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Sample records for high energy planetary

  1. Stellar Winds and High-Energy Radiation: Evolution and influences on planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C.; Tu, L.; Güdel, M.; Lüftinger, T.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K.; Fichtinger, B.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the Austrian research network "Pathways to Habitability: From Disks to Active Stars, Planets and Life" (path.univie.ac.at), we study the evolution of stellar output (e.g. winds, high-energy radiation) over the lifetimes of solar-like stars and the influence of stellar output on the development of habitable planetary environments. We have developed a coupled stellar rotation-wind-radiation model that describes the long term evolution of stellar output over the course of a star's life. We show that the initial rotation rate of a star can significantly influence the evolution of winds and high-energy radiation and therefore the development of planetary atmospheres.

  2. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  3. Large laser sparks for laboratory simulation of high-energy-density events in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babankova, Dagmar; Juha, Libor; Civias, Svatopluk; Bittner, Michal; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Ryc, Leszek; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skala, Jiri; Ullschmied, Jiri

    2005-09-01

    Single ≤1 kJ pulses from a high-power laser are focused into molecular gases to create large laser sparks. This provides a unique way to mimic the chemical effects of high-energy-density events in planetary atmospheres (cometary impact, lightning) matching the natural energy-density, its spatio-temporal evolution and plasma-volume scaling of such events in a fully-controlled laboratory environment. Some chemical reactions initiated by laser-induced dielectric breakdown (LIDB) in both pure molecular gases and mixtures related to the chemical evolution of the Earth's early atmosphere were studied. Most of the experiments were carried out in a static gas cell. However, an initial series of experiments was also performed with a gas-puff target placed within a vacuum interaction chamber. Under these dynamic conditions the hot core of a laser spark can be directly investigated.

  4. High-energy density experiments on planetary materials using high-power lasers and X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Norimasa

    2015-06-01

    Laser-driven dynamic compression allows us to investigate the behavior of planetary and exoplanetary materials at extreme conditions. Our high-energy density (HED) experiments for applications to planetary sciences began over five years ago. We measured the equation-of-state of cryogenic liquid hydrogen under laser-shock compression up to 55 GPa. Since then, various materials constituting the icy giant planets and the Earth-like planets have been studied using laser-driven dynamic compression techniques. Pressure-volume-temperature EOS data and optical property data of water and molecular mixtures were obtained at the planetary/exoplanetary interior conditions. Silicates and oxides data show interesting behaviors in the warm-dense matter regime due to their phase transformations. Most recently the structural changes of iron were observed for understanding the kinetics under the bcc-hcp transformation phenomena on a new HED science platform coupling power-lasers and the X-ray free electron laser (SACLA). This work was performed under the joint research project at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. It was partially supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 20654042, 22224012, 23540556, and 24103507) and also by grants from the Core-to-Core Program of JSPS on International Alliance for Material Science in Extreme States with High Power Laser and XFEL, and the X-ray Free Electron Laser Priority Strategy Program of MEXT.

  5. Formation of bioorganic compounds in simulated planetary atmospheres by high energy particles or photons.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Masuda, H; Ushio, K I; Ohashi, A; Yamanashi, H; Kaneko, T; Takahashi, J I; Hosokawa, T; Hashimoto, H; Saito, T

    2001-01-01

    Various types of organic compounds have been detected in Jupiter, Titan, and cometary coma. It is probable that organic compounds were formed in primitive Earth and Mars atmospheres. Cosmic rays and solar UV are believed to be two major energy sources for organic formation in space. We examined energetics of organic formation in simulated planetary atmospheres. Gas mixtures including a C-source (carbon monoxide or methane) and a N-source (nitrogen or ammonia) was irradiated with the followings: High energy protons or electrons from accelerators, gamma-rays from 60Co, UV light from a deuterium lamp, and soft X-rays or UV light from an electron synchrotron. Amino acids were detected in the products of particles, gamma-rays and soft X-rays irradiation from each gas mixture examined. UV light gave, however, no amino acid precursors in the gas mixture of carbon monoxide, nitrogen and nitrogen. It gave only a trace of them in the gas mixture of carbon monoxide, ammonia and water or that of methane, nitrogen and water. Yield of amino acid precursors by photons greatly depended on their wavelength. These results suggest that nitrogen-containing organic compounds like amino acid precursors were formed chiefly with high energy particles, not UV photons, in Titan or primitive Earth/Mars atmospheres where ammonia is not available as a predominant N-source. PMID:11605633

  6. Formation of bioorganic compounds in simulated planetary atmospheres by high energy particles or photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Masuda, Hitomi; Ushio, Ken-ichiro; Ohashi, Akihiro; Yamanashi, Hiroto; Kaneko, Takeo; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Hosokawa, Teruo; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Saito, Takeshi

    Various types of organic compounds have been detected in Jupiter, Titan, and cometary coma. It is probable that organic compounds were formed in primitive Earth and Mars atmospheres. Cosmic rays and solar UV are believed to be two major energy sources for organic formation in space. We examined energetics of organic formation in simulated planetary atmospheres. Gas mixtures including a C-source (carbon monoxide or methane) and a N-source (nitrogen or ammonia) was irradiated with the followings: High energy protons or electrons from accelerators, gamma-rays from 60Co, UV light from a deuterium lamp, and soft X-rays or UV light from an electron synchrotron. Amino acids were detected in the products of particles, gamma-rays and soft X-rays irradiation from each gas mixture examined. UV light gave, however, no amino acid precursors in the gas mixture of carbon monoxide, nitrogen and nitrogen. It gave only a trace of them in the gas mixture of carbon monoxide, ammonia and water or that of methane, nitrogen and water. Yield of amino acid precursors by photons greatly depended on their wavelength. These results suggest that nitrogen-containing organic compounds like amino acid precursors were formed chiefly with high energy particles, not UV photons, in Titan or primitive Earth/Mars atmospheres where ammonia is not available as a predominant N-source.

  7. Directed energy planetary defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; Bible, Johanna; Bublitz, Jesse; Arriola, Josh; Motta, Caio; Suen, Jon; Johansson, Isabella; Riley, Jordan; Sarvian, Nilou; Clayton-Warwick, Deborah; Wu, Jane; Milich, Andrew; Oleson, Mitch; Pryor, Mark; Krogen, Peter; Kangas, Miikka

    2013-09-01

    Asteroids and comets that cross Earth's orbit pose a credible risk of impact, with potentially severe disturbances to Earth and society. Numerous risk mitigation strategies have been described, most involving dedicated missions to a threatening object. We propose an orbital planetary defense system capable of heating the surface of potentially hazardous objects to the vaporization point as a feasible approach to impact risk mitigation. We call the system DE-STAR for Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation. DE-STAR is a modular phased array of kilowatt class lasers powered by photovoltaic's. Modular design allows for incremental development, test, and initial deployment, lowering cost, minimizing risk, and allowing for technological co-development, leading eventually to an orbiting structure that would be developed in stages with both technological and target milestones. The main objective of DE-STAR is to use the focused directed energy to raise the surface spot temperature to ~3,000K, allowing direct vaporization of all known substances. In the process of heating the surface ejecting evaporated material a large reaction force would alter the asteroid's orbit. The baseline system is a DE-STAR 3 or 4 (1-10km array) depending on the degree of protection desired. A DE-STAR 4 allows for asteroid engagement starting beyond 1AU with a spot temperature sufficient to completely evaporate up to 500-m diameter asteroids in one year. Small asteroids and comets can be diverted/evaporated with a DESTAR 2 (100m) while space debris is vaporized with a DE-STAR 1 (10m).

  8. High energy irradiations simulating cosmic-ray-induced planetary gamma ray production. I - Fe target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Yellin, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two thick Fe targets were bombarded by a series of 6 GeV proton irradiations for the purpose of simulating the cosmic ray bombardment of planetary objects in space. Gamma ray energy spectra were obtained with a germanium solid state detector during the bombardment, and 46 of the gamma ray lines were ascribed to the Fe targets. A comparison between observed and predicted values showed good agreement for Fe lines from neutron inelastic scattering and spallation reactions, and less satisfactory agreement for neutron capture reactions, the latter attributed to the difference in composition between the Fe target and the mean lunar abundance used in the modeling. Through an analysis of the irradiation results together with continuum data obtained in lunar orbit, it was found that 100 hours of measurement with a current instrument should generate a spectrum containing approximately 20 lines due to Fe alone, with a 2-sigma sensitivity for detection of about 0.2 percent.

  9. A high-dynamic and accurate electromagnetic radiation and thermal energy detector for planetary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Karatekin, O.; Noel, J.-P.; van Ruymbeke, M.; Dehant, V.

    2012-04-01

    The radio meter has been broadly applied for the study of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI). As the electromagnetic radiation is the main external climate driving force of our planet: Earth, the Imbalance of the Earth's Radiation Budget (IERB) is a key to better understanding our climate system. The PICARD mission is to study the Sun-Earth's climate connections. With the opportunity of the PICARD mission, we have developed a Bolometric Oscillation Sensor (BOS), which are currently flying side by side with the radiometer SOlar Variability for Picard (SOVAP-an updated instrument of DIARAD/VIRGO on SOHO) to study the solar constant as well as the radiation of the Earth. The BOS sensor is composed with two detectors, the light mass detector (m1), which is rapidly response to the thermal-flux change, and the heavy mass detector (m2), which is slowly modulated by the electromagnetic energy. In addition, the m1 detector can stand alone to precisely monitor the ambient temperature. The original goal of the BOS-PICARD is to study the irradiance of the Sun's and the Earth's. After nearly two year's observations, the variations of Long-Wave radiation of the Earth can be well determined from the BOS measurements. It confirms that the BOS can be applied to measure the electromagnetic radiation near the infrared. Encouraged by these results, we are now working on a second generation of the BOS sensor for the nano-satellite project and future planetary missions. The new sensor will be able to determine the albedo (visible), infrared radiation as well as to detect the thermal initial of objective target either by the remote sensing on-board satellite or by the in-situ measurement setting up in the Lander.

  10. Effect of Nanosize Yittria and Tungsten Addition to Duplex Stainless Steel During High Energy Planetary Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A. K.; Shashanka, R.; Chaira, D.

    2016-02-01

    In this present investigation, elemental powders of duplex stainless steel composition (Fe-18Cr-13Ni) with 1 wt. % nano yittria and tungsten were milled separately in dual drive planetary mill (DDPM) for 10 h to fabricate yittria dispersed and tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel powders. The milled powder samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the size, morphology and phase evolution during milling. The gradual transformation from ferrite to austenite is evident from XRD spectra during milling. The crystallite size and lattice strain of yittria dispersed duplex stainless steel after 10 h milling were found to be 7 nm and 1.1% respectively. The crystallite size of tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel was 5 nm. It has been observed from SEM analysis that particles size has been reduced from 40 to 5 μm in both cases. Annealing of 10 h milled powder was performed at 750°C for 1 h under argon atmosphere to study phase transformation in both yittria and tungsten dispersed duplex stainless steel. The XRD analysis of annealed stainless steel depicts the phase transformation from α-Fe to γ-Fe with the formation of oxides of Y,Fe and Cr. The differential scanning calorimetry analysis was conducted by heating the milled powder from room temperature to 1200°C under argon atmosphere to investigate the thermal analysis of both the stainless steel powders.

  11. Preparation of natural pyrite nanoparticles by high energy planetary ball milling as a nanocatalyst for heterogeneous Fenton process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathinia, Siavash; Fathinia, Mehrangiz; Rahmani, Ali Akbar; Khataee, Alireza

    2015-02-01

    In the present study pyrite nanoparticles were prepared by high energy mechanical ball milling utilizing a planetary ball mill. Various pyrite samples were produced by changing the milling time from 2 h to 6 h, in the constant milling speed of 320 rpm. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) linked with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) were performed to explain the characteristics of primary (unmilled) and milled pyrite samples. The average particle size distribution of the produced pyrite during 6 h milling was found to be between 20 nm and 100 nm. The catalytic performance of the different pyrite samples was examined in the heterogeneous Fenton process for degradation of C.I. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) solution. Results showed that the decolorization efficiency of AO7 in the presence of 6 h-milled pyrite sample was the highest. The impact of key parameters on the degradation efficiency of AO7 by pyrite nanoparticles catalyzed Fenton process was modeled using central composite design (CCD). Accordingly, the maximum removal efficiency of 96.30% was achieved at initial AO7 concentration of 16 mg/L, H2O2 concentration of 5 mmol/L, catalyst amount of 0.5 g/L and reaction time of 25 min.

  12. Toward directed energy planetary defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; Bible, Johanna; Bublitz, Jesse; Arriola, Josh; Motta, Caio; Suen, Jon; Johansson, Isabella; Riley, Jordan; Sarvian, Nilou; Clayton-Warwick, Deborah; Wu, Jane; Milich, Andrew; Oleson, Mitch; Pryor, Mark; Krogen, Peter; Kangas, Miikka; O'Neill, Hugh

    2014-02-01

    Asteroids and comets that cross Earth's orbit pose a credible risk of impact, with potentially severe disturbances to Earth and society. We propose an orbital planetary defense system capable of heating the surface of potentially hazardous objects to the vaporization point as a feasible approach to impact risk mitigation. We call the system DE-STAR, for Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation. The DE-STAR is a modular-phased array of kilowatt class lasers powered by photovoltaic's. Modular design allows for incremental development, minimizing risk, and allowing for technological codevelopment. An orbiting structure would be developed in stages. The main objective of the DE-STAR is to use focused directed energy to raise the surface spot temperature to ˜3000 K, sufficient to vaporize all known substances. Ejection of evaporated material creates a large reaction force that would alter an asteroid's orbit. The baseline system is a DE-STAR 3 or 4 (1- to 10-km array) depending on the degree of protection desired. A DE-STAR 4 allows initial engagement beyond 1 AU with a spot temperature sufficient to completely evaporate up to 500-m diameter asteroids in 1 year. Small objects can be diverted with a DE-STAR 2 (100 m) while space debris is vaporized with a DE-STAR 1 (10 m).

  13. Planetary Atmospheres at High Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurwell, M.; Butler, B.; Moullet, A.

    2013-10-01

    The long millimeter through submillimeter bands are particularly well suited for studying the wide variety of planetary atmospheres in our solar system. Temperatures ranging from a few 10s to hundreds of degrees, coupled with typically high densities (relative to the ISM) mean that thermal ‘continuum’ emission can be strong and molecular rotational transitions can be well-populated. Large bodies (Jovian and terrestrial planets) can be reasonably well studied by current interferometers such as the Submillimeter Array, IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, yet many smaller bodies with atmospheres can only be crudely studied, primarily due to lack of sensitivity on baselines long enough to well resolve the object. Newly powerful interferometers such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array will usher in a new era of planetary atmospheric exploration. The vast sensitivity and spatial resolution of these arrays will increase our ability to image all bodies with extremely fine fidelity (due to the large number of antennas), and for study of smaller objects by resolving their disks into many pixels while providing the sensitivity necessary to detect narrow and/or weak line emission. New science topics will range from detailed mapping of HDO, ClO, and sulfur species in the mesosphere of Venus and PH3 and H2S in the upper tropospheres of the gas and ice giants, high SNR mapping of winds on Mars, Neptune and Titan, down to spectroscopic imaging of volcanic eruptions within the tenuous atmosphere on Io, resolved imaging of CO and other species in the atmosphere of Pluto, and even potentially detection of gases within the plumes of Enceladus.

  14. Directed energy missions for planetary defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; Eskenazi, Mike; Kosmo, Kelly; Johansson, Isabella E.; Griswold, Janelle; Pryor, Mark; O'Neill, Hugh; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Riley, Jordan; Zhang, Qicheng; Walsh, Kevin; Melis, Carl; Kangas, Miikka; Motta, Caio; Brashears, Travis

    2016-09-01

    Directed energy for planetary defense is now a viable option and is superior in many ways to other proposed technologies, being able to defend the Earth against all known threats. This paper presents basic ideas behind a directed energy planetary defense system that utilizes laser ablation of an asteroid to impart a deflecting force on the target. A conceptual philosophy called DE-STAR, which stands for Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploration, is an orbiting stand-off system, which has been described in other papers. This paper describes a smaller, stand-on system known as DE-STARLITE as a reduced-scale version of DE-STAR. Both share the same basic heritage of a directed energy array that heats the surface of the target to the point of high surface vapor pressure that causes significant mass ejection thus forming an ejection plume of material from the target that acts as a rocket to deflect the object. This is generally classified as laser ablation. DE-STARLITE uses conventional propellant for launch to LEO and then ion engines to propel the spacecraft from LEO to the near-Earth asteroid (NEA). During laser ablation, the asteroid itself provides the propellant source material; thus a very modest spacecraft can deflect an asteroid much larger than would be possible with a system of similar mission mass using ion beam deflection (IBD) or a gravity tractor. DE-STARLITE is capable of deflecting an Apophis-class (325 m diameter) asteroid with a 1- to 15-year targeting time (laser on time) depending on the system design. The mission fits within the rough mission parameters of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) program in terms of mass and size. DE-STARLITE also has much greater capability for planetary defense than current proposals and is readily scalable to match the threat. It can deflect all known threats with sufficient warning.

  15. Optimal reusable-tug and expendable-kickstage trajectories for high-energy planetary missions including correction for nodal precession

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsody, J.

    1976-01-01

    Equations are derived by using branched trajectory optimization techniques and the maximum principle to maximize the payload capability of a reusable tug/expendable kickstage vehicle configuration for planetary missions. The two stages and the payload are launched into a low earth orbit by a single space shuttle. The analysis includes correction for precession of the orbit. This correction is done by the tug. The tug propels the payload and the kickstage to an energy beyond earth escape and returns within a specified time to the precessed orbit. After separating from the tug, the kickstage accelerates the payload to the required injection conditions. Planetary injection conditions are specified by the mission energy and a fixed declination and right ascension of the outgoing asymptote. The multipoint boundary value problem resulting from the analysis is solved by a Newton-Raphson iteration technique. Partial derivatives of the boundary conditions are obtained by perturbing the initial conditions one at a time, integrating the trajectory and adjoint equations, and observing the changes in boundary conditions. Maximum payload capability is derived for two typical mission energies. In addition, the variations of several mission and stage parameters are also examined.

  16. Energy Balance Models and Planetary Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    We know that planetary dynamics can have a significant affect on the climate of planets. Planetary dynamics dominate the glacial-interglacial periods on Earth, leaving a significant imprint on the geological record. They have also been demonstrated to have a driving influence on the climates of other planets in our solar system. We should therefore expect th.ere to be similar relationships on extrasolar planets. Here we describe a simple energy balance model that can predict the growth and thickness of glaciers, and their feedbacks on climate. We will also describe model changes that we have made to include planetary dynamics effects. This is the model we will use at the start of our collaboration to handle the influence of dynamics on climate.

  17. Competing Influences of the Direct High Energy Solar Radiation and Mesospheric Planetary Wave (Quasi 16-Day Oscillation) Effects on the Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramkumar, T. K.; Gurubaran, S.; Rajaram, R.

    2001-05-01

    pronounced peak (burst like) near this periodicity. Again, in the third segment 19 June to 12 September, we found a well pronounced spectrum near 13.1-day period in both the wind and EEJS. However, near 19.5-day oscillation found in the EEJS is associated neither with the wind nor with X-ray flux data. Here, it may be associated with other important high energy solar emissions such as Lyman Alpha, EUV etc. One more interesting feature we found in the fourth segment 13 September to 6 December is that near 18.1 day periodicity found in the winds is not associated with the corresponding enhancements in the EEJS. Here, it may be suggested that before reaching above about 100 km, the wave might have damped heavily and hence not able to see the influence of it in the EEJS. Some times the time lag of several days, between the intense long period planetary wave activity in the EEJS and the MLT winds suggests an idea that the dynamo region is first influenced by the direct solar high energy emissions and it takes some days for the planetary waves to propagate to higher altitudes from the lower atmosphere to the EEJS region. The two strong sources of high energy emissions (x-rays, EUV etc.,) located almost 180° apart on the solar (longitude) surface may be the causal effect of the influence on the EEJS, since the average solar rotation period is 27 days.

  18. Formation of amino acids and nucleic acid constituents from simulated primitive planetary atmospheres by irradiation with high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Yamanashi, H.; Ohashi, A.; Kaneko, T.; Miyakawa, S.; Saito, T.

    It is suggested that primitive Earth atmosphere was only slightly reduced, which w as composed of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and water. It has been shown that bioorganic compounds can be hardly formed by energies as UV light, heat and spark discharges. We therefore examined possible formation pat hways of bioorganic compounds in the primitive E arth. A mixt ure of carbon monoxide, nitrogen and water was irradiated with high-energy prot ons generated by a van de Graaff accelerator, whi c h simulated an action of cosm ic rays. Aqueous solution of the product was hydr olyzed, and then analyzed by chromatography and mass spectrometry. A wide variety of amino acids and uracil, one of the nucle ic acid bases, wer e identified. Ribose, the RNA sugar, has not been identified, but formation of reducing polyols was suggested. A mino acids and uracil were also formed from a mixture of carbo n dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and water, and their yields correlated to the ratio of carbon monoxide and nitrogen in the mixture. Since a certain percentage of carbon monoxide could be expected to be in it [1], cosmic radiation can be regarded as an effective energ so urce for prebiotic formation of life's building blocks in they primitive Earth [2]. In the conventional scenario of chemical evolution, amino acids were formed in t he primitive ocean from such intermediates as HCN an d HCHO formed in t he atmosphere. T his scenario seem s not to be possible due to the following reasons: (1) The irradiation products were quit e complex organic com pound s whose molecular weights were ca. 1000, and they gave amino acids after hydrolysis. (2) Energy yields of amino ac ids in the hydrolysates were comparable to those of HCN and HCHO in the irradiation pro duct s. (3) Irradiation products from a mixture of carbon monoxide and nitrogen without water als o gave amino acids aft er hydrolysis. T hes e observations strongly sugge s t e d that complex precursors of bioor ganic com

  19. Orbital Stability of High Mass Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sarah J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2016-05-01

    In light of the observation of systems like HR 8799 that contain several planets with planet-star mass ratios larger than Jupiter's, we explore the relationships between planet separation, mass, and stability timescale for high mass multi-planet systems detectable via direct imaging. We discuss the role of overlap between 1st and sometimes 2nd order mean motion resonances, and show how trends in stability time vary from previous studies of lower mass multi-planet systems. We show that extrapolating empirically derived relationships between planet mass, separation, and stability timescale derived from lower mass planetary systems misestimate the stability timescales for higher mass planetary systems by more than an order of magnitude at separations near the Hill stability limit. We also address what metrics of planet separation are most useful for estimating a system's dynamical stability. We apply these results to young, gapped, debris disk systems of the ScoCen association in order to place limits on the maximum mass and number of planets that could persist for the lifetimes of the disks. These efforts will provide useful constraints for on-going direct imaging surveys. By setting upper limits on the most easily detectable systems, we can better interpret both new discoveries and non-dectections.

  20. High precision defocused observations of planetary transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baştürk, Ö.; Hinse, T. C.; Özavcı, İ.; Tezcan, C. T.; Şenavcı, H. V.; Burdanov, A.; Y&örükoǧlu, O.; Orhan, R.; Selam, S. O.

    2014-03-01

    It is only possible to measure physical properties of extrasolar planets, if they transit their host stars. One can determine the masses and the radii of this kind of objects, and hence, have constraints on their chemical composition, internal structure, formation and evolution. The availability of high quality light curves of planetary transits is essential in determining these properties within a few percent. In order to obtain high-quality transit light curves, we apply the well-established defocus technique on meter and sub-meter class telescopes in our project. This technique allows longer integration times, and hence collecting more photons to build up a higher S/N ratio. In this study, we present our first photometric results with the 1m Turkish telescope (T100) located at TÜBİTAK National Observatory (TUG) of Turkey, which proved to be a well suited instrument to these observations with its large field of view. %

  1. Why Energy is AN Economic Planetary Emergency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difiglio, Carmine

    2014-07-01

    This paper analyzes why high and volatile oil prices cause reduced world-wide economic growth. Disruptions in the petroleum market, due to unexpected economic growth or reduced petroleum supplies, have been shown to cause sharp increases in petroleum prices as a result of the inflexibilities of petroleum supply and demand. An examination of over 40 years of data reveals that oil price shocks are invariably followed by 2-3 years of weak economic growth and weak economic growth is almost always preceded by an oil price shock. While the statistical literature provides evidence that economies have become less vulnerable to a given oil price increase than they were during the 1970s, it also shows that the elasticity of demand for oil has significantly decreased. The increased resiliency of economies to higher oil prices has been partially or fully offset by the increased sensitivity of oil prices to any oil market perturbation. This paper also reviews the current state of oil-supply security noting that previous episodes of supply instability appear to have become chronic conditions. While new unconventional oil production technologies have revitalized North American oil production, it is concluded that these technologies will have only a modest effect on world-wide oil production. The marginal cost of oil production, whether from tight-oil plays, or other unconventional sources, is expected to increase contributing to rising longterm oil prices in an international oil market that will remain vulnerable to disruptions and sharp price increases. Recurring episodes of poor world-wide economic growth are shown to affect hundreds of millions of people though unemployment in the modern economy and, in developing countries, though slower emigration out of agricultural-sector poverty. It is also noted that world-wide greenhouse gas emissions require strong national policies. Clean-energy policies are more likely to be pursued by countries enjoying strong economic growth than

  2. Energy-limited escape revisited: A transition from strong planetary winds to stable thermospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salz, M.; Schneider, P. C.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-10-01

    Hot Jupiters are thought to suffer from mass loss through planetary winds powered by strong high-energy irradiation. These photoevaporative winds can affect planetary evolution. We carried out photoionization-hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets in the solar neighborhood using our new interface between the PLUTO and CLOUDY codes called TPCI. These detailed simulations reveal efficient radiative cooling in the atmospheres of massive and compact Jovian planets, whose gravitational potential surpasses the critical limit of log_{10}( -Φ_{G}) > 13.11 erg g^{-1}. In contrast to widely-made assumptions, our modeling shows that planets like HAT-P-2 b host stable thermospheres in radiative equilibrium, whereas smaller gas giants, indeed, show considerable mass-loss rates. Hence, the heating efficiency of the absorption of EUV radiation in the planetary thermospheres depends on the gravitational potential of the planet. We present a scaling law for the heating efficiencies that can be used in the well-known energy-limited escape formula and provides easily accessible mass-loss estimates for a wide range of irradiated planets from super-Earth type planets to the most massive hot Jupiters. The trend of the heating efficiency versus the gravitational potential is reflected in the planetary Lyα absorption and emission signals. These signals can be used to distinguish between two types of thermospheres in hot gas planets: strong, cool planetary winds with Lyα absorption and hot, stable thermospheres with Lyα emission.

  3. Elemental abundances in high-excitation planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marionni, P. A.; Harrington, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The IUE satellite was used to obtain low dispersion spectra of the high excitation planetary nebulae IC 351, IC 2003, NGC 2022, IC 2165, NGC 2440, Hu 1-2, and IC 5217. Numerical modeling was undertaken to determine the chemical composition of these objects with particular emphasis on obtaining elemental carbon and nitrogen abundances. Large variations in the C/N ratio from object to object are suggested.

  4. Summer Program in Planetary Science and Astronomy for Gifted and Talented High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. P.; Fetters, J.; West, K.; Frazee, P.

    2002-03-01

    The Summer Science and Mathematics Program (SS&MP) is an 8-week program in planetary science and astronomy for gifted and talented high school students. Students undertake research projects, which include current topics in planetary science.

  5. Study of highly integrated payload architectures for future planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Stefan; Moorhouse, Joseph; Mieremet, Arjan L.; Collon, Maximilien; Montella, Jarno; Beijersbergen, Marco; Harris, J.; van den Berg, Marcel L.; Atzei, Alessandro; Lyngvi, Aleksander; Renton, Daniel; Erd, Christian; Falkner, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Future planetary missions will require advanced, smart, low resource payloads and satellites to enable the exploration of our solar system in a more frequent, timely and multi-mission manner. A viable route towards low resource science instrumentation is the concept of Highly Integrated Payload Suites (HIPS), which was introduced during the re-assessment of the payload of the BepiColombo (BC) Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). Considerable mass and power savings were demonstrated throughout the instrumentation by improved definition of the instrument design, a higher level of integration, and identification of resource drivers. The higher integration and associated synergy effects permitted optimisation of the payload performance at minimum investment while still meeting the demanding science requirements. For the specific example of the BepiColombo MPO, the mass reduction by designing the instruments towards a Highly Integrated Payload Suite was found to be about 60%. This has endorsed the acceptance of a number of additional instruments as core payload of the BC MPO thereby enhancing the scientific return. This promising strategic approach and concept is now applied to a set of planetary mission studies for future exploration of the solar system. Innovative technologies, miniaturised electronics and advanced remote sensing technologies are the baseline for a generic approach to payload integration, which is here investigated also in the context of largely differing mission requirements. A review of the approach and the implications to the generic concept as found from the applications to the mission studies are presented.

  6. First-Principles Definition and Measurement of Planetary Electromagnetic-Energy Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Lock, James A.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Travis, Larry D.; Cairns, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The imperative to quantify the Earths electromagnetic-energy budget with an extremely high accuracy has been widely recognized but has never been formulated in the framework of fundamental physics. In this paper we give a first-principles definition of the planetary electromagnetic-energy budget using the Poynting- vector formalism and discuss how it can, in principle, be measured. Our derivation is based on an absolute minimum of theoretical assumptions, is free of outdated notions of phenomenological radiometry, and naturally leads to the conceptual formulation of an instrument called the double hemispherical cavity radiometer (DHCR). The practical measurement of the planetary energy budget would require flying a constellation of several dozen planet-orbiting satellites hosting identical well-calibrated DHCRs.

  7. First-principles definition and measurement of planetary electromagnetic-energy budget.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Michael I; Lock, James A; Lacis, Andrew A; Travis, Larry D; Cairns, Brian

    2016-06-01

    The imperative to quantify the Earth's electromagnetic-energy budget with an extremely high accuracy has been widely recognized but has never been formulated in the framework of fundamental physics. In this paper we give a first-principles definition of the planetary electromagnetic-energy budget using the Poynting-vector formalism and discuss how it can, in principle, be measured. Our derivation is based on an absolute minimum of theoretical assumptions, is free of outdated notions of phenomenological radiometry, and naturally leads to the conceptual formulation of an instrument called the double hemispherical cavity radiometer (DHCR). The practical measurement of the planetary energy budget would require flying a constellation of several dozen planet-orbiting satellites hosting identical well-calibrated DHCRs. PMID:27409440

  8. Energy Budget: Earth's Most Important and Least Appreciated Planetary Attribute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Lin; Bethea, Katie

    2013-01-01

    The energy budget involves more than one kind of energy. People can sense this energy in different ways, depending on what type of energy it is. We see visible light using our eyes. We feel infrared energy using our skin (such as around a campfire). We know some species of animals can see ultraviolet light and portions of the infrared spectrum. NASA satellites use instruments that can "see" different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum to observe various processes in the Earth system, including the energy budget. The Sun is a very hot ball of plasma emitting large amounts of energy. By the time it reaches Earth, this energy amounts to about 340 Watts for every square meter of Earth on average. That's almost 6 60-Watt light bulbs for every square meter of Earth! With all of that energy shining down on the Earth, how does our planet maintain a comfortable balance that allows a complex ecosystem, including humans, to thrive? The key thing to remember is the Sun - hot though it is - is a tiny part of Earth's environment. Earth's energy budget is a critical but little understood aspect of our planetary home. NASA is actively studying this important Earth system feature, and sharing data and knowledge about it with the education community.

  9. Feb 2008 - Feb 2009 Progress Report and Final Report for NA26215: Experimental Studies of High-Energy Processing of Proto-Planetary and Planetary Materials in the Early Solar System

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2009-05-28

    The results of this project are the first experimental data on the behavior of metal-silicate mixtures under very high pressures and temperatures comparable to those of the putative Moon-forming impact experienced by Earth in its early history. Probably the most important outcome of this project was the discovery that metal-silicate interaction and equilibration during highly energetic transient events like impacts may be extremely fast and effective on relatively large scale that was not appreciated before. During the course of this project we have developed a technique for trapping supercritical melts produced in our experiments that allows studying chemical phenomena taking place on a nanosecond timescales. Our results shed new light on the processes and conditions existed in the early Earth history, a subject of perennial interest of the humankind. The results of this project also provide important experimental constraints essential for development of the strategy and technology to mitigate imminent asteroid hazard.

  10. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  11. DE-STARLITE: A directed energy planetary defense mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmo, Kelly; Pryor, Mark; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; O'Neill, Hugh; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Riley, Jordan; Griswold, Janelle; Cook, Brianna V.; Johansson, Isabella E.; Zhang, Qicheng; Walsh, Kevin; Melis, Carl; Kangas, Miikka; Bible, Johanna; Motta, Caio; Brashears, Travis; Mathew, Shana; Bollag, Justin

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the motivation behind and design of a directed energy planetary defense system that utilizes laser ablation of an asteroid to impart a deflecting force on the target. The proposed system is called DE-STARLITE for Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and ExploRation - LITE as it is a small, stand-on unit of a larger standoff DE-STAR system. Pursuant to the stand-on design, ion engines will propel the spacecraft from low-Earth orbit (LEO) to the near-Earth asteroid (NEA). During laser ablation, the asteroid itself becomes the "propellant"; thus a very modest spacecraft can deflect an asteroid much larger than would be possible with a system of similar mission mass using ion beam deflection (IBD) or a gravity tractor. DE-STARLITE is capable of deflecting an Apophis-class (325 m diameter) asteroid with a 15-year targeting time. The mission fits within the rough mission parameters of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) program in terms of mass and size and has much greater capability for planetary defense than current proposals and is readily scalable to the threat. It can deflect all known threats with sufficient warning.

  12. The remarkably high excitation planetary nebula GC 6537.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Hung, S; Feibelman, W A

    1999-05-11

    NGC 6537 is an unusually high excitation point symmetric planetary nebula with a rich spectrum. Its kinematical structures are of special interest. We are here primarily concerned with the high resolution spectrum as revealed by the Hamilton echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory (resolution approximately 0.2 A) and supplemented by UV and near-UV data. These extensive data permit a determination of interstellar extinction, plasma diagnostics, and ionic concentrations. The photoionization models that have been used successfully for many planetary nebulae are not entirely satisfactory here. The plasma electron temperature of a photoionization model cannot much exceed 20,000 K, but plasma diagnostics show that regions emitting radiation of highly ionized atoms such as [NeIV] and [NeV] are much hotter, showing that shock excitation must be important, as suggested by the remarkable kinematics of this object. Hence, instead of employing a strict photoionization model, we are guided by the nebular diagnostics, which reveal how electron temperature varies with ionization potential and accommodates density effects. The predictions of the photoionization model may be useful in estimating ionization correction factor. In effect, we have estimated the chemical composition by using both photoionization and shock considerations. PMID:10318889

  13. Far-UV Spectroscopy of the Planet-hosting Star WASP-13: High-energy Irradiance, Distance, Age, Planetary Mass-loss Rate, and Circumstellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; France, K.; Koskinen, T.; Juvan, I. G.; Haswell, C. A.; Lendl, M.

    2015-12-01

    Several transiting hot Jupiters orbit relatively inactive main-sequence stars. For some of those, the {log}{R}{HK}\\prime activity parameter lies below the basal level (-5.1). Two explanations have been proposed so far: (i) the planet affects the stellar dynamo, (ii) the {log}{R}{HK}\\prime measurements are biased by extrinsic absorption, either by the interstellar medium (ISM) or by material local to the system. We present here Hubble Space Telescope/COS far-UV spectra of WASP-13, which hosts an inflated hot Jupiter and has a measured {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value (-5.26), well below the basal level. From the star's spectral energy distribution we obtain an extinction E(B - V) = 0.045 ± 0.025 mag and a distance d = 232 ± 8 pc. We detect at ≳4σ lines belonging to three different ionization states of carbon (C i, C ii, and C iv) and the Si iv doublet at ˜3σ. Using far-UV spectra of nearby early G-type stars of known age, we derive a C iv/C i flux ratio-age relation, from which we estimate WASP-13's age to be 5.1 ± 2.0 Gyr. We rescale the solar irradiance reference spectrum to match the flux of the C iv 1548 doublet. By integrating the rescaled solar spectrum, we obtain an XUV flux at 1 AU of 5.4 erg s-1 cm-2. We use a detailed model of the planet's upper atmosphere, deriving a mass-loss rate of 1.5 × 1011 g s-1. Despite the low {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value, the star shows a far-UV spectrum typical of middle-aged solar-type stars, pointing toward the presence of significant extrinsic absorption. The analysis of a high-resolution spectrum of the Ca ii H&K lines indicates that the ISM absorption could be the origin of the low {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value. Nevertheless, the large uncertainty in the Ca ii ISM abundance does not allow us to firmly exclude the presence of circumstellar gas. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from MAST at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for

  14. Constraining Planetary Migration Mechanisms with Highly Eccentric Hot Jupiter Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Johnson, J. A.; Murray-Clay, R.; Morton, T.; Crepp, J. R.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Howard, A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Hot Jupiters --- Jupiter-mass planets orbiting within 0.1 AU of their host stars --- are unlikely to have formed in situ and thus serve as evidence for the prevalence of planetary migration. However, it is debated whether the typical hot Jupiter migrated smoothly inward through the protoplanetary disk or was perturbed onto an eccentric orbit, which tidal dissipation subsequently shrank and circularized during close passages to the star. In the latter class of model, the perturber may be a stellar or planetary companion, which causes the Jupiter to undergo a temporary epoch with high eccentricity (e> 0.9). Socrates and et al. (2012) predicted that these super-eccentric hot Jupiter progenitors should be readily discoverable through the transit method by the Kepler Mission. However, eccentricities of individual transiting planets primarily come from Doppler measurements, which are unfortunately precluded by the faintness of most Kepler targets. To solve this problem, we developed a Bayesian method (the “photoeccentric effect”) for measuring an individual planet's eccentricity solely from its Kepler light curve, allowing for a tight measurement of large eccentricities. We applied this new approach to the Kepler giant planet candidates and identified KOI-1474.01 as an eccentric planet (e = 0.81+0.10/-0.07) with an average orbital period of 69.7340 days, varying by approximately 1 hour due to perturbations by a massive outer companion, which is possibly the culprit responsible for KOI-1474.01’s highly eccentric orbit. KOI-1474.01 is likely a failed hot Jupiter, too far from its host star to be tidally transformed into a hot Jupiter. We found a significant lack of super-eccentric proto-hot Jupiters compared to the number expected, allowing us to place a strong upper limit on the fraction of hot Jupiters created by stellar binaries. Our results are consistent with disks or planetary companions being the primary channel for hot Jupiter creation. Supported by

  15. A high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer for planetary spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Sinton, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The employment of a high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) is described for planetary and other astronomical spectroscopy in conjunction with the 88-inch telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. The FTS system is designed for a broad range of uses, including double-beam laboratory spectroscopy, infrared gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The data system is well-suited to astronomical applications because of its great speed in acquiring and transforming data, and because of the enormous storage capability of the magnetic tape unit supplied with the system. The basic instrument is outlined 2nd some of the initial results from the first attempted use on the Mauna Kea 88-inch telescope are reported.

  16. Impact of Planetary Gravitation on High Precision Neutral Atom Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharek, H.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Moebius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bzowski, M.; Schwadron, N.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on physical processes inside and outside our heliosphere. For instance, recent IBEX observations provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction this can result in a significant deflection and acceleration. In this presentation we study the impact of the gravitational effects of the Earth, Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth orbit. We show that planetary gravitational effects do not significantly affect the interstellar neutral gas parameters obtained from IBEX observations. We further study the possibility whether the He focusing cone of the Sun or Jupiter could be measured by IBEX, and whether these cones could be used as an independent measure of the interstellar He temperature. These topics are of particular importance for future missions such as IMAP, which will provide ENA images for a broader energy range and with better sensitivity and resolution.

  17. High resolution coherence analysis between planetary and climate oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the existence of a multi-frequency spectral coherence between planetary and global surface temperature oscillations by using advanced techniques of coherence analysis and statistical significance tests. The performance of the standard Matlab mscohere algorithms is compared versus high resolution coherence analysis methodologies such as the canonical correlation analysis. The Matlab mscohere function highlights large coherence peaks at 20 and 60-year periods although, due to the shortness of the global surface temperature record (1850-2014), the statistical significance of the result depends on the specific window function adopted for pre-processing the data. In fact, window functions disrupt the low frequency component of the spectrum. On the contrary, using the canonical correlation analysis at least five coherent frequencies at the 95% significance level are found at the following periods: 6.6, 7.4, 14, 20 and 60 years. Thus, high resolution coherence analysis confirms that the climate system can be partially modulated by astronomical forces of gravitational, electromagnetic and solar origin. A possible chain of the physical causes explaining this coherence is briefly discussed.

  18. In Situ Magnetohydrodynamic Energy Generation for Planetary Entry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H. K.; Braun, R. D.

    2014-06-01

    This work aims to study the suitability of multi-pass entry trajectories for harnessing of vehicle kinetic energy through magnetohydrodynamic power generation from the high temperature entry plasma. Potential mission configurations are analyzed.

  19. Planetary engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, James B.; Sagan, Carl

    Assuming commercial fusion power, heavy lift vehicles and major advances in genetic engineering, the authors survey possible late-21st century methods of working major transformations in planetary environments. Much more Earthlike climates may be produced on Mars by generating low freezing point greenhouse gases from indigenous materials; on Venus by biological conversion of CO2 to graphite, by canceling the greenhouse effect with high-altitude absorbing fine particles, or by a sunshield at the first Lagrangian point; and on Titan by greenhouses and/or fusion warming. However, in our present state of ignorance we cannot guarantee a stable endstate or exclude unanticipated climatic feedbacks or other unintended consequences. Moreover, as the authors illustrate by several examples, many conceivable modes of planetary engineering are so wasteful of scarce solar system resources and so destructive of important scientific information as to raise profound ethical issues, even if they were economically feasible, which they are not. Global warming on Earth may lead to calls for mitigation by planetary engineering, e.g., emplacement and replenishment of anti-greenhouse layers at high altitudes, or sunshields in space. But here especially we must be concerned about precision, stability, and inadvertent side-effects. The safest and most cost-effective means of countering global warming - beyond, e.g., improved energy efficiency, CFC bans and alternative energy sources - is the continuing reforestation of approximately 2 times 107 sq km of the Earth's surface. This can be accomplished with present technology and probably at the least cost.

  20. Planetary engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Sagan, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Assuming commercial fusion power, heavy lift vehicles and major advances in genetic engineering, the authors survey possible late-21st century methods of working major transformations in planetary environments. Much more Earthlike climates may be produced on Mars by generating low freezing point greenhouse gases from indigenous materials; on Venus by biological conversion of CO2 to graphite, by canceling the greenhouse effect with high-altitude absorbing fine particles, or by a sunshield at the first Lagrangian point; and on Titan by greenhouses and/or fusion warming. However, in our present state of ignorance we cannot guarantee a stable endstate or exclude unanticipated climatic feedbacks or other unintended consequences. Moreover, as the authors illustrate by several examples, many conceivable modes of planetary engineering are so wasteful of scarce solar system resources and so destructive of important scientific information as to raise profound ethical issues, even if they were economically feasible, which they are not. Global warming on Earth may lead to calls for mitigation by planetary engineering, e.g., emplacement and replenishment of anti-greenhouse layers at high altitudes, or sunshields in space. But here especially we must be concerned about precision, stability, and inadvertent side-effects. The safest and most cost-effective means of countering global warming - beyond, e.g., improved energy efficiency, CFC bans and alternative energy sources - is the continuing reforestation of approximately 2 times 107 sq km of the Earth's surface. This can be accomplished with present technology and probably at the least cost.

  1. High efficiency, 100 mJ per pulse, Nd:YAG oscillator optimized for space-based earth and planetary remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry Coyle, D.; Stysley, Paul R.; Poulios, Demetrios; Fredrickson, Robert M.; Kay, Richard B.; Cory, Kenneth C.

    2014-11-01

    We report on a newly solid state laser transmitter, designed and packaged for Earth and planetary space-based remote sensing applications for high efficiency, low part count, high pulse energy scalability/stability, and long life. Finally, we have completed a long term operational test which surpassed 2 Billion pulses with no measured decay in pulse energy.

  2. Properties of planetary fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellis, W. J.; Holmes, N. C.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    Observational data obtained by the Voyager space probes to the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have provided valuable information, which is used to refine the picture of the nature of the interiors of these planets. Major results from the Voyager missions include observations of substantial magnetic fields and improved models of internal density distributions. The goal is to obtain equations of state and electrical conductivity data for planetary gases (H2 and He) and the ices (H2O, CH4, and NH3, and their mixtures), which are considered to be the major constituents of the giant planets. These data are needed to test theoretical data bases used to construct models of the chemical composition of planetary interiors, models which are consistent with observables such as mass, diameter, gravitational moments, rotation rate, and magnetic field. The 100 GPa (1 Mbar) pressures and several 1000 K temperatures in the giant planets can be achieved in the lab by the shock compression of liquid specimens. Results are briefly examined.

  3. Test Before You Fly - High Fidelity Planetary Environment Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Paul; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd; Nehls, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The lunar surface environment will present many challenges to the survivability of systems developed for long duration lunar habitation and exploration of the lunar, or any other planetary, surface. Obstacles will include issues pertaining especially to the radiation environment (solar plasma and electromagnetic radiation) and lunar regolith dust. The Planetary Environments Chamber is one piece of the MSFC capability in Space Environmental Effects Test and Analysis. Comprised of many unique test systems, MSFC has the most complete set of SEE test capabilities in one location allowing examination of combined space environmental effects without transporting already degraded, potentially fragile samples over long distances between tests. With this system, the individual and combined effects of the lunar radiation and regolith environment on materials, sub-systems, and small systems developed for the lunar return can be investigated. This combined environments facility represents a unique capability to NASA, in which tests can be tailored to any one aspect of the lunar environment (radiation, temperature, vacuum, regolith) or to several of them combined in a single test.

  4. High-Performance Micro-Rover for Planetary Surface Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Chen, X.

    2009-04-01

    Planetary robotic missions rely on rovers to produce surface mobility for multiple sites sampling and exploration. For example, the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) have been extremely successful in the exploring a wide area of the Martian surface in the past four years. Each of the MER has the size of a golf car and weights ~170 kg. They both result in a massive launch of nearly 1100 kg. Small rovers (5-30 kg) can help to provide moderate surface traverse and greatly reduce cost of the mission, e.g. the Sojourner rover of the Mars Pathfinder mission. There is a growing interest in the micro-rover design and how to maximize performance of a miniaturized system. For example, the rover traversability and locomotion capability will be compromised if the objective is to reduce the size of the vehicle. Undoubtedly, this affects the rover performance in terms of mobility and usefulness to the mission. We propose to overcome this problem by investigating a new generation of rover chassis design to maximize its terrian capability. This paper presents a chassis concept suited for a micro-rover system and negotiating with different planetary terrains such as the Moon and Mars. The proposed tracked-wheel is motivated by bringing together advantages of wheels and tracks, in the same time keeping the design simple and easy to implement. The chassis is built based on four tracked-wheels and offers 10 DOF for the vehicle. Analysis based on Bekker theories suggests this design can generate larger tractive effort (drawbar pull) compared to the wheeled design for the same rover dimensions. As a result, a more effective and efficent chassis can be achieved and leave a large design margin for the science payload.

  5. Upcoming planetary missions and the applicability of high temperature superconductor bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Kunde, V.; Moseley, H.; Lakew, B.

    1990-01-01

    Past and present planetary exploration is briefly reviewed, and the planned 1996 Cassini mission to Saturn and Titan is examined. The CIRS experiment aboard Cassini, which will retrieve information on the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn, is discussed. Ongoing efforts to build a high-sensitivity, high-Tc bolometer that would greatly improve detection in Titan's atmosphere are addressed.

  6. Current Status of a NASA High-Altitude Balloon-Based Observatory for Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varga, Denise M.; Dischner, Zach

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that progress can be made on over 20% of the key questions called out in the current Planetary Science Decadal Survey by a high-altitude balloon-borne observatory. Therefore, NASA has been assessing concepts for a gondola-based observatory that would achieve the greatest possible science return in a low-risk and cost-effective manner. This paper addresses results from the 2014 Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science (BOPPS) mission, namely successes in the design and performance of the Fine Pointing System. The paper also addresses technical challenges facing the new Gondola for High Altitude Planetary Science (GHAPS) reusable platform, including thermal control for the Optical Telescope Assembly, power generation and management, and weight-saving considerations that the team will be assessing in 2015 and beyond.

  7. Energy-limited escape revised. The transition from strong planetary winds to stable thermospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salz, M.; Schneider, P. C.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than log 10(-ΦG)< 13.11 erg g-1 because in these planets the radiative energy input is efficiently used to drive the planetary wind. Massive and compact planets with log 10(-ΦG) ≳ 13.6 erg g-1 exhibit more tightly bound atmospheres in which the complete radiative energy input is re-emitted through hydrogen Lyα and free-free emission. These planets therefore host hydrodynamically stable thermospheres. Between these two extremes the strength of the planetary winds rapidly declines as a result of a decreasing heating efficiency. Small planets undergo enhanced evaporation because they host expanded atmospheres that expose a larger surface to the stellar irradiation. We present scaling laws for the heating efficiency and the expansion radius that depend on the gravitational potential and irradiation level of the planet. The resulting revised energy-limited escape concept can be used to derive estimates for the mass-loss rates of super-Earth-sized planets as well as massive hot Jupiters with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres.

  8. Analysis of high-altitude planetary ion velocity space distributions detected by the Ion Mass Analyzer aboard Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fraenz, M.; Curry, S.; Mitchell, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    We present observations of planetary ion velocity space distributions from the Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA) onboard Mars Express (MEX). The magnetometer data from Mars Global Surveyor is used to obtain a rough estimate of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Characteristic features of the velocity space distributions will be examined and discussed for orbits aligned with the convective electric field and those in the Mars terminator plane. This study will focus on the high (keV) energy ions, as well as the relative importance of a high-altitude magnetosheath source of escaping planetary ions. Furthermore, this paper will examine various methods for converting the IMA detector counts to species-specific fluxes. After mimicking the methods previously used by researchers, we apply each of these methods of species extraction to data collected during the same time intervals. We discuss the implications for planetary ion motion around Mars, using the details of the velocity space observations to better understand the solar wind interaction with Mars. Comparisons to virtual detections using a test particle simulation will also provide insight into ion origins and trajectories.

  9. A PLANETARY LENSING FEATURE IN CAUSTIC-CROSSING HIGH-MAGNIFICATION MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Hwang, Kyu-Ha; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Lee, Chung-Uk E-mail: kyuha@kasi.re.kr E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2012-05-20

    Current microlensing follow-up observations focus on high-magnification events because of the high efficiency of planet detection. However, central perturbations of high-magnification events caused by a planet can also be produced by a very close or a very wide binary companion, and the two kinds of central perturbations are not generally distinguished without time consuming detailed modeling (a planet-binary degeneracy). Hence, it is important to resolve the planet-binary degeneracy that occurs in high-magnification events. In this paper, we investigate caustic-crossing high-magnification events caused by a planet and a wide binary companion. From this investigation, we find that because of the different magnification excess patterns inside the central caustics induced by the planet and the binary companion, the light curves of the caustic-crossing planetary-lensing events exhibit a feature that is discriminated from those of the caustic-crossing binary-lensing events, and the feature can be used to immediately distinguish between the planetary and binary companions. The planetary-lensing feature appears in the interpeak region between the two peaks of the caustic-crossings. The structure of the interpeak region for the planetary-lensing events is smooth and convex or boxy, whereas the structure for the binary-lensing events is smooth and concave. We also investigate the effect of a finite background source star on the planetary-lensing feature in the caustic-crossing high-magnification events. From this, we find that the convex-shaped interpeak structure appears in a certain range that changes with the mass ratio of the planet to the planet-hosting star.

