shown that up to 10.5% ± 1.9% reduction in tumour dose can occur for field sizes less than 5 cm circle diameter for x-ray beams of 50 to 150 kVp. These results were confirmed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo techniques. Clinically more than 70% of treatments used fields of diameters less than 3 cm where the reductions were up to 6% ± 1.3%. Using a 1 cm diameter field, which can be used for skin cancer treatment on the nose, reductions up to 2.5% ± 1.3% were seen. Thus corrections need to be applied for dose calculations when underlying lead shields are used clinically in kilovoltage x-rays. The size of the reduction was also found to be dependent on the depth of the shield which will normally clinically vary from approximately 0.5 cm for nasal shields or behind eye lobes and up to approximately 1 cm for lips or cheek areas. We recommend that clinics utilize data for corrections to delivered dose in kilovoltage x-ray beams when lead shields are used in nasal passages, behind lips or behind ears for dose reduction. This can be easily and accurately measured with EBT2 Gafchromic film. PMID:23422253

  14. Dosimetry of Microdistributed Dose-Enhancing Agents in X-ray Synchrotron Binary Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugtenburg, Richard P.

    2010-07-01

    Monte Carlo based modelling of the dose distribution in the vicinity of concentrates of iodine (I) and gold (Au) binary radiotherapy agents has been performed for monochromatised synchrotron X-rays. While the KERMA approximation, which ignores electron transport, is often acceptable for kilovoltage X-ray dosimetry in X-ray binary therapy, the range of photoelectrons and Auger electrons may be significant when compared to the microdostributed structure of the binary compound in which case corrections to the approximation may be necessary. Dose is calculated using EGSnrc for microdistributions associated with X-ray radiation synovecotomy, where iodine is taken up in the synovial lining. Dose as a function of the volume of aggregation for an Au-based contrast agent such as Au nanoparticles, ranging in diameter from 5 micron to 100 micron, were calculated using EGSnrc and Penelope, showing that the dose varies slowly for 90 keV X-rays, where much of the dose delivered by short range photoelectrons while 80 keV X-rays, just below the K-edge of Au (80.729 keV) increases linearly with diameter. In general the dose varies slowly as a function of volume suggesting that only small corrections will be needed to account for effects due to the failure of electronic equilibrium.

  15. Dosimetry of Microdistributed Dose-Enhancing Agents in X-ray Synchrotron Binary Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hugtenburg, Richard P.

    2010-07-23

    Monte Carlo based modelling of the dose distribution in the vicinity of concentrates of iodine (I) and gold (Au) binary radiotherapy agents has been performed for monochromatised synchrotron X-rays. While the KERMA approximation, which ignores electron transport, is often acceptable for kilovoltage X-ray dosimetry in X-ray binary therapy, the range of photoelectrons and Auger electrons may be significant when compared to the microdostributed structure of the binary compound in which case corrections to the approximation may be necessary. Dose is calculated using EGSnrc for microdistributions associated with X-ray radiation synovecotomy, where iodine is taken up in the synovial lining. Dose as a function of the volume of aggregation for an Au-based contrast agent such as Au nanoparticles, ranging in diameter from 5 micron to 100 micron, were calculated using EGSnrc and Penelope, showing that the dose varies slowly for 90 keV X-rays, where much of the dose delivered by short range photoelectrons while 80 keV X-rays, just below the K-edge of Au (80.729 keV) increases linearly with diameter. In general the dose varies slowly as a function of volume suggesting that only small corrections will be needed to account for effects due to the failure of electronic equilibrium.

  16. Context sensitive cardiac x-ray imaging: a machine vision approach to x-ray dose control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; Keeble, Claire; Magee, Derek R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2015-09-01

    Modern cardiac x-ray imaging systems regulate their radiation output based on the thickness of the patient to maintain an acceptable signal at the input of the x-ray detector. This approach does not account for the context of the examination or the content of the image displayed. We have developed a machine vision algorithm that detects iodine-filled blood vessels and fits an idealized vessel model with the key parameters of contrast, diameter, and linear attenuation coefficient. The spatio-temporal distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient samples, when appropriately arranged, can be described by a simple linear relationship, despite the complexity of scene information. The algorithm was tested on static anthropomorphic chest phantom images under different radiographic factors and 60 dynamic clinical image sequences. It was found to be robust and sensitive to changes in vessel contrast resulting from variations in system parameters. The machine vision algorithm has the potential of extracting real-time context sensitive information that may be used for augmenting existing dose control strategies.

  17. High pressure x-ray absorption studies of phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Tranquada, J.M.; Ingalls, R.; Crozier, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    High pressure generally changes all of the properties of substances, leading to phase transitions in many cases. This paper reviews how such phase changes reveal themselves in x-ray absorption spectra. Examples are given using the salts NaBr, RbCl, CuBr, and SnSe. (DLC)

  18. Calculation of x-ray scattering patterns from nanocrystals at high x-ray intensity

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Malik Muhammad; Jurek, Zoltan; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2016-01-01

    We present a generalized method to describe the x-ray scattering intensity of the Bragg spots in a diffraction pattern from nanocrystals exposed to intense x-ray pulses. Our method involves the subdivision of a crystal into smaller units. In order to calculate the dynamics within every unit, we employ a Monte-Carlo-molecular dynamics-ab-initio hybrid framework using real space periodic boundary conditions. By combining all the units, we simulate the diffraction pattern of a crystal larger than the transverse x-ray beam profile, a situation commonly encountered in femtosecond nanocrystallography experiments with focused x-ray free-electron laser radiation. Radiation damage is not spatially uniform and depends on the fluence associated with each specific region inside the crystal. To investigate the effects of uniform and non-uniform fluence distribution, we have used two different spatial beam profiles, Gaussian and flattop. PMID:27478859

  19. Calculation of x-ray scattering patterns from nanocrystals at high x-ray intensity.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Malik Muhammad; Jurek, Zoltan; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2016-09-01

    We present a generalized method to describe the x-ray scattering intensity of the Bragg spots in a diffraction pattern from nanocrystals exposed to intense x-ray pulses. Our method involves the subdivision of a crystal into smaller units. In order to calculate the dynamics within every unit, we employ a Monte-Carlo-molecular dynamics-ab-initio hybrid framework using real space periodic boundary conditions. By combining all the units, we simulate the diffraction pattern of a crystal larger than the transverse x-ray beam profile, a situation commonly encountered in femtosecond nanocrystallography experiments with focused x-ray free-electron laser radiation. Radiation damage is not spatially uniform and depends on the fluence associated with each specific region inside the crystal. To investigate the effects of uniform and non-uniform fluence distribution, we have used two different spatial beam profiles, Gaussian and flattop. PMID:27478859

  20. High spectral and spatial resolution X-ray transmission radiography and tomography using a Color X-ray Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Matthieu N.; Garrevoet, Jan; Tack, Pieter; Scharf, Oliver; Cormode, David P.; Van Loo, Denis; Pauwels, Elin; Dierick, Manuel; Vincze, Laszlo; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2014-01-01

    High resolution X-ray radiography and computed tomography are excellent techniques for non-destructive characterization of an object under investigation at a spatial resolution in the micrometer range. However, as the image contrast depends on both chemical composition and material density, no chemical information is obtained from this data. Furthermore, lab-based measurements are affected by the polychromatic X-ray beam, which results in beam hardening effects. New types of X-ray detectors which provide spectral information on the measured X-ray beam can help to overcome these limitations. In this paper, an energy dispersive CCD detector with high spectral resolution is characterized for use in high resolution radiography and tomography, where a focus is put on the experimental conditions and requirements of both measurement techniques.

  1. Nanoplasma Formation by High Intensity Hard X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, T.; Jurek, Z.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Wada, S.; Johnsson, P.; Siano, M.; Mondal, S.; Ito, Y.; Kimura, M.; Sakai, T.; Matsunami, K.; Hayashita, H.; Kajikawa, J.; Liu, X.-J.; Robert, E.; Miron, C.; Feifel, R.; Marangos, J. P.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Son, S.-K.; Ziaja, B.; Yao, M.; Santra, R.; Ueda, K.

    2015-01-01

    Using electron spectroscopy, we have investigated nanoplasma formation from noble gas clusters exposed to high-intensity hard-x-ray pulses at ~5 keV. Our experiment was carried out at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA) facility in Japan. Dedicated theoretical simulations were performed with the molecular dynamics tool XMDYN. We found that in this unprecedented wavelength regime nanoplasma formation is a highly indirect process. In the argon clusters investigated, nanoplasma is mainly formed through secondary electron cascading initiated by slow Auger electrons. Energy is distributed within the sample entirely through Auger processes and secondary electron cascading following photoabsorption, as in the hard x-ray regime there is no direct energy transfer from the field to the plasma. This plasma formation mechanism is specific to the hard-x-ray regime and may, thus, also be important for XFEL-based molecular imaging studies. In xenon clusters, photo- and Auger electrons contribute more significantly to the nanoplasma formation. Good agreement between experiment and simulations validates our modelling approach. This has wide-ranging implications for our ability to quantitatively predict the behavior of complex molecular systems irradiated by high-intensity hard x-rays. PMID:26077863

  2. Equally sloped X-ray microtomography of living insects with low radiation dose and improved resolution capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shengkun; Fan, Jiadong; Zong, Yunbing; He, You; Zhou, Guangzhao; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jianhua; Huang, Qingjie; Xiao, Tiqiao; Jiang, Huaidong

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional X-ray imaging of living specimens is challenging due to the limited resolution of conventional absorption contrast X-ray imaging and potential irradiation damage of biological specimens. In this letter, we present microtomography of a living specimen combining phase-contrast imaging and a Fourier-based iterative algorithm termed equally sloped tomography. Non-destructive 3D imaging of an anesthetized living yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor was demonstrated with a relatively low dose using synchrotron generated X-rays. Based on the high-quality 3D images, branching tracheoles and different tissues of the insect in a natural state were identified and analyzed, demonstrating a significant advantage of the technique over conventional X-ray radiography or histotomy. Additionally, the insect survived without problem after a 1.92-s X-ray exposure and subsequent absorbed radiation dose of ˜1.2 Gy. No notable physiological effects were observed after reviving the insect from anesthesia. The improved static tomographic method demonstrated in this letter shows advantage in the non-destructive structural investigation of living insects in three dimensions due to the low radiation dose and high resolution capability, and offers many potential applications in biological science.

  3. Determination of half-dose depth in skin for soft x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Kolber, A.B.; Altman, S.M.; Gladstein, A.H.; Buchanan, S.; Marx, J.; Grisewood, E.; Kopf, A.

    1982-09-01

    Unlike superficial x-rays, the soft x-rays normally used in dermatologic practice spare unaffected underlying organs during treatment of cutaneous malignancies. However, since the dose with depth from soft x-rays varies markedly, it is important to know this relationship for optimal therapeutic results. The peak kilovoltage, and thus the energy of the beam, is generally selected so that the dose to the base of the lesion is one-half the surface dose. An absorbed dose of 3,400 rads to the surface and a dose of about one-half this amount to the base of most malignant lesions is one standard protocol for optimal therapeutic results. An accurate value of half-depth dose in skin is therefore necessary and is readily obtained from ordinary half-value layer measurements using the technic described.

  4. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Snigireva, I.

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  5. Bright Semiconductor Scintillator for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Ovechkina, Olena E.; Miller, Stuart; Singh, Bipin; Guo, Liang; Irving, Thomas

    2011-08-16

    We report on a novel approach to produce oxygen-doped zinc telluride (ZnTe:O), a remarkable group II-VI semiconductor scintillator, fabricated in the columnar-structured or polycrystalline forms needed to fulfill the needs of many demanding X-ray and {gamma}-ray imaging applications. ZnTe:O has one of the highest conversion efficiencies among known scintillators, emission around 680 nm (which is ideally suited for CCD sensors), high density of 6.4 g/cm{sup 3}, fast decay time of {approx}1 {micro}s with negligible afterglow, and orders of magnitude higher radiation resistance compared to commonly used scintillators. These properties allow the use of ZnTe:O in numerous applications, including X-ray imaging, nuclear medicine (particularly SPECT), room temperature radioisotope identification, and homeland security. Additionally, ZnTe:O offers distinct advantages for synchrotron-based high resolution imaging due to the absence of atomic absorption edges in the low energy range, which otherwise reduce resolution due to secondary X-ray formations. We have fabricated films of ZnTe:O using a vapor deposition technique that allows large-area structured scintillator fabrication in a time- and cost-efficient manner, and evaluated its performance for small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at an Argonne National Laboratory synchrotron beamline. Details of the fabrication and characterization of the optical, scintillation and imaging properties of the ZnTe:O films are presented in this paper.

  6. Microfabrication of High Resolution X-ray Magnetic Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, W.-T.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Bandler, Simon R.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Porst, Jan P.; Rotzinger, Hannes; Seidel, George M.

    2009-12-16

    Metallic magnetic calorimeter (MMC) is one of the most promising x-ray detector technologies for providing the very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray imaging spectroscopy. For this purpose, we have developed micro-fabricated 5x5 arrays of MMC of which each individual pixel has excellent energy resolution as good as 3.4 eV at 6 keV x-ray. Here we report on the fabrication techniques developed to achieve good resolution and high efficiency. These include: processing of a thin insulation layer for strong magnetic coupling between the AuEr sensor film and the niobium pick-up coil; production of overhanging absorbers for enhanced efficiency of x-ray absorption; fabrication on SiN membranes to minimize the effects on energy resolution from athermal phonon loss. We have also improved the deposition of the magnetic sensor film such that the film magnetization is nearly completely that is expected from the AuEr sputter target bulk material. In addition, we have included a study of a positional sensitive design, the Hydra design, which allows thermal coupling of four absorbers to a common MMC sensor and circuit.

  7. Microfabrication of High Resolution X-ray Magnetic Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Bandler, Simon R.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Porst, Jan P.; Rotzinger, Hannes; Seidel, George M.; Stevenson, Thomas R.

    2009-12-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeter (MMC) is one of the most promising x-ray detector technologies for providing the very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray imaging spectroscopy. For this purpose, we have developed micro-fabricated 5×5 arrays of MMC of which each individual pixel has excellent energy resolution as good as 3.4 eV at 6 keV x-ray. Here we report on the fabrication techniques developed to achieve good resolution and high efficiency. These include: processing of a thin insulation layer for strong magnetic coupling between the AuEr sensor film and the niobium pick-up coil; production of overhanging absorbers for enhanced efficiency of x-ray absorption; fabrication on SiN membranes to minimize the effects on energy resolution from athermal phonon loss. We have also improved the deposition of the magnetic sensor film such that the film magnetization is nearly completely that is expected from the AuEr sputter target bulk material. In addition, we have included a study of a positional sensitive design, the Hydra design, which allows thermal coupling of four absorbers to a common MMC sensor and circuit.

  8. High-Energy X-Ray Timing Experiment Detections of Hard X-Ray Tails in Scorpius X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Flavio; Heindl, William A.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Gruber, Duane E.

    2001-02-01

    We report the detection of a nonthermal hard X-ray component from Sco X-1 based on the analysis of 20-220 keV spectra obtained with the High-Energy X-Ray Timing Experiment on board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer satellite. We find that the addition of a power-law component to a thermal bremsstrahlung model is required to achieve a good fit in five of 16 observations analyzed. Using Proportional Counter Array data, we were able to track the movement of the source along the Z diagram, and we found that the presence of the hard X-ray tail is not confined to a specific Z position. However, we do observe an indication that the power-law index hardens with increasing M, as indicated from the position on the Z diagram. We find that the derived nonthermal luminosities are ~10% of that derived for the brightest of the atoll sources.

  9. High redshift QSOs and the x ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Impey, Chris

    1993-01-01

    ROSAT pointed observations were made of 9 QSO's from the Large Bright Quasar Survey (LBQS). The LBQS is based on machine measurement of objective prism plates taken with the UK Schmidt Telescope. Software has been used to select QSO's by both color and by the presence of spectral features and continuum breaks. The probability of detection can be calculated as a function of magnitude, redshift and spectral features, and the completeness of the survey can be accurately estimated. Nine out of 1040 QSO's in the LBQS have z greater than 3. The observations will provide an important data point in the X-ray luminosity function of QSO's at high redshift. The QSO's with z greater than 3 span less than a magnitude in M(sub B), so can be combined as a homogeneous sample. This analysis is only possible with a sample drawn from a large and complete catalog such as the LBQS. Four of the 9 QSO's that were observed with the ROSAT PSPC for this proposal were detected, including one of the most luminous X-ray sources ever observed. The April 1992 version of the PROS DETECT package was used to reduce the data. The results have been used to search for evolution of the X-ray properties of QSO's in redshift. The 9 QSO's lie in the range -28.7 less than M(sub B) less than -27.8. When combined with data for 16 QSO's in a similar luminosity range at lower redshift correlations with luminosity and redshift can be separated out. The LBQS sample also yields a new constraint on the contribution of high redshift QSO's to the X-ray background. An initial requirement is knowledge of the X-ray properties (alpha(sub OX)) as a function of redshift. Integration over the evolving luminosity function of the LBQS then gives the QSO contribution to the source counts.

  10. Changes in the electrical properties of pure and doped polymers under the influence of small doses of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, S. A.; Madi, N. K.; Kassem, M. E.; El-Khatib, A.

    A study has been made of the temperature dependence of the d.c. conductivity of pure and borated low density polyethylene LDPE (4% and 8% borax). The above calculations were carried out before and after X-ray irradiation. The irradiation dose was varied from 0 to 1000 rad. The d.c. electrical conductivity of Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and perspex was measured as a function of temperature ranging from 20°C to 100°C. These samples were irradiated with X-rays of dose 200 rad. The variation of the d.c. conductivity of the treated samples versus temperature was investigated. The results reveal that the d.c. conductivity of LDPE is highly affected by radiation and/or dopant. In addition, the sensitivity of the explored polymers to X-ray irradiation is strongly dependent on its chemical nature.

  11. High Precision Assembly of Thin Mirror X-ray Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattenburg, Mark

    Lightweight high resolution x-ray telescope optics are one of the key technologies under development for next-generation x-ray telescopes. The ultimate goal of this effort is to realize optics with spatial resolution rivaling Chandra (<1 arc-sec) but with collecting areas that are larger by orders of magnitude. In the USA several institutions, including GSFC, MSFC, Harvard-SAO, MIT and Northwest University are working on a variety of approaches to this problem. An excellent example is the NuSTAR x-ray telescope, which teamed Cal Tech, GSFC, Columbia University and LLNL to produce a superb set of hard x-ray optics. The telescope was composed of thousands of 0.2 mm-thick glass mirrors which were epoxied into place around a spindle structure. While very light weight, this process resulted in ~1 arc min resolution. We want to achieve ~100 times better with similar mass. A group at NASA GSFC has recently demonstrated an alternative thin-glass assembly procedure that has achieved ~7 arc sec resolution with x-ray tests. Further progress towards 1 arc-sec will require mirrors with improved figure, lower stress coatings, improved alignment, better metrology, and low stress bonding. Many of the difficulties with current mirror assembly practice stem from the use of epoxy as a bonding agent. Epoxy has many disadvantages, including high shrinkage, large CTE and creep, resin aging effects, water absorption, outgassing, low tensile strength, exothermicity, and requiring large amounts of time and/or heat to cure. These effects can cause errors that become â€oefrozen in― to the bond with no possibility of correction. We propose to investigate replacing epoxy with low temperature, low shrinkage solder alloys. We use these solders in conjunction with high power, millisec-long pulses from a fiber IR laser to deliver controlled amounts of heat into the bond area. We have demonstrated that laser pulses can be used to actuate carefully designed bonds by permanently compressing

  12. Workshop on high heat load x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    A workshop on High Heat Load X-Ray Optics'' was held at Argonne National Laboratory on August 3--5, 1989. The object of this workshop was to discuss recent advances in the art of cooling x-ray optics subject to high heat loads from synchrotron beams. The cooling of the first optical element in the intense photon beams that will be produced in the next generation of synchrotron sources is recognized as one of the major challenges that must be faced before one will be able to use these very intense beams in future synchrotron experiments. Considerable advances have been made in this art during the last few years, but much work remains to be done before the heating problem can be said to be completely solved. Special emphasis was placed on recent cooling experiments and detailed finite element'' and finite difference'' calculations comparing experiment with theory and extending theory to optimize performance.

  13. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  14. The distribution of absorbed dose from x-rays as a function of depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Frederick

    2000-08-01

    Organizations responsible for monitoring the occupational exposure to radiation workers in the U.S. are directed to measure the dose to specific depths in tissue. The knowledge of the depth distribution of energy deposited by radiation in materials is essential to the interpretation of devices used to measure occupational exposure In this work, the quantities used to convert the reference transfer quantity for x-ray fields, air kerma, to the regulatory quantity, dose equivalent, for mono- energetic x-ray fields and poly-energetic x-ray fields specified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology are cogenerated for European x-ray fields are indicated and consistent conversion factors for use in the U.S. are recommended. For the mono-energetic x-ray beams conversion factors ranged from 0.9 to 1.7 at the 7 mg/cm2 depth and from 0.03 to 1.9 at the 1000 mg/cm2 depth in tissue specified by the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements. The conversion factors for the NIST x-ray fields were reasonably consistent with values in an unpublished draft standard by the American National Standards Institute, but exhibited sufficient disagreement to warrant a re-evaluation of the factors in that document prior to publication.

  15. Dental staff doses with handheld dental intraoral x-ray units.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joel E; Bailey, Edgar D; Ludlow, John B

    2012-02-01

    A handheld portable dental intraoral x-ray system is available in the United States and elsewhere. The system is designed to minimize the user's radiation dose. It includes specially designed shielding of the x-ray tube housing and an integral radiation shield to minimize backscatter. Personnel radiation dose records were obtained from 18 dental facilities using both the handheld system and a wall mounted dental x-ray system, providing 661 individual dose measurements. Dental staff doses were also compared for the handheld and conventional systems using both film and digital imaging for the same facilities and staff members. The results indicate that the doses for the handheld systems are significantly less than for wall-mounted systems. The average monthly dose for the handheld systems was 0.28 μSv vs. 7.86 μSv (deep dose equivalent) for the wall-mounted systems, a difference that is statistically significant at the p = 0.01 level. Consequently, there should be no concern about the use of this handheld dental intraoral x-ray system. Additional shielding efforts, (e.g., wearing a lead apron) will not provide significant benefit nor reduce staff radiation dose. PMID:22217586

  16. Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Matthias; Mears, Carl A.; Labov, Simon E.; Hiller, Larry J.; Barfknecht, Andrew T.

    2003-03-04

    A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

  17. New developments in high pressure x-ray spectroscopy beamline at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y. M. Chow, P.; Boman, G.; Bai, L. G.; Rod, E.; Bommannavar, A.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Sinogeikin, S.; Shen, G. Y.

    2015-07-15

    The 16 ID-D (Insertion Device - D station) beamline of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source is dedicated to high pressure research using X-ray spectroscopy techniques typically integrated with diamond anvil cells. The beamline provides X-rays of 4.5-37 keV, and current available techniques include X-ray emission spectroscopy, inelastic X-ray scattering, and nuclear resonant scattering. The recent developments include a canted undulator upgrade, 17-element analyzer array for inelastic X-ray scattering, and an emission spectrometer using a polycapillary half-lens. Recent development projects and future prospects are also discussed.

  18. Advances toward high spectral resolution quantum X-ray calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Kelley, R. L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Mccammon, D.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal detectors for X-ray spectroscopy combining high spectral resolution and quantum efficiency have been developed. These microcalorimeters measure the energy released in the absorption of a single photon by sensing the rise in temperature of a small absorbing structure. The ultimate energy resolution of such a device is limited by the thermodynamic power fluctuations in the thermal link between the calorimeter and isothermal bath and can in principle be made as low as 1 eV. The performance of a real device is degraded due to noise contributions such as excess 1/f noise in the thermistor and incomplete conversion of energy into phonons. The authors report some recent advances in thermometry, X-ray absorption and thermalization, fabrication techniques, and detector optimization in the presence of noise. These improvements have resulted in a device with a spectral resolution of 17 eV FWHM, measured at 6 keV.

  19. Demonstration of ultra high resolution soft x-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, W. S.; McNulty, I.; Trebes, J. E.; Anderson, E. H.; Yang, L.; Brase, J. M.

    1995-05-01

    Ultra high resolution three dimensional images of a microscopic test object were made with soft x-rays using a scanning transmission x-ray microscope. The test object consisted of two different patterns of gold bars on silicon nitride windows which were separated by ˜ 5μm. Depth resolution comparable to the transverse resolution was achieved by recording nine 2-D images of the object at angles between -50 to +55 degrees with respect to the beam axis. The projections were then combined tomographically to form a 3-D image using an algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) algorithm. We observed a transverse resolution of ˜1000 Å. Artifacts in the reconstruction limited the overall depth resolution to ˜6000 Å, however some features were clearly reconstructed with a depth resolution of ˜1000 Å.

  20. Bendable X-ray Optics for High Resolution Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Broadway, D.

    2014-01-01

    Current state-of the-art for x-ray optics fabrication calls for either the polishing of massive substrates into high-angular-resolution mirrors or the replication of thin, lower-resolution, mirrors from perfectly figured mandrels. Future X-ray Missions will require a change in this optics fabrication paradigm in order to achieve sub-arcsecond resolution in light-weight optics. One possible approach to this is to start with perfectly flat, light-weight surface, bend it into a perfect cone, form the desired mirror figure by material deposition, and insert the resulting mirror into a telescope structure. Such an approach is currently being investigated at MSFC, and a status report will be presented detailing the results of finite element analyses, bending tests and differential deposition experiments.

  1. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S.; Sharma, A.; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K. C.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2008-10-15

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm{sup 2} current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance {approx}1/x{sup n}, where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns.

  2. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S; Sharma, A; Mondal, J; Mittal, K C; Nagesh, K V; Chakravarthy, D P

    2008-10-01

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm(2) current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO(4):Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance approximately 1/x(n), where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns. PMID:19044706

  3. Modification of X-Ray Tissue Doses with Strong Magnetic Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borke, Michael Faison

    1990-01-01

    The modification of dose distributions from secondary electrons produced by accelerator-generated photon or electron beams in the presence of strong magnetic fields was studied. A need exists to predict the action of magnetic fields on X-ray tissue doses and to identify those combinations of X-ray energies, magnetic field strengths, and tissue factors where the dose might be changed significantly from an exposure without the presence of a magnetic field. Modification of X-ray produced tissue dose arises from the ability of a strong magnetic field to induce deflections on the path of secondary electrons. In order to demonstrate the existence of this deflection, measurements were made of the relative dose distributions present within a tissue -equivalent phantom produced by exposures to X-rays and in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The dose measurements were made using radiographic film detectors, sandwiched within a polystyrene target phantom irradiated in the presence of different magnetic field intensities. The fields were oriented transversely to the direction of the incident X-ray beam. Optical densities of the film exposures were converted to equivalent tissue doses for comparison to the predictions of a semi-analytical relative dose model for the process. This model was a combination of the electron Continuous Slowing Down Approximation, modified to account for multiple scattering, and a exponential photon dose model. As a result of this work, it was found that: (1) strong magnetic fields in the range of 1.2 to 5 T can induce changes in the tissue distribution of X-ray produced dose to small volumes in excess of 10%, (2) the region of maximum dose may be displaced significantly from the undeflected target volume, and (3) a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of these changes can be predicted, if the X-ray energy distribution and magnetic flux density are known. Such changes in deposited doses may be clinically significant and should be taken into

  4. Investigation of x ray variability in highly active cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Ginga x ray observations of highly active cool star coronae were obtained and analyzed in an effort to better understand the nature of their time variability. The possible types of variability studied included x ray occultations via eclipses in a binary system, rotational modulation of x ray emission, flares, and a search for microflaring. Observation of both sigma(sup 2) CrB and Algol were performed successfully by Ginga. The sigma(sup 2) CrB observations occurred on 27 to 30 June 1988, and the Algol observations on 12 to 14 January 1989. In the sigma(sup 2) CrB observation, simultaneous IUE and Very Large Array (VLA) observations were obtained during part of the Ginga observation. Flaring activity was detected on sigma(sup 2) CrB in the Ginga 1.7 to 11 KeV band and in the IUE microwave region. A large flare on Algol which lasted well over 12 hours was detected, began with a maximum temperature of 65 MK which gradually decayed to 36 MK, and evidence was shown of highly ionized Fe line emission.

  5. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy Using Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    During the past 13 years high resolution X ray spectrometers have been developed that use cryogenically cooled microcalorimeters. These devices have inherently high signal-to-noise by operating at temperatures below 0.1 K and can achieve an energy resolution of < 10 eV over the 0.1-10 keV band. Existing devices use doped semiconductor thermometers and typically employ HgTe absorbers. The energy resolution depends on achieving a low heat capacity for the device. For soft X ray applications a relatively thin absorber (approximately 1 micrometer) may be used and an energy resolution of approximately 7 eV has been achieved. For applications up to approximately 10 keV an absorber thickness of approximately 10 micrometer is required and the energy resolution is typically approximately 12 eV. Improvements to the energy resolution in this energy band could be achieved if the problems of thermalizing X rays in low heat capacity superconductors can be overcome. The recent work on transition edge thermometers by Irwin et nl. looks particularly promising because of the higher sensitivity achievable from a sharp superconducting transition. The relatively low impedance of such a device permits the use of a low noise SQUID amplifier for readout. This would also significantly reduce the cryogen heat load compared with JFETs required by higher impedance semiconductor thermometers.

  6. Radiation damage and its influence on source requirements for high resolution x-ray holography

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Soft x-ray holography offers the possibility of obtaining high resolution, 3-D images of living cells and organelles therein. To achieve a specified resolution, a certain number of photons must be scattered by the smallest features of interest within the sample. This requires a certain irradiating fluence, the magnitude of which depends on the wavelength of the x rays and the scattering cross- sections of the features. Unfortunately, irradiation of the sample will be accompanied by the absorption of x rays. If the dose is large, the sample will be damaged, possibly compromising the quality of the image. A theoretical study of the scattering and absorption of x rays during the creation of a hologram is described. Using a new prescription for scattering by condensed biological materials (e.g., protein and/or DNA) within the aqueous environment of a cell, we estimate the irradiating fluence required for a certain resolution and the associated sample dose. The relative merits of different x-ray wavelengths are discussed. A wavelength of about 44{angstrom}, just outside the water window'' (23.2--43.7{angstrom}), appears to be optimal in that the required fluence and dose are minimized, while reasonable x-ray penetrability is maintained. Estimates are given for the minimum source energy required and the maximum duration of an exposure to capture an image before blurring due heat induce motion. The use of colloidal gold tagging can enhance image contrast and reduce the required irradiating fluence and sample damage. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Attenuation properties and percentage depth dose of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms using computed tomography (CT) and treatment planning system (TPS) at high energy x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, M. F. Mohd; Abdullah, R.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Hashim, R.; Bauk, S.

    2016-01-01

    A set of tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms with dimension of 30 cm x 30 cm was fabricated at target density of 1.0 g/cm3. The mass attenuation coefficient of the phantom was measured using 60Co gamma source. The phantoms were scanned using Computed Tomography (CT) scanner and the percentage depth dose (PDD) of the phantom was calculated using treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray and compared to that in solid water phantoms. The result showed that the mass attenuation coefficient of tannin-based Rhizohora spp. phantoms was near to the value of water with χ2 value of 1.2. The measured PDD also showed good agreement with solid water phantom at both 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray with percentage deviation below 8% at depth beyond the maximum dose, Zmax.

  8. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    The bremsstrahlung X-rays from a plasma focus device were investigated with emphasis on the emission versus position, time, energy, and angle of emission. It is shown that low energy X-rays come from the plasma focus region, but that the higher energy components come from the anode. The emission is anisotropic, the low energy polar diagram resembling a cardioid, while the high energy emission is a lobe into the anode. The plasma parameters were considered indicating that even in the dense focus, the plasma is collisionless near the axis. By considering the radiation patterns of relativistic electrons a qualitative picture is obtained, which explains the measured polar diagrams, assuming the electrons that produce the X-rays have velocity vectors lying roughly in a cone between the point of focus and the anode. The average electron energy is about 3keV at the focus and about 10 keV on the anode surface. Results are consistent with the converging beam model of neutron production.

  9. High efficiency, multiterawatt x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emma, C.; Fang, K.; Wu, J.; Pellegrini, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present undulator magnet tapering methods for obtaining high efficiency and multiterawatt peak powers in x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), a key requirement for enabling 3D atomic resolution single molecule imaging and nonlinear x-ray science. The peak power and efficiency of tapered XFELs is sensitive to time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. To analyze this dependence in detail we perform a comparative numerical optimization for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile including and intentionally disabling these effects. We show that the solution for the magnetic field taper profile obtained from time independent optimization does not yield the highest extraction efficiency when time dependent effects are included. Our comparative optimization is performed for a novel undulator designed specifically to obtain TW power x-ray pulses in the shortest distance: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. We determine that after a fully time dependent optimization of a 100 m long Linac coherent light source-like XFEL we can obtain a maximum efficiency of 7%, corresponding to 3.7 TW peak radiation power. Possible methods to suppress the synchrotron sidebands, and further enhance the FEL peak power, up to about 6 TW by increasing the seed power and reducing the electron beam energy spread, are also discussed.

  10. Masks for high aspect ratio x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Chantal Khan; Jackson, Keith H.; Bonivert, William D.; Hruby, Jill

    1996-06-01

    The requirements for deep x-ray lithography (DXRL) masks are reviewed and a recently developed cost effective mask fabrication process is described. The review includes a summary of tabulated properties for materials used in the fabrication of DXRL masks. X-ray transparency and mask contrast are calculated for material combinations using simulations of exposure at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Berkeley, and compared to the requirements for standard x-ray lithography (XRL) mask technology. Guided by the requirements, a cost-effective fabrication process for manufacturing high contrast masks for DXRL has been developed. Thick absorber patterns (0960-1317/6/2/004/img7) on a thin silicon wafer (0960-1317/6/2/004/img8m) were made using contact printing in thick positive (Hoechst 4620) and negative (OCG 7020) photoresist and subsequent gold electrodeposition. Gold was deposited using a commercially available gold sulphite bath with low current density and good agitation. The resultant gold films were fine-grained and stress-free. Replication of such masks into 0960-1317/6/2/004/img9 thick acrylic sheets was performed at the ALS.

  11. Evaluation of an X-Ray Dose Profile Derived from an Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter during Computed Tomographic Fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Sato, Masanori; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate scatter radiation dose to the subject surface during X-ray computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy using the integrated dose ratio (IDR) of an X-ray dose profile derived from an optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeter. We aimed to obtain quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during previous CT fluoroscopy. A multislice CT scanner was used to perform this study. OSL dosimeters were placed on the top and the lateral side of the chest phantom so that the longitudinal direction of dosimeters was parallel to the orthogonal axis-to-slice plane for measurement of dose profiles in CT fluoroscopy. Measurement of fluoroscopic conditions was performed at 120 kVp and 80 kVp. Scatter radiation dose was evaluated by calculating the integrated dose determined by OSL dosimetry. The overall percent difference of the integrated doses between OSL dosimeters and ionization chamber was 5.92%. The ratio of the integrated dose of a 100-mm length area to its tails (-50 to -6 mm, 50 to 6 mm) was the lowest on the lateral side at 80 kVp and the highest on the top at 120 kVp. The IDRs for different measurement positions were larger at 120 kVp than at 80 kVp. Similarly, the IDRs for the tube voltage between the primary X-ray beam and scatter radiation was larger on the lateral side than on the top of the phantom. IDR evaluation suggested that the scatter radiation dose has a high dependence on the position and a low dependence on tube voltage relative to the primary X-ray beam for constant dose rate fluoroscopic conditions. These results provided quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during CT fluoroscopy in previous studies. PMID:26151914

  12. Evaluation of an X-Ray Dose Profile Derived from an Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter during Computed Tomographic Fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Sato, Masanori; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate scatter radiation dose to the subject surface during X-ray computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy using the integrated dose ratio (IDR) of an X-ray dose profile derived from an optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeter. We aimed to obtain quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during previous CT fluoroscopy. A multislice CT scanner was used to perform this study. OSL dosimeters were placed on the top and the lateral side of the chest phantom so that the longitudinal direction of dosimeters was parallel to the orthogonal axis-to-slice plane for measurement of dose profiles in CT fluoroscopy. Measurement of fluoroscopic conditions was performed at 120 kVp and 80 kVp. Scatter radiation dose was evaluated by calculating the integrated dose determined by OSL dosimetry. The overall percent difference of the integrated doses between OSL dosimeters and ionization chamber was 5.92%. The ratio of the integrated dose of a 100-mm length area to its tails (−50 to −6 mm, 50 to 6 mm) was the lowest on the lateral side at 80 kVp and the highest on the top at 120 kVp. The IDRs for different measurement positions were larger at 120 kVp than at 80 kVp. Similarly, the IDRs for the tube voltage between the primary X-ray beam and scatter radiation was larger on the lateral side than on the top of the phantom. IDR evaluation suggested that the scatter radiation dose has a high dependence on the position and a low dependence on tube voltage relative to the primary X-ray beam for constant dose rate fluoroscopic conditions. These results provided quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during CT fluoroscopy in previous studies. PMID:26151914

  13. On the origin of highly ionized X-ray absorbers detected in the galactic X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yang; Fang, Taotao

    2014-01-10

    X-ray observations of the Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) revealed numerous highly ionized metal absorption lines. However, it is unclear whether such lines are produced by the hot interstellar medium (ISM) or the circumstellar medium intrinsic to the binaries. Here we present a Chandra X-ray absorption line study of 28 observations of 12 XRBs, with a focus on the Ne IX and Fe XVII lines. We report the first detections of these lines in a significant amount of observations. We do not find a significant dependence of the line equivalent width on the distance of the XRBs, but we do see a weak dependence on the source X-ray luminosity. We also find 2 out of 12 selected targets show strong temporal variation of the Ne IX absorbers. While the line ratio between the two ion species suggests a temperature consistent with the previous predictions of the ISM, comparing with two theoretical models of the ISM shows the observed column densities are significantly higher than predictions. On the other hand, photoionization by the XRBs provides a reasonably good fit to the data. Our findings suggest that a significant fraction of these X-ray absorbers may originate in the hot gas intrinsic to the XRBs, and that the ISM makes small, if not negligible, contribution. We briefly discuss the implications to the study of the Milky Way hot gas content.

  14. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy on the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. W.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray spectroscope presented features both spectral and one dimensional spatial resolution. The capabilities of observing sources like supernova remnants, X-ray stars, and the halo surrounding galaxies are discussed.

  15. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy with a Microcalorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Norrell, J.; Anderson, I.

    2005-01-01

    of spectral artifacts. It was found that the detector is capable of distinguishing many Lα and Lβ spectral lines, with a resolution between 13 and 17 eV. It was also observed that the background has an unusual shape, and this is largely being attributed to the variable transmission coefficient of the X-ray optic. These preliminary results suggest that the microcalorimeter has a high potential for use in microanalysis, but more work to quantify its capabilities must still be done.

  16. Refractive optical elements and optical system for high energy x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.; Altapova, V.; Baumbach, T.; Kluge, M.; Last, A.; Marschall, F.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Vogt, H.