  10. Space and man. [planetary exploration and energy sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolman, E.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of man's entry into space on changes in economics and technology, politics and law, science, philosophy, and art are considered. A single world economy, extracting from the natural resources of the moon and other cosmic bodies raw materials and energy, will avoid terrestrial limitations and improve society by eliminating the inequalities of economic and social status. However, a spacecraft for interplanetary travel require thermonuclear engines that achieve an escape velocity of 0.1 times the speed of light in order to allow an astronaut stellar expedition corresponding to the active life of a single generation.

  11. A Weak, Positive Feedback Between Sea Level and the Earth's Planetary Energy Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzeion, B.; Levermann, A.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in global mean temperature lead to increasing sea level mostly by loss of land ice mass and thermal expansion of the ocean. On millennial timescales, a warming of 5 K leads to flooding of about 1.6 % of Earth's current land surface, when taking into account the spatial distribution of relative sea-level rise caused by mass redistribution and isostatic rebound (Marzeion & Levermann, 2014). While there is great seasonal and spatial variability, the planetary albedo over the ocean is generally slightly lower than over land. We use millennial-scale, spatially explicit projections of relative sea-level rise, and the observed spatio-temporal distribution of planetary albedo and incident shortwave radiation, to determine the strength of the feedback between sea-level rise and the planetary energy budget. We find that the feedback is positive, but very weak. While the spatial pattern of sea-level rise is varying strongly with temperature, we find that the strength of the feedback is relatively independent of the temperature change, and around 0.8±0.1 %; i.e., an external forcing of 1 W/m2 will result in 1.008 W/m2 change of the energy balance.

  12. Is Planetary-Scale High Tech Civilization Climatically Sustainable?: The Geophysics v Economics Paradigm War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffert, M.

    2012-12-01

    Climate/energy policy is gridlocked between (1) a geophysics perspective revealing long-term instabilities from continued energy consumption growth, of which the fossil fuel greenhouse an early symptom; and (2) short-term, fossil-fuel energized-rapid-economic-growth-driven policies likely adaptive for hunter-gatherers competing for scarce food, but climatically fatal to planetary-scale economies dependent on agriculture and "energy slaves." Incorporating social science into climate/energy policy formulation has focused on integrated assessment models (IAMs) exploring scenarios (parallel universes making different social choices) depicting the evolution of GDP, energy consumed, the energy technology mixture, land use, greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions, and radiative forcing). Representative concentration pathways (RCP) scenarios developed for the IPCC AR5 report imply 5-10 degree C warming from fossil fuel burning unless unprecedentedly fast decarbonization rates ~ 7 %/yr are implemented from 2020 to 2100. A massive transition to carbon neutrality by midcentury is needed to keep warming < 2 degrees C (FIG. 1).Fossil fuel greenhouse warming is leveraged by two orders of magnitude relative to heating from human energy consumption. Even if civilization successfully transitions to carbon-neutrality in time, but energy use continues growing at 2%/year, fossil-fuel-greenhouse level warming would be generated by heat rejecting in only 200-300 years underscoring that sustainability implies a steady state planetary economy (FIG.2). Evolutionary psychology and neuroeconomics are emergent disciplines that may illuminate the physical v social science paradigm conflict threatening human survivability.

  13. Planetary dynamo energies for paleomagnetic intensity, scaling, inversions and asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, S. V.

    2014-04-01

    I derive, simplify and analyze integral evolutional laws of the kinetic, magnetic, and an original orientation energies in the liquid core of the Earth or another Earth's type planet. These integral laws are reduced to the rude but simplest system of three ordinary differential equations for cross-helicity Z, root-mean square averaged magnetic field Y and velocity X. This system is controlled by the relatively well-known convection power W and other parameters. Estimates are obtained for the characteristic velocities, magnetic fields, periods and scales depending on the convection power at the stable states and near the inversion/excursion where the above system has its stationary (market by s) points. It was shown that for the implementation of this short-time inversion/excursion the convection power should achieve some rare value, while a normal deviation from this value results in longer-time stable period. Here the inversion is a global process when the volume integral of the scalar product of convective velocity on the magnetic field changes sign. So, the inversions and asymmetries are due to two types of stable states. Named as "lined" is a state with the magnetic field predominantly directed along velocity, while "contra lined" state is with their opposite direction. The lined state is characterized by smaller convection power and magnetic field in contrast to the contra lined state. The duration of the lined state is likely smaller than the duration of opposite state when the geodynamo power gradually increases with time, while for decreasing power it is vice versa. Basing on the obtained results I estimate how diffusion can determine the average period between geomagnetic reversals due to turbulent, thermal, electromagnetic and critical viscositycompositional processes. Predominant in this process, in many cases, can be identified from the dependence of the reversal frequency on the magnetic field intensity from paleomagnetic data. The data available to me

  14. Edge technique lidar for high accuracy, high spatial resolution wind measurement in the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Gentry, Bruce M.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the Army Research Office (ARO) Geosciences Program is to measure the three dimensional wind field in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a measurement volume with a 50 meter spatial resolution and with measurement accuracies of the order of 20 cm/sec. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a high vertical resolution lidar experiment using the edge technique for high accuracy measurement of the atmospheric wind field to meet the ARO requirements. This experiment allows the powerful capabilities of the edge technique to be quantitatively evaluated. In the edge technique, a laser is located on the steep slope of a high resolution spectral filter. This produces large changes in measured signal for small Doppler shifts. A differential frequency technique renders the Doppler shift measurement insensitive to both laser and filter frequency jitter and drift. The measurement is also relatively insensitive to the laser spectral width for widths less than the width of the edge filter. Thus, the goal is to develop a system which will yield a substantial improvement in the state of the art of wind profile measurement in terms of both vertical resolution and accuracy and which will provide a unique capability for atmospheric wind studies.

  15. First-principles calculations of the high-pressure melt line of SiO2 and strength of H2O: planetary science implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Amit; Hamel, Sebastien; Qi, Tingting

    2015-06-01

    We report the results from high-pressure high-temperature quantum molecular dynamics simulations of two materials of importance to planetary science. First, the high-pressure melt line of SiO2 using constrained free energy calculations under condition relevant to the Outer Planets. Second, we explore the stability of the H2O super-ionic phase by calculating the elastic constants at finite temperature and provides insight into the generation of magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune.

  16. The high-pressure dimension in earth and planetary science

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2008-06-17

    The bulk of our planet is hidden from view, within the earth, under high pressures and temperatures. The behavior of this material dictates the formation, evolution, and present state of the solid earth. Recent geophysical and geochemical studies of the planet present us with a rich array of large-scale processes and phenomena that are not fully understood. These range from the fate of deeply subducted slabs and the origin of plumes, to the nature of the core-mantle boundary; the differentiation of materials to form the present-day crust, mantle, and core; the distribution of trace elements; and the uptake and recycling of volatiles throughout earth's history. Addressing these questions experimentally has a long history, but it is only recently that the entire range of pressures that prevail within the earth could be produced in the laboratory and the materials probed with the necessary tools. Experiments have demonstrated that, under these extreme conditions, the physical and chemical behavior of materials can be profoundly altered, causing new and unforeseen reactions and giving rise to structural, elastic, electronic, and magnetic transitions not observed in rocks and minerals in the near-surface environment. Resolving new issues that have arisen requires an integrated approach involving subfields that include seismology, geochemistry, petrology, and geodynamics, as well as theoretical and experimental high-pressure mineral sciences. The collection of feature articles that follows, which were presented at a recent symposium, highlights an array of new developments in high-pressure geoscience. In ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks, solid and fluid inclusions in phenocrysts contain rich information on deep-mantle processes. The structure, texture, strain, chemistry, and exsolution of these micrometer- to nanometer-sized inclusions indicate the formation environment of these rocks and contain rich information about the relevant physical and chemical processes

  17. Expanding the Planetary Analog Test Sites in Hawaii - Planetary Basalt Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) is one of the very few planetary surface research test sites in the country that is totally funded by the state legislature. In recent expansions, PISCES is broadening its work in planetary test sites to include much more R&D work in the planetary surface systems, and the manipulation of basalt materials. This is to include laser 3D printing of basalt, 'lunar-concrete' construction in state projects for Hawaii, renewable energy, and adding lava tubes/skylights to their mix of high-quality planetary analog test sites. PISCES Executive Director, Rob Kelso, will be providing program updates on the interest of the Hawaii State Legislature in planetary surface systems, new applied research initiatives in planetary basalts and interests in planetary construction.

  18. Collisions Between Small Bodies In A Planetary System: Disruption Regime At High Impact Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Benz, W.; Tanga, P.; Richardson, D. C.

    Collisions play a major role in the formation of planetary systems, since planetary growth occurs by collisional accretion of small bodies at low relative velocities. How- ever, once the masses of planetesimals are high enough, their relative velocities in- crease due to their mutual perturbations and eventually, collisions occur at high impact speed. In this regime, the planetary growth is prevented and a disruptive phase begins, like in the current asteroid belt of our Solar System, and probably in other systems. Here, we present new simulations of high speed collisions between small bodies which take into account the production of gravitationally reaccumulated bodies. We have de- velopped a procedure which divides the process into two phases. Using a 3D SPH hydrocode, the fragmentation of the solid target through crack propagation is first computed. Then the simulation of the gravitational evolution and possible reaccumu- lation of the resulting new fragments is performed using the parallel N-body code pkdgrav. Our first simulations succeeded in reproducing fundamental properties of some well-identified asteroid families, showing the reliability of our method. We have now made some improvements by including the possibility of fragments bouncing (in- stead of strictly merging) when collisions occur at high speed during the gravitational phase. We present thus new simulations in three different impact regimes, from highly catastrophic to barely disruptive, and compare them with previous ones in which col- lisions between fragments resulted always in their merger. This comparison shows for each regime that the fundamental outcome properties remain statistically unchanged. We also observe the natural production of satellite systems around some fragments. We plan to continue our investigations using this procedure, and to improve upon the modelling of fundamental physical effects during collisions. We will then also inves- tigate the efficiency of planetary accretion

  19. Planetary Defense and the High Temperture Physical Properties of Meteorites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, D. R.; Sears, D. W. G.; Bryson, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Ames Meteorite Characterization Laboratory is examining the physical proprerties of a diverse selection of meteorites. Each meteorite will be processed by the full suite of observations and measurements: petrographic/microscopic studies, density, porosity, albedo, shock effects, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, emissivity, and acoustic velocity. Of these measurments, density and porosity are the most studied to date (Macke, 2010; Britt and Consolmagno, 2003). The thermal properties of meteorites are less well understood. Thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and thermal emissivity are important data for a number of applications but especially to understanding the behavior of a meteor as it passes through the atmosphere. Opeil et al. (2010) have shown that meteorites have a thermal conductivities lower than the pure minerals they are composed of by a factor of 3 to 10, with the values coming to a roughly constant number from 150 to 300 K. Calculated conductivity numbers from Yomogida and Matsui (1983) show the H chondrites have the higest conductivity in the range of 3.8 W/m*K at 200 K and then slowly decreases to 3.2 W/m*K at 400 K. Whereas they show the LL chondrites do not reach 1 W/m*K over the temperature range 100 to 400 K. While there have been several high temperature spectroscopic studies of meteorites, to date all experimental data for the physical properties of meteorites were obtained at temperatures below 400 K, since previous studies were made in attempts to understand the formation and evolution of asteroids. Our laboratory will focus on understanding the thermal properties of materials at temperatures above 300 K and, where possible, up to atmospheric entry temperatures. Work on pure minerals has shown that thermal conductivity decreases as temperatures exceed 300 K but it is unknown whether this holds true for meteorites. We will describe our laboratory and procedures, and present some preliminary data, at the meeting.

  20. The Complex Environment of the High Excitation Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Meaburn, J.; Lopez, J.

    1999-01-01

    Spatially resolved profiles of the H (alpha), [N II] 6584 A and [O III] 5007 A nebular emission lines, obtained with the Manchester echelle spectrometer combined with the 2.1 m San Pedro Martir telescope have revealed the velocity structure of the nebular core and of one of the three (A,B and C) inner haloes of the high excitation planetary nebula NGC 3242.

  1. View planetary differentiation process through high-resolution 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Core-mantle separation is one of the most important processes in planetary evolution, defining the structure and chemical distribution in the planets. Iron-dominated core materials could migrate through silicate mantle to the core by efficient liquid-liquid separation and/or by percolation of liquid metal through solid silicate matrix. We can experimentally simulate these processes to examine the efficiency and time of core formation and its geochemical signatures. The quantitative measure of the efficiency of percolation is usually the dihedral angle, related to the interfacial energies of the liquid and solid phases. To determine the true dihedral angle at high pressure and temperatures, it is necessary to measure the relative frequency distributions of apparent dihedral angles between the quenched liquid metal and silicate grains for each experiment. Here I present a new imaging technique to visualize the distribution of liquid metal in silicate matrix in 3D by combination of focus ion beam (FIB) milling and high-resolution SEM image. The 3D volume rendering provides precise determination of the dihedral angle and quantitative measure of volume fraction and connectivity. I have conducted a series of experiments using mixtures of San Carlos olivine and Fe-S (10wt%S) metal with different metal-silicate ratios, up to 25 GPa and at temperatures above 1800C. High-quality 3D volume renderings were reconstructed from FIB serial sectioning and imaging with 10-nm slice thickness and 14-nm image resolution for each quenched sample. The unprecedented spatial resolution at nano scale allows detailed examination of textural features and precise determination of the dihedral angle as a function of pressure, temperature and composition. The 3D reconstruction also allows direct assessment of connectivity in multi-phase matrix, providing a new way to investigate the efficiency of metal percolation in a real silicate mantle.

  2. Melting, vaporization, and energy partitioning for impacts on asteroidal and planetary objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smither, Catherine L.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code was used to model normal and oblique impacts of silicate projectiles on asteroidal and planetary bodies. The energy of the system, initially in the kinetic energy of the impactor, is partitioned after impact into internal and kinetic energy of the impactor and the target body. These simulations show that, unlike the case of impacts onto a half-space, a significant amount of energy remains in the kinetic energy of the impacting body, as parts of it travel past the main planet and escape the system. This effect is greater for more oblique impacts, and for impacts onto the small planets. Melting and vaporization of both bodies were also examined. The amount of the target body melted was much greater in the case of smaller targets than for an impact of a similar scale on a larger body.

  3. Highly Sensitive Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometers for In Situ Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasudev, Ram; Mansour, Kamjou; Webster, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes highly sensitive tunable diode laser spectrometers suitable for in situ planetary exploration. The technology developed at JPL is based on wavelength modulated cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy. It is capable of sensitively detecting chemical signatures of life through the abundance of biogenic molecules and their isotopic composition, and chemicals such as water necessary for habitats of life. The technology would be suitable for searching for biomarkers, extinct life, potential habitats of extant life, and signatures of ancient climates on Mars; and for detecting biomarkers, prebiotic chemicals and habitats of life in the outer Solar System. It would be useful for prospecting for water on the Moon and asteroids, and characterizing its isotopic composition. Deployment on the Moon could provide ground truth to the recent remote measurements and help to uncover precious records of the early bombardment history of the inner Solar System buried at the shadowed poles, and elucidate the mechanism for the generation of near-surface water in the illuminated regions. The technology would also be useful for detecting other volatile molecules in planetary atmospheres and subsurface reservoirs, isotopic characterization of planetary materials, and searching for signatures of extinct life preserved in solid matrices.

  4. Imaging the Elusive H-poor Gas in the High adf Planetary Nebula NGC 6778

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rojas, Jorge; Corradi, Romano L. M.; Monteiro, Hektor; Jones, David; Rodríguez-Gil, Pablo; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    We present the first direct image of the high-metallicity gas component in a planetary nebula (NGC 6778), taken with the OSIRIS Blue Tunable Filter centered on the O ii λ4649+50 Å optical recombination lines (ORLs) at the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We show that the emission of these faint O ii ORLs is concentrated in the central parts of the planetary nebula and is not spatially coincident either with emission coming from the bright [O iii] λ5007 Å collisionally excited line (CEL) or the bright Hα recombination line. From monochromatic emission line maps taken with VIMOS at the 8.2 m Very Large Telescope, we find that the spatial distribution of the emission from the auroral [O iii] λ4363 line resembles that of the O ii ORLs but differs from nebular [O iii] λ5007 CEL distribution, implying a temperature gradient inside the planetary nebula. The centrally peaked distribution of the O ii emission and the differences with the [O iii] and H i emission profiles are consistent with the presence of an H-poor gas whose origin may be linked to the binarity of the central star. However, determination of the spatial distribution of the ORLs and CELs in other PNe and a comparison of their dynamics are needed to further constrain the geometry and ejection mechanism of the metal-rich (H-poor) component and hence, understand the origin of the abundance discrepancy problem in PNe.

  5. Forbidden lines of (O I) in the high-resolution optical spectra of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.; Aller, L. H.; Hyung, S.; Brown, P. J. F.

    1995-02-01

    Electron impact excitation rates for transitions in O I, calculated with the R-matrix code, are used to derive the electron-temperature sensitive emission-line ratio R = I(2s22p4 (1D) -2s22p4 1S/2s22p4 (3P)1,2-2s22p4 1D = I(5577 A)/I(6300+6365 A), for a range of electron temperatures Te = 5000-20 000 K) and densities (ne = 104 - 106/cu cm) applicable to planetary nebulae. Experimental values of R for a number of planetaries have been measured from high-resolution (approximately 0.6 A FWHM) spectra obtained with the Hamilton Echelle spectrograph on the 3-m telescope at the Lick Observatory. These measurements should be particularly reliable, as the sample of planetaries was restricted to those with large enough radial velocities for the nebular (O I) 5577 A emission to be red- or blue-shifted from the atmospheric airglow feature by a sufficient amount for the former to be reliably determined. Electron temperatures deduced from the observed values of R are generally in good agreement with those derived from Te-sensitive line ratios in other species, providing observational support for the accuracy of the atomic data adopted in the calculations.

  6. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2004-11-11

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we will review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  7. Mars Express observations of high altitude planetary ion beams and their relation to the "energetic plume" loss channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, Michael W.; Johnson, Blake C.; Fränz, Markus; Barabash, Stas

    2014-12-01

    This study presents observational evidence of high-energy (ions >2 keV) beams of planetary ions above Mars' induced magnetospheric boundary (IMB) and relates them with the energetic plume loss channel calculated from numerical models. A systematic search of the Mars Express (MEX) ion data using an orbit filtering criteria is described, using magnetometer data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) to determine the solar wind motional electric field (Esw) direction. Two levels of statistical survey are presented, one focused on times when the MEX orbit was directly in line with the Esw and another for all angles between the MEX location and the Esw. For the first study, within the 3 year overlap of MGS and MEX, nine brief intervals were found with clear and unambiguous high-energy O+ observations consistent with the energetic plume loss channel. The second survey used a point-by-point determination of MEX relative to the E-field and contained many thousands of 192 s measurements. This study yielded only a weak indication for an Esw-aligned plume. Furthermore, the y-z components of the weighted average velocities in the bins of this y-z spatial domain survey do not systematically point in the Esw direction. The first survey implies the existence of this plume and shows that its characteristics are seemingly consistent with the expected energy and flight direction from numerical studies; the second study softens the finding and demonstrates that there are many planetary ions beyond the IMB moving in unexpected directions. Several possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed.

  8. Neutron energy determination with a high-purity germanium detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Gene A.

    1992-01-01

    Two areas that are related to planetary gamma-ray spectrometry are investigated. The first task was the investigation of gamma rays produced by high-energy charged particles and their secondaries in planetary surfaces by means of thick target bombardments. The second task was the investigation of the effects of high-energy neutrons on gamma-ray spectral features obtained with high-purity Ge-detectors. For both tasks, as a function of the funding level, the experimental work was predominantly tied to that of other researchers, whenever there was an opportunity to participate in bombardment experiments at large or small accelerators for charged particles.

  9. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  10. Planetary Seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.

    2015-01-01

    Of the many geophysical means that can be used to probe a planet's interior, seismology remains the most direct. In addition to Earth, seismometers have been installed on Venus, Mars, and the Moon. Given that the seismic data gathered on the Moon (now over 40 years ago) revolutionized our understanding of the Moon and are still being used today to produce new insight into the state of the lunar interior, it is no wonder that many future missions, both real and conceptual, plan to take seismometers to other planets. To best facilitate the return of high-quality data from these instruments, as well as to further our understanding of the dynamic processes that modify a planet's interior, various modeling approaches are used to quantify parameters such as the amount and distribution of seismicity, tidal deformation, and seismic structure of the terrestrial planets. In addition, recent advances in wavefield modeling have permitted a renewed look at seismic energy transmission and the effects of attenuation and scattering, as well as the presence and effect of a core, on recorded seismograms. In this talk I will discuss some of these methods and review the history of planetary seismology.

  11. Highly accurate isotope measurements of surface material on planetary objects in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike; Meyer, Stefan; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Studies of isotope variations in solar system objects are of particular interest and importance. Highly accurate isotope measurements provide insight into geochemical processes, constrain the time of formation of planetary material (crystallization ages) and can be robust tracers of pre-solar events and processes. A detailed understanding of the chronology of the early solar system and dating of planetary materials require precise and accurate measurements of isotope ratios, e.g. lead, and abundance of trace element. However, such measurements are extremely challenging and until now, they never have been attempted in space research. Our group designed a highly miniaturized and self-optimizing laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer for space flight for sensitive and accurate measurements of the elemental and isotopic composition of extraterrestrial materials in situ. Current studies were performed by using UV radiation for ablation and ionization of sample material. High spatial resolution is achieved by focusing the laser beam to about Ø 20μm onto the sample surface. The instrument supports a dynamic range of at least 8 orders of magnitude and a mass resolution m/Δm of up to 800—900, measured at iron peak. We developed a measurement procedure, which will be discussed in detail, that allows for the first time to measure with the instrument the isotope distribution of elements, e.g. Ti, Pb, etc., with a measurement accuracy and precision in the per mill and sub per mill level, which is comparable to well-known and accepted measurement techniques, such as TIMS, SIMS and LA-ICP-MS. The present instrument performance offers together with the measurement procedure in situ measurements of 207Pb/206Pb ages with the accuracy for age in the range of tens of millions of years. Furthermore, and in contrast to other space instrumentation, our instrument can measure all elements present in the sample above 10 ppb concentration, which offers versatile applications

  12. On the concepts of a highly integrated payload suite for use in future planetary missions: the example of the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, S.; Collon, M.; Montella, J.; Buis, E. J.; Beijersbergen, M.; Erd, C.; Falkner, P.; Schulz, R.; Peacock, A.

    2003-11-01

    Future low resource payload concepts will need to be developed from the viewpoint of a standard integrated payload suite where resources are dramatically reduced through high levels of integration and resource sharing. The study of this approach, its gains together with its limitations was the key objective of this work. The highly compact integration of a specific payload suite was carried out during a reassessment of the technical realisation of all instruments required to form part of the BepiColombo Planetary Orbiter payload (MPO) for the exploration of Mercury. A study of the heritage of other instruments developed for other missions such as Mars Express and ROSETTA was the precursor to enable identification of typical resource drivers and related problems or technology requirements. Innovative technologies aboard SMART-1 or other technology demonstration reference missions were also taken into account for their potential in miniaturisation without sacrificing performance. In the specific example of the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) the resource reduction by a Highly Integrated Payload Suite (HIPS) was addressed. Here we give a review on the basic concept and a comparison to the classical approach.

  13. On the concepts of a highly integrated payload suite for use in future planetary missions: The example of the BepiColombo Mercury planetary orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, S.; Collon, M.; Montella, J.; Buis, E. J.; Beijersbergen, M.; Erd, C.; Falkner, P.; Schulz, R.; Peacock, A.

    2006-10-01

    Future low resource payload concepts will need to be developed from the viewpoint of a standard integrated payload suite where resources are dramatically reduced through high levels of integration and resource sharing. The study of this approach, its gains together with its limitations was the key objective of this work. The highly compact integration of a specific payload suite was carried out during a reassessment of the technical realisation of all instruments required to form part of the BepiColombo planetary orbiter payload (MPO) for the exploration of Mercury. A study of the heritage of other instruments developed for other missions such as Mars Express and ROSETTA was the precursor to enable identification of typical resource drivers and related problems or technology requirements. Innovative technologies aboard SMART-1 or other technology demonstration reference missions were also taken into account for their potential in miniaturisation without sacrificing performance. In the specific example of the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) the resource reduction by a Highly Integrated Payload Suite (HIPS) was addressed. Here we give a review on the basic concept and a comparison to the classical approach.

  14. International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite observations of seven high-excitation planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Keyes, C D

    1980-03-01

    Observations of seven high-excitation planetary nebulae secured with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite were combined with extensive ground-based data to obtain electron densities, gas kinetic temperatures, and ionic concentrations. We then employed a network of theoretical model nebulae to estimate the factors by which observed ionic concentrations must be multiplied to obtain elemental abundances. Comparison with a large sample of nebulae for which extensive ground-based observations have been obtained shows nitrogen to be markedly enhanced in some of these objects. Possibly most, if not all, high-excitation nebulae evolve from stars that have higher masses than progenitors of nebulae of low-to-moderate excitation. PMID:16592781

  15. In situ high-pressure study of FeP: Implications for planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Tingting; Wu, Xiang; Qin, Shan; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2011-02-01

    FeP with MnP-type structure is isostructural with high-pressure FeS polymorphs (both post-troilite FeS and FeS VI), which are believed to exist in planetary cores. Due to similar PTX phase diagrams of binary Fe-P and Fe-S, phosphorus can incorporate with iron-sulfur at planetary core conditions. To understand such substitution and the high-pressure behavior of FeP, we investigate the structural stability of FeP up to 15.6 GPa and 1800 ± 200 K by combined in situ powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our experimental results show that FeP remains the MnP-type structure throughout the PT range covered. Isothermal equation of state of FeP is obtained with V0 of 92.91(8) Å 3, B0 of 205(7) GPa, and B0 of 4. The shortest axis of the MnP-type FeP cell, the b-axis, is the most compressible, due to the soft edge-sharing octahedra along the b-axis. Mössbauer results show that no electronic structure changes occur up to 15.6 GPa, but indicate decreasing distortion of FeP 6 octahedron with pressure increasing. The behavior of FeP is quite different from that of FeS under high pressure and high temperature, suggesting that phosphorus will have a significant impact on stability and electronic properties of FeS within terrestrial planet cores.

  16. A High Speed, Radiation Hard X-Ray Imaging Spectroscometer for Planetary Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. P.; Kenter, A. T.; Murray, S. S.; Martindale, A.; Pearson, J.; Gladstone, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Elsner, R.; Kimura, T.; Ezoe, Y.; Grant, C.; Roediger, E.; Howell, R.; Elvis, M.; Smith, R.; Campbell, B.; Morgenthaler, J.; Kravens, T.; Steffl, A. J.; Hong, J.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray observations provide a unique window into fundamental processes in planetary physics, and one that is complementary to observations obtained at other wavelengths. We propose to develop an X-ray imaging spectrometer (0.1-10 keV band) that, on orbital planetary missions, would measure the elemental composition, density, and temperature of the hot plasma in gas giant magnetospheres, the interaction of the Solar wind with the upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets, and map the elemental composition of the surfaces of the Galilean moons and rocky or icy airless systems on spatial scales as small as a few meters. The X-ray emission from gas giants, terrestrial planets and moons with atmospheres, displays diverse characteristics that depend on the Solar wind's interaction with their upper atmospheres and/or magnetospheres. Our imaging spectrometer, as part of a dedicated mission to a gas giant, will be a paradigm changing technology. On a mission to the Jovian system, our baseline instrument would map the elemental composition of the rocky and icy surfaces of the Galilean moons via particle-induced X-ray fluorescence. This instrument would also measure the temperature, density and elemental abundance of the thermal plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Io plasma torus (IPT), explore the interaction of the Solar wind with the magnetosphere, and characterize the spectrum, flux, and temporal variability of X-ray emission from the polar auroras. We will constrain both the mode of energy transport and the effective transport coefficients in the IPT and throughout the Jovian magnetosphere by comparing temporal and spatial variations of the X-ray emitting plasma with those seen from the cooler but energetically dominant 5 eV plasma.

  17. Tour Through the Solar System: A Hands-On Planetary Geology Course for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, S. B.; Gillis-Davis, J. J.

    2011-09-01

    We have developed a course in planetary geology for high school students, the primary goals of which are to help students learn how to learn, to reduce the fear and anxiety associated with learning science and math, and to encourage an interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Our emphasis in this course is on active learning in a learner-centered environment. All students scored significantly higher on the post-knowledge survey compared with the pre-knowledge survey, and there is a good correlation between the post-knowledge survey and the final exam. Student evaluations showed an increased interest in STEM fields as a result of this course.

  18. High-precision radiometric tracking for planetary approach and encounter in the inner solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, C. S.; Thurman, S. W.; Davidson, J. M.; Finger, M. H.; Folkner, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    The benefits of improved radiometric tracking data have been studied for planetary approach within the inner Solar System using the Mars Rover Sample Return trajectory as a model. It was found that the benefit of improved data to approach and encounter navigation was highly dependent on the a priori uncertainties assumed for several non-estimated parameters, including those for frame-tie, Earth orientation, troposphere delay, and station locations. With these errors at their current levels, navigational performance was found to be insensitive to enhancements in data accuracy. However, when expected improvements in these errors are modeled, performance with current-accuracy data significantly improves, with substantial further improvements possible with enhancements in data accuracy.

  19. High resolution infrared spectroscopy of planetary molecules using diode lasers and Fourier transform spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.

    1990-01-01

    Modern observations of infrared molecular lines in planets are performed at spectral resolutions which are as high as those available in the laboratory. Analysis of such data requires laboratory measurements at the highest possible resolution, which also yield accurate line positions and intensities. For planetary purposes the spectrometer must be coupled to sample cells which can be reduced in temperature and varied in pressure. An approach which produces the full range of required molecular line parameters uses a combination of tunable diode lasers and Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS). The FTS provides board spectral coverage and good calibration accuracy, while the diode laser can be used to study those regions which are not resolved by the FTS.

  20. High Power K Sub a -band Transmitter for Planetary Radar and Spacecraft Uplink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhanji, A. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Hartop, R. W.; Stone, E. W.; Imbriale, W. A.; Stone, D.; Caplan, M.

    1984-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design of a 400 kW continuous wave (CW)K sub a band transmitter and associated microwave components to be used for planetary radar and serve as a prototype for future spacecraft uplinks is discussed. System requirements for such a transmitter are presented. Performance of the proposed high-power millimeter wave tube, the gyroklystron is discussed. Parameters of the proposed power amplifier, beam supply, and monitor and control devices are also presented. Microwave transmission line components consisting of signal monitoring devices, signal filtering devices, and an overmoded corrugated feed are discussed. Finally, an assessment of the state of the art technology to meet the system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  1. High power Ka-band transmitter for planetary radar and spacecraft uplink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhanji, A.M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Cormier, R.

    1985-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design of a 400 kW CW Ka-Band transmitter and associated microwave components to be used for planetary radar and serve as a prototype for feature spacecraft uplinks is discussed. System requirements for such a transmitter are presented. Performance of the proposed high power millimeter wave tube, the gyroklystron, is discussed. Parameters of the proposed power amplifier, beam supply, and monitor and control devices are also presented, Microwave transmission line components consisting of signal monitoring devices, signal filtering devices, and an overmoded corrugated feed are discussed. Finally, an assessment of the state of the art technology to meet the system requirements is given and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  2. High-contrast near-infrared studies of planetary systems and their circumstellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodigas, Timothy John

    Planets are thought to form in circumstellar disks, leaving behind planetesimals that collide to produce dusty debris disks. Characterizing the architectures of planetary systems, along with the structures and compositions of debris disks, can therefore help answer questions about how planets form. In this thesis, I present the results of five papers (three published, two in preparation) concerning the properties of extrasolar planetary systems and their circumstellar environments. Chapters 2 and 3 are studies of radial velocity (RV) exoplanetary systems. For years astronomers have been puzzled about the large number of RV-detected planets that have eccentric orbits (e > 0.1). In Chapter 2 I show that this problem can partially be explained by showing that two circular-orbit planets can masquerade as a single planet on an eccentric orbit. I use this finding to predict that planets with mildly eccentric orbits are the most likely to have massive companions on wide orbits, potentially detectable by future direct imaging observations. Chapter 3 presents such a direct imaging study of the 14 Her planetary system. I significantly constrain the phase space of the putative candidate 14 Her c and demonstrate the power of direct imaging/RV overlap. Chapters 4 and 5 are high-contrast 2-4 micron imaging studies of the edge-on debris disks around HD 15115 and HD 32297. HD 15115's color is found to be gray, implying large grains 1-10 microns in size reside in stable orbits in the disk. HD 32297's disk color is red from 1-4 microns. Cometary material (carbon, silicates, and porous water ice) are a good match at 1-2 microns but not at L'. Tholins, organic material that is found in outer solar system bodies, or small silicates can explain the disk's red color but not the short wavelength data. Chapter 6 presents a dynamical study of dust grains in the presence of massive planets. I show that the width of a debris disk increases proportionally with the mass of its shepherding

  3. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  4. The effects of high energy particles on planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Paul A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers review the background and motivation for the detailed study of the variability and uncertainty of the particle environment from a space systems planning perspective. The engineering concern raised by each environment is emphasized rather than the underlying physics of the magnetosphere or the sun. Missions now being planned span the short term range of one to three years to periods over ten years. Thus the engineering interest is beginning to stretch over periods of several solar cycles. Coincidentally, detailed measurements of the environment are now becoming available over that period of time. Both short term and long term environmental predictions are needed for proper mission planning. Short term predictions, perhaps based on solar indices, real time observations, or short term systematics, are very useful in near term planning -- launches, EVAs (extravehicular activities), coordinated observations, and experiments which require the magnetosphere to be in a certain state. Long term predictions of both average and extreme conditions are essential to mission design. Engineering considerations are many times driven by the worst case environment. Knowledge of the average conditions and their variability allows trade-off studies to be made, implementation of designs which degrade gracefully under multi-stress environments.

  5. Dehydration of planetary ices at high pressure; the role of analogue materials (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    , and the latter being found in Ni-, Zn-, Cu-, and Fe-doped MgSO4 solutions. Indeed, I determined that small quantities of pure MgSO4.9H2O can co-crystallise at ambient pressure with meridianiite. However, these all appear to be metastable states, and further work was necessary to try and discover stable forms of these hydrates for further study. In experiments carried out earlier this year, evidence has emerged not only that MgMoO4 can form a (possibly) stable 8-hydrate but also that MgSeO4 can form a 9-hydrate that exists in equilibrium with liquid near the eutectic. These apparently esoteric compounds (from a planetary perspective) may yet hold the key to understanding the high-pressure behaviour of true planetary materials. Just as the search for analogue materials over many decades has substantially advanced our knowledge of Earth materials, similar analogue studies are poised to unlock the mysteries of these planetary ices.

  6. Mathematical optimization of matter distribution for a planetary system configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Yegor; Bukhtoyarov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Planetary formation is mostly a random process. When the humanity reaches the point when it can transform planetary systems for the purpose of interstellar life expansion, the optimal distribution of matter in a planetary system will determine its population and expansive potential. Maximization of the planetary system carrying capacity and its potential for the interstellar life expansion depends on planetary sizes, orbits, rotation, chemical composition and other vital parameters. The distribution of planetesimals to achieve maximal carrying capacity of the planets during their life cycle, and maximal potential to inhabit other planetary systems must be calculated comprehensively. Moving much material from one planetary system to another is uneconomic because of the high amounts of energy and time required. Terraforming of the particular planets before the whole planetary system is configured might drastically decrease the potential habitability the whole system. Thus a planetary system is the basic unit for calculations to sustain maximal overall population and expand further. The mathematical model of optimization of matter distribution for a planetary system configuration includes the input observed parameters: the map of material orbiting in the planetary system with specified orbits, masses, sizes, and the chemical compound for each, and the optimized output parameters. The optimized output parameters are sizes, masses, the number of planets, their chemical compound, and masses of the satellites required to make tidal forces. Also the magnetic fields and planetary rotations are crucial, but they will be considered in further versions of this model. The optimization criteria is the maximal carrying capacity plus maximal expansive potential of the planetary system. The maximal carrying capacity means the availability of essential life ingredients on the planetary surface, and the maximal expansive potential means availability of uranium and metals to build

  7. Planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.; Brahic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of planetary ring research, the view of planetary rings in astronomy and cosmology over the period 1600-1900, the characteristics of the ring systems of Saturn and Uranus, the ethereal rings of Jupiter and Saturn, dust-magnetosphere interactions, the effects of radiation forces on dust particles, the collisional interactions and physical nature of ring particles, transport effects due to particle erosion mechanisms, and collision-induced transport processes in planetary rings. Also discussed are planetary ring waves, ring particle dynamics in resonances, the dynamics of narrow rings, the origin and evolution of planetary rings, the solar nebula and planetary disk, future studies of the planetary rings by space probes, ground-based observatories and earth-orbiting satellites, and unsolved problems in planetary ring dynamics.

  8. High-frequency variations in Earth rotation and the planetary momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    The major focus of the subject contract was on helping to resolve one of the more notable discrepancies still existing in the axial momentum budget of the solid Earth-atmosphere system, namely the disappearance of coherence between length-of-day (l.o.d.) and atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) at periods shorter than about a fortnight. Recognizing the importance of identifying the source of the high-frequency momentum budget anomaly, the scientific community organized two special measurement campaigns (SEARCH '92 and CONT '94) to obtain the best possible determinations of l.o.d. and AAM. An additional goal was to analyze newly developed estimates of the torques that transfer momentum between the atmosphere and its underlying surface to determine whether the ocean might be a reservoir of momentum on short time scales. Discrepancies between AAM and l.o.d. at sub-fortnightly periods have been attributed to either measurement errors in these quantities or the need to incorporate oceanic angular momentum into the planetary budget. Results from the SEARCH '92 and CONT '94 campaigns suggest that when special attention is paid to the quality of the measurements, better agreement between l.o.d. and AAM at high frequencies can be obtained. The mechanism most responsible for the high-frequency changes observed in AAM during these campaigns involves a direct coupling to the solid Earth, i.e, the mountain torque, thereby obviating a significant oceanic role.

  9. AN EFFICIENT METHOD FOR MODELING HIGH-MAGNIFICATION PLANETARY MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, David P.

    2010-06-20

    I present a previously unpublished method for calculating and modeling multiple lens microlensing events that is based on the image centered ray-shooting approach of Bennett and Rhie. It has been used to model a wide variety of binary and triple lens systems, but it is designed to efficiently model high-magnification planetary microlensing events, because these high-magnification events are, by far, the most challenging events to model. It is designed to be efficient enough to handle complicated microlensing events, which include more than two lens masses and lens orbital motion. This method uses a polar coordinate integration grid with a smaller grid spacing in the radial direction than in the angular direction, and it employs an integration scheme specifically designed to handle limb-darkened sources. I present tests that show that these features achieve second-order accuracy for the light curves of a number of high-magnification planetary events. They improve the precision of the calculations by a factor of >100 compared to first-order integration schemes with the same grid spacing in both directions (for a fixed number of grid points). This method also includes a {chi}{sup 2} minimization method, based on the Metropolis algorithm, that allows the jump function to vary in a way that allows quick convergence to {chi}{sup 2} minima. Finally, I introduce a global parameter space search strategy that allows a blind search of parameter space for light curve models without requiring {chi}{sup 2} minimization over a large grid of fixed parameters. Instead, the parameter space is explored on a grid of initial conditions for a set of {chi}{sup 2} minimizations using the full parameter space. While this method may be somewhat faster than methods that find the {chi}{sup 2} minima over a large grid of parameters, I argue that the main strength of this method is for events with the signals of multiple planets, where a much higher dimensional parameter space must be explored

  10. High-dispersion Spectrum of the Halo Planetary Nebula DdDm 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Hyung, Siek; Lee, Seong-Jae; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Tajitsu, Akito

    2009-11-01

    Using the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) at the Subaru Telescope, we secured the high-resolution line spectra in the 3600-7500 Å wavelength range of the Galactic halo planetary nebula DdDm 1. We also analyzed the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph data in the 1200-6730 Å wavelength range. The diagnostic results indicate the electron temperatures of T epsilon~ 11,000-14,000 K and the electron number densities of N epsilon~ 2000-10,500 cm-3. In spite of high gaseous temperatures, we have not detected high excitation lines, e.g., He II. We derived abundance based on the ionic concentration of permitted and forbidden lines and the photoionization model. A comparison of the ionic concentrations from forbidden lines to recombination lines shows the abundance discrepancy between them. We tested various possibilities, e.g., temperature fluctuation and high-density blob components, to explain the discrepancy. The high-density components or density fluctuation might be partly responsible for the discrepancy. DdDm 1 shows a low carbon abundance that corresponds to metal-poor stars, [Fe/H] <=-1. Assuming a distance of 10 kpc to DdDm 1, theoretical models suggest that the central star has T effsime 39,000 K and Lsime 2000-3000 L sun. The relatively high gas temperatures appear to be caused by very low heavy elemental abundances or insufficient coolants in the shell gas. Its progenitor, born in an extremely carbon-poor environment as an initial mass of about 0.9 M sun, had probably experienced only the first dredge-up. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Prop. ID S05B-178S (M. Otsuka).

  11. HIGH-DISPERSION SPECTRUM OF THE HALO PLANETARY NEBULA DdDm 1

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Hyung, Siek; Lee, Seong-Jae; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Tajitsu, Akito

    2009-11-01

    Using the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) at the Subaru Telescope, we secured the high-resolution line spectra in the 3600-7500 A wavelength range of the Galactic halo planetary nebula DdDm 1. We also analyzed the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph data in the 1200-6730 A wavelength range. The diagnostic results indicate the electron temperatures of T {sub e}psilonapprox 11,000-14,000 K and the electron number densities of N {sub e}psilonapprox 2000-10,500 cm{sup -3}. In spite of high gaseous temperatures, we have not detected high excitation lines, e.g., He II. We derived abundance based on the ionic concentration of permitted and forbidden lines and the photoionization model. A comparison of the ionic concentrations from forbidden lines to recombination lines shows the abundance discrepancy between them. We tested various possibilities, e.g., temperature fluctuation and high-density blob components, to explain the discrepancy. The high-density components or density fluctuation might be partly responsible for the discrepancy. DdDm 1 shows a low carbon abundance that corresponds to metal-poor stars, [Fe/H] <=-1. Assuming a distance of 10 kpc to DdDm 1, theoretical models suggest that the central star has T {sub eff}approx = 39,000 K and Lapprox = 2000-3000 L {sub sun}. The relatively high gas temperatures appear to be caused by very low heavy elemental abundances or insufficient coolants in the shell gas. Its progenitor, born in an extremely carbon-poor environment as an initial mass of about 0.9 M {sub sun}, had probably experienced only the first dredge-up.

  12. Ion heating and energy redistribution across supercritical perpendicular shocks: Application to planetary and interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Liu, Y. D.; Richardson, J. D.; Parks, G. K.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate how the ion dissipative process across supercritical perpendicular shocks depends on the shock front micro-structures. At a collisionless plasma shock, the dissipation and micro-structure of the shock font are dominated by wave-particle interactions. Comparison of the ion thermalization at different kinds of shocks, e.g., planetary and interplanetary shocks, can quantify how much interaction is occurring at the shock boundary. Investigation of this problem for diverse solar wind (SW) conditions will yield important information on the dependences of the ion thermalization and energy redistribution on plasma parameters. With the aid of a successful automatic separation method [Yang et al., 2009], the incident ions at the shock can be divided into two parts: reflected (R) ions and directly transmitted (DT) ions. Corresponding heating efficiency of each population of ions at the shock can be calculated respectively. Wilkinson & Schwartz [1990] have theorized that the amount of reflected ions at perpendicular shocks depends on plasma parameters. Based on the Rankine-Hugoniot (R-H) conservation laws, they found that the fraction reflected is strongly dependent on the magnitude of the ratio of specific heat capacities γ chosen in the R-H relations. The main goal of this work is to investigate how the plasma parameters, e.g. the particle velocity distribution, the plasma beta value, seed populations, etc. (from a particle dynamic point of view), control the amount of reflected ions by using one-dimensional (1-D) full-particle-cell simulations. The simulation results may help to explain the ion heating efficiency and energy redistribution at shocks observed by Cluster, Wind, Voyager, etc.

  13. Non-planetary Science from Planetary Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, M.; Rabe, K.; Daniels, K.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary science is naturally focussed on the issues of the origin and history of solar systems, especially our own. The implications of an early turbulent history of our solar system reach into many areas including the origin of Earth's oceans, of ores in the Earth's crust and possibly the seeding of life. There are however other areas of science that stand to be developed greatly by planetary missions, primarily to small solar system bodies. The physics of granular materials has been well-studied in Earth's gravity, but lacks a general theory. Because of the compacting effects of gravity, some experiments desired for testing these theories remain impossible on Earth. Studying the behavior of a micro-gravity rubble pile -- such as many asteroids are believed to be -- could provide a new route towards exploring general principles of granular physics. These same studies would also prove valuable for planning missions to sample these same bodies, as techniques for anchoring and deep sampling are difficult to plan in the absence of such knowledge. In materials physics, first-principles total-energy calculations for compounds of a given stoichiometry have identified metastable, or even stable, structures distinct from known structures obtained by synthesis under laboratory conditions. The conditions in the proto-planetary nebula, in the slowly cooling cores of planetesimals, and in the high speed collisions of planetesimals and their derivatives, are all conditions that cannot be achieved in the laboratory. Large samples from comets and asteroids offer the chance to find crystals with these as-yet unobserved structures as well as more exotic materials. Some of these could have unusual properties important for materials science. Meteorites give us a glimpse of these exotic materials, several dozen of which are known that are unique to meteorites. But samples retrieved directly from small bodies in space will not have been affected by atmospheric entry, warmth or

  14. Ultra-High Resolution Spectroscopic Remote Sensing: A Microscope on Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing of planetary atmospheres is not complete without studies of all levels of the atmosphere, including the dense cloudy- and haze filled troposphere, relatively clear and important stratosphere and the upper atmosphere, which are the first levels to experience the effects of solar radiation. High-resolution spectroscopy can provide valuable information on these regions of the atmosphere. Ultra-high spectral resolution studies can directly measure atmospheric winds, composition, temperature and non-thermal phenomena, which describe the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere. Spectroscopy in the middle to long infrared wavelengths can also probe levels where dust of haze limit measurements at shorter wavelength or can provide ambiguous results on atmospheric species abundances or winds. A spectroscopic technique in the middle infrared wavelengths analogous to a radio receiver. infrared heterodyne spectroscopy [1], will be describe and used to illustrate the detailed study of atmospheric phenomena not readily possible with other methods. The heterodyne spectral resolution with resolving power greater than 1,000.000 measures the true line shapes of emission and absorption lines in planetary atmospheres. The information on the region of line formation is contained in the line shapes. The absolute frequency of the lines can be measured to I part in 100 ,000,000 and can be used to accurately measure the Doppler frequency shift of the lines, directly measuring the line-of-sight velocity of the gas to --Im/s precision (winds). The technical and analytical methods developed and used to measure and analyze infrared heterodyne measurements will be described. Examples of studies on Titan, Venus, Mars, Earth, and Jupiter will be presented. 'These include atmospheric dynamics on slowly rotating bodies (Titan [2] and Venus [3] and temperature, composition and chemistry on Mars 141, Venus and Earth. The discovery and studies of unique atmospheric phenomena will also be

  15. Static rock splitters based on high temperature shape memory alloys for planetary explorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Halsmer, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    A static rock splitter device based on high-force, high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) was developed for space related applications requiring controlled geologic excavation in planetary bodies such as the moon, Mars, and near-Earth asteroids. The device, hereafter referred to as the shape memory alloy rock splitter (SMARS), consisted of active (expanding) elements made of Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (at%) that generate extremely large forces in response to thermal input. The pre-shaping (training) of these elements was accomplished using isothermal, isobaric and cyclic training methods, which resulted in active components capable of generating stresses in excess of 1.5 GPa. The corresponding strains (or displacements) were also evaluated and were found to be 2-3%, essential to rock fracturing and/or splitting when placed in a borehole. SMARS performance was evaluated using a testbed consisting of a temperature controller, custom heaters and heater holders, and an enclosure for rock placement and breakage. The SMARS system was evaluated using various rock types including igneous rocks (e.g., basalt, quartz, granite) and sedimentary rocks (e.g., sandstone, limestone).

  16. Exploring the transition to planetary nebula using high-resolution techniques at infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica

    2015-08-01

    A planetary nebula (PN) is the ionised envelope surrounding a white dwarf, the final fate of low- and intermediate-mass stars. This stellar phase is also important for its contribution to the interstellar medium, when PNe drive out s-process elements, molecules as well as different dust species, the building blocks of life. One of the most discussed topics in the PNe research field is their huge variety of morphologies and how the more complex forms are sculpted. The theoretical models predict the existence of collimating agents such as disks (steady and/or rotating), jets, and binary systems to sculpt these perplexing morphologies. However, the observations able to detect these shaping engines are often quite difficult to accomplish. Furthermore, the transition to PN hides the clues of these process, that is, when the AGB, post-AGBs, proto-PN, and the circumstellar environments of young PNe are compact and embeded in dust. In this work, we present our results implementing observational techniques and different analysis to inspect and resolve these structures by means of high-resolution imaging, high- and low-resolution spectroscopy at infrared wavelengths and using two VLT instruments: CRIRES (near-IR) and VISIR (mid-IR).

  17. Ultra-high degree spectral modelling of Earth and planetary topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rexer, Moritz; Hirt, Christian

    2016-04-01

    New methods for ultra-high degree spherical harmonic analyses and syntheses have been developed and studied over the past years. The focus group "High-resolution Gravity Modelling", established in 2013 at TU Munich, has implemented ultra-high degree spectral modelling techniques and used successfully to transform high-resolution topography grids of Earth, Moon and Mars into spherical harmonics. For Earth, a new set of 1 arc-min topography models, developed by our group and released under the name Earth2014, was expanded into a spherical harmonic series to degree 10,800. For the 15 arc-sec resolution SRTM15_plus topography and bathymetry, a spectral resolution of degree 43,200 was achieved. For Moon and Mars, topography grids from laser altimetry were harmonically analysed up to degree ~46,000. The spectral representations of the topography grids presented in this contribution are required in the context of spectral gravity forward modelling with ultra-high degree, where the topographic potential is computed as a function of the spherical harmonic series of the topography and its integer powers. References: Hirt, C., and M. Rexer (2015) Earth2014: 1 arc-min shape, topography, bedrock and ice-sheet models - available as gridded data and degree-10,800 spherical harmonics, International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation 39, 103-112, doi:10.1016/j.jag.2015.03.001. Rexer, M. and C. Hirt (2015), Ultra-high degree surface spherical harmonic analysis using the Gauss-Legendre and the Driscoll/Healy quadrature theorem and application to planetary topography models of Earth, Moon and Mars. Surveys in Geophysics 36(6), 803-830, doi: 10.1007/s10712-015-9345-z.