    2012-05-17

    In material science, X-ray radiation with photon energies above 25 keV is used because of its penetration into high density materials. Research of the inner structure of novel materials, such as electrodes in high power batteries for engines, require X-ray microscopes operating in the hard X-ray energy range. A flexible X-ray microscope for hard X-rays with photon energies higher than 25 keV will be realized at the synchrotron source ANKA in Karlsruhe, Germany. The device will use refractive X-ray lenses as condenser as well as objective lenses.

  17. Masks for high aspect ratio x-ray lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, C.K.; Jackson, K.H.; Bonivert, W.D.; Hruby, J.

    1997-04-01

    Fabrication of very high aspect ratio microstructures, as well as ultra-high precision manufacturing is of increasing interest in a multitude of applications. Fields as diverse as micromechanics, robotics, integrated optics, and sensors benefit from this technology. The scale-length of this spatial regime is between what can be achieved using classical machine tool operations and that which is used in microelectronics. This requires new manufacturing techniques, such as the LIGA process, which combines x-ray lithography, electroforming, and plastic molding.

  18. Mutations induced in Tradescantia by small doses of X-rays and neutrons - Analysis of dose-response curves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, A. H.; Underbrink, A. G.; Rossi, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were analyzed after neutron and X-ray irradiation with doses ranging from a fraction of a rad to the region of saturation. The dose-effect relation for neutrons indicates a linear dependence from 0.01 to 8 rads; between 0.25 and 5 rads, a linear dependence is indicated for X-rays also. As a consequence the relative biological effectiveness reaches a constant value (about 50) at low doses. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the theory of dual radiation action and support its interpretation of the effects of radiation on higher organisms. The doubling dose of X-rays was found to be nearly 1 rad.

  19. The High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N. E.; Tananbaum, H.; Kahn, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    The HTXS mission concept combines large effective area (approximately 15,000 sq cm at 1 keV), high spectral resolution (E/Delta(E) approximately 300-3000), and broad energy bandpass (0.25-40 keV and possibly up to 100 keV) by using replicated optics together with a complement of spectroscopic instrumentation including reflection gratings readout by charge-coupled device detectors (CCDs), quantum micro-calorimeters, and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) or comparable high energy detectors. An essential feature of this concept involves minimization of cost (approximately $350M for development and approximately $500-600M including launches) and risk by building six identical modest satellites to achieve the large area. Current mission and technology studies are targeted towards a new start in the 2002 timeframe, with first launch around 2005-2006. The HTXS mission represents a major advance, providing as much as a factor of 100 increase in sensitivity over currently planned high resolution X ray spectroscopy missions. HTXS will mark the start of a new era when high quality X ray spectra will be obtained for all classes of X ray sources, over a wide range of luminosity and distance. With its increased capabilities, HTXS will address many fundamental astrophysics questions such as the origin and distribution of the elements from carbon to zinc, the formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies, the validity of general relativity in the strong gravity limit, the evolution of supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, the details of supernova explosions and their aftermath, and the mechanisms involved in the heating of stellar coronae and driving of stellar winds.

  20. High-speed X-ray microscopy by use of high-resolution zone plates and synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qiyue; Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Pan, Zhiyun; Wang, Dajiang; Ge, Xin; Zhang, Kai; Hong, Youli; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2012-09-01

    X-ray microscopy based on synchrotron radiation has become a fundamental tool in biology and life sciences to visualize the morphology of a specimen. These studies have particular requirements in terms of radiation damage and the image exposure time, which directly determines the total acquisition speed. To monitor and improve these key parameters, we present a novel X-ray microscopy method using a high-resolution zone plate as the objective and the matching condenser. Numerical simulations based on the scalar wave field theory validate the feasibility of the method and also indicate the performance of X-ray microscopy is optimized most with sub-10-nm-resolution zone plates. The proposed method is compatible with conventional X-ray microscopy techniques, such as computed tomography, and will find wide applications in time-resolved and/or dose-sensitive studies such as living cell imaging. PMID:22763718

  1. Estimating the Absorbed Dose to Critical Organs During Dual X-ray Absorptiometry

    PubMed Central

    Sharafi, A A; Larijani, B; Mokhlesian, N; Hasanzadeh, H

    2008-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to estimate a patient's organ dose (effective dose) during performance of dual X-ray absorptiometry by using the correlations derived from the surface dose and the depth doses in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods An anthropomorphic phantom was designed and TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) were placed at the surface and these were also inserted at different depths of the thyroid and uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. The absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for the spine and femur scan modes. The correlation coefficients and regression functions between the absorbed surface dose and the depth dose were determined. The derived correlation was then applied for 40 women patients to estimate the depth doses to the thyroid and uterus. Results There was a correlation between the surface dose and depth dose of the thyroid and uterus in both scan modes. For the women's dosimetry, the average surface doses of the thyroid and uterus were 1.88 µGy and 1.81 µGy, respectively. Also, the scan center dose in the women was 5.70 µGy. There was correlation between the thyroid and uterus surface doses, and the scan center dose. Conclusion We concluded that the effective dose to the patient's critical organs during dual X-ray absorptiometry can be estimated by the correlation derived from phantom dosimetry. PMID:18385556

  2. Soft x-ray-controlled dose deposition in yeast cells: techniques, model, and biological assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Batani, Dimitri; Conti, Aldo; Masini, Alessandra; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Turcu, I. C. Edmond

    1996-12-01

    A procedure is presented to release soft x-rays onto yeast cell membrane allegedly damaging the resident enzymatic processes connected with fermentation. The damage is expected to be restricted to regulating fermentation processes without interference with respiration. By this technique fermentation is followed leading to CO2 production, and respiration resulting in global pressure measurements. A solid state pressure sensor system has been developed linked to a data acquisition system. Yeast cells cultures have been investigated at different concentrations and with different nutrients. A non-monotone response in CO2 production as a function of the delivered x-ray dose is observed.

  3. High energy, high resolution X-ray optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Joy, Marshall; Kahn, Steven

    1990-01-01

    The scientific goals of X-ray astronomy are considered to evaluate the relative advantages of using classical Wolter-1 optics or using a different approach. The portion of the X-ray band over 10 keV is unexploited in the present X-ray optics technology, and focussing in this portion of the band is crucial because nonfocussed experiments are background limited. The basic design of 'hard' X-ray optics is described theoretically emphasizing the very small angles of incidence in the grazing-incidence optics. Optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio is found to occur at a finite angular resolution. In real applications, the effective area reduced by the efficiency of the two reflections is 80 percent at energies up to 40 keV, and the quality of the reflecting surface can be monitored to minimize scattering. Focussing optics are found to offer improvements in signal-to-noise as well as more effective scientific return because microelectronic focal-plane technology is employed.

  4. X-Ray Diagnostics of CUEBIT Highly Charged Ion Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silwal, Roshani; Gall, Amy; Sosolik, Chad; Harriss, James; Takacs, Endre

    2015-05-01

    Clemson University Electron Beam Ion Trap (CUEBIT) is one of the few EBIT facilities around the globe that produces highly charged ions by successive electron impact ionization. Ions are confined in the machine by the space-charge of the electron beam, a 6 T magnetic field generated by a superconducting magnet, and the voltages applied to axial electrodes. The device is a small laboratory scale instrument for the study of the structure and emission of highly charged ions and the collisions of these ions with external targets. Along with the introduction of the facility including its structure and capabilities, we present an overview of various spectroscopic and imaging tools that allow the diagnosis of the high temperature ion cloud of the CUEBIT. Instruments include a crystal spectrometer, solid-state detectors, and pin-hole imaging setup equipped with an x-ray CCD camera. Measurements of x-ray radiation from CUEBIT are used to investigate the fundamental properties of the highly charged ions and their interaction with the energetic electron beam.

  5. The Soft X-ray Spectrum of the High Mass X-Ray Binary V0332+53 in Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshamouty, Khaled G.; Heinke, Craig O.; Chouinard, Rhys

    2016-08-01

    The behaviour of neutron stars in high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) during periods of low mass transfer is of great interest. Indications of spectral softening in systems at low mass transfer rates suggest that some HMXBs are undergoing fundamental changes in their accretion regime, but the nature of the quiescent X-ray emission is not clear. We performed a 39 ks XMM-Newton observation of the transient HMXB V0332+53, finding it at a very low X-ray luminosity (Lx ˜ 4 × 1032 erg s-1). A power-law spectral fit requires an unusually soft spectral index (4.4^{+0.9}_{-0.6}), while a magnetized neutron star atmosphere model, with temperature LogTeff 6.7±0.2 K and inferred emitting radius of ˜0.2 - 0.3 km, gives a good fit. We suggest that the quiescent X-ray emission from V0332+53 is mainly from a hot spot on the surface of the neutron star. No conclusions on the presence of pulsations could be drawn due to the low count rate. Due to the high absorption column, thermal emission from the rest of the neutron star could be only weakly constrained, to LogTeff <6.14^{+0.05}_{-6.14} K, or <3 × 1033 erg s-1.

  6. Absorbed Dose Determination Using Experimental and Analytical Predictions of X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Carruth, Ralph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the U.S. Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the international space welding experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine for ground-based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during extravehicular activities to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure, then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  7. MANAGEMENT OF PATIENT DOSES FROM DIGITAL X-RAY CHEST SCREENING EXAMINATIONS.

    PubMed

    Vodovatov, A V; Drozdov, A A; Telnova, A U; Bernhardsson, C

    2016-06-01

    An anthropomorphic phantom study was carried out in 2013-14 in two hospitals, one located in Russia (Mariinsky Hospital, Saint Petersburg) and the other in Sweden (Skåne University Hospital, Malmö). The aim of the study was to investigate the possibilities to reduce the patient dose from digital X-ray chest screening examinations. The existing chest imaging protocols were adjusted by changing the tube voltage, total filtration and grid in order to determine the most dose-effective combination of the examination parameters. It was possible to achieve up to 50 % dose-area product (DAP) and 30 % effective dose reduction by raising the tube voltage from 100 to 125 or 150 kV, and simultaneously decrease the total filtration to the minimum allowed by the X-ray unit (3 mm Al). The absence of a grid allowed to further reduce the DAP and effective dose by up to 80 %. Comparison between Russian and Swedish X-ray units showed the same trend in DAP and effective dose reduction, but the absolute dose values were lower by almost a factor of 10 for the Swedish units due to different image receptors and automatic exposure control settings. PMID:26769906

  8. The integral dose in panoramic intraoral x-ray tube radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayami, A.; Fujishita, M.; Sumida, A.; Kanke, M.; Fujiki, T.; Uemura, S.; Fuchihata, H.

    1983-07-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program was developed to estimate the integral dose to the head and thyroid for panoramic intraoral x-ray tube radiography. The advantage of this computer simulation is that it is able to avoid many of the difficulties associated with low-energy and low-dose x-ray dosimetry. The calculations were made for maxillary and mandibular projections separately, using 10 kv. increments between 40 and 60 kv. The results obtained were presented in terms of the integral dose per milliampere second. Typical integral doses for a routine examination of the head are 2.1 mJ. and 8.5 microJ for the thyroid during mandibular radiography and 1.7 microJ for the thyroid during radiography of the maxilla using 55 kv. and 0.5 mAs.

  9. X-ray Polarisation in highly-magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turolla, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Radiation emitted in the vicinity of an isolated neutron star is expected to be intrinsically polarized because the high magnetic field (B˜10^{12}-10^{15} G) strongly affects the plasma opacity. The polarization fraction and polarization angle measured by an instrument, however, do not necessary coincide with the intrinsic ones, due to the effects of both quantum electrodynamics in the highly magnetized vacuum around the star (the vacuum polarization) and rotation of the Stokes parameters in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight induced by the non-uniform magnetic field. I'll review theoretical estimates for the polarization observables in the case of thermal surface emission from neutron stars and of the (soft) X-ray emission from magnetars, where magnetospheric reprocessing of radiation by resonant cyclotron scattering is important. The potentials of X-ray polarimetry to probe the physical conditions in neutron star sources and to test, for the first time, vacuum polarization are discussed in connection with the recently proposed polarimetric missions, like XIPE.

  10. L X-ray intensity ratios for high Z elements induced with X-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Limin

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the intensity ratios I(Lα1,2)/I(Lβ1,2), I(Lα1,2)/I(Lγ) and I(Lβ1,2)/I(Lγ) for elements Ta, W, Au and Pb by 13.1 keV bremsstrahlung radiation. In this work, experimental values were compared with the theoretical results and other experimental results. Theoretical results of the intensity ratios were calculated with theoretical subshell photoionization cross sections, fractional X-ray emission rates, fluorescence yields, and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities. Good agreement can be observed between experimental values and theoretical results. Comparing with L1 and L2 subshells, the ionization cross section of L3 subshell shows a large increase for Ta and W with the variation of excitation energy from 59.5 keV to 13.1 keV.

  11. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV. PMID:27131669

  12. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>1013 photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  13. Stellar Coronae Viewed with High-Resolution X-Rays: The Impact of the International X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Stephen Alan; Osten, R. A.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Gagne, M.

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of stars (those with masses less than 1.7 solar masses) have X-ray emitting coronae for all but their red giant and later stages of their evolution. Such coronae are believed to be powered by a magnetic dynamo mechanism that results from an interplay between the convective and rotational flows in their outer envelopes, although the details, e.g., whether coronae are predominantly energized by flares, waves, currents, etc., are still actively debated. As stars age, they lose angular momentum through their stellar wind, and their coronae become less powerful, e.g., the present solar corona's X-ray luminosity is only 10-7 of its total luminosity, and cooler, e.g., the bulk of the solar corona is cooler than 3 MK. Because of sensitivity limitations, essentially all operating and previous X-ray observatories with high spectral resolution capabilities have studied primarily the exceptional X-ray luminous coronal stars, such as active binaries and stars much younger than the Sun, i.e., the `tip of the iceberg' of the stellar coronal population. The high-resolution instruments on the International X-Ray Observatory (IXO) will enable us to study the complex, line-rich spectra of a wide range of stellar coronae in unprecedented detail, e.g., with an E/Delta E of 3000 implying a velocity resolution of 100 km/s. We discuss sample programs that IXO could conduct on various classes of stellar coronal sources, and the information that these would yield on coronal abundances, temperatures, electron densities, etc., and potentially on the underlying coronal heating mechanism(s).

  14. Dose properties of x-ray beams produced by laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Kainz, K K; Hogstrom, K R; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D

    2005-01-01

    Given that laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been demonstrated experimentally to accelerate electron beams to energies beyond 25 MeV, it is reasonable to assess the ability of existing LWFA technology to compete with conventional radiofrequency linear accelerators in producing electron and x-ray beams for external-beam radiotherapy. We present calculations of the dose distributions (off-axis dose profiles and central-axis depth dose) and dose rates of x-ray beams that can be produced from electron beams that are generated using state-of-the-art LWFA. Subsets of an LWFA electron energy distribution were propagated through the treatment head elements (presuming an existing design for an x-ray production target and flattening filter) implemented within the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Three x-ray energy configurations (6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV) were studied, and the energy width deltaE of the electron-beam subsets varied from 0.5 MeV to 12.5 MeV. As deltaE increased from 0.5 MeV to 4.5 MeV, we found that the off-axis and central-axis dose profiles for x-rays were minimally affected (to within about 3%), a result slightly different from prior calculations of electron beams broadened by scattering foils. For deltaE of the order of 12 MeV, the effect on the off-axis profile was of the order of 10%, but the central-axis depth dose was affected by less than 2% for depths in excess of about 5 cm beyond d(max). Although increasing deltaE beyond 6.5 MeV increased the dose rate at d(max) by more than 10 times, the absolute dose rates were about 3 orders of magnitude below those observed for LWFA-based electron beams at comparable energies. For a practical LWFA-based x-ray device, the beam current must be increased by about 4-5 orders of magnitude. PMID:15715431

  15. A combination of high dose rate (10X FFF/2400 MU/min/10 MV X-rays) and total low dose (0.5 Gy) induces a higher rate of apoptosis in melanoma cells in vitro and superior preservation of normal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Sarojini, Sreeja; Pecora, Andrew; Milinovikj, Natasha; Barbiere, Joseph; Gupta, Saakshi; Hussain, Zeenathual M; Tuna, Mehmet; Jiang, Jennifer; Adrianzen, Laura; Jun, Jaewook; Catello, Laurice; Sanchez, Diana; Agarwal, Neha; Jeong, Stephanie; Jin, Youngjin; Remache, Yvonne; Goy, Andre; Ndlovu, Alois; Ingenito, Anthony; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the apoptotic effects, toxicity, and radiosensitization of total low dose irradiation delivered at a high dose rate in vitro to melanoma cells, normal human epidermal melanocytes (HEM), or normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and to study the effect of mitochondrial inhibition in combination with radiation to enhance apoptosis in melanoma cells. Cells irradiated using 10X flattening filter-free (FFF) 10 MV X-rays at a dose rate of 400 or 2400 MU/min and a total dose of 0.25-8 Gy were analyzed by cell/colony counting, MitoTracker, MTT, and DNA-damage assays, as well as by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR in the presence or absence of mitochondrial respiration inhibitors. A dose rate of 2400 MU/min killed on average five-fold more melanoma cells than a dose rate 400 MU/min at a total dose of 0.5 Gy and preserved 80% survival of HEM and 90% survival of HDF. Increased apoptosis at the 2400 MU/min dose rate is mediated by greater DNA damage, reduced cell proliferation, upregulation of apoptotic genes, and downregulation of cell cycle genes. HEM and HDF were relatively unharmed at 2400 MU/min. Radiation induced upregulation of mitochondrial respiration in both normal and cancer cells, and blocking the respiration with inhibitors enhanced apoptosis only in melanoma cells. A high dose rate with a low total dose (2400 MU/min, 0.5 Gy/10X FFF 10 MV X-rays) enhances radiosensitivity of melanoma cells while reducing radiotoxicity toward HEM and HDF. Selective cytotoxicity of melanoma cells is increased by blocking mitochondrial respiration. PMID:26177150

  16. A combination of high dose rate (10X FFF/2400 MU/min/10 MV X-rays) and total low dose (0.5 Gy) induces a higher rate of apoptosis in melanoma cells in vitro and superior preservation of normal melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sarojini, Sreeja; Pecora, Andrew; Milinovikj, Natasha; Barbiere, Joseph; Gupta, Saakshi; Hussain, Zeenathual M.; Tuna, Mehmet; Jiang, Jennifer; Adrianzen, Laura; Jun, Jaewook; Catello, Laurice; Sanchez, Diana; Agarwal, Neha; Jeong, Stephanie; Jin, Youngjin; Remache, Yvonne; Goy, Andre; Ndlovu, Alois; Ingenito, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the apoptotic effects, toxicity, and radiosensitization of total low dose irradiation delivered at a high dose rate in vitro to melanoma cells, normal human epidermal melanocytes (HEM), or normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and to study the effect of mitochondrial inhibition in combination with radiation to enhance apoptosis in melanoma cells. Cells irradiated using 10X flattening filter-free (FFF) 10 MV X-rays at a dose rate of 400 or 2400 MU/min and a total dose of 0.25–8 Gy were analyzed by cell/colony counting, MitoTracker, MTT, and DNA-damage assays, as well as by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR in the presence or absence of mitochondrial respiration inhibitors. A dose rate of 2400 MU/min killed on average five-fold more melanoma cells than a dose rate 400 MU/min at a total dose of 0.5 Gy and preserved 80% survival of HEM and 90% survival of HDF. Increased apoptosis at the 2400 MU/min dose rate is mediated by greater DNA damage, reduced cell proliferation, upregulation of apoptotic genes, and downregulation of cell cycle genes. HEM and HDF were relatively unharmed at 2400 MU/min. Radiation induced upregulation of mitochondrial respiration in both normal and cancer cells, and blocking the respiration with inhibitors enhanced apoptosis only in melanoma cells. A high dose rate with a low total dose (2400 MU/min, 0.5 Gy/10X FFF 10 MV X-rays) enhances radiosensitivity of melanoma cells while reducing radiotoxicity toward HEM and HDF. Selective cytotoxicity of melanoma cells is increased by blocking mitochondrial respiration. PMID:26177150

  17. High-Resolution Detector For X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Withrow, William K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Yost, Vaughn H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed x-ray-sensitive imaging detector offers superior spatial resolution, counting-rate capacity, and dynamic range. Instrument based on laser-stimulated luminescence and reusable x-ray-sensitive film. Detector scans x-ray film line by line. Extracts latent image in film and simultaneously erases film for reuse. Used primarily for protein crystallography. Principle adapted to imaging detectors for electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and general use in astronomy, engineering, and medicine.

  18. Ultra high resolution soft x-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.; Trebes, J.E.; Goodman, D.M.

    1995-07-19

    Ultra high resolution three dimensional images of a microscopic test object were made with soft x-rays using a scanning transmission x-ray microscope. The test object consisted of two different patterns of gold bars on silicon nitride windows that were separated by {approximately}5{mu}m. A series of nine 2-D images of the object were recorded at angles between {minus}50 to +55 degrees with respect to the beam axis. The projections were then combined tomographically to form a 3-D image by means of an algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) algorithm. A transverse resolution of {approximately}1000 {Angstrom} was observed. Artifacts in the reconstruction limited the overall depth resolution to {approximately}6000 {Angstrom}, however some features were clearly reconstructed with a depth resolution of {approximately}1000 {Angstrom}. A specially modified ART algorithm and a constrained conjugate gradient (CCG) code were also developed as improvements over the standard ART algorithm. Both of these methods made significant improvements in the overall depth resolution bringing it down to {approximately}1200 {Angstrom} overall. Preliminary projection data sets were also recorded with both dry and re-hydrated human sperm cells over a similar angular range.

  19. The X-ray properties of high redshift, optically selected QSOs. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the X-ray properties of high redshift QSOs, grism/grens plates covering 17 deg. of sky previously imaged to very sensitive X-ray flux levels with the Einstein Observatory were taken. Following optical selection of the QSO, the archived X-ray image is examined to extract an X-ray flux detection or a sensitive upper limit.

  20. Modeling a superficial radiotherapy X-ray source for relative dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Christopher D; LaFontaine, Richard; Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically characterize and validate a kilovoltage (kV) X-ray beam source model of a superficial X-ray unit for relative dose calculations in water and assess the accuracy of the British Journal of Radiology Supplement 25 (BJR 25) percentage depth dose (PDD) data. We measured central axis PDDs and dose profiles using an Xstrahl 150 X-ray system. We also compared the measured and calculated PDDs to those in the BJR 25. The Xstrahl source was modeled as an effective point source with varying spatial fluence and spectra. In-air ionization chamber measurements were made along the x- and y-axes of the X-ray beam to derive the spatial fluence and half-value layer (HVL) measurements were made to derive the spatially varying spectra. This beam characterization and resulting source model was used as input for our in-house dose calculation software (kVDoseCalc) to compute radiation dose at points of interest (POIs). The PDDs and dose profiles were measured using 2, 5, and 15 cm cone sizes at 80, 120, 140, and 150 kVp energies in a scanning water phantom using IBA Farmer-type ionization chambers of volumes 0.65 and 0.13 cc, respectively. The percent difference in the computed PDDs compared with our measurements range from -4.8% to 4.8%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 1.5% and 0.7%, respectively. The percent difference between our PDD measurements and those from BJR 25 range from -14.0% to 15.7%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 4.9% and 2.1%, respectively - showing that the measurements are in much better agreement with kVDoseCalc than BJR 25. The range in percent difference between kVDoseCalc and measurement for profiles was -5.9% to 5.9%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 1.4% and 1.4%, respectively. The results demonstrate that our empirically based X-ray source modeling approach for superficial X-ray therapy can be used to accurately

  1. X-RAY ABSORPTION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eitan, Assaf; Behar, Ehud E-mail: behar@physics.technion.ac.il

    2013-09-01

    The soft X-ray photoelectric absorption of high-z quasars has been known for two decades, but has no unambiguous astrophysical context. We construct the largest sample to date of 58 high-redshift quasars (z > 0.45) selected from the XMM-Newton archive based on a high photon count criterion (>1800). We measure the optical depth {tau} at 0.5 keV and find that 43% of the quasars show significant absorption. We aim to find which physical parameters of the quasars, e.g., redshift, radio luminosity, radio loudness, or X-ray luminosity, drive their observed absorption. We compare the absorption behavior with redshift with the pattern expected if the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM) is responsible for the observed absorption. We also compare the absorption with a comparison sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray afterglows. Although the z > 2 quasar opacity is consistent with diffuse IGM absorption, many intermediate-z (0.45 < z < 2) quasars are not sufficiently absorbed for this scenario, and are appreciably less absorbed than GRBs. Only 10/37 quasars at z < 2 are absorbed, and only 5/30 radio-quiet quasars are absorbed. We find a weak correlation between {tau} and z, and an even weaker correlation between {tau} and radio luminosity. These findings lead to the conclusion that although a diffuse IGM origin for the quasar absorption is unlikely, the optical depth does seem to increase with redshift, roughly as (1 + z){sup 2.2{+-}0.6}, tending to {tau} Almost-Equal-To 0.4 at high redshifts, similar to the high-z GRBs. This result can be explained by an ionized and clumpy IGM at z < 2, and a cold, diffuse IGM at higher redshift. If, conversely, the absorption occurs at the quasar, and owing to the steep L{sub x} {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 7.1{+-}0.5} correlation in the present sample, the host column density scales as N{sub H}{proportional_to}L{sub x}{sup 0.7{+-}0.1}.

  2. National reference doses for common radiographic, fluoroscopic and dental X-ray examinations in the UK.

    PubMed

    Hart, D; Hillier, M C; Wall, B F

    2009-01-01

    The National Patient Dose Database (NPDD) is maintained by the Radiation Protection Division of the Health Protection Agency. The latest review of the database analysed the data collected from 316 hospitals over a 5-year period to the end of 2005. The information supplied amounted to a total of 23 000 entrance surface dose measurements and 57 000 dose-area product measurements for single radiographs, and 208 000 dose-area product measurements along with 187 000 fluoroscopy times for diagnostic examinations or interventional procedures. In addition, patient dose data for dental X-ray examinations were included for the first time in the series of 5-yearly reviews. This article presents a summary of a key output from the NPDD - national reference doses. These are based on the third quartile values of the dose distributions for 30 types of diagnostic X-ray examination and 8 types of interventional procedure on adults, and for 4 types of X-ray examination on children. The reference doses are approximately 16% lower than the corresponding values in the previous (2000) review, and are typically less than half the values of the original UK national reference doses that were derived from a survey in the mid-1980s. This commentary suggests that two of the national reference doses from the 2000 review be retained as diagnostic reference levels because the older sample size was larger than for the 2005 review. No clear evidence could be found for the use of digital imaging equipment having a significant effect on dose. PMID:18852213

  3. Theoretical Calculations and Simulations of Interaction of X-Rays with High-Z Nanomoities for Use in Cancer Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.

    2013-06-01

    When used with X-ray radiotherapy, heavy elements (high atomic number Z or HZ) such as gold(Au) and platinum(Pt) have the potential to greatly sensitize and enhance the damage to tumor tissues. While HZ radiosensitization has been shown to be higly effective in reducing tumor sizes, much work still needs to be done to determine the ideal X-ray energy/energy spectrum. The likelihood of photoelectric absorption of X-rays that result in the production of cell-killing Auger electrons relative to the photon scatter in an HZ sensitized tumor has to be determined for treatments using X-rays from various sources and energies to assess their efficacy. In this report, we present computations that outline the dependence of photoelectric absorption on X-ray energy. The relative X-ray absorption by a radiosensitized tumor was calculated to contrast the efficacy of different X-ray sources in Auger electron production at different tumor depths. Enhanced photoabsorption of low-energy X-rays from broadband sources in the keV range is shown to be much higher than from those in the MeV range. In addition, with the use of the Monte Carlo code package Geant4, we present the total X-ray energy deposited into a radiosensitized tumor located at different depths in a phantom. The enhancement in radiation dose deposition will also be analysed at the microscopic cellular level to determine the HZ radiosensitizer concentration required. Potential use of monochromatic X-rays for more precise HZ radiosensitization will also be described.

  4. Fabricating High-Resolution X-Ray Collimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Michael; Atkinson, James E.; Fraser, Iain; Klinger, Jill

    2008-01-01

    A process and method for fabricating multi-grid, high-resolution rotating modulation collimators for arcsecond and sub-arcsecond x-ray and gamma-ray imaging involves photochemical machining and precision stack lamination. The special fixturing and etching techniques that have been developed are used for the fabrication of multiple high-resolution grids on a single array substrate. This technology has application in solar and astrophysics and in a number of medical imaging applications including mammography, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and gamma cameras used in nuclear medicine. This collimator improvement can also be used in non-destructive testing, hydrodynamic weapons testing, and microbeam radiation therapy.

  5. 30-Lens interferometer for high-energy X-rays.

    PubMed

    Lyubomirskiy, Mikhail; Snigireva, Irina; Kohn, Victor; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Yunkin, Vyacheslav; Vaughan, Gavin; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-09-01

    A novel high-energy multi-lens interferometer consisting of 30 arrays of planar compound refractive lenses is reported. Under coherent illumination each lens array creates a diffraction-limited secondary source. Overlapping such coherent beams produces an interference pattern demonstrating strong longitudinal functional dependence. The proposed multi-lens interferometer was tested experimentally at the 100 m-long ID11 ESRF beamline in the X-ray energy range from 30 to 65 keV. The interference pattern generated by the interferometer was recorded at fundamental and fractional Talbot distances. An effective source size (FWHM) of the order of 15 µm was determined from the first Talbot image, proving the concept that the multi-lens interferometer can be used as a high-resolution tool for beam diagnostics. PMID:27577763

  6. Differential Effects of X-Rays and High-Energy {sup 56}Fe Ions on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kurpinski, Kyle; Jang, Deok-Jin; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Rydberg, Bjorn; Chu, Julia; So, Joanna; Wyrobek, Andy; Li Song; Wang Daojing

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Stem cells hold great potential for regenerative medicine, but they have also been implicated in cancer and aging. How different kinds of ionizing radiation affect stem cell biology remains unexplored. This study was designed to compare the biological effects of X-rays and of high-linear energy transfer (LET) {sup 56}Fe ions on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Methods and Materials: A multi-functional comparison was carried out to investigate the differential effects of X-rays and {sup 56}Fe ions on hMSC. The end points included modulation of key markers such as p53, cell cycle progression, osteogenic differentiation, and pathway and networks through transcriptomic profiling and bioinformatics analysis. Results: X-rays and {sup 56}Fe ions differentially inhibited the cell cycle progression of hMSC in a p53-dependent manner without impairing their in vitro osteogenic differentiation process. Pathway and network analyses revealed that cytoskeleton and receptor signaling were uniquely enriched for low-dose (0.1 Gy) X-rays. In contrast, DNA/RNA metabolism and cell cycle regulation were enriched for high-dose (1 Gy) X-rays and {sup 56}Fe ions, with more significant effects from {sup 56}Fe ions. Specifically, DNA replication, DNA strand elongation, and DNA binding/transferase activity were perturbed more severely by 1 Gy {sup 56}Fe ions than by 1 Gy X-rays, consistent with the significant G2/M arrest for the former while not for the latter. Conclusions: {sup 56}Fe ions exert more significant effects on hMSC than X-rays. Since hMSC are the progenitors of osteoblasts in vivo, this study provides new mechanistic understandings of the relative health risks associated with low- and high-dose X-rays and high-LET space radiation.

  7. High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, D.R.

    1995-07-18

    An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays from the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detector such that each one of the semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction. 5 figs.

  8. High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, David R.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays From the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detect or such that each one of the of semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction.

  9. A new high-speed x-ray beam chopper.

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, A.; Wang, J.; Lee, P. L.; Mills, D. M.

    1999-10-29

    A new high-speed x-ray beam chopper using laser scanner technology has been developed and tested on the SRI-CAT sector 1 beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring (1). As illustrated in figure 1, it is compact in size and has two sets of transmission windows: BK-7 glass for visible light transmission and 0.23-mm-thick Be for the transmission of x-rays. The rotor is made of aluminum and has a diameter of 50.8 mm. A 0.5-mm-wide and 2.29-mm-tall slit is cut through the center of the rotor. The circumference of the rotor has a coating of 1-mm-thick Ni, which gives an attenuation of 10{sup 8} at 30 keV. Turning at nearly 80000 RPM, this beam chopper has an opening time window of 2450 ns, corresponding to 67% of the revolution time of the APS storage ring. The primary feature in selecting laser scanner technology to develop into an x-ray beam chopper was the high level of rotational speed control of the rotor that makes up the beam chopper element (2). By using an optical feedback circuit to sample the rotational speed four times each revolution, the jitter in the position of the transmission open time window is only 3 ns at the 3 standard deviation level. The APS storage ring orbital frequency, supplied by the control room, is divided down to provide the appropriate drive frequency for the beam chopper motor controller. By this means, both the storage ring and the beam chopper are operating off the same master clock. After a turn-on time of about 15 to 20 seconds, the rotational precision of the motor results in immediate phase locking to the temporal structure of the APS storage ring. By inserting a Stanford delay generator between the frequency divider and the beam chopper motor controller, the phase between the storage ring temporal structure and the beam chopper rotation can be adjusted to position the transmission time window of the beam chopper on any desired part of the storage ring fill pattern. If an asymmetric fill pattern is used in the APS

  10. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    X-rays from a 25-hJ plasma focus apparatus were observed with pinhole cameras. The cameras consist of 0.4 mm diameter pinholes in 2 cm thick lead housing enclosing an X-ray intensifying screen at the image plane. Pictures recorded through thin aluminum foils or plastic sheets for X-ray energies sub gamma smaller than 15 keV show distributed X-ray emissions from the focussed plasma and from the anode surface. However, when thick absorbers are used, radial filamentary structure in the X-ray emission from the anode surface is revealed. Occasionally larger structures are observed in addition to the filaments. Possible mechanisms for the filamentary structure are discussed.

  11. Potential enhancement of warm x-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.; Weber, B.V.

    1995-07-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of war x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions. The calculation are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggest Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung which accompanies the warm x rays is a concern, then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately} 400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately} 5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  12. Potential enhancement of warm X-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.

    1995-08-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of warm x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions, for a Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) class accelerator. The calculations are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggested Jupiter diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung, which accompanies the warm x rays, is a concern then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately}400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately}5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  13. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  14. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, C. K. Endrizzi, M.; Diemoz, P. C.; Olivo, A.; Munro, P. R. T.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.

  15. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  16. X-ray induced Sm{sup 3+} to Sm{sup 2+} conversion in fluorophosphate and fluoroaluminate glasses for the monitoring of high-doses in microbeam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vahedi, Shahrzad; Okada, Go; Morrell, Brian; Muzar, Edward; Koughia, Cyril; Kasap, Safa; Edgar, Andy; Varoy, Chris; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean

    2012-10-01

    Fluorophosphate and fluoroaluminate glasses doped with trivalent samarium were evaluated as sensors of x-ray radiation for microbeam radiation therapy at the Canadian Light Source using the conversion of trivalent Sm{sup 3+} to the divalent form Sm{sup 2+}. Both types of glasses show similar conversion rates and may be used as a linear sensor up to {approx}150 Gy and as a nonlinear sensor up to {approx}2400 Gy, where saturation is reached. Experiments with a multi-slit collimator show high spatial resolution of the conversion pattern; the pattern was acquired by a confocal fluorescence microscopy technique. The effects of previous x-ray exposure may be erased by annealing at temperatures exceeding the glass transition temperature T{sub g} while annealing at T{sub A} < T{sub g} enhances the Sm conversion. This enhancement is explained by a thermally stimulated relaxation of host glass ionic matrix surrounding x-ray induced Sm{sup 2+} ions. In addition, some of the Sm{sup 3+}-doped glasses were codoped with Eu{sup 2+}-ions but the results show that there is no marked improvement in the conversion efficiency by the introduction of Eu{sup 2+}.

  17. High-Energy X-Ray Diffraction Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-11-29

    The functionality of heRXD includes the following: distance and angular calibration and viewing flat-panel detector images used for X-ray diffraction; image (polar) rebinning or "caking"; line position fitting in powder diffraction images; image segmentation or "blob finding"; crystal orentation indesing; and lattice vector refinement. These functionalities encompass a critical set analyzing teh data for high-energy diffraction measurements that are currently performed at synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The software design modularmore » and open source under LGPL. The intent is to provide a common framework and graphical user interface that has the ability to utillize internal as well as external subroutines to provide various optins for performing the fuctionalities listed above. The software will initially be deployed at several national user facilities--including APS, ALS, and CHESS--and then made available for download using a hosting service such as sourceforge.« less

  18. High-Energy X-Ray Diffraction Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-29

    The functionality of heRXD includes the following: distance and angular calibration and viewing flat-panel detector images used for X-ray diffraction; image (polar) rebinning or "caking"; line position fitting in powder diffraction images; image segmentation or "blob finding"; crystal orentation indesing; and lattice vector refinement. These functionalities encompass a critical set analyzing teh data for high-energy diffraction measurements that are currently performed at synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The software design modular and open source under LGPL. The intent is to provide a common framework and graphical user interface that has the ability to utillize internal as well as external subroutines to provide various optins for performing the fuctionalities listed above. The software will initially be deployed at several national user facilities--including APS, ALS, and CHESS--and then made available for download using a hosting service such as sourceforge.

  19. Collective effective dose in Europe from X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures.

    PubMed

    Bly, R; Jahnen, A; Järvinen, H; Olerud, H; Vassileva, J; Vogiatzi, S

    2015-07-01

    Population doses from radiodiagnostic (X-ray and nuclear medicine) procedures in Europe were estimated based on data collected from 36 European countries. For X-ray procedures in EU and EFTA countries (except Liechtenstein) the collective effective dose is 547,500 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 605,000 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.05 mSv per caput. For nuclear medicine procedures in EU countries and EFTA (except Liechtenstein) countries the collective effective dose is 30,700 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 31,100 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.05 mSv per caput. PMID:25848115

  20. A correction-based dose calculation algorithm for kilovoltage x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X.; Pawlowski, Jason M.; Coffey, Charles W.

    2008-12-15

    Frequent and repeated imaging procedures such as those performed in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) programs may add significant dose to radiosensitive organs of radiotherapy patients. It has been shown that kV-CBCT results in doses to bone that are up to a factor of 3-4 higher than those in surrounding soft tissue. Imaging guidance procedures are necessary due to their potential benefits, but the additional incremental dose per treatment fraction may exceed an individual organ tolerance. Hence it is important to manage and account for this additional dose from imaging for radiotherapy patients. Currently available model-based dose calculation methods in radiation treatment planning (RTP) systems are not suitable for low-energy x rays, and new and fast calculation algorithms are needed for a RTP system for kilovoltage dose computations. This study presents a new dose calculation algorithm, referred to as the medium-dependent-correction (MDC) algorithm, for accurate patient dose calculation resulting from kilovoltage x rays. The accuracy of the new algorithm is validated against Monte Carlo calculations. The new algorithm overcomes the deficiency of existing density correction based algorithms in dose calculations for inhomogeneous media, especially for CT-based human volumetric images used in radiotherapy treatment planning.

  1. High-performance multilevel blazed x-ray microscopy Fresnel zone plates: Fabricated using x-ray lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Di Fabrizio, E.; Gentili, M.; Grella, L.; Baciocchi, M. , I-00156 Rome ); Krasnoperova, A.; Cerrina, F. ); Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E. )

    1994-11-01

    Diffractive lenses are becoming the optical elements of choice for many applications. One type of diffractive lens, the binary zone plate, has already demonstrated high-resolution performance experimentally. However, in order to increase the diffraction efficiency of these zone plates, a blazed grating profile must be used. This can best be approximated by a staircase grating profile, created by multilevel exposures. Using x-ray lithograph, we fabricated for the first time circular, linear bi- and trilevel zone plates, with gold structures 0.75 [mu]m thick (per level), on silicon nitride substrates. The zone plates were designed for use at a wavelength of 1.54 A, and had a theoretical efficiency of 68.5% for bilevel and 81.5% for trilevel zone plates. Due to the large depth of focus and high resolution inherent to x-ray lithography, the finished zone plate exhibits very steep sidewall profiles, with linewidth resolution down to 0.25 [mu]m. Such vertical sidewalls are essential for achieving high lens efficiency. Fabrication errors, such as thickness variation in the electroplated gold and misalignment, were considered, and their effect on the optical efficiency of the zone plate was estimated. Alignment errors between levels were minimized, achieving a best result of 25 nm (3[sigma]). In fabricating the zone plates, we employed standard integrated device tools, such as a Leica Cambridge Electron Beam microfabricator (EBMF) 10cs/120 electron-beam writer for the x-ray mask fabrication, and a Suss 200 x-ray stepper for the multilevel exposures. Thus, we have shown that it will be possible to fabricate many lenses, with a variety of optical characteristics, in one wafer.

  2. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  3. X-ray depth-dose characteristics of the Toshiba LMR-16.

    PubMed

    Mantel, J; Perry, H; Weinkam, J J

    1979-01-01

    The depth-dose characteristics of the Toshiba LMR-16 linear accelerator for 14-MeV x rays have been measured at an SSD of 100 cm using diodes and ion chambers. The surface dose and build-up depth both exhibit a considerable variation with field size. A new central axis model has been developed which takes account of these variations, and the agreement between the measured and computed data using this model is found to be excellent. Formulas are also presented to estimate the surface dose, buildup depth, and output factor as a function of field size. PMID:460069

  4. Cryo X-ray microscopy with high spatial resolution in amplitude and phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Schneider, G

    1998-11-01

    The resolution of transmission X-ray microscopes (TXMs) using zone plate optics is presently about 30 nm. Theory and experiments presented here show that this resolution can be obtained in radiation sensitive hydrated biological material by using shock frozen samples. For this purpose the interaction of X-rays with matter and the image formation with zone plates is described. For the first time the influence of the limited apertures of the condenser and the zone plate objective are in included in calculations of the image contrast, the photon density and radiation dose required for the object illumination. Model considerations show that lowest radiation dose and high image contrast are obtained in optimized phase contrast which exploits absorption as well as phase shift. The damaging effect of the absorbed X-rays is quantitatively evaluated by radiation-induced kinetics showing that cryogenic samples are structurally stable. To verify these theoretical models the TXM was modified to allow imaging of frozen-hydrated samples at atmospheric pressure. Details inside cells and algae as small as 35 nm are visible at 2.4 nm wavelength in amplitude contrast mode. At this resolution the cryogenic samples show no structural changes. As predicted, optimized phase contrast shows structures inside the frozen-hydrated objects with high contrast. Stereo-pair images of algae reveal the 3D organization of the organelles. Element analysis and micro-tomography of whole cryogenic cells are possible. PMID:9836467

  5. Radiation dose to patients from X-ray radiographic examinations using computed radiography imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reena; Sharma, Sunil Dutt; Pawar, Shramika; Chaubey, Ajay; Kantharia, S; Babu, D A R

    2015-01-01

    The screen-film system is replaced by computed radiography system for recording the images of the patients during X-ray radiography examinations. The change in imaging system requires the re-establishment of the institutional diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of X-ray examinations conducted at the hospital. For this purpose, patient specific parameters [age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), object to image distance (OID)] and machine specific parameters (kVp, mAs, distance and field sizes) of 1875 patients during 21 different types of X-ray examinations were recorded for estimating the entrance skin dose (ESD). The ESD for each of these patients were estimated using measured X-ray beam output and the standard value of the back scatter factor. Five number summary was calculated for all the data for their presentation in the Box-Whisker plot, which provides the statistical distribution of the data. The data collected indicates that majorly performed examinations are cervical spine AP, Chest PA and Knee Lat with percentage contributions of 16.05, 16 and 8.27% respectively. The lowest contribution comes from Hip Lat which is about 1.01%. The ratio of measured ESD (maximum to minimum) for these examinations is found to be highest for the cervical spine AP with a value of 50 followed by Thoracic spine AP of 32.36. The ESD ratio for Chest PA, Knee Lat and Lumbar Spine AP are 30.75, 30.4 and 30.2 respectively. The lowest ESD ratio is for Hip Lat which is 2.68. The third quartile values of ESDs are established as the institutional DRLs. The ESD values obtained for 21 different X-ray projections are either comparable or lesser than the reported national/international values. PMID:26150685

  6. MOSFET dosimetry with high spatial resolution in intense synchrotron-generated x-ray microbeams

    SciTech Connect

    Siegbahn, E. A.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Bravin, A.; Nettelbeck, H.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2009-04-15

    Various dosimeters have been tested for assessing absorbed doses with microscopic spatial resolution in targets irradiated by high-flux, synchrotron-generated, low-energy ({approx}30-300 keV) x-ray microbeams. A MOSFET detector has been used for this study since its radio sensitive element, which is extraordinarily narrow ({approx}1 {mu}m), suits the main applications of interest, microbeam radiation biology and microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). In MRT, micrometer-wide, centimeter-high, and vertically oriented swaths of tissue are irradiated by arrays of rectangular x-ray microbeams produced by a multislit collimator (MSC). We used MOSFETs to measure the dose distribution, produced by arrays of x-ray microbeams shaped by two different MSCs, in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Doses were measured near the center of the arrays and maximum/minimum (peak/valley) dose ratios (PVDRs) were calculated to determine how variations in heights and in widths of the microbeams influenced this for the therapy, potentially important parameter. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the absorbed dose distribution in the phantom were also performed. The results show that when the heights of the irradiated swaths were below those applicable to clinical therapy (<1 mm) the MC simulations produce estimates of PVDRs that are up to a factor of 3 higher than the measured values. For arrays of higher microbeams (i.e., 25 {mu}mx1 cm instead of 25x500 {mu}m{sup 2}), this difference between measured and simulated PVDRs becomes less than 50%. Closer agreement was observed between the measured and simulated PVDRs for the Tecomet MSC (current collimator design) than for the Archer MSC. Sources of discrepancies between measured and simulated doses are discussed, of which the energy dependent response of the MOSFET was shown to be among the most important.

  7. MOSFET dosimetry with high spatial resolution in intense synchrotron-generated x-ray microbeams.

    PubMed

    Siegbahn, E A; Bräuer-Krisch, E; Bravin, A; Nettelbeck, H; Lerch, M L F; Rosenfeld, A B

    2009-04-01

    Various dosimeters have been tested for assessing absorbed doses with microscopic spatial resolution in targets irradiated by high-flux, synchrotron-generated, low-energy (approximately 30-300 keV) x-ray microbeams. A MOSFET detector has been used for this study since its radio sensitive element, which is extraordinarily narrow (approximately 1 microm), suits the main applications of interest, microbeam radiation biology and microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). In MRT, micrometer-wide, centimeter-high, and vertically oriented swaths of tissue are irradiated by arrays of rectangular x-ray microbeams produced by a multislit collimator (MSC). We used MOSFETs to measure the dose distribution, produced by arrays of x-ray microbeams shaped by two different MSCs, in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Doses were measured near the center of the arrays and maximum/minimum (peak/valley) dose ratios (PVDRs) were calculated to determine how variations in heights and in widths of the microbeams influenced this for the therapy, potentially important parameter. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the absorbed dose distribution in the phantom were also performed. The results show that when the heights of the irradiated swaths were below those applicable to clinical therapy (< 1 mm) the MC simulations produce estimates of PVDRs that are up to a factor of 3 higher than the measured values. For arrays of higher microbeams (i.e., 25 microm x 1 cm instead of 25 x 500 microm2), this difference between measured and simulated PVDRs becomes less than 50%. Closer agreement was observed between the measured and simulated PVDRs for the Tecomet MSC (current collimator design) than for the Archer MSC. Sources of discrepancies between measured and simulated doses are discussed, of which the energy dependent response of the MOSFET was shown to be among the most important. PMID:19472618

  8. Prunus armeniaca L (apricot) protects rat testes from detrimental effects of low-dose x-rays.

    PubMed

    Ugras, Murat Y; Kurus, Meltem; Ates, Burhan; Soylemez, Haluk; Otlu, Ali; Yilmaz, Ismet

    2010-03-01

    Exposure to low x-ray doses damages the spermatozoa, mainly by late-onset (ie, after 3 months) oxidative stress. Antioxidants ameliorate oxidation and prevent tissue damage. Prunus armeniaca L (apricot), rich in carotenoids and vitamins, is a potent natural antioxidant. We hypothesized that an apricot-rich diet might ameliorate the detrimental effects of low-dose x-rays on testis tissue. A 20% apricot diet was composed isoenergetically to the regular rodent diet. The total phenolic content, reducing power, and antioxidant capacity of both diets were determined. Sprague-Dawley rats received apricot-rich diets before and after x-ray exposure. Regular diets were given to controls. Rats were exposed to 0.2 Gy x-rays at the eighth week and were euthanized at the 20th postexposure week. Testicular oxidative status was determined by tissue thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities. For histologic evaluation, qualitative and quantitative microscopic determinations were performed, and Leydig and Sertoli cell counts and Johnsen scores were measured. The control diet group had significant testicular oxidative stress and mild tissue deterioration. Leydig and Sertoli cell counts, tubule diameters, and Johnsen scores were significantly decreased in the exposure groups. Apricot-rich diet significantly ameliorated the oxidative status and prevented the damage in tubular histology. The protective effects were prominent when the diet was maintained throughout the time course and were partially protected when the diet was initiated after exposure. The natural antioxidant activity of apricot ameliorates the delayed detrimental effects of low-dose irradiation on testis tissue. The high total antioxidant capacity of the apricot deserves further investigation. PMID:20417881

  9. Flash imaging of fine structures of cellular organelles by contact x-ray microscopy with a high intensity laser plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Ishino, Masahiko; Kishimoto, Maki; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shinohara, Kunio

    2011-09-01

    X-ray flash imaging by contact microscopy with a highly intense laser-plasma x-ray source was achieved for the observation of wet biological cells. The exposure time to obtain a single x-ray image was about 600 ps as determined by the pulse duration of the driving laser pulse. The x-ray flash imaging makes it possible to capture an x-ray image of living biological cells without any artificial treatment such as staining, fixation, freezing, and so on. The biological cells were cultivated directly on the surface of the silicon nitride membranes, which are used for the x-ray microscope. Before exposing the cells to x-rays they were observed by a conventional fluorescent microscope as reference, since the fluorescent microscopes can visualize specific organelles stained with fluorescent dye. Comparing the x-ray images with the fluorescent images of the exact same cells, each cellular organelle observed in the x-ray images was identified one by one and actin filaments and mitochondria were clearly identified in the x-ray images.

  10. Comprehensive x-ray spectral code for high energy astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D A; Fournier, K B; Mauche, C W

    2000-08-18

    The aim of this project has been to develop a spectral analysis tool with a level of quality and completeness commensurate to that expected in data from the current generation of X-ray observatories. The code is called LXSS (Livermore X-Ray Spectral Synthesizer). X-ray-emitting astrophysical plasmas are rarely, if ever, in LTE, so they have adopted the detailed level accounting approach, in which rates for processes that populate or depopulate atomic energy levels are treated explicitly. This entails the generation of a large quantity of atomic data, most of which is calculated using ''in-house'' computer codes. Calculations are benchmarked against laboratory data, and spectral models have been used to provide first-time interpretations of astrophysical X-ray spectra. The design of a versatile graphical user interface that allows access to and manipulation of the atomic database comprises the second major part of the project.

  11. Acoustically Mounted Microcystals Yield High Resolution X-ray Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, A.S.; Engel, M. A.; Stearns, R.; Datwani, S.; Olechno, J.; Ellson, R.; Skinner, J. M.; Allaire, M.; Orville, A. M.

    2011-05-31

    We demonstrate a general strategy for determining structures from showers of microcrystals. It uses acoustic droplet ejection to transfer 2.5 nL droplets from the surface of microcrystal slurries, through the air, onto mounting micromesh pins. Individual microcrystals are located by raster-scanning a several-micrometer X-ray beam across the cryocooled micromeshes. X-ray diffraction data sets merged from several micrometer-sized crystals are used to determine 1.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures.

  12. Deeply X-raying the high-energy sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottacini, Eugenio; Ajello, Marco

    2016-05-01

    All-sky explorations by Fermi-LAT have revolutionized our view of the gamma-ray Universe. While its ongoing all-sky survey counts thousands of sources, essential issues related to the nature of unassociated sources call for more sensitive all-sky surveys at hard X-ray energies that allow for their identification. This latter energy band encodes the hard-tail of the thermal emission and the soft-tail of non-thermal emission thereby bridging the non-thermal and thermal emission mechanisms of gamma-ray sources. All-sky surveys at hard X-rays are best performed by current coded-mask telescopes Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL/IBIS. To boost the hard X-ray all-sky sensitivity, we have developed an ad hoc technique by combining photons from independent observations of BAT and IBIS. The resulting Swift-INTEGRAL X-ray (SIX) survey has an improved source-number density. This improvement is essential to enhance the positive hard X-ray - gamma-ray source matches. We present the results from the scientific link between the neighboring gamma-ray and hard X-ray bands in the context of galactic and extragalactic source classes of the second catalog Fermi Gamma-ray LAT (2FGL).

  13. Compact high current generator for x-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlov, A. V.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Zorin, V. B.

    2006-12-01

    We report here a design of the portable high current generator, which can be used for a row of experiments and applications, including, but not limited to, X pinch, plasma focus, vacuum spark, etc. The X generator consists of the capacitor bank, multigap spark switch, load chamber, and built-in high voltage triggering generator. The capacitor bank consists of 12 General Atomics 35404 type capacitors (20nF, 25nH, 0.2Ω, 100kV). It stores ˜0.8kJ at 80kV charging voltage. Each three capacitors are commuted to a load by the multigap spark switch, which is able to commute by eight parallel channels. Switches operate in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. At 76kV charging voltage the generator provides ˜260kA with 120ns rise time and 5nH inductive load and ˜220kA with 145ns rise time and 10nH. Delay of output pulse relative to high voltage triggering pulse is ˜65ns with 5ns jitter. The dimensions of the generator are 1240×1240×225mm3 and the weight is ˜250kg, and only one high voltage power supply is required as additional equipment for the generator. The generator with a pumping system is placed on area about 0.5m2. Operation and handling are very simple, because no oil nor purified gases are required for the generator. The X generator has been successfully employed for experiments on the Ni X pinch load. X-ray pulse duration (full width at half maximum above 1keV) was about 5ns. Radiation yield Wr⩾500mJ was observed in the 1.2-1.5KeV range and Wr⩾20mJ in the 3-5keV energy range, which is comparable to results, obtained on the nanosecond accelerators. Clearly resolved images of 6μm wire indicate micron level size of hot spot. These results demonstrate possibility of this generator for application for x-ray backlighting.

  14. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) Juice Modulates Oxidative Damage Induced by Low Dose X-Ray in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Mohd Khairul Amran; Mohamed, Muhamad Idham; Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Saad, Wan Mazlina Md.

    2014-01-01

    Watermelon is a natural product that contains high level of antioxidants and may prevent oxidative damage in tissues due to free radical generation following an exposure to ionizing radiation. The present study aimed to investigate the radioprotective effects of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice against oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure in mice. Twelve adult male ICR mice were randomly divided into two groups consisting of radiation (Rx) and supplementation (Tx) groups. Rx received filtered tap water, while Tx was supplemented with 50% (v/v) watermelon juice for 28 days ad libitum prior to total body irradiation by 100 μGy X-ray on day 29. Brain, lung, and liver tissues were assessed for the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibition activities. Results showed significant reduction of MDA levels and AP sites formation of Tx compared to Rx (P < 0.05). Mice supplemented with 50% watermelon juice restore the intracellular antioxidant activities by significantly increased SOD inhibition activities and GSH levels compared to Rx. These findings may postulate that supplementation of 50% watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice could modulate oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure. PMID:24877107

  15. X-Ray Absorption of High- Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, Ehud; Eitan, Assaf

    2012-09-01

    Soft X-ray absorption of high-z quasars has been known for more than a decade, but its astrophysical context remains a mystery. In order to better understand this absorption, we have constructed the largest to date high-S/N sample of high-z quasars (z > 0.5) from the XMM-Newton archive. We find that generally, z<2 and radio quiet objects provide only upper limits for the 0.5 keV optical depth (tau). Thus, we use censored statistics methods to seek correlations between tau and other quasar parameters. We find a dramatic increase of tau with z [(1+z)^{2.5}], although the correlation is rather weak. The correlation of tau with radio luminosity (or loudness) is even weaker. We also compare the absorption behavior with redshift with a large sample of GRBs, and with the pattern expected if the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM) is responsible for the observed absorption. We find that although the z > 2 quasar opacity is consistent with a diffuse IGM effect and with the high-z GRB opacities, absorption of intermediate z (0.5 < z < 2) quasars is too low for this scenario, which leads to the conclusion that a simple IGM origin for this absorption is unlikely.

  16. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  17. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    PubMed Central

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Finkenthal, M.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Pfeiffer, F.; Stutman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  18. High pressure x-ray diffraction techniques with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Liu

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the developments of experimental techniques for high pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD) in diamond anvil cells (DACs) using synchrotron radiation. Basic principles and experimental methods for various diffraction geometry are described, including powder diffraction, single crystal diffraction, radial diffraction, as well as coupling with laser heating system. Resolution in d-spacing of different diffraction modes is discussed. More recent progress, such as extended application of single crystal diffraction for measurements of multigrain and electron density distribution, time-resolved diffraction with dynamic DAC and development of modulated heating techniques are briefly introduced. The current status of the high pressure beamline at BSRF (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility) and some results are also presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10875142, 11079040, and 11075175). The 4W2 beamline of BSRF was supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. KJCX2-SW-N20, KJCX2-SW-N03, and SYGNS04).

  19. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-01

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  20. X-ray spectral evolution of high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtold, Jill; Elvis, Martin; Fiore, Fabrizio; Kuhn, Olga; Cutri, Roc M.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.; Rieke, Marcia; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1994-01-01

    At z approx. equals 3, the x-ray spectra of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars are different. High-redshift radio-quiet quasars either have large absorbing columns, N(sub H), and steeper power law spectral indices, alpha(sub epsilon), than low redshift quasars, or no absorption and similar alpha(sub epsilon)'s. In contrast, the radio-loud quasars at high redshift have substantial absorption and similar alpha(sub epsilon)'s to low redshift quasars. Implications for the interpretation of the evolution of the luminosity function of quasars are discussed. If the absorption arises outside the central engine for both radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, then radio-quiet quasars differ from the radio-loud quasars in that their emitted power law spectrum has evolved with redshift. We argue that this favors models where quasars are numerous and short-lived, rather than rare and long-lived.

  1. High-throughput screening with micro-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.

    2005-06-15

    Micro-x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) is a useful characterization tool for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Due to the increasing threat of use of chemical warfare (CW) agents both in military actions and against civilians by terrorist extremists, there is a strong push to improve existing methods and develop means for the detection of a broad spectrum of CW agents in a minimal amount of time to increase national security. This paper describes a combinatorial high-throughput screening technique for CW receptor discovery to aid in sensor development. MXRF can screen materials for elemental composition at the mesoscale level (tens to hundreds of micrometers). The key aspect of this work is the use of commercial MXRF instrumentation coupled with the inherent heteroatom elements within the target molecules of the combinatorial reaction to provide rapid and specific identification of lead species. The method is demonstrated by screening an 11-mer oligopeptide library for selective binding of the degradation products of the nerve agent VX. The identified oligopeptides can be used as selective molecular receptors for sensor development. The MXRF screening method is nondestructive, requires minimal sample preparation or special tags for analysis, and the screening time depends on the desired sensitivity.

  2. Measurement of patient entrance surface dose rates for fluoroscopic x-ray units.

    PubMed

    Martin, C J

    1995-05-01

    Measurements of patient entrance surface dose rate provide valuable data for interpreting results from dose-area product studies on fluoroscopic x-ray equipment. Methods for measurement of entrance surface dose rate with backscatter and incident dose rate without backscatter have been investigated. Entrance surface dose rate is measured with an ionization chamber in contact with a tissue-equivalent phantom. Backscattered radiation contributes 27-45% to the measurement and is affected by field size and chamber position. Incident dose rate measured using a copper phantom provides an alternative approach. Consistent relationships between thicknesses of Perspex and copper giving similar incident dose rates under automatic gain control have been established for different tube potentials with and without a grid. This allows measurements of incident dose rate made using copper to be linked to corresponding thicknesses of tissue-equivalent material. Since only a few millimetres of copper are required, contributions from backscatter can be minimized and transport of phantoms is simplified. Incident dose can be related to dose-area product and entrance surface dose derived using backscatter factors. Such measurements play a valuable role in interpreting patient dose data and recommending options to reduce patient dose. PMID:7652010

  3. High-resolution multi-MeV x-ray radiography using relativistic laser-solid interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Barbotin, M.; Bazzoli, S.; Brebion, D.; Bourgade, J. L.; Gazave, J.; Lagrange, J. M.; Landoas, O.; Le Dain, L.; Lefebvre, E.; Pichoff, N.; Edwards, R.; Aedy, C.; Biddle, L.; Drew, D.; Gardner, M.; Ramsay, M.; Simons, A.; Sircombe, N.

    2011-02-15

    When high intensity ({>=}10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}) laser light interacts with matter, multi-MeV electrons are produced. These electrons can be utilized to generate a MeV bremsstrahlung x-ray emission spectrum as they propagate into a high-Z solid target positioned behind the interaction area. The short duration (<10 ps) and the small diameter (<500 {mu}m) of the x-ray pulse combined with the MeV x-ray spectrum offers an interesting alternative to conventional bremsstrahlung x-ray sources based on an electron accelerator used to radiograph dense, rapidly moving objects. In experiments at the Omega EP laser, a multi-MeV x-ray source is characterized consistently with number of independent diagnostics. An unfiltered x-ray dose of approximately 2 rad in air at 1 m and a source diameter of less than 350 {mu}m are inferred. Radiography of a complex and high area density (up to 61 g/cm{sup 2}) object is then performed with few hundred microns spatial resolution.

  4. A dual-energy medical instrument for measurement of x-ray source voltage and dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikov, V. D.; Naydenov, S. V.; Volkov, V. G.; Opolonin, O. D.; Makhota, S.; Pochet, T.; Smith, C. F.

    2016-03-01

    An original dual-energy detector and medical instrument have been developed to measure the output voltages and dose rates of X-ray sources. Theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to characterize the parameters of a new scintillator-photodiode sandwich-detector based on specially-prepared zinc selenide crystals in which the low-energy detector (LED) works both as the detector of the low-energy radiation and as an absorption filter allowing the highenergy fraction of the radiation to pass through to the high-energy detector (HED). The use of the LED as a low-energy filter in combination with a separate HED opens broad possibilities for such sandwich structures. In particular, it becomes possible to analyze and process the sum, difference and ratio of signals coming from these detectors, ensuring a broad (up to 106) measurement range of X-ray intensity from the source and a leveling of the energy dependence. We have chosen an optimum design of the detector and the geometry of the component LED and HED parts that allow energy-dependence leveling to within specified limits. The deviation in energy dependence of the detector does not exceed about 5% in the energy range from 30 to 120 keV. The developed detector and instrument allow contactless measurement of the anode voltage of an X-ray emitter from 40 to 140 kV with an error no greater than 3%. The dose rate measurement range is from 1 to 200 R/min. An original medical instrument has passed clinical testing and was recommended for use in medical institutions for X-ray diagnostics.

  5. High resolution, high rate X-ray spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, Frederick S.; Landis, Donald A.

    1987-01-01

    A pulse processing system (10) for use in an X-ray spectrometer in which a ain channel pulse shaper (12) and a fast channel pulse shaper (13) each produce a substantially symmetrical triangular pulse (f, p) for each event detected by the spectrometer, with the pulse width of the pulses being substantially independent of the magnitude of the detected event and with the pulse width of the fast pulses (p) being substantially shorter than the pulse width of the main channel pulses (f). A pile-up rejector circuit (19) allows output pulses to be generated, with amplitudes linearly related to the magnitude of the detected events, whenever the peak of a main channel pulse (f) is not affected by a preceding or succeeding main channel pulse, while inhibiting output pulses wherein peak magnitudes of main channel pulses are affected by adjacent pulses. The substantially symmetrical triangular main channel pulses (f) are generated by the weighted addition (27-31) of successive RC integrations (24, 25, 26) of an RC differentiated step wave (23). The substantially symmetrical triangular fast channel pulses (p) are generated by the RC integration ( 43) of a bipolar pulse (o) in which the amplitude of the second half is 1/e that of the first half, with the RC time constant of integration being equal to one-half the width of the bipolar pulse.

  6. Dose calculations using convolution and superposition principles: the orientation of dose spread kernels in divergent x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, M B; Battista, J J

    1993-01-01

    The convolution/superposition method of dose calculation has the potential to become the preferred technique for radiotherapy treatment planning. When this approach is used for therapeutic x-ray beams, the dose spread kernels are usually aligned parallel to the central axis of the incident beam. While this reduces the computational burden, it is more rigorous to tilt the kernel axis to align it with the diverging beam rays that define the incident direction of primary photons. We have assessed the validity of the parallel kernel approximation by computing dose distributions using parallel and tilted kernels for monoenergetic photons of 2, 6, and 10 MeV; source-to-surface distances (SSDs) of 50, 80, and 100 cm; and for field sizes of 5 x 5, 15 x 15, and 30 x 30 cm2. Over most of the irradiated volume, the parallel kernel approximation yields results that differ from tilted kernel calculations by 3% or less for SSDs greater than 80 cm. Under extreme conditions of a short SSD, a large field size and high incident photon energy, the parallel kernel approximation results in discrepancies that may be clinically unacceptable. For 10-MeV photons, we have observed that the parallel kernel approximation can overestimate the dose by up to 4.4% of the maximum on the central axis for a field size of 30 x 30 cm2 applied with a SSD of 50 cm. Very localized dose underestimations of up to 27% of the maximum dose occurred in the penumbral region of a 30 x 30-cm2 field of 10-MeV photons applied with a SSD of 50 cm. PMID:8309441

  7. Cosolvent-free polymer gel dosimeters with improved dose sensitivity and resolution for x-ray CT dose response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chain, J. N. M.; Jirasek, A.; Schreiner, L. J.; McAuley, K. B.

    2011-04-01

    This study reports new N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel recipes with increased dose sensitivity and improved dose resolution for x-ray CT readout. NIPAM can be used to increase the solubility of N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) in aqueous solutions from approximately 3% to 5.5% by weight, enabling the manufacture of dosimeters containing up to 19.5%T, which is the total concentration of NIPAM and Bis by weight. Gelatin is shown to have a mild influence on dose sensitivity when gels are imaged using x-ray CT, and a stronger influence when gels are imaged optically. Phantoms that contain only 3% gelatin and 5 mM tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride are sufficiently stiff for dosimetry applications. The best cosolvent-free gel formulation has a dose sensitivity in the linear range (~0.88 H Gy-1) that is a small improvement compared to the best NIPAM-based gels that incorporate isopropanol as a cosolvent (~0.80 H Gy-1). This new gel formulation results in enhanced dose resolution (~0.052 Gy) for x-ray CT readout, making clinical applications of this imaging modality more feasible.

  8. X-Ray Resonant Irradiation and High-Z Radiosensitization in Cancer Therapy Using Platinum Nano-Reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Lim, S.; Montenegro, M.; Pradhan, A. K.; Barth, R.; Bell, E.; Turro, C.; Pitzer, R.

    2012-06-01

    %TEXT OF YOUR ABSTRACT We describe the atomic-molecular-bio physics of X-ray irradiation of High-Z heavy-element nanomaterials as radiosensitizing agents in cancer therapy. Our reports in past few ISMSs showed that compounds of High-Z elements, Pt and Au, embedded in tumors could provide the most efficient therapy and diagnostics (theranostics) when X-rays are targeted at their resonant energies. Harmful damages due to unnecessary broadband radiation from conventional X-ray sources can be reduced considerably by using a monochromatic X-ray source at resonant energy. We will present our recent findings from Monte Carlo simulations, using Geant4 code, for X-ray energy absorption and dose deposition in tissues where the broadband X-ray sources have three different peak voltages, 100 keV, 170 keV and 6 MeV. We use platinum as an agent for killing cancerous cells via increased linear-energy-transfer (LET) and dose enhancement. We find that X-ray energies in the range below 100 keV are most efficient in achieving both the required tissue penetrative depths and deposition of energy. This confirms the previous results for Au that it is only the low-energy component around 100 keV from the 6 MV linear accelerator (LINAC) that is most effective in dose-enhanced cell killing. Preliminary experimental results cancer cells with Pt and results on Kα radiation of Al will also be presented. Acknowledgement: Partially supported by DOE, NSF; Computational work was carried out at the Ohio Supercomputer Center

  9. High Resolution Temporal and Spectral Monitoring of Eta Carinae's X-Ray Emission the June Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Henley, D.; Pittard, J. M.; Gull, T. R.; Davidson, K.; Swank, J. H.; Petre, R.; Ishibashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    The supermassive and luminous star Eta Carinae undergoes strong X-ray variations every 5.5 years when its 2-10 keV X-ray emission brightens rapidly with wild fluctuations before dropping by a factor of 100 to a minimum lasting 3 months. The most recent X-ray "eclipse" began in June 2003 and during this time Eta Carinae was intensely observed throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. Here we report the first results of frequent monitoring of the 2-10 keV band X-ray emission by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer along wit high resolution X-ray spectra obtained with the transmission gratings on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We compare these observations to those results obtained during the previous X-ray eclipse in 1998, and interpret the variations in the X-ray brightness, in the amount of absorption, in the X-ray emission measure and in the K-shell emission lines in terms of a colliding wind binary model.

  10. Note: High-pressure in situ x-ray laminography using diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Ryuichi; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2016-04-01

    A high-pressure in situ X-ray laminography technique was developed using a newly designed, laterally open diamond anvil cell. A low X-ray beam of 8 keV energy was used, aiming at future application to dual energy X-ray chemical imaging techniques. The effects of the inclination angle and the imaging angle range were evaluated at ambient pressure using the apparatus. Sectional images of ruby ball samples were successfully reconstructed at high pressures, up to approximately 50 GPa. The high-pressure in situ X-ray laminography technique is expected to provide new insights into the deep Earth sciences. PMID:27131721

  11. Note: High-pressure in situ x-ray laminography using diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ryuichi; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2016-04-01

    A high-pressure in situ X-ray laminography technique was developed using a newly designed, laterally open diamond anvil cell. A low X-ray beam of 8 keV energy was used, aiming at future application to dual energy X-ray chemical imaging techniques. The effects of the inclination angle and the imaging angle range were evaluated at ambient pressure using the apparatus. Sectional images of ruby ball samples were successfully reconstructed at high pressures, up to approximately 50 GPa. The high-pressure in situ X-ray laminography technique is expected to provide new insights into the deep Earth sciences.

  12. Relationship between radiation dose and reduced X-ray sensitivity surrounding breast region using CR stimulable phosphor plate for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishide, Hiroko; Kodera, Yoshie

    2015-03-01

    Computed radiography (CR) systems use a photostimulable phosphor plate (imaging plate ; IP) as a sensor for digital mammography. In clinical mammography, breast is almost exposed same region of IP, and therefor, direct x-ray regions surrounding suffer from reduced x-ray sensitivity. Consequently, the difference in x-ray sensitivity between the breast regions and the unattenuated x-ray region was obtained. However, radiation dose quantity that reduces x-ray sensitivity is not known. In this study, we imaged a breast phantom under fixed conditions, and subsequently, we investigated the pixel value differences between the breast region and the unattenuated x-ray regions. We measured the entrance air-kerma using 550 sensing elements of glass dosimeter, 22x25 lines, that were placed at the surface of the cassette including the IP. In order to measure the x-ray sensitivity, pre- and post-exposure breast phantom images were acquired after 500, 1,000, 1,350, and 1,500 trials. The pixel values were measured at four points; in the breast region and in the unattenuated x-ray region. The ratio of these pixel values was compared with the cumulative exposure dose. The ratio was nearly constant until 1,000 trials, but a significant reduction was observed after 1,350 trials. Further, in the image obtained after 1,500th trials, the shape of breast phantom could be observed. This image supports the fact that the x-ray sensitivity was lowered in the unattenuated x-ray region. The difference in the pixel value between the breast region and the unattenuated x-ray region was obtained over 1,000 exposures at 100,000 mAs.

  13. High resolution, low energy avalanche photodiode X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, R.; Vanderpuye, K.; Entine, G.; Squillante, M. R.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes have been fabricated, and their performance as X-ray detectors has been measured. Photon sensitivity and energy resolution were measured as a function of size and operating parameters. Noise thresholds as low as 212 eV were obtained at room temperature, and backscatter X-ray fluorescence data were obtained for aluminum and other light elements. It is concluded that the results with the X-ray detector are extremely encouraging, and the performance is challenging the best available proportional counters. While not at the performance level of either cryogenic silicon or HgI2, these device operate at room temperature and can be reproduced in large numbers and with much larger areas than typically achieved with HgI2. In addition, they are rugged and appear to be indefinitely stable.

  14. High ionisation absorption in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; De, K.; Fender, R.; Merloni, A.

    2016-05-01

    The advent of the new generation of X-ray telescopes yielded a significant step forward in our understanding of ionised absorption generated in the accretion discs of X-ray binaries. It has become evident that these relatively weak and narrow absorption features, sporadically present in the X-ray spectra of some systems, are actually the signature of equatorial outflows, which might carry away more matter than that being accreted. Therefore, they play a major role in the accretion phenomenon. These outflows (or ionised atmospheres) are ubiquitous during the softer states but absent during the power-law dominated, hard states, suggesting a strong link with the state of the inner accretion disc, presence of the radio-jet and the properties of the central source. Here, we discuss the current understanding of this field.

  15. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Burion, Steve; Speidel, Michael A.; Funk, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm2, calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 ± 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without compromising the

  16. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burion, Steve; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm{sup 2}, calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 {+-} 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without

  17. Next Generation Astronomical X-ray Optics: High Angular Resolution, Light Weight, and Low Production Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang. W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Blake, P. N.; Chan, K. W.; Gaskin, J. A.; Hong, M. L.; Jones, W. D.; Kolos, L. D.; Mazzarella, J. R.; McClelland, R. S.; O'Dell, S. L.; Saha, T. T.; Sharpe, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray astronomy depends on the availability of telescopes with high resolution and large photon collecting areas. Since x-ray observation can only be carried out above the atmosphere, these telescopes must be necessarily lightweight. Compounding the lightweight requirement is that an x-ray telescope consists of many nested concentric shells, which further require that x-ray mirrors must also be geometrically thin to achieve high packing efficiency. This double lightweight and geometrically thin requirement poses significant technical challenges in fabricating the mirrors and in integrating them into mirror assemblies. This paper reports on the approach, strategy and status of our x-ray optics development program whose objective is to meet these technical challenges at modest cost to enable future x-ray missions, including small Explorer missions in the near term, probe class missions in the medium term, and large flagship missions in the long term.

  18. Characterization of amorphous thermoluminescence dosimeters for patient dose measurement in X-ray diagnostic procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, N. N. H.; Salleh, H.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Zulkifli, M. I.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; M. Noor, N.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the use of novel Ge-doped amorphous silica flat fibers as thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in verifying patient entrance surface-dose (ESD) in diagnostic examinations. Selected fibers with established dosimetric characteristics (including energy dependence, linearity, reproducibility, and fading) were loaded into plastic capsules in groups of six. The fibers have been calibrated against a parallel plate ionization chamber, use being made of x-rays generated at 70 kVp, accessing a Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) facility. The fiber characterization measurements were made using a Toshiba X-ray machine operating within the nominal energies range 40 kVp to 150 kVp, for doses in the range 0.02 mGy up to 3 mGy. For doses from 2 mGy up to 150 mGy, the flat fibers exhibit linearity between TL yield and dose, reproducible to better than 3% standard deviation following repeat measurements (n=3). A marked energy-dependent response is observed for photons generated at potentials from 40 kVp to 150 kVp. From present results, it is concluded that Ge-doped fibers represent a viable system for use in diagnostic dosimetry, corrections being made for the various factors influencing TL yield.

  19. Fetal radiation doses and subsequent risks from X-ray examinations: Should we be concerned?

    PubMed Central

    Chaparian, Ali; Aghabagheri, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pregnant women are sometimes exposed to ionizing radiation in radiology examinations for various reasons. In such cases, the radiation dose to the conceptus and subsequent risks should be estimated. Objective: The purpose of this study was the calculation and presentation of fetal dose and subsequent risks resulted from different X-ray examinations. Materials and Methods: An analytical simulation study was conducted and six common radiographies in different views and three types of special examinations were evaluated. The entrance skin exposure (ESE) was measured using a solid-state dosimeter. A Monte Carlo program was used in order to simulate different views of X-ray examinations and calculate the radiation doses received by the conceptus for every view of each examination. Then the risk of childhood cancer and small head size were calculated for different radiographies. Results: The fetal doses and consequence risks of the small head size and childhood cancer for the radiographs of chest, skull, and sinuses were negligible but the risks of childhood cancer and small head size due to radiographies of abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis areas were ponderable. Conclusion: Results of this study can be used for the pregnant women radiographies management. PMID:24639714

  20. Calculating patient-specific doses in X-ray diagnostics and from radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampinen, Juha Sakari

    2000-06-01

    The risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation is dependent on the characteristics of the exposed individual. The size and structure of the individual influences the absorbed dose distribution in the organs. Traditional methods used to calculate the patient organ doses are based on standardised calculation phantoms, which neglect the variance of the patient size or even sex. Methods for patient specific dosimetry in the fields of X-ray diagnostics and diagnostic and therapeutic use of radiopharmaceuticals were proposed in this thesis. A computer program, ODS-60, for calculating organ doses from diagnostic X-ray exposures was presented. The calculation is done in a patient specific phantom with depth dose and profile algorithms fitted to Monte Carlo simulation data from a previous study. Improvements to the version reported earlier were introduced, e.g. bone attenuation was implemented. The applicability of the program to determine patient doses from complex X-ray examinations (barium enema examination) was studied. The conversion equations derived for female and male patients as a function of patient weight gave the smallest deviation from the actual patient doses when compared to previous studies. Another computer program, Intdose, was presented for calculation of the dose distribution from radiopharmaceuticals. The calculation is based on convolution of an isotope specific point dose kernel with activity distribution, obtained from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Anatomical information is taken from magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images. According to a phantom study, Intdose agreed within 3% with measurements. For volunteers administered diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, the results given by Intdose were found to agree with traditional methods in cases of medium sized patients. For patients undergoing systemic radiation therapy, the results by Intdose differed from measurements due to dynamic biodistribution

  1. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Geoff; Yoon, Sungwon; Krishna, Ganesh; Wilfley, Brian; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    location. When tumor SNR is held constant (i.e., x-ray fluence is scaled appropriately), SBDX gives 2–10 times less dose than fluoroscopy for the same conditions within the typical range of patient locations. The relative position of the patient (as a percent of SDD) has a much more significant impact on dose than either SDD or patient position. The patient position providing the minimum dose for a given tumor SNR and SDD is approximately the same as the position of maximum tomographic angle. Conclusions: SBDX offers a significant dose advantage over currently used C-arm fluoroscopy. The patient location with lowest dose coincides with the location of maximum tomographic angle. In order to provide adequate space for the patient and for the pulmonologists’ equipment, a SDD of 100 cm is recommended. PMID:24320450

  2. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Geoff; Fahrig, Rebecca; Yoon, Sungwon; Krishna, Ganesh; Wilfley, Brian

    2013-11-15

    location. When tumor SNR is held constant (i.e., x-ray fluence is scaled appropriately), SBDX gives 2–10 times less dose than fluoroscopy for the same conditions within the typical range of patient locations. The relative position of the patient (as a percent of SDD) has a much more significant impact on dose than either SDD or patient position. The patient position providing the minimum dose for a given tumor SNR and SDD is approximately the same as the position of maximum tomographic angle.Conclusions: SBDX offers a significant dose advantage over currently used C-arm fluoroscopy. The patient location with lowest dose coincides with the location of maximum tomographic angle. In order to provide adequate space for the patient and for the pulmonologists’ equipment, a SDD of 100 cm is recommended.