  18. Optical Sensors for Planetary Radiant Energy (OSPREy): Calibration and Validation of Current and Next-Generation NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B.; Bernhard, Germar; Morrow, John H.; Booth, Charles R.; Comer, Thomas; Lind, Randall N.; Quang, Vi

    2012-01-01

    A principal objective of the Optical Sensors for Planetary Radiance Energy (OSPREy) activity is to establish an above-water radiometer system as a lower-cost alternative to existing in-water systems for the collection of ground-truth observations. The goal is to be able to make high-quality measurements satisfying the accuracy requirements for the vicarious calibration and algorithm validation of next-generation satellites that make ocean color and atmospheric measurements. This means the measurements will have a documented uncertainty satisfying the established performance metrics for producing climate-quality data records. The OSPREy approach is based on enhancing commercial-off-the-shelf fixed-wavelength and hyperspectral sensors to create hybridspectral instruments with an improved accuracy and spectral resolution, as well as a dynamic range permitting sea, Sun, sky, and Moon observations. Greater spectral diversity in the ultraviolet (UV) will be exploited to separate the living and nonliving components of marine ecosystems; UV bands will also be used to flag and improve atmospheric correction algorithms in the presence of absorbing aerosols. The short-wave infrared (SWIR) is expected to improve atmospheric correction, because the ocean is radiometrically blacker at these wavelengths. This report describes the development of the sensors, including unique capabilities like three-axis polarimetry; the documented uncertainty will be presented in a subsequent report.

  19. Planetary Science Enabled by High Power Ion Propulsion Systems from NASA's Prometheus Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John

    2004-11-01

    NASA's Prometheus program seeks to develop new generations of spacecraft nuclear-power and ion propulsion systems for applications to future planetary missions. The Science Definition Team for the first mission in the Prometheus series, the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), has defined science objectives for in-situ orbital exploration of the icy Galilean moons (Europa, Ganymede, Callisto) and the Jovian magnetosphere along with remote observations of Jupiter's atmosphere and aurorae, the volcanic moon Io, and other elements of the Jovian system. Important to this forum is that JIMO power and propulsion systems will need to be designed to minimize magnetic, radio, neutral gas, and plasma backgrounds that might otherwise interfere with achievement of mission science objectives. Another potential Prometheus mission of high science interest would be an extended tour of primitive bodies in the solar system, including asteroids, Jupiter family comets, Centaurs, and Kuiper Belt Objects (KBO). The final landed phase of this mission might include an active keplerian experiment for detectable (via downlink radio doppler shift) acceleration of a small kilometer-size Centaur or KBO object, likely the satellite of a larger object observable from Earth. This would have obvious application to testing of mitigation techniques for Earth impact hazards.

  20. MHD Solutions for Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segura, G.; López, J. A.; Franco, J.

    2004-07-01

    This paper provides solutions for the origin of post-AGB winds, their acceleration up to high speed, and the subsequent formation of extremely collimated proto-planetary nebulae. Several wind models with terminal velocities from a few tens of kms up to 103 kms are calculated, which produce proto-planetary nebulae with linear momentum in the range 1036-1040 gcms and with kinetic energies in the range 1042-1047 erg. These results match available observations of proto-planetary nebulae. In the present simplistic scheme, the driver of the wind is just the magnetic pressure at the stellar surface. Other forces are not taken into account in this study, except gravity. We conclude that mass-loss rates of post-AGB stars and transition times from late AGB up to planetary nebula central stars could be directly linked with the production of magnetic field at the stellar core.

  1. Planetary Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1998-01-01

    This 1-year project was an augmentation grant to my NASA Planetary Astronomy grant. With the awarded funding, we accomplished the following tasks: (1) Conducted two NVK imaging runs in conjunction with the ILAW (International Lunar Atmosphere Week) Observing Campaigns in 1995 and 1997. In the first run, we obtained repeated imaging sequences of lunar Na D-line emission to better quantify the temporal variations detected in earlier runs. In the second run we obtained extremely high resolution (R=960.000) Na line profiles using the 4m AAT in Australia. These data are being analyzed under our new 3-year Planetary Astronomy grant. (2) Reduced, analyzed, and published our March 1995 spectroscopic dataset to detect (or set stringent upper limits on) Rb. Cs, Mg. Al. Fe, Ba, Ba. OH, and several other species. These results were reported in a talk at the LPSC and in two papers: (1) A Spectroscopic Survey of Metallic Abundances in the Lunar Atmosphere. and (2) A Search for Magnesium in the Lunar Atmosphere. Both reprints are attached. Wrote up an extensive, invited Reviews of Geophysics review article on advances in the study of the lunar atmosphere. This 70-page article, which is expected to appear in print in 1999, is also attached.

  2. High mass resolution, high angular acceptance time-of-flight mass spectroscopy for planetary missions under the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, David T.

    1991-01-01

    This final report covers three years and several phases of work in which instrumentation for the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) were successfully developed. There were two main thrusts to this research: (1) to develop and test methods for electrostatically scanning detector field-of-views, and (2) to improve the mass resolution of plasma mass spectrometers to M/delta M approximately 25, their field-of-view (FOV) to 360 degrees, and their E-range to cover approximately 1 eV to 50 keV. Prototypes of two different approaches to electrostatic scanning were built and tested. The Isochronous time-of-flight (TOF) and the linear electric field 3D TOF devices were examined.

  3. A test of the applicability of independent scattering to high albedo planetary regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    We show that 'independent scattering' is a useful approximation for high albedo particles whose size and packing density are similar to typical particles in the lunar regolith. Laboratory measurements of the intensity and linear polarization of light scattered from a laboratory sample of glass spheres of know size and composition are compared to radiative transfer calculations of the same observable quantities. Mie scattering is integrated over the size distribution of the particles to determine the mean phase and polarization functions, or phase matrix, of the particle. Assuming that the particles scatter independently, the 'doubling method' is used to rigorously calculate multiple scattering in an optically thick layer of these anisotropically scattering particles. All of the major features 'predicted' in the calculated intensity (double peaks at small phase angles) and polarization (negative branch at small phase angles, large positive peak near 20 degrees phase, and small polarization elsewhere) are observed in the laboratory measurements, with good quantitative agreement indicated at phase angles less than 90 degrees. Even though the particles are supported by physical contact with each other in the sample, as are the particles in planetary regoliths, the independent scattering calculation yields a good approximation to both the intensity and polarization. The physical parameters input to the calculation are only the size distribution of the particles and their complex index of refraction (composition). Significant advantages of this approach are that the phase matrix is calculated from basic physical principles and both the intensity and polarization are determined simultaneously. This model may have broad applications to the interpretation of photometry, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of the icy regoliths of high albedo satellites. The intent of this effort is to perform a controlled experiment that tests the utility of the independent scattering assumption

  4. Charged dust in planetary magnetospheres: Hamiltonian dynamics and numerical simulations for highly charged grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, L.; Burns, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We use a combination of analytical and numerical methods to investigate the dynamics of charged dust grains in planetary magnetospheres. Our emphasis is on obtaining results valid for particles that are not necessarily dominated either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces. A Hamiltonian formulation of the problem yields exact results, for all values of charge-to-mass ratio, when we introduce two constraints: particles remain in the equatorial plane and the magnetic field is taken as axially symmetric. In particular, we obtain locations of equilibrium points, the frequencies of stable periodic orbits, the topology of separatrices in phase space, and the rate of longitudinal drift. These results are significant for specific applications: motion in the nearly aligned dipolar field of Saturn, and the trajectories of arbitrarily charged particles in complex magnetic fields for limited periods of time after ejection from parent bodies. Since the model is restrictive, we also use numerical integrations of the full three-dimensional equations of motion and illustrate under what conditions the constrained problem yields reasonable results. We show that a large fraction of the intermediately charged and highly charged (gyrating) particles will always be lost to a planet's atmosphere within a few hundred hours, for motion through tilted-dipole magnetic fields. We find that grains must have a very high charge-to-mass ratio in order to be mirrored back to the ring plane. Thus, except perhaps at Saturn where the dipole tilt is very small, the likely inhabitants of the dusty ring systems are those particles that are either nearly Keplerian (weakly charged) grains or grains whose charges place them in the lower end of the intermediate charge zone. Fianlly, we demonstrate the effect of plasma drag on the orbits of gyrating particles to be a rapid decrease in gyroradius followed by a slow radial evolution of the guiding center.

  5. Imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy of the Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Vázquez, Roberto; Zavala, Saúl A.; Guillén, Pedro F.; Ayala, Sandra A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a high-resolution imaging and high-dispersion spectroscopy study of the complex morphological and kinematical structure of the planetary nebula NGC 3242. We analyze narrowband Hα, [O III] and [N II] images, addressing important morphological features: in the [O III] image we found one knot oriented to PA=-4°, in the [N II] image, three knots oriented at PA1=155°, PA2=+157°, and PA3=-45.5°, and in the Hα image, two bubbles in the internal region, one of them oriented toward SE and the other toward NW. Additionally we used the unsharp-masking technique and found faint structures in the halo that have not been studied before. These structures are presented in two pairs of arcs, one pair oriented toward PA=-35° and the other toward PA=140°. NGC 3242 is a morphologically rich PN with bubbles, asymmetrical outflows, and some knots in a double-shell nebular structure. Ground-based long-slit echelle spectra were obtained crossing NGC 3242 at twelve different positions to precisely determine kinematical features in the structure of the nebula. We obtain a systemic velocity of VLSR=-6.6 km/s. We have used the software SHAPE (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to reconstruct a 3D model of NGC 3242 which fits all our observational data. Preliminary results (deprojected velocities and kinematical ages) of all these structures will be presented.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  6. 1. Transport of Mass, Momentum and Energy in Planetary Magnetodisc Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilleos, Nicholas; André, Nicolas; Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Brandt, Pontus C.; Delamere, Peter A.; Winglee, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The rapid rotation of the gas giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, leads to the formation of magnetodisc regions in their magnetospheric environments. In these regions, relatively cold plasma is confined towards the equatorial regions, and the magnetic field generated by the azimuthal (ring) current adds to the planetary dipole, forming radially distended field lines near the equatorial plane. The ensuing force balance in the equatorial magnetodisc is strongly influenced by centrifugal stress and by the thermal pressure of hot ion populations, whose thermal energy is large compared to the magnitude of their centrifugal potential energy. The sources of plasma for the Jovian and Kronian magnetospheres are the respective satellites Io (a volcanic moon) and Enceladus (an icy moon). The plasma produced by these sources is globally transported outwards through the respective magnetosphere, and ultimately lost from the system. One of the most studied mechanisms for this transport is flux tube interchange, a plasma instability which displaces mass but does not displace magnetic flux—an important observational constraint for any transport process. Pressure anisotropy is likely to play a role in the loss of plasma from these magnetospheres. This is especially the case for the Jovian system, which can harbour strong parallel pressures at the equatorial segments of rotating, expanding flux tubes, leading to these regions becoming unstable, blowing open and releasing their plasma. Plasma mass loss is also associated with magnetic reconnection events in the magnetotail regions. In this overview, we summarise some important observational and theoretical concepts associated with the production and transport of plasma in giant planet magnetodiscs. We begin by considering aspects of force balance in these systems, and their coupling with the ionospheres of their parent planets. We then describe the role of the interaction between neutral and ionized species, and how it determines

  7. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  8. The high-velocity outflow in the proto-planetary nebula Hen 3-1475

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, A.; García-Lario, P.; Manchado, A.; Bobrowsky, M.; Estalella, R.

    2003-04-01

    The proto-planetary nebula Hen 3-1475 shows a remarkable highly collimated optical jet with an S-shaped string of three pairs of knots and extremely high velocities. We present here a detailed analysis of the overall morphology, kinematic structure and the excitation conditions of these knots based on deep ground-based high dispersion spectroscopy complemented with high spatial resolution spectroscopy obtained with STIS onboard HST, and WFPC2 [N II] images. The spectra obtained show double-peaked, extremely wide emission line profiles, and a decrease of the radial velocities with distance to the source in a step-like fashion. We find that the emission line ratios observed in the intermediate knots are consistent with a spectrum arising from the recombination region of a shock wave with shock velocities ranging from 100 to 150 km s-1. We propose that the ejection velocity is varying as a function of time with a quasi-periodic variability (with timescale of the order of 100 years) and the direction of ejection is also varying with a precession period of the order of 1500 years. Some slowing down with distance along the axis of the Hen 3-1475 jet may be due to the entrainment process and/or to the enviromental drag. This scenario is supported by geometric and kinematic evidence: firstly, the decrease of the radial velocities along the Hen 3-1475 jet in a step like fashion; secondly, the kinematic structure observed in the knots; thirdly, the point-symmetric morphology together with the high proper motions shown by several knots; and finally the fact that the shock velocity predicted from the observed spectra of the shocked knots is much slower than the velocities at which these knots move outwards with respect to the central source. Based on observations made during service time with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope operated on La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de

  9. High-energy detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph B.

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  10. Upcoming planetary missions and the applicability of high temperature superconductor bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Kunde, V.; Moseley, H.; Lakew, B.

    1991-01-01

    Planetary missions to Mars and beyond can last 11 years and longer, making impractical the use of stored cryogens. Passive radiative coolers and single-stage mechanical coolers remain possibilities. Cassini and Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Fly-by (CRAF), both using the newly developed Mariner Mark 2 spacecraft, will be the next outer planet missions after Galileo; they are intended to provide information on the origin and evolution of the solar system. CRAF is slated for a 1994 launch. Cassini was chosen by ESA and will be launched by a Titan 4/Centaur in 1996. It will fly by Jupiter in 2000, inject an ESA-supplied probe into Titan in 2002, and take data in Saturn's orbit from 2002 to 2006. NASA/Goddard is currently developing a prototype Fourier transform spectrometer, the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), for the Cassini mission. The baseline infrared detectors for CIRS are HgCdTe to 16 microns and Schwarz-type thermopiles from 16 to 1000 microns. The far infrared focal plane could be switched from thermopiles to high temperature superconductor (HTS) bolometers between now and 1996. An HTS bolometer could be built using the kinetic inductance effect, or the sharp resistance change at the transition. The transition-edge bolometer is more straightforward to implement, and initial efforts at NASA/Goddard are directed to that device. A working device was made and tested in early 1989. It also has somewhat elevated noise levels below 100 Hz. Upcoming efforts will center on reducing the time constant of the HTS bolometer by attempting to deposit an HTS film on a diamond substrate, and by thinning SrTiO3 substrates. Attempts will be made to improve the film quality to reduce the 1/4 noise level, and to improve the thermal isolation to increase the bolometer sensitivity. An attempt is being made to deposit good-quality HTS films on diamond films using a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique.

  11. Upcoming planetary missions and the applicability of high temperature superconductor bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Kunde, V.; Moseley, H.; Lakew, B.

    1990-01-01

    Planetary missions to Mars and beyond can last 11 years and longer, making impractical the use of stored cryogens. Passive radiative coolers and single-stage mechanical coolers remain possibilities. CRAF and CASSINI, both using the newly developed Mariner Mark 2 spacecraft, will be the next outer planet missions after Galileo; they are intended to provide information on the origin and evolution of the solar system. CRAF is a cometary rendezvous mission slated for a 1994 launch. CASSINI has been chosen by ESA and will be launched by a Titan 4/Centaur in 1996. It will fly by Jupiter in 2000, inject an ESA-supplied probe into Titan in 2002, and take data in Saturn orbit from 2002 to 2006. NASA/Goddard is currently developing a prototype Fourier transform spectrometer (CIRS) that will be proposed for the CASSINI mission. The baseline infrared detectors for CIRS are HgCdTe to 16 microns and Schwarz-type thermopiles from 16 to 1000 microns. The far infrared focal plane could be switched from thermopiles to high temperature superconductor (HTS) bolometers between now and 1996. An HTS bolometer could be built using the kinetic inductance effect, or the sharp resistance change at the transition. The transition-edge bolometer is more straightforward to implement and initial efforts at NASA/Goddard are directed to that device. A working device was made and tested in early 1989. It also has somewhat elevated noise levels below 100 Hz. Upcoming efforts will center on reducing the time constant of the HTS bolometer by attempting to deposit an HTS film on a diamond substrate, and by thinning SrTiO3 substrates. Attempts will be made to improve the film quality to reduce th 1/f noise level, and to improve the thermal isolation to increase the bolometer sensitivity. An attempt is being made to deposit good-quality HTS films on diamond films using an MOCVD technique.

  12. Sensitivity of High-Resolution Simulations of Hurricane Bob (1991) to Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    1999-01-01

    The MM5 mesoscale model is used to simulate Hurricane Bob (1991) using grids nested to high resolution (4 km). Tests are conducted to determine the sensitivity of the simulation to the available planetary boundary layer parameterizations, including the bulk-aerodynamic, Blackadar, Medium-RanGe Forecast (MRF) model, and Burk-Thompson boundary-layer schemes. Significant sensitivity is seen, with minimum central pressures varying by up to 17 mb. The Burk-Thompson and bulk-aerodynamic boundary-layer schemes produced the strongest storms while the MRF scheme produced the weakest storm. Precipitation structure of the simulated hurricanes also varied substantially with the boundary layer parameterizations. Diagnostics of boundary-layer variables indicated that the intensity of the simulated hurricanes generally increased as the ratio of the surface exchange coefficients for heat and momentum, C(sub h)/C(sub M), although the manner in which the vertical mixing takes place was also important. Findings specific to the boundary-layer schemes include: 1) the MRF scheme produces mixing that is too deep and causes drying of the lower boundary layer in the inner-core region of the hurricane; 2) the bulk-aerodynamic scheme produces mixing that is probably too shallow, but results in a strong hurricane because of a large value of C(sub h)/C(sub M) (approximately 1.3); 3) the MRF and Blackadar schemes are weak partly because of smaller surface moisture fluxes that result in a reduced value of C(sub h)/C(sub M) (approximately 0.7); 4) the Burk-Thompson scheme produces a strong storm with C(sub h)/C(sub M) approximately 1; and 5) the formulation of the wind-speed dependence of the surface roughness parameter, z(sub 0), is important for getting appropriate values of the surface exchange coefficients in hurricanes based upon current estimates of these parameters.

  13. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  14. A Model of Radiative and Conductive Energy Transfer in Planetary Regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    The thermal regime in planetary regoliths involves three processes: propagation of visible radiation, propagation of thermal radiation, and thermal conduction. The equations of radiative transfer and heat conduction are formulated for particulate media composed of anisotropically scattering particles. Although the equations are time dependent, only steady state problems are considered in this paper. Using the two-stream approximation, solutions are obtained for two cases: a layer of powder heated from below and an infinitely thick regolith illuminated by visible radiation. Radiative conductivity, subsurface temperature gradients, and the solid state greenhouse effect all appear intrinsically in the solutions without ad hoc additions. Although the equations are nonlinear, approximate analytic solutions that are accurate to a few percent are obtained. Analytic expressions are given for the temperature distribution, the optical and thermal radiance distributions, the hemispherical albedo, the hemispherical emissivity, and the directional emissivity. Additional applications of the new model to three problems of interest in planetary regoliths are presented by Hapke.

  15. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA (Universities Space Research Association) contract team during the six months during the reporting period (10/95 - 3/96) and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science, Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  16. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed-by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, visiting the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA); X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE); X-ray Spectrometer (XRS); Astro-E; High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  17. Atmospheric and Surface Contributions to Planetary Albedo and their Relationship to the Total Meridional Energy Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, A.; Battisti, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    The meridional distribution of incident solar radiation and planetary albedo both contribute to the equator-to-pole gradient in absorbed solar radiation (ASR) in the observed climate system. While the former component is determined by the Earth-Sun geometry and composes 60% of the equator-to-pole gradient in ASR, the latter component makes a significant (40%) contribution to the ASR gradient and is potentially a function of climate state due to its dependence on both atmospheric and surface albedo. In turn, the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo is found to be primarily (86% -89%) dictated by atmospheric albedo with meridional gradients in surface albedo playing a much smaller role in forcing the climate system on the equator-to-pole scale. Simulations of the pre-industrial climate system using the CMIP3 coupled models show large differences in the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo which are mainly due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution, with surface processes playing a much smaller role. The inter-model spread in total meridional heat transport is also primarily (85% of the inter-model spread) due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution. Further model simulations demonstrate that the surface albedo changes associated with moving from the present climate to an ice free climate have a small effect on the equator-to-pole gradient of ASR as compared to the uncertainty in simulated cloud distributions, and hence a small effect on the meridional heat transport.

  18. High-resolution simulations of the final assembly of Earth-like planets. 2. Water delivery and planetary habitability.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Sean N; Quinn, Thomas; Lunine, Jonathan I

    2007-02-01

    The water content and habitability of terrestrial planets are determined during their final assembly, from perhaps 100 1,000-km "planetary embryos " and a swarm of billions of 1-10-km "planetesimals. " During this process, we assume that water-rich material is accreted by terrestrial planets via impacts of water-rich bodies that originate in the outer asteroid region. We present analysis of water delivery and planetary habitability in five high-resolution simulations containing about 10 times more particles than in previous simulations. These simulations formed 15 terrestrial planets from 0.4 to 2.6 Earth masses, including five planets in the habitable zone. Every planet from each simulation accreted at least the Earth's current water budget; most accreted several times that amount (assuming no impact depletion). Each planet accreted at least five water-rich embryos and planetesimals from the past 2.5 astronomical units; most accreted 10-20 water-rich bodies. We present a new model for water delivery to terrestrial planets in dynamically calm systems, with low-eccentricity or low-mass giant planets-such systems may be very common in the Galaxy. We suggest that water is accreted in comparable amounts from a few planetary embryos in a " hit or miss " way and from millions of planetesimals in a statistically robust process. Variations in water content are likely to be caused by fluctuations in the number of water-rich embryos accreted, as well as from systematic effects, such as planetary mass and location, and giant planet properties. PMID:17407404

  19. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  20. High Energy Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory 2 contributions to X-ray astronomy is presented along with a brief description of the satellite and onboard telescope. Observations relating to galaxies and galactic clusters, black holes, supernova remnants, quasars, and cosmology are discussed.

  1. A high-precision radial-velocity survey for other planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.; Hatzes, Artie P.

    1994-01-01

    The precise measurement of variations in stellar radial velocities provides one of several promising methods of surveying a large sample of nearby solar type stars to detect planetary systems in orbit around them. The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) was started in 1987 September with the goal of detecting other nearby planetary systems. A stabilized I2 gas absorption cell placed in front of the entrance slit to the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m telescope coude spectrograph serves as the velocity metric. With this I2 cell we can achieve radial velocity measurement precision better than 10 m/s in an individual measurement. At this level we can detect a Jupiter-like planet around a solar-type star, and have some hope of detecting Saturn-like planets in a long-term survey. The detectability of planets is ultimately limited by stellar pulsation modes and photospheric motions. Monthly MOPS observing runs allow us to obtain at least 5 independent observations per year of the 33 solar-type (F5-K7) stars on our observing list. We present representative results from the first five years of the survey.

  2. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Preface: a personal view of planetary rings; 1. Introduction: the allure of the ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2013; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Uranus' rings and moons; 13. Neptune's partial rings; 14. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo and New Horizons; 15. Ring photometry; 16. Dusty rings; 17. Concluding remarks; Afterword; Glossary; References; Index.

  3. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  4. Planetary Magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  5. Planetary Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. Bruce; Abercrombie, Rachel; Keddie, Susan; Mizutani, Hitoshi; Nagihara, Seiichi; Nakamura, Yosio; Pike, W. Thomas

    1996-01-01

    This report identifies two main themes to guide planetary science in the next two decades: understanding planetary origins, and understanding the constitution and fundamental processes of the planets themselves. Within the latter theme, four specific goals related to interior measurements addressing the theme. These are: (1) Understanding the internal structure and dynamics of at least one solid body, other than the Earth or Moon, that is actively convecting, (2) Determine the characteristics of the magnetic fields of Mercury and the outer planets to provide insight into the generation of planetary magnetic fields, (3) Specify the nature and sources of stress that are responsible for the global tectonics of Mars, Venus, and several icy satellites of the outer planets, and (4) Advance significantly our understanding of crust-mantle structure for all the solid planets. These goals can be addressed almost exclusively by measurements made on the surfaces of planetary bodies.

  6. High energy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce; Canizares, Claude; Catura, Richard C.; Clark, George W.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Friedman, Herbert; Giacconi, Riccardo; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Helfand, David J.; Holt, Stephen S.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) important scientific problems for high energy astrophysics (stellar activity, the interstellar medium in galaxies, supernovae and endpoints of stellar evolution, nucleosynthesis, relativistic plasmas and matter under extreme conditions, nature of gamma-bursts, identification of black holes, active nuclei, accretion physics, large-scale structures, intracluster medium, nature of dark matter, and the X- and gamma-ray background); (2) the existing experimental programs (Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE), U.S. participation in foreign missions, and attached Shuttle and Space Station Freedom payloads); (3) major missions for the 1990's; (4) a new program of moderate missions; (5) new opportunities for small missions; (6) technology development issues; and (7) policy issues.

  7. High energy transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    A meeting was convened on the campus of the University of California at Santa Cruz during the two-week interval July 11 through July 22, 1983. Roughly 100 participants were chosen so as to give broad representation to all aspects of high energy transients. Ten morning review sessions were held in which invited speakers discussed the current status of observations and theory of the above subjects. Afternoon workshops were also held, usually more than one per day, to informally review various technical aspects of transients, confront shortcomings in theoretical models, and to propose productive courses for future research. Special attention was also given to the instrumentation used to study high energy transient and the characteristics and goals of a dedicated space mission to study transients in the next decade were determined. A listing of articles written by various members of the workshop is included.

  8. High Energy Density Microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.M.

    1999-04-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the RF98 Workshop entitled `High Energy Density Microwaves` held in California in October, 1998. The topics discussed were predominantly accelerator{minus}related. The Workshop dealt, for the most part, with the generation and control of electron beams, the amplification of RF signals, the design of mode converters, and the effect of very high RF field gradients. This Workshop was designed to address the concerns of the microwave tube industry worldwide, the plasma physicists who deal with very high beam currents and gigawatts of RF power, and researchers in accelerator centers around the world. Papers were presented on multibeam klystrons, gyrotron development, plasmas in microwave tubes, RF breakdown, and alternatives to conventional linear coliders at 1 TeV and above. The Workshop was partially sponsored by the US Department of Energy. There were 46 papers presented at the conference,out of which 19 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  9. GRAPHIC: The Geneva Reduction and Analysis Pipeline for High-contrast Imaging of planetary Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Janis; Ségransan, Damien; Udry, Stéphane; Wildi, François

    2014-01-01

    We present a new analysis and reduction pipeline for the detection of planetary companions using Angular Differential Imaging. The pipeline uses Fourier transforms for image shifting and rotation in order to achieve very low signal loss. Furthermore it is parallelised in order to run on computer clusters of up to 1024 cores. The pipeline was developed in Geneva for the ongoing direct imaging campaign for stars with radial velocity drifts in the HARPS and CORALIE radial-velocity planet-search surveys. In addition to that, a disk mode has been implemented in the context of observations of the protoplanetary disk around HD142527.

  10. Multi-Year Radar Observations of Planetary Waves at High Conjugate Latitudes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, D. C.; Iimura, H.; Janches, D.; Mitchell, N. J.; Singer, W.

    2013-12-01

    Meteor radars at nearly conjugate latitudes from ~54o to 68o S and N are enabling multi-year studies of planetary wave (PW) structure and seasonal, interannual, and inter-hemispheric variability. The various PWs exhibit dramatically different seasonal and inter-hemispheric variability, strongly variable amplitude and phase structures with altitude, latitude, and time, and episodic maxima in E-P flux components. This talk will review these features defined with meteor radars at Rothera Station and Ferraz Base (62 and 68 S), on Tierra del Fuego (54 S), and at Juliusruh, Germany and Esrange, Sweden (55 and 68 N).

  11. Simulating thermal stress features on hot planetary surfaces in vacuum at high temperature facility in the PEL laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, A.; Ferrari, S.; Helbert, J.; D'Incecco, P.; D'Amore, M.

    2011-12-01

    In the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) at the Institute for Planetary Research of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin, we set-up a simulation chamber for the spectroscopic investigation of minerals separates under Mercurial conditions. The chamber can be evacuated to 10-4 bar and the target samples heated to 700 K within few minutes, thanks to the innovative inductive heating system. While developing the protocol for the high temperature spectroscopy measurements we discovered interesting "morphologies" on the sample surfaces. The powders are poured into stainless steel cups of 50 mm internal diameter, 8 mm height and 3 mm depth, having a 5 mm thick base (thus leaving 3 mm free space for the minerals), and rim 1 mm thick. We selected several minerals of interest for Mercurial surface composition and for each of them we analyzed various grain size separates, to study the influence of grain dimensions to the process of thermal stressing. We observed that for the smaller grain size separate (0-25 μm) the thermal stress mainly induces large depressions and fractures, while on larger grain sizes (125-250 μm) small depressions and a cratered surface. Our current working hypothesis is that these features are mainly caused by thermal stress induced by a radiatively quickly cooling surface layer covering the much hotter bulk material. Further investigation is ongoing to understand the processes better. The observed morphologies exhibit surprising similarities to features observed at planetary scale size for example on Mercury and even on Venus. Especially the high resolution images provided currently from MESSENGER'S Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) instrument has revealed plains dominated by polygonal fractures whose origin still have to be determined. Our laboratory analogue studies might in the future provide some insight into the processes creating those features

  12. Planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieseking, F.

    1983-02-01

    The first planetary nebula (PN) was discovered by Darquier in 1779. In 1981, a compilation of galactic PN listed a total of 1455 objects. Outside the Milky Way Galaxy, PN are currently known in the Magellanic Clouds and in several members of the local group of galaxies. The PN have a rich emission-line spectrum, which makes it possible to recognize them at large distances. A central stellar object can be observed within the nebula. In 1927, spectral lines at 4959 A and 5007 A emitted by the PN could finally be identified as 'forbidden lines' of O(++). The life expectancy of a PN, estimated on the basis of the observed expansion rate, is only about 30,000 years. The PN have a number of interesting characteristics which are partly related to the high effective temperature and luminosity of the central stars, the presence of a particle system under extreme physical conditions, and the stellar material provided by the PN for the interstellar medium. Attention is given to the determination of the distance of PN, the Shklovsky distances, and two mysterious aspects related to the spectrum

  13. High-energy transients.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K

    2013-06-13

    We present an overview of high-energy transients in astrophysics, highlighting important advances over the past 50 years. We begin with early discoveries of γ-ray transients, and then delve into physical details associated with a variety of phenomena. We discuss some of the unexpected transients found by Fermi and Swift, many of which are not easily classifiable or in some way challenge conventional wisdom. These objects are important insofar as they underscore the necessity of future, more detailed studies. PMID:23630376

  14. Very high energy colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, B.

    1985-05-01

    The required emittance in very high energy machines are small. It will be a real challenge to produce these small emittances and to maintain them during acceleration. The small emittances probably make acceleration by laser techniques easier, if such techniques will be practical at all. The beam spot sizes are very small indeed. It will be a challenge to design beam transport systems with the necessary freedom from aberration required for these small spot sizes. It would of course help if the beta functions at the collision points could be reduced. Beam power will be large - to paraphrase the old saying, power is money - and efficient acceleration systems will be required.

  15. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  16. Prospects at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1988-11-01

    I discuss some possibilities for neutrino experiments in the fixed-target environment of the SPS, Tevatron, and UNK, with their primary proton beams of 0.4, 0.9, and 3.0 TeV. The emphasis is on unfinished business: issues that have been recognized for some time, but not yet resolved. Then I turn to prospects for proton-proton colliders to explore the 1-TeV scale. I review the motivation for new physics in the neighborhood of 1 TeV and mention some discovery possibilities for high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders and the implications they would have for neutrino physics. I raise the possibility of the direct study of neutrino interactions in hadron colliders. I close with a report on the status of the SSC project. 38 refs., 17 figs.

  17. CONSTRAINING THE PLANETARY SYSTEM OF FOMALHAUT USING HIGH-RESOLUTION ALMA OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, A. C.; Payne, M. J.; Ford, E. B.; Shabram, M.; Corder, S.; Dent, W. R. F.

    2012-05-01

    The dynamical evolution of planetary systems leaves observable signatures in debris disks. Optical images trace micron-sized grains, which are strongly affected by stellar radiation and need not coincide with their parent body population. Observations of millimeter-sized grains accurately trace parent bodies, but previous images lack the resolution and sensitivity needed to characterize the ring's morphology. Here we present ALMA 350 GHz observations of the Fomalhaut debris ring. These observations demonstrate that the parent body population is 13-19 AU wide with a sharp inner and outer boundary. We discuss three possible origins for the ring and suggest that debris confined by shepherd planets is the most consistent with the ring's morphology.

  18. Nature of the interior of Uranus based on studies of planetary ices at high dynamic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Hamilton, D.C.; Holmes, N.C.; Radousky, H.B.; Ree, F.H.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nicol, M.

    1988-05-06

    Data from the Voyager II spacecraft showed that Uranus has a large magnetic field with geometry similar to an offset tilted dipole. To interpret the origin of the magnetic field, measurements were made of electrical conductivity and equation-of-state data of the planetary ices ammonia, methane, and synthetic Uranus at shock pressures and temperatures up to 75 gigapascals and 5000 K. These pressures and temperatures correspond to conditions at the depths at which the surface magnetic field is generated. Above 40 gigapascals the conductivities of synthetic Uranus, water, and ammonia plateau at about 20 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/, providing an upper limit for the electrical conductivity used in kinematic or dynamo calculations. The nature of materials at the extreme conditions in the interior is discussed. 29 references, 3 figures.

  19. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io.

  20. Planetary astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, David; Hunten, Donald; Ahearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Black, David; Brown, Robert A.; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Cochran, Anita L.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Depater, Imke

    1991-01-01

    The authors profile the field of astronomy, identify some of the key scientific questions that can be addressed during the decade of the 1990's, and recommend several facilities that are critically important for answering these questions. Scientific opportunities for the 1990' are discussed. Areas discussed include protoplanetary disks, an inventory of the solar system, primitive material in the solar system, the dynamics of planetary atmospheres, planetary rings and ring dynamics, the composition and structure of the atmospheres of giant planets, the volcanoes of IO, and the mineralogy of the Martian surface. Critical technology developments, proposed projects and facilities, and recommendations for research and facilities are discussed.

  1. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2011-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: the allure of ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2004; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-Body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Neptune's partial rings; 13. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo; 14. Ring photometry; 15. Dusty rings; 16. Cassini observations; 17. Summary: the big questions; Glossary; References; Index.

  2. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  3. New Planetary Energy Balance, Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction and their Effects on Extreme Events in North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrouk, Mohammed-Said

    2016-04-01

    Global warming has now reached the energetic phase of H2O's return to the ground after the saturation of the atmosphere in evaporation since the 80s and 90s of the last century, which were characterized by severe droughts, mainly in Africa. This phase is the result of the accumulation of thermal energy exchanges in the Earth-Ocean-Atmosphere system that resulted in the thrust reversal of the energy balance toward the poles. This situation is characterized by a new thermal distribution: above the ocean, the situation is more in surplus compared to the mainland, or even opposite when the balance is negative on the land, and in the atmosphere, warm thermal advection easily reach the North Pole (planetary crests), as well as cold advection push deep into North Africa and the Gulf of Mexico (planetary valleys). This "New Ground Energy Balance" establishes a "New Meridian Atmospheric Circulation (MAC)" with an undulating character throughout the year, including the winter characterized by intense latitudinal very active energy exchanges between the surplus areas (tropical) and the deficit (polar) on the one hand, and the atmosphere, the ocean and the continent on the other. The excess radiation balance increases the potential evaporation of the atmosphere and provides a new geographical distribution of H2O worldwide: the excess water vapor is easily converted by cold advection (polar vortex) to heavy rains that cause floods or snow storms that paralyze the normal functioning of human activities, which creates many difficulties for users and leaves damage and casualties, but ensures water availability missing since a long time in many parts of the world, in Africa, Europe and America. The new thermal distribution reorganizes the geography of atmospheric pressure: the ocean energy concentration is transmitted directly to the atmosphere, and the excess torque is pushed northward. The Azores anticyclone is strengthened and is a global lock by the Atlantic ridge at Greenland

  4. High Energy Astrophysics Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Ormes, Jonathan F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The nature of gravity and its relationship to the other three forces and to quantum theory is one of the major challenges facing us as we begin the new century. In order to make progress we must challenge the current theories by observing the effects of gravity under the most extreme conditions possible. Black holes represent one extreme, where the laws of physics as we understand them break down. The Universe as whole is another extreme, where its evolution and fate is dominated by the gravitational influence of dark matter and the nature of the Cosmological constant. The early universe represents a third extreme, where it is thought that gravity may somehow be unified with the other forces. NASA's "Cosmic Journeys" program is part of a NASA/NSF/DoE tri-agency initiative designed to observe the extremes of gravity throughout the universe. This program will probe the nature of black holes, ultimately obtaining a direct image of the event horizon. It will investigate the large scale structure of the Universe to constrain the location and nature of dark matter and the nature of the cosmological constant. Finally it will search for and study the highest energy processes, that approach those found in the early universe. I will outline the High Energy Astrophysics part of this program.

  5. Planetary quarantine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The overall objective is to identify those areas of future missions which will be impacted by planetary quarantine (PQ) constraints. The objective of the phase being described was to develop an approach for using decision theory in performing a PQ analysis for a Mariner Jupiter Uranus Mission and to compare it with the traditional approach used for other missions.

  6. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  7. Planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The radar astronomy activities supported by the Deep Space Network during June, July, and August 1980 are reported. The planetary bodies observed were Venus, Mercury, and the asteroid Toro. Data were obtained at both S and X band, and the observations were considered successful.

  8. Planetary Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Victor R.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various topics related to planetary geomorphology, including: research techniques; such geomorphic processes as impact, volcanic, degradational, eolian, and hillslope/mass movement processes; and channels and valleys. Indicates that the subject should be taught as a series of scientific questions rather than scientific results of…

  9. Planetary quarantine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Developed methodologies and procedures for the reduction of microbial burden on an assembled spacecraft at the time of encapsulation or terminal sterilization are reported. This technology is required for reducing excessive microbial burden on spacecraft components for the purposes of either decreasing planetary contamination probabilities for an orbiter or minimizing the duration of a sterilization process for a lander.

  10. Fundamental Parameters and Spectral Energy Distributions of Young and Field Age Objects with Masses Spanning the Stellar to Planetary Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippazzo, Joe; Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Godfrey, Paige A.; BDNYC

    2016-01-01

    The physical and atmospheric properties of ultracool dwarfs are deeply entangled due to the degenerate effects of mass, age, metallicity, clouds and dust, activity, rotation, and possibly even formation mechanism on observed spectra. Accurate determination of fundamental parameters for a wide diversity of objects at the low end of the IMF is thus crucial to testing stellar and planetary formation theories. To determine these quantities, we constructed and flux calibrated nearly-complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 221 M, L, T, and Y dwarfs using published parallaxes and 0.3-40 μm spectra and photometry. From these homogeneous SEDs, we calculated bolometric luminosity (Lbol), effective temperature (Teff), mass, surface gravity, radius, spectral indexes, synthetic photometry, and bolometric corrections (BCs) for each object. We used these results to derive Lbol, Teff, and BC polynomial relations across the entire very-low-mass star/brown dwarf/planetary mass regime. We use a subsample of objects with age constraints based on nearby young moving group membership, companionship with a young star, or spectral signatures of low surface gravity to define new age-sensitive diagnostics and characterize the reddening of young substellar atmospheres as a redistribution of flux from the near-infrared into the mid-infrared. Consequently we find the SED flux pivots at Ks band, making BCKs as a function of spectral type a tight and age independent relationship. We find that young L dwarfs are systematically 300 K cooler than field age objects of the same spectral type and up to 600 K cooler than field age objects of the same absolute H magnitude. Finally, we present preliminary comparisons of these empirical results to best fit parameters from four different model atmosphere grids via Markov-Chain Monte Carlo analysis in order to create prescriptions for the reliable and efficient characterization of new ultracool dwarfs.

  11. LDRD ER Final Report: Recreating Planetary Cores in the Laboratory: New Techniques to Extremely High Density States

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G; Celliers, P; Hicks, D; Cauble, R; Bradley, D; MacKinnon, A; Moon, S; Young, D; Chau, R; Eggert, J; Willi, P; Pasley, J; Jeanloz, R; Lee, K; Bennedetti, R; Koenig, M; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Batani, D; Loubeyre, P; Hubbard, W

    2003-02-07

    An accurate equation of state (EOS) for planetary constituents at extreme conditions is the key to any credible model of planets or low mass stars. However, very few materials have their high pressure (>few Mbar) EOS experimentally validated, and even then, only on the principal Hugoniot. For planetary and stellar interiors, compression occurs from gravitational force so that material states follow a line of isotropic compression (ignoring phase separation) to ultra-high densities. An example of the hydrogen phase space composing Jupiter and one particular Brown Dwarf is shown. At extreme densities, material states are predicted to have quite unearthly properties such as high temperature superconductivity and low temperature fusion. High density experiments on Earth are achieved with either static compression techniques (i.e. diamond anvil cells) or dynamic compression techniques using large laser facilities, gas guns, or explosives. The ultimate goal of this multi-directorate and multi-institutional proposal was to develop techniques that will enable us to understand material states that previously only existed at the core of giant planets, stars, or speculative theories. Our effort was a complete success, meeting all of the objectives set out in our proposals. First we focused on developing accurate Hugoniot techniques to be used for constraining the equation of state at high pressure/temperature. We mapped out an accurate water EOS and measured that the ionic->electronic conduction transition occurs at lower pressures than models predict. These data and their impact are fully described in the first enclosed paper ''The Equation of State and Optical Properties of Water Compressed by Strong Shock Waves.'' Currently models used to construct planetary isentropes are constrained by only the planet radius, outer atmospheric spectroscopy, and space probe gravitational moment and magnetic field data. Thus these data, which provide rigid constraints to these models, will

  12. A rare gas optics-free absolute photon flux and energy analyzer for solar and planetary observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Darrell L.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a prototype spectrometer for space applications requiring long term absolute EUV photon flux measurements. In this recently developed spectrometer, the energy spectrum of the incoming photons is transformed directly into an electron energy spectrum by taking advantage of the photoelectric effect in one of several rare gases at low pressures. Using an electron energy spectrometer, followed by an electron multiplier detector, pulses due to individual electrons are counted. The overall efficiency of this process can be made essentially independent of gain drifts in the signal path, and the secular degradation of optical components which is often a problem in other techniques is avoided. A very important feature of this approach is its freedom from the problem of overlapping spectral orders that plagues grating EUV spectrometers. An instrument with these features has not been flown before, but is essential to further advances in our understanding of solar EUV flux dynamics, and the coupled dynamics of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. The detailed characteristics of this optics-free spectrometer are presented in the publications section.

  13. Impact of Planetary Gravitation on High-precision Neutral Atom Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharek, H.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Möbius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bzowski, M.; Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on the physical processes inside and outside of our heliosphere. For instance, recent Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observations have provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare, and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction, this can result in significant deflection and acceleration. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the gravitational effects of Earth, the Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth’s orbit. The results show that current analysis of the interstellar neutral parameters by IBEX is not significantly affected by planetary gravitational effects. We further studied the possibility of whether or not the Helium focusing cone of the Sun and Jupiter could be measured by IBEX and whether or not these cones could be used as an independent measure of the temperature of interstellar Helium.

  14. High Precision Dielectric Permittivity Measurements of Planetary Regolith analogs Using A Split-Cylinder Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. A.; Boivin, A.; Ghent, R. R.; Daly, M. G.; Bailey, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Complex relative permittivity is essential for quantitative interpretation of radar data in remote sensing of planetary surfaces. The real part determines the speed of the electromagnetic waves, while the imaginary part is related to the penetration depth. This project is part of NASA's OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission. Radar is an important tool for asteroid investigation, particularly for detecting and characterizing regolith; but without robust knowledge of dielectric properties, these data cannot be used to their greatest advantage. Here, we present preliminary measurements of complex relative permittivity using the split-cylinder resonator method at 10 GHz. Resonant cavity methods utilize the difference in resonant frequency between an empty cavity and a cavity containing a sample to calculate relative permittivity and loss tangent of the sample, at higher precision than is possible with other methods. We use these split-cylinder measurements of solid samples at a single frequency in conjunction with companion broadband (300 MHz to 14 GHz) measurements of powders. Our goal is to establish a "parameter space" that characterize the effects of various factors such as water content, frequency, and the relative abundances of mineralogical and elemental constituents such as iron and titanium on complex relative permittivity of geological materials that might represent good analogs for the regolith of Bennu, OSIRIS-REx's target asteroid. Our results will also provide a database for future asteroid exploration with radar.

  15. Ultraviolet spectrum and probable chemical composition of the high-excitation planetary nebula M1-1.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Keyes, C D; Feibelman, W A

    1986-05-01

    One of the highest excitation planetary nebulae known, M1-1, was studied with the image-tube scanner on the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory and with the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Large fractions of abundant elements such as C, N, O, S, and Ar exist in unobservable stages of ionization. Hence, it is difficult to establish the chemical composition of this nebula. The logarithmic abundance values of various elements compared with those of the Sun appear to be as follows: [Table: see text] Here log N(H) = 12. In contrast to NGC 6537, the composition of M1-1 does not appear to differ markedly from that of the Sun. N may be enhanced but there is no enhancement of He or C. In spite of its high excitation and its presumed origin from a relatively massive star, M1-1 shows no evidence for pronounced nuclear processing. PMID:16593688

  16. Ultraviolet spectrum and probable chemical composition of the high-excitation planetary nebula M1-1

    PubMed Central

    Aller, Lawrence H.; Keyes, Charles D.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1986-01-01

    One of the highest excitation planetary nebulae known, M1-1, was studied with the image-tube scanner on the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory and with the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Large fractions of abundant elements such as C, N, O, S, and Ar exist in unobservable stages of ionization. Hence, it is difficult to establish the chemical composition of this nebula. The logarithmic abundance values of various elements compared with those of the Sun appear to be as follows: [Table: see text] Here log N(H) = 12. In contrast to NGC 6537, the composition of M1-1 does not appear to differ markedly from that of the Sun. N may be enhanced but there is no enhancement of He or C. In spite of its high excitation and its presumed origin from a relatively massive star, M1-1 shows no evidence for pronounced nuclear processing. PMID:16593688

  17. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prosper, Harrison B.; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Berg, Bernd; Blessing, Susan K.; Okui, Takemichi; Owens, Joseph F.; Reina, Laura; Wahl, Horst D.

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  18. Phase Diagram and Physical Properties of H[subscript 2]O at High Pressures and temperatures: Applications to Planetary Interiors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Schwegler, Eric; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2007-02-22

    Here we discuss the phase diagram and physical properties of H{sub 2}O under pressure-temperature conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Recent studies show that the melting curve of H{sub 2}O increases rapidly above a recently discovered triple point at approximately 35 to 47 GPa and 1000 K, indicating a large increase in {Delta}V/{Delta}S (volume versus entropy change) and associated changes in the physical properties of H{sub 2}O at high pressures and temperatures. Existence of the triple point is thought to be associated with the formation of a superionic phase, dynamically-disordered ice VII, or extension of the ice VII-ice X phase boundary; although the precise pressure and temperature of the triple point, curvature of the melting line, and nature of the solid-solid transition below the triple point all remain to be further explored. The steep increase in the melting curve of H{sub 2}O at high pressures and temperatures has important implications on our understanding of planetary interiors. Depending on its curvature, the melting line of H{sub 2}O may intersect the isentropes of Neptune and Uranus as well as the geotherm of Earth's lower mantle. Furthermore, if the triple point is due to the occurrence of the theoretically predicted superionic phase, besides leading to significant ionic conductivity, fast proton diffusion would cause enhanced chemical reactivity and formation of complex compounds in these planets. For example, reaction of H{sub 2}O with iron and other metals to form metal hydrides such as FeH{sub x} could provide a mechanism for incorporation of hydrogen as a light element into Earth's core. The equation of state of water is also presented as it pertains to the properties of hydrous fluid and melt phases in the mantle.

  19. High energy plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.

    1985-05-01

    Colinear intense laser beams ..omega../sub 0/, kappa/sub 0/ and ..omega../sub 1/, kappa/sub 1/ shone on a plasma with frequency separation equal to the electron plasma frequency ..omega../sub pe/ are capable of creating a coherent large longitudinal electric field E/sub L/ = mc ..omega../sub pe//e of the order of 1GeV/cm for a plasma density of 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/ through the laser beat excitation of plasma oscillations. Accompanying favorable and deleterious physical effects using this process for a high energy beat-wave accelerator are discussed: the longitudinal dephasing, pump depletion, the transverse laser diffraction, plasma turbulence effects, self-steepening, self-focusing, etc. The basic equation, the driven nonlinear Schroedinger equation, is derived to describe this system. Advanced accelerator concepts to overcome some of these problems are proposed, including the plasma fiber accelerator of various variations. An advanced laser architecture suitable for the beat-wave accelerator is suggested. Accelerator physics issues such as the luminosity are discussed. Applications of the present process to the current drive in a plasma and to the excitation of collective oscillations within nuclei are also discussed.

  20. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics Program at the University of California, Riverside. In 1990, we will concentrate on analysis of LEP data from the OPAL detector. We expect to record 10{sup 5} Z`s by the end of 1989 and 10{sup 6} in 1990. This data will be used to measure the number of quark-lepton families in the universe. In the second half of 1990 we will also be occupied with the installation of the D-Zero detector in the Tevatron Collider and the preparation of software for the 1991 run. A new initiative made possible by generous university support is a laboratory for detector development at UCR. The focus will be on silicon strip tracking detectors both for the D-Zero upgrade and for SSC physics. The theory program will pursue further various mass-generating radiative mechanisms for understanding small quark and lepton masses as well as some novel phenomenological aspects of supersymmetry.

  1. High Energy Density Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of today’s best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

  2. Planetary Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  3. Planetary quarantine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Those areas of future missions which will be impacted by planetary quarantine (PQ) constraints were identified. The specific objectives for this reporting period were (1) to perform an analysis of the effects of PQ on an outer planet atmospheric probe, and (2) to prepare a quantitative illustration of spacecraft microbial reduction resulting from exposure to space environments. The Jupiter Orbiter Probe mission was used as a model for both of these efforts.

  4. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M. K.; Araki, S.; Black, G. J.; Bosh, A. S.; Brahic, A.; Brooks, S. M.; Charnoz, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Dones, L.; Durisen, R. H.; Esposito, L. W.; Ferrari, C.; Festou, M.; French, R. G.; Giuliatti-Winter, S. M.; Graps, A. L.; Hamilton, D. P.; Horanyi, M.; Karjalainen, R. M.; Krivov, A. V.; Krueger, H.; Larson, S. M.; Levison, H. F.; Lewis, M. C.; Lissauer, J. J.; Murray, C. D.; Namouni, F.; Nicholson, P. D.; Olkin, C. B.; Poulet, F.; Rappaport, N. J.; Salo, H. J.; Schmidt, J.; Showalter, M. R.; Spahn, F.; Spilker, L. J.; Srama, R.; Stewart, G. R.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.

    2002-08-01

    The past two decades have witnessed dramatic changes in our view and understanding of planetary rings. We now know that each of the giant planets in the Solar System possesses a complex and unique ring system. Recent studies have identified complex gravitational interactions between the rings and their retinues of attendant satellites. Among the four known ring systems, we see elegant examples of Lindblad and corotation resonances (first invoked in the context of galactic disks), electromagnetic resonances, spiral density waves and bending waves, narrow ringlets which exhibit internal modes due to collective instabilities, sharp-edged gaps maintained via tidal torques from embedded moonlets, and tenuous dust belts created by meteoroid impact onto, or collisions between, parent bodies. Yet, as far as we have come, our understanding is far from complete. The fundamental questions confronting ring scientists at the beginning of the twenty-first century are those regarding the origin, age and evolution of the various ring systems, in the broadest context. Understanding the origin and age requires us to know the current ring properties, and to understand the dominant evolutionary processes and how they influence ring properties. Here we discuss a prioritized list of the key questions, the answers to which would provide the greatest improvement in our understanding of planetary rings. We then outline the initiatives, missions, and other supporting activities needed to address those questions, and recommend priorities for the coming decade in planetary ring science.

  5. Finding the Needle in the Haystack: High-Fidelity Models of Planetary Systems for Simulating Exoplanet Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincowski, Andrew; Roberge, Aki; Stark, Christopher C.; Wilkins, Ashlee N.; Nesvold, Erika; Haystacks Team

    2015-01-01

    Future missions to characterize exoplanets will require instruments tailored to the problem of finding a habitable exoplanet: suppressing the bright star while still directly observing planets at small angular separations. This problem is compounded by interplanetary dust, which will likely be a significant source of astrophysical background noise. Instrument parameters must be constrained with detailed performance simulations, which must then be analyzed to determine if the instruments are capable of discerning the desired exoplanet characteristics. One valuable characteristic is the mass of the planet. A constraint on a planet's mass can quickly show if it is likely to be a rocky terrestrial planet, which may have the potential to form life as we know it. Unfortunately, it is difficult to measure the masses of small planets with traditional indirect techniques (e.g. radial velocity).A planet's gravitational effects on nearby interplanetary dust (or 'exozodi') can be more easily observed than the planet itself. A single observation of a planetary disk could constrain the mass of an exoplanet if the dust distribution varies sufficiently to be distinguished by future instruments. The NASA Haystacks team (PI: A. Roberge) has completed preliminary high-fidelity spectral image cubes of our entire Solar System at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, including star & planet spectra and scattered light from dust. In addition to these models, we present new planetary system architectures designed to test whether we can distinguish between mini-Neptune-mass planets and Earth-mass planets by their effects on the dust structure. These spectral image cubes will be processed through instrument simulators, allowing comparison of known disk structure with simulated observations of the disk. The results will help inform future exoplanet telescope missions in development (e.g. WFIRST/AFTA and ATLAST).Spectral image cubes will be available for download from a NASA website once

  6. Design, manufacture and spin test of high contact ratio helicopter transmission utilizing Self-Aligning Bearingless Planetary (SABP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folenta, Dezi; Lebo, William

    1988-01-01

    A 450 hp high ratio Self-Aligning Bearingless Planetary (SABP) for a helicopter application was designed, manufactured, and spin tested under NASA contract NAS3-24539. The objective of the program was to conduct research and development work on a high contact ratio helical gear SABP to reduce weight and noise and to improve efficiency. The results accomplished include the design, manufacturing, and no-load spin testing of two prototype helicopter transmissions, rated at 450 hp with an input speed of 35,000 rpm and an output speed of 350 rpm. The weight power density ratio of these gear units is 0.33 lb hp. The measured airborne noise at 35,000 rpm input speed and light load is 94 dB at 5 ft. The high speed, high contact ratio SABP transmission appears to be significantly lighter and quieter than comtemporary helicopter transmissions. The concept of the SABP is applicable not only to high ratio helicopter type transmissions but also to other rotorcraft and aircraft propulsion systems.

  7. Quenching ilmenite with a high-temperature and high-pressure phase using super-high-energy ball milling.

    PubMed

    Hashishin, Takeshi; Tan, Zhenquan; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Kim, Jungeum; Numako, Chiya; Naka, Takashi; Valmalette, Jean Christophe; Ohara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The mass production of highly dense oxides with high-temperature and high-pressure phases allows us to discover functional properties that have never been developed. To date, the quenching of highly dense materials at the gramme-level at ambient atmosphere has never been achieved. Here, we provide evidence of the formation of orthorhombic Fe2TiO4 from trigonal FeTiO3 as a result of the high-temperature (>1250 K) and high-pressure (>23 GPa) condition induced by the high collision energy of 150 gravity generated between steel balls. Ilmenite was steeply quenched by the surrounding atmosphere, when iron-rich ilmenite (Fe2TiO4) with a high-temperature and high-pressure phase was formed by planetary collisions and was released from the collision points between the balls. Our finding allows us to infer that such intense planetary collisions induced by high-energy ball milling contribute to the mass production of a high-temperature and high-pressure phase. PMID:24763088

  8. High Energy Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.; Gallardo, J. C.

    INTRODUCTION PHYSICS CONSIDERATIONS GENERAL REQUIRED LUMINOSITY FOR LEPTON COLLIDERS THE EFFECTIVE PHYSICS ENERGIES OF HADRON COLLIDERS HADRON-HADRON MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST CIRCULAR e^{+}e^- MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST e^{+}e^- LINEAR COLLIDERS LUMINOSITY CONVENTIONAL RF SUPERCONDUCTING RF AT HIGHER ENERGIES γ - γ COLLIDERS μ ^{+} μ^- COLLIDERS ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES DESIGN STUDIES STATUS AND REQUIRED R AND D COMPARISION OF MACHINES CONCLUSIONS DISCUSSION

  9. Coupled nonequilibrium flow, energy and radiation transport for hypersonic planetary entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Donald Jerome

    An ever increasing demand for energy coupled with a need to mitigate climate change necessitates technology (and lifestyle) changes globally. An aspect of the needed change is a decrease in the amount of anthropogenically generated CO2 emitted to the atmosphere. The decrease needed cannot be expected to be achieved through only one source of change or technology, but rather a portfolio of solutions are needed. One possible technology is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), which is likely to play some role due to its combination of mature and promising emerging technologies, such as the burning of hydrogen in gas turbines created by pre-combustion CCS separation processes. Thus research on effective methods of burning turbulent hydrogen jet flames (mimicking gas turbine environments) are needed, both in terms of experimental investigation and model development. The challenge in burning (and modeling the burning of) hydrogen lies in its wide range of flammable conditions, its high diffusivity (often requiring a diluent such as nitrogen to produce a lifted turbulent jet flame), and its behavior under a wide range of pressures. In this work, numerical models are used to simulate the environment of a gas turbine combustion chamber. Concurrent experimental investigations are separately conducted using a vitiated coflow burner (which mimics the gas turbine environment) to guide the numerical work in this dissertation. A variety of models are used to simulate, and occasionally guide, the experiment. On the fundamental side, mixing and chemistry interactions motivated by a H2/N2 jet flame in a vitiated coflow are investigated using a 1-D numerical model for laminar flows and the Linear Eddy Model for turbulent flows. A radial profile of the jet in coflow can be modeled as fuel and oxidizer separated by an initial mixing width. The effects of species diffusion model, pressure, coflow composition, and turbulent mixing on the predicted autoignition delay times and mixture

  10. Flare physics at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy processes, involving a rich variety of accelerated particle phenomena, lie at the core of the solar flare problem. The most direct manifestation of these processes are high-energy radiations, gamma rays, hard X-rays and neutrons, as well as the accelerated particles themselves, which can be detected in interplanetary space. In the study of astrophysics from the moon, the understanding of these processes should have great importance. The inner solar system environment is strongly influenced by activity on the sun; the physics of solar flares is of great intrinsic interest; and much high-energy astrophysics can be learned from investigations of flare physics at high energies.

  11. Planetary atlases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Inge, J. L.; Morgan, H. F.

    1991-01-01

    Two kinds of planetary map atlases are in production. Atlases of the first kind contain reduced-scale versions of maps in hard-bound books with dimensions of 11 x 14 inches. These new atlases are intended to: (1) provide concise but comprehensive references to the geography of the planets needed by planetary scientists and others; and (2) allow inexpensive access to the planetary map dataset without requiring acquisition and examination of tens or hundreds of full-size map sheets. Two such atlases have been published and a third is in press. Work was begun of an Atlas of the Satellite of the Outer Planets. The second kind of atlas is a popular or semi-technical version designed for commercial publication and distribution. The first edition, The Atlas of the Solar System, is nearly ready for publication. New funding and contracting constraints now make it unlikely that the atlas can be published in the format originally planned. Currently, the possibility of publishing the maps through the U.S. Geological Survey as a series of folios in the I-map series is being explored. The maps are global views of each solid-surface body of the Solar System. Each map shows airbrushed relief, albedo, and, where available, topography. A set of simplified geologic maps is also included. All of the maps are on equal-area projections. Scales are 1:40,000,000 for the Earth and Venus; 1:2,000,000 for the Saturnian satellites Mimas and Enceladus and the Uranian satellite Miranda; 1:100,000 for the Martian satellites, Phobos and Deimos; and 1:10,000,000 for all other bodies.

  12. Probing planetary interiors: Shock compression of water to 700 GPa and 3.8 g/cc, and recent high precision Hugoniot measurements of deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudson, Marcus

    2013-06-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous increase in the number of identified extra-solar planetary systems. Our understanding of the formation of these systems is tied to our understanding of the internal structure of these exoplanets, which in turn rely upon equations of state of light elements and compounds such as water and hydrogen. Here we present shock compression data for water with unprecedented accuracy that shows commonly used models for water in planetary modeling significantly overestimate the compressibility at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Furthermore, we show that its behavior at these conditions, including reflectivity and isentropic response, is well described by a recent first-principles based equation of state. These findings advocate the use of this model as the standard for modeling Neptune, Uranus, and ``hot Neptune'' exoplanets, and should contribute to improved understanding of the interior structure of these planets, and perhaps improved understanding of formation mechanisms of planetary systems. We also present very recent experiments on deuterium that have taken advantage of continued improvements in both experimental configuration and the understanding of the quartz shock standard to obtain Hugoniot data with a significant increase in precision. These data will prove to provide a stringent test for the equation of state of hydrogen and its isotopes. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-ACO4-94AL85000.

  13. Planetary Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busse, F. H.

    1985-01-01

    The MAGSAT-program has added significantly to our knowledge of planetary magnetism. The accuracy of observations has been improved such that a reliable extrapolation of the magnetic field to the core surface is now much more feasible than it has been before, and the prospect of further MAGSAT missions raises the expectation that the time dependence of the geomagnetic field will be known with similar accuracy in the future. In the research support it has been attempted to develop dynamo theory with these applications in mind.

  14. Planetary astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Harlan J.

    1991-01-01

    Lunar-based astronomy offers major prospects for solar system research in the coming century. In addition to active advocacy of both ground-based and Lunar-based astronomy, a workshop on the value of asteroids as a resource for man is being organized. The following subject areas are also covered: (1) astrophysics from the Moon (composition and structure of planetary atmospheres); (2) a decade of cost-reduction in Very Large Telescopes (the SST as prototype of special-purpose telescopes); and (3) a plan for development of lunar astronomy.

  15. Planetary Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonenko, I.; Head, J. W.; Pieters, C. W.

    1998-01-01

    The final report consists of 10 journal articles concerning Planetary Volcanism. The articles discuss the following topics: (1) lunar stratigraphy; (2) cryptomare thickness measurements; (3) spherical harmonic spectra; (4) late stage activity of volcanoes on Venus; (5) stresses and calderas on Mars; (6) magma reservoir failure; (7) lunar mare basalt volcanism; (8) impact and volcanic glasses in the 79001/2 Core; (9) geology of the lunar regional dark mantle deposits; and (10) factors controlling the depths and sizes of magma reservoirs in Martian volcanoes.

  16. Planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.; Ness, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    A concise overview is presented of our understanding of planetary magnetospheres (and in particular, of that of the Earth), as of the end of 1981. Emphasis is placed on processes of astrophysical interest, e.g., on particle acceleration, collision-free shocks, particle motion, parallel electric fields, magnetic merging, substorms, and large scale plasma flows. The general morphology and topology of the Earth's magnetosphere are discussed, and important results are given about the magnetospheres of Jupiter, Saturn and Mercury, including those derived from the Voyager 1 and 2 missions and those related to Jupiter's satellite Io. About 160 references are cited, including many reviews from which additional details can be obtained.

  17. Meteorite impact ejecta - Dependence of mass and energy lost on planetary escape velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. D.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    The amounts of material and energy which escape a planet in a meteorite impact event is calculated as functions of impact and escape velocities. Results are obtained from the computed flow induced by the impact of iron and gabbroic anorthosite spheres onto a half-space of anorthosite at impact velocities of 5 to 45 km/sec. The impact-induced flows were determined by a numerical method using the mass, momentum, and energy conservation relations in finite-difference approximation, within an Eulerian computational grid. The impact velocities at which ejecta losses equal meteorite mass gains are found to be approximately 20, 35, and 45 km/sec for anorthosite objects and approximately 25, 35, and 40 km/sec for iron objects striking anorthosite surfaces for the gravity fields of the moon, Mercury and Mars.

  18. Meteorite impact ejecta: dependence of mass and energy lost on planetary escape velocity.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J D; Ahrens, T J

    1977-12-23

    The calculated energy efficiency of mass ejection for iron and anorthosite objects striking an anorthosite planet at speeds of 5 to 45 kilometers per second decreases with increasing impact velocity at low escape velocities. At escape velocities of >10(5) and >2 x 10(4) centimeters per second, respectively, the slower impactors produce relatively less ejecta for a given impact energy. The impact velocities at which ejecta losses equal meteorite mass gains are found to be approximately 20, 35, and 45 kilometers per second for anorthosite objects and approximately 25, 35, and 40 kilometers per second for iron objects striking anorthosite surfaces for the gravity fields of the moon, Mercury, and Mars. PMID:17741703

  19. High energy forming facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciurlionis, B.

    1967-01-01

    Watertight, high-explosive forming facility, 25 feet in diameter and 15 feet deep, withstands repeated explosions of 10 pounds of TNT equivalent. The shell is fabricated of high strength steel and allows various structural elements to deform or move elastically and independently while retaining structural integrity.

  20. Density and Sound Velocity of Iron-Sulfur Alloying Liquids at High Pressures and Implications to Planetary Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Z.; Wang, Y.; Yu, T.; Sakamaki, T.; Kono, Y.; Park, C.

    2012-04-30

    Liquid Fe-light element alloys are likely present in the Earth's outer core and the cores (or outer cores) of other terrestrial planets such as Moon, Mercury, and Mars, suggested by geophysical and geochemical observations. In order to determine the abundances of light elements and their effects on the structure, dynamics, and evolution of planetary cores, it is crucial to determine the equation of state for Fe-light element alloying liquids under core conditions. However, density data on liquid Fe-light element alloys at core pressures are very limited and no sound velocity or bulk modulus data are available for these liquids at high pressures. This makes it difficult to extrapolate the equation of state to core pressures. As a result, density data on solid Fe alloys are often used in the literature to compare with seismological observations by making rough corrections for the volume of melting. In this study, we determine the density and sound velocity for Fe-S liquids with different sulfur contents at high pressure and temperature conditions up to 8 GPa and 2173 K using synchrotron X-ray techniques.

  1. High energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation covers three broad topics: a brief introduction to the field of nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies; a discussion of several topics illustrating what`s been learned after more than a decade of fixed target experiments; and an indication of what the future may bring at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) under construction at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) planned at CERN.

  2. A New Vision for Fusion Energy Research: Fusion Rocket Engines for Planetary Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G. A.; Weber, T. E.; Turchi, P. J.; Parks, P. B.; Evans, T. E.; Cohen, S. A.; Cassibry, J. T.; Campbell, E. M.

    2015-11-16

    Here, we argue that it is essential for the fusion energy program to identify an imagination-capturing critical mission by developing a unique product which could command the marketplace. We also lay out the logic that this product is a fusion rocket engine, to enable a rapid response capable of deflecting an incoming comet, to prevent its impact on the planet Earth, in defense of our population, infrastructure, and civilization. Deep space solar system exploration, with greater speed and orders-of-magnitude greater payload mass is also be possible.

  3. A new vision for fusion energy research: Fusion rocket engines for planetary defense

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wurden, G. A.; Weber, T. E.; Turchi, P. J.; Parks, P. B.; Evans, T. E.; Cohen, S. A.; Cassibry, J. T.; Campbell, E. M.

    2015-11-16

    Here, we argue that it is essential for the fusion energy program to identify an imagination-capturing critical mission by developing a unique product which could command the marketplace. We lay out the logic that this product is a fusion rocket engine, to enable a rapid response capable of deflecting an incoming comet, to prevent its impact on the planet Earth, in defense of our population, infrastructure, and civilization. As a side benefit, deep space solar system exploration, with greater speed and orders-of-magnitude greater payload mass would also be possible.

  4. Planetary Habitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, James F.

    1997-01-01

    This grant was entitled 'Planetary Habitability' and the work performed under it related to elucidating the conditions that lead to habitable, i.e. Earth-like, planets. Below are listed publications for the past two and a half years that came out of this work. The main thrusts of the research involved: (1) showing under what conditions atmospheric O2 and O3 can be considered as evidence for life on a planet's surface; (2) determining whether CH4 may have played a role in warming early Mars; (3) studying the effect of varying UV levels on Earth-like planets around different types of stars to see whether this would pose a threat to habitability; and (4) studying the effect of chaotic obliquity variations on planetary climates and determining whether planets that experienced such variations might still be habitable. Several of these topics involve ongoing research that has been carried out under a new grant number, but which continues to be funded by NASA's Exobiology program.

  5. Planetary Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Radar is a powerful technique that has furnished otherwise unavailable information about solar system bodies for three decades. The advantages of radar in planetary astronomy result from: (1) the observer's control of all the attributes of the coherent signal used to illuminate the target, especially the wave form's time/frequency modulation and polarization; (2) the ability of radar to resolve objects spatially via measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency; (3) the pronounced degree to which delay-Doppler measurements constrain orbits and spin vectors; and (4) centimeter-to-meter wavelengths, which easily penetrate optically opaque planetary clouds and cometary comae, permit investigation of near-surface macrostructure and bulk density, and are sensitive to high concentrations of metal or, in certain situations, ice. Planetary radar astronomy has primarily involved observations with Earth-based radar telescopes, but also includes some experiments with a spaceborne transmitter or receiver. In addition to providing a wealth of information about the geological and dynamical properties of asteroids, comets, the inner planets, and natural satellites, radar experiments have established the scale of the solar system, have contributed significantly to the accuracy of planetary ephemerides, and have helped to constrain theories of gravitation. This review outlines radar astronomical techniques and describes principal observational results.

  6. MHD Solutions for Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segura, G.; López, J. A.; Franco, J.

    2003-09-01

    This paper provides solutions for the origin of post-AGB winds, their acceleration up to high speed, and the subsequent formation of extremely collimated proto-planetary nebulae. Several wind models with terminal velocities from a few tens of voidb @xkms-1 up to 10^3 voidb @xkms-1 are calculated, which produce proto-planetary nebulae with linear momentum in the range 10^36 - 10^40 voidb @xgcms-1 and with kinetic energies in the range 10^42 - 10^47 erg. These results match available observations of proto-planetary nebulae. In the present simplistic scheme, the driver of the wind is just the magnetic pressure at the stellar surface. Other forces are not taken into account in this study, except gravity. We conclude that mass-loss rates of post-AGB stars and transition times from late AGB up to planetary nebula central stars could be directly linked with the production of magnetic field at the stellar core. As an example, mass-loss rates as large as 8×10^-5 M[ scriptstyle sun ]yr-1 and transition times as short as 5,000 years are predicted.

  7. The Multi-Temporal Database of High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) and Planetary Images of Mars (MUTED): A Tool to Support the Identification of Surface Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkeling, G.; Luesebrink, D.; Hiesinger, H.; Reiss, D.; Jaumann, R.

    2015-10-01

    Image data transmitted to Earth by Martian spacecraft since the 1970s, for example by Mariner and Viking, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Express (MEx) and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) showed, that the surface of Mars has changed dramatically and actually is continually changing [e.g., 1-8]. The changes are attributed to a large variety of atmospherical, geological and morphological processes, including eolian processes [9,10], mass wasting processes [11], changes of the polar caps [12] and impact cratering processes [13]. The detection of surface changes in planetary image data is closely related to the spatial and temporal availability of images in a specific region. While previews of the images are available at ESA's Planetary Science Archive (PSA), through the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) and via other less frequently used databases, there is no possibility to quickly and conveniently see the spatial and temporal availability of HRSC images and other planetary image data in a specific region, which is important to detect the surface changes that occurred between two or more images. In addition, it is complicated to get an overview of the image quality and label information for images covering the same area. However, the investigation of surface changes represents a key element in martian research and has implications for the geologic, morphologic and climatic evolution of Mars. In order to address these issues, we developed the "Multi- Temporal Database of High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) Images" (MUTED), which represents a tool for the identification of the spatial and multi-temporal coverage of planetary image data from Mars. Scientists will be able to identify the location, number, and time range of acquisition of overlapping HRSC images. MUTED also includes images of other planetary image datasets such as those of the Context Camera (CTX), the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and the High Resolution

  8. Advanced planetary analyses. [for planetary mission planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The results are summarized of research accomplished during this period concerning planetary mission planning are summarized. The tasks reported include the cost estimations research, planetary missions handbook, and advanced planning activities.

  9. Ultra high resolution molecular beam cars spectroscopy with application to planetary atmospheric molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of high resolution pulsed and continuous wave (CW) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in pulsed and steady state supersonic expansions were demonstrated. Pulsed molecular beam sources were characterized, and saturation of a Raman transition and, for the first time, the Raman spectrum of a complex molecular cluster were observed. The observation of CW CARS spectra in a molecular expansion and the effects of transit time broadening is described. Supersonic expansion is established as a viable technique for high resolution Raman spectroscopy of cold molecules with resolutions of 100 MH2.

  10. Fundamental Parameters and Spectral Energy Distributions of Young and Field Age Objects with Masses Spanning the Stellar to Planetary Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippazzo, Joseph C.; Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline; Cruz, Kelle L.; Van Gordon, Mollie M.; Looper, Dagny L.

    2015-09-01

    We combine optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared spectra and photometry to construct expanded spectral energy distributions for 145 field age (>500 Myr) and 53 young (lower age estimate <500 Myr) ultracool dwarfs (M6-T9). This range of spectral types includes very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planetary mass objects, providing fundamental parameters across both the hydrogen and deuterium burning minimum masses for the largest sample assembled to date. A subsample of 29 objects have well constrained ages as probable members of a nearby young moving group. We use 182 parallaxes and 16 kinematic distances to determine precise bolometric luminosities (Lbol) and radius estimates from evolutionary models give semi-empirical effective temperatures (Teff) for the full range of young and field age late-M, L, and T dwarfs. We construct age-sensitive relationships of luminosity, temperature, and absolute magnitude as functions of spectral type and absolute magnitude to disentangle the effects of degenerate physical parameters such as Teff, surface gravity, and clouds on spectral morphology. We report bolometric corrections in J for both field age and young objects and find differences of up to a magnitude for late-L dwarfs. Our correction in Ks shows a larger dispersion but not necessarily a different relationship for young and field age sequences. We also characterize the NIR-MIR reddening of low gravity L dwarfs and identify a systematically cooler Teff of up to 300 K from field age objects of the same spectral type and 400 K cooler from field age objects of the same MH magnitude.

  11. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A synoptic view of early and recent data on the planetary magnetism of Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn is presented. The data on Mercury from Mariner 10 are synthesized with various other sources, while data for Venus obtained from 120 orbits of Pioneer Venus give the upper limit of the magnetic dipole. Explorer 35 Lunar Orbiter data provided the first evidence of lunar magnetization, but it was the Apollo subsatellite data that measured accurately the magnetic dipole of the moon. A complete magnetic survey of Mars is still needed, and only some preliminary data are given on the magnetic dipole of the planet. Figures on the magnetic dipoles of Jupiter and Saturn are also suggested. It is concluded that if the magnetic field data are to be used to infer the interior properties of the planets, good measures of the multiple harmonics in the field are needed, which may be obtained only through low altitude polar orbits.

  12. Spatial Query for Planetary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Khawaja S.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Powell, Mark W.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Fox, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    Science investigators need to quickly and effectively assess past observations of specific locations on a planetary surface. This innovation involves a location-based search technology that was adapted and applied to planetary science data to support a spatial query capability for mission operations software. High-performance location-based searching requires the use of spatial data structures for database organization. Spatial data structures are designed to organize datasets based on their coordinates in a way that is optimized for location-based retrieval. The particular spatial data structure that was adapted for planetary data search is the R+ tree.

  13. High Precision Isotope Analyses Using Multi-Collector SIMS: Applications to Earth and Planetary Science.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, N. T.; Ushikubo, T.; Valley, J. W.

    2008-05-01

    The CAMECA IMS-1280 large radius, multicollector ion microprobe at the Wisc-SIMS National Facility is capable of high accuracy and precision for in situ analysis of isotope ratios. With improved hardware stability and software capability, high precision isotope analyses are routinely performed, typically 5 min per spot. We have developed analytical protocols for stable isotope analyses of oxygen, carbon, Mg, Si and Sulfur using multi-collector Faraday Cups (MCFC) and achieved precision of 0.1-0.2 ‰ (1SD) from a typically 10μm spot analyses. A number of isotopically homogeneous mineral standards have been prepared and calibrated in order to certify the accuracy of analyses in the same level. When spatial resolution is critical, spot size is reduced down to sub- μm for δ 18O to obtain better than 0.5‰ (1SD) precision by using electron multiplier (EM) on multi-collection system. Multi-collection EM analysis is also applied at 10 ppm level to Li isotope ratios in zircon with precision better than 2‰ (1SD). A few applications will be presented. (1) Oxygen three isotope analyses of chondrules in ordinary chondrites revealed both mass dependent and mass independent oxygen isotope fractionations among chondrules as well as within individual chondrules. The results give constraints on the process of chondrule formation and origin of isotope reservoirs in the early solar system. (2) High precision 26Al-26Mg (half life of 0.73 Ma) chronology is applied to zoned melilite and anorthite from Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAI) in Leoville meteorite, and a well-defined internal isochron is obtained. The results indicate the Al- Mg system was remained closed within 40ky of the crystallization of melilite and anorthite in this CAI. (3) Sub- μm spot analyses of δ18O in isotopically zoned zircon from high-grade metamorphism reveals a diffusion profile of ~6‰ over 2μm, indicating slow diffusion of oxygen in zircon. This result also implies that old Archean detrital zircons (> 4

  14. Surface charging and x-ray emission from insulator surfaces induced by collisions with highly charged ions : relevance to cometary and planetary sp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djuric, N.; Lozano, J. A.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2005-01-01

    Characteristic X-ray emission lines are detected from simulants of comet surfaces as they undergo collisions with highly charged ions (HCIs). The HCI projectiles are O+2-O+7. Ion energies are varied in the range (2-7)q keV, where q is the ion charge state. The targets are the insulator minerals olivine, augite, and quartz. It is found that the emission of characteristic K-L, K-M X-rays appears to proceed during positive charging of the surface by the HCI beam. When one uses low-energy, flood-gun electrons to neutralize the surface charge, the X-ray emission is eliminated or greatly reduced, depending on the flood-gun current. Acceleration of background electrons onto the charged surface results in excitation of elemental transitions, including the K-L2 and K-L3 target X-ray emission lines of Mg and Si located spectroscopically at 1253.6 and 1739.4 eV, respectively. Also observed are emission lines from O, Na, Ca, Al, and Fe atoms in the target and charge-exchange lines via surface extraction of electrons by the O+q electric field. Good agreement is found in the ratio of the measured X-ray yields for Mg and Si relative to the ratio of their electron-impact K-shell ionization cross sections. The present study may serve as a guide to astronomers as to specific observing X-ray energies indicative of solar/stellar wind or magnetospheric ion interactions with a comet, planetary surface, or circumstellar dust.

  15. High-Pressure Studies on Iron Analogs with Application to Planetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwal, B. K.; Raju, S.; Geballe, Z.; Jeanloz, R.

    2013-12-01

    The properties of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals at high pressures are of geophysical interest because hcp Fe is likely to be the primary constituent of Earth's inner core. Zinc and cadmium crystallize in a distorted hcp structure, and undergo electronic topological transitions at high pressures manifested through anomalous values of the c/a crystal-axis ratio, compressibility and electron transport properties. There is renewed interest in such electronic transitions due to their recent association with anomalies in c/a, Debye velocity and Mössbauer center shift in Fe and Fe-Ni alloy near 40 GPa. Past high-pressure studies have shown that the c/a anomaly is larger in Cd as compared to Zn. Nonhydrostatic measurements on Cd reveal texture development, which is used in identifying deformation mechanisms in Os and Fe. Angular x-ray diffraction measurements in a resistively heated diamond-anvil cell, with argon as pressure medium, were carried out on Cd up to 25 GPa at room temperature. We minimized nonhydrostatic conditions by thermally annealing the sample at each pressure by heating it to 100° C, which resulted in sharpening of diffraction peaks. Variations of c/a with pressure revealed anomalies near 2, 7, 15 and 22 GPa, with corresponding anomalies in compression at similar pressures. We associate these anomalies with electronic topological transitions, based on results of first-principles electronic structure calculations at high pressures. Our data are in good agreement with independent measurements using helium as a pressure medium, so the anomalies cannot be ascribed to nonhydrostaticity. Also, in-situ x-ray powder-diffraction shows that the melting curve of Cd deviates from the Lindemann law above 1 GPa, consistent with the occurrence of electronic transitions.

  16. Refining Parameters of the XO-5 Planetary System with High-Precision Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, G.; Seeliger, M.; Adam, Ch.; Raetz, St.; Neuhäuser, R.

    2011-03-01

    Studies of transiting extrasolar planets provide unique opportunity to get to know the internal structure of those worlds. The transiting exoplanet XO-5 b was found to have an anomalously high Safronov number and surface gravity. Our aim was to refine parameters of this intriguing system and search for signs of transit timing variations. We gathered high-precision light curves for two transits of XO-5 b. Assuming three different limb darkening laws, we found the best-fitting model and redetermined parameters of the system, including planet-to-star radius ratio, impact parameter and central time of transits. Error estimates were derived by the prayer bead method and Monte Carlo simulations. Although system's parameters obtained by us were found to agree with previous studies within one sigma, the planet was found to be notable smaller with the radius of 1.03+0.06-0.05 Jupiter radii. Our results confirm the high Safronov number and surface gravity of the planet. With two new mid-transit times, the ephemeris was refined to BJDTDB=(2454485.66842±0.00028)+(4.1877537±0.000017)E. No significant transit timing variation was detected.

  17. Two perspectives on the coupled carbon, water and energy exchange in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combe, M.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H. G.; Jacobs, C. M. J.; Peters, W.

    2015-01-01

    analysis where high subsidence and soil moisture depletion, typical for periods of drought, have competing and opposite effects on the boundary-layer height h. The resulting net decrease in h induces a change of 12 ppm in the late-afternoon CO2 mole fraction. Also, the effect of such high subsidence and soil moisture depletion on the surface Bowen ratio are of the same magnitude. Thus, correctly including such two-way land-surface interactions on the diurnal scale can potentially improve our understanding and interpretation of observed variations in atmospheric CO2, as well as improve crop yield forecasts by better describing the water loss and carbon gain.

  18. Experimental High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, Carla

    2005-10-12

    Neutrinos are considered promising probes for high energy astrophysics. More than four decades after deep water Cerenkov technique was proposed to detect high energy neutrinos. Two detectors of this type are successfully taking data: BAIKAL and AMANDA. They have demonstrated the feasibility of the high energy neutrino detection and have set first constraints on TeV neutrino production astrophysical models. The quest for the construction of km3 size detectors have already started: in the South Pole, the IceCube neutrino telescope is under construction; the ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR Collaborations are working towards the installation of a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea.

  19. High-energy spectroscopic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel; Walter, Roland

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  20. Hydrogen and related materials at high density: Physics, chemistry and planetary implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Mao, H. K.; Duffy, T. S.; Goncharov, A.; Vos, W.; Zha, C. S.; Eggert, J. H.; Li, M.; Hanfland, M.

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies of low-Z molecular materials including hydrogen to multimegabar pressures (less than 300 GPa) have uncovered a range of phenomena relevant to understanding the nature of the interiors of the outer planets and their satellites. Synchrotron x ray diffraction measurements (to 42 GPa) have been used to determine the crystal structure of the solid (hexagonal-close packed) and equation of state. Sound velocities in fluid and solid hydrogen (to 24 GPa) have been inverted to obtain elastic constants and aggregate bulk and shear moduli. In addition, an improved intermolecular potential has been determined which fits both static and shock-wave data. Use of the new potential for the molecular envelope of Jupiter suggests the need for major revisions of existing Jovian models or a reanalysis of reported free oscillations for the planet. Studies at higher pressures (greater than 100 GPa) reveal a sequence of pressure-induced symmetry-breaking transitions in molecular hydrogen, giving rise to three high-pressure phases (1, 2, and 3). Phase 1 is the rotationally disordered hcp phase which persists from low pressure to well above 100 GPa at high temperature (e.g., 300 K). Phase 2 is a low-temperature, high-pressure phase (transition at 100 GPa and 77 K in H2) with spectral features indicative of partial rotational ordering and crystallographic distortion. The transition to Phase 3 at 150 GPa is accompanied by a weakening of the molecular bond, gradual changes in orientational ordering, strong enhancement of the infrared intramolecular vibrational absorption, and strong intermolecular interactions similar to those of ambient-pressure network solids. Studies of the phase diagram reveal a triple point near 130 K and 160 GPa. Higher pressure measurements of vibrational spectra place a lower bound of approximately 250 GPa on the predicted transition pressure for dissociation of molecular hydrogen to form a monatomic metal.

  1. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

  2. Pigmentation as a survival strategy for ancient and modern photosynthetic microbes under high ultraviolet stress on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn-Williams, D. D.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Newton, E. M.; Holder, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Solar radiation is the primary energy source for surface planetary life, so that pigments are fundamental components of any surface-dwelling organism. They may therefore have evolved in some form on Mars as they did on Earth. Photosynthetic microbes are major primary producers on Earth, but are concurrently vulnerable to ultraviolet (UV) damage. Using non-intrusive laser Raman spectroscopy to recognize the component parts of biomolecules, we have shown not only the abundance of microbial photosynthetic and photoprotective pigments in situ, but also their spatial distribution within their microhabitat. This essential aspect of their screening or avoidance survival strategies is lost on extraction with solvents. This precise approach is eminently suited to analysis of epilithic (surface) and endolithic (within rocks) communities in Antarctic desert habitats, which are putative analogues of early Mars. Raman spectra for key biomolecules (e.g. the UV screen parietin and the antioxidant [beta]-carotene in epilithic lichens) enable not only the detection of organics in light-stratified habitats, but also the characterization of unknown pigments. Typical biomarkers of astrobiological relevance in our Raman spectral database include scytonemin (a UV screen), chlorophyll (primary photosynthetic pigment), phycocyanin (accessory pigment for shade adaptation) and a hopanoid extracted from 2.5 Gya microbial stromatolite from Australia. This compound dates from the same time period when a wetter Mars could have had a potentially flourishing surface microbial community of its own. Analyses with a laboratory Raman instrument have been extended to a novel miniature Raman spectrometer, operating at the same optimal excitation wavelength (1064 nm) via an In-Ga-As detector. After evaluation in Antarctica, this instrument will be space-qualified for a proposed Mars rover mission to detect biomolecules in the near-surface sediment profile of palaeolakes, using experience with Antarctic

  3. High pressure and temperature electrical resistivity of iron and implications for planetary cores (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, L.; Seagle, C. T.; Fei, Y.; Shahar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements of polycrystalline iron have been performed at 5, 7 and 15 GPa and in the temperature range 293-2200 K by employing a four-wired method. The kinks in electrical resistivity associated with solid iron phase transitions and the solid to liquid transition were clearly observed upon increasing temperature. Geometry corrections due to volume variations with pressure and temperature were applied to the entire data set. High pressure and temperature thermal conductivity were calculated by fitting resistivity data through the Wiedemann-Franz law. The temperature dependences of electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity for α, γ and ɛ solid iron have been determined at high pressure conditions. Our study provides the first experimental constraint on the heat flux conducted at Mercury's outmost core, estimated to be 0.29-0.36 TW, assuming an adiabatic core. Extrapolations of our data to Martian outer core conditions yield a series of heat transport parameters (eg. electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and heat flux), which are in reasonable comparison with various geophysical estimates.

  4. Future of high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-06-01

    A rough overview is given of the expectations for the extension of high energy colliders and accelerators into the xtremely high energy range. It appears likely that the SSC or something like it will be the last gasp of the conventional method of producing high energy proton-proton collisions using synchrotron rings with superconducting magnets. It is likely that LEP will be the highest energy e+e/sup -/ colliding beam storage ring built. The future beyond that depends on the successful demonstrations of new technologies. The linear collider offers hope in this respect for some extension in energy for electrons, and maybe even for protons, but is too early to judge whether, by how much, or when such an extension will indeed take place.

  5. High resolution infrared spectroscopy: Some new approaches and applications to planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The principles of spectral line formation and of techniques for retrieval of atmospheric temperature and constituent profiles are discussed. Applications to the atmospheres of Earth, Mars, Venus, and Jupiter are illustrated by results obtained with Fourier transform and infrared heterodyne spectrometers at resolving powers (lambda/delta hyperon lambda of approximately 10,000 and approximately 10 to the seventh power), respectively, showing the high complementarity of spectroscopy at these two widely different resolving powers. The principles of heterodyne spectroscopy are presented and its applications to atmospheric probing and to laboratory spectroscopy are discussed. Direct absorption spectroscopy with tuneable semiconductor lasers is discussed in terms of precision frequency-and line strength-measurements, showing substantial advances in laboratory infrared spectroscopy.

  6. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z[degrees] resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant [alpha][sub s] for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  7. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z{degrees} resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}{gamma}. We also began a major upgrade of the L3 luminosity monitor by replacing PWC chamber by a Si strip system in front of the BGO calorimeters. Finally we have continued our SSC R&D work on BaF{sub 2} by joining the GEM collaboration.

  8. NASA Planetary Rover Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, David; Bedard, Roger J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Planetary Rover Project was initiated in 1989. The emphasis of the work to date has been on development of autonomous navigation technology within the context of a high mobility wheeled vehicle at the JPL and an innovative legged locomotion concept at Carnegie Mellon University. The status and accomplishments of these two efforts are discussed. First, however, background information is given on the three rover types required for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) whose objective is a manned mission to Mars.

  9. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  10. Maximization of the effective impulse delivered by a high-frequency/low-frequency planetary drill tool.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Patrick; Lucas, Margaret; Cardoni, Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Ultrasonic tools are used for a variety of cutting applications in surgery and the food industry, but when they are applied to harder materials, such as rock, their cutting performance declines because of the low effective impulse delivered by each vibration cycle. To overcome this problem, a technique known as high-frequency/low-frequency (or alternatively, ultrasonic/sonic) drilling is employed. In this approach, an ultrasonic step-horn is used to deliver an impulse to a free mass which subsequently moves toward a drilling bit, delivering the impulse on contact. The free mass then rebounds to complete the cycle. The horn has time between impacts to build significant vibration amplitude and thus delivers a much larger impulse to the free mass than could be delivered if it were applied directly to the target. To maximize the impulse delivered to the target by the cutting bit, both the momentum transfer from the ultrasonic horn to the free mass and the dynamics of the horn/free mass/cutting bit stack must be optimized. This paper uses finite element techniques to optimize the ultrasonic horns and numerical propagation of the stack dynamics to maximize the delivered effective impulse, validated in both cases by extensive experimental analysis. PMID:22083772

  11. Planetary Photojournal Home Page Graphic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image is an unannotated version of the Planetary Photojournal Home Page graphic. This digital collage contains a highly stylized rendition of our solar system and points beyond. As this graphic was intended to be used as a navigation aid in searching for data within the Photojournal, certain artistic embellishments have been added (color, location, etc.). Several data sets from various planetary and astronomy missions were combined to create this image.

  12. Planetary Surface Instruments Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Charles (Editor); Treiman, Allan H. (Editor); Kostiuk, Theodor (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This report on planetary surface investigations and planetary landers covers: (1) the precise chemical analysis of solids; (2) isotopes and evolved gas analyses; (3) planetary interiors; planetary atmospheres from within as measured by landers; (4) mineralogical examination of extraterrestrial bodies; (5) regoliths; and (6) field geology/processes.

  13. Energy transformations associated with the synoptic and planetary scales during the evolution of a blocking anticyclone and an upstream explosively-developing cyclone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Phillip J.; Tsou, Chih-Hua

    1992-01-01

    The eddy kinetic energy (KE), release of eddy potential energy, generation of eddy kinetic energy, and exchange between eddy and zonal kinetic energy are investigated for a blocking anticyclone over the North Atlantic Ocean and an extratropical cyclone that developed during January 17-21, 1979. The results indicate that KE was maintained by baroclinic conversion of potential to kinetic. As released potential energy was being used to generate KE, a portion of the KE was barotropically converted to zonal KE. These transformations were dominated by the synoptic-scale component. While changes in the mass field depended not only on the synoptic scale but also on the interactions between the synoptic and planetary scales, the corresponding changes in the eddy motion fields responded largely to synoptic-scale processes.

  14. Planetary nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobell, M. E.; Masursky, Harold

    1987-01-01

    In fiscal 1986, names were chosen for prominent features on the five previously known Uranian satellites and for features on the largest of the 10 satellites discovered by Voyager 2. The names of the five large satellites are taken mostly from Shakespeare, and most are spirits; therefore, Shakespearean and spirit themes were used to choose names for topographic features on the satellites. Crater names and most other feature names on Miranda, Oberon, and Titania are from Shakespeare; features on Ariel are named for bright spirits and those on Umbriel for dark, all taken from universal mythology. Preliminary coordinates for these features are derived from shaded relief maps of the satellites to be published in 1987. Orbital elements have been established for the 10 new satellites, and a paper describing this work is in progress; satellite positions are under review by Commission 16 of the IAU. The moon 1985 U1 is informally designated Puck. The nine small satellites discovered in 1986 are to be named for Shakespearean heroines; these names are to be listed in the 1987 edition of the Annual Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature.

  15. High energy high brightness thin disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Matthew D.; Cates, Michael C.

    2012-11-01

    Boeing has been developing solid state lasers for high energy applications since 2004 using Yb:YAG thin disk lasers as pioneered by A. Giesen1 and commercialized by Trumpf Laser GmbH.2 In this paper, we report results of our second generation design and status of a third generation we are currently developing, which will produce 35 kW and a beam quality <2.

  16. Nd-142/Nd-144 in bulk planetary reservoirs, the problem of incomplete mixing of interstellar components and significance of very high precision Nd-145/Nd-144 measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, C. L., Jr.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    1993-01-01

    Apart from the challenge of very high precision Nd-142/Nd-144 ratio measurement, accurate applications of the coupled Sm-(146,147)-Nd-(142,143) systematics in planetary differentiation studies require very precise knowledge of the present-day (post-Sm-146 decay) Nd-142/Nd-144 ratios of bulk planetary objects (BP). The coupled systematics yield model ages for the time of formation of Sm/Nd-fractionated reservoirs by differentiation of Sm/Nd-unfractionated bulk planetary reservoirs. Estimates of (Nd-142/Nd-144)(sub BP) and (Nd-143/Nd-144)(sub BP) therefore provide the critical baseline relative to which these model ages are referenced. In the Sm-147-Nd-143 systematics, Nd-143/Nd-144 variations are mostly large; therefore, small variations in initial Nd-143/Nd-144 ratios generally can be ignored. However, in the case of Sm-146-Nd-142, the range of Nd-142/Nd-144 divergence for differentiated planetary reservoirs is much smaller. Consequently Sm-(146,147)-Nd-(142,143) model ages are sensitive to small variations in bulk planetary Nd-142/Nd-144 (both present-day and initial). One major unanswered question is whether or not Nd shelf standards (CIT Nd beta/Ames metal, La Jolla, NASA-JSC/Ames metal) have Nd-142/Nd-144 identical to the bulk Earth or otherwise might record some degree of radiogenic evolution in an early-fractionated reservoir. Our discussions of earth Earth differentiation based on Nd-142/Nd-144 in Isua and Acasta samples have employed a working assumption: (Nd-142/Nd-144)(sub Nd beta) = (Nd-142/Nd-144)(sub Bulk Earth). This requires experimental justification and is apparently contradicted by chondrite Nd-142/Nd-144 measurements, which have been interpreted to indicate: (Nd-142/Nd-144)(sub JSC/Ames metal) = ((Nd-142/Nd-144)(sub CHUR) = 35 plus or minus 8 ppm). At present, interpretations of the early Earth and Moon hinge largely on this issue. Because Ba in bulk chondrite samples exhibit similar magnitude nuclear anomalies, attributable to incomplete mixing

  17. Time-dependent simulations of disk-embedded planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stökl, A.; Dorfi, E. A.

    2014-03-01

    At the early stages of evolution of planetary systems, young Earth-like planets still embedded in the protoplanetary disk accumulate disk gas gravitationally into planetary atmospheres. The established way to study such atmospheres are hydrostatic models, even though in many cases the assumption of stationarity is unlikely to be fulfilled. Furthermore, such models rely on the specification of a planetary luminosity, attributed to a continuous, highly uncertain accretion of planetesimals onto the surface of the solid core. We present for the first time time-dependent, dynamic simulations of the accretion of nebula gas into an atmosphere around a proto-planet and the evolution of such embedded atmospheres while integrating the thermal energy budget of the solid core. The spherical symmetric models computed with the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code) range from the surface of the rocky core up to the Hill radius where the surrounding protoplanetary disk provides the boundary conditions. The TAPIR-Code includes the hydrodynamics equations, gray radiative transport and convective energy transport. The results indicate that diskembedded planetary atmospheres evolve along comparatively simple outlines and in particular settle, dependent on the mass of the solid core, at characteristic surface temperatures and planetary luminosities, quite independent on numerical parameters and initial conditions. For sufficiently massive cores, this evolution ultimately also leads to runaway accretion and the formation of a gas planet.

  18. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Gleckman, Philip L.; O'Gallagher, Joseph J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  19. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  20. Extraterrestrial high energy neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Using the most recent cosmic ray spectra up to 2x10 to the 20th power eV, production spectra of high energy neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with 3K universal background photons are presented and discussed. Estimates of the fluxes from cosmic diffuse sources and the nearby quasar 3C273 are made using the generic relationship between secondary neutrinos and gammas and using recent gamma ray satellite data. These gamma ray data provide important upper limits on cosmological neutrinos. Quantitative estimates of the observability of high energy neutrinos from the inner galaxy and 3C273 above atmospheric background for a DUMAND type detector are discussed in the context of the Weinberg-Salam model with sq sin theta omega = 0.2 and including the atmospheric background from the decay of charmed mesons. Constraints on cosmological high energy neutrino production models are also discussed. It appears that important high energy neutrino astronomy may be possible with DUMAND, but very long observing times are required.

  1. Magnetic transition and sound velocities of Fe 3S at high pressure: implications for Earth and planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Fei, Yingwei; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zhao, Jiyong; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2004-09-01

    Magnetic, elastic, thermodynamic, and vibrational properties of the most iron-rich sulfide, Fe3S, known to date have been studied with synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS) and nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) up to 57 GPa at room temperature. The magnetic hyperfine fields derived from the time spectra of the synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy show that the low-pressure magnetic phase displays two magnetic hyperfine field sites and that a magnetic collapse occurs at 21 GPa. The magnetic to non-magnetic transition significantly affects the elastic, thermodynamic, and vibrational properties of Fe3S. The magnetic collapse of Fe3S may also affect the phase relations in the iron-sulfur system, changing the solubility of sulfur in iron under higher pressures. Determination of the physical properties of the non-magnetic Fe3S phase is important for the interpretation of the amount and properties of sulfur present in the planetary cores. Sound velocities of Fe3S obtained from the measured partial phonon density of states (PDOS) for 57Fe incorporated in the alloy show that Fe3S has higher compressional and shear wave velocity than those of hcp-Fe and hcp-Fe0.92Ni0.08 alloy under high pressures, making sulfur a potential light element in the Earth's core based on geophysical arguments. The VP and VS of the non-magnetic Fe3S follow a Birch's law trend whereas the slopes decrease in the magnetic phase, indicating that the decrease of the magnetic moment significantly affects the sound velocities. If the Martian core is in the solid state containing 14.2 wt.% sulfur, it is likely that the non-magnetic Fe3S phase is a dominant component and that our measured sound velocities of Fe3S can be used to construct the corresponding velocity profile of the Martian core. It is also conceivable that Fe3P and Fe3C undergo similar magnetic phase transitions under high pressures.

  2. Stellar activity effects on high energy exoplanet transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llama, Joe; Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2016-01-01

    High energy (X-ray / UV) observations of transiting exoplanets have revealed the presence of extended atmospheres around a number of systems. At such high energies, stellar radiation is absorbed high up in the planetary atmosphere, making X-ray and UV observations a potential tool for investigating the upper atmospheres of exoplanets. At these high energies, stellar activity can dramatically impact the observations. At short wavelengths the stellar disk appears limb-brightened, and active regions appear as extended bright features that evolve on a much shorter timescale than in the optical making it difficult . These features impact both the transit depth and shape, affecting our ability to measure the true planet-to-star radius ratio.I will show results of simulated exoplanet transit light curves using Solar data obtained in the soft X-ray and UV by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to investigate the impact of stellar activity at these wavelengths. By using a limb-brightened transit model coupled with disk resolved Solar images in the X-ray, extreme- and far-UV I will show how both occulted and unocculted active regions can mimic an inflated planetary atmosphere by changing the depth and shape of the transit profile. I will also show how the disk integrated Lyman-alpha Solar irradiance varies on both short and long timescales and how this variability can impact our ability to recover the true radius ratio of a transiting exoplanet.Finally, I will present techniques on how to overcome these effects to determine the true planet-to-star radius in X-ray and UV observations.

  3. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; Corcoran, Michael; Drake, Stephen; McGlynn, Thomas A.; Snowden, Stephen; Mukai, Koji; Cannizzo, John; Lochner, James; Rots, Arnold; Christian, Eric; Barthelmy, Scott; Palmer, David; Mitchell, John; Esposito, Joseph; Sreekumar, P.; Hua, Xin-Min; Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Chan, Kai-Wing; Soong, Yang; Barrett, Paul

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by the members of the USRA contract team during the 6 months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming 6 months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in astrophysics. Supported missions include advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-Ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and others.

  4. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.; Holdridge, David V.; Norris, J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  5. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Education" includes the following topics: 1) Convection, Magnetism, Orbital Resonances, Impacts, and Volcanism: Energies and Processes in the Solar System: Didactic Activities; 2) Knowledge Management in Aerospace-Education and Training Issues; 3) Creating Easy-to-Understand Planetary Maps; 4) Planetary Environment comparison in the Education of Astrobiology; and 5) Design and Construction of a Mechanism for the Orbital Resonances Simulation.