  3. Future prospects for high resolution X-ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Capabilities of the X-ray spectroscopy payloads were compared. Comparison of capabilities of AXAF in the context of the science to be achieved is reported. The Einstein demonstrated the tremendous scientific power of spectroscopy to probe deeply the astrophysics of all types of celestial X-ray source. However, it has limitations in sensitivity and resolution. Each of the straw man instruments has a sensitivity that is at least an order of magnitude better than that of the Einstein FPSC. The AXAF promises powerful spectral capability.

  4. MAXI/GSC detection of an X-ray flare-like activity probably from the high mass X-ray binary EXO 1722-363

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoro, H.; Nakajima, M.; Serino, M.; Mihara, T.; Nakahira, S.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Ishikawa, M.; Sugawara, Y.; Sugizaki, M.; Iwakiri, W.; Shidatsu, M.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Isobe, N.; Sugita, S.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Ono, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Harita, S.; Muraki, Y.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Kitaoka, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Shomura, R.; Tanaka, K.; Masumitsu, T.; Kawase, T.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Tanimoto, A.; Tsuboi, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Sasaki, R.; Yamauchi, M.; Furuya, K.; Yamaoka, K.; Nakagawa, Y. E.

    2016-08-01

    At 05:06 UT on 2016 August 23, the MAXI/GSC nova-alert system triggered faint X-ray enhancement from the region positionally consistent with the super-giant high mass X-ray binary pulsar EXO 1722-363 (a.k.a., X 1722-36, IGR J17252-3616).

  5. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigning a single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs. PMID:24593746

  6. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigninga single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs.

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of dose enhancement around gold nanoparticles used as X-ray imaging contrast agents and radiosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. B.; Müllner, M.; Greiter, M. B.; Bissardon, C.; Xie, W. Z.; Schlatll, H.; Oeh, U.; Li, J. L.; Hoeschen, C.

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were demonstrated as X-ray imaging contrast agents and radiosensitizers in mice. However, the translational medical applications of GNPs in to the clinical practice need further detailed information on the biological effects related to the enhanced doses in malignant and healthy cells. The idea of improving radiotherapy with high atomic number materials, especially gold foils, was initiated in our research unit in the 1980s. Recently, experimental and theoretical efforts were made to investigate the potential improvement of imaging and radiotherapy with GNPs. Initially, the present work attempts to validate the dose enhancement effects of GNPs to cancer cells; secondly, it intends to examine the possible side effects on healthy cells when using GNPs as X-ray contrast agent. In this study, three Monte Carlo simulation programs, namely PENELOPE-2011, GEANT4 and EGSnrc were used to simulate the local energy deposition and the resulting dose enhancement of GNPs. Diameters of the GNPs were assumed to be 2 nm, 15 nm, 50 nm, 100 nm and 200 nm. The X-ray energy spectra for irradiation were 60 kVp, 80 kVp, 100 kVp, 150 kVp with a filtering of 2.7 mm Al for projectional radiography, and 8 mm Al for 100 kVp and 150 kVp for computed tomography. Additional peak energy of 200 kVp was simulated for radiotherapy purpose. The information of energy deposition and dose enhancement can help understanding the physical processes of medical imaging and the implication of nanoparticles in radiotherapy.

  8. Common envelope mechanisms: constraints from the X-ray luminosity function of high-mass X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Zhao-Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn

    2014-12-10

    We use the measured X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in nearby star-forming galaxies to constrain the common envelope (CE) mechanisms, which play a key role in governing the binary evolution. We find that the XLF can be reproduced quite closely under both CE mechanisms usually adopted, i.e., the α{sub CE} formalism and the γ algorithm, with a reasonable range of parameters considered. Provided that the parameter combination is the same, the γ algorithm is likely to produce more HMXBs than the α{sub CE} formalism, by a factor of up to ∼10. In the framework of the α{sub CE} formalism, a high value of α{sub CE} is required to fit the observed XLF, though it does not significantly affect the global number of the HMXB populations. We present the detailed components of the HMXB populations under the γ algorithm and compare them with those in Zuo et al. and observations. We suggest the distinct observational properties, as well as period distributions of HMXBs, may provide further clues to discriminate between these two types of CE mechanisms.

  9. Technology development for high-energy x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Engelhaupt, Darell; Kester, Thomas; Speegle, Chet

    2006-06-01

    We are developing hard-x-ray optics using an electroformed-nickel-replication process off superpolished mandrels. To date, we have fabricated over 100 shells for our HERO balloon payload with typical angular resolutions in the 13-15 arcsec range. This paper discusses the factors currently limiting this resolution and various developments geared towards the production of higher-resolution optics.

  10. Experimental validation of a kilovoltage x-ray source model for computing imaging dose

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Yannick; Kouznetsov, Alexei; Koger, Brandon; Tambasco, Mauro

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To introduce and validate a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source model and characterization method to compute absorbed dose accrued from kV x-rays. Methods: The authors propose a simplified virtual point source model and characterization method for a kV x-ray source. The source is modeled by: (1) characterizing the spatial spectral and fluence distributions of the photons at a plane at the isocenter, and (2) creating a virtual point source from which photons are generated to yield the derived spatial spectral and fluence distribution at isocenter of an imaging system. The spatial photon distribution is determined by in-air relative dose measurements along the transverse (x) and radial (y) directions. The spectrum is characterized using transverse axis half-value layer measurements and the nominal peak potential (kVp). This source modeling approach is used to characterize a Varian{sup ®} on-board-imager (OBI{sup ®}) for four default cone-beam CT beam qualities: beams using a half bowtie filter (HBT) with 110 and 125 kVp, and a full bowtie filter (FBT) with 100 and 125 kVp. The source model and characterization method was validated by comparing dose computed by the authors’ inhouse software (kVDoseCalc) to relative dose measurements in a homogeneous and a heterogeneous block phantom comprised of tissue, bone, and lung-equivalent materials. Results: The characterized beam qualities and spatial photon distributions are comparable to reported values in the literature. Agreement between computed and measured percent depth-dose curves is ⩽2% in the homogeneous block phantom and ⩽2.5% in the heterogeneous block phantom. Transverse axis profiles taken at depths of 2 and 6 cm in the homogeneous block phantom show an agreement within 4%. All transverse axis dose profiles in water, in bone, and lung-equivalent materials for beams using a HBT, have an agreement within 5%. Measured profiles of FBT beams in bone and lung-equivalent materials were higher than their

  11. Ultraprecision motion control technique for high-resolution x-ray instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Toellner, T. S.; Alp, E. E.

    2000-07-17

    With the availability of third-generation hard x-ray synchrotron radiation sources, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, x-ray inelastic scattering and x-ray nuclear resonant scattering provide powerful means for investigating the vibrational dynamics of a variety of materials and condensed matter systems. Novel high-resolution hard x-ray optics with meV energy resolution requires a compact positioning mechanism with 20--50-nrad angular resolution and stability. In this paper, the authors technical approach to this design challenge is presented. Sensitivity and stability test results are also discussed.

  12. Early effects of low dose 12C6+ ion or X-ray irradiation on human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingtai; Li, Yumin; Zhang, Hong; Xie, Yi; Chen, Xuezhong; Ren, Jinyu; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Zijiang; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yawei

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the acute effects of low dose 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation on human immune function. The human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) of seven healthy donors were exposed to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation and cell responses were measured at 24 h after exposure. The cytotoxic activities of HPBL were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT); the percentages of T and NK cells subsets were detected by flow cytometry; mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were examined by real time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); and these cytokines protein levels in supernatant of cultured cells were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The results showed that the cytotoxic activity of HPBL, mRNA expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α in HPBL and their protein levels in supernatant were significantly increased at 24 h after exposure to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions radiation and the effects were stronger than observed for X-ray exposure. However, there was no significant change in the percentage of T and NK cells subsets of HPBL. These results suggested that 0.05 Gy high linear energy transfer (LET) 12C6+ radiation was a more effective approach to host immune enhancement than that of low LET X-ray. We conclude that cytokines production might be used as sensitive indicators of acute response to LDI.

  13. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Machek, Pavel; Froeba, Michael; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brueggmann, Ulf; Draeger, Guenter

    2007-01-19

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 {mu}m thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5x1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  14. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  15. Characteristics of x-ray emission from optically thin high-Z plasmas in the soft x-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Hayato; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Tamura, Naoki; Sudo, Shigeru; Koike, Fumihiro; Suzuki, Chihiro

    2015-07-01

    The characteristics of soft x-ray emission from optically thin high-Z plasmas of gold, lead and bismuth were investigated with the large helical device. Compared to optically thicker laser-produced plasmas, significantly different spectral structures were observed due to the difference in opacities and electron temperatures. Peak structures appearing in unresolved transition arrays were identified by calculations using atomic structure codes. The main contributors of discrete line emission in each case were Pd-, Ag-, and Rh-like ion stages. The present calculations point to the overestimation of contributions for 4p-4d transitions based on intensity estimates arising purely from gA distributions that predict strong emission from 4p-4d transitions. Understanding of such spectral emission is not only important for the completion of databases of high-Z highly ion charge states but also the development of promising high brightness sources for biological imaging applications.

  16. A Review of X-ray Diagnostic Calibrations in the 2 to 100 keV Region Using the High Energy X-ray Calibration Facility (HEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Zaheer; Pond, T; Buckles, R A; Maddox, B R; Chen, C D; DeWald, E L; Izumi, N; Stewart, R

    2010-05-19

    The precise and accurate measurement of X-rays in the 2 keV to 100 keV region is crucial to the understanding of HED plasmas and warm dense matter in general. With the emergence of inertially confined plasma facilities as the premier platforms for ICF, laboratory astrophysics, and national security related plasma experiments, the need to calibrate diagnostics in the high energy X-ray regime has grown. At National Security Technologies High Energy X-ray Calibration Facility (HEX) in Livermore, California, X-ray imagers, filter-fluorescer spectrometers, crystal spectrometers, image plates, and nuclear diagnostics are calibrated. The HEX can provide measurements of atomic line radiation, X-ray flux (accuracy within 10%), and X-ray energy (accuracy within 1%). The HEX source is comprised of a commercial 160 kV X-ray tube, a fluorescer wheel, a filter wheel, and a lead encasement. The X-ray tube produces a Tungsten bremsstrahlung spectrum which causes a foil to fluoresce line radiation. To minimize bremsstrahlung in the radiation for calibration we also provide various foils as filters. For experimental purposes, a vacuum box capable of 10{sup -7} Torr, as well as HPGe and CdTe radiation detectors, are provided on an optical table. Most geometries and arrangements can be changed to meet experimental needs.

  17. Measurement of radiotherapy superficial X-ray dose under eye shields with radiochromic film.

    PubMed

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K N; Price, Sian; Bailey, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Accurate measurement and knowledge of dose delivered under eye shield during superficial X-ray radiotherapy is required for patient peripheral dose assessment. Critical structures can include the cornea, lens and retina. Measurement of dose under eye shields has been historically performed with Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLD's) due to their small size and design. Restrictions include the energy dependence and the fact that they only provide a point dose assessment. This note investigates the use of a low energy dependence radiochromic thin film for measurement of dose under eye shields in a phantom and compares results to theoretical calculation of dose. Results have shown a good match between predicted and experimentally measured results at the centre of an eye shield irradiated with 50kVp and 150kVp beams. The added advantage of radiochromic film compared to TLD measurements is the two dimensional dose map which is recorded for the assessment of dose providing not only an assessment at the site of the cornea, lens and retina in a phantom but in other areas as well. Radiochromic film has been found to accurately measure dose under eye shield in phantom treatments. PMID:18162428

  18. The superconducting high-resolution soft X-ray spectrometer at the advanced biological and environmental X-ray facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, S.; Drury, O. B.; George, S. J.; Cramer, S. P.

    2007-11-01

    We have built a 36-pixel superconducting tunnel junction X-ray spectrometer for chemical analysis of dilute samples in the soft X-ray band. It offers an energy resolution of ˜10-20 eV FWHM below 1 keV, a solid angle coverage of ˜10 -3, and can be operated at total rates of up to ˜10 6 counts/s. Here, we describe the spectrometer performance in speciation measurements by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray facility at the ALS synchrotron.

  19. 21 CFR 892.1700 - Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. 892.1700 Section 892.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... generator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator is a device that is intended...

  20. 21 CFR 892.1700 - Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. 892.1700 Section 892.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... generator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator is a device that is intended...

  1. 21 CFR 892.1700 - Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. 892.1700 Section 892.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... generator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator is a device that is intended...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1700 - Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. 892.1700 Section 892.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... generator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator is a device that is intended...

  3. 21 CFR 892.1700 - Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. 892.1700 Section 892.1700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... generator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator is a device that is intended...

  4. Radiation dose levels for conventional chest and abdominal X-ray procedures in elected hospitals in Sudan.

    PubMed

    Babikir, E; Hasan, Hussein A; Abdelrazig, A; Alkhorayef, M A; Manssor, E; Sulieman, A

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to assess patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) during chest and abdominal X-ray procedures in screen film radiography (SFR) and computed radiography (CR) to establish dose reference levels. Patients' doses were measured in five hospitals for a total of 196 patients. ESAK was calculated from exposure parameters using DosCal software. The X-ray tube output (mGy mAs(-1)), accuracy of exposure factors, linearity and reproducibility were measured using an Unfors Xi dosimeter. The overall mean and range of ESAK during chest X-ray were 0.6 ± 0.3 (0.1-1.3) mGy, while for abdominal X-rays they were 4.0 ± 3.2 (1.3-9.2) mGy. Hospital with a CR system was found to use relatively higher doses. Dose values for abdominal X-ray procedures were comparable with previous studies. The dose for chest X-ray procedure was higher by a factor of 2-3 compared with the current international reference levels. PMID:25852182

  5. Dose and energy dependence of response of Gafchromic® XR-QA film for kilovoltage x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampado, O.; Garelli, E.; Deagostini, S.; Ropolo, R.

    2006-06-01

    There is a growing interest in Gafchromic® films for patient dosimetry in radiotherapy and in radiology. A new model (XR-QA) with high sensitivity to low dose was tested in this study. The response of the film to different x-ray beam energies (range 28-145 kVp with various filtrations, dose range 0-100 mGy) and to visible light was investigated, together with the after exposure darkening properties. Exposed films were digitized with a commercially available, optical flatbed scanner. A single functional form for dose versus net pixel value variation has been determined for all the obtained calibration curves, with a unique fit parameter different for each of the used x-ray beams. The film response was dependent on beam energy, with higher colour variations for the beams in the range 80-140 kVp. Different sources of uncertainties in dose measurements, governed by the digitalization process, the film response uniformity and the calibration curve fit procedure, have been considered. The overall one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty depended on the beam energy and decreased with increasing absorbed dose. For doses above 10 mGy and beam energies in the range 80-140 kVp the total uncertainty was less than 5%, whereas for the 28 kVp beam the total uncertainty at 10 mGy was about 10%. The post-exposure colour variation was not negligible in the first 24 h after the exposure, with a consequent increase in the calculated dose of about 10%. Results of the analysis of the sensitivity to visible light indicated that a short exposure of this film to ambient and scanner light during the measurements will not have a significant impact on the radiation dosimetry.

  6. Dose and energy dependence of response of Gafchromic XR-QA film for kilovoltage x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Rampado, O; Garelli, E; Deagostini, S; Ropolo, R

    2006-06-01

    There is a growing interest in Gafchromic films for patient dosimetry in radiotherapy and in radiology. A new model (XR-QA) with high sensitivity to low dose was tested in this study. The response of the film to different x-ray beam energies (range 28-145 kVp with various filtrations, dose range 0-100 mGy) and to visible light was investigated, together with the after exposure darkening properties. Exposed films were digitized with a commercially available, optical flatbed scanner. A single functional form for dose versus net pixel value variation has been determined for all the obtained calibration curves, with a unique fit parameter different for each of the used x-ray beams. The film response was dependent on beam energy, with higher colour variations for the beams in the range 80-140 kVp. Different sources of uncertainties in dose measurements, governed by the digitalization process, the film response uniformity and the calibration curve fit procedure, have been considered. The overall one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty depended on the beam energy and decreased with increasing absorbed dose. For doses above 10 mGy and beam energies in the range 80-140 kVp the total uncertainty was less than 5%, whereas for the 28 kVp beam the total uncertainty at 10 mGy was about 10%. The post-exposure colour variation was not negligible in the first 24 h after the exposure, with a consequent increase in the calculated dose of about 10%. Results of the analysis of the sensitivity to visible light indicated that a short exposure of this film to ambient and scanner light during the measurements will not have a significant impact on the radiation dosimetry. PMID:16723772

  7. A high resolution small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) with x-ray tomographic guidance capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John; Armour, Elwood; Kazanzides, Peter; Iordachita, Iulian; Tryggestad, Erik; Deng, Hua; Matinfar, Mohammad; Kennedy, Christopher; Liu, Zejian; Chan, Timothy; Gray, Owen; Verhaegen, Frank; McNutt, Todd; Ford, Eric; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the CT imaging, conformal irradiation and treatment planning capabilities of a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). Methods The SARRP employs a dual-focal spot, constant voltage x-ray source mounted on a gantry with a source-to-isocenter distance of 35 cm. Gantry rotation is limited to 120° from vertical. Eighty to 100 kVp x-rays from the smaller 0.4 mm focal spot are used for imaging. Both 0.4 mm and 3.0 mm focal spots operate at 225 kVp for irradiation. Robotic translate/rotate stages are used to position the animal. Cone-beam (CB) CT imaging is achieved by rotating the horizontal animal between the stationary x-ray source and a flat-panel detector. Radiation beams range from 0.5 mm in diameter to (60 × 60) mm2. Dosimetry is measured with radio-chromic films. Monte Carlo dose calculations are employed for treatment planning. The combination of gantry and robotic stage motions facilitate conformal irradiation. Results The SARRP spans 3 ft × 4 ft × 6 ft (WxLxH). Depending on filtration, the isocenter dose outputs at 1 cm depth in water range from 22 to 375 cGy/min from the smallest to the largest radiation fields. The 20% to 80% dose fall-off spans 0.16 mm. CBCT with (0.6 × 0.6 × 0.6) mm3 voxel resolution is acquired with less than 1 cGy. Treatment planning is performed at sub-mm resolution. Conclusions The capability of the SARRP to deliver highly focal beams to multiple animal model systems provides new research opportunities that more realistically bridge laboratory research and clinical translation. PMID:18640502

  8. Characterization of an Yb:LuVO 4 single crystal using X-ray topography, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszkowicz, W.; Romanowski, P.; Bąk-Misiuk, J.; Wierzchowski, W.; Wieteska, K.; Graeff, W.; Iwanowski, R. J.; Heinonen, M. H.; Ermakova, O.; Dąbkowska, H.

    2011-10-01

    Knowledge on the defect and electronic structure allows for improved modeling of material properties. A short literature review has shown that the information on defect structure of rare earth orthovanadate single crystals is limited. In this paper, defect and electronic structure of a needle-shaped Yb:LuVO 4 single crystal grown by the slow cooling method have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction topography employing white synchrotron beam, high-resolution diffraction (HRD) and photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Topographic investigations show that the crystal is composed of two blocks disoriented by about 1.5° and separated by a narrow deformed region. Some contrasts observed within the crystal volume may be attributed to glide bands and sector boundaries. The contrasts appearing in the vicinity of the surface may be interpreted as due to the presence of small inclusions. The HRD study indicates, in particular, that among point defects, the vacancy type defects dominate and that the density of other defects is small in comparison. The XPS measurements enabled, despite highly insulating properties of the studied crystal, an analysis of its bulk electronic structure, including the main core-levels (O 1 s, V 2 p, Lu 4 f) as well as the valence band range.

  9. Importance of Dose Settings in the X-Ray Systems Used for Interventional Radiology: A National Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Vano, E. Sanchez, R.; Fernandez, J. M.; Rosales, F.; Garcia, M. A.; Sotil, J.; Hernandez, J.; Carrera, F.; Ciudad, J.; Soler, M. M.; Ballester, T.

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the differences in dose settings among the X-ray units involved in a national survey of patient doses in interventional radiology (IR). The survey was promoted by the National Society of IR and involved 10 centers. As part of the agreed quality control for the survey, entrance doses were measured in a 20-cm-thick acrylic phantom simulating a medium-sized patient. A standard digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging protocol for the abdomen was used at the different centers. The center of the phantom was placed at the isocenter of the C-arm system during the measurements to simulate clinical conditions. Units with image intensifiers and flat detectors were involved in the survey. Entrance doses for low, medium, and high fluoroscopy modes and DSA acquisitions were measured for a field of view of 20 cm (or closest). A widespread range of entrance dose values was obtained: 4.5-18.6, 9.2-28.4, and 15.4-51.5 mGy/min in low, medium, and high fluoroscopy mode, respectively, and 0.7-5.0 mGy/DSA image. The ratios between the maximum and the minimum values measured (3-4 for fluoroscopy and 7 for DSA) suggest an important margin for optimization. The calibration factor for the dose-area product meter was also included in the survey and resulted in a mean value of 0.73, with a standard deviation of 0.07. It seems clear that the dose setting for the X-ray systems used in IR requires better criteria and approaches.

  10. Filtration to reduce paediatric dose for a linear slot-scanning digital X-ray machine.

    PubMed

    Perks, T D; Dendere, R; Irving, B; Hartley, T; Scholtz, P; Lawson, A; Trauernicht, C; Steiner, S; Douglas, T S

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes modelling, application and validation of a filtration technique for a linear slot-scanning digital X-ray system to reduce radiation dose to paediatric patients while preserving diagnostic image quality. A dose prediction model was implemented, which calculates patient entrance doses using variable input parameters. Effective dose is calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation. An added filter of 1.8-mm aluminium was predicted to lower the radiation dose significantly. An objective image quality study was conducted using detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The PTW Normi 4FLU test phantom was used for quantitative assessment, showing that image contrast and spatial resolution were maintained with the proposed filter. A paediatric cadaver full-body imaging trial assessed the diagnostic quality of the images and measured the dose reduction using a 1.8-mm aluminium filter. Assessment by radiologists indicated that diagnostic quality was maintained with the added filtration, despite a reduction in DQE. A new filtration technique for full-body paediatric scanning on the Lodox Statscan has been validated, reducing entrance dose for paediatric patients by 36 % on average and effective dose by 27 % on average, while maintaining image quality. PMID:25433049

  11. Patient dose measurement in common medical X-ray examinations in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rasuli, Behrouz; Mahmoud-Pashazadeh, Ali; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Tabari Juybari, Raheleh; Naserpour, Mozafar

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate patient dose in the chest (PA/AP/LAT) and skull (PA/AP/LAT) X-ray examinations, as frequent procedures. The study was performed in eight public hospitals of Khuzestan province, Iran. Patient dosimetry was conducted on 567 standard patient X-ray examinations (males: 61.2%, female: 38.2%). Dosimetry protocol in this study was indirect method, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Reports series No.457. Patients weighing 70 ± 10 kg were considered as standard. In the indirect dosimetry approach, exposure parameters such as kVp, mAs, focal film distance (FFD), and tube outputs recorded during data acquisition were used for calculating incident air kerma on the patient's skin, entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) that is recommended by the IAEA as the most appropriate patient dosimetry quantity in simple radiographic examinations. This survey reveals significant variations in the radiological practice. Results showed that the parameters set by radiologic technologists change in a wide range: mAs varied from 2 to 80 for skull PA, 2 to 202 for chest LAT, and FFD varied from 50 to 180 for skull LAT projection. The study showed that patient doses in three chest projections exceed the IAEA and European Commission dose reference levels (EC DRLs) - 1.0, 1.12, and 2.20 mGy for chest PA, chest AP, and chest LAT, respectively. Results also showed that mean ESAKs of patients in skull projections were generally lower than the IAEA and EC DRLs, 1.5, 1.72, and 2.25 for skull LAT, skull AP, and skull PA, respectively. This study provides evidence that dose reduction in the simple X-ray examinations is feasible by updating clinical audits and implementation of systematic quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) programs. The authors recommend that DRLs obtained in this study can be used as local DRLs in Khuzestan area and dose surveys must be performed in all provinces to establish national dose

  12. MULTICENTRE COMPARISON OF PATIENT AND DETECTOR DOSE FOR X-RAY-GUIDED EMBOLISATIONS OF ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS IN THE BRAIN.

    PubMed

    Geleijns, J; Overvelde, M L; Zweers, D; Mourik, J E M

    2016-06-01

    Dosimetric benchmarking at four hospitals was performed to investigate incident entrance dose and dose rate on a phantom, and entrance detector dose and dose rate for protocols that are used in routine clinical practice for complex neuroradiological treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Measurements were performed with a head phantom that simulates the attenuation and scattering of the human head for the lateral and posteroanterior (PA) views. For fluoroscopy, the measured incident entrance dose rate and entrance detector dose rate were in the range of 44-172 and 0.3-1.3 μGy s(-1), respectively. The pulse rate in fluoroscopy varied between 6.3 and 15 frames per second (fps). For digital subtraction angiography (DSA), incident entrance dose per frame and entrance detector dose per frame were in the range of 744-2800 and 2.6-8.1 μGy/frame, respectively. Optimisation of acquisition parameters such as pulse rate in fluoroscopy, dose per frame in DSA, beam filtration and tube voltage may further improve imaging protocols and lower the patient dose in very complex X-ray-guided embolisations of AVMs in the brain. However, differences in these acquisition parameters observed in this study were relatively small, suggesting that a relatively high degree of optimisation has already been achieved. PMID:27154974

  13. MiR-34a is up-regulated in response to low dose, low energy X-ray induced DNA damage in breast cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are non-coding RNAs involved in the regulation of gene expression including DNA damage responses. Low doses of low energy X-ray radiation, similar to those used in mammographic exams, has been described to be genotoxic. In the present work we investigated the expression of miR-34a; a well described p53-regulated miRNA implicated in cell responses to X-ray irradiation at low doses. Methods Non-cancerous breast cell line MCF-10A and cancerous T-47D and MCF-7 cell lines were submitted to a low-energy X-ray irradiation (ranging from 28–30 Kv) using a dose of 5 Gy. The expression level of miR-34a, let-7a and miR-21 was assessed by qRT-PCR at 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation. DNA damage was then measured by comet assay and micronuclei estimation in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines, where an increase of miR-34a levels could be observed after irradiation. The rate of apoptotic cells was estimated by nuclear staining and fluorescence microscopy. These experiments were also performed at low doses (3; 12 and 48 mGy) in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines. Results We have observed an increase in miR-34a expression 4 hours post-irradiation at 5 Gy in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines while its level did not change in T-47D, a breast cancer cell line bearing non-functional p53. At low doses, miR-34a was up-regulated in non-tumoral MCF-10A to a higher extent as compared to MCF-7. MiR-34a levels decreased 24 hours post-irradiation. We have also observed DNA damage and apoptosis at low-energy X-ray irradiation at low doses and the high dose in MCF-10A and MCF-7 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation relative to the mock control. Conclusion Low energy X-ray is able to promote DNA strand breaks and miR-34a might be involved in cell responses to low energy X-ray DNA damage. MiR-34a expression correlates with X-ray dose, time after irradiation and cell type. The present study reinforces the need of investigating consequences of low dose X-ray irradiation of breast cells. PMID

  14. High-resolution spectroscopy and high-density monitoring in X-rays of novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, J. U.

    2012-09-01

    The 21st century X-ray observatories XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift gave us completely new insights into the X-ray behaviour of nova outbursts. These new-generation X-ray observatories provide particularly high spectral resolution and high density in monitoring campaigns, simultaneously in X-rays and UV/optical. The entire evolution of several nova outbursts has been observed with the Swift XRT and UVOT instruments, allowing studies of the gradual shift of the peak of the SED from UV to X-rays, time scales to the onset and duration of the X-ray brightest supersoft source (SSS) phase, and pre- and post-SSS X-ray emission. In addition, XMM-Newton and Chandra observations can efficiently be scheduled, allowing deeper studies of strategically chosen evolutionary stages. Before Swift joined in 2005, Chandra and XMM-Newton blind shots in search of SSS emission unavoidably led to some underexposed observations taken before and/or after the SSS phase. More systematic Swift studies reduced this number while increasing the number of novae. Pre- and post-SSS spectra at low and high spectral resolution were successfully modelled with collisional plasma models. Pre-SSS emission arises in shocks and post-SSS emission in radiatively cooling thin ejecta. In contrast, the grating spectra taken during the SSS phase are a lot more complex than expected and have not yet been successfully modeled. Available hot white dwarf (WD) radiation transport models give only approximate reproduction of the observations, and make some critical assumptions that are only valid in isolated WDs. More grating spectra would be important to search for systematic trends between SSS spectra and system parameters. Summary of well-established discoveries with Swift, XMM-Newton, and Chandra: - About 50% of novae display faint X-ray emission before the start of the SSS phase - The start of the SSS phase is not a smooth process. High-amplitude variations during the early SSS phase were seen that disappear close

  15. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity.

    PubMed

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang-Kil; Barends, Thomas R M; White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R Bruce; Nanao, Max H; Nass, Karol; Shoeman, Robert L; Timneanu, Nicusor; Santra, Robin; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N

    2015-11-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential 'bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. A pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed. PMID:26594370

  16. High energy X-ray observations of extragalactic objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.; Knight, F. K.; Nolan, P. L.; Scheepmaker, A.; Wheaton, W. A.; Hofman, J. A.; Primini, F. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported for scanning observations of the active galaxy NGC 5128 (Cen A) and the Type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 with the low-energy detectors of the HEAO-1 A-4 hard X-ray instrument. The X-ray spectra in the energy range from 15 to 100 keV are shown to be consistent with previous observations of these galaxies. It is noted that NGC 5128 rose in intensity from 1972 to 1975, that spectral softening occurred after early 1973, and that the source has since decreased in intensity while maintaining an E to the -1.7 photon power law. The results for NGC 4151 indicate variable absorption below 10 keV and a power-law slope of about E to the -1.4 in the range from 10 keV to 10 MeV.

  17. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang -Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; et al

    2015-09-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. In conclusion, a pattern sorting schememore » is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.« less

  18. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang-Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; Nass, Karol; Shoeman, Robert L.; Timneanu, Nicusor; Santra, Robin; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential ‘bleaching’ of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. A pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed. PMID:26594370

  19. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang-Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; Nass, Karol; Shoeman, Robert L.; Timneanu, Nicusor; Santra, Robin; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N.

    2015-09-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. A pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.

  20. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Lorenzo; Son, Sang -Kil; Barends, Thomas R. M.; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Botha, Sabine; Boutet, Sébastien; Caleman, Carl; Doak, R. Bruce; Nanao, Max H.; Nass, Karol; Shoeman, Robert L.; Timneanu, Nicusor; Santra, Robin; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N.

    2015-09-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. In conclusion, a pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.

  1. Low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction via dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2012-09-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  2. Low-Dose X-ray CT Reconstruction via Dictionary Learning

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  3. Repair in mouse lung between multiple small doses of X rays

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, E.L.; Parkins, C.S.; Down, J.D.; Fowler, J.F.; Thames, H.D.

    1983-05-01

    Multiple fraction experiments have been carried out to determine the response of mouse lung to repeated small doses of 240 kV X rays down to 150 rad/fraction using breathing rate and lethality to assess damage. Two experimental approaches were used to measure the effect of small doses in vivo: (1) multiple equal doses and (2) multiple priming doses followed by a large test dose. Analysis was performed using the multitarget two-component model and the linear test dose. The amount of repair was calculated as a function of either dose per fraction (F/sub R/) or total dose (F/sub rec/). Both F/sub R/ and F/sub rec/ increased with decreasing dose per fraction but the change in F/sub R/ was small. The advantage of F/sub rec/ was that it varied more rapidly with dose per fraction than F/sub R/, so that possible differences between tissue repair capabilities are more visible on plots of repair as a function of dose per fraction. F/sub R/ and F/sub rec/ both decreased with the level of single-dose isoeffect injury; thus neither parameter is acceptable for comparing repair capability of different normal tissues with widely differing single-dose end point levels. Beta/alpha values were calculated and found to be a more acceptable index of repair capability than either F/sub R/ or F/sub rec/ because unlike those two parameters, ..beta../..cap alpha.. varied little with level of damage. Beta/alpha values of 1.7 to 4.2 krad/sup -1/ were obtained for both lung death and increased breathing rate and are clearly intermediate between the lower ..beta../..cap alpha.. ratios for acute reactions, i.e., skin and intestine, and the higher values for late reactions in kidney and spinal cord.

  4. RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS BY HIGH SENSITIVITY DUAL-OPTIC MICRO X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel dual-optic micro X-ray fluorescence instrument will be developed to do radiochemical analysis of high-level radioactive wastes at DOE sites such as Savannah River Site and Hanford. This concept incorporates new X-ray optical elements such as monolithic polycapillaries and...

  5. Patient radiation dose reduction using an X-ray imaging noise reduction technology for cardiac angiography and intervention.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Funatsu, Atsushi; Okada, Tadahisa; Mauti, Maria; Waizumi, Yuki; Yamada, Shinichi

    2016-05-01

    Coronary angiography and intervention can expose patients to high radiation dose. This retrospective study quantifies the patient dose reduction due to the introduction of a novel X-ray imaging noise reduction technology using advanced real-time image noise reduction algorithms and optimized acquisition chain for fluoroscopy and exposure in interventional cardiology. Patient, procedure and radiation dose data were retrospectively collected in the period August 2012-August 2013 for 883 patients treated with the image noise reduction technology (referred as "new system"). The same data were collected for 1083 patients in the period April 2011-July 2012 with a system using state-of-the-art image processing and reference acquisition chain (referred as "reference system"). Procedures were divided into diagnostic (CAG) and intervention (PCI). Acquisition parameters such as fluoroscopy time, volume of contrast medium, number of exposure images and number of stored fluoroscopy images were collected to classify procedure complexity. The procedural dose reduction was investigated separately for three main cardiologists. The new system provides significant dose reduction compared to the reference system. Median DAP values decreased for all procedures (p < 0.0001) from 172.7 to 59.4 Gy cm(2), for CAG from 155.1 to 52.0 Gy cm(2) and for PCI from 229.0 to 85.8 Gy cm(2) with reduction quantified at 66, 66 and 63 %, respectively. Based on median values, the dose reduction for all procedures was 68, 60 and 67 % for cardiologists 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The X-ray imaging technology combining advanced real-time image noise reduction algorithms and anatomy-specific optimized fluoroscopy and cine acquisition chain provides 66 % patient dose reduction in interventional cardiology. PMID:25840815

  6. High power x-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1999-01-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10.sup.4 watts/cm.sup.2 and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  7. Ultra-high vacuum compatible optical chopper system for synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hao; Cummings, Marvin; Shirato, Nozomi; Stripe, Benjamin; Rosenmann, Daniel; Preissner, Curt; Freeland, John W.; Kersell, Heath; Hla, Saw-Wai; Rose, Volker

    2016-01-01

    High-speed beam choppers are a crucial part of time-resolved x-ray studies as well as a necessary component to enable elemental contrast in synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM). However, many chopper systems are not capable of operation in vacuum, which restricts their application to x-ray studies with high photon energies, where air absorption does not present a significant problem. To overcome this limitation, we present a fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible chopper system capable of operating at variable chopping frequencies up to 4 kHz. The lightweight aluminum chopper disk is coated with Ti and Au films to provide the required beam attenuation for soft and hard x-rays with photon energies up to about 12 keV. The chopper is used for lock-in detection of x-ray enhanced signals in SX-STM.

  8. Grazing Incidence Pumping for High Efficiency X-ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2005-10-03

    Over the last decade, most laser-driven collisional excitation x-ray lasers have relied on the absorption of the pump energy incident at normal incidence to a pre-formed plasma. The main advantage is that the inversion can be created at various plasma regions in space and time where the amplification and ray propagation processes are best served. The main disadvantage is that different plasma regions regardless of the contribution to the inversion have to be pumped simultaneously in order to make the laser work. This leads to a loss of efficiency. The new scheme of grazing incidence pumping (GRIP) addresses this issue. In essence, a chosen electron density region of a pre-formed plasma column, produced by a longer pulse at normal incidence onto a slab target, is selectively pumped by focusing a short pulse of 100 fs-10 ps duration laser at a determined grazing incidence angle to the target surface. The exact angle is dependent on the pump wavelength and relates to refraction of the drive beam in the plasma. The controlled use of refraction of the pumping laser in the plasma results in several benefits: The pump laser path length is longer and there is an increase in the laser absorption in the gain region for creating a collisional Ni-like ion x-ray laser. There is also an inherent traveling wave, close to c, that increases the overall pumping efficiency. This can lead to a 3-30 times reduction in the pump energy for mid-Z, sub-20 nm lasers. We report several examples of this new x-ray laser on two different laser systems. The first demonstrates a 10 Hz x-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm pumped with a total of 150 mJ of 800 nm wavelength from a Ti:Sapphire laser. The second case is shown where the COMET laser is used both at 527 nm and 1054 nm wavelength to pump higher Z materials with the goal of extending the wavelength regime of tabletop x-ray lasers below 10 nm.