  6. High-precision potassium measurements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy under high vacuum conditions for in situ K-Ar dating of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yuichiro; Sugita, Seiji; Kameda, Shingo; Miura, Yayoi N.; Ishibashi, Ko; Ohno, Sohsuke; Kamata, Shunichi; Arai, Tomoko; Morota, Tomokatsu; Namiki, Noriyuki; Matsui, Takafumi

    2015-04-01

    We conducted a series of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) experiments for K measurements under high vacuum conditions (10- 6 Pa) for the purpose of developing in-situ isochron type K-Ar dating instruments for planetary missions. Unlike whole rock measurement methods, isochron measurements require LIBS experiments in a vacuum chamber because simultaneous Ar isotopic measurements are necessary. However, detailed examination of detection limits and accuracy of this method at low pressures has not been examined extensively before. In this study, the capability of K measurements under high vacuum conditions was examined using LIBS. A compact Czerny-Turner type spectrometer equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) as a detector was employed. Twenty-three geologic standard samples were measured using the LIBS method. The second strongest K emission line at 769.89 nm was used for calibration because the strongest emission line at 766.49 nm may suffer from strong interference from another emission line. A calibration curve was constructed for K using internal normalization with the oxygen line at 777 nm and well fitted by a power-law function. Based on the prediction band method, the detection limit and the quantitation limit were estimated to be 300 and 800 ppm, respectively. The 1σ relative uncertainty of the K calibration was 20% for 1 wt.% K2O and 40% for 3000 ppm K2O. If the amount of Ar is measured with 15% error for the 3.5 billion years rocks containing 1 and 0.3 wt.% K2O, the K-Ar ages would be determined with 10% and 20% 1σ errors, respectively. This level of precision will significantly improve the current Martian chronology, which has uncertainty about a factor of two to four. These results indicate that the concentration of K can be measured quantitatively under high vacuum conditions using a combination of instruments that have previously been carried in planetary missions, which suggests the viability of building in situ isochron K-Ar dating

  7. Observations of a two-layer soil moisture influence on surface energy dynamics and planetary boundary layer characteristics in a semiarid shrubland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Zulia Mayari; Papuga, Shirley A.

    2014-01-01

    We present an observational analysis examining soil moisture control on surface energy dynamics and planetary boundary layer characteristics. Understanding soil moisture control on land-atmosphere interactions will become increasingly important as climate change continues to alter water availability. In this study, we analyzed 4 years of data from the Santa Rita Creosote Ameriflux site. We categorized our data independently in two ways: (1) wet or dry seasons and (2) one of the four cases within a two-layer soil moisture framework for the root zone based on the presence or absence of moisture in shallow (0-20 cm) and deep (20-60 cm) soil layers. Using these categorizations, we quantified the soil moisture control on surface energy dynamics and planetary boundary layer characteristics using both average responses and linear regression. Our results highlight the importance of deep soil moisture in land-atmosphere interactions. The presence of deep soil moisture decreased albedo by about 10%, and significant differences were observed in evaporative fraction even in the absence of shallow moisture. The planetary boundary layer height (PBLh) was largest when the whole soil profile was dry, decreasing by about 1 km when the whole profile was wet. Even when shallow moisture was absent but deep moisture was present the PBLh was significantly lower than when the entire profile was dry. The importance of deep moisture is likely site-specific and modulated through vegetation. Therefore, understanding these relationships also provides important insights into feedbacks between vegetation and the hydrologic cycle and their consequent influence on the climate system.

  8. High-energy neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Michele Rhea

    2001-12-01

    Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for the radiation protection quantity effective dose were calculated for neutrons, photons and protons with energies up to 2 GeV using the MCNPX code. The calculations were performed using the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory versions of the MIRD-V male and female anthropomorphic phantoms modified to include the skin and esophagus. The latest high-energy neutron evaluated cross-section libraries and the recommendations given in ICRP Publication 60 and ICRP Publication 74 were utilized to perform the calculations. Sets of fluence-to- effective dose conversion coefficients are given for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left-lateral, right-lateral and rotational irradiation geometries. This is the first set of dose conversion coefficients over this energy range calculated for the L-LAT irradiation geometry. A unique set of high-energy neutron depth-dose benchmark experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center/Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE/WNR) complex. The experiments consisted of filtered neutron beams with energies up to 800 MeV impinging on a 30 x 30 x 30 cm3 tissue-equivalent phantom. The absorbed dose was measured in the phantom at various depths with tissue-equivalent ion chambers. The phantom and the experimental set-up were modeled using MCNPX. Comparisons of the experimental and computational depth- dose distributions indicate that the absorbed dose calculated by MCNPX is within 13% for neutrons with energies up to 750 MeV. This experiment will serve as a benchmark experiment for the testing of high-energy radiation transport codes for the international radiation protection community.

  9. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  10. High energy density electrochemical cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, J. J.; Williams, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Primary cell has an anode of lithium, a cathode containing dihaloisocyanuric acid, and a nonaqueous electrolyte comprised of a solution of lithium perchlorate in methyl formate. It produces an energy density of 213 watt hrs/lb and can achieve a high current density.

  11. Analysis of new high-precision transit light curves of WASP-10 b: starspot occultations, small planetary radius, and high metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, G.; Raetz, St.; Nettelmann, N.; Seeliger, M.; Adam, C.; Nowak, G.; Neuhäuser, R.

    2011-11-01

    Context. The WASP-10 planetary system is intriguing because different values of radius have been reported for its transiting exoplanet. The host star exhibits activity in terms of photometric variability, which is caused by the rotational modulation of the spots. Moreover, a periodic modulation has been discovered in transit timing of WASP-10 b, which could be a sign of an additional body perturbing the orbital motion of the transiting planet. Aims: We attempt to refine the physical parameters of the system, in particular the planetary radius, which is crucial for studying the internal structure of the transiting planet. We also determine new mid-transit times to confirm or refute observed anomalies in transit timing. Methods: We acquired high-precision light curves for four transits of WASP-10 b in 2010. Assuming various limb-darkening laws, we generated best-fit models and redetermined parameters of the system. The prayer-bead method and Monte Carlo simulations were used to derive error estimates. Results: Three transit light curves exhibit signatures of the occultations of dark spots by the planet during its passage across the stellar disk. The influence of stellar activity on transit depth is taken into account while determining system parameters. The radius of WASP-10 b is found to be no greater than 1.03+0.07-0.03 Jupiter radii, a value significantly smaller than most previous studies indicate. We calculate interior structure models of the planet, assuming a two-layer structure with one homogeneous envelope atop a rock core. The high value of the WASP-10 b's mean density allows one to consider the planet's internal structure including 270 to 450 Earth masses of heavy elements. Our new mid-transit times confirm that transit timing cannot be explained by a constant period if all literature data points are considered. They are consistent with the ephemeris assuming a periodic variation of transit timing. We show that possible starspot features affecting the

  12. Comparative Understanding of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.; Atreya, S. K.; Bolton, S. J.; Bougher, S. W.; Coustenis, A.; Edgington, S. G.; Friedson, A. J.; Griffith, C. A.; Guberman, S. L.; Hammel, H. B.; Lunine, J. I.; Mendillo, M.; Moses, J.; Mueller-Wodarg, I.; Orton, G. S.; Rages, K. A.; Slanger, T. G.; Titov, D. V.; Yelle, R.

    2001-11-01

    Observing, characterizing, and understanding planetary atmospheres are key components of solar system exploration. A planet's atmosphere is the interface between the surface and external energy and mass sources. Understanding how atmospheres are formed, evolve, and respond to perturbations is essential for addressing the long-range science objectives of identifying the conditions that are favorable for producing and supporting biological activity, managing the effects of human activity on the Earth's atmosphere, and planning and evaluating observations of extra-solar planets. Our current knowledge, based on very few observations, indicates that the planets and moons in the solar system have diverse atmospheres with a number of shared characteristics. Comparing and contrasting solar system atmospheres provides the best means of addressing the broad scientific goals. Additional space missions with specific atmospheric objectives are required. At the same time, investment of additional resources is needed in the infrastructure of observation and interpretation of planetary atmospheres. The Planetary Atmospheres Community Panel is considering and prioritizing potential recommendations in two broad categories. Possible recommendations that apply to multiple planets include creation of a new Comparative Planetary Atmospheres program, establishing a mechanism for secure funding for analysis and interpretation of mission data, creation of a new "Super-Discovery" program for more ambitious planetary missions, enhancement of laboratory and theory research, and deployment of space- or ground-based telescopes dedicated to planetary observations. Possible recommendations for specific planetary missions with atmospheric goals include deep-penetration multiprobes to determine elemental compositions of giant planet atmospheres, Venus and Mars atmospheric explorer missions, and a Post-Cassini atmospheric/surface mission to Titan.

  13. Synthetic high-resolution near-IR spectra of the Sun for planetary data reductions made from ATMOS/Spacelab-3 and Atlas-3 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Haingja; Kim, Sang J.; Hwang, Sungwon; Jung, Aeran; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Joo Hyeon; Kim, Kap-Sung; Lee, Jinny; Jang, Minhwan

    2007-12-01

    We have constructed synthetic solar spectra for the 2302-4800 cm -1 (2.08-4.34 μm) range, a spectral range where planetary objects mainly emit reflected sunlight, using ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy)/Spacelab-3 and Atlas-3 spectra, of which resolution is 0.01 cm -1. We adopted Voigt line profiles for the modeling of line shapes based on an atlas of line identifications compiled by Geller [Geller, M., 1992. Key to Identification of Solar Features. A High-Resolution Atlas of the Infrared Spectrum of the Sun and the Earth Atmosphere from Space. NASA Reference Publ. 1224, vol. III. NASA, Washington, DC, pp. 1-22], who derived solar line positions and intensities from contaminated high-resolution solar spectra obtained by ATMOS/Spacelab-3. Because the ATMOS spectra in these wavelength ranges are compromised by absorption lines of molecules existing in Earth's high-altitude atmosphere and in the compartment of the spacecraft, the direct use of these high-resolution solar spectra has been inconvenient for the data reductions of planetary spectra. We compared the synthetic solar spectra with the ATMOS spectra, and obtained satisfactory fits for the majority of the solar lines with the exception of abnormal lines, which do not fit with Voigt line profiles. From the model fits, we were able to determine Voigt line parameters for the majority of solar lines; and we made a list of the abnormal lines. We also constructed telluric-line-free solar spectra by manually eliminating telluric lines from the ATMOS spectra and filling the gaps with adjacent continua. These synthetic solar spectra will be useful to eliminate solar continua from spectra of planetary objects to extract their own intrinsic spectral features.

  14. CRYSTALLINE BEAMS AT HIGH ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.; OKAMOTO, H.; YURI, Y.; SESSLER, A.; MACHIDA, S.

    2006-06-23

    Previously it was shown that by crystallizing each of the two counter-circulating beams, a much larger beam-beam tune shift can be tolerated during the beam-beam collisions; thus a higher luminosity can be reached for colliding beams [1]. On the other hand, crystalline beams can only be formed at energies below the transition energy ({gamma}{sub T}) of the accelerators [2]. In this paper, we investigate the formation of crystals in a high-{gamma}{sub T} lattice that also satisfies the maintenance condition for a crystalline beam [3].

  15. Planetary sample rapid recovery and handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Methods for recovering and cost effectively handling planetary samples following return to the vicinity of Earth were designed for planetary mission planners. Three topics are addressed: (1) a rough cost estimate was produced for each of a series of options for the handling of planetary samples following their return to the vicinity of Earth; (2) the difficulty of quickly retrieving planetary samples from low circular and high elliptical Earth orbit is assessed; and (3) a conceptual design for a biological isolation and thermal control system for the returned sample and spacecraft is developed.

  16. Probing the high energy universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, John K.

    1988-04-01

    Techniques and programs involved with gamma-ray astronomy are discussed. The way in which information about high energy processes in the universe can be obtained from the study of gamma-ray emissions is reviewed. Coded mask telescopes, the French and Soviet Gamma-1 project to study gamma-rays in the 100-300 MeV energy range, and the French Sigma hard X-ray/medium energy gamma-ray experiment are considered. The planned NASA Gamma-Ray Observatory mission is described, including the burst and transient source, experiment, the Compton telescope, the energetic gamma-ray experimental telescope, and the oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment. Also, the proposed ESA Gamma-Ray Astronomy with Spectroscopy and Positioning mission is examined.

  17. Disequilibration by Planetary Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Jutzi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Molten planets equilibrate gravitationally, chemically, and thermally. Large scale collisions (a.k.a. giant impacts, similar-sized collisions) can upset the apple cart by bringing core material, late in the game, into mixture with mantle products, and by shredding stratified planets into strands of mantle and clumps of core (c.g. Asphaug et al. Nature 2006). Atmophiles and volatiles come along for the ride, and can find themselves in disequilibrium mixtures not anticipated by one-dimensional models of planetary evolution, or by planet growth models in which planets stick, merge, and mix perfectly in the aftermath of a collision. We present very high resolution case studies of such collisions.

  18. Advances in planetary geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    This second issue in a new series intended to serve the planetary geology community with a form for quick and thorough communications includes (1) a catalog of terrestrial craterform structures for northern Europe; (2) abstracts of results of the Planetary Geology Program, and (3) a list of the photographic holdings of regional planetary image facilities.

  19. A high energy physics perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  20. Cosmology for high energy physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, A.

    1987-11-01

    The standard big bang model of cosmology is presented. Although not perfect, its many successes make it a good starting point for most discussions of cosmology. Places are indicated where well understood laboratory physics is incorporated into the big bang, leading to successful predictions. Much less established aspects of high energy physics and some of the new ideas they have introduced into the field of cosmology are discussed, such as string theory, inflation and monopoles. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Topics covered include: Ringwoodite-olivine assemblages in Dhofar L6 melt veins; Amorphization of forsterite grains due to high energy heavy ion irradiation: Implications for grain processing in ISM; Validation of AUTODYN in replicating large-scale planetary impact events; A network of geophysical observatories for mars; Modelling catastrophic floods on the surface of mars; Impact into coarse grained spheres; The diderot meteorite: The second chassignite; Galileo global color mosaics of Io; Ganymede's sulci on global and regional scales; and The cold traps near the south pole of the moon.

  2. High energy overcurrent protective device

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical loads connected to capacitance elements in high voltage direct current systems are protected from damage by capacitance discharge overcurrents by connecting between the capacitance element and the load, a longitudinal inductor comprising a bifilar winding wound about a magnetic core, which forms an incomplete magnetic circuit. A diode is connected across a portion of the bifilar winding which conducts a unidirectional current only. Energy discharged from the capacitance element is stored in the inductor and then dissipated in an L-R circuit including the diode and the coil winding. Multiple high voltage circuits having capacitance elements may be connected to loads through bifilar windings all wound about the aforementioned magnetic core.

  3. High energy electron positron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Soding, P.

    1987-01-01

    With the termination of the physics program at PETRA in a year from now, and with the start of TRISTAN and the SLC and later LEP, an era of e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics will come to an end and a new one begins. The field is changing from a field of a few specialists, to becoming one of the mainstream efforts of the high energy community. It seems appropriate at this moment to summarize what has been learned over the past years, in a way more useful to any high energy physicist in particular to newcomers in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ field. This is the purpose of the book. This book should be used as a reference for future workers in the field of e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions. It includes the most relevant data, parametrizations, theoretical background, and a chapter on detectors. Contents: Foreword; Detectors for High Energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ Physics; Lepton Pair Production and Electroweak Parameters; Hadron Production, Strong and Electroweak Properties; tau Physics; Recent Results on the Charm Sector; Bottom Physics; Lifetime Measurements of tau, Charmed and Beauty Hadrons; UPSILON Spectroscopy; Hadronic Decays of the UPSILON; Quark and Gluon Fragmentation in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ Continuum; Jet Production and QCD; Two Photon Physics; Search for New Particles.

  4. High Pressure Cosmochemistry of Major Planetary Interiors: Laboratory Studies of the Water-rich Region of the System Ammonia-water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, M.; Johnson, M.; Koumvakalis, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of gas-ice mixtures in major planets at very high pressures was studied. Some relevant pressure-temperature-composition (P-T-X) regions of the hydrogen (H2)-helium (He)-water (H2O-ammonia (NH3)-methane (CH4) phase diagram were determined. The studies, and theoretical model, of the relevant phases, are needed to interpret the compositions of ice-gas systems at conditions of planetary interest. The compositions and structures of a multiphase, multicomponent system at very high pressures care characterized, and the goal is to characterize this system over a wide range of low and high temperatures. The NH3-H2O compositions that are relevant to planetary problems yet are easy to prepare were applied. The P-T surface of water was examined and the corresponding surface for NH3 was determined. The T-X diagram of ammonia-water at atmospheric pressure was studied and two water-rich phases were found, NH3-2H2O (ammonia dihydrate), which melts incongruently, and NH3.H2O (ammonia monohydrate), which is nonstoichiometric and melts at a higher temperature than the dihydrate. It is suggested that a P-T surface at approximately the monohydrate composition and the P-X surface at room temperature is determined.

  5. High-energy density physics at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, P.

    1993-03-01

    This brochure describes the facilities of the Above Ground Experiments 2 (AGEX 2) and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs at Los Alamo. Combined, these programs represent, an unparalleled capability to address important issues in high-energy density physics that are critical to the future defense, energy, and research needs of the United States. The mission of the AGEX 2 program at Los Alamos is to provide additional experimental opportunities for the nuclear weapons program. For this purpose we have assembled at Los Alamos the broadest array of high-energy density physics facilities of any laboratory in the world. Inertial confinement fusion seeks to achieve thermonuclear burn on a laboratory scale through the implosion of a small quantity of deuterium and tritium fuel to very high pressure and temperature. The Los Alamos ICF program is focused on target physics. With the largest scientific computing center in the world, We can perform calculations of unprecedented sophistication and precision. We field experiments at facilities worldwide--including our own Trident and Mercury lasers--to confirm our understanding and to provide the necessary data base to proceed toward the historic goal of controlled fusion in the laboratory. The ultrahigh magnetic fields produced in our high explosive pulsed-power generators can be used in a wide variety of solid state physics and temperature superconductor studies. The structure and dynamics of planetary atmospheres can be simulated through the compression of gas mixtures.

  6. Pion exchange at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    The state of Regge pion exchange calculations for high-energy reactions is reviewed. Experimental evidence is summarized to show that (i) the pion trajectory has a slope similar to that of other trajectories; (ii) the pion exchange contribution can dominate contributions of higher trajectories up to quite a large energy; (iii) many two-body cross sections with large pion contributions can be fit only by models which allow for kinematical conspiracy at t=0. The theory of kinematic conspiracy is reviewed for two-body amplitudes, and calculations of the conspiring pion--Pomeron cut discussed. The author then summarizes recent work on pion exchange in Reggeized Deck models for multiparticle final states, with emphasis on the predictions of various models (with and without resonances) for phases of the partial wave amplitudes.

  7. Present and Future Capabilities of High Energy Density Experiments*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzen, M. Keith

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, experiments on high energy lasers and pulsed power facilities have successfully reached extreme conditions of temperature and pressure in the laboratory, allowing replication of conditions relevant to areas of high energy density (HED) plasma physics (for example, astrophysics, planetary interiors, stellar physics, and Inertial Confinement Fusion). Experiments in these areas are now routinely providing high quality data in the areas of high energy density hydrodynamics and implosions, radiation transport, and equation-of-state. Current facilities include pulsed-power accelerators, such as the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories, and high-energy lasers, such as the 60-beam Omega laser at the Laboratory of Laser Energetics at Rochester, as well as other MA-class pulsed-power facilities and kJ-class lasers worldwide. These facilities routinely conduct experiments at radiation temperatures of 200 eV and pressures up to 40 MBar. New facilities, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the refurbished Z facility, will extend the experimental regimes to higher temperatures and densities. The National Petawatt laser initiative is examining the physics regimes that could be explored by coupling energetic short-pulse lasers (multi-kJ energies at ps pulse widths) to experiments on these large HED facilities. We will review capabilities of the existing HED facilities, highlight examples of recent experimental results in HED plasma physics, discuss new regimes that might be achievable on next-generation facilities (e.g. NIF and refurbished Z), and explore the potential applications resulting from coupling multi-PW laser pulses with HED plasmas produced on these facilities. *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. High Energy Laser Diagnostic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, James R.; Goddard, Douglas N.; Lewis, Jay; Thomas, David

    2010-10-01

    Recent advancements in high energy laser (HEL) sources have outpaced diagnostic tools capable of accurately quantifying system performance. Diagnostic tools are needed that allow system developers to measure the parameters that define HEL effectiveness. The two critical parameters for quantifying HEL effectiveness are the irradiance on target and resultant rise in target temperature. Off-board sensing has its limitations, including unpredictable changes in the reflectivity of the target, smoke and outgassing, and atmospheric distortion. On-board sensors overcome the limitations of off-board techniques but must survive high irradiance levels and extreme temperatures. We have developed sensors for on-target diagnostics of high energy laser beams and for the measurement of the thermal response of the target. The conformal sensors consist of an array of quantum dot photodetectors and resistive temperature detectors. The sensor arrays are lithographically fabricated on flexible substrates and can be attached to a variety of laser targets. We have developed a nanoparticle adhesive process that provides good thermal contact with the target and that ensures the sensor remains attached to the target for as long as the target survives. We have calibrated the temperature and irradiance sensors and demonstrated them in a HEL environment.

  9. Duke University high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  10. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  11. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is an artist's concept describing the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO). The HEAO project involved the launching of three unmarned scientific observatories into low Earth orbit between 1977 and 1979 to study some of the most intriguing mysteries of the universe; pulsars, black holes, neutron stars, and super nova. This concept was painted by Jack Hood of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Hardware support for the imaging instruments was provided by American Science and Engineering. The HEAO spacecraft were built by TRW, Inc. under project management of the MSFC.

  12. High-Energy-Density Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slenes, Kirk

    2003-01-01

    Capacitors capable of storing energy at high densities are being developed for use in pulse-power circuits in such diverse systems as defibrillators, particle- beam accelerators, microwave sources, and weapons. Like typical previously developed energy-storage capacitors, these capacitors are made from pairs of metal/solid-dielectric laminated sheets that are wound and pressed into compact shapes to fit into cans, which are then filled with dielectric fluids. Indeed, these capacitors can be fabricated largely by conventional fabrication techniques. The main features that distinguish these capacitors from previously developed ones are improvements in (1) the selection of laminate materials, (2) the fabrication of the laminated sheets from these materials, and (3) the selection of dielectric fluids. In simplest terms, a high-performance laminated sheet of the type used in these capacitors is made by casting a dielectric polymer onto a sheet of aluminized kraft paper. The dielectric polymer is a siloxane polymer that has been modified with polar pendant groups to increase its permittivity and dielectric strength. Potentially, this polymer is capable of withstanding an energy density of 7.5 J/cm3, which is four times that of the previous state-of-the-art-capacitor dielectric film material. However, the full potential of this polymer cannot be realized at present because (1) at thicknesses needed for optimum performance (.8.0 m), the mechanical strength of a film of this polymer is insufficient for incorporation into a wound capacitor and (2) at greater thickness, the achievable energy density decreases because of a logarithmic decrease in dielectric strength with increasing thickness. The aluminized kraft paper provides the mechanical strength needed for processing of the laminate and fabrication of the capacitor, and the aluminum film serves as an electrode layer. Because part of the thickness of the dielectric is not occupied by the modified siloxane polymer, the

  13. A high-resolution model of the planetary boundary layer - Sensitivity tests and comparisons with SESAME-79 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, D.; Anthes, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    A one-dimensional, planetary boundary layer (PBL) model is presented and verified using April 10, 1979 SESAME data. The model contains two modules to account for two different regimes of turbulent mixing. Separate parameterizations are made for stable and unstable conditions, with a predictive slab model for surface temperature. Atmospheric variables in the surface layer are calculated with a prognostic model, with moisture included in the coupled surface/PBL modeling. Sensitivity tests are performed for factors such as moisture availability, albedo, surface roughness, and thermal capacity, and a 24 hr simulation is summarized for day and night conditions. The comparison with the SESAME data comprises three hour intervals, using a time-dependent geostrophic wind. Close correlations were found with daytime conditions, but not in nighttime thermal structure, while the turbulence was faithfully predicted. Both geostrophic flow and surface characteristics were shown to have significant effects on the model predictions

  14. Planetary radar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    1983-03-01

    The present investigation is concerned with planetary radar research reported during the time from 1979 to 1982. A brief synopsis of radar definitions and technical terminology is also provided. In connection with the proximity of the moon to earth, lunar radar studies have been performed over a wider range of wavelengths than radar investigations of other planetary targets. The most recent study of lunar quasispecular scattering is due to Simpson and Tyler (1982). The latest efforts to interpret the lunar radar maps focus on maria-highlands regolith differences and models of crater ejecta evolution. The highly successful Pioneer Venus Radar Mapper experiment has provided a first look at Venus' global distributions of topography, lambda 17-cm radar reflectivity, and rms surface slopes. Attention is given to recent comparisons of Viking Orbiter images of Mars to groundbased radar altimetry of the planet, the icy Galilean satellites, radar observations of asteroids and comets, and lambda 4-cm and lambda 13-cm observations of Saturn's rings.

  15. Frontiers in plasma science: a high energy density perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    The potential for ground-breaking research in plasma physics in high energy density (HED) regimes is compelling. The combination of HED facilities around the world spanning microjoules to megajoules, with time scales ranging from femtoseconds to microseconds enables new regimes of plasma science to be experimentally probed. The ability to shock and ramp compress samples and simultaneously probe them allows dense, strongly coupled, Fermi degenerate plasmas relevant to planetary interiors to be studied. Shock driven hydrodynamic instabilities evolving into turbulent flows relevant to the dynamics of exploding stars are being probed. The physics and dynamics of magnetized plasmas relevant to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion are also starting to be studied. High temperature, high velocity interacting flows are being probed for evidence of astrophysical collisionless shock formation. Turbulent, high magnetic Reynolds number flows are being experimentally generated to look for evidence of the turbulent magnetic dynamo effect. And new results from thermonuclear reactions in dense hot plasmas relevant to stellar interiors are starting to emerge. A selection of examples providing a compelling vision for frontier plasma science in the coming decade will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. High pressure cosmochemistry of major planetary interiors: Laboratory studies of the water-rich region of the system ammonia-water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, Malcolm; Johnson, Mary; Boone, Steven; Cynn, Hyunchee

    1987-01-01

    Several studies relative to high pressure cosmochemistry of major planetary interiors are summarized. The behavior of gas-ice mixtures at very high pressures, studies of the phase diagram of (NH3) sub x (H2O) sub 1-x at pressures to 5GPa and temperatures from 240 to 370 K, single crystal growth of ammonia dihydrate at room temperature in order to determine their structures by x-ray diffraction, spectroscopy of chemical reactions during shock compression in order to evaluate how the reactions affect the interpretation of equation of state data obtained by shock methods, and temperature and x-ray diffraction measurements made on resistively heated wire in diamond anvil cells in order to obtain phase and structural data relevant to the interiors of terrestrial planets are among the studies discussed.

  17. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support provided by Science Applications, Inc. staff members to Earth and Planetary Exploration Division, OSSA/NASA, for the period 1 February 1981 to 30 April 1982 are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation, planetary missions performance, solar system exploration committee support, Mars program planning, Galilean satellite mission concepts, and advanced propulsion data base. The work covers 80 man-months of research. Study reports and related publications are included in a bibliography section.

  18. Tactical high-energy laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwartz, Josef; Wilson, Gerald T.; Avidor, Joel M.

    2002-06-01

    The Nautilus Project was started in 1995 as a joint US-Israel feasibility study for using laser systems to defend against short-range artillery rockets. It has now matured into a successful laser weapon demonstration program - the Tactical High Energy Laser (THEL) Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) Program. By now the THEL Demonstrator has engaged and destroyed a large number of artillery rockets in mid-flight in an extended series of demonstration tests at the US Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The THEL ACTD hardware and development process are described in this paper, as well as the major test results. The paper also describes the operational concept for a deployed THEL weapon system and some possible growth paths for the THEL ACTD Program.

  19. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  20. High energy femtosecond pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassonde, Philippe; Mironov, Sergey; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Payeur, Stéphane; Khazanov, Efim; Sergeev, Alexander; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Mourou, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    An original method for retrieving the Kerr nonlinear index was proposed and implemented for TF12 heavy flint glass. Then, a defocusing lens made of this highly nonlinear glass was used to generate an almost constant spectral broadening across a Gaussian beam profile. The lens was designed with spherical curvatures chosen in order to match the laser beam profile, such that the product of the thickness with intensity is constant. This solid-state optics in combination with chirped mirrors was used to decrease the pulse duration at the output of a terawatt-class femtosecond laser. We demonstrated compression of a 33 fs pulse to 16 fs with 170 mJ energy.

  1. The planetary data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Steven W.

    1991-01-01

    Nasa has sponsored the development of the Planetary Data System (PDS) in order to preserve the scientific returns from past and future planeary missions and to make those data readily accessible in a well-documented form. The PDS encompasses all planetary data, but also provides a distributed, discipline-oriented architecture to best serve the needs of the diverse planetary sciences user-community. It is the intention of the PDS to ease and promote the analysis of planetary data through the development and application of data and documentation standards, basic analysis tools, and technology.

  2. Planetary geosciences, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, Maria T. (Editor); Plescia, Jeff L. (Editor); James, Odette B. (Editor); Macpherson, Glenn (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Research topics within the NASA Planetary Geosciences Program are presented. Activity in the fields of planetary geology, geophysics, materials, and geochemistry is covered. The investigator's current research efforts, the importance of that work in understanding a particular planetary geoscience problem, the context of that research, and the broader planetary geoscience effort is described. As an example, theoretical modelling of the stability of water ice within the Martian regolith, the applicability of that work to understanding Martian volatiles in general, and the geologic history of Mars is discussed.

  3. Low Energy Building for High Energy People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The Huston Huffman Center at the University of Oklahoma's Norman campus has a jogging track as well as facilities for exercise and court games that are fully accessible to the handicapped. The building is set eight feet in the ground both to reduce its bulk and to conserve energy. (Author/MLF)

  4. Mass spectrometry of planetary exospheres at high relative velocity: direct comparison of open- and closed source measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Stefan; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The exploration of habitable worlds around the gas giants in the Solar System is of major interest in upcoming planetary missions. Exactly this theme is addressed by the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) mission of ESA, which will characterise Ganymede, Europa and Callisto as planetary objects and potential habitats [1], [2]. We developed a prototype of the Neutral gas and Ion Mass spectrometer (NIM) of the Particle Environment Package (PEP) for the JUICE mission intended for composition measurements of neutral gas and thermal plasma. NIM/PEP will be used to measure the chemical composition of the exospheres of the icy Jovian moons. Besides direct ion measurement, the NIM instrument is able to measure the inflowing neutral gas in two different modes: in neutral mode the gas enters directly the ion source (open source) and in thermal mode, the gas gets thermally accommodated to wall temperature by several collisions inside an equilibrium sphere before entering the ion source (closed source). We performed measurements with the prototype NIM using a neutral gas beam of 1 up to 5 km/s velocity in the neutral and thermal mode. The current trajectory of JUICE foresees a flyby velocity of 4 km/s at Europa, other flybys are in the range of 1 up to 7 km/s and velocity in Ganymede orbits is around 2 km/s. Different species are used for gas beam, such as noble gases Ne, Ar, Kr as well as molecules like H2, Methane, Ethane, Propane and more complex ones. We will present the results of these measurements with respect to fragmentation and density enhancements in the closed source mode. Furthermore, we will give a direct comparison between open and closed source mode measurements. References: [1] ESA, "JUICE assessment study report (Yellow Book)", ESA/SRE(2011)18, 2012. [2] O. Grasset, M.K. Dougherty, A. Coustenis, E.J. Bunce, C. Erd, D. Titov, M. Blanc, A. Coates, P. Drossart, L.N. Fletcher, H. Hussmann, R. Jaumann, N. Krupp, J.-P. Lebreton, O. Prieto-Ballesteros, P. Tortora, F

  5. International Infrastructure for Planetary Sciences: Universal Planetary Database Development Project 'the International Planetary Data Alliance'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaba, Yasumasa; Crichton, D.; Capria, M. T.; Beebe, R.; Zender, J.

    2009-09-01

    The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA), formed under COSPAR in 2008, is a joint international effort to enable global access and exchange of high quality planetary science data, and to establish archive standards that make it easier to share data across international boundaries. In June - July 2009, we held the 4th Steering Committee meeting. Thanks to the many players from several agencies and institutions in the world, we got fruitful results in 6 projects: (1) Inter-operable Planetary Data Access Protocol (PDAP) implementations [led by J. Salgado@ESA], (2) Small bodies interoperability [led by I. Shinohara@JAXA & N. Hirata@U. Aizu], (3) PDAP assessment [led by Y. Yamamoto@JAXA], (4) Architecture and standards definition [led by D. Crichton@NASA], (5) Information model and data dictionary [led by S. Hughes@NASA], and (6) Venus Express Interoperability [led by N. Chanover@NMSU]. The projects demonstrated the feasibility of sharing data and emphasized the importance of developing common data standards to ensure world-wide access to international planetary archives. The Venus Express Interoperability project leveraged standards and technology efforts from both the Planetary Data System (PDS) and IPDA in order to deliver a new capability for data sharing between NASA/PDS and ESA/PSA. This project demonstrated a model and framework for linking compliant planetary archive systems for future international missions. The next step for IPDA, during the 2009-2010 period, will be to work with NASA/PDS to review and participate in an upgrade of its standards to improve both the consistency of the standards to build compliant international archives as well as improve long-term usability of the science data products. This paper presents the achievements and plans, which will be summarized in the paper which will appear in 'Space Research Today' in December 2009.

  6. High Energy Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Edward McCullough; Patrick Dhooge; Jonathan Nimitz

    2003-12-31

    This project determined the performance of a new high efficiency refrigerant, Ikon B, in a residential air conditioner designed to use R-22. The refrigerant R-22, used in residential and small commercial air conditioners, is being phased out of production in developed countries beginning this year because of concerns regarding its ozone depletion potential. Although a replacement refrigerant, R-410A, is available, it operates at much higher pressure than R-22 and requires new equipment. R-22 air conditioners will continue to be in use for many years to come. Air conditioning is a large part of expensive summer peak power use in many parts of the U.S. Previous testing and computer simulations of Ikon B indicated that it would have 20 - 25% higher coefficient of performance (COP, the amount of cooling obtained per energy used) than R-22 in an air-cooled air conditioner. In this project, a typical new R-22 residential air conditioner was obtained, installed in a large environmental chamber, instrumented, and run both with its original charge of R-22 and then with Ikon B. In the environmental chamber, controlled temperature and humidity could be maintained to obtain repeatable and comparable energy use results. Tests with Ikon B included runs with and without a power controller, and an extended run for several months with subsequent analyses to check compatibility of Ikon B with the air conditioner materials and lubricant. Baseline energy use of the air conditioner with its original R-22 charge was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. After changeover to Ikon B and a larger expansion orifice, energy use was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. Ikon B proved to have about 19% higher COP at 90 deg F and about 26% higher COP at 100 deg F versus R-22. Ikon B had about 20% lower cooling capacity at 90 deg F and about 17% lower cooling capacity at 100 deg F versus R-22 in this system. All results over multiple runs were within 1% relative standard deviation (RSD). All of these

  7. Micrometer-sized ice particles for planetary-science experiments - I. Preparation, critical rolling friction force, and specific surface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, B.; Kilias, S.; Beitz, E.; Blum, J.

    2011-08-01

    Coagulation models assume a higher sticking threshold for micrometer-sized ice particles than for micrometer-sized silicate particles. However, in contrast to silicates, laboratory investigations of the collision properties of micrometer-sized ice particles (in particular, of the most abundant H 2O-ice) have not been conducted yet. Thus, we used two different experimental methods to produce micrometer-sized H 2O-ice particles, i.e. by spraying H 2O droplets into liquid nitrogen and by spraying H 2O droplets into a cold nitrogen atmosphere. The mean particle radii of the ice particles produced with these experimental methods are (1.49 ± 0.79) μm and (1.45 ± 0.65) μm. Ice aggregates composed of the micrometer-sized ice particles are highly porous (volume filling factor: ϕ = 0.11 ± 0.01) or rather compact (volume filling factor: ϕ = 0.72 ± 0.04), depending on the method of production. Furthermore, the critical rolling friction force of FRoll, ice = (114.8 ± 23.8) × 10 -10 N was measured for micrometer-sized ice particles, which exceeds the critical rolling friction force of micrometer-sized SiO 2 particles (F=(12.1±3.6)×10-10N). This result implies that the adhesive bonding between micrometer-sized ice particles is stronger than the bonding strength between SiO 2 particles. An estimation of the specific surface energy of micrometer-sized ice particles, derived from the measured critical rolling friction forces and the surface energy of micrometer-sized SiO 2 particles, results in γice = 0.190 J m -2.

  8. The aurora as a source of planetary-scale waves in the middle atmosphere. [atmospheric turbulence caused by auroral energy absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Straus, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Photographs of global scale auroral forms taken by scanning radiometers onboard weather satellites in 1972 show that auroral bands exhibit well organized wave motion with typical zonal wave number of 5 or so. The scale size of these waves is in agreement with that of well organized neutral wind fields in the 150- to 200-km region during the geomagnetic storm of May 27, 1967. Further, the horizontal scale size revealed by these observations are in agreement with that of high altitude traveling ionospheric disturbances. It is conjectured that the geomagnetic storm is a source of planetary and synoptic scale neutral atmospheric waves in the middle atmosphere. Although there is, at present, no observation of substorm related waves of this scale size at mesospheric and stratospheric altitudes, the possible existence of a new source of waves of the proper scale size to trigger instabilities in middle atmospheric circulation systems may be significant in the study of lower atmospheric response to geomagnetic activity.

  9. Planetary Moon Cycler Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ryan P.; Strange, Nathan J.

    2007-01-01

    Free-return cycler trajectories repeatedly shuttle a spacecraft between two bodies using little or no fuel. Here, the cycler architecture is proposed as a complementary and alternative method for designing planetary moon tours. Previously applied enumerative cycler search and optimization techniques are generalized and specifically implemented in the Jovian and Saturnian moon systems. In addition, the algorithms are tested for general use to find non-Earth heliocentric cyclers. Overall, hundreds of ideal model ballistic cycler geometries are found and several representative cases are documented and discussed. Many of the ideal model solutions are found to remain ballistic in a zero radius sphere of influence patched conic ephemeris model, and preliminary work in a high-fidelity fully integrated model demonstrates near-ballistic cycles for several example cases.

  10. Priority Planetary Science Missions Identified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. National Research Council's (NRC) planetary science decadal survey report, released on 7 March, lays out a grand vision for priority planetary science missions for 2013-2022 within a tightly constrained fiscal environment. The cost-conscious report, issued by NRC's Committee on the Planetary Science Decadal Survey, identifies high-priority flagship missions, recommends a number of potential midsized missions, and indicates support for some smaller missions. The report states that the highest-priority flagship mission for the decade is the Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C)—the first of three components of a NASA/European Space Agency Mars sample return campaign—provided that the mission scope can be reduced so that MAX-C costs no more than $2.5 billion. The currently estimated mission cost of $3.5 billion “would take up a disproportionate near-term share of the overall budget for NASA's Planetary Science Division,” the report notes.

  11. Compact, high energy gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stapleton, Robert E.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1976-08-03

    An electrically pumped gas laser amplifier unit having a disc-like configuration in which light propagation is radially outward from the axis rather than along the axis. The input optical energy is distributed over a much smaller area than the output optical energy, i.e., the amplified beam, while still preserving the simplicity of parallel electrodes for pumping the laser medium. The system may thus be driven by a comparatively low optical energy input, while at the same time, owing to the large output area, large energies may be extracted while maintaining the energy per unit area below the threshold of gas breakdown.

  12. Advances in Planetary Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in Planetary Geology is a new series intended to serve the planetary geology community with a form for quick and thorough communications. There are no set lists of acceptable topics or formats, and submitted manuscripts will not undergo a formal review. All submissions should be in a camera ready form, preferably spaced, and submitted to the editor.

  13. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator advanced studies, Mercury mission transport requirements, definition of super solar electric propulsion/solar sail mission discriminators, and advanced planning activities.

  14. Planetary Exploration in ESA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwehm, Gerhard H.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on planetary exploration in the European Space Agency is shown. The topics include: 1) History of the Solar System Material; 2) ROSETTA: The Comet Mission; 3) A New Name For The Lander: PHILAE; 4) The Rosetta Mission; 5) Lander: Design Characteristics; 6) SMART-1 Mission; 7) MARS Express VENUS Express; 8) Planetary Exploration in ESA The Future.

  15. High energy chemical laser system

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, D.W.; Pearson, R.K.

    1975-12-23

    A high energy chemical laser system is described wherein explosive gaseous mixtures of a reducing agent providing hydrogen isotopes and interhalogen compounds are uniformly ignited by means of an electrical discharge, flash- photolysis or an electron beam. The resulting chemical explosion pumps a lasing chemical species, hydrogen fluoride or deuterium fluoride which is formed in the chemical reaction. The generated lasing pulse has light frequencies in the 3- micron range. Suitable interhalogen compounds include bromine trifluoride (BrF$sub 3$), bromine pentafluoride (BrF$sub 5$), chlorine monofluoride (ClF), chlorine trifluoride (ClF$sub 3$), chlorine pentafluoride (ClF$sub 5$), iodine pentafluoride (IF$sub 5$), and iodine heptafluoride (IF$sub 7$); and suitable reducing agents include hydrogen (H$sub 2$), hydrocarbons such as methane (CH$sub 4$), deuterium (D$sub 2$), and diborane (B$sub 2$H$sub 6$), as well as combinations of the gaseous compound and/or molecular mixtures of the reducing agent.

  16. High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's challenge on advanced concept activity in the propulsion area, we initiated a new program entitled "High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion Studies" within the current cooperative agreement in 1998. The goals of this work are to gain further understanding of the engine of the AIMStar spacecraft, a concept which was developed at Penn State University, and to develop a prototype concept for the engine. The AIMStar engine concept was developed at Penn State University several years ago as a hybrid between antimatter and fusion technologies. Because of limited amounts of antimatter available, and concurrently the demonstrated ability for antiprotons to efficiently ignite nuclear fusion reactions, it was felt that this was a very good match. Investigations have been made concerning the performance of the reaction trap. This is a small Penning-like electromagnetic trap, which is used to simultaneously confine antiprotons and fusion fuels. Small DHe3 or DT droplets, containing a few percent molar of a fissile material, are injected into the trap, filled with antiprotons. We have found that it is important to separate the antiprotons into two adjacent wells, to inject he droplet between them and to simultaneously bring the antiprotons to the center of the trap, surrounding the droplet. Our previous concept had the droplet falling onto one cloud of antiprotons. This proved to be inefficient, as the droplet tended to evaporate away from the cloud as it interacted on its surface.

  17. The minimum mass of detectable planets in protoplanetary discs and the derivation of planetary masses from high-resolution observations

    PubMed Central

    Rosotti, Giovanni P.; Juhasz, Attila; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the minimum planet mass that produces observable signatures in infrared scattered light and submillimetre (submm) continuum images and demonstrate how these images can be used to measure planet masses to within a factor of about 2. To this end, we perform multi-fluid gas and dust simulations of discs containing low-mass planets, generating simulated observations at 1.65, 10 and 850 μm. We show that the minimum planet mass that produces a detectable signature is ∼15 M⊕: this value is strongly dependent on disc temperature and changes slightly with wavelength (favouring the submm). We also confirm previous results that there is a minimum planet mass of ∼20 M⊕ that produces a pressure maximum in the disc: only planets above this threshold mass generate a dust trap that can eventually create a hole in the submm dust. Below this mass, planets produce annular enhancements in dust outwards of the planet and a reduction in the vicinity of the planet. These features are in steady state and can be understood in terms of variations in the dust radial velocity, imposed by the perturbed gas pressure radial profile, analogous to a traffic jam. We also show how planet masses can be derived from structure in scattered light and submm images. We emphasize that simulations with dust need to be run over thousands of planetary orbits so as to allow the gas profile to achieve a steady state and caution against the estimation of planet masses using gas-only simulations. PMID:27279783

  18. The High-Excitation Planetary Nebula NCG 246: Optical and Near-Ultraviolet Observations and Two-dimensional Numerical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Raymond, John; Franco, Jose; Villaver, Eva; Lopez-Martin, Luis

    2003-01-01

    We have imaged the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 246 in the near-ultraviolet wavelengths [Ne v] 342.6 nm, the Bowen fluorescence line of 0 111 at 344.4 nm, and a nearby line-free region centered on 338.6 nm, as well as H(alpha), [O III] 500.7 nm, and [S II] 673.0 and 671.5 nm. Imaging in the 344.4 nm line is necessary to deconvolve contamination of the [Ne v] images by O III 342.9 nm. The emission from the shell and inner parts of the nebula is detected in [Ne v]. The radial profiles of the [Ne v] brightness decrease with radius from the exciting star, indicating that the bulk of the emission from this ion is due to the hard UV stellar radiation field, with a (probably) marginal contribution from collisional ionization in a shock between the PN shell and the interstellar medium (ISM). In contrast, the radial profiles of the emission in H(alpha), [0 III] 500.7 nm, and [S II] are flatter and peak at the location of the shell. The emission of [S II] probably traces the interaction of the PN with the ambient ISM. We also present two-dimensional numerical simulations for this PN-ISM interaction. The simulations consider the stellar motion with respect to the ambient ISM, with a velocity of 85 km/s , and include the time evolution of the wind parameters and UV radiation field from the progenitor star.

  19. Searching for Scatterers: High-Contrast Imaging of Young Stars Hosting Wide-Separation Planetary-Mass Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Marta L.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Knutson, Heather A.; Kraus, Adam L.; Hinkley, Sasha; Mawet, Dimitri; Nielsen, Eric L.; Blunt, Sarah C.

    2016-08-01

    We have conducted an angular differential imaging survey with NIRC2 at Keck in search of close-in substellar companions to a sample of seven systems with confirmed planetary-mass companions (PMCs) on wide orbits (>50 au). These wide-separation PMCs pose significant challenges to all three possible formation mechanisms: core accretion plus scattering, disk instability, and turbulent fragmentation. We explore the possibility that these companions formed closer in and were scattered out to their present-day locations by searching for other massive bodies at smaller separations. The typical sensitivity for this survey is ΔK ∼ 12.5 at 1″. We identify eight candidate companions, whose masses would reach as low as one Jupiter mass if gravitationally bound. From our multi-epoch astrometry we determine that seven of these are conclusively background objects, while the eighth near DH Tau is ambiguous and requires additional monitoring. We rule out the presence of >7 M Jup bodies in these systems down to 15–50 au that could be responsible for scattering. This result combined with the totality of evidence suggests that dynamical scattering is unlikely to have produced this population of PMCs. We detect orbital motion from the companions ROXs 42B b and ROXs 12 b, and from this determine 95% upper limits on the companions’ eccentricities of 0.58 and 0.83 respectively. Finally, we find that the 95% upper limit on the occurrence rate of additional planets with masses between 5 and 15 M Jup outside of 40 au in systems with PMCs is 54%.

  20. The minimum mass of detectable planets in protoplanetary discs and the derivation of planetary masses from high-resolution observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosotti, Giovanni P.; Juhasz, Attila; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the minimum planet mass that produces observable signatures in infrared scattered light and submillimetre (submm) continuum images and demonstrate how these images can be used to measure planet masses to within a factor of about 2. To this end, we perform multi-fluid gas and dust simulations of discs containing low-mass planets, generating simulated observations at 1.65, 10 and 850 μm. We show that the minimum planet mass that produces a detectable signature is ˜15 M⊕: this value is strongly dependent on disc temperature and changes slightly with wavelength (favouring the submm). We also confirm previous results that there is a minimum planet mass of ˜20 M⊕ that produces a pressure maximum in the disc: only planets above this threshold mass generate a dust trap that can eventually create a hole in the submm dust. Below this mass, planets produce annular enhancements in dust outwards of the planet and a reduction in the vicinity of the planet. These features are in steady state and can be understood in terms of variations in the dust radial velocity, imposed by the perturbed gas pressure radial profile, analogous to a traffic jam. We also show how planet masses can be derived from structure in scattered light and submm images. We emphasize that simulations with dust need to be run over thousands of planetary orbits so as to allow the gas profile to achieve a steady state and caution against the estimation of planet masses using gas-only simulations.

  1. Searching for Scatterers: High-Contrast Imaging of Young Stars Hosting Wide-Separation Planetary-Mass Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Marta L.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Knutson, Heather A.; Kraus, Adam L.; Hinkley, Sasha; Mawet, Dimitri; Nielsen, Eric L.; Blunt, Sarah C.

    2016-08-01

    We have conducted an angular differential imaging survey with NIRC2 at Keck in search of close-in substellar companions to a sample of seven systems with confirmed planetary-mass companions (PMCs) on wide orbits (>50 au). These wide-separation PMCs pose significant challenges to all three possible formation mechanisms: core accretion plus scattering, disk instability, and turbulent fragmentation. We explore the possibility that these companions formed closer in and were scattered out to their present-day locations by searching for other massive bodies at smaller separations. The typical sensitivity for this survey is ΔK ˜ 12.5 at 1″. We identify eight candidate companions, whose masses would reach as low as one Jupiter mass if gravitationally bound. From our multi-epoch astrometry we determine that seven of these are conclusively background objects, while the eighth near DH Tau is ambiguous and requires additional monitoring. We rule out the presence of >7 M Jup bodies in these systems down to 15–50 au that could be responsible for scattering. This result combined with the totality of evidence suggests that dynamical scattering is unlikely to have produced this population of PMCs. We detect orbital motion from the companions ROXs 42B b and ROXs 12 b, and from this determine 95% upper limits on the companions’ eccentricities of 0.58 and 0.83 respectively. Finally, we find that the 95% upper limit on the occurrence rate of additional planets with masses between 5 and 15 M Jup outside of 40 au in systems with PMCs is 54%.

  2. Reconnection in Planetary Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    2000-01-01

    Current sheets in planetary magnetospheres that lie between regions of "oppositely-directed" magnetic field are either magnetopause-like, separating plasmas with different properties, or tail-like, separating plasmas of rather similar properties. The magnetopause current sheets generally have a nearly limitless supply of magnetized plasma that can reconnect, possibly setting up steady-state reconnection. In contrast, the plasma on either side of a tail current sheet is stratified so that, as reconnection occurs, the plasma properties, in particular the Alfven velocity, change. If the density drops and the magnetic field increases markedly perpendicular to the sheet, explosive reconnection can occur. Even though steady state reconnection can take place at magnetopause current sheets, the process often appears to be periodic as if a certain low average rate was demanded by the conditions but only a rapid rate was available. Reconnection of sheared fields has been postulated to create magnetic ropes in the solar corona, at the Earth's magnetopause, and in the magnetotail. However, this is not the only way to produce magnetic ropes as the Venus ionosphere shows. The geometry of the reconnecting regions and the plasma conditions both can affect the rate of reconnection. Sorting out the various controlling factors can be assisted through the examination of reconnection in planetary settings. In particular we observe similar small-scale tearing in the magnetopause current layers of the Earth, Saturn. Uranus and Neptune and the magnetodisk current sheet at Jupiter. These sites may be seeds for rapid reconnection if the reconnection site reaches a high Alfven velocity region. In the Jupiter magnetosphere this appears to be achieved with resultant substorm activity. Similar seeds may be present in the Earth's magnetotail with the first one to reach explosive growth dominating the dynamics of the tail.