  9. Determination of the implantation dose in silicon wafers by X-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klockenkaemper, R.; Becker, M.; Bubert, H.; Burba, P. ); Palmetshofer, L. )

    1990-08-01

    The ion dose implanted in silicon wafers was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis after the implantation process. As only near-surface layers below 1-{mu}m thickness were considered, the calibration could be carried out with external standards consisting of thin films of doped gelatine spread on pure wafers. Dose values for Cr and Co were determined between 4 {times} 10{sup 15} and 2 {times} 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2}, the detection limits being about 3 {times} 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2}. The results are precise and accurate apart from a residual scatter of less than 7%. This was confirmed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after volatilization of the silicon matrix as SiF{sub 4}. It was found that ion-current measurements carried out during the implantation process can have considerable systematic errors.

  10. Evaluation of resolution performance of high energy x-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Makoto; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Sato, Osamu; Sato, Katsutoshi; Takatsuji, Toshiyuki

    2015-07-01

    Dimensional X-ray CT has attracted production industry due to its nature [1] enabling not only external dimensional measurement but also internal dimensional measurement which has been difficult for pre-existing dimensional measurement instruments. However, because the reconstruction process of three dimensional volume image may be affected by various kinds of error sources of the hardware and also the software, performance evaluation of dimensional X-ray CT has become one of the major issues [2], especially for X-ray CT system with higher energy such as several MeV. Resolution performance of high energy X-ray CT was evaluated by using a series of phantoms which equip regular line-and-space structures with various pitch sizes down to 100 micrometer. These phantoms were prototyped in the identical pitch sizes with three different materials. These phantoms were practically measured by a high energy X-ray CT. Results and perspective of the resolution performance is presented.

  11. High-resolution X-ray imaging by polycapillary optics and lithium fluoride detectors combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampai, D.; Dabagov, S. B.; Della Ventura, G.; Bellatreccia, F.; Magi, M.; Bonfigli, F.; Montereali, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Novel results on high-resolution X-ray imaging by a table-top laboratory system based on lithium fluoride (LiF) imaging radiation detectors and a X-ray tube combined with polycapillary optics are reported for the first time. In this paper, imaging experiments of reference objects, as well as thick geological samples, show some of the potentialities of this approach for the development of a compact laboratory X-ray microscopy apparatus. The high spatial resolution and dynamic range of versatile LiF imaging detectors, based on optical reading of photoluminescence from X-ray-induced color centers in LiF crystals and films, allow us to use very simple contact imaging techniques. Promising applications can be foreseen in the fields of bio-medical imaging diagnostics, characterization of X-ray sources and optical elements, material science and photonics.

  12. A Compact X-Ray System for Support of High Throughput Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Gubarev, Mikhail; Gibson, Walter M.; Joy, Marshall K.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Standard x-ray systems for crystallography rely on massive generators coupled with optics that guide X-ray beams onto the crystal sample. Optics for single-crystal diffractometry include total reflection mirrors, polycapillary optics or graded multilayer monochromators. The benefit of using polycapillary optic is that it can collect x-rays over tile greatest solid angle, and thus most efficiently, utilize the greatest portion of X-rays emitted from the Source, The x-ray generator has to have a small anode spot, and thus its size and power requirements can be substantially reduced We present the design and results from the first high flux x-ray system for crystallography that combine's a microfocus X-ray generator (40microns FWHM Spot size at a power of 45 W) and a collimating, polycapillary optic. Diffraction data collected from small test crystals with cell dimensions up to 160A (lysozyme and thaumatin) are of high quality. For example, diffraction data collected from a lysozyme crystal at RT yielded R=5.0% for data extending to 1.70A. We compare these results with measurements taken from standard crystallographic systems. Our current microfocus X-ray diffraction system is attractive for supporting crystal growth research in the standard crystallography laboratory as well as in remote, automated crystal growth laboratory. Its small volume, light-weight, and low power requirements are sufficient to have it installed in unique environments, i.e.. on-board International Space Station.

  13. On filtration for high-energy phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Christian; Mohamed, Ashraf; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    Phase-sensitive x-ray imaging promises unprecedented soft-tissue contrast and resolution. However, several practical challenges have to be overcome when using the setup in a clinical environment. The system design that is currently closest to clinical use is the grating-based Talbot-Lau interferometer (GBI).1-3 The requirements for patient imaging are low patient dose, fast imaging time, and high image quality. For GBI, these requirements can be met most successfully with a narrow energy width, high- ux spectrum. Additionally, to penetrate a human-sized object, the design energy of the system has to be well above 40 keV. To our knowledge, little research has been done so far to investigate optimal GBI filtration at such high x-ray energies. In this paper, we study different filtration strategies and their impact on high-energy GBI. Specifically, we compare copper filtration at low peak voltage with equal-absorption, equal-imaging time K-edge filtration of spectra with higher peak voltage under clinically realistic boundary conditions. We specifically focus on a design energy of 59 keV and investigate combinations of tube current, peak voltage, and filtration that lead to equal patient absorption. Theoretical considerations suggest that the K edge of tantalum might provide a transmission pocket at around 59 keV, yielding a well-shaped spectrum. Although one can observe a slight visibility benefit when using tungsten or tantalum filtration, experimental results indicate that visibility benefits most from a low x-ray tube peak voltage.

  14. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 in the X-Ray Calibration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This photograph is of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 telescope being evaluated by engineers in the clean room of the X-Ray Calibration Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The MSFC was heavily engaged in the technical and scientific aspects, testing and calibration, of the HEAO-2 telescope The HEAO-2 was the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date. The X-Ray Calibration Facility was built in 1976 for testing MSFC's HEAO-2. The facility is the world's largest, most advanced laboratory for simulating x-ray emissions from distant celestial objects. It produced a space-like environment in which components related to x-ray telescope imaging are tested and the quality of their performance in space is predicted. The original facility contained a 1,000-foot long by 3-foot diameter vacuum tube (for the x-ray path) cornecting an x-ray generator and an instrument test chamber. Recently, the facility was upgraded to evaluate the optical elements of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-Ray Observatory and Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory.

  15. X-ray Spectral Measurements of the JMAR High-Power Laser-plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Robert R.; Dozier, Charles M.; Newman, Daniel A.; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Gaeta, Celestino J.; Cassidy, Kelly L.; Powers, Michael F.; Kleindolph, Thomas; Morris, James H.; Forber, Richard A.

    2002-10-01

    X-ray spectra of Cu plasmas at the focus of a four-beam, solid-state diode-pumped laser have been recorded. This laser-plasma X-ray source is being developed for JMAR's lithography systems aimed at high- performance semiconductor integrated circuits. The unique simultaneous overlay of the four sub-nanosecond laser beams at 300 Hertz produces a bright, point-plasma X-ray source. PIN diode measurements of the X-ray output indicate that the conversion efficiency (ratio of X-ray emission energy into 2π steradians to incident laser energy) was approximately 9 percent with average X-ray power yields of greater than 10 Watts. Spectra were recorded on calibrated Kodak DEF film in a curved-crystal spectrograph. A KAP crystal (2d = 26.6 Angstroms) was used to disperse the 900 eV to 3000 eV spectral energies onto the film. Preliminary examination of the films indicated the existence of Cu and Cu XX ionization states. Additional spectra as a function of laser input power were also recorded to investigate potential changes in X-ray yields. These films are currently being analyzed. The analysis of the spectra provide absolute line and continuum intensities, and total X-ray output in the measured spectral range.

  16. AXAF-1 High Resolution Assembly Image Model and Comparison with X-Ray Ground Test Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zissa, David E.

    1999-01-01

    The x-ray ground test of the AXAF-I High Resolution Mirror Assembly was completed in 1997 at the X-ray Calibration Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center. Mirror surface measurements by HDOS, alignment results from Kodak, and predicted gravity distortion in the horizontal test configuration are being used to model the x-ray test image. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) image modeling serves as a cross check with Smithsonian Astrophysical observatory modeling. The MSFC image prediction software has evolved from the MSFC model of the x-ray test of the largest AXAF-I mirror pair in 1991. The MSFC image modeling software development is being assisted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The modeling process, modeling software, and image prediction will be discussed. The image prediction will be compared with the x-ray test results.

  17. Intrapulse x-ray parametric amplification in high-order-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrat, Carles

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate strong-field-driven impulsive XUV-x-ray parametric amplification (IXPA) processes in high-order harmonic generation at the single-atom level by using ab initio calculations. We consider the example of Li+ ions exposed simultaneously to an intense IR pulse and a weak 200-as XUV-x-ray pulse with central photon energies varying from 90 to 400 eV. We determine optimal parameter ranges and the precise delays between the IR and the XUV-x-ray pulses for IXPA to occur. The present results might be a guide to achieve exponential growth of the XUV-x-ray signal in tabletop XUV-x-ray lasers.

  18. High sensitivity all sky X-ray monitor and survey with MAXI

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, N.; Mihara, T.; Kohama, M.; Suzuki, M.; Matsuoka, M.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Yoshida, A.; Yamaoka, K.; Tsunemi, H.; Miyata, E.; Negoro, H.; Nakajima, M.; Morii, M.

    2007-07-12

    MAXI is an all sky X-ray monitor to be mounted on the Japanese Experimental Module in the International Space Station (ISS). It scans almost all over the sky every 96 minutes, in the course of the orbital motion of the ISS. MAXI is designed to have a sensitivity, significantly higher than the previous X-ray monitors, and then, to detect X-ray sources as faint as 1 mCrab in a week observation. Therefore, MAXI is expected to create a novel catalogue of not only the stable X-ray sources but also the highly variable ones in the sky, especially active galactic nuclei for the first time. If MAXI detects X-ray phenomena, alerts will be quickly made through the Internet.

  19. Scintillator Evaluation for High-Energy X-Ray Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Lutz; S. A. Baker

    2001-09-01

    This report presents results derived from a digital radiography study performed using x-rays from a 2.3 MeV, rod-pinch diode. Detailed is a parameter study of cerium-doped lutetium ortho-silicate (LSO) scintillator thickness, as it relates to system resolution and detection quantum efficiency (DQE). Additionally, the detection statistics of LSO were compared with that of CsI(Tl). As a result of this study we found the LSO scintillator with a thickness of 3 mm to yield the highest system DQE over the range of spatial frequencies from 0.75 to 2.5 mm{sup -1}.

  20. High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study of Potassium Azide

    SciTech Connect

    C Ji; F Zhang; D Hong; H Zhu; J Wu; M Chyu; V Levitas; Y Ma

    2011-12-31

    Crystal structure and compressibility of potassium azide was investigated by in-situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature up to 37.7 GPa. In the body-centered tetragonal (bct) phase, an anisotropic compressibility was observed with greater compressibility in the direction perpendicular to the plane containing N{sub 3}{sup -} ions than directions within that plane. The bulk modulus of the bct phase was determined to be 18.6(7) GPa. A pressure-induced phase transition may occur at 15.5 GPa.

  1. A laser-driven undulator x-ray source: simulation of image formation and dose deposition in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Schlattl, Helmut; Grüner, Florian; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Since overcoming some of the inherent limitations of x-ray tubes becomes increasingly harder, it is important to consider new ways of x-ray generation and to study their applications in the field of medical imaging. In the present work we investigate a novel table-top-sized x-ray source, developed in a joint project within the Cluster of Excellence "Munich Center for Advanced Photonics". It uses laser-accelerated electrons emitting x-ray radiation in a short period undulator. This source has the potential to deliver tunable x-rays with a very narrow spectral bandwidth. The main purpose of this contribution is to investigate the performance of this source in the field of mammography and to compare it to that of conventional x-ray tubes. We simulated the whole imaging process from the electron beam dynamics through the generation of the synchrotron radiation in the undulator up to the x-ray-matter interaction and detection in the mammographic setting. A Monte Carlo simulation of the absorption and scattering processes based on the Geant4 software toolkit has been developed that uses a high-resolution voxel phantom of the female breast for the accurate simulation of mammography. We present simulated mammograms generated by using quasi-monochromatic undulator radiation and by using the polychromatic spectrum of a conventional x-ray tube.

  2. EVALUATION OF DOSE REDUCTION POTENTIALS OF A NOVEL SCATTER CORRECTION SOFTWARE FOR BEDSIDE CHEST X-RAY IMAGING.

    PubMed

    Renger, Bernhard; Brieskorn, Carina; Toth, Vivien; Mentrup, Detlef; Jockel, Sascha; Lohöfer, Fabian; Schwarz, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J; Noël, Peter B

    2016-06-01

    Bedside chest X-rays (CXR) for catheter position control may add up to a considerable radiation dose for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). In this study, image quality and dose reduction potentials of a novel X-ray scatter correction software (SkyFlow, Philips Healthcare, Hamburg, Germany) were evaluated. CXRs of a 'LUNGMAN' (Kyoto Kagaku Co., LTD, Kyoto, Japan) thoracic phantom with a portacath system, a central venous line and a dialysis catheter were performed in an experimental set-up with multiple tube voltage and tube current settings without and with an antiscatter grid. Images with diagnostic exposure index (EI) 250-500 were evaluated for the difference in applied mAs with and without antiscatter grid. Three radiologists subjectively assessed the diagnostic image quality of grid and non-grid images. Compared with a non-grid image, usage of an antiscatter grid implied twice as high mAs in order to reach diagnostic EI. SkyFlow significantly improved the image quality of images acquired without grid. CXR with grid provided better image contrast than grid-less imaging with scatter correction. PMID:26977074

  3. Measurement of absorbed doses from X-ray baggage examinations to tooth enamel by means of ESR and glass dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Zhumadilov, Kassym; Stepanenko, Valeriy; Ivannikov, Alexander; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Zharlyganova, Dinara; Toyoda, Shin; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2008-11-01

    The contribution of radiation from X-ray baggage scans at airports on dose formation in tooth samples was investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry and by glass dosimetry. This was considered important, because tooth samples from population around the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS), Kazakhstan, had been transported in the past to Hiroshima University for retrospective dose assessment of these residents. Enamel samples and glass dosimeters were therefore examined at check-in time at Kansai airport (Osaka, Japan), Dubai airport (Dubai, United Arab Emirates) and Domodedovo airport (Moscow, Russia). These airports are on the route from Kazakhstan to Japan. Three different potential locations of the samples were investigated: in pocket (without X-ray scans), in a small bag (with four X-ray scans) and in large luggage (with two X-ray scans). The doses obtained by glass and ESR dosimetry methods were cross-compared. As expected, doses from X-ray examinations measured by glass dosimetry were in the microGy range, well below the ESR detection limit and also below the doses measured in enamel samples from residents of the SNTS. PMID:18648837

  4. Measurement of high energy x-ray beam penumbra with Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT radiochromic film

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung Tsang; Butson, Martin J.; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2006-08-15

    High energy x-ray beam penumbra are measured using Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT film. Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT, due to its limited energy dependence and high spatial resolution provide a high level of accuracy for dose assessment in penumbral regions. The spatial resolution of film detector systems is normally limited by the scanning resolution of the densitometer. Penumbral widths (80%/20%) measured at D{sub max} were found to be 2.8, 3.0, 3.2, and 3.4 mm ({+-}0.2 mm) using 5, 10, 20, and 30 cm square field sizes, respectively, for a 6 MV linear accelerator produced x-ray beam. This is compared to 3.2 mm{+-}0.2 mm (Kodak EDR2) and 3.6 mm{+-}0.2 mm (Kodak X-Omat V) at 10 cmx10 cm measured using radiographic film. Using a zero volume extrapolation technique for ionization chamber measurements, the 10 cmx10 cm field penumbra at D{sub max} was measured to be 3.1 mm, a close match to Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT results. Penumbral measurements can also be made at other depths, including the surface, as the film does not suffer significantly from dosimetric variations caused by changing x-ray energy spectra. Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT film provides an adequate measure of penumbral dose for high energy x-ray beams.

  5. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science. PMID:27466217

  6. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science. PMID:27466217

  7. High-resolution projection image reconstruction of thick objects by hard x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2010-12-01

    Hard x-ray diffraction microscopy enables us to observe thick objects at high spatial resolution. The resolution of this method is limited, in principle, by only the x-ray wavelength and the largest scattering angle recorded. As the resolution approaches the wavelength, the thickness effect of objects plays a significant role in x-ray diffraction microscopy. In this paper, we report high-resolution hard x-ray diffraction microscopy for thick objects. We used highly focused coherent x rays with a wavelength of {approx}0.1 nm as an incident beam and measured the diffraction patterns of a {approx}150-nm-thick silver nanocube at the scattering angle of {approx}3 deg. We observed a characteristic contrast of the coherent diffraction pattern due to only the thickness effect and collected the diffraction patterns at nine incident angles so as to obtain information on a cross section of Fourier space. We reconstructed a pure projection image by the iterative phasing method from the patched diffraction pattern. The edge resolution of the reconstructed image was {approx}2 nm, which was the highest resolution so far achieved by x-ray microscopy. The present study provides us with a method for quantitatively observing thick samples at high resolution by hard x-ray diffraction microscopy.

  8. The high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments at ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32.

    PubMed

    Kummer, K; Fondacaro, A; Jimenez, E; Velez-Fort, E; Amorese, A; Aspbury, M; Yakhou-Harris, F; van der Linden, P; Brookes, N B

    2016-03-01

    A new high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments has been installed and commissioned at the ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32. The magnet consists of two split-pairs of superconducting coils which can generate up to 9 T along the beam and up to 4 T orthogonal to the beam. It is connected to a cluster of ultra-high-vacuum chambers that offer a comprehensive set of surface preparation and characterization techniques. The endstation and the beam properties have been designed to provide optimum experimental conditions for X-ray magnetic linear and circular dichroism experiments in the soft X-ray range between 400 and 1600 eV photon energy. User operation started in November 2014. PMID:26917134

  9. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C.

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1-100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5-9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. The impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.

  10. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rinderknecht, H G; Rojas-Herrera, J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Sio, H; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Filkins, T; Steidle, Jeffrey A; Steidle, Jessica A; Traynor, N; Freeman, C

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1-100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5-9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. The impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant. PMID:26724031

  11. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G. Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.

    2015-12-15

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. The impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.

  12. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C.

    2015-12-23

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. Lastly, the impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.

  13. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; et al

    2015-12-23

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protonsmore » with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. Lastly, the impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.« less

  14. High-throughput baggage scanning employing x-ray diffraction for accurate explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Michael C.; Partain, Larry D.

    2003-07-01

    X-ray systems dominate the installed base of airport baggage scanning systems for explosives detection. The majority are conveyer systems with projection line scanners. These systems can achieve a high throughput but exhibit a high false positive rate and require significant operator involvement. Systems employing computed tomography (CT) are currently being installed at a rapid rate. These can provide good discrimination of levels of xray absorption coefficient and can largely circumvent superimposition effects. Nonetheless CT measures only x-ray absorption coefficient per voxel which does not provide a means of specific material identification resulting in many false positives, and it is relatively straightforward to configure explosive materials so that they are undetectable by CT systems. Diffraction-based x-ray systems present a solution to this problem. They detect and measure atomic layer spacings in crystalline and microcrystalline materials with high sensitivity. This provides a means of specific material identification. The majority of explosive compounds are well crystallized solids at room temperature. X-ray diffraction systems using both conventional wavelength-dispersive diffraction and fixed-angle, multi-wavelength diffraction for improved throughput are described. Large-area, flat-panel x-ray detector technology coupled with an extended x-ray source will permit a full 3D volumetric x-ray diffraction scan of a bag in a single pass, (patent pending).

  15. Ultrafast ionization and fragmentation dynamics of molecules at high x-ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil

    2016-05-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) open a new era in science and technology, offering many unique opportunities that have not been conceivable with conventional light sources. Because of their very high x-ray photon fluence within very short pulse duration, materials interacting with XFEL undergo significant radiation damage -- they possibly become highly ionized and then explode. To comprehend underlying physics, it is crucial to understand detailed ionization and fragmentation dynamics of atoms and molecules during intense XFEL pulses. We have developed the XMOLECULE toolkit to describe molecular x-ray-induced processes and to simulate radiation damage dynamics of molecules. In this talk, I will present a theoretical framework of XFEL-matter interaction, namely x-ray multiphoton absorption. Then I will discuss recent results of ultrafast x-ray-induced explosion of methyl iodide (CH3 I) molecules. Charge state distribution and kinetic energy releases of fragments are calculated to probe ionization and fragmentation dynamics, and compared with recent experimental results. It will be demonstrated that ionization of heavy-atom-containing molecules at high x-ray intensity is much enhanced in comparison with the isolated atomic case, due to ultrafast charge rearrangement during x-ray multiphoton absorption.

  16. High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction of Macromolecules with Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Boggon, Titus; Helliwell, John R.; Judge, Russell; Olczak, Alex; Snell, Edward H.; Siddons, D. Peter; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We recently combined synchrotron-based monochromatic X-ray diffraction topography methods with triple axis diffractometry and rocking curve measurements: high resolution X-ray diffraction imaging techniques, to better understand the quality of protein crystals. We discuss these methods in the light of results obtained on crystals grown under different conditions. These non destructive techniques are powerful tools in the characterization of the protein crystals and ultimately will allow to improve, develop, and understand protein crystal growth. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging methods will be discussed in detail in light of recent results obtained on Hen Egg White Lysozyme crystals and other proteins.

  17. Lensless Diffractive Imaging Using Tabletop Coherent High-Harmonic Soft-X-Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, Richard L.; Paul, Ariel; Raymondson, Daisy A.; Haedrich, Steffen; Gaudiosi, David M.; Holtsnider, Jim; Tobey, Ra'anan I.; Cohen, Oren; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Song, Changyong; Miao Jianwei; Liu Yanwei; Salmassi, Farhad

    2007-08-31

    We present the first experimental demonstration of lensless diffractive imaging using coherent soft x rays generated by a tabletop soft-x-ray source. A 29 nm high harmonic beam illuminates an object, and the subsequent diffraction is collected on an x-ray CCD camera. High dynamic range diffraction patterns are obtained by taking multiple exposures while blocking small-angle diffraction using beam blocks of varying size. These patterns reconstruct to images with 214 nm resolution. This work demonstrates a practical tabletop lensless microscope that promises to find applications in materials science, nanoscience, and biology.

  18. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  19. High-average-power water window soft X-rays from an Ar laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Sho

    2016-07-01

    A high average power of 140 mW and high conversion efficiency of 14% were demonstrated in “water window” soft X-rays generated using a laser plasma source developed in-house, when a solid Ar target was irradiated by a commercial Nd:YAG Q-switched laser with an energy of 1 J at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. This soft X-ray power compared favorably with that produced using a synchrotron radiation source, and the developed laser plasma source can be used in various applications, such as soft X-ray microscopy, in place of synchrotron facilities.

  20. Calibration of a high resolution grating soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, E. W.; Dunn, J.; Brown, G. V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Cone, K. V.; Park, J.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Kelley, R. L.

    2010-10-15

    The calibration of the soft x-ray spectral response of a large radius of curvature, high resolution grating spectrometer (HRGS) with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector is reported. The instrument is cross-calibrated for the 10-50 A waveband at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap (EBIT) x-ray source with the EBIT calorimeter spectrometer. The HRGS instrument is designed for laser-produced plasma experiments and is important for making high dynamic range measurements of line intensities, line shapes, and x-ray sources.

  1. Calibration of a high resolution grating soft x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Magee, E W; Dunn, J; Brown, G V; Cone, K V; Park, J; Porter, F S; Kilbourne, C A; Kelley, R L; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-10-01

    The calibration of the soft x-ray spectral response of a large radius of curvature, high resolution grating spectrometer (HRGS) with a back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector is reported. The instrument is cross-calibrated for the 10-50 Å waveband at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap (EBIT) x-ray source with the EBIT calorimeter spectrometer. The HRGS instrument is designed for laser-produced plasma experiments and is important for making high dynamic range measurements of line intensities, line shapes, and x-ray sources. PMID:21034013

  2. X-ray resonant photoexcitation: linewidths and energies of Kα transitions in highly charged Fe ions.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, J K; Bernitt, S; Epp, S W; Steinbrügge, R; Beilmann, C; Brown, G V; Eberle, S; Graf, A; Harman, Z; Hell, N; Leutenegger, M; Müller, A; Schlage, K; Wille, H-C; Yavaş, H; Ullrich, J; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R

    2013-09-01

    Photoabsorption by and fluorescence of the Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions are essential mechanisms for x-ray radiation transfer in astrophysical environments. We study photoabsorption due to the main Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions from heliumlike to fluorinelike (Fe24+ to Fe17+) using monochromatic x rays around 6.6 keV at the PETRA III synchrotron photon source. Natural linewidths were determined with hitherto unattained accuracy. The observed transitions are of particular interest for the understanding of photoexcited plasmas found in x-ray binary stars and active galactic nuclei. PMID:25166661

  3. Simulation of high-resolution x-ray zone plates.

    PubMed

    Kurokhtin, Alexei N; Popov, Alexei V

    2002-02-01

    A full-wave approach to quantitative characterization of x-ray zone plate lenses is proposed. Distributed focusing efficiency eta(z) of a multifocus optical element is defined as the energy flux through the Airy disk of a reference perfect lens with variable focal length z. Maxima of this function characterize diffraction efficiencies and spatial resolution of the zone plate foci. The parabolic wave equation is used to take into account diffraction effects inside the optical element. Rough and fuzzy interface models are introduced to describe realistic zone profiles. Numerical simulation reveals the limited capability of zone width reduction to improve the zone plate imaging performance. The possibilities of second-order focus enhancement by optimization of the zone plate thickness, line-to-space ratio, and zone tilt are studied numerically. PMID:11822594

  4. High efficiency replicated x-ray optics and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lane, Stephen M.; Hoffman, Donald E.

    2001-01-01

    Replicated x-ray optics are fabricated by sputter deposition of reflecting layers on a super-polished reusable mandrel. The reflecting layers are strengthened by a supporting multilayer that results in stronger stress-relieved reflecting surfaces that do not deform during separation from the mandrel. The supporting multilayer enhances the ability to part the replica from the mandrel without degradation in surface roughness. The reflecting surfaces are comparable in smoothness to the mandrel surface. An outer layer is electrodeposited on the supporting multilayer. A parting layer may be deposited directly on the mandrel before the reflecting surface to facilitate removal of the layered, tubular optic device from the mandrel without deformation. The inner reflecting surface of the shell can be a single layer grazing reflection mirror or a resonant multilayer mirror. The resulting optics can be used in a wide variety of applications, including lithography, microscopy, radiography, tomography, and crystallography.

  5. Design and Development of Thin Plastic Foil, Conical Approximation, High Through-out X-Ray Telescope: Light Weight, Thin Plastic Foil, X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, Herbert W.; Barbera, Marco; Silver, Eric; Ingram, Russell; Christensen, Finn E.; Romaine, Suzanne; Cohen, Lester; Collura, Alfonso; Murray, Stephen S.; Brinton, John C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present results from a program to develop an X-ray telescope made from thin plastic shells. Our initial results have been obtained from multi-shell cylindrical lenses that are used in a point-to-point configuration to image the small focal spot of a an X-ray tube on a microchannel plate detector. We describe the steps that led up to the present design and present data from the tests that have been used to identify the properties of the plastic material that make it a suitable X-ray reflector. We discuss two applications of our technology to X-ray missions that are designed to address some of the scientific priorities set forth in NASA's long term plans for high energy astrophysics. One mission will observe in the 1 - 10 keV band, the other will extend up to ca. 100 keV.

  6. Exploratory X-ray monitoring of luminous radio-quiet quasars at high redshift: Initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Shemmer, Ohad; Stein, Matthew S.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P.; Paolillo, Maurizio; Kaspi, Shai; Vignali, Cristian; Lira, Paulina; Gibson, Robert R.

    2014-03-10

    We present initial results from an exploratory X-ray monitoring project of two groups of comparably luminous radio-quiet quasars (RQQs). The first consists of four sources at 4.10 ≤ z ≤ 4.35, monitored by Chandra, and the second is a comparison sample of three sources at 1.33 ≤ z ≤ 2.74, monitored by Swift. Together with archival X-ray data, the total rest-frame temporal baseline spans ∼2-4 yr and ∼5-13 yr for the first and second group, respectively. Six of these sources show significant X-ray variability over rest-frame timescales of ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} days; three of these also show significant X-ray variability on rest-frame timescales of ∼1-10 days. The X-ray variability properties of our variable sources are similar to those exhibited by nearby and far less luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). While we do not directly detect a trend of increasing X-ray variability with redshift, we do confirm previous reports of luminous AGNs exhibiting X-ray variability above that expected from their luminosities, based on simplistic extrapolation from lower luminosity sources. This result may be attributed to luminous sources at the highest redshifts having relatively high accretion rates. Complementary UV-optical monitoring of our sources shows that variations in their optical-X-ray spectral energy distribution are dominated by the X-ray variations. We confirm previous reports of X-ray spectral variations in one of our sources, HS 1700+6416, but do not detect such variations in any of our other sources in spite of X-ray flux variations of up to a factor of ∼4. This project is designed to provide a basic assessment of the X-ray variability properties of RQQs at the highest accessible redshifts that will serve as a benchmark for more systematic monitoring of such sources with future X-ray missions.

  7. Event-Driven X-Ray CCD Detectors for High Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, George R.

    2004-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the Event-Driven X- Ray CCD (EDCCD) detector system for high energy astrophysics is presented. The topics include: 1) EDCCD: Description and Advantages; 2) Summary of Grant Activity Carried Out; and 3) EDCCD Test System.

  8. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Feldmeier, A.; Falanga, M.

    2016-04-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the nonstationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total timescale of several hours), the transitions of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the nonstationary wind. The X-ray luminosity released by the system is computed at each time step by taking into account the relevant physical processes occurring in the different accretion regimes. Synthetic lightcurves are derived and qualitatively compared with those observed from classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. Although a number of simplifications are assumed in these calculations, we show that taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion significantly reduces the average X-ray luminosity expected for any neutron star wind-fed binary. The present model calculations suggest that long spin periods and stronger magnetic fields are favored in order to reproduce the peculiar behavior of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the X-ray domain.

  9. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Feldmeier, A.; Falanga, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the nonstationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total timescale of several hours), the transitions of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the nonstationary wind. The X-ray luminosity released by the system is computed at each time step by taking into account the relevant physical processes occurring in the different accretion regimes. Synthetic lightcurves are derived and qualitatively compared with those observed from classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. Although a number of simplifications are assumed in these calculations, we show that taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion significantly reduces the average X-ray luminosity expected for any neutron star wind-fed binary. The present model calculations suggest that long spin periods and stronger magnetic fields are favored in order to reproduce the peculiar behavior of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the X-ray domain.

  10. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  11. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yajiang; Inhester, Ludger; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-07-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging. PMID:26798806

  12. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yajiang; Inhester, Ludger; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging. PMID:26798806

  13. Superconducting High-Resolution X-Ray Spectrometers for Chemical State Analysis of Dilute Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O B; Funk, T; Sherrell, D; Yachandra, V K; Labov, S E; Cramer, S P

    2003-09-02

    Cryogenic X-ray spectrometers operating at temperatures below 1 K combine high energy resolution with broadband efficiency for X-ray energies up to 10 keV. They offer advantages for chemical state analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in cases where conventional Ge or Si(Li) detectors lack energy resolution and grating spectrometers lack detection efficiency. We are developing soft X-ray spectrometers based on superconducting Nb-Al-AlOx-Al-Nb tunnel junction (STJ) technology. X-rays absorbed in one of the superconducting electrodes generate excess charge carriers in proportion to their energy, thereby producing a measurable temporary increase in tunneling current. For STJ operation at the synchrotron, we have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) with a cold finger that holds a 3 x 3 array of STJs inside the UHV sample chamber at a temperature of {approx}0.1 K within {approx}15 mm of a room temperature sample. Our STJ spectrometer can have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies up to 1 keV, and has total count rate capabilities above 100,000 counts/s. We will describe detector performance in synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence experiments and demonstrate its use for XAS on a dilute metal site in a metalloprotein.

  14. X-ray laser interferometry for probing high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 4-40 nm. With the recent advances in the development of multilayer mirrors and beamsplitters in the soft x-ray regime, the authors can utilize the unique properties of x-ray lasers to study large, rapidly evolving laser-driven plasmas with high electron densities. Using a neon-like yttrium x-ray laser which operates at a wavelength of 15.5 nm, they have performed a series of x-ray laser interferometry experiments to characterize plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion. In this paper the authors describe experiments using a soft x-ray laser interferometer, operated in the Mach-Zehnder configuration, to study CH plasmas and exploding foil targets commonly used for x-ray laser targets. The two-dimensional density profiles obtained from the interferograms allow the authors to validate and benchmark their numerical models used to study the physics of laser-plasma interactions.

  15. Megavoltage X-ray Dose Enhancement with Gold Nanoparticles in Tumor Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mousavie Anijdan, Sayyed Hossein; Mahdavi, Seyyed Rabi; Shirazi, Alireza; Zarrinfard, Mohammad Ali; Hajati, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    One of the applications of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in medicine is radiation dose-enhancing effect. Although there are many simulations, in vitro and in vivo evidence that GNPs can enhance significantly the radiation dose effect of orthovoltage beams. These beams compared with megavoltage (MV) beams, have limited applications in radiotherapy. In order to evaluate GNPs radiosensitization performance with MV beams in-vivo, we used two most clinically used X-ray beams (6 and 18 MV) with the dose of 20 Gy for each mouse. Intratumoral injection of 50 nm GNPs with the concentration of 5 mg ml-1 was applied to melanoma tumor growing in the left leg of 7 to 8 mice in 4 control and treatment groups of C57BL/6 mice. Albeit, using 10 cm plexiglass jig phantom in the beam path improved the radiation - treatments, the statistical differences between groups were not significant. According to the results, it is concluded that mice can be treated with smaller tumors and higher concentrations of GNPs in MV radiation beams. PMID:24551801

  16. Work Towards Experimental Evidence Of Hard X-Ray Photoionization In Highly Charged Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Kirby, K.; Lin, T.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Gokhale, P.; Kanter, E. P.; Dunford, R. W.; Seifert, S.; Young, L.; McDonald, J.; Schneider, D.

    2011-06-01

    Ions of almost any charge state can be produced through electron-impact ionization. Here we describe our first experiments designed to photoionize these highly charged ions with hard x-rays by pairing an electron and photon beam. A spectral line at 12.7(1) keV with an intensity corroborated by theory may be the first evidence of hard x-ray photoionization of a highly charged ion.

  17. Work toward experimental evidence of hard x-ray photoionization in highly charged krypton.

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.; Gillaspy, J.D.; Gokhale, P.; Kanter, E.P.; Brickhouse, N.S.; Dunford, R.W.; Kirby, K.; Lin, T.; McDonald, J.; Schneider, D.; Seifert, S.; Young, L.

    2011-06-01

    Ions of almost any charge state can be produced through electron-impact ionization. Here we describe our first experiments designed to photoionize these highly charged ions with hard x-rays by pairing an electron and photon beam. A spectral line at 12.7(1) keV with an intensity corroborated by theory may be the first evidence of hard x-ray photoionization of a highly charged ion.

  18. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Zhao Yunzhe; Huang Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Zhu Chun; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Osher, Stanley J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Results: Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest

  19. Prospects for using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.A.; Farrell, W.; Ma, Q.

    1997-09-01

    Third-generation, high-intensity, x-ray synchrotron radiation sources are capable of producing high heat-flux x-ray beams. In many applications finding ways to handle these powers is viewed as a burden. However, there are some technological applications where the deep penetration length of the x-rays may find beneficial uses as a volumetric heat source. In this paper the authors discuss the prospects for using high power x-rays for volumetric heating and report some recent experimental results. The particular applications they focus on are welding and surface heat treatment. The radiation source is an undulator at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Results of preliminary tests on aluminum, aluminum metal matrix composites, and steel will be presented.

  20. Wire array z-pinch insights for high x-ray power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mock, R.C.; Nash, T.J.

    1998-08-01

    The discovery that the use of very large numbers of wires enables high x-ray power to be generated from wire-array z-pinches represents a breakthrough in load design for large pulsed power generators, and has permitted high temperatures to be generated in radiation cavities on Saturn. In this paper, changes in x-ray emission characteristics as a function of wire number, array mass, and load radius, for 20-mm-long aluminum arrays on Saturn that led to these breakthrough hohlraum results, are discussed and compared with a few related emission characteristics of high-wire-number aluminum and tungsten arrays on Z. X=ray measurement comparisons with analytic models and 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHC) code simulations in the x-y and r-z planes provide confidence in the ability of the models and codes to predict future x-ray performance with very-large-number wire arrays.

  1. Wire array z-pinch insights for high x-ray power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mock, R.C.; Marder, B.M.

    1997-12-31

    The discovery that the use of very large numbers of wires enables high x-ray power to be generated from wire-array z-pinches represents a breakthrough in load design for large pulsed power generators, and has permitted high temperatures to be generated in radiation cavities on Saturn and Z. In this paper, changes in x-ray emission characteristics as a function of wire number, array mass, and load radius, for 20-mm-long aluminum arrays on Saturn that led to these breakthrough hohlraum results, are discussed and compared with a few related emission characteristics of high-wire-number aluminum and tungsten arrays on Z. X-ray measurement comparisons with analytic models and 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHC) code simulations in the x-y and r-z planes provide confidence in the ability of the models and codes to predict future x-ray performance with very-large-number wire arrays.

  2. High-resolution X-ray spectra of solar flares. VII - A long-duration X-ray flare associated with a coronal mass ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreplin, R. W.; Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Seely, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recognized that very long duration X-ray events (lasting several hours) are frequently associated with coronal mass ejection. Thus, Sheeley et al. (1983) found that the probability of the occurrence of a coronal mass ejection (CME) increases monotonically with the X-ray event duration time. It is pointed out that the association of long-duration, or long-decay, X-ray events (LDEs) with CMEs was first recognized from analysis of solar images obtained by the X-ray telescopes on Skylab and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) slitless spectroheliograph. Recently high-resolution Bragg crystal X-ray spectrometers have been flown on three spacecraft, including the Department of Defense P78-1 spacecraft, the NASA Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), and the Japanese Hinotori spacecraft. In the present paper, P78-1 X-ray spectra of an LDE which had its origin behind the solar west limb on November 14, 1980 is presented. The obtained data make it possible to estimate temperatures of the hottest portion of the magnetic loops in which the emission arises.

  3. Imaging doses from the Elekta Synergy X-ray cone beam CT system.

    PubMed

    Amer, A; Marchant, T; Sykes, J; Czajka, J; Moore, C

    2007-06-01

    The Elekta Synergy is a radiotherapy treatment machine with integrated kilovoltage (kV) X-ray imaging system capable of producing cone beam CT (CBCT) images of the patient in the treatment position. The aim of this study is to assess the additional imaging dose. Cone beam CT dose index (CBDI) is introduced and measured inside standard CTDI phantoms for several sites (head: 100 kV, 38 mAs, lung: 120 kV, 152 mAs and pelvis: 130 kV, 456 mAs). The measured weighted doses were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements at various locations in a Rando phantom and at patients' surfaces. The measured CBDIs in-air at the isocentre were 9.2 mGy 100 mAs(-1), 7.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) and 5.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) for 130 kV, 120 kV and 100 kV, respectively. The body phantom weighted CBDI were 5.5 mGy 100 mAs(-1) and 3.8 mGy 100 mAs(-1 )for 130 kV and 120 kV. The head phantom weighted CBDI was 4.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) for 100 kV. The weighted doses for the Christie Hospital CBCT imaging techniques were 1.6 mGy, 6 mGy and 22 mGy for the head, lung and pelvis. The measured CBDIs were used to estimate the total effective dose for the Synergy system using the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator. Measured CBCT doses using the Christie Hospital protocols are low for head and lung scans whether compared with electronic portal imaging (EPI), commonly used for treatment verification, or single and multiple slice CT. For the pelvis, doses are similar to EPI but higher than CT. Repeated use of CBCT for treatment verification is likely and hence the total patient dose needs to be carefully considered. It is important to consider further development of low dose CBCT techniques to keep additional doses as low as reasonably practicable. PMID:17684077

  4. High resolution X-ray fluorescence imaging for a microbeam radiation therapy treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Inscoe, Christina; Burk, Laurel; Ger, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses an array of high-dose, narrow (~100 μm) beams separated by a fraction of a millimeter to treat various radio-resistant, deep-seated tumors. MRT has been shown to spare normal tissue up to 1000 Gy of entrance dose while still being highly tumoricidal. Current methods of tumor localization for our MRT treatments require MRI and X-ray imaging with subject motion and image registration that contribute to the measurement error. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel form of imaging to quickly and accurately assist in high resolution target positioning for MRT treatments using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The key to this method is using the microbeam to both treat and image. High Z contrast media is injected into the phantom or blood pool of the subject prior to imaging. Using a collimated spectrum analyzer, the region of interest is scanned through the MRT beam and the fluorescence signal is recorded for each slice. The signal can be processed to show vascular differences in the tissue and isolate tumor regions. Using the radiation therapy source as the imaging source, repositioning and registration errors are eliminated. A phantom study showed that a spatial resolution of a fraction of microbeam width can be achieved by precision translation of the mouse stage. Preliminary results from an animal study showed accurate iodine profusion, confirmed by CT. The proposed image guidance method, using XRF to locate and ablate tumors, can be used as a fast and accurate MRT treatment planning system.

  5. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  6. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  7. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; et al

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore » resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  8. A fast and high resolution x-ray imaging sensor for tape substrate inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Jung-Yeol; Roh, Young-Jun; Jung, Chang-Ook; Jeong, Dae-Hwa

    2008-11-01

    In automated Tape substrate (TS) inspection, machine vision is widely adopted for their high throughput and cost advantages. However, conventional methods are overly sensitive to foreign particles or have limitations in detecting three dimensional defects such as top over-etching. In an attempt to complement vision inspection systems, we proposed utilizing x-ray inspection. To implement x-ray inspection in TS application, we developed a prototype fast and high spatial resolution x-ray imaging sensor which functions at frame rate in excess of 30 fps and has a spatial resolution of 20 µm. In this paper, the development of the sensor and its performance is addressed and the efficiency of the x-ray inspection in detecting top over-etching defects will be shown with experimental studies.

  9. Dosimetric properties of high energy current (HEC) detector in keV x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Shrestha, Suman; Elshahat, Bassem; Karellas, Andrew; Sajo, Erno

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a new x-ray radiation detector. The detector employs high-energy current (HEC) formed by secondary electrons consisting predominantly of photoelectrons and Auger electrons, to directly convert x-ray energy to detector signal without externally applied power and without amplification. The HEC detector is a multilayer structure composed of thin conducting layers separated by dielectric layers with an overall thickness of less than a millimeter. It can be cut to any size and shape, formed into curvilinear surfaces, and thus can be designed for a variety of QA applications. We present basic dosimetric properties of the detector as function of x-ray energy, depth in the medium, area and aspect ratio of the detector, as well as other parameters. The prototype detectors show similar dosimetric properties to those of a thimble ionization chamber, which operates at high voltage. The initial results obtained for kilovoltage x-rays merit further research and development towards specific medical applications.

  10. High sensitive X-ray films to detect electron showers in 100 GeV region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taira, T.; Kazuno, M.; Shirai, T.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Nishimura, J.; Fujii, M.; Yoshida, A.; Aizu, H.; Nomura, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Nonscreen type X-ray films were used in emulsion chamber experiments to detect high energy showers in cosmic rays. Ranges of the detection threshold is from about 1 to 2 TeV depending on the exposure conditions. Different types of X-ray films and sheets i.e. high sensitive screen type X-ray films and luminescence sheets were tested. The threshold of the shower detection is found to be about 200 GeV, which is much lower than that of nonscreen type X-ray films. These films are useful to detect showers in the medium energy range, a few hundred GeV, of the cosmic ray electrons.

  11. High Time Resolution Studies of Binary X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.

    1996-05-01

    The work for this project was substantially more than anticipated, and involved recreating an analysis system for all the HEAO A-1 scanning data which had been converted to the ELE format. As a result of this work, a complete software analysis package was first created at Sonoma State University using Fortran, that can extract the data for any given X-ray source, and produce light curves from the scanning data. A second complete software analysis package was also created, this time in IDL, which can also display all the data in a timely manner, allowing data screening without the generation of hardcopy plots. The creation of the software systems was not the original goal of the project; rather this was a necessary result when the NRL computers became inoperable due to old age and could not be used to support the project, as originally planned. There were 6 sources originally proposed for analysis: SMC X-1, A0538-66, LMC X-1, LMC X-3, (these 3 sources are all located in the Large Magellanic Cloud region), 4UO115+63 and 4U1626-67. Results on these sources are summarized.

  12. Innovative uses of X-ray FEL and the pulsed magnets: High magnetic field X-ray scattering studies on quantum materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Gerber, S.; Lee, W.-S.; Zhu, D.; Lee, J.-S.; Kao, C.-C.

    X-ray scattering under high magnetic fields provides unique opportunities for solving many scientific puzzles in quantum materials, such as strongly correlated electron systems. Incorporating high magnetic field capability presents serious challenges at an x-ray facility, including the limitation on the maximum magnetic field even with a DC magnet (up to ~20 Tesla), expensive cost in development, radiation damage, and limited flexibility in the experimental configuration. These challenges are especially important when studying the symmetry broken state induced by the high magnetic field are necessary, for example, exploring intertwined orders between charge density wave (CDW) and high Tc superconductivity. Moreover, a gap in magnetic field strengths has led to many discrepancies and puzzling issues for understanding strongly correlated systems - is a CDW competing or more intimately intertwined with high-temperature superconductivity. To bridge this gap and resolve these experimental discrepancies, one needs an innovative experimental approach. Here, we will present a new approach to x-ray scattering under high magnetic field up to 28 Teals by taking advantage of brilliant x-ray free electron laser (FEL). The FEL generates sufficiently high photon flux for single shot x-ray scattering experiment. In this talk, we will also present the first demonstration about the field induced CDW order in YBCO Ortho-VIII with 28 Tesla, which show the totally unexpected three-dimensional behavior.

  13. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    A high resolution X-ray spectrometer and large area phoswich detector were designed and co-aligned in a common elevation mounting in order to measure solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma ray emission in the 13 to 600 KeV energy range from a balloon. The instrument is described and results obtained for the Crab Nebula, the supernova remnant Cas A, and the Sun are discussed and analyzed.

  14. Quasi-monochromatic radiography using a high-intensity quasi-x-ray laser generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Obara, Haruo; Ichimaru, Toshio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    2002-05-01

    High-intensity quasi-monochromatic x-ray irradiation from the linear plasma target is described. The plasma x-ray generator employs a high-voltage power supply, a low- impedance coaxial transmission line, a high-voltage condenser with a capacity of about 200 nF, a turbo-molecular pump, a thyristor pulse generator as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser is charged up to 55 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The flash x-rays are then produced. The x-ray tube is of a demountable triode that is connected to the turbo molecular pump with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. As the electron flows from the cathode electrode are roughly converged to the molybdenum target by the electric field in the tube, the plasma x-ray source, which consists of metal ions and electrons, forms by the target evaporating. Both the tube voltage and current displayed damped oscillations, and their peak values increased according to increases in the charging voltage. In the present work, the peak tube voltage was almost equal to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was about 20 kA with a charging voltage of 55 kV. When the charging voltage was increased, the linear plasma x-ray source formed, and the characteristic x-ray intensities of K-series lines increased. The quasi- monochromatic radiography was performed by as new film-less computed radiography system.

  15. High-intensity quasi-monochromatic x-ray irradiation from the linear plasma target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Suzuki, Yusaku; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    2001-12-01

    High-intensity quasi-monochromatic x-ray irradiation from the linear plasma target is described. The plasma x-ray generator employs a high-voltage power supply, a low- impedance coaxial transmission line, a high-voltage condenser with a capacity of about 200 nF, a turbo-molecular pump, a thyristor pulse generator as a trigger device, and a new flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser is charged up to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The flash x-rays are then produced. The x-ray tube is of a demountable triode that is connected to the turbo molecular pump with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. As the electron flows from the cathode electrode are roughly converged to the nickel target by the electric field in the tube, the plasma x-ray source, which consists of metal ions and electrons, forms by the target evaporating. Both the tube voltage and current displayed damped oscillations, and their peak values increased according to increases in the charging voltage. In the present work, the peak tube voltage was almost equal to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was about 29 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. When the charging voltage was increased, the linear plasma x-ray source formed, and the characteristic x-ray intensities of K-series lines increased. The quasi- monochromatic radiography was performed by a new film-less computed radiography system.

  16. A high sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Bleach, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    A high sensitivity scan of the galactic plane was performed to search for 2-20 keV X-rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 deg and 31 deg longitude, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants, are reported on. Upper limits are presented for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned in this survey.

  17. A high-sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Bleach, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    A high-sensitivity scan of the galactic plane from 70 to 30 deg was performed to search for 2-20-keV X rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 and 31 deg longitude are presented, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants. Upper limits are given for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned.

  18. Experimental demonstration of high resolution three-dimensional x-ray holography

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, I. ); Trebes, J.E.; Brase, J.M.; Yorkey, T.J.; Levesque, R.; Szoke, H. ); Anderson, E.H. ); Jacobsen, C. . Dept. of Physics); Kern, D. (IBM T.J. Watson Research Laboratory, Yorktown Heights, NY (Unit

    1992-01-01

    Tomographic x-ray holography may make possible the imaging of biological objects at high resolution in three dimensions. We performed a demonstration experiment with soft x-rays to explore the feasibility of this technique. Coherent 3.2-nm undulator radiation was used to record Fourier transform holograms of a microfabricated test object from various illumination angles. The holograms were numerically reconstructed according to the principles of diffraction tomography, yielding images of the object that are well resolved in three dimensions.

  19. Experimental demonstration of high resolution three-dimensional x-ray holography

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, I.; Trebes, J.E.; Brase, J.M.; Yorkey, T.J.; Levesque, R.; Szoke, H.; Anderson, E.H.; Jacobsen, C.; Kern, D.

    1992-12-01

    Tomographic x-ray holography may make possible the imaging of biological objects at high resolution in three dimensions. We performed a demonstration experiment with soft x-rays to explore the feasibility of this technique. Coherent 3.2-nm undulator radiation was used to record Fourier transform holograms of a microfabricated test object from various illumination angles. The holograms were numerically reconstructed according to the principles of diffraction tomography, yielding images of the object that are well resolved in three dimensions.

  20. Alignment of low-dose X-ray fluorescence tomography images using differential phase contrast

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Pyo; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Que, Emily L.; Bleher, Reiner; Vogt, Stefan; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence nanotomography provides unprecedented sensitivity for studies of trace metal distributions in whole biological cells. Dose fractionation, in which one acquires very low dose individual projections and then obtains high statistics reconstructions as signal from a voxel is brought together (Hegerl & Hoppe, 1976 ▶), requires accurate alignment of these individual projections so as to correct for rotation stage runout. It is shown here that differential phase contrast at 10.2 keV beam energy offers the potential for accurate cross-correlation alignment of successive projections, by demonstrating that successive low dose, 3 ms per pixel, images acquired at the same specimen position and rotation angle have a narrower and smoother cross-correlation function (1.5 pixels FWHM at 300 nm pixel size) than that obtained from zinc fluorescence images (25 pixels FWHM). The differential phase contrast alignment resolution is thus well below the 700 nm × 500 nm beam spot size used in this demonstration, so that dose fractionation should be possible for reduced-dose, more rapidly acquired, fluorescence nanotomography experiments. PMID:24365941

  1. Alignment of low-dose X-ray fluorescence tomography images using differential phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young Pyo; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Que, Emily L; Bleher, Reiner; Vogt, Stefan; Woodruff, Teresa K; Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence nanotomography provides unprecedented sensitivity for studies of trace metal distributions in whole biological cells. Dose fractionation, in which one acquires very low dose individual projections and then obtains high statistics reconstructions as signal from a voxel is brought together (Hegerl & Hoppe, 1976), requires accurate alignment of these individual projections so as to correct for rotation stage runout. It is shown here that differential phase contrast at 10.2 keV beam energy offers the potential for accurate cross-correlation alignment of successive projections, by demonstrating that successive low dose, 3 ms per pixel, images acquired at the same specimen position and rotation angle have a narrower and smoother cross-correlation function (1.5 pixels FWHM at 300 nm pixel size) than that obtained from zinc fluorescence images (25 pixels FWHM). The differential phase contrast alignment resolution is thus well below the 700 nm × 500 nm beam spot size used in this demonstration, so that dose fractionation should be possible for reduced-dose, more rapidly acquired, fluorescence nanotomography experiments. PMID:24365941

  2. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-Ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Bailey, Catherine N.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; DeLuca, Edward E.; Chervenak, Jay A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Daniel P.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, Jack E.; Smith, Stephen J.; Smith, Randall K.

    2010-01-01

    High spectral resolution, high cadence, imaging x-ray spectroscopy has the potential to revolutionize the study of the solar corona. To that end we have been developing transition-edge-sensor (TES) based x-ray micro calorimeter arrays for future solar physics missions where imaging and high energy resolution spectroscopy will enable previously impossible studies of the dynamics and energetics of the solar corona. The characteristics of these x-ray microcalorimeters are significantly different from conventional micro calorimeters developed for astrophysics because they need to accommodate much higher count rates (300-1000 cps) while maintaining high energy resolution of less than 4 eV FWHM in the X-ray energy band of 0.2-10 keV. The other main difference is a smaller pixel size (less than 75 x 75 square microns) than is typical for x-ray micro calorimeters in order to provide angular resolution less than 1 arcsecond. We have achieved at energy resolution of 2.15 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 12 x 12 square micron TES sensor and 34 x 34 x 9.1 micron gold absorber, and a resolution of 2.30 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 35 x 35 micron TES and a 57 x 57 x 9.1 micron gold absorber. This performance has been achieved in pixels that are fabricated directly onto solid substrates, ie. they are not supported by silicon nitride membranes. We present the results from these detectors, the expected performance at high count-rates, and prospects for the use of this technology for future Solar missions.

  3. Measurement of X-ray for the dose area product and spectrum by the added filtration in Rando phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Woong; Kim, Eun-Soo; Choi, Jiwon; Kweon, Dae Cheol

    2014-02-01

    The most important point in the medical use of radiation is to minimize the patient entrance dose while maintaining the diagnostic information. Low-energy photons (long-wave X-ray) are unnecessary among diagnostic X-ray because they are mostly absorbed and increase the patient's entrance dose. The most effective method to eliminate the low-energy photon is use of a filtering plate. Using a filter appropriate for the image will maintain diagnostic value. Obtaining an effective image allows comparison of the resulting images in a logical objective way. This experiment was performed to determine the quality of image dosimeter when there is no filter, and when 2 mm Al, 0.1 mm Cu + 1 mm Al, 0.2 mm Cu + 1 mm Al filters are used. Using TORECK PD-8100 dose area products meter placed on top of an abdominal phantom, we measured the dose when the filter changes in this condition 85 kVp, 40 mAs, anode angle 13, source image distance 100 cm, 20 cm × 20 cm. We used the SRS-78 program for accurate comparison because we could not evaluate the difference in the image optically. The spectrum changed due to the emission of X-rays as the filter changed. We observed that the use of a filter eliminated the low-energy photons and revealed continuous X-ray and special X-ray. Therefore, the experiment highlighted the advantages of filters and confirmed that there are no changes in the quality of image through signal to noise ratio, peak signal to noise ratio, root mean square error comparison. We found that the use of filter did not lead to distortions in the image or drop in diagnostic value while minimizing the radiation dose. This means that it can help manage long-term patient dose. We conclude that we need to recommend the use of the filter as it reduces the area of dose.

  4. Optimized Fluoroscopy Setting and Appropriate Project Position Can Reduce X-ray Radiation Doses Rates during Electrophysiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Bing-Bo; Yao, Yan; Wu, Ling-Min; Qiao, Yu; Zheng, Li-Hui; Ding, Li-Gang; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nonfluoroscopic three-dimensional electroanatomical system is widely used nowadays, but X-ray remains indispensable for complex electrophysiology procedures. This study aimed to evaluate the value of optimized parameter setting and different projection position to reduce X-ray radiation dose rates. Methods: From June 2013 to October 2013, 105 consecutive patients who underwent complex ablation were enrolled in the study. After the ablation, the radiation dose rates were measured by two different settings (default setting and optimized setting) with three projection positions (posteroanterior [PA] projection; left anterior oblique [LAO] 30° projection; and LAO 45° projection). The parameter of preset voltage, pulse width, critical voltage, peak voltage, noise reduction, edge enhancement, pulse rate, and dose per frame was modified in the optimized setting. Results: The optimized setting reduced radiation dose rates by 87.5% (1.7 Gy/min vs. 13.6 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in PA, 87.3% (2.5 Gy/min vs. 19.7 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in LAO 30°, 85.9% (3.1 Gy/min vs. 22.1 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in LAO 45°. Increase the angle of projection position will increase the radiation dose rate. Conclusions: We can reduce X-ray radiation dose rates by adjusting the parameter setting of X-ray system. Avoiding oblique projection of large angle is another way to reduce X-ray radiation dose rates. PMID:25947395

  5. Effects of high energy x ray and proton irradiation on lead zirconate titanate thin films' dielectric and piezoelectric response

    SciTech Connect

    Bastani, Y.; Cortes-Pena, A. Y.; Wilson, A. D.; Gerardin, S.; Bagatin, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Bassiri-Gharb, N.

    2013-05-13

    The effects of irradiation by X rays and protons on the dielectric and piezoelectric response of highly (100)-textured polycrystalline Pb(Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x})O{sub 3} (PZT) thin films have been studied. Low-field dielectric permittivity, remanent polarization, and piezoelectric d{sub 33,f} response all degraded with exposure to radiation, for doses higher than 300 krad. At first approximation, the degradation increased at higher radiation doses, and was stronger in samples exposed to X rays, compared to the proton-irradiated ones. Nonlinear and high-field dielectric characterization suggest a radiation-induced reduction of the extrinsic contributions to the response, attributed to increased pinning of the domain walls by the radiation-induced point defects.

  6. Hard x-ray production from high intensity laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sefcik, J. A., LLNL

    1998-06-03

    Intense laser (> 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and cost advantage for multiple axis views and have the potential for much higher spatial and temporal resolution than is achievable with accelerator sources We have begun a series of experiments using the Petawatt Laser system at LLNL to determine the potential of these sources for radiography applications Absolutely calibrated spectra extending to 20 MeV and high resolution radiographs through a {rho}r{>=}150 gm/cm{sup 2} have been obtained The physics of these sources and the scaling relationships and laser technology required to provide the dose levels necessary for radiography applications will be discussed Diagnostics of the laser produced electrons and photons will be addressed

  7. High-energy processes in Young Stellar Objects -- the radio--X-ray (dis)connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, Jan; Wolk, Scott; Osten, Rachel

    2009-09-01

    Low-mass young stellar objects show high levels of magnetic activity in a wide spectral range. Powerful flares have been observed from X-ray to radio wavelengths. It has been expected that radio and X-ray emission from YSOs are correlated if magnetic fields close to the star are responsible for both nonthermal radio emission (usually gyrosynchrotron radiation) and thermal hot-plasma X-ray emission (see Guedel & Benz 1994). These high-energy processes strongly influence the surroundings of the YSOs, including irradiation of their disks. A deeper understanding of these processes requires taking into account their manifestations in different spectral ranges. However, the strong variability of YSOs ideally necessitates simultaneous multi-wavelength observations or at least a large sample of sources. While a general correlation of radio and X-ray luminosities of phenomena ranging from solar flares to active stars has been found for more evolved stars, it remains unclear to what degree it applies to YSOs -- particularly their earliest evolutionary stages. Drawing from the latest simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of star-forming regions as well as on archival data from the Chandra Orion Ultra-deep project, we present an update on the question of whether and how the radio and X-ray properties of YSOs are correlated and what this tells us about high-energy processes in YSOs compared to other classes of active stars. We mostly find a very limited relation between the X-ray and radio fluxes indicating a non-magnetic origin for some of the radio or X-ray emission.

  8. High resolution three-dimensional visualization and characterization of coronary atherosclerosis in vitro by synchrotron radiation x-ray microtomography and highly localized x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hua; Ham, Kyungmin; Chan, Julia Y.; Butler, Leslie G.; Kurtz, Richard L.; Thiam, Serigne; Robinson, James W.; Agbaria, Rezik A.; Warner, Isiah M.; Tracy, Richard E.

    2002-12-01

    Human atherosclerotic plaques in both native and bypass arteries have been visualized using microtomography to provide additional information on the nature of coronary artery disease. Plaques contained within arteries removed from three white males aged 51, 55 and 70 are imaged in three-dimensions with monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation. Fields of view are 658 × 658 × 517 voxels, with cubic voxels ranging from 12 to 13 µm on a side. X-ray energies range from 11 to 15 keV (bandpass approximately 10 eV). At lower energies, high local absorption tends to generate reconstruction artefacts, while at higher energies the arterial wall is scarcely visible. At all energies, calcifications are clearly visible and differences are observed between plaques in native arteries (lifetime accumulations) versus bypass arteries (plaques developing in the interval between the heart bypass operation and the autopsy). In order to characterize coronary calcification, a micro-focused, 50 µm2, 25 keV x-ray beam was used to acquire powder diffraction data from selected calcifications. Also, large calcifications were removed from the native arteries and imaged with 25 keV x-ray energy. Calcifications are composed of hydroxyapatite crystallites and an amorphous phase. In summary, native calcifications are larger and have a higher fraction of hydroxyapatite than calcifications from the bypass arteries.

  9. High-Sensitivity X-ray Polarimetry with Amorphous Silicon Active-Matrix Pixel Proportional Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jahoda, K.; Ready, S. E.; Street, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Photoelectric X-ray polarimeters based on pixel micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) offer order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity over more traditional techniques based on X-ray scattering. This new technique places some of the most interesting astronomical observations within reach of even a small, dedicated mission. The most sensitive instrument would be a photoelectric polarimeter at the focus of 2 a very large mirror, such as the planned XEUS. Our efforts are focused on a smaller pathfinder mission, which would achieve its greatest sensitivity with large-area, low-background, collimated polarimeters. We have recently demonstrated a MPGD polarimeter using amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) readout suitable for the focal plane of an X-ray telescope. All the technologies used in the demonstration polarimeter are scalable to the areas required for a high-sensitivity collimated polarimeter. Leywords: X-ray polarimetry, particle tracking, proportional counter, GEM, pixel readout

  10. High resolution double-sided diffractive optics for hard X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohacsi, Istvan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Karvinen, Petri; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; Müller, Elisabeth; Färm, Elina; Ritala, Mikko; Kewish, Cameron M; Somogyi, Andrea; David, Christian

    2015-01-26

    The fabrication of high aspect ratio metallic nanostructures is crucial for the production of efficient diffractive X-ray optics in the hard X-ray range. We present a novel method to increase their structure height via the double-sided patterning of the support membrane. In transmission, the two Fresnel zone plates on the two sides of the substrate will act as a single zone plate with added structure height. The presented double-sided zone plates with 30 nm smallest zone width offer up to 9.9% focusing efficiency at 9 keV, that results in a factor of two improvement over their previously demonstrated single-sided counterparts. The increase in efficiency paves the way to speed up X-ray microscopy measurements and allows the more efficient utilization of the flux in full-field X-ray microscopy. PMID:25835837

  11. High-Energy X-ray Absorption Diagnostics as an Experimental Combustion Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnmon, Jared; Sobhani, Sadaf; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    X-ray diagnostics such as X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) have recently been utilized for measurement of scalar concentration fields in gas-phase flow phenomena. In this study, we apply high-energy X-ray absorption techniques to visualize a laboratory-scale flame via fluoroscopic measurements by using krypton as a radiodense tracer media. Advantages of X-ray absorption diagnostics in a combustion context, including application to optically inaccessible environments and lack of ambient photon interference, are demonstrated. Analysis methods and metrics for extracting physical insights from these data are presented. The accuracy of the diagnostic is assessed via comparison to known results from canonical flame configurations, and the potential for further applications is discussed. Support from the NDSEG fellowship, Bosch, and NASA are gratefully acknolwedged.

  12. Development of High Resolution Hard X-Ray Telescope with Multilayer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinton, John C. (Technical Monitor); Gorenstein, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The major objective of this program is the development of a focusing hard X-ray telescope with moderately high angular resolution, i .e. comparable to the telescopes of XMM-Newton. The key ingredients of the telescope are a depth graded multilayer coatings and electroformed nickel substrates that are considerably lighter weight than those of previous missions such as XMM-Newton, which have had conventional single metal layer reflective coatings and have operated at much lower energy X-rays. The ultimate target mission for this technology is the Hard X-Ray Telescope (HXT) of the Constellation X-Ray Mission. However, it is applicable to potential SMEX and MIDEX programs as well.

  13. Chandra X-ray Observatory high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of stars: Modeling and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David P.

    2004-05-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory grating spectrometers allow study of stellar spectra at resolutions on the order of 1000. Prior x-ray observatories' low resolution data have shown that nearly all classes of stars emit x rays. Chandra reveals details of line and continuum contributions to the spectra which can be interpreted through application of plasma models based on atomic databases. For cool stars with hot coronas interpreted in the solar paradigm, assumption of collisional ionization equilibrium allows derivation of temperature distributions and elemental abundances. Densities can be derived from He-like ion's metastable transition lines. Abundance trends are unlike the Sun, as are the very hot temperature distributions. For young stars, there is evidence of accretion driven x-ray emission, rather than magnetically confined plasma emission. For some hot stars, the expected emission mechanism of shocked winds has been challenged; there is now evidence for magnetically confined thermal plasmas. The helium-like line emission in hot stars is susceptible to photoexcitation, which can also be exploited to derive wind structure.

  14. An Ultra-High Pressure Proportional Counter for Hard X-Ray Astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zongnan

    1992-01-01

    This thesis describes the successful development of ultra-high pressure proportional counters for balloon -borne hard X-ray astronomy. The proportional counters were filled with argon/xenon at pressures up to {~}30atm. The properties of proportional counters filled at such pressures have been studied by the author in the laboratory. The spatial response of these counters to X-rays and charged particles, and the energy response to X-rays up to 1MeV have been analysed. Gas gain measurements using the charge collection technique and analysis of the subsequent data show that simple extrapolation from low pressures cannot explain the observed behaviour (e.g. the mobility of positive ions and quenching efficiency) of these counters at high pressures. A hard X-ray telescope consisting of 32 such proportional counters filled at ultra-high pressures is being constructed, details of which are described. The sensitivity of this telescope for both continuum and narrow-line spectra is superb compared to contemporary balloon-and satellite-borne hard X-ray detectors. Together with an imaging phoswich Anger camera, it is scheduled for launch from Alice Springs in November 1992. An anticoincidence system for an X-ray detector, consisting of a combined passive and active shield, has been designed and constructed by the author, and flown on a balloon. The active shield, made of a plastic scintillator, has resulted in an additional reduction of 25% in the background registered at balloon altitudes.

  15. X-ray beam filtration, dosimetry phantom size and CT patient dose conversion factors.

    PubMed

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer

    2010-01-21

    We examine how the choice of CT x-ray beam filtration and phantom size influences patient dose (D) to computed tomography dose index (CTDI) conversion factors (i.e. D/CTDI). The ratio of head to body phantom CTDI(w) for a defined scan technique is alpha, and the ratio of organ dose when the body filter is changed to the head filter is beta. CTDI and organ doses were obtained using the ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator, and values of alpha and beta were determined for 39 CT scanners. The average value of alpha for the 39 CT scanners covering a 20 year period was 1.99 +/- 0.23, but 30% of scanners had alpha values that differed by more than 10% from the average. For GE, the value of alpha has been approximately constant at approximately 2.0. Both Philips and Siemens show a definite upward trend from values well below 2.0 in the early 1990s to well over 2.0 for their latest models. The data for Toshiba show no overall trend with time with half the data points below 2.0 and the remainder above this value. The average value of beta was 1.09 +/- 0.25. All vendors showed a downward trend in the beta parameter, and where the most recent scanners from each vendor had a beta value close to unity. Our results show that average D/CTDI conversion factors for a body phantom/filter combination are typically double those appropriate for a head phantom/filter combination. PMID:20023330

  16. A POPULATION OF X-RAY WEAK QUASARS: PHL 1811 ANALOGS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Gibson, Robert R.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Richards, Gordon T.; Shemmer, Ohad; Just, Dennis W.

    2011-07-20

    We report the results from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of 10 type 1 quasars selected to have unusual UV emission-line properties (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines; strong UV Fe emission) similar to those of PHL 1811, a confirmed intrinsically X-ray weak quasar. These quasars were identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at high redshift (z {approx} 2.2); eight are radio quiet while two are radio intermediate. All of the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, without exception, are notably X-ray weak by a mean factor of {approx}13. These sources lack broad absorption lines and have blue UV/optical continua, supporting the hypothesis that they are intrinsically X-ray weak like PHL 1811 itself. However, their average X-ray spectrum appears to be harder than those of typical quasars, which may indicate the presence of heavy intrinsic X-ray absorption. Our sample of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs supports a connection between an X-ray weak spectral energy distribution and PHL 1811-like UV emission lines; this connection provides an economical way to identify X-ray weak type 1 quasars. The fraction of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs in the radio-quiet quasar population is estimated to be {approx}< 1.2%. We have investigated correlations between relative X-ray brightness and UV emission-line properties (e.g., C IV equivalent width and blueshift) for a sample combining our radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, PHL 1811 itself, and typical type 1 quasars. These correlation analyses suggest that PHL 1811 analogs may have extreme wind-dominated broad emission-line regions. Observationally, the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs appear to be a subset ({approx}30%) of radio-quiet weak-line quasars (WLQs). The existence of a subset of quasars in which high-ionization 'shielding gas' covers most of the broad emission-line region (BELR), but little more than the BELR, could potentially unify the PHL 1811 analogs and WLQs. The two radio-intermediate PHL 1811 analogs are X-ray

  17. Measurement of radiotherapy x-ray skin dose on a chest wall phantom.

    PubMed

    Quach, K Y; Morales, J; Butson, M J; Rosenfeld, A B; Metcalfe, P E

    2000-07-01

    Sufficient skin dose needs to be delivered by a radiotherapy chest wall treatment regimen to ensure the probability of a near surface tumor recurrence is minimized. To simulate a chest wall treatment a hemicylindrical solid water phantom of 7.5 cm radius was irradiated with 6 MV x-rays using 20x20 cm2 and 10x20 cm2 fields at 100 cm source surface distance (SSD) to the base of the phantom. A surface dose profile was obtained from 0 to 180 degrees, in 10 degrees increments around the circumference of the phantom. Dosimetry results obtained from radiochromic film (effective depth of 0.17 mm) were used in the investigation, the superficial doses were found to be 28% (of Dmax) at the 0 degrees beam entry position and 58% at the 90 degrees oblique beam position. Superficial dose results were also obtained using extra thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) (effective depth 0.14 mm) of 30% at 0 degrees, 57% at 90 degrees, and a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector (effective depth 0.5 mm) of 43% at 0 degrees, 62% at 90 degrees. Because the differences in measured superficial doses were significant and beyond those related to experimental error, these differences are assumed to be mostly attributable to the effective depth of measurement of each detector. We numerically simulated a bolus on/bolus off technique and found we could increase the coverage to the skin. Using an alternate "bolus on," "bolus off" regimen, the skin would receive 36.8 Gy at 0 degrees incidence and 46.4 Gy at 90 degrees incidence for a prescribed midpoint dose of 50 Gy. From this work it is evident that, as the circumference of the phantom is traversed the SSD increases and hence there is an inverse square fluence fall-off, this is more than offset by the increase in skin dose due to surface curvature to a plateau at about 90 degrees. Beyond this angle it is assumed that beam attenuation through the phantom and inverse square fall-off is causing the surface dose to

  18. Integration of flat panel X-ray detector for high resolution diagnostic medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Woo; Yun, Min-Seok; Kim, Yoon-Suk; Oh, Kyung-Min; Shin, Jung-Wook; Nam, Kyung-Tae; Nam, Sang-Hee

    2011-05-01

    In these days, flat panel X-ray image detectors have shown their potential for replacing traditional screen-film systems. To detect the X-ray photon energy, there are two main methods known as a direct method and an indirect method. The X-rays are converted immediately into electrical signal with the direct method. The indirect method has two conversion steps: the scintillator absorbs the X-rays and converts them to visible light. And then the visible light is converted to electrical signal (e.g. by photodiodes). In this work, the flat panel digital X-ray image detector based on direct method with a high atomic number material was designed and evaluated. The high atomic number material for X-ray conversion is deposited by a rubbing method with about 300 μm. The rubbing method is similar to the screen printing method. It consists of two elements: the screen and the squeegee. The method uses a proper stiff bar stretched tightly over a frame made of wood or metal. Proper tension is essential for proper laminated structure. The detector prototype has 139 μm pixel pitch, total 1280×1536 pixels and 86% fill factor. Twelve readout ICs are installed on digital X-ray detector and simultaneously operated to reach short readout time. The electronics integrated: the preamplifier to amplify generated signal, the Analog to Digital converter and the source of bias voltage (1 V/μm). The system board and interface use an NI-camera program. Finally, we achieved images from this flat panel X-ray image detector.

  19. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  20. High-mass X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, F.; Sturm, R.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: The last comprehensive catalogue of high-mass X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was published about ten years ago. Since then new such systems were discovered, mainly by X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton. For the majority of the proposed HMXBs in the SMC no X-ray pulsations were discovered as yet, and unless other properties of the X-ray source and/or the optical counterpart confirm their HMXB nature, they remain only candidate HMXBs. Methods: From a literature search we collected a catalogue of 148 confirmed and candidate HMXBs in the SMC and investigated their properties to shed light on their real nature. Based on the sample of well-established HMXBs (the pulsars), we investigated which observed properties are most appropriate for a reliable classification. We defined different levels of confidence for a genuine HMXB based on spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray sources and colour-magnitude diagrams from the optical to the infrared of their likely counterparts. We also took the uncertainty in the X-ray position into account. Results: We identify 27 objects that probably are misidentified because they lack an infrared excess of the proposed counterpart. They were mainly X-ray sources with a large positional uncertainty. This is supported by additional information obtained from more recent observations. Our catalogue comprises 121 relatively high-confidence HMXBs (the vast majority with Be companion stars). About half of the objects show X-ray pulsations, while for the rest no pulsations are known as yet. A comparison of the two subsamples suggests that long pulse periods in excess of a few 100 s are expected for the "non-pulsars", which are most likely undetected because of aperiodic variability on similar timescales and insufficiently long X-ray observations. The highest X-ray variability together with the lowest observed minimum fluxes for short-period pulsars indicate that in addition to the eccentricity of the

  1. Interstellar dust grain composition from high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-06-01

    X-ray light is sufficient to excite electrons from n=1 (K-shell) and n=2 (L-shell) energy levels of neutral interstellar metals, causing a sharp increase in the absorption cross-section. Near the ionization energy, the shape of the photoelectric absorption edge depends strongly on whether the atom is isolated or bound in molecules or minerals (dust). With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, we can directly measure the state of metals and the mineral composition of dust in the interstellar medium. In addition, the scattering contribution to the X-ray extinction cross-section can be used to gauge grain size, shape, and filling factor. In order to fully take advantage of major advances in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, lab measurements of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) from suspected interstellar minerals are required. Optical constants derived from the absorption measurements can be used with Mie scattering or anomalous diffraction theory in order to model the full extinction cross-sections from the interstellar medium. Much like quasar spectra are used to probe other intergalactic gas, absorption spectroscopy of Galactic X-ray binaries and bright stars will yield key insights to the mineralogy and evolution of dust grains in the Milky Way.

  2. Simultaneous small- and wide-angle scattering at high X-ray energies.

    PubMed

    Daniels, J E; Pontoni, D; Hoo, Rui Ping; Honkimäki, V

    2010-07-01

    Combined small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) is a powerful technique for the study of materials at length scales ranging from atomic/molecular sizes (a few angstroms) to the mesoscopic regime ( approximately 1 nm to approximately 1 microm). A set-up to apply this technique at high X-ray energies (E > 50 keV) has been developed. Hard X-rays permit the execution of at least three classes of investigations that are significantly more difficult to perform at standard X-ray energies (8-20 keV): (i) in situ strain analysis revealing anisotropic strain behaviour both at the atomic (WAXS) as well as at the mesoscopic (SAXS) length scales, (ii) acquisition of WAXS patterns to very large q (>20 A(-1)) thus allowing atomic pair distribution function analysis (SAXS/PDF) of micro- and nano-structured materials, and (iii) utilization of complex sample environments involving thick X-ray windows and/or samples that can be penetrated only by high-energy X-rays. Using the reported set-up a time resolution of approximately two seconds was demonstrated. It is planned to further improve this time resolution in the near future. PMID:20567079

  3. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited).

    PubMed

    Nagel, S R; Hilsabeck, T J; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Ayers, M J; Piston, K; Felker, B; Kilkenny, J D; Chung, T; Sammuli, B; Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2014-11-01

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2-17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10(17). We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments. PMID:25430346

  4. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S. R. Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B.; Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  5. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations.

  6. High-precision figure correction of x-ray telescope optics using ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalifoux, Brandon; Sung, Edward; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2013-09-01

    Achieving both high resolution and large collection area in the next generation of x-ray telescopes requires highly accurate shaping of thin mirrors, which is not achievable with current technology. Ion implantation offers a promising method of modifying the shape of mirrors by imparting internal stresses in a substrate, which are a function of the ion species and dose. This technique has the potential for highly deterministic substrate shape correction using a rapid, low cost process. Wafers of silicon and glass (D-263 and BK-7) have been implanted with Si+ ions at 150 keV, and the changes in shape have been measured using a Shack-Hartmann metrology system. We show that a uniform dose over the surface repeatably changes the spherical curvature of the substrates, and we show correction of spherical curvature in wafers. Modeling based on experiments with spherical curvature correction shows that ion implantation could be used to eliminate higher-order shape errors, such as astigmatism and coma, by using a spatially-varying implant dose. We will report on progress in modelling and experimental tests to eliminate higher-order shape errors. In addition, the results of experiments to determine the thermal and temporal stability of implanted substrates will be reported.