  3. High precision astrometry mission for the detection and characterization of nearby habitable planetary systems with the Nearby Earth Astrometric Telescope (NEAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbet, Fabien; Léger, Alain; Shao, Michael; Goullioud, Renaud; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Brown, Anthony G. A.; Cara, Christophe; Durand, Gilles; Eiroa, Carlos; Feautrier, Philippe; Jakobsson, Björn; Hinglais, Emmanuel; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Labadie, Lucas; Lagrange, Anne-Marie; Laskar, Jacques; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Maldonado, Jesús; Mercier, Manuel; Mordasini, Christoph; Queloz, Didier; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Traub, Wesley; Absil, Olivier; Alibert, Yann; Andrei, Alexandre Humberto; Arenou, Frédéric; Beichman, Charles; Chelli, Alain; Cockell, Charles S.; Duvert, Gilles; Forveille, Thierry; Garcia, Paulo J. V.; Hobbs, David; Krone-Martins, Alberto; Lammer, Helmut; Meunier, Nadège; Minardi, Stefano; Moitinho de Almeida, André; Rambaux, Nicolas; Raymond, Sean; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Sahlmann, Johannes; Schuller, Peter A.; Ségransan, Damien; Selsis, Franck; Surdej, Jean; Villaver, Eva; White, Glenn J.; Zinnecker, Hans

    2012-10-01

    A complete census of planetary systems around a volume-limited sample of solar-type stars (FGK dwarfs) in the Solar neighborhood ( d ≤ 15 pc) with uniform sensitivity down to Earth-mass planets within their Habitable Zones out to several AUs would be a major milestone in extrasolar planets astrophysics. This fundamental goal can be achieved with a mission concept such as NEAT—the Nearby Earth Astrometric Telescope. NEAT is designed to carry out space-borne extremely-high-precision astrometric measurements at the 0.05 μas (1 σ) accuracy level, sufficient to detect dynamical effects due to orbiting planets of mass even lower than Earth's around the nearest stars. Such a survey mission would provide the actual planetary masses and the full orbital geometry for all the components of the detected planetary systems down to the Earth-mass limit. The NEAT performance limits can be achieved by carrying out differential astrometry between the targets and a set of suitable reference stars in the field. The NEAT instrument design consists of an off-axis parabola single-mirror telescope (D = 1 m), a detector with a large field of view located 40 m away from the telescope and made of 8 small movable CCDs located around a fixed central CCD, and an interferometric calibration system monitoring dynamical Young's fringes originating from metrology fibers located at the primary mirror. The mission profile is driven by the fact that the two main modules of the payload, the telescope and the focal plane, must be located 40 m away leading to the choice of a formation flying option as the reference mission, and of a deployable boom option as an alternative choice. The proposed mission architecture relies on the use of two satellites, of about 700 kg each, operating at L2 for 5 years, flying in formation and offering a capability of more than 20,000 reconfigurations. The two satellites will be launched in a stacked configuration using a Soyuz ST launch vehicle. The NEAT primary

  4. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  5. High-Energy Astrophysics: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics is the study of objects and phenomena in space with energy densities much greater than that found in normal stars and galaxies. These include black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, hypernovae and gamma-ray bursts. A history and an overview of high-energy astrophysics will be presented, including a description of the objects that are observed. Observing techniques, space-borne missions in high-energy astrophysics and some recent discoveries will also be described. Several entirely new types of astronomy are being employed in high-energy astrophysics. These will be briefly described, along with some NASA missions currently under development.

  6. High energy gamma ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Michael Richard

    This thesis presents a design study into gamma ray collimation techniques for use in high energy radiation imaging devices for the nuclear industry. Such technology is required to provide information on the nature and location of isotopes within nuclear facilities that have reached the end of their useful life. The work has concentrated on the use of two different techniques, namely mechanical collimation using the Anger camera and electronic collimation using a Compton camera. The work has used computational models to evaluate the performance of such systems and thereby suggest optimal design parameters for use in prototype devices. Ray tracing models have been constructed to simulate both parallel hole and tapered bore diverging collimators. Investigations have been carried out to measure the effects on the spatial resolution of changing various design parameters of the collimators. The effects of varying the hole size, septal thickness and collimator length over a range of source to collimator distances likely to be encountered in an industrial scenario have been examined. Some new insight into the nature of the point spread function of mechanical collimators has been gained and the limitations of the conventional analytical approach to collimator evaluation have been highlighted. Modifications to the standard equations used in collimator design have subsequently been suggested. An analytical description of tapered bore collimators has been derived. Monte Carlo models have been developed to model a single scatter Compton camera. Germanium, silicon and sodium iodide have been investigated as candidates for the scattering detector in such a device. A model of a complete ring array Compton camera system has been used to evaluate performance. The data from the Monte Carlo model has been reconstructed to form images. The quality of the images generated have then been compared with images obtained from parallel hole and focusing mechanical collimators.

  7. Effects of leaf area index on the coupling between water table, land surface energy fluxes, and planetary boundary layer at the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Rihani, J.; Langensiepen, M.; Simmer, C.

    2013-12-01

    Vegetation plays an important role in the exchange of moisture and energy at the land surface. Previous studies indicate that vegetation increases the complexity of the feedbacks between the atmosphere and subsurface through processes such as interception, root water uptake, leaf surface evaporation, and transpiration. Vegetation cover can affect not only the interaction between water table depth and energy fluxes, but also the development of the planetary boundary layer. Leaf Area Index (LAI) is shown to be a major factor influencing these interactions. In this work, we investigate the sensitivity of water table, surface energy fluxes, and atmospheric boundary layer interactions to LAI as a model input. We particularly focus on the role LAI plays on the location and extent of transition zones of strongest coupling and how this role changes over seasonal timescales for a real catchment. The Terrestrial System Modelling Platform (TerrSysMP), developed within the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 32 (TR32), is used in this study. TerrSysMP consists of the variably saturated groundwater model ParFlow, the land surface model Community Land Model (CLM), and the regional climate and weather forecast model COSMO (COnsortium for Small-scale Modeling). The sensitivity analysis is performed over a range of LAI values for different vegetation types as extracted from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dataset for the Rur catchment in Germany. In the first part of this work, effects of vegetation structure on land surface energy fluxes and their connection to water table dynamics are studied using the stand-alone CLM and the coupled subsurface-surface components of TerrSysMP (ParFlow-CLM), respectively. The interconnection between LAI and transition zones of strongest coupling are investigated and analyzed through a subsequent set of subsurface-surface-atmosphere coupled simulations implementing the full TerrSysMP model system.

  8. Planetary Data Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Planetary data include all of those data which have resulted from measurements made by the instruments carried aboard planetary exploration spacecraft, and (for our purposes) exclude observations of Moon and Earth. The working, planetary data base is envisioned to contain not only these data, but also a wide range of supporting measurements such as calibration files, navigation parameters, spacecraft engineering states, and the various Earth-based and laboratory measurements which provide the planetary research scientist with historical and comparative data. No convention exists across the disciplines of the planetary community for defining or naming the various levels through which data pass in the progression from a sensed impulse at the spacecraft to a reduced, calibrated, and/or analyzed element in a planetary data set. Terms such as EDR (experiment data record), RDR (reduced data record), and SEDR (supplementary experiment data record) imply different meanings depending on the data set under consideration. The development of standard terminology for the general levels of planetary data is necessary.

  9. Planetary data definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-10-01

    Planetary data include all of those data which have resulted from measurements made by the instruments carried aboard planetary exploration spacecraft, and (for our purposes) exclude observations of Moon and Earth. The working, planetary data base is envisioned to contain not only these data, but also a wide range of supporting measurements such as calibration files, navigation parameters, spacecraft engineering states, and the various Earth-based and laboratory measurements which provide the planetary research scientist with historical and comparative data. No convention exists across the disciplines of the planetary community for defining or naming the various levels through which data pass in the progression from a sensed impulse at the spacecraft to a reduced, calibrated, and/or analyzed element in a planetary data set. Terms such as EDR (experiment data record), RDR (reduced data record), and SEDR (supplementary experiment data record) imply different meanings depending on the data set under consideration. The development of standard terminology for the general levels of planetary data is necessary.

  10. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    to assume that the mechanism for the formation of the narrow Saturnian and Uranian rings is the same and that the elliptical Titan, Maxwell and Huygens ringlets are direct relations of the Uranian rings. A reliable theory of the planetary rings would enable us to consider from completely different perspective the evolution of other cosmic disk systems: protosatellite disks [2], zodiacal and protoplanetary disks [3-5]. In this review we also discuss numerical models of the 3D structure and infrared emission of circumstellar dust disks, incorporating all relevant physical processes. We review the resonant structures of a dusty disk induced by the presence of planets [3-5]. It is shown that the planet, via resonances and gravitational scattering, produces an asymmetric resonant dust belt with one or more clumps intermittent with one or a few off-center cavities. These features can serve as indicators of a planet embedded in the circumstellar dust disk and, moreover, can be used to determine its major orbital parameters and even the mass of the planet. The results of our study reveal a remarkable similarity with various types of highly asymmetric circumstellar disks observed with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and other telescopes around Epsilon Eridani and Vega. The proposed interpretation of the clumps in those disks as being resonant patterns is testable - it predicts the asymmetric design around the star to revolve by ∼ 1 deg/yr about Vega and 0.6-0.8 deg/yr about Epsilon Eri. Our simulations indicate that Vega may have a massive planet ∼ 2 Jupiter mass at a distance ∼ 80-100 AU [3,5], and Epsilon Eri may have a less massive planet ∼ 0.2 Jovian mass as a distance of 55-60 AU [3]. Dynamical model of the origin of the warping of the Beta Pictoris disk includes the gravitational influence of a planet with a mass of about 10 masses of Earth, at a distance of 70 AU, and a small inclination (2.5 deg) of the planetary orbit to the main dust disk. The optical

  11. Thermal transport measurements in high-energy-density matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Thermal conductivity is one of the most fundamental physical properties of matter. It determines the heat transport rate and has an enormous impact on a variety of mechanical, electrical, chemical, and nuclear systems. Thermal conduction is important in high energy density (HED) matter such as laboratory fusion plasmas, planetary cores, compact stars, and other celestial objects. Examples are in the ablation and instability growth in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules, in energy loss from ICF hot spot, and in the evolution of Earth's core-mantle boundary. Despite the importance of thermal conductivity in HED systems, experimental measurements under relevant conditions are scarce and challenging. We have developed a method of differential heating for thermal conductivity measurements. In this talk, experimental designs will be described for four different platforms: optical laser heating, proton heating, laser-generated x-ray heating and XFEL heating. Data from various facilities will be presented and comparison with models will be discussed. This work was performed under DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 with support from OFES Early Career program and LLNL LDRD program.

  12. A two Turbulence Kinetic Energy model as a scale-adaptive approach to modeling the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ritthik; Stevens, Bjorn

    2016-03-01

    A two Turbulence Kinetic Energy (2TKE) model is developed to address the boundary layer "grey zone" problem. The model combines ideas from local and nonlocal models into a single energetically consistent framework. By applying the Reynolds averaging to the large eddy simulation (LES) equations that employ Deardorff's subgrid TKE, we arrive at a system of equations for the boundary layer quantities and two turbulence kinetic energies: one which encapsulates the TKE of large boundary-layer-scale eddies and another which represents the energy of eddies subgrid to the vertical grid size of a typical large-scale model. These two energies are linked via the turbulent cascade of energy from larger to smaller scales and are used to model the mixing in the boundary layer. The model is evaluated for three dry test cases and found to compare favorably to large eddy simulations. The usage of two TKEs for mixing helps reduce the dependency of the model on the vertical grid scale as well as on the free tropospheric stability and facilitates a smoother transition from convective to stable regimes. The usage of two TKEs representing two ranges of scales satisfies the prerequisite for modeling the boundary layer in the "grey zone": an idea that is explored further in a companion paper.

  13. Theory of high-energy messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the distant high-energy universe comes from photons, ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), high-energy neutrinos, and gravitational waves. The theory of high-energy messengers reviewed here focuses on the extragalactic background light at all wavelengths, cosmic rays and magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and neutrinos of extragalactic origin. Comparisons are drawn between the intensities of photons and UHECRs in intergalactic space, and the high-energy neutrinos recently detected with IceCube at about the Waxman-Bahcall flux. Source candidates for UHECRs and high-energy neutrinos are reviewed, focusing on star-forming and radio-loud active galaxies. HAWC and Advanced LIGO are just underway, with much anticipation.

  14. High energy hadrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data on the high energy hadronic component in extensive air showers of energies approx. 10 to the 14 to 10 to the 16 eV when compared with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations have shown the observed showers to be deficient in high energy hadrons relative to simulated showers. An attempt is made to understand these anomalous features with more accurate comparison of observations with expectations, taking into account the details of the experimental system. Results obtained from this analysis and their implications for the high energy physics of particle interactions at energy approx. 10 to the 15 eV are presented.

  15. The effects of birth environment on planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Melvyn B.

    2015-10-01

    The birth environments of stars and the planetary systems they host are hazardous places. Close encounters may destabilise planetary systems leading to orbit crossings and thus planetary scatterings (leading ultimately to ejections) or planetary collisions. Stellar binary companions may induce similar outcomes via the Kozai mechanism which will put the outer planet of a planetary system on a periodically eccentric orbit. If the natural outcome of the planetary formation process is a stable planetary system with the planets on relatively co-planar, low-eccentricity orbits, then close encounters and the perturbations from stellar binary companions may explain the relatively high eccentricities observed for some exoplanets, and may in part also explain the origin of so-called hot Jupiters.

  16. On the Migratory Behavior of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah Ilene

    For centuries, an orderly view of planetary system architectures dominated the discourse on planetary systems. However, there is growing evidence that many planetary systems underwent a period of upheaval, during which giant planets "migrated" from where they formed. This thesis addresses a question key to understanding how planetary systems evolve: is planetary migration typically a smooth, disk-driven process or a violent process involving strong multi-body gravitational interactions? First, we analyze evidence from the dynamical structure of debris disks dynamically sculpted during planets' migration. Based on the orbital properties our own solar systems Kuiper belt, we deduce that Neptune likely underwent both planet-planet scattering and smooth migration caused by interactions with leftover planetesimals. In another planetary system, beta Pictoris, we find that the giant planet discovered there must be responsible for the observed warp of the systems debris belt, reconciling observations that suggested otherwise. Second, we develop two new approaches for characterizing planetary orbits: one for distinguishing the signal of a planets orbit from aliases, spurious signals caused by gaps in the time sampling of the data, and another to measure the eccentricity of a planet's orbit from transit photometry, "the photoeccentric effect." We use the photoeccentric effect to determine whether any of the giant planets discovered by the Kepler Mission are currently undergoing planetary migration on highly elliptical orbits. We find a lack of such "super-eccentric" Jupiters, allowing us to place an upper limit on the fraction of hot Jupiters created by the stellar binary Kozai mechanism. Finally, we find new correlations between the orbital properties of planets and the metallicity of their host stars. Planets orbiting metal-rich stars show signatures of strong planet-planet gravitational interactions, while those orbiting metal-poor stars do not. Taken together, the

  17. High Energy Continuum of High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discussion with the RXTE team at GSFC showed that a sufficiently accurate background subtraction procedure had now, been derived for sources at the flux level of PKS 2126-158. However this solution does not apply to observations carried out before April 1997, including our observation. The prospect of an improved solution becoming available soon is slim. As a result the RXTE team agreed to re-observe PKS2126-158. The new observation was carried out in April 1999. Quasi-simultaneous optical observations were obtained, as Service observing., at the 4-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope, and ftp-ed from the AAT on 22April. The RXTE data was processed in late June, arriving at SAO in early July. Coincidentally, our collaborative Beppo-SAX observation of PKS2126-158 was made later in 1999, and a GTO Chandra observation (with which we are involved) was made on November 16. Since this gives us a unique monitoring data for a high redshift quasar over a broad pass-band we are now combining all three observations into a single comprehensive study Final publication of the RXTE data will thus take place under another grant.

  18. Planetary Landscape Geography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargitai, H.

    hydrosphere (no erosion). Adding new elements (differentiated body: horizon, atmosphere: blue/purple etc sky as visually important elements; complex lithology (mountains of tectonic ori- gin); atmosphere (which can alter temperature) and hydrosphere (erosion, rivers, de- position) a more complex landscape will appear. As a first step, by making a "landscape model", we can input general parameters of atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, the distance from the Sun, orbital parameters, last resurfacing date, age of the planet and the model will output the pos- 1 sible landscape elements in the planet. This can be refined by inputing the actual pa- rameters (place on planet, climate region etc.) from which the actual landscape can be the result. The landscape altering processes are: exogenic (impact), mass movement, endogenic (volcanism, thermal conditions), weathering, aeolic, fluvial, glacial, biogenic, antro- pogenic processes. Comparing planets and moons, all of these processes work on Earth, only half of them works on Mars and Venus, and even fewer on Mercury and Moon [3], where most of the surface is an "post-impact" landscape. A Planetary view. Science-fiction writers often describe planets with one characteris- tic: "desert planet", "ocean planet", "forest planet". Generally, planetary flyby missions verify these images (Europa - ice plain planet or Io - volcano world), but a orbiter mis- sion makes clear than in any planet, several significantly different landcape units are present, but from planet to planet, the average climatic and lithologic conditions do change and characterize the given planet. LANDSCAPE RESOURCES, LANDSCAPE "HOT SPOTS" Landscape hot spots has "high values" in the factors listed below. Physical landscape values. Small object not detectable from orbiters: individual rocks or the local physical characteristics of the upper layer of the regolith, the sediment or bedrock characteristics along with relief forms will be the important factors of

  19. Performance assessment of planetary missions as launched from an orbiting space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, A.

    1982-01-01

    Results presented are intended to assist planners and the mission analysis community in assessing the performance impact (pro or con) of launching planetary missions from an orbiting space station as compared to the usual, ground-based Shuttle launch of such missions. The analyses comprising this assessment include: (1) a basic understanding and description of the space station launch problem; (2) examination of alternative injection strategies and selection of the most appropriate strategy for minimizing performance penalties; and (3) quantitative comparison of station-launched and Shuttle-launched performance over a wide energy/mass range of planetary mission opportunities. Data for each mission covers a full 360 deg of possible nodal location of the space station orbit. The main results are that planetary missions can be launched from a space station within acceptable penalty bounds, and that the station serving as a staging base/propellant depot can benefit some missions requiring large payload mass or high injection energy.

  20. Applications of an Energy Transfer Model to Three Problems in Planetary Regoliths: The Solid-State Greenhouse, Thermal Beaming, and Emittance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Several problems of interest in planetary infrared remote sensing are investigated using a new radiative-conductive model of energy transfer in regoliths: the solid-state greenhouse effect, thermal beaming, and reststrahlen spectra. The results of the analysis are as follows: (1) The solid-state greenhouse effect is self-limiting to a rise of a few tens of degrees in bodies of the outer solar system. (2) Non-Lambertian directional emissivity can account for only about 20% of the observed thermal beaming factor. The remainder must have another cause, presumably surface roughness effects. (3) The maximum in a reststrahlen emissivity spectrum does not occur exactly at the Christiansen wavelength where, by definition, the real part of the refractive index equals one, but rather at the first transition minimum in reflectance associated with the transition from particle scattering being dominated by volume scattering to that dominated by strong surface scattering. The transparency feature is at the second transition minimum and does not require the presence of a second band at longer wavelength for its occurance. Subsurface temperature gradients have only a small effect on emissivity bands.

  1. Applications of an energy transfer model to three problems in planetary regoliths: The solid-state greenhouse, thermal beaming, and emittance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapke, Bruce

    Several problems of interest in planetary infrared remote sensing are investigated using a new radiative-conductive model of energy transfer in regoliths: the solid-state greenhouse effect, thermal beaming, and reststrahlen spectra. The results of the analysis are as follows: (1) The solid-state greenhouse effect is self-limiting to a rise of a few tens of degrees in bodies of the outer solar system. (2) Non-Lambertian directional emissivity can account for only about 20% of the observed thermal beaming factor. The remainder must have another cause, presumably surface roughness effects. (3) The maximum in a reststrahlen emissivity spectrum does not occur exactly at the Christiansen wavelength where, by definition, the real part of the refractive index equals one, but rather at the first transition minimum in reflectance associated with the transition from particle scattering being dominated by volume scattering to that dominated by strong surface scattering. The transparency feature is at the second transition minimum and does not require the presence of a second band at longer wavelength for its occurance. Subsurface temperature gradients have only a small effect on emissivity bands.

  2. High Energy Density Electrolytic Capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David A.

    1996-01-01

    A new type of electrolytic capacitor which combines an electrolytic capacitor anode with an electrochemical capacitor cathode was developed. The resulting capacitor has a four time higher energy density than standard electrolytic capacitors, with comparable electric performance. The prototype, a 480 microFarad, 200 V device, has an energy density exceeding 4 J/cc. Now a 680 microFarad 50 V, MIL-style all tantalum device has been constructed and is undergoing qualification testing. Pending a favorable outcome, work will begin on other ratings. The potential for commercially significant development exists in applying this technology to aluminum-based electrolytic capacitors. It is possible to at least double the energy density of aluminum electrolytics, while using existing manufacturing methods, and without adding material expense. Data presented include electrical characteristics and performance measurements of the 200 V and 50 V hybrid capacitors and results from ongoing qualification testing of the MIL-style tantalum capacitors.

  3. High energy density electrolytic capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Recently a new type of electrolytic capacitor was developed. This capacitor, the Evans Hybrid, combines an electrolytic capacitor anode with an electrochemical capacitors cathode. The resulting capacitor has four times the energy density of other electrolytic capacitors, with comparable electrical performance. The prototype, a 480 micro F, 200 V device, had an energy density exceeding 4 J/cc. Now, a 680 micro F, 50 V, MIL-style all tantalum device has been constructed and is undergoing qualification testing. Pending a favorable outcome, work will begin on other ratings. Potential for commercially significant development exists in applying this technology to aluminum-based electrolytic capacitors. It is possible to at least double the energy density of aluminum electrolytics, while using existing manufacturing methods, and without adding material expense. Data presented include electrical characteristics and performance measurements of the 200 V and 50 V Hybrid capacitors and results of ongolng qualification status of the MJL-style tantalum.

  4. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  5. Physics of planetary ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental physical and chemical processes in an idealized planetary ionosphere are considered as a general abstraction, with actual planetary ionospheres representing special cases. After describing the structure of the neutral atmospheres (the barosphere, the thermosphere, and the exosphere) and noting the principal ionizing radiations responsible for the formation of planetary ionospheres, a detailed study is made of the thermal structure of these ionospheres and of the chemical processes and plasma-transport processes occurring in them. The features of equilibrium and realistic models of planetary ionospheres are discussed, and an attempt is made to determine the extent of these ionospheres. Considering the ionosphere as a plasma, a plasma kinetic approach is developed for determining the effects of interactions between individual particles and waves in this plasma. The use of remote-sensing radio techniques and direct measurement or in situ techniques is discussed. Finally, the observed properties of the ionospheres of the Earth, Mars, Venus, and Jupiter are reviewed.

  6. Lunar & Planetary Science, 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents a summary of each paper presented at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference at the Johnson Space Center, Houston in March 1980. Topics relate to Venus, Jupiter, Mars, asteroids, meteorites, regoliths, achondrites, remote sensing, and cratering studies. (SA)

  7. Chemistry of Planetary Atmospheres: Insights and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Yuk

    2015-11-01

    Using observations from the Mariners, Pioneers, Vikings, Voyagers, Pioneer Venus, Galileo, Venus Express, Curiosity, Cassini, New Horizons, and numerous observatories both in orbit of Earth and on the ground, I will give a survey of the major chemical processes that control the composition of planetary atmospheres. For the first time since the beginning of the space age, we understand the chemistry of planetary atmospheres ranging from the primitive atmospheres of the giant planets to the highly evolved atmospheres of terrestrial planets and small bodies. Our understanding can be distilled into three important ideas: (1) The stability of planetary atmospheres against escape of their constituents to space, (2) the role of equilibrium chemistry in determining the partitioning of chemical species, and (3) the role of disequilibrium chemistry, which produces drastic departures from equilibrium chemistry. To these three ideas we must also add a fourth: the role of biochemistry at Earth's surface, which makes its atmospheric chemistry unique in the cosmochemical environment. Only in the Earth's atmosphere do strong reducing and oxidizing species coexist to such a degree. For example, nitrogen species in the Earth's atmosphere span eight oxidation states from ammonia to nitric acid. Much of the Earth's atmospheric chemistry consists of reactions initiated by the degradation of biologically produced molecules. Life uses solar energy to drive chemical reactions that would otherwise not occur; it represents a kind of photochemistry that is special to Earth, at least within the Solar System. It remains to be seen how many worlds like Earth there are beyond the Solar System, especially as we are now exploring the exoplanets using Kepler, TESS, HST, Spitzer, soon to be launched missions such as JWST and WFIRST, and ground-based telescopes. The atmospheres of the Solar System provide a benchmark for studying exoplanets, which in turn serve to test and extend our current

  8. The high-energy environment in the super-Earth system CoRoT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Czesla, S.; Schröter, S.; Lalitha, S.; Kashyap, V.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2012-05-01

    High-energy irradiation of exoplanets has been identified to be a key influence on the stability of these planets' atmospheres. So far, irradiation-driven mass-loss has been observed only in two Hot Jupiters, and the observational data remain even more sparse in the super-Earth regime. We present an investigation of the high-energy emission in the CoRoT-7 system, which hosts the first known transiting super-Earth. To characterize the high-energy XUV radiation field into which the rocky planets CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c are immersed, we analyzed a 25 ks XMM-Newton observation of the host star. Our analysis yields the first clear (3.5σ) X-ray detection of CoRoT-7. We determine a coronal temperature of ≈ 3 MK and an X-ray luminosity of 3 × 1028 erg s-1. The level of XUV irradiation on CoRoT-7b amounts to ≈37 000 erg cm-2 s-1. Current theories for planetary evaporation can only provide an order-of-magnitude estimate for the planetary mass loss; assuming that CoRoT-7b has formed as a rocky planet, we estimate that CoRoT-7b evaporates at a rate of about 1.3 × 1011 g s-1 and has lost ≈4-10 earth masses in total.

  9. The Planetary Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pataki, Louis P.

    2016-06-01

    This poster presentation presents the Planetary Project, a multi-week simulated research experience for college non-science majors. Students work in research teams of three to investigate the properties of a fictitious planetary system (the “Planetary System”) created each semester by the instructor. The students write team and individual papers in which they use the available data to draw conclusions about planets, other objects or general properties of the Planetary System and in which they compare, contrast and explain the similarities between the objects in the Planetary System and comparable objects in the Solar System.Data about the orbital and physical properties of the planets in the Planetary System are released at the start of the project. Each week the teams request data from a changing pool of available data. For example, in week one pictures of the planets are available. Each team picks one planet and the data (pictures) on that planet are released only to that team. Different data are available in subsequent weeks. Occasionally a news release to all groups reports an unusual occurrence - e.g. the appearance of a comet.Each student acts as principal author for one of the group paper which must contain a description of the week’s data, conclusions derived from that data about the Planetary System and a comparison with the Solar System. Each students writes a final, individual paper on a topic of their choice dealing with the Planetary System in which they follow the same data, conclusion, comparison format. Students “publish” their papers on a class-only restricted website and present their discoveries in class talks. Data are released to all on the website as the related papers are “published.” Additional papers commenting on the published work and released data are encouraged.The successes and problems of the method are presented.

  10. Planetary radio astronomy from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of radio astronomy makes it possible for a remote observer to detect the presence of magnetic fields and plasmas in planetary environments. Prior to the flights of the Voyager spacecraft, radio astronomical studies of Jupiter from earth and from earth orbit had correctly predicted the strength and orientation of Jupiter's magnetic field and trapped radiation belts. The Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy investigations have now provided measurements of the complete spectrum of low frequency radio emissions from both planets. Each Voyager instrument consists of a pair of orthogonal, 10-m, electric monopole antennas which are connected to a step-tuned, superheterodyne receiver operating over the frequency range from 1.2 kHz to 40.5 MHz. The Voyager trajectory provided observations from above both the sunlit and nightside hemispheres of Jupiter. Saturn's nonthermal radio emission has been observed at frequencies as low as 3 kHz and as high as 1.2 MHz.

  11. Planetary Geophysics and Tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Research supported by grant NAGW-1928 has addressed a variety of problems related to planetary evolution. One important focus has been on questions related to the role of chemical buoyancy in planetary evolution with application to both Venus and the Moon. We have developed a model for the evolution of the Moon (Hess and Parmentier, 1995) in which dense, highly radioactive, late stage magma ocean cumulates sink forming a core. This core heats the overlying, chemically layered mantle giving rise to a heated, chemically well-mixed layer that thickens with time. This Mixed layer eventually becomes hot enough and thick enough that its top begins to melt at a pressure low enough that melt is buoyant, thus creating mare basalts from a high pressure source of the correct composition and at an appropriate time in lunar evolution. In work completed during the last year, numerical experiments on convection in a chemically stably stratified fluid layer heated from below have been completed. These results show us how to calculate the evolution of a mixed layer in the Moon, depending on the heat production in the ilmenite- cumulate core and the chemical stratification of the overlying mantle. Chemical stratification of the mantle after its initial differentiation is would trap heat in the deep interior and prevent the rapid rise of plumes with accompanying volcanism. This trapping of heat in the interior can explain the thickness of the lunar lithosphere as a function of time as well as the magmatic evolution. We show that heat transported to the base of the lithosphere at a rate determined by current estimates of radioactivity in the Moon would not satisfy constraints on elastic lithosphere thickness from tectonic feature associated with basin loading. Trapping heat at depth by a chemically stratified mantle may also explain the absence of global compressional features on the surface that previous models predict for an initially hot lunar interior. For Venus, we developed a

  12. Planetary Regolith Delivery Systems for ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantovani, James G.; Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2012-01-01

    The challenges associated with collecting regolith on a planetary surface and delivering it to an in-situ resource utilization system differ significantly from similar activities conducted on Earth. Since system maintenance on a planetary body can be difficult or impossible to do, high reliability and service life are expected of a regolith delivery system. Mission costs impose upper limits on power and mass. The regolith delivery system must provide a leak-tight interface between the near-vacuum planetary surface and the pressurized ISRU system. Regolith delivery in amounts ranging from a few grams to tens of kilograms may be required. Finally, the spent regolith must be removed from the ISRU chamber and returned to the planetary environment via dust tolerant valves capable of operating and sealing over a large temperature range. This paper will describe pneumatic and auger regolith transfer systems that have already been field tested for ISRU, and discuss other systems that await future field testing.

  13. Improving Access to Planetary Data for Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, J.

    2005-12-01

    Over the years the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has collected an enormous amount of observational data from space missions. Using this scientific data in high school or college science education courses can be invaluable. Factors that impeded wide spread use of NASA planetary data in science education include accessibility to data and freely available software tools used to analyze and visually model planetary data sets. To address these issues we created a Graphical Analyses and Visualization Software Tool for Planetary Data (GAVPD). GAVPD is a web based software tool that can be used to visualize and analyze planetary data over the internet. GAVPD has a simple web based interface that allows users to create visual projections of altimeter data and make 2D and 3D surface measurements graphically. GAVPD is in currently a prototype and work is underway to extend its capability to other types of data sets.

  14. Energy Activities for Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, David; And Others

    This document is a collection of six energy education activities for junior high school science. Its purpose is to help promote knowledge about energy, provide laboratory experiences, provoke inquiry, and relate energy to society through the science curriculum. The six activities are designed to take one to three class periods. Two of the…

  15. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  16. Resolving shocked and UV excited components of H2 emission in planetary nebulae with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Kyle; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) form when low and intermediate-mass stars eject their outer layers into the ISM at the end of the AGB phase. Many PNe exhibit near-infrared (NIR) emission from molecular hydrogen (H2). This NIR emission arises from radiative decay out of excited rotation-vibration (rovibrational) states. The rovibrational states can be populated by excitation to higher electronic states through absorption of a far-UV photon followed by a radiative cascade to the electronic ground state, or by collisions (e.g., in a hot gas). The two processes populate the rovibrational levels of H2 differently, so the observed emergent emission spectrum provides an effective probe of the mechanisms that excite the H2. Many PNe display line intensity ratios that are intermediate between these two processes (Otsuka et al. 2013). With the advantages of the high spectral resolution (R~40000), broad wavelength coverage (1.45-2.45 μm), and high spatial resolution of the Immersion GRating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS, Park et al. 2014), we are able to differentiate components in position-velocity space: we see a slowly expanding UV-excited H2 shell in the PN M 1-11 and two faster moving “bullets” of thermalized H2 that we interpret as shocked gas from a bipolar outflow. We also present observations of several other PNe that exhibit similar morphologies of thermalized and UV-excited H2 components.

  17. Polarimeter for high energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Tedeschi, David; Danagulian, Samuel; Litvienko, Vladimir; Pinayev, Igor

    1999-11-01

    The physics program at TJNAF includes fundamental experiments with polarized photon beam in few GeV energy range. Development of the Polarimeter for use in Hall B experiments is the subject of present abstract. We have proposed to take advantage of the recent progress in silicon micro strip detectors for measurement of the geometry and angle correlation in electron positron pair production from an amorphous converter. A detailed analysis of the setup including MC simulation shows an experimental asymmetry σ_allel/σ_⊥ ~ 1.7 in a wide range of the photon energies. This asymmetry value is confirmed by our experimental results obtained using 100 percent polarized 40 MeV γ rays at Duke FEL.

  18. Multiplicities in high energy interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Derrick, M.

    1984-01-01

    Charged particle multiplicities in hadronic collision have been measured for all energies up to ..sqrt..s = 540 GeV in the center of mass. Similar measurements in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation cover the much smaller range - up to ..sqrt..s = 40 GeV. Data are also available from deep inelastic neutrino scattering up to ..sqrt..s approx. 10 GeV. The experiments measure the mean charged multiplicity , the rapidity density at y = O, and the distributions in prong number. The mean number of photons associated with the events can be used to measure the ..pi../sup 0/ and eta/sup 0/ multiplicities. Some information is also available on the charged pion, kaon, and nucleon fractions as well as the K/sup 0/ and ..lambda../sup 0/ rates and for the higher energy data, the identically equal fraction. We review this data and consider the implications of extrapolations to SSC energies. 13 references.

  19. High energy physics in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.

    1985-10-16

    The US program in high energy physics from 1985 to 1995 is reviewed. The program depends primarily upon work at the national accelerator centers, but includes a modest but diversified nonaccelerator program. Involvement of universities is described. International cooperation in high energy physics is discussed, including the European, Japanese, USSR, and the People's Republic of China's programs. Finally, new facilities needed by the US high energy physics program are discussed, with particular emphasis given to a Superconducting Super Collider for achieving ever higher energies in the 20 TeV range. (LEW)

  20. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-04-07

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.

  1. High energy interactions of cosmic ray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of seven sessions of the Conference dealing with high energy interactions of cosmic rays are discussed. High energy cross section measurements; particle production-models of experiments; nuclei and nuclear matter; nucleus-nucleus collision; searches for magnetic monopoles; and studies of nucleon decay are covered.

  2. GEANT4: Applications in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Tariq; Zafar, Abrar Ahmed; Hussain, Talib; Rashid, Haris

    2007-02-14

    GEANT4 is a detector simulation toolkit aimed at studying, mainly experimental high energy physics. In this paper we will give an overview of this software with special reference to its applications in high energy physics experiments. A brief of process methods is given. Object-oriented nature of the simulation toolkit is highlighted.

  3. Black holes and high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grib, A. A.; Pavlov, Yu. V.

    2016-01-01

    Three mechanisms of getting high energies in particle collisions in the ergosphere of the rotating black holes are considered. The consequences of these mechanisms for observation of ultra high energy cosmic rays particles on the Earth as result of conversion of superheavy dark matter particles into ordinary particles are discussed.

  4. Solar thermal propulsion for planetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Sercel, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that many desirable planetary exploration missions require large injection delta-V. Solar Thermal Rocket (STR) propulsion, under study for orbit-raising applications may enhance or enable such high-energy missions. The required technology of thermal control for liquid hydrogen propellant is available for the required storage duration. Self-deploying, inflatable solar concentrators are under study. The mass penalty for passive cryogenic thermal control, liquid hydrogen tanks and solar concentrators does not compromise the specific impulse advantage afforded by the STR as compared to chemical propulsion systems. An STR injection module is characterized and performance is evaluated by comparison to electric propulsion options for the Saturn Orbiter Titan Probe (SOTP) and Uranus Flyby Uranus Probe (UFUP) missions.

  5. High-speed Bullet Ejections during the AGB-to-Planetary Nebula Transition: HST Observations of the Carbon Star, V Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, R.; Scibelli, S.; Morris, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    The well-studied carbon star, V Hya, showing evidence for high-speed, collimated outflows and dense equatorial structures, is a key object in the study of the poorly understood transition of AGB stars into aspherical planetary nebulae. Using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained high spatial-resolution long-slit optical spectra of V Hya that show high-velocity emission in [S ii] and [Fe ii] lines. Our data set, spanning three epochs spaced apart by a year during each of two periods (in 2002–2004 and 2011–2013), shows that V Hya ejects high-speed (˜200–250 {km} {{{s}}}-1) bullets once every ˜8.5 years. The ejection axis flip–flops around a roughly eastern direction, both in and perpendicular to the sky-plane, and the radial velocities of the ejecta also vary in concert between low and high values. We propose a model in which the bullet ejection is associated with the periastron passage of a binary companion in an eccentric orbit around V Hya with an orbital period of ˜8.5 years. The flip–flop phenomenon is likely the result of collimated ejection from an accretion disk (produced by gravitational capture of material from the primary) that is warped and precessing, and/or that has a magnetic field that is misaligned with that of the companion or the primary star. We show how a previously observed 17 year period in V Hya’s light-cycle can also be explained in our model. Additionally, we describe how the model proposed here can be extended to account for multipolar nebulae.

  6. High-speed Bullet Ejections during the AGB-to-Planetary Nebula Transition: HST Observations of the Carbon Star, V Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, R.; Scibelli, S.; Morris, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    The well-studied carbon star, V Hya, showing evidence for high-speed, collimated outflows and dense equatorial structures, is a key object in the study of the poorly understood transition of AGB stars into aspherical planetary nebulae. Using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained high spatial-resolution long-slit optical spectra of V Hya that show high-velocity emission in [S ii] and [Fe ii] lines. Our data set, spanning three epochs spaced apart by a year during each of two periods (in 2002–2004 and 2011–2013), shows that V Hya ejects high-speed (∼200–250 {km} {{{s}}}-1) bullets once every ∼8.5 years. The ejection axis flip–flops around a roughly eastern direction, both in and perpendicular to the sky-plane, and the radial velocities of the ejecta also vary in concert between low and high values. We propose a model in which the bullet ejection is associated with the periastron passage of a binary companion in an eccentric orbit around V Hya with an orbital period of ∼8.5 years. The flip–flop phenomenon is likely the result of collimated ejection from an accretion disk (produced by gravitational capture of material from the primary) that is warped and precessing, and/or that has a magnetic field that is misaligned with that of the companion or the primary star. We show how a previously observed 17 year period in V Hya’s light-cycle can also be explained in our model. Additionally, we describe how the model proposed here can be extended to account for multipolar nebulae.

  7. Extrasolar Planetary Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Andrew Collier

    An extrasolar planet will transit the visible hemisphere of its host star if its orbital plane lies sufficiently close to the observer's line of sight. The resulting periodic dips in stellar flux reveal key system parameters, including the density of the host star and, if radial-velocity observations are available, the surface gravitational acceleration of the planet. In this chapter I present the essential methodology for modelling the time-dependent flux variation during a transit, and its use in determining the posterior probability distribution for the physical parameters of the system. Large-scale searches for transiting systems are an efficient way of discovering planets whose bulk densities, and hence compositions, can be accessed if their masses can also be determined. I present algorithms for detrending large ensembles of light curves, for searching for transit-like signals among them. I also discuss methods for identifying diluted stellar eclipsing binaries mimicking planetary transit signals, and validation of transit candidates too faint for radial-velocity follow-up. I review the use of time-resolved spectrophotometry and high-resolution spectroscopy during transits to identify the molecular constituents of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  8. Planetary Vital Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennel, Charles; Briggs, Stephen; Victor, David

    2016-07-01

    The climate is beginning to behave in unusual ways. The global temperature reached unprecedented highs in 2015 and 2016, which led climatologists to predict an enormous El Nino that would cure California's record drought. It did not happen the way they expected. That tells us just how unreliable temperature has become as an indicator of important aspects of climate change. The world needs to go beyond global temperature to a set of planetary vital signs. Politicians should not over focus policy on one indicator. They need to look at the balance of evidence. A coalition of scientists and policy makers should start to develop vital signs at once, since they should be ready at the entry into force of the Paris Agreement in 2020. But vital signs are only the beginning. The world needs to learn how to use the vast knowledge we will be acquiring about climate change and its impacts. Is it not time to use all the tools at hand- observations from space and ground networks; demographic, economic and societal measures; big data statistical techniques; and numerical models-to inform politicians, managers, and the public of the evolving risks of climate change at global, regional, and local scales? Should we not think in advance of an always-on social and information network that provides decision-ready knowledge to those who hold the responsibility to act, wherever they are, at times of their choosing?

  9. Calculating the X-Ray Fluorescence from the Planet Mercury Due to High-Energy Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Bergstrom, P. M., Jr.; Christon, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The least-studied terrestrial planet is Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, which makes telescopic observations and spacecraft encounters difficult. Our lack of knowledge about Mercury should change in the near future due to the recent launching of MESSENGER, a Mercury orbiter. Another mission (BepiColombo) is currently being planned. The x-ray spectrometer on MESSENGER (and planned for BepiColombo) can characterize the elemental composition of a planetary surface by measuring emitted fluorescent x-rays. If electrons are ejected from an atom s inner shell by interaction with energetic particles such as photons, electrons, or ions, electrons from an outer shell can transfer to the inner shell. Characteristic x-rays are then emitted with energies that are the difference between the binding energy of the ion in its excited state and that of the ion in its ground state. Because each element has a unique set of energy levels, each element emits x-rays at a unique set of energies. Electrons and ions usually do not have the needed flux at high energies to cause significant x-ray fluorescence on most planetary bodies. This is not the case for Mercury where high-energy particles were detected during the Mariner 10 flybys. Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field that deflects the solar wind, resulting in a bow shock in the solar wind and a magnetospheric cavity. Electrons and ions accelerated in the magnetosphere tend to follow its magnetic field lines and can impact the surface on Mercury s dark side Modeling has been done to determine if x-ray fluorescence resulting from the impact of high-energy electrons accelerated in Mercury's magnetosphere can be detected by MESSENGER. Our goal is to understand how much bulk chemical information can be obtained from x-ray fluorescence measurements on the dark side of Mercury.

  10. Planetary Systems Around Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolszczan, Alexander

    1997-01-01

    This project was initiated in 1993, about one year after the announcement of two planets around PSR B1257+12. Its goal was to investigate planetary systems around neutron stars using high precision timing of radio pulsars as a tool. A microsecond precision of the pulse timing analysis, which is equivalent to a millimeter-per-second radial velocity resolution, makes it possible to detect asteroid-mass bodies in orbit around pulsars and to study the dynamics of pulsar planetary systems. The project originally consisted of two longterm efforts: (i) routine observations and timing analysis of the millisecond pulsar PSR B1257+12 which was found to be orbited by at least two earth-mass bodies (Wolszczan and Frail, Nature, 355, 145) and (ii) a sensitive all-sky search for millisecond pulsars to detect further examples of neutron stars with planetary systems. In the third year of the project, it was expanded to include long-term timing observations of slow pulsars in search for planetary systems around these younger neutron stars. The instrumentation used to conduct these investigations included the 305-m Arecibo antenna with the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM-1), the 100-m Effelsberg telescope with the local pulse timing hardware, and the 32-m paraboloid of the Torun Centre for Astronomy in Torun, Poland (TCFA) with the PSPM-2, the second pulsar machine built at Penn State. The PI's collaborators included pulsar groups led by D. Backer (Berkeley), R. Foster (NRL), S. Kulkarni (Caltech), J. Taylor (Princeton) and R. Wielebinski (Bonn). One postdoc (Stuart Anderson), one graduate student (Brian Cadwell) and several undergraduates have been engaged in various aspects of research related to this project.

  11. Planetary magnetism. [emphasizing dynamo theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D.

    1974-01-01

    The origin and maintenance of planetary magnetic fields are discussed. The discussion is not limited to dynamo theories, although these are almost universally favored. Thermoelectric currents are found to be a possible alternative for Jupiter. Two energy sources for dynamos are considered: convection and precessionally induced fluid flow. The earth is the most favorable planet for precessionally driven dynamo, although Neptune is a possibility. Jupiter is likely to have a convectionally driven dynamo, as may Saturn, but the relevant properties of Saturn are not yet well known. Conclusions for each planet are given.

  12. High-resolution Imaging of NGC 2346 with GSAOI/GeMS: Disentangling the Planetary Nebula Molecular Structure to Understand Its Origin and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchado, Arturo; Stanghellini, Letizia; Villaver, Eva; García-Segura, Guillermo; Shaw, Richard A.; García-Hernández, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    We present high spatial resolution (≈ 60-90 mas) images of the molecular hydrogen emission in the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 2346. The data were acquired during the system verification of the Gemini Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics System + Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager. At the distance of NGC 2346, 700 pc, the physical resolution corresponds to ≈ 56 AU, which is slightly higher than an [N ii] image of NGC 2346 that was obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2. With this unprecedented resolution, for the first time we were able to study the structure of the H2 gas within the nebula in detail. We found it to be composed of knots and filaments, which at a lower resolution had appeared to be a uniform torus of material. We explain how the formation of the clumps and filaments in this PN are consistent with a mechanism in which a central hot bubble of nebular gas surrounding the central star has been depressurized, and the thermal pressure of the photoionized region drives the fragmentation of the swept-up shell.

  13. Exoplanetary systems: The role of an equilibrium at high mutual inclination in shaping the global behavior of the 3-D secular planetary three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libert, Anne-Sophie; Henrard, Jacques

    2007-11-01

    On the basis of a high-order (order 12) expansion of the perturbative potential in powers of the eccentricities and the inclinations, we analyze the secular interactions of two non-coplanar planets which are not in mean-motion resonance. The model is based on the planetary three-body problem which can be reduced to two degrees of freedom by the well-known elimination of the nodes [Jacobi, C.G.J., 1842. Astron. Nachr. XX, 81-102]. We introduce non-singular canonical variables which bring forward the symmetries of the problem. The main dynamical features depend on the location and stability of the equilibria which are easily found with our analytical model. We find that there exists an equilibrium when both eccentricities are zero. When the mutual inclination is small, this equilibrium is stable, but for larger mutual inclination it becomes unstable, generating a large chaotic zone and, by bifurcation, two regular regions, the so-called Kozai resonances. This analytical study which depends on only two parameters (the ratio of the semi-major axes and the mass ratio of the planets) makes possible a large survey of the problem and enables us to identify and quantify its main dynamical features, periodic orbits, regular and chaotic zones, etc. The results of our analytical model are illustrated and confirmed by numerical integrations.

  14. The grinding behavior of ground copper powder for Cu/CNT nanocomposite fabrication by using the dry grinding process with a high-speed planetary ball mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Heekyu; Bor, Amgalan; Sakuragi, Shiori; Lee, Jehyun; Lim, Hyung-Tae

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of ground copper powder for copper-carbon nanotube (copper-CNT) nanocomposite fabrication during high-speed planetary ball milling was investigated because the study of the behavior characteristics of copper powder has recently gained scientific interest. Also, studies of Cu/CNT composites have widely been done due to their useful applications to enhanced, advanced nano materials and components, which would significantly improve the properties of new mechatronics-integrated materials and components. This study varied experimental conditions such as the rotation speed and the grinding time with and without CNTs, and the particle size distribution, median diameter, crystal structure and size, and particle morphology were monitored for a given grinding time. We observed that pure copper powders agglomerated and that the morphology changed with changing rotation speed. The particle agglomerations were observed with maximum experiment conditions (700 rpm, 60 min) in this study of the grinding process for mechanical alloys in the case of pure copper powders because the grinding behavior of Cu/CNT agglomerations was affected by the addition of CNTs. Indeed, the powder morphology and the crystal size of the composite powder could be changed by increasing the grinding time and the rotation speed.

  15. Calorimeter probes for measuring high thermal flux. [in electric-arc jet facilities for planetary entry heating simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes expendable, slug-type calorimeter probes developed for measuring high heat-flux levels of 10-30 kW/sq cm in electric-arc jet facilities. The probes are constructed with thin tungsten caps mounted on Teflon bodies; the temperature of the back surface of the tungsten cap is measured, and its rate of change gives the steady-state, absorbed heat flux as the calorimeter probe heats to destruction when inserted into the arc jet. It is concluded that the simple construction of these probes allows them to be expendable and heated to destruction to obtain a measurable temperature slope at high heating rates.

  16. Probing QCD at high energy via correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2011-04-26

    A hadron or nucleus at high energy or small x{sub Bj} contains many gluons and may be described as a Color Glass Condensate. Angular and rapidity correlations of two particles produced in high energy hadron-hadron collisions is a sensitive probe of high gluon density regime of QCD. Evolution equations which describe rapidity dependence of these correlation functions are derived from a QCD effective action.

  17. Density and Sound Velocity of Iron-Sulfur Alloying Liquids at High Pressures and Implications to Planetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Z.; Wang, Y.; Yu, T.; Sakamaki, T.; Kono, Y.; Park, C.

    2012-03-01

    We determine the density and sound velocity of Fe-S liquids at high P-T conditions up to 8 GPa and 2173 K. The results can be compared with geophysical observations to constrain the composition and structure of the cores of Moon and Mercury.

  18. High-energy cosmic ray interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Ralph; Orellana, Mariana; Reynoso, Matias M.; Vila, Gabriela S.

    2009-04-30

    Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

  19. Planetary mass function and planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, M.

    2011-02-01

    With planets orbiting stars, a planetary mass function should not be seen as a low-mass extension of the stellar mass function, but a proper formalism needs to take care of the fact that the statistical properties of planet populations are linked to the properties of their respective host stars. This can be accounted for by describing planet populations by means of a differential planetary mass-radius-orbit function, which together with the fraction of stars with given properties that are orbited by planets and the stellar mass function allows the derivation of all statistics for any considered sample. These fundamental functions provide a framework for comparing statistics that result from different observing techniques and campaigns which all have their very specific selection procedures and detection efficiencies. Moreover, recent results both from gravitational microlensing campaigns and radial-velocity surveys of stars indicate that planets tend to cluster in systems rather than being the lonely child of their respective parent star. While planetary multiplicity in an observed system becomes obvious with the detection of several planets, its quantitative assessment however comes with the challenge to exclude the presence of further planets. Current exoplanet samples begin to give us first hints at the population statistics, whereas pictures of planet parameter space in its full complexity call for samples that are 2-4 orders of magnitude larger. In order to derive meaningful statistics, however, planet detection campaigns need to be designed in such a way that well-defined fully deterministic target selection, monitoring and detection criteria are applied. The probabilistic nature of gravitational microlensing makes this technique an illustrative example of all the encountered challenges and uncertainties.