  7. Feasibility of using intermediate x-ray energies for highly conformal extracranial radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Peng; Yu, Victoria; Nguyen, Dan; Demarco, John; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke; Woods, Kaley; Boucher, Salime

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using intermediate energy 2 MV x-rays for extracranial robotic intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: Two megavolts flattening filter free x-rays were simulated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP (v4c). A convolution/superposition dose calculation program was tuned to match the Monte Carlo calculation. The modeled 2 MV x-rays and actual 6 MV flattened x-rays from existing Varian Linacs were used in integrated beam orientation and fluence optimization for a head and neck, a liver, a lung, and a partial breast treatment. A column generation algorithm was used for the intensity modulation and beam orientation optimization. Identical optimization parameters were applied in three different planning modes for each site: 2, 6 MV, and dual energy 2/6 MV. Results: Excellent agreement was observed between the convolution/superposition and the Monte Carlo calculated percent depth dose profiles. For the patient plans, overall, the 2/6 MV x-ray plans had the best dosimetry followed by 2 MV only and 6 MV only plans. Between the two single energy plans, the PTV coverage was equivalent but 2 MV x-rays improved organs-at-risk sparing. For the head and neck case, the 2MV plan reduced lips, mandible, tongue, oral cavity, brain, larynx, left and right parotid gland mean doses by 14%, 8%, 4%, 14%, 24%, 6%, 30% and 16%, respectively. For the liver case, the 2 MV plan reduced the liver and body mean doses by 17% and 18%, respectively. For the lung case, lung V20, V10, and V5 were reduced by 13%, 25%, and 30%, respectively. V10 of heart with 2 MV plan was reduced by 59%. For the partial breast treatment, the 2 MV plan reduced the mean dose to the ipsilateral and contralateral lungs by 27% and 47%, respectively. The mean body dose was reduced by 16%. Conclusions: The authors showed the feasibility of using flattening filter free 2 MV x-rays for extracranial treatments as evidenced by equivalent or superior dosimetry compared to 6 MV plans

  8. A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM structured reports.

    PubMed

    Omar, Artur; Bujila, Robert; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro; Poludniowski, Gavin

    2016-04-21

    Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to deterministic tissue reactions in addition to stochastic effects, convenient and accurate estimation of absorbed organ doses has traditionally been out of reach. This has mainly been due to the absence of practical means to access dose-related data that describe the physical context of the numerous exposures during an XA procedure. The present work provides a comprehensive and general framework for the determination of absorbed organ dose, based on non-proprietary access to dose-related data by utilizing widely available DICOM radiation dose structured reports. The framework comprises a straightforward calculation workflow to determine the incident kerma and reconstruction of the geometrical relation between the projected x-ray beam and the patient's anatomy. The latter is difficult in practice, as the position of the patient on the table top is unknown. A novel patient-specific approach for reconstruction of the patient position on the table is presented. The proposed approach was evaluated for 150 patients by comparing the estimated position of the primary irradiated organs (the target organs) with their position in clinical DICOM images. The approach is shown to locate the target organ position with a mean (max) deviation of 1.3 (4.3), 1.8 (3.6) and 1.4 (2.9) cm for neurovascular, adult and paediatric cardiovascular procedures, respectively. To illustrate the utility of the framework for systematic and automated organ dose estimation in routine clinical practice, a prototype implementation of the framework with Monte Carlo simulations is included. PMID:27008040

  9. A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM structured reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Artur; Bujila, Robert; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro; Poludniowski, Gavin

    2016-04-01

    Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to deterministic tissue reactions in addition to stochastic effects, convenient and accurate estimation of absorbed organ doses has traditionally been out of reach. This has mainly been due to the absence of practical means to access dose-related data that describe the physical context of the numerous exposures during an XA procedure. The present work provides a comprehensive and general framework for the determination of absorbed organ dose, based on non-proprietary access to dose-related data by utilizing widely available DICOM radiation dose structured reports. The framework comprises a straightforward calculation workflow to determine the incident kerma and reconstruction of the geometrical relation between the projected x-ray beam and the patient’s anatomy. The latter is difficult in practice, as the position of the patient on the table top is unknown. A novel patient-specific approach for reconstruction of the patient position on the table is presented. The proposed approach was evaluated for 150 patients by comparing the estimated position of the primary irradiated organs (the target organs) with their position in clinical DICOM images. The approach is shown to locate the target organ position with a mean (max) deviation of 1.3 (4.3), 1.8 (3.6) and 1.4 (2.9) cm for neurovascular, adult and paediatric cardiovascular procedures, respectively. To illustrate the utility of the framework for systematic and automated organ dose estimation in routine clinical practice, a prototype implementation of the framework with Monte Carlo simulations is included.

  10. Exposure Dose Reconstruction from EPR Spectra of Tooth Enamel Exposed to the Combined Effect of X-rays and Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, J. I.

    2014-09-01

    We have used EPR dosimetry on tooth enamel to show that the combined effect of x-rays with effective energy 34 keV and gamma radiation with average energy 1250 keV leads to a significant increase in the reconstructed absorbed dose compared with the applied dose from a gamma source or from an x-ray source or from both sources of electromagnetic radiation. In simulation experiments, we develop an approach to estimating the contribution of diagnostic x-rays to the exposure dose formed in the tooth enamel by the combined effect of x-rays and gamma radiation.

  11. Development of a Radiation Dose Reporting Software for X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has experienced tremendous technological advances in recent years and has established itself as one of the most popular diagnostic imaging tools. While CT imaging clearly plays an invaluable role in modern medicine, its rapid adoption has resulted in a dramatic increase in the average medical radiation exposure to the worldwide and United States populations. Existing software tools for CT dose estimation and reporting are mostly based on patient phantoms that contain overly simplified anatomies insufficient in meeting the current and future needs. This dissertation describes the development of an easy-to-use software platform, “VirtualDose”, as a service to estimate and report the organ dose and effective dose values for patients undergoing the CT examinations. “VirtualDose” incorporates advanced models for the adult male and female, pregnant women, and children. To cover a large portion of the ignored obese patients that frequents the radiology clinics, a new set of obese male and female phantoms are also developed and applied to study the effects of the fat tissues on the CT radiation dose. Multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT) and clinical protocols, as well as the most recent effective dose algorithms from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 are adopted in “VirtualDose” to keep pace with the MDCT development and regulatory requirements. A new MDCT scanner model with both body and head bowtie filter is developed to cover both the head and body scanning modes. This model was validated through the clinical measurements. A comprehensive slice-by-slice database is established by deriving the data from a larger number of single axial scans simulated on the patient phantoms using different CT bowtie filters, beam thicknesses, and different tube voltages in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code. When compared to the existing CT dose software packages, organ dose data in this

  12. X-Ray Dose and Spot Size Calculations for the DARHT-II Distributed Target

    SciTech Connect

    McCarrick, J

    2001-04-05

    The baseline DARHT-II converter target consists of foamed tantalum within a solid-density cylindrical tamper. The baseline design has been modified by D. Ho to further optimize the integrated line density of material in the course of multiple beam pulses. LASNEX simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion of the target have been performed by D. Ho (documented elsewhere). The resulting density profiles have been used as inputs in the MCNP radiation transport code to calculate the X-ray dose and spot size assuming a incoming Gaussian electron beam with {sigma} = 0.65mm, and a PIC-generated beam taking into account the ''swept'' spot emerging from the DARHT-II kicker system. A prerequisite to these calculations is the absorption spectrum of air. In order to obtain this, a separate series of MCNP runs was performed for a set of monoenergetic photon sources, tallying the energy deposited in a volume of air. The forced collision feature was used to improve the statistics since the photon mean free path in air is extremely long at the energies of interest. A sample input file is given below. The resulting data for the MCNP DE and DF cards is shown in the beam-pulse input files, one of which is listed below. Note that the DE and DF cards are entered in column format for easy reading.

  13. Low contrast detectability and dose savings with an amorphous silicon detector designed for x-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ping; Schubert, Scott F.; Aufrichtig, Richard

    2000-04-01

    In an observer study we compare low contrast detectability and dose efficiency of an amorphous silicon x-ray detector versus a standard thoracic screen-film (Kodak InSight HC/InSight IT). Twelve images of a CDRAD contrast-detail phantom were acquired with the screen-film system using an entrance exposure corresponding to a conventional chest x-ray. Using the same x- ray system with an interchanged digital detector, we acquired four digital image sets (12 images each) at dose levels corresponding to 27%, 41%, 63% and 100% of the film dose. Prior to laser printing, the digital images were processed to match the film contrast and optical density level. A 4- alternative forced choice (4-AFC) paradigm with seven observers was used to measure the threshold contrasts of disk sizes from 0.5 to 4.0 mm. Further, we estimated the equivalent perceptual dose (EPD), which is the dose level of digital for which the same contrast detectability as film is obtained. Contrast detectability is significantly improved with the digital detector. On average, all disk shaped objects detected from the digital detector have lower threshold contrasts than those from film at the same dose level. The EPD value averaged over disk size is 44%, which corresponds to a 56% dose savings for the digital detector.

  14. High Resolution X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Distribution of Matter in and around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert; MIT/CAT Team

    2015-10-01

    The chemical evolution of the Universe embraces aspects that reachdeep into modern astrophysics and cosmology. We want to know how present and past matter is affected by various levels and types of nucleo-synthesis and stellar evolution. Three major categories were be identified: 1. The study of pre-mordial star formation including periods of super-massive black hole formation, 2. The embedded evolution of the intergalactic medium IGM, 3. The status and evolution of stars and the interstellar medium ISM in galaxies. Today a fourth category relates to our understanding of dark matter in relationwith these three categories. The X-ray band is particularly sensitive to K- and L-shell absorption and scattering from high abundant elements like C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S,Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni. Like the Lyman alpha forest in the optical band, absorbers in the IGM produce an X-ray line forest along the line of sight in the X-rayspectrum of a background quasar. Similary bright X-ray sources within galaxies and the Milky Way produce a continuum, which is being absorbed by elements invarious phases of the ISM. High resolution X-ray absorption surveys are possible with technologies ready for flight within decade. == high efficiency X-ray optics with optical performance 3== high resolution X-ray gratings with R 3000 for E 1.5 keV== X-ray micro-calorimeters with R 2000 for E 1.5 keV. The vision for the next decade needs to lead to means and strategies which allows us to perform such absorption surveys as effectively as surveys are now or in very near future quite common in astronomy pursued in other wave length bands such as optical, IR, and sub-mm.

  15. X-ray emission in collisions of highly charged I, Pr, Ho, and Bi ions with a W surface

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, H.; Tona, M.; Ohtani, S.; Sun, J.; Nakamura, N.; Yamada, C.; Yoshiyasu, N.; Sakurai, M.

    2007-06-15

    X-ray emission yields, which are defined as the total number of emitted x-ray photons per incident ion, and dissipated fractions of potential energies through x-ray emission have been measured for slow highly charged ions of I, Pr, Ho, and Bi colliding with a W surface. A larger amount of potential energy was consumed for the x-ray emission with increasing the atomic number and the charge state. The present measurements show that x-ray emission is one of the main decay channels of hollow atoms produced in collisions of very highly charged ions of heavy elements.

  16. Investigating the suitability of GaAs:Cr material for high flux X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, M. C.; Bell, S. J.; Duarte, D. D.; French, M. J.; Hart, M.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Wilson, M. D.; Kachkanov, V.; Lozinskaya, A. D.; Novikov, V. A.; Tolbanov, O. P.; Tyazhev, A.; Zarubin, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-insulating wafers of GaAs material with a thickness of 500μm have been compensated with chromium by Tomsk State University. Initial measurements have shown the material to have high resistivity (3 × 109Ωcm) and tests with pixel detectors on a 250 μm pitch produced uniform spectroscopic performance across an 80 × 80 pixel array. At present, there is a lack of detectors that are capable of operating at high X-ray fluxes (> 108 photons s-1 mm-2) in the energy range 5-50 keV. Under these conditions, the poor stopping power of silicon, as well as issues with radiation hardness, severely degrade the performance of traditional detectors. While high-Z materials such as CdTe and CdZnTe may have much greater stopping power, the formation of space charge within these detectors degrades detector performance. Initial measurements made with GaAs:Cr detectors suggest that many of its material properties make it suitable for these challenging conditions. In this paper the radiation hardness of the GaAs:Cr material has been measured on the B16 beam line at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron. Small pixel detectors were bonded to the STFC Hexitec ASIC and were irradiated with 3 × 108 photons s-1 mm-2 monochromatic 12 keV X-rays up to a maximum dose of 0.6 MGy. Measurements of the spectroscopic performance before and after irradiation have been used to assess the extent of the radiation damage.

  17. Z-pinches as intense x-ray sources for high energy density physics application

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, M.K.

    1997-02-01

    Fast z-pinch implosions can convert more than 10% of the stored electrical energy in a pulsed-power accelerator into x rays. These x rays are produced when an imploding cylindrical plasma, driven by the magnetic field pressure associated with very large axial currents, stagnates upon the cylindrical axis of symmetry. On the Saturn pulsed-power accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories, for example, currents of 6 to 8 MA with a risetime of less than 50 ns are driven through cylindrically-symmetric loads, producing implosions velocities as high as 100 cm/{mu}s and x-ray energies as high as 500 kJ. The keV component of the resulting x-ray spectrum has been used for many years 8 a radiation source for material response studies. Alternatively, the x-ray output can be thermalized into a near-Planckian x-ray source by containing it within a large cylindrical radiation case. These large volume, long-lived radiation sources have recently been used for ICF-relevant ablator physics experiments as well as astrophysical opacity and radiation-material interaction experiments. Hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and cylindrical load symmetry are critical, limiting factors in determining the assembled plasma densities and temperatures, and thus in the x-ray pulse widths that can be produced on these accelerators. In recent experiments on the Saturn accelerator, these implosion nonuniformities have been minimized by using uniform-fill gas puff loads or by using wire arrays with as many a 192 wires. These techniques produced significant improvements in the pinched plasma quality, Zn reproducibility, and x-ray output power. X-ray pulse widths of less than 5 ns and peak powers of 75{+-}10 TW have been achieved with arrays of 120 tungsten wires. These powers represent greater than a factor of three in power amplification over the electrical power of the Saturn n accelerator, and are a record for x-ray powers in the laboratory.

  18. High-efficiency blazed transmission gratings for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-09-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of astrophysical sources is the key to gaining a quantitative understanding of the history, dynamics, and current conditions of the cosmos. A large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ> 3000) soft x-ray grating spectrometer (XGS) that covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions is the ideal tool to address a number of high-priority science questions from the 2010 Decadal Survey, such as the connection between super-massive black holes and large-scale structure via cosmic feedback, the evolution of large- scale structure, the behavior of matter at high densities, and the conditions close to black holes. While no grating missions or instruments are currently approved, an XGS aboard a potential future X-ray Surveyor could easily surpass the above performance metrics. To improve the chances for future soft x-ray grating spectroscopy missions or instruments, grating technology has to progress and advance to higher Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). To that end we have developed Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, high transparency at higher energies). A CAT grating-based spectrometer can provide performance 1-2 orders of magnitude better than current grating instruments on Chandra and Newton-XMM with minimal resource requirements. At present we have fabricated large-area freestanding CAT gratings with narrow integrated support structures from silicon-on- insulator wafers using advanced lithography and a combination of deep reactive-ion and wet etching. Our latest x-ray test results show record high absolute diffraction efficiencies in blazed orders in excess of 30% with room for improvement.

  19. Calculating the X-Ray Fluorescence from the Planet Mercury Due to High-Energy Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Bergstrom, P. M., Jr.; Christon, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The least-studied terrestrial planet is Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, which makes telescopic observations and spacecraft encounters difficult. Our lack of knowledge about Mercury should change in the near future due to the recent launching of MESSENGER, a Mercury orbiter. Another mission (BepiColombo) is currently being planned. The x-ray spectrometer on MESSENGER (and planned for BepiColombo) can characterize the elemental composition of a planetary surface by measuring emitted fluorescent x-rays. If electrons are ejected from an atom s inner shell by interaction with energetic particles such as photons, electrons, or ions, electrons from an outer shell can transfer to the inner shell. Characteristic x-rays are then emitted with energies that are the difference between the binding energy of the ion in its excited state and that of the ion in its ground state. Because each element has a unique set of energy levels, each element emits x-rays at a unique set of energies. Electrons and ions usually do not have the needed flux at high energies to cause significant x-ray fluorescence on most planetary bodies. This is not the case for Mercury where high-energy particles were detected during the Mariner 10 flybys. Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field that deflects the solar wind, resulting in a bow shock in the solar wind and a magnetospheric cavity. Electrons and ions accelerated in the magnetosphere tend to follow its magnetic field lines and can impact the surface on Mercury s dark side Modeling has been done to determine if x-ray fluorescence resulting from the impact of high-energy electrons accelerated in Mercury's magnetosphere can be detected by MESSENGER. Our goal is to understand how much bulk chemical information can be obtained from x-ray fluorescence measurements on the dark side of Mercury.

  20. WE-E-18A-01: Large Area Avalanche Amorphous Selenium Sensors for Low Dose X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuermann, J; Goldan, A; Zhao, W; Tousignant, O; Leveille, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A large area indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being developed to achieve x-ray quantum noise limited low dose imaging. It uses a thin optical sensing layer of amorphous selenium (a-Se), known as High-Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP), to detect optical photons generated from a high resolution x-ray scintillator. We will report initial results in the fabrication of a solid-state HARP structure suitable for a large area FPI. Our objective is to establish the blocking layer structures and defect suppression mechanisms that provide stable and uniform avalanche gain. Methods: Samples were fabricated as follows: (1) ITO signal electrode. (2) Electron blocking layer. (3) A 15 micron layer of intrinsic a-Se. (4) Transparent hole blocking layer. (5) Multiple semitransparent bias electrodes to investigate avalanche gain uniformity over a large area. The sample was exposed to 50ps optical excitation pulses through the bias electrode. Transient time of flight (TOF) and integrated charge was measured. A charge transport simulation was developed to investigate the effects of varying blocking layer charge carrier mobility on defect suppression, avalanche gain and temporal performance. Results: Avalanche gain of ∼200 was achieved experimentally with our multi-layer HARP samples. Simulations using the experimental sensor structure produced the same magnitude of gain as a function of electric field. The simulation predicted that the high dark current at a point defect can be reduced by two orders of magnitude by blocking layer optimization which can prevent irreversible damage while normal operation remained unaffected. Conclusion: We presented the first solid state HARP structure directly scalable to a large area FPI. We have shown reproducible and uniform avalanche gain of 200. By reducing mobility of the blocking layers we can suppress defects and maintain stable avalanche. Future work will optimize the blocking layers to prevent lag

  1. Long-term optical variability of high-mass X-ray binaries. II. Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Nersesian, A.; Zezas, A.; Gkouvelis, L.; Coe, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass X-ray binaries are bright X-ray sources. The high-energy emission is caused by the accretion of matter from the massive companion onto a neutron star. The accreting material comes from either the strong stellar wind in binaries with supergiant companions or the cirscumstellar disk in Be/X-ray binaries. In either case, the Hα line stands out as the main source of information about the state of the accreting material. Aims: We present the results of our monitoring program to study the long-term variability of the Hα line in high-mass X-ray binaries. Our aim is to characterise the optical variability timescales and study the interaction between the neutron star and the accreting material. Methods: We fitted the Hα line with Gaussian profiles and obtained the line parameters and equivalent width. The peak separation in split profiles was used to determine the disk velocity law and estimate the disk radius. The relative intensity of the two peaks (V/R ratio) allowed us to investigate the distribution of gas particles in the disk. The equivalent width was used to characterise the degree of variability of the systems. We also studied the variability of the Hα line in correlation with the X-ray activity. Results: Our results can be summarised as follows: i) we find that Be/X-ray binaries with narrow orbits are more variable than systems with long orbital periods; ii) we show that a Keplerian distribution of gas particles provides a good description of the disks in Be/X-ray binaries, as it does in classical Be stars; iii) a decrease in the Hα equivalent width is generally observed after major X-ray outbursts; iv) we confirm that the Hα equivalent width correlates with disk radius; v) while systems with supergiant companions display multi-structured profiles, most of the Be/X-ray binaries show, at some epoch, double-peak asymmetric profiles, which indicates that density inhomogeneities is a common property in the disk of Be/X-ray binaries; vi) the

  2. High-efficiency blazed transmission gratings for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of astrophysical sources is the key to gaining a quantitative understanding of the history, dynamics, and current conditions of the cosmos. A large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ > 3,000) soft x-ray spectrometer that covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions is the ideal tool to address a number of high-priority sciences questions from the 2010 Decadal Survey, such as the connection between super-massive black holes and large-scale structure via cosmic feedback, the evolution of large-scale structure, the behavior of matter at high densities, and the conditions close to black holes. Numerous mission concepts that meet these requirements have been studied and proposed over the last few years, including grating instruments for the International X-ray Observatory. Nevertheless, no grating missions are currently approved. To improve the chances for future soft x-ray grating spectroscopy missions, grating technology has to progress and be advanced to higher TRLs. We have developed Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, transparent at higher energies). A CAT grating-based spectrometer can provide performance 1-2 orders of magnitude better than current grating instruments on Chandra and Newton-XMM with minimal resource requirements. We have fabricated large-area free-standing CAT gratings with minimal integrated support structures from silicon-on-insulator wafers using advanced lithography and a combination of deep reactive-ion and wet etching, and will present our latest x-ray test results showing record high diffraction efficiencies in blazed orders.

  3. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  4. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC.

    PubMed

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-11-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed (28)Al, (24)Na, (54)Mn and (60)Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is (28)Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several (28)Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  5. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC

    PubMed Central

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-01-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed 28Al, 24Na, 54Mn and 60Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is 28Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several 28Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  6. Improvement of the radiation hardness of a directly converting high resolution intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spartiotis, Konstantinos; Pyyhtiä, Jouni; Schulman, Tom

    2003-11-01

    The radiation tolerance of a directly converting digital intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor reported in Spartiotis et al. [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 501 (2003) 594] has been tested using a typical dental X-ray beam spectrum. Radiation induced degradation in the performance of the sensor which consists of CMOS signal readout circuits bump bonded to a high resistivity silicon pixel detector was observed already before a dose (in air) of 1 krad. Both increase in the leakage current of the pixel detector manufactured by Sintef, Norway and signal leakage to ground from the gate of the pixel input MOSFETs of the readout circuit were observed and measured. The sensitive part of the CMOS circuit was identified as the protection diode of the gate of the input MOSFET. After removing the gate protection diode no signal leakage was observed up to a dose of 5 krad (air) which approximately corresponds to 125.000 typical dental X-ray exposures. The radiation hardness of the silicon pixel detector was improved by using a modified oxidation process supplied by Colibrys, Switzerland. The improved pixel detectors showed no increase in the leakage current at dental doses.

  7. Strain Measurements using High Energy White X-rays at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobu, T.; Kaneko, H.; Mizuki, J.; Konishi, H.; Shibano, J.; Hirata, T.; Suzuki, K.

    2007-01-01

    The strain in the bulk of a material was evaluated using high energy white X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8. The specimen, which was a 5 mm thick austenitic stainless steel sample (JIS-SUS304L), was subjected to bending. The internal strain was measured using white X-rays, which ranged in energy from 60 keV to 125 keV. Highly accurate internal strain measurements were accomplished by simultaneously using strain data from several lattice planes of α -Fe. Furthermore, utilizing diffracted beams with a high energy, a high peak count, and a profile similar to a Gaussian distribution decreased the error of the strain measurement The results indicated that high energy white X-rays can effectively measure the internal strain at a millimeter depth.

  8. X-ray rocking curve measurements of bent crystals. [used in High Resolution Spectrometer in Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakim, M. B.; Muney, W. S.; Fowler, W. B.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1988-01-01

    A three-crystal laboratory X-ray spectrometer is used to measure the Bragg reflection from concave cylindrically curved crystals to be used in the high-resolution X-ray spectrometer of the NASA Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The first two crystals, in the dispersive (1.1) arrangement, select a narrow collimated monochromatic beam in the Cu K-alpha(1) line at 1.5 A (8.1 keV), which illuminates the test crystal. The angular centroids of rocking curves measured along the surface provide a measure of the conformity of the crystal to the desired radius of curvature. Individual and combined rocking-curve widths and areas provide a measure of the resolution and efficiency at 1.54 A. The crystals analyzed included LiF(200), PET, and acid phthalates such as TAP.

  9. High Resolution Spectroscopy of X-ray Quasars: Searching for the X-ray Absorption from the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Taotao; Canizares, Claude R.; Marshall, Herman L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a survey of six low to moderate redshift quasars with Chandra and XMM-Newton. The primary goal is to search for the narrow X-ray absorption lines produced by highly ionized metals in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium. All the X-ray spectra can be well fitted by a power law with neutral hydrogen absorption. Only one feature is detected at above 3-sigma level in all the spectra, which is consistent with statistic fluctuation. We discuss the implications in our understanding of the baryon content of the universe. We also discuss the implication of the non-detection of the local (z approx. 0) X-ray absorption.

  10. High resolution x-ray microtomography of biological samples: Requirements and strategies for satisfying them

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W. Jr. ||; Rothman, S.S. |

    1997-02-01

    High resolution x-ray microscopy has been made possible in recent years primarily by two new technologies: microfabricated diffractive lenses for soft x-rays with about 30-50 nm resolution, and high brightness synchrotron x-ray sources. X-ray microscopy occupies a special niche in the array of biological microscopic imaging methods. It extends the capabilities of existing techniques mainly in two areas: a previously unachievable combination of sub-visible resolution and multi-micrometer sample size, and new contrast mechanisms. Because of the soft x-ray wavelengths used in biological imaging (about 1-4 nm), XM is intermediate in resolution between visible light and electron microscopies. Similarly, the penetration depth of soft x-rays in biological materials is such that the ideal sample thickness for XM falls in the range of 0.25 - 10 {mu}m, between that of VLM and EM. XM is therefore valuable for imaging of intermediate level ultrastructure, requiring sub-visible resolutions, in intact cells and subcellular organelles, without artifacts produced by thin sectioning. Many of the contrast producing and sample preparation techniques developed for VLM and EM also work well with XM. These include, for example, molecule specific staining by antibodies with heavy metal or fluorescent labels attached, and sectioning of both frozen and plastic embedded tissue. However, there is also a contrast mechanism unique to XM that exists naturally because a number of elemental absorption edges lie in the wavelength range used. In particular, between the oxygen and carbon absorption edges (2.3 and 4.4 nm wavelength), organic molecules absorb photons much more strongly than does water, permitting element-specific imaging of cellular structure in aqueous media, with no artifically introduced contrast agents. For three-dimensional imaging applications requiring the capabilities of XM, an obvious extension of the technique would therefore be computerized x-ray microtomography (XMT).

  11. Highly efficient beamline and spectrometer for inelastic soft X-ray scattering at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Lai, C H; Fung, H S; Wu, W B; Huang, H Y; Fu, H W; Lin, S W; Huang, S W; Chiu, C C; Wang, D J; Huang, L J; Tseng, T C; Chung, S C; Chen, C T; Huang, D J

    2014-03-01

    The design, construction and commissioning of a beamline and spectrometer for inelastic soft X-ray scattering at high resolution in a highly efficient system are presented. Based on the energy-compensation principle of grating dispersion, the design of the monochromator-spectrometer system greatly enhances the efficiency of measurement of inelastic soft X-rays scattering. Comprising two bendable gratings, the set-up effectively diminishes the defocus and coma aberrations. At commissioning, this system showed results of spin-flip, d-d and charge-transfer excitations of NiO. These results are consistent with published results but exhibit improved spectral resolution and increased efficiency of measurement. The best energy resolution of the set-up in terms of full width at half-maximum is 108 meV at an incident photon energy tuned about the Ni L3-edge. PMID:24562553

  12. High contrast Kr gas jet Kα x-ray source for high energy density physics experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugland, N. L.; Neumayer, P.; Döppner, T.; Chung, H.-K.; Constantin, C. G.; Girard, F.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kemp, A.; Niemann, C.

    2008-10-01

    A high contrast 12.6keV Kr Kα source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility using strongly clustering Kr gas jet targets. The contrast ratio (Kα to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultrashort pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10-5. Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr Kα and Kβ x rays are emitted from a roughly 1×2mm2 emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70eV (i.e., mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of Kα to Kβ. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy Kα source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

  13. High average power, highly brilliant laser-produced plasma source for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Günther, Sabrina; Baumann, Jonas; Kanngießer, Birgit; Witte, Katharina; Jung, Robert; Stiel, Holger; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a novel laser-produced plasma source is presented which delivers pulsed broadband soft X-radiation in the range between 100 and 1200 eV. The source was designed in view of long operating hours, high stability, and cost effectiveness. It relies on a rotating and translating metal target and achieves high stability through an on-line monitoring device using a four quadrant extreme ultraviolet diode in a pinhole camera arrangement. The source can be operated with three different laser pulse durations and various target materials and is equipped with two beamlines for simultaneous experiments. Characterization measurements are presented with special emphasis on the source position and emission stability of the source. As a first application, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurement on a thin polyimide foil shows the potential of the source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  14. Novel technique for high-precision Bragg-angle determination in crystal x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, J.; Bruhns, H.; Trinczek, M.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Ullrich, J.

    2005-07-15

    A novel technique for a high-precision large acceptance determination of the Bragg angle in crystal x-ray spectroscopy is presented and demonstrated. The method exploits visible light beams as fiducials reflected on the x-ray crystal's surface to ensure exact knowledge of the position on the crystal at which the x rays are reflected, replacing entrance slits, thus making flat crystals suitable for low x-ray fluxes. It can be shown that many error sources arising from uncertainties in the determination of geometrical properties are eliminated in this way. A flat crystal x-ray spectrometer based on this technique has been designed, built, and tested using the most precisely known wavelengths emitted by highly charged ions, namely H- and He-like argon. The result for the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1}{yields}1s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} w-line of He-like argon exhibits a statistical uncertainty of 3.8 ppm and an estimated systematic error of about 3 ppm, thus becoming the most accurate measurement of the He-like resonance transition in highly charged ions. It is shown that achieving a systematic error of below 1 ppm is feasible with this method. Therefore, our technique should allow reaching total accuracies approaching 1 ppm on transitions of mid-Z highly charged ions, which would provide challenging tests for state-of-the-art theoretical predictions.

  15. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil, high-pressure apparatus - Comparison of synchrotron and conventional X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, I. L.; Black, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The use of both conventional fixed-anode X-ray sources and synchrotron radiation to carry out energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell, is discussed. The photon flux at the sample and at the detector for the two cases are compared and the results are presented in graphs. It is shown that synchrotron radiation experiments can be performed with nearly two orders of magnitude increase in data rate if superior detectors and detector electronics are available.

  16. HIGH ENERGY, HIGH BRIGHTNESS X-RAYS PRODUCED BY COMPTON BACKSCATTERING AT THE LIVERMORE PLEIADES FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, A M; Anderson, S G; Betts, S; Crane, J; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Jacob, J S; Frigola, P; Lim, J; Rosenzweig, J; Travish, G

    2005-05-19

    PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron Interaction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) produces tunable 30-140 keV x-rays with 0.3-5 ps pulse lengths and up to 10{sup 7} photons/pulse by colliding a high brightness electron beam with a high power laser. The electron beam is created by an rf photo-injector system, accelerated by a 120 MeV linac, and focused to 20 {micro}m with novel permanent magnet quadrupoles. To produce Compton back scattered x-rays, the electron bunch is overlapped with a Ti:Sapphire laser that delivers 500 mJ, 100 fs, pulses to the interaction point. K-edge radiography at 115 keV on Uranium has verified the angle correlated energy spectrum inherent in Compton scattering and high-energy tunability of the Livermore source. Current upgrades to the facility will allow laser pumping of targets synchronized to the x-ray source enabling dynamic diffraction and time-resolved studies of high Z materials. Near future plans include extending the radiation energies to >400 keV, allowing for nuclear fluorescence studies of materials.

  17. Silver fluorescent x-ray yield and its influence on the dose rate constant for nine low-energy brachytherapy source models

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Ravinder; Chen, Zhe Jay

    2007-10-15

    The physical characteristics of the photons emitted by a low-energy brachytherapy source are strongly dependent on the source's construction. Aside from absorption and scattering caused by the internal structures and the source encapsulation, the photoelectric interactions occurred in certain type of source-construction materials can generate additional energetic characteristic x rays with energies different from those emitted by the bare radionuclide. As a result, the same radionuclide encapsulated in different source models can result in dose rate constants and other dosimetric parameters that are strikingly different from each other. The aim of this work was to perform a systematic study on the yield of silver fluorescent x rays produced in nine {sup 125}I sources that are known to contain silver and its impact on the dose-rate constant. Using a high-resolution germanium spectrometer, the relative {sup 125}I spectra emitted by the nine sources on its bisector were measured and found to be similar to each other (the maximum variation in the {sup 125}I-K{sub {beta}} relative intensity was less than 4%). On the other hand, the measured silver fluorescent x-ray spectra exhibited much greater variations from model to model; the maximum change in the measured Ag-K{sub {alpha}} relative intensity was over 95%. This larger variation in the measured silver fluorescent x-ray yield was caused by (1) the different amount of silver that was directly exposed to the {sup 125}I radionuclide in different source models and (2) the stronger influence of the source's internal geometry on the silver fluorescent x rays. Because the addition of silver fluorescent x rays can significantly alter the photon characteristics emitted by the radioactive sources, a precise knowledge on the silver fluorescent x-ray yield is needed in theoretical calculations of the sources' intrinsic dosimetric properties. This study concludes that the differences in silver fluorescent yield are the primary

  18. Nanosecond X-ray detector based on high resistivity ZnO single crystal semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaolong; Chen, Liang; He, Yongning; Liu, Jinliang; Peng, Wenbo; Huang, Zhiyong; Qi, Xiaomeng; Pan, Zijian; Zhang, Wenting; Zhang, Zhongbing; Ouyang, Xiaoping

    2016-04-01

    The pulse radiation detectors are sorely needed in the fields of nuclear reaction monitoring, material analysis, astronomy study, spacecraft navigation, and space communication. In this work, we demonstrate a nanosecond X-ray detector based on ZnO single crystal semiconductor, which emerges as a promising compound-semiconductor radiation detection material for its high radiation tolerance and advanced large-size bulk crystal growth technique. The resistivity of the ZnO single crystal is as high as 1013 Ω cm due to the compensation of the donor defects (VO) and acceptor defects (VZn and Oi) after high temperature annealing in oxygen. The photoconductive X-ray detector was fabricated using the high resistivity ZnO single crystal. The rise time and fall time of the detector to a 10 ps pulse electron beam are 0.8 ns and 3.3 ns, respectively, indicating great potential for ultrafast X-ray detection applications.

  19. High energy X-ray and radio studies of Scorpius X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, M. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Maurer, G. S.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Graf, W.; Price, K. M.

    1978-01-01

    The results from extended high energy X-ray observations of Scorpius XR-1 from the OSO-8 satellite are reported here. The source was observed for a total of 15 days in 1975, 1977 and 1978. Simultaneous 10.7 GHz and 4.75 GHz radio data were obtained during the 1978 observation, and low energy X-ray data during the 1975 and 1978 observations. The data reveals a lack of any correlation between the high energy X-rays and the other energy ranges. A three standard deviation upper limit of 22% was obtained for any modulation of the high energy flux with the binary period. No high energy tail was observed at any time.

  20. Research relative to high resolution camera on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the x-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft x-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15 ergs sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  1. Simple Method to Estimate Mean Heart Dose From Hodgkin Lymphoma Radiation Therapy According to Simulation X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Nimwegen, Frederika A. van; Cutter, David J.; Schaapveld, Michael; Rutten, Annemarieke; Kooijman, Karen; Krol, Augustinus D.G.; Janus, Cécile P.M.; Darby, Sarah C.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Aleman, Berthe M.P.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To describe a new method to estimate the mean heart dose for Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated several decades ago, using delineation of the heart on radiation therapy simulation X-rays. Mean heart dose is an important predictor for late cardiovascular complications after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment. For patients treated before the era of computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning, retrospective estimation of radiation dose to the heart can be labor intensive. Methods and Materials: Patients for whom cardiac radiation doses had previously been estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative CT data sets were selected at random from a case–control study of 5-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (n=289). For 42 patients, cardiac contours were outlined on each patient's simulation X-ray by 4 different raters, and the mean heart dose was estimated as the percentage of the cardiac contour within the radiation field multiplied by the prescribed mediastinal dose and divided by a correction factor obtained by comparison with individual CT-based dosimetry. Results: According to the simulation X-ray method, the medians of the mean heart doses obtained from the cardiac contours outlined by the 4 raters were 30 Gy, 30 Gy, 31 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively, following prescribed mediastinal doses of 25-42 Gy. The absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.85-0.97), indicating excellent agreement. Mean heart dose was 30.4 Gy with the simulation X-ray method, versus 30.2 Gy with the representative CT-based dosimetry, and the between-method absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.80-0.95), indicating good agreement between the two methods. Conclusion: Estimating mean heart dose from radiation therapy simulation X-rays is reproducible and fast, takes individual anatomy into account, and yields results comparable to the labor

  2. Preliminary investigation of the NMR, optical and x-ray CT dose-response of polymer gel dosimeters incorporating cosolvents to improve dose sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeva, V. I.; Olding, T.; Jirasek, A.; Schreiner, L. J.; McAuley, K. B.

    2009-05-01

    This study reports on efforts to increase the dose sensitivity of polymer gel dosimeters used in 3D radiation dosimetry. The potential of several different cosolvents is investigated, with the aim of increasing the solubility of N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide crosslinker in polymer gel dosimeters. Glycerol and isopropanol increase the limit for the crosslinker solubility from approximately 3% to 5% and 10% by weight, respectively. This enables the manufacture of polymer gel dosimeters with much higher levels of crosslinking than was previously possible. New dosimeter recipes containing up to 5 wt% N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide were subjected to spatially uniform radiation and were studied using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as x-ray and optical CT techniques. The resulting dosimeters exhibit dose sensitivities that are up to 2.7 times higher than measured for a typical dosimeters with 3% N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide without the addition of cosolvent. Two additional cosolvents (n-propanol and sec-butanol) were deemed unsuitable for practical dosimeters due to incompatibility with gelatin, cloudiness prior to irradiation, and immiscibility with water when large quantities of cosolvent were used. The dosimeters with high N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide content that used isopropanol or glycerol as cosolvents had high optical clarity prior to irradiation, but did not produce suitable optical CT results for non-uniformly irradiated gels due to polymer development outside of the high dose regions of the pencil beams and significant light scatter. Further experiments are required to determine whether cosolvents can be used to manufacture gels with sufficiently high dose sensitivity for readout using x-ray computed tomography.

  3. Volumetric measurement of residual stress using high energy x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesell, R.; McKenna, A.; Wendt, S.; Gray, J.

    2016-02-01

    We present results and recent developments from our laboratory, bench-top high energy x-ray diffraction system (HEXRD), between diffraction energies 50 and 150 KeV, to measure internal strain of moderately sized objects. Traditional x-ray strain measurements are limited to a few microns depth due to the use of Cu Kα1 Mo Kα1 radiation. The use of high energy x-rays for volumetric measurements of strain is typically the domain of synchrotron sources. We discuss the use of industrial 320kVp tube sources to generate a brighter x-ray beam along with a method using the intrinsic 43 eV width of the Kα1 characteristic peak of tungsten to measure volumetric strains in a number of industrially relevant materials. We will present volumetric strain measurements from two examples, first, additive manufacturing (AM) parts with various build configurations and, secondly, residual strain depth profiles from shot peened surface treatments. The spatial resolution of these depth profiles is ˜75 microns. The development of a faster method as compared to energy dispersive or θ-2θ scans is based on the intensity variation measurement of the strain using the aforementioned 43 eV characteristic tungsten kα line. We will present recent results on the development of this new tool and on x-ray diffraction measurements at high energy.

  4. High Resolution Triple Axis X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of II-VI Semiconductor Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to develop methods of structural analysis based on high resolution triple axis X-ray diffractometry (HRTXD) and to carry out detailed studies of defect distributions in crystals grown in both microgravity and ground-based environments. HRTXD represents a modification of the widely used double axis X-ray rocking curve method for the characterization of grown-in defects in nearly perfect crystals. In a double axis rocking curve experiment, the sample is illuminated by a monochromatic X-ray beam and the diffracted intensity is recorded by a fixed, wide-open detector. The intensity diffracted by the sample is then monitored as the sample is rotated through the Bragg reflection condition. The breadth of the peak, which is often reported as the full angular width at half the maximum intensity (FWHM), is used as an indicator of the amount of defects in the sample. This work has shown that high resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction is an effective tool for characterizing the defect structure in semiconductor crystals, particularly at high defect densities. Additionally, the technique is complimentary to X-ray topography for defect characterization in crystals.

  5. HEAO 1 observations of high-energy X-rays from 3C273. [quasar emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primini, F. A.; Cooke, B. A.; Dobson, C. A.; Howe, S. K.; Scheepmaker, A.; Wheaton, W. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    The first detection of high energy (13 to 120 keV) X rays from the quasar 3C273, made by the HEAO 1 satellite, is reported. Observations were made with the 13 to 180 keV slat collimated detectors of the high energy X-ray and low energy gamma-ray (A4) experiment during December 1977-January 1978 and June-July 1978. Results are consistent with the previously observed X-ray flux variability on a scale of months. Photon count rates are presented for each of five energy bands and count rate and photon spectra for the June through July 1978 observations are derived. A comparison of the data obtained with that at lower X-ray energies and higher gamma-ray energies indicates that there is an overall spectral steepening from low to high energies and a possible break near 20 keV, which may be due to the gamma rays originating from a different region than that of the X rays.

  6. A high time resolution x-ray diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuBois, Ami M.; Lee, John David; Almagri, Abdulgadar F.

    2015-07-01

    A new high time resolution x-ray detector has been installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to make measurements around sawtooth events. The detector system is comprised of a silicon avalanche photodiode, a 20 ns Gaussian shaping amplifier, and a 500 MHz digitizer with 14-bit sampling resolution. The fast shaping time diminishes the need to restrict the amount of x-ray flux reaching the detector, limiting the system dead-time. With a much higher time resolution than systems currently in use in high temperature plasma physics experiments, this new detector has the versatility to be used in a variety of discharges with varying flux and the ability to study dynamics on both slow and fast time scales. This paper discusses the new fast x-ray detector recently installed on MST and the improved time resolution capabilities compared to the existing soft and hard x-ray diagnostics. In addition to the detector hardware, improvements to the detector calibration and x-ray pulse identification software, such as additional fitting parameters and a more sophisticated fitting routine are discussed. Finally, initial data taken in both high confinement and standard reversed-field pinch plasma discharges are compared.

  7. A high time resolution x-ray diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus.

    PubMed

    DuBois, Ami M; Lee, John David; Almagri, Abdulgadar F

    2015-07-01

    A new high time resolution x-ray detector has been installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to make measurements around sawtooth events. The detector system is comprised of a silicon avalanche photodiode, a 20 ns Gaussian shaping amplifier, and a 500 MHz digitizer with 14-bit sampling resolution. The fast shaping time diminishes the need to restrict the amount of x-ray flux reaching the detector, limiting the system dead-time. With a much higher time resolution than systems currently in use in high temperature plasma physics experiments, this new detector has the versatility to be used in a variety of discharges with varying flux and the ability to study dynamics on both slow and fast time scales. This paper discusses the new fast x-ray detector recently installed on MST and the improved time resolution capabilities compared to the existing soft and hard x-ray diagnostics. In addition to the detector hardware, improvements to the detector calibration and x-ray pulse identification software, such as additional fitting parameters and a more sophisticated fitting routine are discussed. Finally, initial data taken in both high confinement and standard reversed-field pinch plasma discharges are compared. PMID:26233388

  8. Data of low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-03-01

    This article presents the data of using three phase-based X-ray imaging techniques to characterize biomaterial scaffold and soft tissues in situ, as reported in our study "Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments" [1]. The examined parameters include the radiation dose, scan time, and image quality, which are all critical to longitudinal in situ live animal assessments. The data presented were obtained from three dimensional imaging of scaffolds in situ cartilage by means of synchrotron-based computed tomography-diffraction enhanced imaging (CT-DEI), analyzer based imaging (CT-ABI), and in-line phase contrast imaging (CT-PCI) at standard and low dose imaging modalities. PMID:26909381

  9. Data of low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments

    PubMed Central

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the data of using three phase-based X-ray imaging techniques to characterize biomaterial scaffold and soft tissues in situ, as reported in our study “Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments” [1]. The examined parameters include the radiation dose, scan time, and image quality, which are all critical to longitudinal in situ live animal assessments. The data presented were obtained from three dimensional imaging of scaffolds in situ cartilage by means of synchrotron-based computed tomography-diffraction enhanced imaging (CT-DEI), analyzer based imaging (CT-ABI), and in-line phase contrast imaging (CT-PCI) at standard and low dose imaging modalities. PMID:26909381

  10. Bismuth Passivation Technique for High-Resolution X-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James; Hess, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Athena-plus team requires X-ray sensors with energy resolution of better than one part in 3,000 at 6 keV X-rays. While bismuth is an excellent material for high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity (for large signal when an X-ray is stopped by the absorber), oxidation of the bismuth surface can lead to electron traps and other effects that degrade the energy resolution. Bismuth oxide reduction and nitride passivation techniques analogous to those used in indium passivation are being applied in a new technique. The technique will enable improved energy resolution and resistance to aging in bismuth-absorber-coupled X-ray sensors. Elemental bismuth is lithographically integrated into X-ray detector circuits. It encounters several steps where the Bi oxidizes. The technology discussed here will remove oxide from the surface of the Bi and replace it with nitridized surface. Removal of the native oxide and passivating to prevent the growth of the oxide will improve detector performance and insulate the detector against future degradation from oxide growth. Placing the Bi coated sensor in a vacuum system, a reduction chemistry in a plasma (nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) + argon) is used to remove the oxide and promote nitridization of the cleaned Bi surface. Once passivated, the Bi will perform as a better X-ray thermalizer since energy will not be trapped in the bismuth oxides on the surface. A simple additional step, which can be added at various stages of the current fabrication process, can then be applied to encapsulate the Bi film. After plasma passivation, the Bi can be capped with a non-diffusive layer of metal or dielectric. A non-superconducting layer is required such as tungsten or tungsten nitride (WNx).

  11. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm(-1) spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm(-1) are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10(12) photons s(-1) in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS. PMID:26917127

  12. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-01-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm−1 spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm−1 are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s−1 in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS. PMID:26917127

  13. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-02-12

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm₋1spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm₋1are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seedingmore » and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s₋1in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. Ultimately, this will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.« less

  14. Building X-ray tube based irradiators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The construction of economical x-ray tube based irradiators in a variety of configurations is described using 1000 Watt x-ray tubes. Single tube, double tube, and four tube designs are described, as well as various cabinet construction techniques. Relatively high dose rates were achieved for small s...

  15. Cryogenic x-ray diffraction microscopy utilizing high-pressure cryopreservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Enju; Chushkin, Yuriy; van der Linden, Peter; Kim, Chae Un; Zontone, Federico; Carpentier, Philippe; Gruner, Sol M.; Pernot, Petra

    2014-10-01

    We present cryo x-ray diffraction microscopy of high-pressure-cryofixed bacteria and report high-convergence imaging with multiple image reconstructions. Hydrated D. radiodurans cells were cryofixed at 200 MPa pressure into ˜10-μm-thick water layers and their unstained, hydrated cellular environments were imaged by phasing diffraction patterns, reaching sub-30-nm resolutions with hard x-rays. Comparisons were made with conventional ambient-pressure-cryofixed samples, with respect to both coherent small-angle x-ray scattering and the image reconstruction. The results show a correlation between the level of background ice signal and phasing convergence, suggesting that phasing difficulties with frozen-hydrated specimens may be caused by high-background ice scattering.

  16. Cryogenic x-ray diffraction microscopy utilizing high-pressure cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Lima, Enju; Chushkin, Yuriy; van der Linden, Peter; Kim, Chae Un; Zontone, Federico; Carpentier, Philippe; Gruner, Sol M; Pernot, Petra

    2014-10-01

    We present cryo x-ray diffraction microscopy of high-pressure-cryofixed bacteria and report high-convergence imaging with multiple image reconstructions. Hydrated D. radiodurans cells were cryofixed at 200 MPa pressure into ∼10-μm-thick water layers and their unstained, hydrated cellular environments were imaged by phasing diffraction patterns, reaching sub-30-nm resolutions with hard x-rays. Comparisons were made with conventional ambient-pressure-cryofixed samples, with respect to both coherent small-angle x-ray scattering and the image reconstruction. The results show a correlation between the level of background ice signal and phasing convergence, suggesting that phasing difficulties with frozen-hydrated specimens may be caused by high-background ice scattering. PMID:25375529

  17. Superconducting Detector System for High-Resolution Energy-Dispersive Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Niedermayr, T; Drury, O; Funk, T; Frank, M; Labov, S E; Cramer, S

    2001-02-21

    Synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy is often limited by detector performance. Grating spectrometers have the resolution, but lack the efficiency for the analysis of dilute samples. Semiconducting Si(Li) or Ge detectors are efficient, but often lack the resolution to separate weak signals from strong nearby lines in multi-element samples. Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) operated at temperatures below 1 K can be used as high-resolution high-efficiency x-ray detectors. They combine high energy resolution around 10 eV FWHM with the broad band efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors. We have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate STJ detectors in x-ray fluorescence measurements at beam line 4 of the ALS. We demonstrate the capabilities of such a detector system for fluorescence analysis of dilute metal sites in proteins and inorganic model compounds.

  18. [Manufacture of high frequency direct current dental X-ray machine].

    PubMed

    Su, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hai-Hui; Zhang, Yang-De

    2008-11-01

    This paper introduces five dental X-ray machines which are manufactured with IGBT to realize high frequency, real-time sampling and PWM to ensure the closed-loop control for tube current and Anodes's high voltage. These five machines also use microcomputer and combined X-ray tube for precise control. The sets don't have high voltage outside. The error of tube voltage is less than 1% and exposure time is less than 3%. The photos of pulp cavity and surrounding tissue can be seen clearly. These sets surely meet the requirements of perspective use in clinical. PMID:19253581

  19. High-average-power 100-Hz repetition rate table-top soft x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, Jorge J.; Reagan, Brendan A.; Wernsing, Keith; Wang, Yong; Yin, Liang; Wang, Shoujun; Berrill, Mark; Woolston, Mark R.; Curtis, Alden H.; Furch, Federico J. A.; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Luther, Brad M.; Patel, Dinesh; Marconi, Mario C.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2013-09-01

    The table-top generation of high average power coherent soft x-ray radiation in a compact set up is of high interest for numerous applications. We have demonstrated the generation of bright soft x-ray laser pulses at 100 Hz repetition rate with record-high average power from compact plasma amplifiers excited by an ultrafast diode-pumped solid state laser. Results of compact λ=18.9nm Ni-like Mo and λ=13.9nm Ni-like Ag lasers operating at 100 Hz repetition rate are discussed.

  20. X Persei: The X-Ray Halo and Spectrum of a High-Latitude X-Ray Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Smith, Randall

    2004-01-01

    The observations were completed on February 25,2003. Although the source was in the FOV for 31.4 ksec, only 18.2 ksec of data were usable due to a strong flare in the first part of the observations. We have extracted the X-ray halo from the good portion of the data, and were then faced with the problem of calibrating the far-off-axis point spread function, which is needed only for X-ray halo analysis; the same problem affected Chandra halo observations. We used data from 3C273, MCG 6-30-15, LMC X-1, and Her X-1 to measure the PSF, and found that it is reasonably well fit with a power law of the form PSF(theta) = A theta^-G, where A = 0.0034 arcmin^-2, and G = 3.05 for energies between 1-4 keV. This suggests there are fewer large dust grains along the When fitting the spectrum of X Persei, we found NH = 3e21 cm^-2, as expected. However, the X-ray halo (using a Mathis, Rumpl, Nordsieck 1977 dust model) required at most a column density of 1.4+/-0.1 e21 cm^-2; other models required sightline to X Per than would have been expected. In addition, a smoothly distributed dust model fit the observations better than a single cloud model, also against our expectations. We are in the process of writing a paper to be submitted to ApJ with these results, and will also present them at the 2004 HEAD meeting in New Orleans.

  1. High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-08-01

    The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, are described. Issues of X-ray damage especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high-resolution which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and other spectroscopic techniques has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented PS II membrane preparations and PS II single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and K? emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

  2. High Resolution X-ray Microscopy For Nano-Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, A.; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Roy, T.; Sinha, Amar

    2010-12-01

    If an object is illuminated with coherent electromagnetic radiation, e.g. by visible laser light or highly brilliant X-rays, a diffraction pattern is formed in the Fraunhofer far field that is related via a Fourier transform to the optical transmission function of the object. The aim of X-ray diffractive imaging or so-called lensless imaging, is to directly reconstruct the original optical transmission function of the specimen from its measured diffraction pattern. In principle, it allows one to obtain a resolution that is ultimately limited only by the wavelength of the radiation used and not by the quality of optical lenses. In X-ray microscopy, for instance, the resolution is presently limited to several tens of nanometers because of difficulties in manufacturing efficient high-quality nano-structured X-ray optical elements. Since this technique allows the resolution to be increased beyond these limits, they are among the most promising techniques for X-ray imaging applications in life and materials sciences on the nanometer scale.

  3. Spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Podpaly, Y.; Marmar, E. S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Gu, M. F.; Eikenberry, E.; Broennimann, Ch.; Lee, S. G.

    2008-10-15

    The use of high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometers to diagnose fusion plasmas has been limited by the poor spatial localization associated with chord integrated measurements. Taking advantage of a new x-ray imaging spectrometer concept [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3660 (2004)], and improvements in x-ray detector technology [Ch. Broennimann et al., J. Synchrotron Radiat. 13, 120 (2006)], a spatially resolving high resolution x-ray spectrometer has been built and installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. This instrument utilizes a spherically bent quartz crystal and a set of two dimensional x-ray detectors arranged in the Johann configuration [H. H. Johann, Z. Phys. 69, 185 (1931)] to image the entire plasma cross section with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm. The spectrometer was designed to measure line emission from H-like and He-like argon in the wavelength range 3.7 and 4.0 A with a resolving power of approximately 10 000 at frame rates up to 200 Hz. Using spectral tomographic techniques [I. Condrea, Phys. Plasmas 11, 2427 (2004)] the line integrated spectra can be inverted to infer profiles of impurity emissivity, velocity, and temperature. From these quantities it is then possible to calculate impurity density and electron temperature profiles. An overview of the instrument, analysis techniques, and example profiles are presented.

  4. Spatially resolved high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of high-current plasma-focus discharges

    SciTech Connect

    ZajaPc, S.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Scholz, M.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Rosmej, O.; Yongtao, Zhao; Gojska, A.

    2010-10-15

    Soft x-ray emission from a Mather-type plasma-focus device (PF-1000) operated at {approx}400 kJ was measured. The high density and temperature plasma were generated by the discharge in the deuterium-argon gas mixture in the modified (high-current) plasma-focus configuration. A spherically bent mica crystal spectrograph viewing the axial output of the pinch region was used to measure the x-ray spectra. Spatially resolved spectra including the characteristic x-ray lines of highly ionized Ar and continua were recorded by means of an x-ray film. The x-ray emission of PF-1000 device was studied at different areas of the pinch.

  5. Manufacturing technologies for high-throughput imaging x-ray telescopes: XMM carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) technology compared to other x-ray systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerret, Rainer; Glatzel, Holger; Schmidt, Michael

    1994-09-01

    High throughput and/or high resolution imaging telescopes for x-ray energies up to 8 keV are part of several space based astronomic missions to study small and faint cosmic x-ray objects. High throughput telescopes are applied for spectroscopy missions, high resolution telescopes to detect and analyze small X-ray sources. Depending on the goal and the constraints of the mission some of the various parameters such as resolution, throughput, number of nested shells or weight etc. are optimized. The production technology has to match to the mission goals and constraints to obtain an optimum balance between scientific performance, production time and costs. The entire production process of XMM mirror shells at Carl Zeiss and Medialario (Italy) respectively will be presented in this paper. This technology will be compared with the ones of other x-ray telescopes such as EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, ROSAT, JET-X, AND AXAF; and EUV telescopes such as CDS and EUVE regarding potentials and limitations of the manufacturing processes and optical performances.

  6. Phase contrast enhanced high resolution X-ray imaging and tomography of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Dammer, Jiri; Hanus, Robert; Holy, Tomas; Pospisil, Stanislav; Tykva, Richard; Uher, Josef; Vykydal, Zdenek

    2007-02-01

    A tabletop system for digital high resolution and high sensitivity X-ray micro-radiography has been developed for small-animal and soft-tissue imaging. The system is based on a micro-focus X-ray tube and the semiconductor hybrid position sensitive Medipix2 pixel detector. Transmission radiography imaging, conventionally based only on absorption, is enhanced by exploiting phase-shift effects induced in the X-ray beam traversing the sample. Phase contrast imaging is realized by object edge enhancement. DAQ is done by a novel fully integrated USB-based readout with online image generation. Improved signal reconstruction techniques make use of advanced statistical data analysis, enhanced beam hardening correction and direct thickness calibration of individual pixels. 2D and 3D micro-tomography images of several biological samples demonstrate the applicability of the system for biological and medical purposes including in-vivo and time dependent physiological studies in the life sciences.

  7. X-ray Spectroscopy of High-Z Elements on Nike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2013-10-01

    Survey X-ray spectrometer covering a spectral range from 0.5 to 19.5 angstroms has been added to the spectroscopic suite of Nike diagnostics. That allows simultaneous observation of both M- and N- spectra of W, Ta and Au with high spectral resolution. Low energy test shots confirmed strong presence of 3-4 transitions of Ni-like W, Ta and Au with X-ray energies as high as 3.5 keV when above mentioned elements were used as the targets. In our continuous effort to support DOE-NNSA's inertial fusion program, the future campaign will cover a wide range of plasma conditions that result in relatively energetic X-ray production. Eventually, absolutely calibrated spectrometers of similar geometry will be fielded at NIF in cooperation with NIF diagnostic group. Work supported by US DOE, Defense Programs.

  8. Plasma Diagnostic Calibration and Characterizations with High Energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer Ali

    2009-06-05

    National Security Technologies’ High Energy X-ray (HEX) Facility is unique in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The HEX provides fluorescent X-rays of 5 keV to 100 keV with fluence of 10^5–10^6 photons/cm^2/second at the desired line energy. Low energy lines can be filtered, and both filters and fluorescers can be changed rapidly. We present results of calibrating image plates (sensitivity and modulation transfer function), a Bremsstrahlung spectrometer (stacked filters and image plates), and the National Ignition Facility’s Filter- Fluorescer Experiment (FFLEX) high energy X-ray spectrometer. We also show results of a scintillator light yield and alignment study for a neutron imaging system.

  9. Polarization spectroscopy of x-ray transitions from beam-excited highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C.; Decaux, V.; Widmann, K.; Neill, P.

    1997-01-01

    Polarization spectroscopy of x-ray lines represents a diagnostic tool to ascertain the presence of electron beams in high-temperature plasmas. Making use of the Livermore electron beam ion trap, which optimizes the linear x-ray line polarization by exciting highly charged ions with a monoenergetic electron beam, we have begun to develop polarization diagnostics and test theoretical models. Our measurement relies on the sensitivity of crystal spectrometers to the linear polarization of x-ray lines which depends on the value of the Bragg angle. We employed two spectrometers with differing analyzing crystals and simultaneously recorded the K-shell emission from heliumlike Fe{sup 24+} and lithiumlike Fe{sup 23+} ions at two different Bragg angles. A clear difference in the relative intensities of the dominant transitions is observed, which is attributed to the amount of linear polarization of the individual lines. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. The effects of dust scattering on high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, Lia; Garcia, Javier; Wilms, Joern; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2016-04-01

    In high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, dust scattering significantly enhances the total extinction optical depth and alters the shape of photoelectric absorption edges. This effect is modulated by the dust grain size distribution, spatial location along the line of sight, and the imaging resolution of the X-ray telescope. We focus in particular on the Fe L-edge at 0.7 keV, fitting a template for the total extinction to the high resolution spectrum of three X-ray binaries from the Chandra archive: GX 9+9, XTE J1817-330, and Cyg X-1. In cases where dust is intrinsic to the source, a covering factor based on the angular extent of the dusty material must be applied to the extinction curve, regardless of imaging resolution. We discuss the various astrophysical cases in which scattering effects need to be taken into account.

  11. Quantitative simulation and density reconstruction in high-energy X-ray radiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Li; Xu, Haibo

    2014-03-01

    Numerical radiograph using Monte Carlo method is used to study fidelity of density reconstruction in high-energy X-ray radiography. A density reconstruction method for a polyenergetic X-ray source and an object composed of different materials is proposed. The method includes energy spectrum, angular spectrum and spot size of photon source. And it includes mass absorption coefficients explicitly in density reconstruction as well. A constrained conjugate gradient algorithm and variation regularization are applied to determine material edges and density reconstruction of a French test object. It shows that the method is valid for density reconstruction and energy spectrum of imaging photons is important in obtaining accurate material densities in high-energy X-ray radiograph.

  12. Diamond monochromator for high heat flux synchrotron x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.M.; Smither, R.K.; Davey, S.; Purohit, A.

    1993-01-28

    Single crystal silicon has been the material of choice for x-ray monochromators for the past several decades. However, the need for suitable monochromators to handle the high heat load of the next generation synchrotron x-ray beams on the one hand and the rapid and on-going advances in synthetic diamond technology on the other make a compelling case for the consideration of a diamond monochromator system. In this paper, we consider various aspects, advantages and disadvantages, and promises and pitfalls of such a system and evaluate the comparative performance of a diamond monochromator subjected to the high heat load of the most powerful x-ray beam that will become available in the next few years. The results of experiments performed to evaluate the diffraction properties of a currently available synthetic single crystal diamond are also presented. Fabrication of a diamond-based monochromator is within present technical means.

  13. Diamond monochromator for high heat flux synchrotron x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Khounsary, A.M.; Smither, R.K.; Davey, S.; Purohit, A.

    1992-12-01

    Single crystal silicon has been the material of choice for x-ray monochromators for the past several decades. However, the need for suitable monochromators to handle the high heat load of the next generation synchrotron x-ray beams on the one hand and the rapid and on-going advances in synthetic diamond technology on the other make a compelling case for the consideration of a diamond mollochromator system. In this Paper, we consider various aspects, advantage and disadvantages, and promises and pitfalls of such a system and evaluate the comparative an monochromator subjected to the high heat load of the most powerful x-ray beam that will become available in the next few years. The results of experiments performed to evaluate the diffraction properties of a currently available synthetic single crystal diamond are also presented. Fabrication of diamond-based monochromator is within present technical means.

  14. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan Jing; Yang Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing Zhenxue

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 x 2 detector binning

  15. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan, Jing; Yang, Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang, Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing, Zhenxue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 × 2 detector

  16. Studies of auroral X-ray imaging from high altitude spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, D. L.; Mizera, P. F.; Rice, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    Results of a study of techniques for imaging the aurora from a high altitude satellite at X-ray wavelengths are summarized. The X-ray observations allow the straightforward derivation of the primary auroral X-ray spectrum and can be made at all local times, day and night. Five candidate imaging systems are identified: X-ray telescope, multiple pinhole camera, coded aperture, rastered collimator, and imaging collimator. Examples of each are specified, subject to common weight and size limits which allow them to be intercompared. The imaging ability of each system is tested using a wide variety of sample spectra which are based on previous satellite observations. The study shows that the pinhole camera and coded aperture are both good auroral imaging systems. The two collimated detectors are significantly less sensitive. The X-ray telescope provides better image quality than the other systems in almost all cases, but a limitation to energies below about 4 keV prevents this system from providing the spectra data essential to deriving electron spectra, energy input to the atmosphere, and atmospheric densities and conductivities. The orbit selection requires a tradeoff between spatial resolution and duty cycle.

  17. Introduction to high-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B. X.; Friedsam, H.

    2006-01-01

    A novel alignment technique utilizing the x-ray beam of a dedicated alignment undulator in conjunction with pinholes and position-sensitive detectors for positioning accelerator components in an x-ray free-electron laser will be presented. In this concept two retractable pinholes at each end of the main undulator line define a stable and reproducible x-ray beam axis (XBA). Targets are precisely positioned on the XBA using a pinhole camera technique. Position-sensitive detectors responding to both x-ray and electron beams enable the direct transfer of the position setting from the XBA to the electron beam. This system has the potential to deliver superior alignment accuracy in the micron range for target pinholes in the transverse directions over long distances. It defines the beam axis for the electron-beam-based alignment with high reproducibility. This concept complements the electron-beam-based alignment and the existing survey methods advancing the alignment accuracy of long accelerators to an unprecedented level. Further improvements of the transverse accuracy using x-ray zone plates and a concurrent measurement scheme during accelerator operation, providing real-time feedback for transverse position corrections, will be discussed.

  18. High-precision laser-assisted absolute determination of x-ray diffraction angles

    SciTech Connect

    Kubicek, K.; Braun, J.; Bruhns, H.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Mokler, P. H.; Ullrich, J.

    2012-01-15

    A novel technique for absolute wavelength determination in high-precision crystal x-ray spectroscopy recently introduced has been upgraded reaching unprecedented accuracies. The method combines visible laser beams with the Bond method, where Bragg angles ({theta} and -{theta}) are determined without any x-ray reference lines. Using flat crystals this technique makes absolute x-ray wavelength measurements feasible even at low x-ray fluxes. The upgraded spectrometer has been used in combination with first experiments on the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1}{yields} 1s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} w-line in He-like argon. By resolving a minute curvature of the x-ray lines the accuracy reaches there the best ever reported value of 1.5 ppm. The result is sensitive to predicted second-order QED contributions at the level of two-electron screening and two-photon radiative diagrams and will allow for the first time to benchmark predicted binding energies for He-like ions at this level of precision.

  19. Diamond for high-heat-load synchrotron x-ray applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wah-Keat

    1994-12-31

    Synchrotron facilities worldwide provide scientists with useful radiation in the ultraviolet to the x-ray regime. Third-generation synchrotron sources win deliver photon fluxes in the 10{sup 15} photons/s/0.1%BW range, with brilliance on the order of 10{sup 18} photons/s/0.1%BW/mrad{sup 2}/mm{sup 2}. Along with the increase in flux and brilliance is an increase in the power and power densities of the x-ray beam. Depending on the particular insertion device, the x-ray beam can have total power in excess of 10 kW and peak power, density of more than 400 W/mm{sup 2}. Such high heat loads are a major challenge in the design and fabrication of x-ray beamline components. The superior thermal and mechanical properties of diamond make it a good candidate as material in these components. Single crystal diamonds can be used as x-ray monochromators, while polycrystalline or CVD diamonds can be used in a variety of ways on the front-end beamline components. This paper discusses the issues regarding the feasibility of using diamond in third-generation synchrotron beamline components.

  20. New techniques provide low-cost X-ray inspection of highly attenuating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stupin, D.M.; Mueller, K.H.; Viskoe, D.A.; Howard, B.; Poland, R.W.; Schneberk, D.; Dolan, K.; Thompson, K.; Stoker, G.

    1995-12-31

    As a result of an arms reduction treaty between the United States and the Russian Federation, both countries will each be storing over 40,000 containers of plutonium. To help detect any deterioration of the containers and prevent leakage, the authors are designing a digital radiography and computed tomography system capable of handling this volume reliably, efficiently, and at a lower cost. The materials to be stored have very high x-ray attenuations, and, in the past, were inspected using 1- to 24-MV x-ray sources. This inspection system, however, uses a new scintillating (Lockheed) glass and an integrating CCD camera. Preliminary experiments show that this will permit the use of a 450-kV x-ray source. This low-energy system will cost much less than others designed to use a higher-energy x-ray source because it will require a less expensive source, less shielding, and less floor space. Furthermore, they can achieve a tenfold improvement in spatial resolution by using their knowledge of the point-spread function of the x-ray imaging system and a least-squares fitting technique.

  1. High-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray microscopy: Present status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Spanne, P. ); Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R. )

    1991-01-01

    High-energy radiation synchrotron x-ray microscopy is used to characterize materials of importance to the chemical and materials sciences and chemical engineering. The x-ray microscope (XRM) forms images of elemental distributions fluorescent x rays or images of mass distributions by measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of the material. Distributions of sections through materials are obtained non-destructively using the technique of computed microtomography. The energy range of the x rays used for the XRM ranges from a few keV at the minimum value to more than 100 keV, which is sufficient to excite the K-edge of all naturally occurring elements. The work in progress at the Brookhaven NSLS X26 and X17 XRM is described in order to show the current status of the XRM. While there are many possible approaches to the XRM instrumentation, this instrument gives state-of-the-art performance in most respects and serves as a reasonable example of the present status of the instrumentation in terms of the spatial resolution and minimum detection limits obtainable. The examples of applications cited give an idea of the types of research fields that are currently under investigation. They can be used to illustrate how the field of x-ray microscopy will benefit from the use of bending magnets and insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Soft X-ray flare spectra. [existence of high temperature plasmas in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Meekins, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Large solar flares produce intense soft X-ray emission, indicating the existence of high temperature plasmas that coexist in time with the plasmas responsible for the normally observed brightenings in H-alpha. The time behavior of the X-ray flux, as revealed, for example, by ion chamber detectors on the series of Solrad monitoring satellites, appears to roughly mimic the intensity-time behavior of the H-alpha flare, insofar as start times, times of maximum flux, and approximate decay times are concerned. In recent years, soft X-ray spectra of both active regions and solar flares have been obtained by instruments flown on spacecraft such as the Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO) series. The disbursing elements used were Bragg crystals, and in the 8 Angstrom region the resolution is typically approximately 1200. This paper discusses the observed characteristics of X-ray flare spectra and spectroscopic diagnostics for determining electron temperatures, electron densities, and departures from ionization equilibrium within the soft X-ray emitting plasma.

  3. Application of x-ray-laser interferometry to study high-density laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R.; Celliers, P.; Libby, S.B.; London, R.A.; Moreno, J.C.; Trebes, J.E.; Weber, F.

    1996-02-01

    Collisionally pumped soft-x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 4 to 40 nm. With the recent advances in the development of multilayer mirrors and beam splitters in the soft-x-ray regime, we can utilize the unique properties of x-ray lasers to study large, rapidly evolving laser-driven plasmas with high electron densities. Using a neonlike yttrium x-ray laser, which operates at a wavelength of 15.5 nm, we have performed a series of radiography, moir{acute e} deflectometry, and interferometry experiments to characterize plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion. We describe experiments using a soft-x-ray laser interferometer, operated in the Mach{endash}Zehnder configuration, to study CH plasmas. The two-dimensional density profiles obtained from the interferograms allow us to validate and benchmark our numerical models used to study the physics of laser{endash}plasma interactions. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  4. Catalytic Adventures in Space and Time Using High Energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Mark A.; Di Michiel, Marco; Ferri, Davide; Fernàndez-Garcia, Marcos; Beale, Andrew M.; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Chupas, Peter J.; Chapman, Karena W.

    2014-09-16

    Very high energy X-rays have long offered great promise in providing great insight into the inner workings of catalysts; insights that may complement the array of techniques available to researchers in catalysis either in the laboratory or at more conventional X-ray wavelengths. This contribution aims to critically assess the diverse possibilities now available in the high energy domain as a result of the maturation of third generation synchrotron facilities and to look forward to the potential that forthcoming developments in synchrotron source technology may offer the world of catalysis in the near future.

  5. A miniature closed-circle flow cell for high photon flux X-ray scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Sahle, Ch J; Henriquet, C; Schroer, M A; Juurinen, I; Niskanen, J; Krisch, M

    2015-11-01

    A closed-circle miniature flow cell for high X-ray photon flux experiments on radiation-sensitive liquid samples is presented. The compact cell is made from highly inert material and the flow is induced by a rotating magnetic stir bar, which acts as a centrifugal pump inside the cell. The cell is ideal for radiation-sensitive yet precious or hazardous liquid samples, such as concentrated acids or bases. As a demonstration of the cell's capabilities, X-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy data on the oxygen K-edge of liquid water under ambient conditions are presented. PMID:26524322

  6. Aplanatic Three-Mirror Objective for High-Magnification Soft X-Ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, M.; Jinno, T.; Yanagihara, M.

    2011-09-09

    An innovative solution for high-magnification microscopy, based on attaching afocal optics for focal length reduction, is proposed. The solution, consisting of three spherical mirrors, allows one to enhance a magnification of a laboratory based soft x-ray microscope over 1000x, where movies with diffraction-limited resolution can be observed with an x-ray CCD. The design example, having a numerical aperture of 0.25, was successfully demonstrated both a high magnification and a large field of view.

  7. Digital Signal Processors for Cryogenic High-Resolution X-Ray Detector Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Bechstein, S; Henning, W; Momayezi, M

    2003-01-01

    The authors are developing fast digital signal processors (DSPs) to read out superconducting high-resolution X-ray detectors with on-line pulse processing. For superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector read-out, the DSPs offer on-line filtering, rise time discrimination and pile-up rejection. Compared to analog pulse processing, DSP readout somewhat degrades the detector resolution, but improves the spectral purity of the detector response. They discuss DSP performance with the 9-channel STJ array for synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy.

  8. Development of Silver Tape Target System for High Repetition X-ray Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikino, Masaharu; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Ohba, Toshiyuki; Kaihori, Takeshi; Nagashima, Keisuke

    The development of continuous pumping to the target system is an important issue for realizing an x-ray laser (XRL) with the high repetition rate. We have developed a 13.9 nm XRL using a silver tape target and demonstrated a highly coherent XRL with an oscillator-amplifier configuration using two tape target systems and the TOPAZ laser system with a 10-J and a 0.1-Hz repetition rate. The output energy is comparable to the x-ray laser generated with a silver-deposited slab target, and the pointing stability using the new tape target system is better than conventional slab target.

  9. Characteristics of the soft X-ray emission from laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Arai, Goki; Kondo, Yoshiki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Ejima, Takeo; Hatano, Tadashi; Jiang, Weihua; Nishikino, Masaharu; Sasaki, Akira; Sunahara, Atsushi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    We characterized the spectral structure of the soft X-ray emission and determined the plasma parameters in laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas. The spectral structure observed originated from Pt21+ to Pt34+ ions, emissions from which overlapped to produce a high output flux in the carbon-window soft X-ray spectral region. Using dual laser pulse irradiation, we observed the maximum output flux, which was 20% larger than that obtained under single-laser irradiation, and the evolution of a strongly absorbed spectral structure, which was attributed to the effects of both opacity and long-scale length of the expanding pre-plasma.

  10. Development of High Pressure Single Crystal X-Ray Diffraction Study at ESRF ID 30 Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaussy, A.C.; Mezouar, M.; Mentre, O.

    2004-05-12

    We report about the newly single crystal diffraction set-up development at ID30 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To illustrate the experimental performance of this set-up, we also present X-ray diffraction spectra recorded at high pressure (HP) using dedicated diamond anvil cell (DAC). Using this new setup, high quality synchrotron single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements of Pb2V3O9 have been performed at HP. We evidenced a reordering in the distorted system by resorbing the existing twin. The structure was partially solved by direct methods and refined by the use of the BRUKER suite of programs package.

  11. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struminsky, A.; Gan, W.

    2015-08-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV γ-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these γ-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and π0-decay γ-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X- ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard y-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and subsequently trapped by some magnetic structure. In-situ energetic particle measurements by GOES and STEREO (High Energy Telescope, HET) shows that five of these y-events were not accompanied by SEP events at 1 AU, even when multi-point measurements including STEREO are taken into account. Therefore accelerated protons are not always released into the heliosphere. A longer delay between the maximum temperature and the maximum emission measure characterises flares with prolonged high energy γ-emission and solar proton events.

  12. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  13. Simulation of high-resolution X-ray microscopic images for improved alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiangxia; Zhang, Xiaobo; Liu, Gang; Cheng, Xianchao; Li, Wenjie; Guan, Yong; Liu, Ying; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Yangchao

    2011-12-01

    The introduction of precision optical elements to X-ray microscopes necessitates fine realignment to achieve optimal high-resolution imaging. In this paper, we demonstrate a numerical method for simulating image formation that facilitates alignment of the source, condenser, objective lens, and CCD camera. This algorithm, based on ray-tracing and Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory, is applied to simulate the X-ray microscope beamline U7A of National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The simulations and imaging experiments show that the algorithm is useful for guiding experimental adjustments. Our alignment simulation method is an essential tool for the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) with optical elements and may also be useful for the alignment of optical components in other modes of microscopy.

  14. A Small Mission Featuring an Imaging X-ray Polarimeter with High Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Baldini, Luca; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Brez, Alessandro; Costa, Enrico; Dissley, Richard; Elsner, Ronald; Fabiani, Sergio; Matt, Giorgio; Minuti, Massimo; Mulieri, Fabio; O'Dell, Steve; Pinchera, Michelle; Ramsey, Brian; Rubini, Alda; Sgro, Carmelo; Soffitta, Paolo; Spandre, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed description of a small mission capable of obtaining high precision and meaningful measurement of the X-ray polarization of a variety of different classes of cosmic X-ray sources. Compared to other ideas that have been suggested this experiment has demonstrated in the laboratory a number of extremely important features relevant to the ultimate selection of such a mission by a funding agency. The most important of these questions are: 1) Have you demonstrated the sensitivity to a polarized beam at the energies of interest (i.e. the energies which represent the majority (not the minority) of detected photons from the X-ray source of interest? 2) Have you demonstrated that the device's sensitivity to an unpolarized beam is really negligible and/or quantified the impact of any systematic effects upon actual measurements? We present our answers to these questions backed up by laboratory measurements and give an overview of the mission.

  15. COMMISSIONING OF A HIGH-BRIGHTNESS PHOTOINJECTOR FOR COMPTON SCATTERING X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Messerly, M; Shverdin, M; Siders, C W; Tremaine, A M; Barty, C J; Badakov, H; Frigola, P; Fukasawa, A; OShea, B; Rosenzweig, J B

    2007-06-21

    Compton scattering of intense laser pulses with ultrarelativistic electron beams has proven to be an attractive source of high-brightness x