  20. High energy physics at UCR

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    The hadron collider group is studying proton-antiproton interactions at the world`s highest collision energy 2 TeV. Data-taking with the D0 detector is in progress at Fermilab and the authors have begun the search for the top quark. S. Wimpenny is coordinating the effort to detect t{bar t} decaying to two leptons, the most readily identifiable channel. At UC Riverside design and testing for a silicon tracker for the D0 upgrade is in progress; a parallel development for the SDC detector at SSC is also underway. The major group effort of the lepton group has been devoted to the OPAL experiment at LEP. They will continue to focus on data-taking to improve the quality and quantity of their data sample. A large number of papers have been published based on approximately 500,000 events taken so far. The authors will concentrate on physics analysis which provides stringent tests of the Standard Model. The authors are continuing participation in the RD5 experiment at the SPS to study muon triggering and tracking. The results of this experiment will provide critical input for the design of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment being proposed for the LHC. The theory group has been working on problems concerning the possible vilation of e-{mu}-{tau} universality, effective Lagrangians, neutrino physics, as well as quark and lepton mass matrices.

  1. Assessing Antibody Microarray for Space Missions: Effect of Long-term Storage, Gamma radiation and High Energy proton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Diego-Castilla, G.; Parro, V.

    2012-09-01

    Fluorescent antibody microarray has been proposed for Molecular biomarker detector in planetary exploration [1]. A number of different environmental stresses may affect the antibody performance, such as temperatures variations, highly penetrating radiation and high energy particles. Here we have tested the effect of gamma radiation, proton radiation and longterm storage on the microarray immunoassay and fluorocromes. Although different antibodies might have different susceptibilities we conclude that there was not significant reduction in the functionality of antibodies printed on the microarray and the fluorescent tracers antibodies, even in a extreme case of receiving a radiation dose 3000-fold than a biochip would receive in a trip mission to Mars. In summary, antibodies are suitable for use in planetary exploration purposes.

  2. Equations of State: Gateway to Planetary Origin and Evolution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, J.

    2013-12-01

    Research over the past decades has shown that collisions between solid bodies govern many crucial phases of planetary origin and evolution. The accretion of the terrestrial planets was punctuated by planetary-scale impacts that generated deep magma oceans, ejected primary atmospheres and probably created the moons of Earth and Pluto. Several extrasolar planetary systems are filled with silicate vapor and condensed 'tektites', probably attesting to recent giant collisions. Even now, long after the solar system settled down from its violent birth, a large asteroid impact wiped out the dinosaurs, while other impacts may have played a role in the origin of life on Earth and perhaps Mars, while maintaining a steady exchange of small meteorites between the terrestrial planets and our moon. Most of these events are beyond the scale at which experiments are possible, so that our main research tool is computer simulation, constrained by the laws of physics and the behavior of materials during high-speed impact. Typical solar system impact velocities range from a few km/s in the outer solar system to 10s of km/s in the inner system. Extrasolar planetary systems expand that range to 100s of km/sec typical of the tightly clustered planetary systems now observed. Although computer codes themselves are currently reaching a high degree of sophistication, we still rely on experimental studies to determine the Equations of State (EoS) of materials critical for the correct simulation of impact processes. The recent expansion of the range of pressures available for study, from a few 100 GPa accessible with light gas guns up to a few TPa from current high energy accelerators now opens experimental access to the full velocity range of interest in our solar system. The results are a surprise: several groups in both the USA and Japan have found that silicates and even iron melt and vaporize much more easily in an impact than previously anticipated. The importance of these findings is

  3. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2010-01-08

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal?s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  4. High energy collimating fine grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrieta, Victor M.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Laferla, Raffaele

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the fabrication of extremely tight tolerance collimating grids using a high-Z material, specifically tungsten. The approach taken was to fabricate grids by a replication method involving the coating of a silicon grid substrate with tungsten by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A negative of the desired grid structure was fabricated in silicon using highly wafering techniques developed for the semiconductor industry and capable of producing the required tolerances. Using diamond wafering blades, a network of accurately spaced slots was machined into a single-crystal silicon surface. These slots were then filled with tungsten by CVD, via the hydrogen reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Following tungsten deposition, the silicon negative was etched away to leave the tungsten collimating grid structure. The project was divided into five tasks: (1) identify materials of construction for the replica and final collimating grid structures; (2) identify and implement a micromachining technique for manufacturing the negative collimator replicas (performed by NASA/JPL); (3) develop a CVD technique and processing parameters suitable for the complete tungsten densification of the collimator replicas; (4) develop a chemical etching technique for the removal of the collimator replicas after the tungsten deposition process; and (5) fabricate and deliver tungsten collimating grid specimens.

  5. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently.

  6. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blewett, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting.

  7. High Energy Electron Detection with ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Ahn, H.; Ampe, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) balloon-borne ionization calorimeter is well suited to record and identify high energy cosmic ray electrons. The instrument was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN H2 bean-dine in September of 1999. We have simulated the performance of the instrument, and compare the simulations with actual high energy electron exposures at the CERN accelerator. Simulations and measurements do not compare exactly, in detail, but overall the simulations have predicted actual measured behavior quite well.

  8. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

    2013-06-28

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the DØ experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  9. Computing in high-energy physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mount, Richard P.

    2016-05-31

    I present a very personalized journey through more than three decades of computing for experimental high-energy physics, pointing out the enduring lessons that I learned. This is followed by a vision of how the computing environment will evolve in the coming ten years and the technical challenges that this will bring. I then address the scale and cost of high-energy physics software and examine the many current and future challenges, particularly those of management, funding and software-lifecycle management. Lastly, I describe recent developments aimed at improving the overall coherence of high-energy physics software.

  10. Planetary noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the history and current status of research on planetary noble gases is presented. The discovery that neon and argon are vastly more abundant on Venus than on earth points to the solar wind rather than condensation as the fundamental process for placing noble gases in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets; however, solar wind implantation may not be able to fully reproduce the observed gradient, nor does it obviously account for similar planetary Ne/Ar ratios and dissimilar planetary Ar/Kr ratios. More recent studies have emphasized escape rather than accretion. Hydrodynamic escape, which is fractionating, readily accounts for the difference between atmospheric neon and isotopically light mantle neon. Atmospheric cratering, which is nearly nonfractionating, can account for the extreme scarcity of nonradiogenic noble gases (and other volatiles) on Mars.

  11. Principles of Planetary Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond T.

    2010-12-01

    This book introduces the reader to all the basic physical building blocks of climate needed to understand the present and past climate of Earth, the climates of Solar System planets, and the climates of extrasolar planets. These building blocks include thermodynamics, infrared radiative transfer, scattering, surface heat transfer and various processes governing the evolution of atmospheric composition. Nearly four hundred problems are supplied to help consolidate the reader's understanding, and to lead the reader towards original research on planetary climate. This textbook is invaluable for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate students in atmospheric science, Earth and planetary science, astrobiology, and physics. It also provides a superb reference text for researchers in these subjects, and is very suitable for academic researchers trained in physics or chemistry who wish to rapidly gain enough background to participate in the excitement of the new research opportunities opening in planetary climate.

  12. Extrasolar planetary systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.-S.

    1973-01-01

    The terms 'planet' and 'planet-like objects' are defined. The observational search for extrasolar planetary systems is described, as performable by earthbound optical telescopes, by space probes, by long baseline radio interferometry, and finally by inference from the reception of signals sent by intelligent beings in other worlds. It is shown that any planetary system must be preceded by a rotating disk of gas and dust around a central mass. A brief review of the theories of the formation of the solar system is given, along with a proposed scheme for classification of these theories. The evidence for magnetic activity in the early stages of stellar evolution is presented. The magnetic braking theories of solar and stellar rotation are discussed, and an estimate is made for the frequency of occurrence of planetary systems in the universe.

  13. High-energy, high-power, long-life battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abens, S. G.

    1969-01-01

    High-energy-density primary battery achieves energy densities of up to 130 watt hrs./lb. The electrochemical couple consists of a lithium anode, a copper-fluoride cathode, and uses methyl formate/lithium hexafluoroarsenate for the electrolyte. Once achieved, battery life is approximately 30 hours.

  14. On Planetary Evolution and the Evolution of Planetary Science During the Career of Don Anderson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2003-12-01

    disruption, processes that would have affected the final composition of the other inner planets to lesser degrees. These hypotheses will be distinguishable by future remote sensing measurements from a spacecraft in Mercury orbit, but all lead to the prediction that volatile species such as sodium should be deficient in Mercury's silicate fraction. The most recent models for Mercury's exosphere are consistent with the idea that the required fresh supply of sodium from Mercury's surface is no greater than that predicted for meteorite infall. One of the leading questions driving the current exploration of Mars is whether the surface or subsurface was ever conducive to the origin and evolution of life. Sites of hydrothermal circulation within the crust may have provided the necessary energy and chemical building blocks. Remote sensing of candidate hydrothermal minerals at the Martian surface is the leading technique being used to seek such sites, but paleomagnetism may offer another route. Several hypotheses link hydrothermal activity to either the formation of magnetic carriers during the lifetime of the Martian dynamo or the alteration of such carriers after the dynamo ceased, leading to the possibility that high-resolution mapping of crustal magnetism may provide a prospecting tool for promising Martian biological habitats. As Don Anderson showed us by example throughout his career, students of the Earth need not confine their attention to a single planet or even a single planetary system. The lessons from diverse fields that planetary scientists must master to stay current will keep all of us --- like Don --- young and curious.

  15. High energy mode locked fiber oscillators for high contrast, high energy petawatt laser seed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; An, J; Kim, D; Barty, C J

    2006-06-15

    In a high-energy petawatt laser beam line the ASE pulse contrast is directly related to the total laser gain. Thus a more energetic input pulse will result in increased pulse contrast at the target. We have developed a mode-locked fiber laser with high quality pulses and energies exceeding 25nJ. We believe this 25nJ result is scalable to higher energies. This oscillator has no intra-cavity dispersion compensation, which yields an extremely simple, and elegant laser configuration. We will discuss the design of this laser, our most recent results and characterization of all the key parameters relevant to it use as a seed laser. Our oscillator is a ring cavity mode-locked fiber laser [1]. These lasers operate in a self-similar pulse propagation regime characterized by a spectrum that is almost square. This mode was found theoretically [2] to occur only in the positive dispersion regime. Further increasing positive dispersion should lead to increasing pulse energy [2]. We established that the positive dispersion required for high-energy operation was approximately that of 2m of fiber. To this end, we constructed a laser cavity similar to [1], but with no gratings and only 2m of fiber, which we cladding pumped in order to ensure sufficient pump power was available to achieve mode-locked operation. A schematic of the laser is shown in figure 1 below. This laser produced low noise 25nJ pulses with a broad self similar spectrum (figure 2) and pulses that could be de-chirped to <100fs (figure 3). Pulse contrast is important in peta-watt laser systems. A major contributor to pulse contrast is amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which is proportional to the gain in the laser chain. As the oscillator strength is increased, the required gain to reach 1PW pulses is decreased, reducing ASE and improving pulse contrast. We believe these lasers can be scaled in a stable fashion to pulse energies as high as 100nJ and have in fact seen 60nJ briefly in our lab, which is work still

  16. Airships for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing an airship for planetary atmospheric exploration was assessed. The environmental conditions of the planets and moons within our solar system were evaluated to determine their applicability for airship flight. A station-keeping mission of 50 days in length was used as the baseline mission. Airship sizing was performed utilizing both solar power and isotope power to meet the baseline mission goal at the selected planetary location. The results show that an isotope-powered airship is feasible within the lower atmosphere of Venus and Saturn s moon Titan.

  17. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  18. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1989-10-01

    In this lecture I would like to trace how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to gigantic projects being hotly debated in Congress as well as in the scientific community.

  19. New developments for high-energy astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J.

    2000-03-01

    Unlike nearly all branches of physics, founded on the elaboration and analysis of experiments, astronomy is, above all, a science of observation, based mainly on the detection and study of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by celestial bodies. If one excepts devices operating in the radio bands, nearly all instruments used in astrophysics are based on the detection of photons. This review intends to highlight recent developments in high-energy astronomy and astrophysics studies from ground and space observations (from the X-ray band up to high-energy γ-rays and neutrinos). Particular attention will be given not only to recent technologies of photodetection now at work in the field of high-energy astronomy and to emerging photodetection studies in progress for future missions, but also to advanced imaging techniques used in the high-energy domain, which beyond any doubt, constitutes the most arduous of new astronomical disciplines.

  20. Junior High Gets Energy Efficient VAV System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Minnesota's Isanti Junior High, designed with an energy efficient variable air volume system, is an innovative school selected for display at the 1977 Exhibition of School Architecture in Las Vegas. (Author/MLF)

  1. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  2. High Energy Astrophysics Research and Programmatic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angellini, L.

    1994-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the three months of the reporting period. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics.

  3. DOTS: A High Resolution Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer for In Situ Analysis of the surface samples of Airless Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briois, Christelle; Thissen, Roland; Engrand, Cécile; Altwegg, Kathrin; Bouabdellah, Abdel; Boukrara, Amirouche; Carrasco, Nathalie; Chapuis, Claude; Cottin, Hervé; Grün, Eberhard; Grand, Noel; Henkel, Hartmut; Kempf, Sascha; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Makarov, Alexander A.; Postber, Frank; Srama, Ralf; Schmidt, Jürgen; Szopa, Cyril; Thirkell, Laurent; Tobie, Gabriel; Wurz, Peter; Zolotov, Mikhail Yu

    2013-04-01

    The dust detectors on board the Ulysses and Galileo spacecraft have shown that the Galilean satellites are surrounded by clouds of sub-micrometer size grains generated by impacts of interplanetary (micro-) meteoroids [1, 2]. In situ chemical analysis from orbit of these ballistic grains ejected from the surface of airless bodies provides a unique opportunity to remotely access the chemical composition of the Jovian moons' surface and subsurface. For Saturn, in situ identification by the Cassini Dust Analyzer (CDA) of sodium in icy grains in the E-Ring and in Enceladus plumes have proven a subsurface liquid water reservoir inside Enceladus [3, 4]. Noticeably, this was not accessible to other in situ or traditional remote sensing techniques. In situ measurements, either during a flyby or from orbit, of grains ejected from the surface, or emerging from the subsurface, of an airless body is a powerful tool to remotely study its surface composition and the nature of its geological activity. Crucial constraints on habitability can thus be determined. Our consortium of laboratories, in collaboration with Thermo Fischer Scientific [5, 6], is currently developing a high mass resolution Fourier Transform (FT) Orbitrap-based mass spectrometer optimized for in situ analysis of dust and icy grains in the environment of Solar System airless bodies. This new generation of dust mass spectrometer was studied in the framework of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) instrument study in 2010-2012 and proposed in response to ESA's AO for the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) mission [7]. This mass analyser can provide very high mass resolution analysis (M/ΔM reaching 50 000 at m/z 50 Da). DOTS would allow identification of elemental and molecular species with excellent accuracy, in the 20-1000 Da mass range. In the context of the JUICE mission, DOTS would provide decisive information on the surface composition and on the putative liquid oceans in the subsurface of Ganymede

  4. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; de Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the following research in high energy physics: the properties of the z neutral boson with the SLD detector; the research and development program for the SDC muon detector; the fixed-target k-decay experiments; the Rocky Mountain Consortium for HEP; high energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; and electron-positron physics with the CLEO II and Mark II detectors. (LSP).

  5. Nuclear diffractive structure functions at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Marquet,C.; Kowalski, H.; Lappi, T.; Venugopalan, R.

    2008-08-08

    A future high-energy electron-ion collider would explore the non-linear weakly-coupled regime of QCD, and test the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) approach to high-energy scattering. Hard diffraction in deep inelastic scattering off nuclei will provide many fundamental measurements. In this work, the nuclear diffractive structure function F{sub 2,A}{sup D} is predicted in the CGC framework, and the features of nuclear enhancement and suppression are discussed.

  6. High Energy Flywheel Containment Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Trase, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A flywheel testing facility is being constructed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This facility is to be used for life cycle testing of various flywheel rotors. The lifecycle testing consists of spinning a rotor from a low rpm (approx. 20,000 ) to a high rpm (approx. 60,000) and then back to the low rpm. This spin cycle will model that which the rotor will see during use. To simulate the lifetime of the rotor, the spin cycle will be performed tens of thousands of times. A typical life cycle spin test is expected to last six months. During this time the rotor will be spun through a cycle every five minutes. The test will run continuously for the six month period barring a flywheel failure. Since it is not reasonable to have the surrounding area evacuated of personnel for the duration of the testing, the flywheel facility has to be designed to withstand a flywheel rotor failure and insure that there is no danger to any personnel in the adjacent buildings or surrounding areas. In order to determine if the facility can safely contain a flywheel rotor failure an analysis of the facility in conjunction with possible flywheel failure modes was performed. This analysis is intended as a worst case evaluation of the burst liner and vacuum tank's ability to contain a failure. The test chamber consists of a cylindrical stainless steel vacuum tank, two outer steel containment rings, and a stainless steel burst liner. The stainless steel used is annealed 302, which has an ultimate strength of 620 MPa (90,000 psi). A diagram of the vacuum tank configuration is shown. The vacuum tank and air turbine will be located below ground in a pit. The tank is secured in the pit with 0.3 m (12 in.) of cement along the base and the remaining portion of the tank is surrounded by gravel up to the access ports. A 590 kg (1300 lb.) bulkhead is placed on top of the pit during operation and the complete facility is housed within a concrete structure which has 7.5 cm (3 in.) thick walls. A cutaway

  7. Fundamentals of high energy electron beam generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turman, B. N.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Neau, E. L.

    High energy electron beam accelerator technology has been developed over the past three decades in response to military and energy-related requirements for weapons simulators, directed-energy weapons, and inertially-confined fusion. These applications required high instantaneous power, large beam energy, high accelerated particle energy, and high current. These accelerators are generally referred to as 'pulsed power' devices, and are typified by accelerating potential of millions of volts (MV), beam current in thousands of amperes (KA), pulse duration of tens to hundreds of nanoseconds, kilojoules of beam energy, and instantaneous power of gigawatts to teffawatts (10(exp 9) to 10(exp 12) watts). Much of the early development work was directed toward single pulse machines, but recent work has extended these pulsed power devices to continuously repetitive applications. These relativistic beams penetrate deeply into materials, with stopping range on the order of a centimeter. Such high instantaneous power deposited in depth offers possibilities for new material fabrication and processing capabilities that can only now be explored. Fundamental techniques of pulse compression, high voltage requirements, beam generation and transport under space-charge-dominated conditions will be discussed in this paper.

  8. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  9. ESA Missions Planetary Protection Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kminek, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    This presentation will report the planetary protection status of ESA flight projects with planetary protection requirements. It will cover Rosetta, Mars Express, ExoMars 2016, ExoMars 2018, JUICE, Solar Orbiter, and Bepi Colombo.

  10. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building lifemore » cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  11. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrametz, K.; Kofler, L.

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution were addressed.

  12. Planetary quarantine computer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafenstein, M.

    1973-01-01

    The computer programs are identified pertaining to planetary quarantine activities within the Project Engineering Division, both at the Air Force Eastern Test Range and on site at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A brief description of each program and program inputs are given and typical program outputs are shown.

  13. Advances in planetary geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A wide variety of topics on planetary geology are presented. Subjects include stratigraphy and geomorphology of Copernicus, the Mamers valle region, and other selected regions of Mars and the Moon. Crater density and distribution are discussed for Callisto and the lunar surface. Spectroscopic analysis is described for Europa and Ganymede.

  14. Asteroidal and planetary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Photometric, spectrophotometric, and radiometric investigations of asteroids and planets are reported. Profiles of the planetary disk were used to study the physical structure of the Uranus atmosphere, and thermal and photographic properties of Saturn rings were theoretically modelled. Ground-based Mars observations were made for long-term comparison with Mariner 9 results.

  15. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Eleven study tasks are described and key results are discussed for the following: advanced planning activity; cost estimation research; planetary missions performance handbooks-revisions; multiple discipline science assessment; asteroid workshop; galilean lander mission strategies; asteroid exploration study; ion drive transport capabilities; Mars strategy study; Venus surface sample return; and ion drive/solar sail assessment study.

  16. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O. (Compiler); Oconnell, R. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution are addressed.

  17. Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Heights Derived From NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Data Acquired During TexAQS/GoMACCS, CHAPS, and MILAGRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Cook, A.; Harper, D.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed on the NASA Langley B-200 King Air aircraft in the Mexico City metropolitan area during the Mega-city Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March 2006; in the Houston metropolitan area during the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS)/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) in August and September 2006; and in the Oklahoma City area during Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) in June 2007. The HSRL instrument measures profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter and depolarization. The height of the Planetary Boundary Layer was derived by identifying sharp gradients in the HSRL 532-nm aerosol backscatter signal profiles using an automated technique based on Brooks (2003) [I.M. Brooks, Finding Boundary Layer Top: Application of Wavelet Covariance Transform to Lidar Backscatter Profiles. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 20, 1092-1105, 2003]. The technique uses a Haar wavelet covariance transform with multiple wavelet dilation values to adapt to non-ideal conditions where there can be gradients in the background signals and the boundary layer can be ill defined. The technique also identifies the top and bottom of the transition (i.e. entrainment) zone. We have further modified the algorithm to find PBL heights using HSRL backscatter data acquired during GoMACCS and MILAGRO, where complex terrain and overlying aerosol layers further complicate identifying the boundary layer. In addition, PBL heights are derived from HSRL backscatter data acquired during the CHAPS campaign, in another urban environment where the terrain is not as complex. We will describe the algorithm modifications we have made and show boundary layer heights and transition zone thicknesses for HSRL measurements over the Oklahoma City, Houston, and Mexico City areas during CHAPS, TexAQS/GoMACCS, and MILAGRO.

  18. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The 35th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference covered topics on Mars, planetary origins, planetary analog studies, education,chondrite studies, and meteorite composition. Over 1000 reports were presented at the conference in over 100 sessions. Each session, and presentations,was processed separately for the database.

  19. NASA Planetary Visualization Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, P.; Kim, R.

    2004-12-01

    NASA World Wind allows one to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging the combination of high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience Earth in visually rich 3D, just as if they were really there. NASA World Wind combines LandSat 7 imagery with Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) elevation data, for a dramatic view of the Earth at eye level. Users can literally fly across the world's terrain from any location in any direction. Particular focus was put into the ease of usability so people of all ages can enjoy World Wind. All one needs to control World Wind is a two button mouse. Additional guides and features can be accessed though a simplified menu. Navigation is automated with single clicks of a mouse as well as the ability to type in any location and automatically zoom to it. NASA World Wind was designed to run on recent PC hardware with the same technology used by today's 3D video games. NASA World Wind delivers the NASA Blue Marble, spectacular true-color imagery of the entire Earth at 1-kilometer-per-pixel. Using NASA World Wind, you can continue to zoom past Blue Marble resolution to seamlessly experience the extremely detailed mosaic of LandSat 7 data at an impressive 15-meters-per-pixel resolution. NASA World Wind also delivers other color bands such as the infrared spectrum. The NASA Scientific Visualization Studio at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has produced a set of visually intense animations that demonstrate a variety of subjects such as hurricane dynamics and seasonal changes across the globe. NASA World Wind takes these animations and plays them directly on the world. The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) produces a set of time relevant planetary imagery that's updated every day. MODIS catalogs fires, floods, dust, smoke, storms and volcanic activity. NASA World Wind produces an easily customized view of this information and marks them directly on the globe. When one

  20. Interpreting HSE Contents of Planetary Basalts: The Importance of Sulfide Saturation and Under-Saturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.

    2000-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements provide important constraints on planetary differentiation due to their siderophile behavior. Their interpretation in terms of planetary differentiation models has so far overlooked the importance of sulfide saturation and under-saturation.

  1. Europlanet Research Infrastructure: Planetary Simulation Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G. R.; Mason, N. J.; Green, S.; Gómez, F.; Prieto, O.; Helbert, J.; Colangeli, L.; Srama, R.; Grande, M.; Merrison, J.

    2008-09-01

    pressures and temperatures and through provision of external UV light and or electrical discharge can be used to form the well known Titan Aerosol species, which can subsequently be analysed using one of several analytical techniques (UV-Vis, FTIR and mass spectrometry). Simulated surfaces can be produced (icy surfaces down to 15K) and subjected to a variety of light and particles (electron and ion) sources. Chemical and physical changes in the surface may be explored using remote spectroscopy. Planetary Simulation chamber for low density atmospheres INTA-CAB The planetary simulation chamber-ultra-high vacuum equipment (PSC-UHV) has been designed to study planetary surfaces and low dense atmospheres, space environments or any other hypothetic environment at UHV. Total pressure ranges from 7 mbar (Martian conditions) to 5x10-9 mbar. A residual gas analyzer regulates gas compositions to ppm precision. Temperature ranges from 4K to 325K and most operations are computer controlled. Radiation levels are simulated using a deuterium UV lamp, and ionization sources. 5 KV electron and noble-gas discharge UV allows measurement of IR and UV spectra and chemical compositions are determined by mass spectroscopy. Planetary Simulation chamber for high density planetary atmospheres at INTA-CAB The facility allows experimental study of planetary environments under high pressure, and was designed to include underground, seafloor and dense atmosphere environments. Analytical capabilities include Raman spectra, physicochemical properties of materials, e.a. thermal conductivity. P-T can be controlled as independent variables to allow monitoring of the tolerance of microorganisms and the stability of materials and their phase changes. Planetary Simulation chamber for icy surfaces at INTA-CAB This chamber is being developed to the growth of ice samples to simulate the chemical and physical properties of ices found on both planetary bodies and their moons. The goal is to allow measurement of the

  2. Atmospheric escape, redox evolution, and planetary habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Through the greenhouse effect, the presence and composition of an atmosphere is critical for defining a (conventional) circumstellar habitable zone in terms of planetary surface temperatures suitable for liquid water. Lack of knowledge of planetary atmospheres is likely to frustrate attempts to say with any certainty whether detected terrestrial-sized exoplanets may or may not be habitable. Perhaps an underappreciated role in such considerations is the evolutionary effect of atmospheric escape for determining atmospheric composition or whether an atmosphere exists in the first place. Whether atmospheres exist at all on planets is demonstrably connected to the effect of integrated atmospheric escape. When we observe our own Solar System and transiting exoplanets, the existence of an atmosphere is clearly delineated by a relative vulnerability to thermal escape and impact erosion. The prevalence of thermal escape as a key evolutionary determinant for the presence of planetary atmosphere is shown by a relationship between the relative solar (or stellar) heating and the escape velocity. Those bodies with too much stellar heating and too smaller escape velocity end up devoid of atmospheres. Impact erosion is evident in the relationship between impact velocity and escape velocity. Escape due to impacts is particularly important for understanding the large differences in the atmospheres of giant planet moons, such as Ganymede versus Titan. It is also significant for Mars-sized planets. The oxidation state of atmospheres is important for some theories of the origin of life (where an early reducing atmosphere is helpful for organic synthesis) and the evolution of advanced life (where free molecular oxygen is the best source of high energy metabolism). Surfaces on some relatively small planets and moons are observed to have evolved to an oxidized state, which theory and observation can explain through atmospheric escape. There are several examples in the Solar System where a

  3. On the Complexity of H2 Excitation Near Hot Stars: High Spectral and Spatial Resolution Observations of Compact Planetary Nebulae with IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Kaplan, Kyle F.; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared emission lines of vibrationally-excited H2 were first detected in planetary nebulae (PNe) four decades ago. In some environments, e.g. outflows from low-mass young stellar objects, such emission is generally attributed to shock heating. The situation is more complicated for PNe, which host more than one potential agent of excitation. Shocks are indeed present within PNe, due to interactions among expanding layers of different velocities. On the other hand, the UV radiation field of the central star can populate excited vibrational levels of the ground electronic state via an indirect process, initiated by transitions to excited electronic states upon absorption of non-H-ionizing UV photons (the H2 Lyman-Werner bands), followed by radiative decay. When not modified by other processes, this produces a highly distinctive “pure fluorescent” H2 spectrum (Black & van Dishoeck 1987, ApJ, 322, 412). Such emission was first identified in a PN, Hb 12, by Dinerstein et al. 1988 (ApJ, 327, L27). Later surveys (e.g. Hora et al. 1999, ApJS, 124, 195; Likkel & Dinerstein et al. 2006, AJ, 131, 1515) found that some PNe display thermal (collisionally-dominated) spectra, a few are fluorescent, and others show intermediate line ratios. It is not always easy to distinguish whether the latter is due to a superposition of radiative and shock components (Davis et al. 2003, MNRAS, 344, 262), or to thermalization of initially radiatively excited molecules due to high density, a hard radiation field, and/or advective effects (e.g. Henney et al. 2007, ApJ, 671, 137). We present new observations of H2 in PNe obtained with the high-spectral resolution (R = 40,000), broad spectral grasp IGRINS spectrometer (Park & Jaffe et al. 2014, Proc SPIE, 9147). This instrument reveals small-scale structures in position-velocity space that differ in excitation and emergent line ratios. For example, the compact PN M 1-11 contains both a fluorescent shell of H2 and higher-velocity compact

  4. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: the highest energy frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello Neto, João R. T.

    2016-04-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are the highest energy messengers of the present universe, with energies up to 1020 eV. Studies of astrophysical particles (nuclei, electrons, neutrinos and photons) at their highest observed energies have implications for fundamental physics as well as astrophysics. The primary particles interact in the atmosphere and generate extensive air showers. Analysis of those showers enables one not only to estimate the energy, direction and most probable mass of the primary cosmic particles, but also to obtain information about the properties of their hadronic interactions at an energy more than one order of magnitude above that accessible with the current highest energy human-made accelerator. In this contribution we will review the state-of-the-art in UHECRs detection. We will present the leading experiments Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array and discuss the cosmic ray energy spectrum, searches for directional anisotropy, studies of mass composition, the determination of the number of shower muons (which is sensitive to the shower hadronic interactions) and the proton-air cross section.

  5. Planetary science: A lunar perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    An interpretative synthesis of current knowledge on the moon and the terrestrial planets is presented, emphasizing the impact of recent lunar research (using Apollo data and samples) on theories of planetary morphology and evolution. Chapters are included on the exploration of the solar system; geology and stratigraphy; meteorite impacts, craters, and multiring basins; planetary surfaces; planetary crusts; basaltic volcanism; planetary interiors; the chemical composition of the planets; the origin and evolution of the moon and planets; and the significance of lunar and planetary exploration. Photographs, drawings, graphs, tables of quantitative data, and a glossary are provided.

  6. Interactive investigations into planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, I.

    2015-12-01

    Many processes in Earth science are difficult to observe or visualize due to the large timescales and lengthscales over which they operate. The dynamics of planetary mantles are particularly challenging as we cannot even look at the rocks involved. As a result, much teaching material on mantle dynamics relies on static images and cartoons, many of which are decades old. Recent improvements in computing power and technology (largely driven by game and web development) have allowed for advances in real-time physics simulations and visualizations, but these have been slow to affect Earth science education.Here I demonstrate a teaching tool for mantle convection and seismology which solves the equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in real time, allowing users make changes to the simulation and immediately see the effects. The user can ask and answer questions about what happens when they add heat in one place, or take it away from another place, or increase the temperature at the base of the mantle. They can also pause the simulation, and while it is paused, create and visualize seismic waves traveling through the mantle. These allow for investigations into and discussions about plate tectonics, earthquakes, hot spot volcanism, and planetary cooling.The simulation is rendered to the screen using OpenGL, and is cross-platform. It can be run as a native application for maximum performance, but it can also be embedded in a web browser for easy deployment and portability.

  7. [High Energy Physics: Research in high energy physics]. Annual report, FY 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, B C

    1982-12-31

    This report discusses high energy physics research on: Quantum chromodynamics; neutrinos; multiparticle spectrometers; inclusive scattering; Mark III detector; and cascade decays of phi resonances. (LSP)

  8. Alternative Approaches to High Energy Density Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores selected approaches to High Energy Density (HED) fusion, beginning with discussion of ignition requirements at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The needed improvements to achieve ignition are closely tied to the ability to concentrate energy in the implosion, manifested in the stagnation pressure, Pstag . The energy that must be assembled in the imploded state to ignite varies roughly as Pstag -2, so among other requirements, there is a premium on reaching higher Pstag to achieve ignition with the available laser energy. The U.S. inertial confinement fusion program (ICF) is pursuing higher Pstag on NIF through improvements to capsule stability and symmetry. One can argue that recent experiments place an approximate upper bound on the ultimate ignition energy requirement. Scaling the implosions consistently in spatial, temporal and energy scales shows that implosions of the demonstrated quality ignite robustly at 9-15 times the current energy of NIF. While lasers are unlikely to reach that bounding energy, it appears that pulsed-power sources could plausibly do so, giving a range of paths forward for ICF depending on success in improving energy concentration. In this paper, I show the scaling arguments then discuss topics from my own involvement in HED fusion. The recent Viewfactor experiments at NIF have shed light on both the observed capsule drive deficit and errors in the detailed modelling of hohlraums. The latter could be important factors in the inability to achieve the needed symmetry and energy concentration. The paper then recounts earlier work in Fast Ignition and the uses of pulsed- power for HED and fusion applications. It concludes with a description of a method for improving pulsed-power driven hohlraums that could potentially provide a factor of 10 in energy at NIF-like drive conditions and reach the energy bound for indirect drive ICF.

  9. Origin of high energy Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    The flux of cosmic ray antiprotons and the chemical composition in the region of the 'knee' of the cosmic ray energy spectrum are discussed. The importance of a direct determination of the energy spectrum of each major component of cosmic radiation through the knee region is stressed, and the necessary kinds of experiments are described. It is emphasized that antiprotons are a unique probe of acceleration and propagation of energetic particles in the galaxy because of the high threshold for their production.

  10. Parallel Architectures for Planetary Exploration Requirements (PAPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezzar, Ruknet; Sen, Ranjan K.

    1989-01-01

    The Parallel Architectures for Planetary Exploration Requirements (PAPER) project is essentially research oriented towards technology insertion issues for NASA's unmanned planetary probes. It was initiated to complement and augment the long-term efforts for space exploration with particular reference to NASA/LaRC's (NASA Langley Research Center) research needs for planetary exploration missions of the mid and late 1990s. The requirements for space missions as given in the somewhat dated Advanced Information Processing Systems (AIPS) requirements document are contrasted with the new requirements from JPL/Caltech involving sensor data capture and scene analysis. It is shown that more stringent requirements have arisen as a result of technological advancements. Two possible architectures, the AIPS Proof of Concept (POC) configuration and the MAX Fault-tolerant dataflow multiprocessor, were evaluated. The main observation was that the AIPS design is biased towards fault tolerance and may not be an ideal architecture for planetary and deep space probes due to high cost and complexity. The MAX concepts appears to be a promising candidate, except that more detailed information is required. The feasibility for adding neural computation capability to this architecture needs to be studied. Key impact issues for architectural design of computing systems meant for planetary missions were also identified.

  11. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-07

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N{sub c} arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  12. Scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    The convergence of numerous factors makes the time ripe for the development of a community of researchers to use the high-energy laser for scientific investigations. This document attempts to outline the steps necessary to access high-energy laser systems and create a realistic plan to implement usage. Since an academic/scientific user community does not exist in the USA to any viable extent, we include information on present capabilities at the Nova laser. This will briefly cover laser performance and diagnostics and a sampling of some current experimental projects. Further, to make the future possibilities clearer, we will describe the proposed next- generation high-energy laser, named for its inertial fusion confinement (ICF) goal, the multi-megaJoule, 500-teraWatt National Facility, or NIF.

  13. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  14. Detector for high-energy photon backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Michael D.; Erker, Joseph W.; Duncan, Michael Z.; Hartford, Thomas J.; Sivers, E. A.; Hopkinson, James F.

    1993-12-01

    High energy photon backscatter uses pair production to probe deep beneath surfaces with single side accessibility or to image thick, radiographically opaque objects. At the higher photon energies needed to penetrate thick and/or highly attenuating objects, Compton backscatter becomes strongly forward peaked with relatively little backscatter flux. Furthermore, the downward energy shift of the backscattered photon makes it more susceptible to attenuation on its outbound path. Above 1.022 MeV, pair production is possible; at about 10 MeV, pari production crosses over Compton scatter as the dominant x-ray interaction mechanism. The backscattered photons can be hard x rays from the bremsstrahlung of the electrons and positrons or 0.511 MeV photons from the annihilation of the positron. Monte Carlo computer simulations of such a backscatter system were done to characterize the output signals and to optimize a high energy detector design. This paper touches on the physics of high energy backscatter imaging and describes at some length the detector design for tomographic and radiographic imaging.

  15. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kai, K.

    1986-01-01

    A project for space observations of solar flares for the coming solar maximum phase is briefly described. The main objective is to make a comprehensive study of high energy phenomena of flares through simultaneous imagings in both hard and soft X-rays. The project will be performed with collaboration from US scientists. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) WG of ISAS (Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences) has extensively discussed future aspects of space observations of high energy phenomena of solar flares based on successful results of the Hinotori mission, and proposed a comprehensive research program for the next solar maximum, called the HESP (SOLAR-A) project. The objective of the HESP project is to make a comprehensive study of both high energy phenomena of flares and quiet structures including pre-flare states, which have been left uncovered by SMM and Hinotori. For such a study simultaneous imagings with better resolutions in space and time in a wide range of energy will be extremely important.

  16. THE DYNAMICS OF STELLAR CORONAE HARBORING HOT JUPITERS. I. A TIME-DEPENDENT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF THE INTERPLANETARY ENVIRONMENT IN THE HD 189733 PLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, O.; Kashyap, V. L.; Drake, J. J.; Garraffo, C.; Sokolov, I. V.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2011-05-20

    We carry out the first time-dependent numerical magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an extrasolar planetary system to study the interaction of the stellar magnetic field and wind with the planetary magnetosphere and outflow. We base our model on the parameters of the HD 189733 system, which harbors a close-in giant planet. Our simulation reveals a highly structured stellar corona characterized by sectors with different plasma properties. The star-planet interaction (SPI) varies in magnitude and complexity, depending on the planetary phase, planetary magnetic field strength, and the relative orientation of the stellar and planetary fields. It also reveals a long, comet-like tail which is a result of the wrapping of the planetary magnetospheric tail by its fast orbital motion. A reconnection event occurs at a specific orbital phase, causing mass loss from the planetary magnetosphere that can generate a hot spot on the stellar surface. The simulation also shows that the system has sufficient energy to produce hot spots observed in Ca II lines in giant planet hosting stars. However, the short duration of the reconnection event suggests that such SPI cannot be observed persistently.

  17. How the Martian Magnetic Anomalies Reduce the Planetary Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A.; Sauvaud, J.; Barabash, S.

    2012-12-01

    The present paper uses the Mars Express Ion spectrometer IMA data to check the spatial distribution of the planetary origin ions populating the induced magnetosphere of Mars. It was shown that there are two main planetary ions sources located: 1) in the region of the magnetosphere current sheet, 2) in the ring-shape region contouring the planet ionosphere. The planetary ions in the current sheet (source 1) are quickly accelerated up to several keV energy by JxB force, while ring shape (source 2) distributed ions reach just several tens eV. A statistical study of the planetary ion distribution taking into account location of Martian magnetic anomalies shows that planetary ions fill the magnetosphere in the regions free of the magnetic anomalies only. We can see that magnetic anomalies create small magnetospheres that protect ionospheric ions from the escape. This mechanism works well for both ion sources.

  18. High energy particles and quanta in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, F. B. (Editor); Fichtel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The various subdisciplines of high-energy astrophysics are surveyed in a series of articles which attempt to give an overall view of the subject as a whole by emphasizing the basic physics common to all fields in which high-energy particles and quanta play a role. Successive chapters cover cosmic ray experimental observations, the abundances of nuclei in the cosmic radiation, cosmic electrons, solar modulation, solar particles (observation, relationship to the sun acceleration, interplanetary medium), radio astronomy, galactic X-ray sources, the cosmic X-ray background, and gamma ray astronomy. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  19. Electrolytes for high-energy lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Jennifer L.; Lu, Yingying; Moganty, Surya S.; Agarwal, Praveen; Jayaprakash, N.; Archer, Lynden A.

    2012-06-01

    From aqueous liquid electrolytes for lithium-air cells to ionic liquid electrolytes that permit continuous, high-rate cycling of secondary batteries comprising metallic lithium anodes, we show that many of the key impediments to progress in developing next-generation batteries with high specific energies can be overcome with cleaver designs of the electrolyte. When these designs are coupled with as cleverly engineered electrode configurations that control chemical interactions between the electrolyte and electrode or by simple additives-based schemes for manipulating physical contact between the electrolyte and electrode, we further show that rechargeable battery configurations can be facilely designed to achieve desirable safety, energy density and cycling performance.

  20. High Energy Astrophysics Research and Programmatic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  1. High Energy Astrophysics Research and Programmatic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  2. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  3. Energy and Energy Conservation Activities for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottinelli, Charles A., Ed.; Dow, John O., Ed.

    This manual contains fifteen energy activities suitable for high school physical and environmental science and mathematics classrooms. The activities are independent, each having its own objectives, introduction, and background information. A special section of each activity is written for the instructor and contains limits, sample data, and…

  4. Cubesat Application for Planetary Entry Missions (CAPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Baumann, Jean-Pierre; Herdrich, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The Cubesat Application for Planetary Entry Missions (CAPE) concept describes a high-performing Cubesat system which includes a propulsion module and miniaturized technologies capable of surviving atmospheric entry heating, while reliably transmitting scientific and engineering data. The Micro Return Capsule 2 (MIRKA2) is CAPE’s first planetary entry probe flight prototype. Within this context, this paper summarizes CAPE’s configuration and typical operational scenario. It also summarizes MIRKA2’s design and basic aerodynamic characteristics, and discusses potential challenges drawn from the experience of missions such as Stardust and MUSES-C. CAPE not only opens the door to new planetary mission capabilities, it also offers relatively low-cost opportunities especially suitable to university participation.

  5. Forming different planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ji-Lin; Xie, Ji-Wei; Liu, Hui-Gen; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Yi-Sui

    2012-08-01

    With the increasing number of detected exoplanet samples, the statistical properties of planetary systems have become much clearer. In this review, we summarize the major statistical results that have been revealed mainly by radial velocity and transiting observations, and try to interpret them within the scope of the classical core-accretion scenario of planet formation, especially in the formation of different orbital architectures for planetary systems around main sequence stars. Based on the different possible formation routes for different planet systems, we tentatively classify them into three major catalogs: hot Jupiter systems, standard systems and distant giant planet systems. The standard system can be further categorized into three sub-types under different circumstances: solar-like systems, hot Super-Earth systems, and subgiant planet systems. We also review the theory of planet detection and formation in binary systems as well as planets in star clusters.

  6. High-Energy Traumatic Maxillofacial Injury.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jacob; Sawatari, Yoh; Peleg, Michael

    2015-07-01

    High-energy blunt or penetrating impact leads to great variability in facial injury patterns. Although the mechanism, pattern, and distribution of forces vary, the resultant damage to hard and soft tissues requires dedicated planning and execution of debridement and reconstructive procedures. This article evaluates the initial management of patients sustaining high-energy facial impact injuries resulting in one or more comminuted or displaced facial fractures, with accompanying severe facial lacerations and/or soft tissue defects and avulsion injuries. Seventy-three patients met the criteria for high-energy traumatic injuries at Jackson Memorial/University of Miami Medical Center between 2003 and 2013 and are included in this article. Thirty-nine patients sustained one or more gunshot wounds to the face, and 34 patients were involved in high-speed motor vehicle collisions; all patients met our criteria for high-energy trauma. The treatment protocol for these injuries involves meticulous surgical exploration and assessment, aggressive debridement, early definitive reduction/fixation, and reconstruction as necessary. PMID:26114523

  7. Understanding Microbial Contributions to Planetary Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Should our search of distant, extrasolar planetary atmospheres encounter evidence of life, that evidence will most likely be the gaseous products of microorganisms. Our biosphere was exclusively microbial for over 80 percent of its history and, even today, microbes strongly influence atmospheric composition. Life's greatest environmental impact arises from its capacity for harvesting energy and creating organic matter. Microorganisms catalyze the equilibration of C, S and transition metal species at temperatures where such reactions can be very slow in the absence of life. Sunlight has been harvested through photosynthesis to create enormous energy reservoirs that exist in the form of coexisting reservoirs of reduced, organic C and S stored in Earth's crust, and highly oxidized species (oxygen, sulfate and ferric iron) stored in the crust, oceans and atmosphere. Our civilization taps that storehouse of energy by burning fossil fuels. As astrobiologists, we identify the chemical consequences of distant biospheres as expressed in the atmospheres of their planets. Our approach must recognize that planets, biospheres and atmospheres evolve and change. For example, a tectonically more active early Earth hosted a thermophilic, non-photosynthetic biosphere and a mildly reducing, carbon dioxide-rich and oxygen-poor atmosphere. Microorganisms acquired energy by consuming hydrogen and sulfide and producing a broad array of reduced C and S gases, most notably, methane. Later, diverse types of bacterial photosynthesis developed that enhanced productivity but were incapable of splitting water to produce oxygen. Later, but still prior to 2.6 billion years ago, oxygenic photosynthesis developed. We can expect to encounter distant biospheres that represent various stages of evolution and that coexist with atmospheres ranging from mildly reducing to oxidizing compositions. Accordinaly, we must be prepared to interpret a broad range of atmospheric compositions, all containing

  8. Survival of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, William R.

    1996-06-01

    Recent low frequency results from attempts to detect Jupiter-sized planets around nearby stars have raised a question as to whether such objects are all that common. In the over 200 stars observed so far, the yield has been 3%. And, the close orbit (0.05 AU) of the nearly Jupiter-sized object around Peg 51 places the object in an environment where the current paradigm of planetary formation would not predict planets to form at all. Other newly discovered candidates, such a Vir 70 and HR3522, also have suspiciously small semi-major axes for gas giants. Of course, the low yield may be strongly influenced by selection effects since massive planets close to their primaries are more easily detected. Nevertheless, given the results to date, it is natural to wonder whether a planetary system like ours is such a natural outgrowth of a circumplantary disk. In particular, could there be forces absent from the existing paradigm that tend to destroy a planetary system once formed? We point out that strong gravitational interactions (i.e., disk tides) between a newly formed protoplanet and its precursor disk give rise to a net torque that drains angular momentum from the protoplanet's orbit. As a result, protoplanetary objects suffer orbital decay as the disk attempts to destroy the very system it spawns. Strong interaction (type I) leads to gap formation and co-evolution with the disk; weak inter- action (type II) leads to drift relative to the disk and in some cases, a much more rapid decay. Survival of a planetary system may be a comparatively uncommon outcome. Newly discovered planets such as Peg 51b may be evidence of such large-scale orbit migration due to disk tidal torques (i.e., Lin et al., 1996).

  9. Planetary seismology and interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.

    1979-01-01

    This report briefly summarizes knowledge gained in the area of planetary seismology in the period 1969-1979. Attention is given to the seismic instruments, the seismic environment (noise, characteristics of seismic wave propagation, etc.), and the seismicity of the moon and Mars as determined by the Apollo missions and Viking Lander experiments, respectively. The models of internal structures of the terrestrial planets are discussed, with the earth used for reference.

  10. Galactic planetary science.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-04-28

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets--mainly radial velocity and transit--or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even 'just' in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current 'understanding'. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy. PMID:24664916

  11. Planetary System Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    Contents include a summary of publications followed by their abstracts titeled: 1. On microlensing rates and optical depth toward the Galactic center. 2. Newly discovered brown dwarfs not seen in microlensing timescale frequency distribution? 3. Origin and evolution of the natural satellites. 4. Probing the structure of the galaxy with microlensing. 5. Tides, Encyclopedia of Astronomy and Astrophysics. 6. The Puzzle of the Titan-Hyperion 4:3 Orbital Resonance. 7. On the Validity of the Coagulation Equation and the Nature of Runaway Growth. 8. Making Hyperion. 9. The MESSENGER mission to Mercury: Scientific objectives and implementation. 10. A Survey of Numerical Solutions to the Coagulation. 11. Probability of detecting a planetary companion during a microlensing event. 12. Dynamics and origin of the 2:l orbital resonances of the GJ876 planets. 13. Planetary Interior Structure Revealed by Spin Dynamics. 14. A primordial origin of the Laplace relation among the Galilean Satellites. 15. A procedure for determining the nature of Mercury's core. 16. Secular evolution of hierarchical planetary systems. 17. Tidally induced volcanism. 18. Extrasolar planets and mean motion resonances. 19. Comparison of a ground-based microlensing search for planets with a search from space.

  12. Galactic planetary science

    PubMed Central

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets—mainly radial velocity and transit—or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even ‘just’ in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current ‘understanding’. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy. PMID:24664916

  13. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium-yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  14. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  15. A double-spike method for K-Ar measurement: A technique for high precision in situ dating on Mars and other planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Asimow, P. D.; Jacobson, N. S.; Cartwright, J. A.

    2013-06-01

    A new method for K-Ar dating using a double isotope dilution technique is proposed and demonstrated. The method is designed to eliminate known difficulties facing in situ dating on planetary surfaces, especially instrument complexity and power availability. It may also have applicability in some terrestrial dating applications. Key to the method is the use of a solid tracer spike enriched in both 39Ar and 41K. When mixed with lithium borate flux in a Knudsen effusion cell, this tracer spike and a sample to be dated can be successfully fused and degassed of Ar at <1000 °C. The evolved 40Ar∗/39Ar ratio can be measured to high precision using noble gas mass spectrometry. After argon measurement the sample melt is heated to a slightly higher temperature (˜1030 °C) to volatilize potassium, and the evolved 39K/41K ratio measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. Combined with the known composition of the tracer spike, these two ratios define the K-Ar age using a single sample aliquot and without the need for extreme temperature or a mass determination. In principle the method can be implemented using a single mass spectrometer. Experiments indicate that quantitative extraction of argon from a basalt sample occurs at a sufficiently low temperature that potassium loss in this step is unimportant. Similarly, potassium isotope ratios measured in the Knudsen apparatus indicate good sample-spike equilibration and acceptably small isotopic fractionation. When applied to a flood basalt from the Viluy Traps, Siberia, a K-Ar age of 351 ± 19 Ma was obtained, a result within 1% of the independently known age. For practical reasons this measurement was made on two separate mass spectrometers, but a scheme for combining the measurements in a single analytical instrument is described. Because both parent and daughter are determined by isotope dilution, the precision on K-Ar ages obtained by the double isotope dilution method should routinely approach that of a pair of

  16. The Large Hadron Collider: Redefining High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, Sarah

    2007-06-19

    Particle physicists have a description of the forces of nature known as the Standard Model that has successfully withstood decades of testing at laboratories around the world. Though the Standard Model is powerful, it is not complete. Important details like the masses of particles are not explained well, and realities as fundamental as gravity, dark matter, and dark energy are left out altogether. I will discuss gaps in the model and why there is hope that some puzzles will be solved by probing high energies with the Large Hadron Collider. Beginning next year, this machine will accelerate protons to record energies, hurling them around a 27 kilometer ring before colliding them 40 million times per second. Detectors the size of five-story buildings will record the debris of these collisions. The new energy frontier made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider will allow thousands of physicists to explore nature's fundamental forces and particles from a fantastic vantage point.

  17. Photodisintegration of the deuteron at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the angular distribution for the {gamma}d{yields}+pn reaction were performed at SLAC for photon energies between 0.7 and 1.8 GeV (experiment NE8) and between 1.6 and 4.4. GeV (experiment NE17). The final results for experiment NE8 will be presented, but only preliminary results for NE17 will be discussed. The data at {theta}{sub cm} = 90{degrees} appear to follow the constituent counting rules. The angular distribution at high photon energies exhibit large values of the cross section at forward angles. There is evidence that the cross section may also be large at backward angles and high energies.

  18. Photodisintegration of the deuteron at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.J.

    1992-08-01

    Measurements of the angular distribution for the {gamma}d{yields}+pn reaction were performed at SLAC for photon energies between 0.7 and 1.8 GeV (experiment NE8) and between 1.6 and 4.4. GeV (experiment NE17). The final results for experiment NE8 will be presented, but only preliminary results for NE17 will be discussed. The data at {theta}{sub cm} = 90{degrees} appear to follow the constituent counting rules. The angular distribution at high photon energies exhibit large values of the cross section at forward angles. There is evidence that the cross section may also be large at backward angles and high energies.

  19. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1991-12-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. More recent studies are highlighted below. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which remains to be dipole in form but contains an energy-dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. We discovered that the cluster size of emitted hadrons increases steadily with energy and is close to 2 as we predicted.

  20. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; Z. Segalov; K. Smith; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; J.R. Delayen; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble

    2005-05-16

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  1. High Energy 2-Micron Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier, high energy Q-switched 2-micron laser system has been recently demonstrated. The laser and amplifiers are all designed in side-pumped rod configuration, pumped by back-cooled conductive packaged GaAlAs diode laser arrays. This 2-micron laser system provides nearly transform limited beam quality.

  2. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of the junior high science curriculum. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher…

  3. DOE is Funding Young High- Energy Physicists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waff, Craig B.

    1978-01-01

    Reports on some recommendations made by a subpanel on High Energy Physics Manpower for the purpose of employing additional physicists through the transfer of some postdoctoral monies to produce long-term positions, and the creation of a five-year national fellowship program. (GA)

  4. Status of (US) High Energy Physics Networking

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1987-02-01

    The current status of Networking to and between computers used by the High Energy Physics community is discussed. Particular attention is given to developments over the last year and to future prospects. Comparison between the current status and that of two years ago indicates that considerable strides have been made but that much remains to be done to achieve an acceptable level of functionality.

  5. Permeability enhancement using high energy gas fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Cuderman, J.F.; Jung, J.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study of using High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF) techniques for geothermal well stimulation. Experiments conducted in the G-tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) showed that multiple fractures could be created in water-filled boreholes using HEGF. Therefore, the method is potentially useful for geothermal well stimulation. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  6. ACCELERATION FOR A HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S

    2000-04-07

    The authors describe a method for designing the acceleration systems for a muon collider, with particular application and examples for a high energy muon collider. This paper primarily concentrates on design considerations coming from longitudinal motion, but some transverse issues are briefly discussed.

  7. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wosiek, B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions are presented. The data are discussed within the framework of standard super-position models and from the point-of-view of the possible formation of new states of matter in heavy ion collisions.

  8. High-energy-density composite flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satchwell, D. L.; Towgood, D. A.

    1980-02-01

    A flywheel was designed and fabricated to demonstrate a high energy density of 80 w-h/kg in the rotor. The rotor design consists of a multiring, subcircular rim made of S-glass/epoxy composite and Kevlar/epoxy composite materials and mounted on a spoked hub made of graphite/epoxy composite materials.

  9. Energy Activities for Junior High Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Energy Agency, St. Paul.

    The document contains seven learning activities for junior high students on the energy situation. Objectives are to help students gain understanding and knowledge about the relationships between humans and their social and physical environments; solve problems and clarify issues; examine personal beliefs and values; and recognize the relationships…

  10. Trends in experimental high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-06-01

    Data from a scan of papers in Physical Review Letters and Physical Review are used to demonstrate that American high-energy physicists show a pattern of accelerator and instrumentation usage characteristic of that expected from the logistic-substitution model of Marchetti and of Fischer and Pry.

  11. Energy Conservation Featured in Illinois High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The William Fremd High School in Palatine, Illinois, scheduled to open in 1977, is being built with energy conservation uppermost in mind. In this system, 70 heat pumps will heat and cool 300,000 square feet of educational facilities. (Author/MLF)

  12. ENERGY SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY NUCLEI AT HIGH ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Malinine, A.; Allison, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Brandt, T. J.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Barbier, L.; Childers, J. T.; DuVernois, M. A.; Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S.; Jeon, J. A.; Minnick, S.

    2009-12-10

    We present new measurements of the energy spectra of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei from the second flight of the balloon-borne experiment Cosmic-Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM). The instrument included different particle detectors to provide redundant charge identification and measure the energy of CRs up to several hundred TeV. The measured individual energy spectra of C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe are presented up to approx10{sup 14} eV. The spectral shape looks nearly the same for these primary elements and it can be fitted to an E {sup -2.66} {sup +}- {sup 0.04} power law in energy. Moreover, a new measurement of the absolute intensity of nitrogen in the 100-800 GeV/n energy range with smaller errors than previous observations, clearly indicates a hardening of the spectrum at high energy. The relative abundance of N/O at the top of the atmosphere is measured to be 0.080 +- 0.025 (stat.)+-0.025 (sys.) at approx800 GeV/n, in good agreement with a recent result from the first CREAM flight.

  13. Planetary polarization nephelometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, D.; Dissly, R.; Mishchenko, M.; Muñoz, O.; Roos-Serote, M.; Stam, D.; Volten, H.

    2004-02-01

    We have proposed to develop a polarization nephelometer for use on future planetary descent probes. It will measure both the scattered intensity and polarization phase functions of the aerosols it encounters descending through an atmosphere. These measurements will be taken at two wavelengths separated by about an octave, with one light source near 500nm and another near 1μm. Adding polarization measurements to the intensity phase functions greatly increases our ability to constrain the size distribution, shape and chemical composition of the sampled particles. There remain important questions about these parameters of the aerosols on Venus, the giant planets and Titan that can only be addressed with a nephelometer like ours. The NRC Planetary Sciences Decadal Survey has identified probe missions to Venus and Jupiter as a priority. On both of these missions, our proposed instrument would be an excellent candidate for flight. We also expect that future probe missions to Saturn, Uranus, Neptune or Titan would employ our instrument. It could also find use in Earth in situ aerosol studies. We will use a technique to simultaneously measure intensity and polarization phase functions that uses polarization modulation of a light source. This technique has been implemented in laboratory settings, but not with considerations to the environment on a planetary descent probe. We have proposed to design and build a flexible breadboard nephelometer to test the components and concepts of our approach. We would then test the device against well defined aerosols, ensuring that it accurately measures their expected intensity and polarization phase functions. With the knowledge gained in this flexible design, we would then design and build a breadboard polarization nephelometer more suited to integration on a planetary descent probe. To include traceability in the technical requirements of our device, we would also conduct an Observing System Simulation Experiment. In this study, we

  14. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  15. Laboratory Spectroscopy of Planetary Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L.; Orton, G.

    2007-08-01

    An international team of laboratory spectroscopists are working in concert to support remote sensing of planetary atmospheres and Titan. An overview of high resolution laboratory investigations will be presented for spectral bands from the rotational wavelengths into the near infrared. The studies include measurements and theoretical analyses of the line positions, intensities and/or broadening coefficients needed to improve the spectroscopic databases required for planetary applications. The molecular studies include water (H2O) broadened by carbon dioxide in the far- and mid- infrared; positions, intensities, broadening and line mixing of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the near-IR; broadening and line mixing of methane in the mid- and near-IR; frequencies of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) in the rotational region and line positions, intensities and nitrogen broadening of methyl cyanide in the low fundamental bands; global theoretical modeling of the phosphine (PH3) parameters; and frequencies of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), methylamine (CH3NH2) and deuterated acetylene (HCCD, DCCD) in the rotational region.

  16. Laboratory Spectroscopy of Planetary Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L.; Drouin, B.; Miller, C.; Pearson, J.; Orton, G.; Toth, R.; Benner, C.; Devi, M.; Blake, T.; Masiello, T.; Sams, R.; Butler, R.; Champion, J.; Chelin, P.; Dehayem, A.; Kleiner, I.; Orphal, J.; Sagui, L.; Gamache, R.; Humphrey, C.; Liu, W.; Predoi

    An international team of laboratory spectroscopists are working in concert to support remote sensing of planetary atmospheres and Titan. An overview of high resolution laboratory investigations will be presented for spectral bands from the rotational wavelengths into the near infrared. The studies include measurements and theoretical analyses of the line positions, intensities and/or broadening coefficients needed to improve the spectroscopic databases required for planetary applications. The molecular studies include water (H2O) broadened by carbon dioxide in the far- and mid-infrared; positions, intensities, broadening and line mixing of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the near-IR; broadening and line mixing of methane in the mid- and near-IR; frequencies of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) in the rotational region and line positions, intensities and nitrogen broadening of methyl cyanide in the low fundamental bands; global theoretical modeling of the phosphine (PH3) parameters; and frequencies of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), methylamine (CH3NH2) and deuterated acetylene (HCCD, DCCD) in the rotational region.

  17. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The measured intensities of certain gamma rays of specific energies escaping from a planetary surface can be used to determine the abundances of a number of elements. The fluxes of the more intense gamma-ray lines emitted from 32 elements were calculated using current nuclear data and existing models for the source processes. The source strengths for neutron-capture reactions were modified from those previously used. The fluxes emitted form a surface of average lunar composition are reported for 292 gamma-ray lines. These theoretical fluxes were used elsewhere to convert the data from the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometers to elemental abundances and can be used with measurements from future missions to map the concentrations of a number of elements over a planet's surface. Detection sensitivities for these elements are examined and applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy for future orbiters to Mars and other solar-system objects are discussed.

  18. Highly Compressed Ion Beam for High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Briggs, R.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Caporaso, G.J.; Celata, C.M.; Davidson, R.C.; Faltens, A.; Grisham, L.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich I.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, R.W.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Nelson, S.D.; Olson, C.L.; Penn, G.; Reginato,L.R.; Renk, T.; Rose, D.; Seessler, A.; Staples, J.W.; Tabak, M.; Thoma,C.; Waldron, W.; Welch, D.R.; Wurtele, J.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-05-16

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is developing the intense ion beams needed to drive matter to the High Energy Density regimes required for Inertial Fusion Energy and other applications. An interim goal is a facility for Warm Dense Matter studies, wherein a target is heated volumetrically without being shocked, so that well-defined states of matter at 1 to 10 eV are generated within a diagnosable region. In the approach they are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto thin target ''foils,'' which may in fact be foams with mean densities 1% to 10% of solid. This approach complements that being pursued at GSI Darmstadt, wherein high-energy ion beams deposit a small fraction of their energy in a cylindrically target. They present the beam requirements for Warm Dense Matter experiments. The authors discuss neutralized drift compression and final focus experiments and modeling. They describe suitable accelerator architectures based on Drift-Tube Linac, RF, single-gap, Ionization-Front Accelerator, and Pulse-Line Ion Accelerator concepts. The last of these is being pursued experimentally. Finally, they discuss plans toward a user facility for target experiments.

  19. Pulse switching for high energy lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A saturable inductor switch for compressing the width and sharpening the rise time of high voltage pulses from a relatively slow rise time, high voltage generator to an electric discharge gas laser (EDGL) also provides a capability for efficient energy transfer from a high impedance primary source to an intermediate low impedance laser discharge network. The switch is positioned with respect to a capacitive storage device, such as a coaxial cable, so that when a charge build-up in the storage device reaches a predetermined level, saturation of the switch inductor releases or switches energy stored in the capactive storage device to the EDGL. Cascaded saturable inductor switches for providing output pulses having rise times of less than ten nanoseconds and a technique for magnetically biasing the saturable inductor switch are disclosed.

  20. High Energy Polarized e+e‑ Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatunov, Yu.; Koop, I.; Otboev, A.; Mane, S.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the wide discussion about Higgs-factory design again returns to problem of high energy polarized electrons and positrons. It’s good known the radiative beam polarization at LEP-collider. It was obtained after spin resonance suppression at Z0 pick, but didn’t appear at energies above 70 GeV due to an enhancement of unavoidable depolarization effects. We examine in this paper various ideas for radiative polarization at TLEP/FCC-ee and formulate some estimates for the polarization buildup time and the asymptotic polarization. Using wigglers, a useful degree of polarization (for energy calibration), with a time constant of about 1 h, may be possible up to the threshold of W pair production. At higher energies such as the threshold of Higgs production, attaining a useful level of polarization may be difficult in a planar ring. With Siberian Snakes, wigglers and some imagination, polarization of reasonable magnitude, with a reasonable time constant (of not more than about 1 h), may be achievable at very high energies.

  1. High-energy emission from transients.

    PubMed

    Hinton, J A; Starling, R L C

    2013-06-13

    Cosmic explosions dissipate energy into their surroundings on a very wide range of time scales: producing shock waves and associated particle acceleration. The historical culprits for the acceleration of the bulk of Galactic cosmic rays are supernova remnants: explosions on approximately 10(4) year time scales. Increasingly, however, time-variable emission points to rapid and efficient particle acceleration in a range of different astrophysical systems. Gamma-ray bursts have the shortest time scales, with inferred bulk Lorentz factors of approximately 1000 and photons emitted beyond 100 GeV, but active galaxies, pulsar wind nebulae and colliding stellar winds are all now associated with time-variable emission at approximately teraelectron volt energies. Cosmic photons and neutrinos at these energies offer a powerful probe of the underlying physical mechanisms of cosmic explosions, and a tool for exploring fundamental physics with these systems. Here, we discuss the motivations for high-energy observations of transients, the current experimental situation, and the prospects for the next decade, with particular reference to the major next-generation high-energy observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array. PMID:23630380

  2. Detectability of extrasolar planetary transits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Scargle, J. D.; Hudson, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Precise stellar photometry can be used to detect other planetary systems. However, the intrinsic variability of stellar luminosity imposes a fundamental limit on the sensitivity of this method. Based on recent precise solar observations made from the Solar Maximum Mission satellite, it appears that the detection of earth-sized planets will be marginal during periods of high stellar activity. However, with a suitable photometer larger planets should be readily detectable even in the presence of stellar activity equal to that of the sun at the peak of its sunspot cycle. The high precision, multiple-star photometric system required to detect planets in other stellar systems could be used to monitor flares, starspots, and global oscillations.

  3. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-03-31

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac and AGS to RHIC to CERN-LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  4. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Vogt, R

    2005-03-31

    The authors propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and CERN-LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, they propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  5. High energy photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  6. Automatic Energy Schemes for High Performance Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sundriyal, Vaibhav

    2013-01-01

    Although high-performance computing traditionally focuses on the efficient execution of large-scale applications, both energy and power have become critical concerns when approaching exascale. Drastic increases in the power consumption of supercomputers affect significantly their operating costs and failure rates. In modern microprocessor architectures, equipped with dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) and CPU clock modulation (throttling), the power consumption may be controlled in software. Additionally, network interconnect, such as Infiniband, may be exploited to maximize energy savings while the application performance loss and frequency switching overheads must be carefully balanced. This work first studies two important collective communication operations, all-to-all and allgather and proposes energy saving strategies on the per-call basis. Next, it targets point-to-point communications to group them into phases and apply frequency scaling to them to save energy by exploiting the architectural and communication stalls. Finally, it proposes an automatic runtime system which combines both collective and point-to-point communications into phases, and applies throttling to them apart from DVFS to maximize energy savings. The experimental results are presented for NAS parallel benchmark problems as well as for the realistic parallel electronic structure calculations performed by the widely used quantum chemistry package GAMESS. Close to the maximum energy savings were obtained with a substantially low performance loss on the given platform.

  7. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1990-11-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (i) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (ii) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (iii) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic collisions, a simple expression for the proton matter distribution is proposed which fits well the elastic {bar p}p scattering from ISR to S{bar p}pS energies within the geometrical model. The proton form factor is of the dipole form with an energy-dependent range parameter. The {bar p}p elastic differential cross section at Tevatron energies obtained by extrapolation is in good agreement with experiments. For multiparticle emission processes a unified physical picture for hadron-hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions was proposed. A number of predictions were made, including the one that KNO-scaling does not obtain for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} two-jet events. An extension of the considerations within the geometrical model led to a theory of the momentum distributions of the outgoing particles which are found in good agreement with current experimental data. Extrapolations of results to higher energies have been made. The cluster size of hadrons produced in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation is found to increase slowly with energy.

  8. High energy H- ion transport and stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the Proton Driver design study based on an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac, a major concern is the feasibility of transport and injection of high energy H{sup -} ions because the energy of H{sup -} beam would be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This paper will focus on two key technical issues: (1) stripping losses during transport (including stripping by blackbody radiation, magnetic field and residual gases); (2) stripping efficiency of carbon foil during injection.

  9. High-Energy Neutrinos from Galactic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappes, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    Even 100 years after the discovery of cosmic rays their origin remains a mystery. In recent years, TeV gamma-ray detectors have discovered and investigated many Galactic sources where particles are accelerated up to energies of 100 TeV. However, it has not been possible up to now to identify these sites unambiguously as sources of hadronic acceleration. The observation of cosmic high-energy neutrinos from these or other sources will be a smoking-gun evidence for the sites of the acceleration of cosmic rays.

  10. Diffuse fluxes of cosmic high energy neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Production spectra of high-energy neutrinos from galactic cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic ultrahigh energy cosmic-ray interactions with microwave black-body photons are presented and discussed. These production processes involve the decay of charged pions and are thus related to the production of cosmic gamma-rays from the decay of neutral pions. Estimates of the neutrino fluxes from various diffuse cosmic sources are then made and the reasons fro significant differences with previous estimates are discussed. Predicted event rates for a DUMAND type detection system are significantly lower than early estimates indicated.

  11. High Energy Polarization of Blazars: Detection Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  12. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  13. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) for Planetary Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Bahamon, Tatiana; Cimo, Giuseppe; Duev, Dmitry; Gurvits, Leonid; Molera Calves, Guifre; Pogrebenko, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a technique that allows the determination of the radial velocity and lateral coordinates of planetary spacecraft with very high accuracy (Duev, 2012). The setup of the experiment consists of several ground stations from the European VLBI Network (EVN) located around the globe, which simultaneously perform Doppler tracking of a spacecraft carrier radio signal, and are subsequently processed in a VLBI-style in phase referencing mode. Because of the accurate examination of the changes in phase and amplitude of the radio signal propagating from the spacecraft to the multiple stations on Earth, the PRIDE technique can be used for several fields of planetary research, among which planetary atmospheric studies, gravimetry and ultra-precise celestial mechanics of planetary systems. In the study at hand the application of this technique for planetary atmospheric investigations is demonstrated. As a test case, radio occultation experiments were conducted with PRIDE having as target ESA's Venus Express, during different observing sessions with multiple ground stations in April 2012 and March 2014. Once each of the stations conducts the observation, the raw data is delivered to the correlation center at the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE) located in the Netherlands. The signals are processed with a high spectral resolution and phase detection software package from which Doppler observables of each station are derived. Subsequently the Doppler corrected signals are correlated to derive the VLBI observables. These two sets of observables are used for precise orbit determination. The reconstructed orbit along with the Doppler observables are used as input for the radio occultation processing software, which consists of mainly two modules, the geometrical optics module and the ray tracing inversion module, from which vertical density profiles, and subsequently, temperature and pressure profiles of Venus

  14. Cosmological Effects in Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, H. J.; Wilson, T. L.

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier discussion of the planetary flyby anomaly, a preliminary assessment of cosmological effects upon planetary orbits exhibiting the flyby anomaly was made. A more comprehensive investigation has since been published, although it was directed at the Pioneer anomaly and possible effects of universal rotation. The general subject of Solar System anomalies will be examined here from the point of view of planetary science.

  15. Current Perspectives in High Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, Jonathan F. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    High energy astrophysics is a space-age discipline that has taken a quantum leap forward in the 1990s. The observables are photons and particles that are unable to penetrate the atmosphere and can only be observed from space or very high altitude balloons. The lectures presented as chapters of this book are based on the results from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) and Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) missions to which the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center made significant hardware contributions. These missions study emissions from very hot plasmas, nuclear processes, and high energy particle interactions in space. Results to be discussed include gamma-ray beaming from active galactic nuclei (AGN), gamma-ray emission from pulsars, radioactive elements in the interstellar medium, X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies, and the progress being made to unravel the gamma-ray burst mystery. The recently launched X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) and prospects for upcoming Astro-E and Advanced X-ray Astronomy Satellite (AXAF) missions are also discussed.

  16. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy and Neutrino Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchner, A.

    2015-04-01

    Neutrinos constitute a unique probe since they escape from their sources, travel undisturbed on cosmological distances and are produced in high-energy (HE) hadronic processes. In particular they would allow a direct detection and unambiguous identification of the acceleration sites of HE baryonic cosmic rays (CR), which remain unknown. Recent results from the ICECUBE collaboration present the first highly significant indication for the detection of high-energy extraterrestrial neutrinos, after several decades of instrumental efforts. We briefly report on this important results which open the route for the high-energy neutrino astronomy era. We then focus on the ANTARES detector, which despite its modest size with respect to ICECUBE is the largest deep-sea neutrino telescope in the world. The primary goal is to search for astrophysical neutrinos in the TeV-PeV range. This comprises generic searches for any diffuse cosmic neutrino flux as well as more specific searches for astrophysical sources such as active galactic nuclei or Galactic sources. The search program also includes multi-messenger analyses based on time and/or space coincidences with other cosmic probes. The ANTARES observatory is sensitive to a wide-range of other phenomena, from atmospheric neutrino oscillations to dark matter annihilation or potential exotics such as nuclearites and magnetic monopoles. The most recent results are reported.

  17. Planetary Protection Technologies: Technical Challenges for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buxbaum, Karen L.

    2005-01-01

    The search for life in the solar system, using either in situ analysis or sample return, brings with it special technical challenges in the area of planetary protection. Planetary protection (PP) requires planetary explorers to preserve biological and organic conditions for future exploration and to protect the Earth from potential extraterrestrial contamination that could occur as a result of sample return to the Earth-Moon system. In view of the exploration plans before us, the NASA Solar System Exploration Program Roadmap published in May 2003 identified planetary protection as one of 13 technologies for "high priority technology investments." Recent discoveries at Mars and Jupiter, coupled with new policies, have made this planning for planetary protection technology particularly challenging and relevant.New missions to Mars have been formulated, which present significantly greater forward contamination potential. New policies, including the introduction by COSPAR of a Category IVc for planetary protection, have been adopted by COSPAR in response. Some missions may not be feasible without the introduction of new planetary protection technologies. Other missions may be technically possible but planetary protection requirements may be so costly to implement with current technology that they are not affordable. A strategic investment strategy will be needed to focus on technology investments designed to enable future missions and reduce the costs of future missions. This presentation will describe some of the potential technological pathways that may be most protective.

  18. High efficiency, high pulse energy fiber laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Mark S.; Henrie, Jason; Garske, Megan; Templeman, Dan; Afzal, Robert

    2013-05-01

    We report a master-oscillator/power-amplifier laser system featuring a polarizing and coilable 40-micron-core Yb-doped photonic crystal fiber as the final-stage amplifier. The laser source generates 3.4 ns pulses at a repetition rate 19 kHz, with maximum pulse energy 1.2 mJ, maximum average power 22.8 W, near diffraction-limited (M2 < 1.1) beam quality, and 20% electrical to optical efficiency in a compact package. This pulsed-fiber laser flight system provides high pulse energy, average power, peak power, diffraction limited beam quality, and high efficiency all in a thermally and mechanically stable compact package.

  19. Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2009-04-01

    Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics) G. Kochemasov IGEM of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, kochem.36@mail.ru The wave planetology [1-3 & others] proceeds from the following: "planetary structures are made by orbits and rotations". A uniform reason makes uniform structures. Inertia-gravity waves arising in planetary bodies due to their movements in Keplerian elliptical orbits with periodically changing accelerations warp these bodies in such way that they acquire polyhedron shapes (after interference of standing waves of four directions). Strong Newtonian gravity makes bodies larger than ~400 to 500 km in diameter globular and polyhedra are rarely seen. Only geomorphologic, geologic and geophysical mapping can develop these hidden structures. But small bodies, normally less than ~ 300 to 400 km in diameter, often show parts of the polyhedra, rarely fully developed forms (the asteroid Steins and satellite Amalthea present rather perfect forms of "diamond"). Depending on warping wavelengths (they make harmonics) various Plato's figures superimposed on each other can be distinguished. The fundamental wave 1 produces a tetrahedron, intrinsically dichotomic figure in which a vertex (contraction) always is opposed to a face (expansion). From the recent examples the best is the saturnian northern hexagon (a face) opposed to the southern hurricane (a vertex). The first overtone wave 2 is responsible for creation of structural octahedra. Whole ‘diamonds" and their parts are known [4, 5]. Other overtones produce less developed (because of smaller wave amplitudes) planetary shapes complicating main forms. Thus, the first common structural peculiarity of planetary bodies is their polyhedron nature. Not less important is the second common structural peculiarity. As all globular or smaller more or less isometric bodies rotate, they have an angular momentum. It is inevitably different in tropic and extra-tropic belts having uneven radii or distances to

  20. A New Perspective on Trapped Radiation Belts in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, A.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    The charged particle fluxes trapped in the magnetic dipole fields of certain planets in our Solar System are interesting signatures of planetary properties in space physics. They also represent a source of potentially hazardous radiation to spacecraft during planetary and interplanetary exploration. The Earth s trapped radiation belts have been studied for years and the physical mechanisms by which primary radiation from the Sun and Galaxy is captured is well understood. The higher-energy particles collide with molecules in the planetary atmosphere and initiate large cascades of secondary radiation which itself becomes trapped by the magnetic dipole field of the planet. Some of it is even backscattered as albedo neutrons.

  1. The Energetic Demands and Planetary Footprint of Alternative Human Diets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshel, G.; Martin, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    Agriculture is one of the major vehicles of human alteration of the planetary environment. Yet different diets vary vastly in terms of both their energetic demands and overall planetary footprint. We present a quantitative argument that demonstrates that plant-based diets exert vastly smaller planetary environmental cost than animal-based ones. We demonstrate that under a reasonable and readily defensible set of assumptions, a plant-based diet differs from the average American diet by as much energy as the difference between driving a compact and efficient sedan and a Sport Utility Vehicle.

  2. Top Quarks and the High Energy Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelli, Florencia

    2006-04-01

    One of the still missing pieces of the Standard Model of particle physics is the Higgs boson, providing a mechanism to generate the masses of the particles. Furthermore, there is strong indication that the Standard Model is merely the low energy limit of a more fundamental theory which could manifest itself near the TeV scale. This talk will explore aspects of experimentation at the High Energy frontier, starting from experience at the Tevatron accelerator currently providing the world's highest energy particle collisions. In particular, a precision measurement of the top quark mass using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) will be presented. An outlook will be given towards a direct search for the Higgs boson and New Physics at the LHC and beyond, concluding with a historic perspective.

  3. Energy harvesting in high voltage measuring techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żyłka, Pawel; Doliński, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    The paper discusses selected problems related to application of energy harvesting (that is, generating electricity from surplus energy present in the environment) to supply autonomous ultra-low-power measurement systems applicable in high voltage engineering. As a practical example of such implementation a laboratory model of a remote temperature sensor is presented, which is self-powered by heat generated in a current-carrying busbar in HV- switchgear. Presented system exploits a thermoelectric harvester based on a passively cooled Peltier module supplying micro-power low-voltage dc-dc converter driving energy-efficient temperature sensor, microcontroller and a fibre-optic transmitter. Performance of the model in laboratory simulated conditions are presented and discussed.

  4. A Pair Polarimeter for High Energy Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedeschi, David; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Abbott, D.; Vlahovic, B.; Hotta, T.; Kohri, H.; Matsumura, T.; Mibe, T.; Nakano, T.; Yurita, T.; Zegers, R.; Khandaker, M.; Feldman, G.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Wood, M.; Asai, G.; Rudge, A.; Weilhammer, P.

    2001-10-01

    The physics program at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility includes fundamental experiments with polarized photon beams in the GeV energy range. To measure the degree of photon polarization, a photon polarimeter based on the detection of e^+e^- pairs has been developed for use in Hall B and was recently tested at the LEPS facility at SPring-8 in Japan. The use of silicon micro-strip detectors allows for the first time the measurement of the angle correlation in electron-positron pair production by high energy photons incident on an amorphous converter. Theoretical calculations of the pair production process show an asymmetry σ_allel/σ_⊥ ~ 1.7 in a wide range of photon energies. Experimental results from the measurement of the pair asymmetry using 2 GeV photons from the SPring-8 facility will be presented.

  5. A Pair Polarimeter for High Energy Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedeschi, David; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Khandaker, M.; Klein, F.; Feldman, G.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Vlahovic, B.

    2000-10-01

    The physics program at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility includes fundamental experiments with polarized photon beams in the GeV energy range. To measure the degree of photon polarization, a photon polarimeter based on the detection of e^+e^- pairs has been developed for use in Hall B experiments. Recent progress in silicon micro-strip detectors allows for the measurement of the angle correlation in electron-positron pair production by high energy photons incident on an amorphous converter. Theoretical calculations of the pair production process show an asymmetry σ_allel/σ_⊥ ~ 1.7 in a wide range of photon energies. Experimental results obtained from 40 MeV photons at the Duke-FEL and 300 MeV photons from the Brookhaven-LEGS facility using prototype polarimeters will be presented.

  6. Low to high temperature energy conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for converting heat energy from low temperature heat sources to higher temperature was developed. It consists of a decomposition chamber in which ammonia is decomposed into hydrogen and nitrogen by absorbing heat of decomposition from a low temperature energy source. A recombination reaction then takes place which increases the temperature of a fluid significantly. The system is of use for the efficient operation of compact or low capital investment turbine driven electrical generators, or in other applications, to enable chemical reactions that have a critical lower temperature to be used. The system also recovers heat energy from low temperature heat sources, such as solar collectors or geothermal sources, and converts it to high temperatures.

  7. Calorimetry At Very High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Mickey

    2011-06-01

    The capability of hadron colliders has increased to where it will soon be possible to collide protons at center of mass energies of 14 TeV with the advent of the LHC. With increasing collision energy, calorimeters become ever more essential components of a detector, and collaborations often choose very different technologies to meet their goals. From the perspective of a high energy particle and nuclear physicist, a survey is presented of the differences in design considerations and actual performance of the wide variety of calorimeters used in modern hadron colliders such as the Tevatron, RHIC, and LHC. The lessons learned and some ideas for future development of calorimetry will also be discussed.

  8. Planetary rover technology development requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedard, Roger J., Jr.; Muirhead, Brian K.; Montemerlo, Melvin D.; Hirschbein, Murray S.

    1989-01-01

    Planetary surface (including lunar) mobility and sampling capability is required to support proposed future National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) solar system exploration missions. The NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) is addressing some of these technology needs in its base research and development program, the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) and a new technology initiative entitled Pathfinder. The Pathfinder Planetary Rover (PPR) and Sample Acquisition, Analysis and Preservation (SAAP) programs will develop and validate the technologies needed to enable both robotic and piloted rovers on various planetary surfaces. The technology requirements for a planetary roving vehicle and the development plans of the PPR and SAAP programs are discussed.

  9. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell has been designed and tested to deliver high capacity at a C/1.5 discharge rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet made at a discharge rate this high in the 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters, performance, and future test plans are described.

  10. Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, Rafael Antonio; Moncada, Roberto; Guerra, Juan; Anchordoqui, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The search for the origin(s) of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CR) remains one of the cornerstones of high energy astrophysics. The previously proposed sources of acceleration for these UHECRs were gamma-ray bursts (GRB) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) due to their energetic activity and powerful jets. However, a problem arises between the acceleration method and the observed CR spectrum. The CRs from GRBs or AGN jets are assumed to undergo Fermi acceleration and a source injection spectrum proportional to E^-2 is expected. However, the most recent fits to the spectrum and nuclear composition suggest an injection spectrum proportional to E^-1. It is well known that such a hard spectrum is characteristic of unipolar induction of rotating compact objects. When this method is applied to the AGN cores, they prove to be much too luminous to accelerate CR nuclei without photodisintegrating, thus creating significant energy losses. Instead, here we re-examine the possibility of these particles being accelerated around the much less luminous quasar remnants, or dead quasars. We compare the interaction times of curvature radiation and photodisintegration, the two primary energy loss considerations with the acceleration time scale. We show that the energy losses at the source are not significant enough as to prevent these CRs from reaching the maximum observed energies. Using data from observatories in the northern and southern sky, the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory respectively, two hotspots have been discerned which have some associated quasar remnants that help to motivate our study.

  11. Resonance lock and planetary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighipour, Nader

    1999-11-01

    The main purpose of this study is to utilize the method of partial averaging in order to analyze the dynamics of a planetary system while captured in resonance. A restricted planar circular three-body system, consisting of a star and two planets, is studied as a simple model for a planetary system. The mass of the inner planet is considered to be larger and the system is assumed to be moving in a freely rotating uniform interplanetary medium with constant density. Numerical integrations of this system indicate a resonance capture when the dynamical friction of the interplanetary medium is taken into account. As a result of this resonance trapping, the ratio of orbital periods of the two planets becomes nearly commensurable and the eccentricity and semimajor axis of the osculating orbit of the outer planet and also its angular momentum and total energy become constant. It appears from the numerical work that the resulting commensurability and also the resonant values of the orbital elements of the outer planet are essentially independent of the initial relative positions of the two bodies. In order to analytically explain this resonance phenomenon, the method of partial averaging near a resonance is utilized and the dynamics of the partially averaged system at resonance is studied. The finding that resonance lock occurs for all initial relative positions of the two planets is confirmed by analyzing the dynamics of the first order partially averaged system at resonance. It is also shown in this study that the first- order partially averaged system at resonance does not provide a complete picture of the evolutionary dynamics of the system and the similarity between the dynamical behavior of the averaged system and the main planetary system holds only for short time intervals. To overcome these limitations, the method of partial averaging near a resonance is extended to the second order of perturbation and a complete picture of the dynamical behavior of the system at

  12. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1994-08-01

    Accelerators have been devised and built for two reasons: In the first place, by physicists who needed high energy particles in order to have a means to explore the interactions between particles that probe the fundamental elementary forces of nature. And conversely, sometimes accelerator builders produce new machines for higher energy than ever before just because it can be done, and then challenge potential users to make new discoveries with the new means at hand. These two approaches or motivations have gone hand in hand. This lecture traces how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to the gigantic projects of today. So far all the really high-energy machines built and planned in the world--except the SLC--have been ring accelerators and storage rings using the strong-focusing method. But this method has not removed the energy limit, it has only pushed it higher. It would seem unlikely that one can go beyond the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)--but in fact a workshop was held in Sicily in November 1991, concerned with the question of extrapolating to 100 TeV. Other acceleration and beam-forming methods are now being discussed--collective fields, laser acceleration, wake-field accelerators etc., all aimed primarily at making linear colliders possible and more attractive than with present radiofrequency methods. So far it is not entirely clear which of these schemes will dominate particle physics in the future--maybe something that has not been thought of as yet.

  13. Submillimeter Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Erich T.; Allen, Mark A.; Gill, John J.; Choonsup, Lee; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.; Maestrini, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder (SPACES), a high-sensitivity laboratory breadboard for a spectrometer targeted at orbital planetary atmospheric analysis. The frequency range is 520 to 590 GHz, with a target noise temperature sensitivity of 2,500 K for detecting water, sulfur compounds, carbon compounds, and other atmospheric constituents. SPACES is a prototype for a powerful tool for the exploration of the chemistry and dynamics of any planetary atmosphere. It is fundamentally a single-pixel receiver for spectral signals emitted by the relevant constituents, intended to be fed by a fixed or movable telescope/antenna. Its front-end sensor translates the received signal down to the 100-MHz range where it can be digitized and the data transferred to a spectrum analyzer for processing, spectrum generation, and accumulation. The individual microwave and submillimeter wave components (mixers, LO high-powered amplifiers, and multipliers) of SPACES were developed in cooperation with other programs, although with this type of instrument in mind. Compared to previous planetary and Earth science instruments, its broad bandwidth (approx. =.13%) and rapid tunability (approx. =.10 ms) are new developments only made possible recently by the advancement in submillimeter circuit design and processing at JPL.

  14. Planetary cratering mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, John D.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    To obtain a quantitative understanding of the cratering process over a broad range of conditions, we have numerically computed the evolution of impact induced flow fields and calculated the time histories of the major measures of crater geometry (e.g., depth diameter, lip height ...) for variations in planetary gravity (0 to 10 exp 9 cm/sq seconds), material strength (0 to 140 kbar), thermodynamic properties, and impactor radius (0.05 to 5000 km). These results were fit into the framework of the scaling relations of Holsapple and Schmidt (1987). We describe the impact process in terms of four regimes: (1) penetration; (2) inertial; (3) terminal; and (4) relaxation.

  15. Robotic Planetary Drill Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Brian J.; Thompson, S.; Paulsen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Several proposed or planned planetary science missions to Mars and other Solar System bodies over the next decade require subsurface access by drilling. This paper discusses the problems of remote robotic drilling, an automation and control architecture based loosely on observed human behaviors in drilling on Earth, and an overview of robotic drilling field test results using this architecture since 2005. Both rotary-drag and rotary-percussive drills are targeted. A hybrid diagnostic approach incorporates heuristics, model-based reasoning and vibration monitoring with neural nets. Ongoing work leads to flight-ready drilling software.

  16. Planetary submillimeter spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    The aim is to develop a comprehensive observational and analytical program to study solar system physics and meterology by measuring molecular lines in the millimeter and submillimeter spectra of planets and comets. A primary objective is to conduct observations with new JPL and Caltech submillimeter receivers at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. A secondary objective is to continue to monitor the time variable planetary phenomena (e.g., Jupiter and Uranus) at centimeter wavelength using the NASA antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN).

  17. Planetary Spatial Analyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keely, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    This is a status report for the project entitled Planetary Spatial Analyst (PSA). This report covers activities from the project inception on October 1, 2007 to June 1, 2008. Originally a three year proposal, PSA was awarded funding for one year and required a revised work statement and budget. At the time of this writing the project is well on track both for completion of work as well as budget. The revised project focused on two objectives: build a solid connection with the target community and implement a prototype software application that provides 3D visualization and spatial analysis technologies for that community. Progress has been made for both of these objectives.

  18. Planetary entry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roger A.

    1994-01-01

    The final report summarizes the results from three research areas: (1) window design for the radiometric measurement of the forebody radiative heating experienced by atmospheric entry spaceraft; (2) survey of the current understanding of chemical species on selected solar system bodies and assess the importance of measurements with regard to vehicle environment and with regard to understanding of planetary atmospheres with emphasis on Venus, Mars, and Titan; and (3) measure and analyze the radiation (VUV to near-IR) from the shock heated gas cap of a blunt body in an Ames arc Jet wind-tunnel facility.

  19. Misclassified planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbadin, F.

    1986-08-01

    The classifications of 130 objects as planetary nebulae (PNs) in the catalogs of Kohoutek (1965, 1969, and 1972) are reexamined by analyzing their images on the IR (755-885-nm) and red (610-690-nm) plates of the NIR photographic survey of the Galactic plane of Hoessel et al. (1985). Factors affecting the IR and red brightness of normal stars and emission-line objects are discussed, and it is shown that PNs should be brighter in the red than in the IR. Thirty-six supposed PNs for which this is not the case are identified, and it is suggested that they have been improperly classified.

  20. Dynamics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, S.

    1991-02-01

    The modeling of the dynamics of particle collisions within planetary rings is discussed. Particles in the rings collide with one another because they have small random motions in addition to their orbital velocity. The orbital speed is roughly 10 km/s, while the random motions have an average speed of about a tenth of a millimeter per second. As a result, the particle collisions are very gentle. Numerical analysis and simulation of the ring dynamics, performed with the aid of a supercomputer, is outlined.

  1. Characterization of Fillite as a planetary soil simulant in support of rover mobility assessment in high-sinkage/high-slip environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Michael

    This thesis presents the results of a research program characterizing a soil simulant called Fillite, which is composed of alumino-silicate hollow microspheres harvested from the pulverized fuel ash of coal-fired power plants. Fillite is available in large quantities at a reasonable cost and it is chemically inert. Fillite has been selected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center to simulate high-sinkage/high-slip environment in a large test bed such as the ones encountered by the Spirit rover on Mars in 2009 when it became entrapped in a pocket of soft, loose regolith on Mars. The terms high-sinkage and high-slip used here describe the interaction of soils with typical rover wheels. High-sinkage refers to a wheel sinking with little to no applied force while high-slip refers to a spinning wheel with minimal traction. Standard material properties (density, specific gravity, compression index, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio) of Fillite were determined from a series of laboratory tests conducted in general accordance with ASTM standards. Tests were also performed to determine some less standard material properties of Fillite such as the small strain shear wave velocity, maximum shear modulus, and several pressure-sinkage parameters for use in pressure-sinkage models. The experiments include an extensive series of triaxial compression tests, bender element tests, and normal and shear bevameter tests. The unit weight of Fillite on Earth ranges between 3.9 and 4.8 kN/m 3, which is similar to that of Martian regolith (about 3.7 -- 5.6 kN/m3) on Mars and close to the range of the unit weight of lunar regolith (about 1.4 -- 2.9 kN/m3) on the Moon. The data presented here support that Fillite has many physical and mechanical properties that are similar to what is known about Martian regolith. These properties are also comparable to lunar regolith. Fillite is quite dilatant; its peak and critical angles of internal friction are

  2. New Prospects in High Energy Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, Roger; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-15

    Recent discoveries using TeV, X-ray and radio telescopes as well as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray arrays are leading to new insights into longstanding puzzles in high energy astrophysics. Many of these insights come from combining observations throughout the electromagnetic and other spectra as well as evidence assembled from different types of source to propose general principles. Issues discussed in this general overview include methods of accelerating relativistic particles, and amplifying magnetic field, the dynamics of relativistic outflows and the nature of the prime movers that power them. Observational approaches to distinguishing hadronic, leptonic and electromagnetic outflows and emission mechanisms are discussed along with probes of the velocity field and the confinement mechanisms. Observations with GLAST promise to be very prescriptive for addressing these problems.

  3. High energy density redox flow device

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  4. Extremely high energy neutrinos from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Berezinsky, Veniamin; Sabancilar, Eray; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    Superstring theory and other supersymmetric theories predict the existence of relatively light, weakly interacting scalar particles, called moduli, with a universal form of coupling to matter. Such particles can be emitted from cusps of cosmic strings, where extremely large Lorentz factors are achieved momentarily. Highly boosted modulus bursts emanating from cusps subsequently decay into gluons; they generate parton cascades which in turn produce large numbers of pions and then neutrinos. Because of very large Lorentz factors, extremely high energy neutrinos, up to the Planck scale and above, are produced. For some model parameters, the predicted flux of neutrinos with energies > or approx. 10{sup 21} eV is observable by JEM-EUSO and by the future large radio detectors LOFAR and SKA.

  5. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

  6. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  7. Preventing cavitation in high energy centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Garbers, A.W.F.; Wasfi, A.K. Ltd. )

    1990-07-01

    Large-eye impellers for high energy centrifugal pumps were developed to meet the specification of reduced NPSH{sub r} at rated flow conditions. Unfortunately, this improved NPSH performance was not without adverse tradeoffs because an abnormal increase in noise, vibration and cavitation erosion were experienced at low flows. Centrifugal pumps are often used under widely varying and adverse conditions, and in the case of high energy and large-eye impeller pumps, these conditions should be evaluated very carefully. At petrochemical complexes in Secunda in the Republic of South Africa, a centrifugal pump application for lean carbonate solution experienced frequent failures. An investigation and literature survey indicated the cause was low flow cavitation. The purpose of this article is but to give design guidelines as obtained from literature and experience.

  8. Prospects of High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, J.S.T.; Chen, P.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21

    Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) have been observed but their sources and production mechanisms are yet to be understood. We envision a laboratory astrophysics program that will contribute to the understanding of cosmic accelerators with efforts to: (1) test and calibrate UHECR observational techniques, and (2) elucidate the underlying physics of cosmic acceleration through laboratory experiments and computer simulations. Innovative experiments belonging to the first category have already been done at the SLAC FFTB. Results on air fluorescence yields from the FLASH experiment are reviewed. Proposed future accelerator facilities can provided unprecedented high-energy-densities in a regime relevant to cosmic acceleration studies and accessible in a terrestrial environment for the first time. We review recent simulation studies of nonlinear plasma dynamics that could give rise to cosmic acceleration, and discuss prospects for experimental investigation of the underlying mechanisms.

  9. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  10. HIGH ENERGY RATE EXTRUSION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.

    1963-07-23

    A method of extruding uranium at a high energy rate is described. Conditions during the extrusion are such that the temperature of the metal during extrusion reaches a point above the normal alpha to beta transition, but the metal nevertheless remains in the alpha phase in accordance with the Clausius- Clapeyron equation. Upon exiting from the die, the metal automatically enters the beta phase, after which the metal is permitted to cool. (AEC)

  11. MASS SEPARATION OF HIGH ENERGY PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, L.

    1962-09-25

    An apparatus and method are described for separating charged, high energy particles of equal momentum forming a beam where the particles differ slightly in masses. Magnetic lenses are utilized to focus the beam and maintain that condition while electrostatic fields located between magnetic lenses are utilized to cause transverse separation of the particles into two beams separated by a sufficient amount to permit an aperture to block one beam. (AEC)

  12. HIGH ENERGY GASEOUS PLASMA CONTAINMENT DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.; Hammel, J.E.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presenied for producing neutrons as a result of collisions between ions in high temperature plasmas. The invention resides in the particular arrangement of ihe device whereby ihe magneiic and electric fields are made to cross at substantially right angles in several places along a torus shaped containment vessel. A plasma of deuterium gas is generated in the vessel under the electric fields and is "trapped" in any one of the "crossed field" regions to produce a release of energy.

  13. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherfoord, John P.; Johns, Kenneth A.; Shupe, Michael A.; Cheu, Elliott C.; Varnes, Erich W.; Dienes, Keith; Su, Shufang; Toussaint, William Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2013-07-29

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  14. The high energy sky with INTEGRAL

    SciTech Connect

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; De Rosa, A.; Fiocchi, M. T.

    2007-07-12

    INTEGRAL is continuing the deep observations of the Galactic Plane and, at level of a mCrab, of the whole sky in the soft Gamma ray range. The new IBIS catalogue contains more than 420 sources detected in 20-40 and 40-100 keV range. We present a view of the INTEGRAL high energy sky with particular regard to sources emitting beyond 100 keV, including Blazar and HESS couterpart.0.

  15. Gratings for High-Energy Petawatt Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H T; Britten, J A; Carlson, T C; Nissen, J D; Summers, L J; Hoaglan, C R; Aasen, M D; Peterson, J E; Jovanovic, I

    2005-11-08

    To enable high-energy petawatt laser operation we have developed the processing methods and tooling that produced both the world's largest multilayer dielectric reflection grating and the world's highest laser damage resistant gratings. We have successfully delivered the first ever 80 cm aperture multilayer dielectric grating to LLNL's Titan Intense Short Pulse Laser Facility. We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings.

  16. Laser Experiments for High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2010-11-23

    High energy density science probes some of the most basic scientific questions that cut across traditional disciplines. The advent of table top, terawatt, femtosecond lasers promises to revolutionize this area by the use of precise experimental techniques on the one hand and testing of models and computer simulations on the other. In this paper, we present some of our results on hot electron generation, giant magnetic fields and ultrafast plasma dynamics using such experiments and theoretical modeling.

  17. The effect of carbon monoxide on planetary haze formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hörst, S. M.; Tolbert, M. A

    2014-01-20

    Organic haze plays a key role in many planetary processes ranging from influencing the radiation budget of an atmosphere to serving as a source of prebiotic molecules on the surface. Numerous experiments have investigated the aerosols produced by exposing mixtures of N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} to a variety of energy sources. However, many N{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} atmospheres in both our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems also contain carbon monoxide (CO). We have conducted a series of atmosphere simulation experiments to investigate the effect of CO on the formation and particle size of planetary haze analogues for a range of CO mixing ratios using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that CO strongly affects both number density and particle size of the aerosols produced in our experiments and indicates that CO may play an important, previously unexplored, role in aerosol chemistry in planetary atmospheres.

  18. Role of Planetary waves in Winter Stratospheric Warming: Decadal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagavathiammal, G. J.

    2016-07-01

    Winter Stratospheric dynamics is quiet variable and fascinating in nature, because of the energetic planetary waves, propagates upward from troposphere. Using ECMWF ERA Interim Reanalysis datasets, this paper presents the decadal behaviour of winter stratosphere. Traditional diagnostic tool, Eliassen Palm (E-P) flux provides a realistic understanding of the middle atmospheric processes. Horizontal and vertical component of E-P flux is used to characterize the intensity of upward propagating tropospheric planetary waves. Inter annual variability reveals that the intensification planetary wave energy in the extratropical stratosphere was observed in the month of December; revert the stratospheric circulation, by creating the preconditioning state for the occurrence of stratospheric warming in January (mid-winter). After SSW, No evidence of heat flux energy is observed. This work will provide a better understanding in planetary wave - stratospheric warming mechanism.

  19. Infrastructure for Planetary Sciences: Universal planetary database development project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaba, Yasumasa; Capria, M. T.; Crichton, D.; Zender, J.; Beebe, R.

    The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA), formally formed under COSPAR (Formal start: from the COSPAR 2008 at Montreal), is a joint international effort to enable global access and exchange of high quality planetary science data, and to establish archive stan-dards that make it easier to share the data across international boundaries. In 2008-2009, thanks to the many players from several agencies and institutions, we got fruitful results in 6 projects: (1) Inter-operable Planetary Data Access Protocol (PDAP) implementations [led by J. Salgado@ESA], (2) Small bodies interoperability [led by I. Shinohara@JAXA N. Hirata@U. Aizu], (3) PDAP assessment [led by Y. Yamamoto@JAXA], (4) Architecture and standards definition [led by D. Crichton@NASA], (5) Information model and data dictionary [led by S. Hughes@NASA], and (6) Venus Express Interoperability [led by N. Chanover@NMSU]. 'IPDA 2009-2010' is important, especially because the NASA/PDS system reformation is now reviewed as it develops for application at the international level. IPDA is the gate for the establishment of the future infrastructure. We are running 8 projects: (1) IPDA Assessment of PDS4 Data Standards [led by S. Hughes (NASA/JPL)], (2) IPDA Archive Guide [led by M.T. Capria (IASF/INAF) and D. Heather (ESA/PSA)], (3) IPDA Standards Identification [led by E. Rye (NASA/PDS) and G. Krishna (ISRO)], (4) Ancillary Data Standards [led by C. Acton (NASA/JPL)], (5) IPDA Registries Definition [led by D. Crichton (NASA/JPL)], (6) PDAP Specification [led by J. Salgado (ESA/PSA) and Y. Yamamoto (JAXA)], (7) In-teroperability Assessment [R. Beebe (NMSU) and D. Heather (ESA/PSA)], and (8) PDAP Geographic Information System (GIS) extension [N. Hirata (Univ. Aizu) and T. Hare (USGS: thare@usgs.gov)]. This paper presents our achievements and plans summarized in the IPDA 5th Steering Com-mittee meeting at DLR in July 2010. We are now just the gate for the establishment of the Infrastructure.

  20. EXTRACTOR FOR HIGH ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Lambertson, G.R.

    1964-04-01

    A particle-extracting apparatus for use with a beam of high-energy charged particles such as travel in an evacuated chamber along a circular equilibrium axis is described. A magnetized target is impacted relatively against the beam whereby the beam particles are deflected from the beam by the magnetic induction in the target. To this end the target may be moved into the beam or the beam may coast into the target and achieve high angular particle deflection and slow extraction. A deflecting septum magnet may additionally be used for deflection at even sharper angles. (AEC)