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Sample records for high enery gamma

  1. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  2. Fourth Workshop on Science with the New Generation of High Energy Gamma-ray Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massai, Marco Maria; Omodei, Nicola; Spandre, Gloria

    I. Space-based telescope. Integral-4 years in orbit / P. Umbertini, P. Caraveo. The Suzaku mission / K. Yamaoka. The Swift mission: two years of operation / A. Moretti. Gamma-ray astrophysics with AGILE / F.Longo et al., The AGILE collaboration. The GLAST mission / J.E. McEnery -- II. Ground-based telescope. Recent results from CANGAROO / M. Mori for the CANGAROO team. The H.E.S.S. project / C. Masterson for the H.E.S.S. collaboration. The MAGIC experiment / N. Turini for the MAGIC collaboration. VERITAS: status and performance / J. Holder for the VERITAS collaboration -- III. Galactic variable sources. Galactic variable sky with EGRET and GLAST / S. Digel. Galactic variable sources observed with H.E.S.S. / N. Komin for the H.E.S.S collaboration. Gamma ray pulsars in the GLAST era / M. Razzano. Solving the riddle of unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources / P. Caraveo. Supernovae and gamma-ray burst / M. Della Valle. First cycle of MAGIC galactic observations / J. Cortina for the MAGIC collaboration. Gamma-rays and neutrinos from a SNR in the galactic center / V. Cavasinni, D. Grasso, L. Maccione. Solving GRBs and SGRs puzzles by precessing jets / D. Fargion, O. Lanciano, P. Oliva -- IV. Extragalactic sources. Multiwavelength observations and theories of blazers / G. Tosti. AGN observations with the MAGIC telescope / C. Bigongiari for the MAGIC collaboration. Gamma ray bursts/ L. Amati. X-rays and GeV flares in GRB light curves / A. Galli ... [et al.]. The highest energy emission from gamma ray bursts: MILAGRO's constraints and HAWC's potential / B. Dingus for the MILAGRO and HAWC collaborations. Observation of GRB with the MAGIC telescope / N. Galante, P. Piccioli for the MAGIC collaboration. GRB 060218 and the outliers with respect to the E-E correlation / G. Ghirlanda, G. Ghibellini -- V. Poster session. Study of the performance and calibration of the GLAST-LAT silicon tracker / M. Brigida, N. Giglietto, P. Spinelli. The online monitor for the GLAST

  3. Helios 2-Vela-Ariel 5 gamma-ray burst source position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Trainor, J.; Pizzichini, G.; Spizzichino, A.; Klebesadel, R.; Ricketts, M.; Helmken, H.

    1979-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst of January 28, 1976, one of 18 events thus far detected in interplanetary space with Helios 2, was also observed with the Vela 5A and 6A and the Ariel 5 satellites. A small source field is obtained from the intersection of the region derived from the observed time delays between Helios 2 and Vela 5A and 6A, with the source region independently found with the Ariel 5 X-ray detector. This area contains neither any steady X-ray source as scanned by HEAO 1 nor any previously cataloged X-ray, radio, or infrared sources, X-ray transients, quasars, Seyferts, globular clusters, flare stars, pulsars, white dwarfs, or high enery gamma-ray sources. The region is, however, within the source field of a gamma-ray transient observed in 1974 by Jacobson et al. (1978) which exhibited nuclear gamma-ray line structure.

  4. Exploring the High Energy Universe: GLAST Mission and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    GLAST, the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, is NASA's next-generation high-energy gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in Autumn 2007. GLAST will allow measurements of cosmic gamma-ray sources in the 10 MeV to 100 GeV energy band to be made with unprecedented sensitivity. Amongst its key scientific objectives are to understand particle acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei, Pulsars and Supernovae Remnants, to provide high resolution measurements of unidentified gamma-ray sources, to study transient high energy emission from objects such as gamma-ray bursts, and to probe Dark Matter and the early Universe. Dr. McEnery will present an overview of the GLAST mission and its scientific goals.

  5. High temperature spectral gamma well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Normann, R.A.; Henfling, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A high temperature spectral gamma tool has been designed and built for use in small-diameter geothermal exploration wells. Several engineering judgments are discussed regarding operating parameters, well model selection, and signal processing. An actual well log at elevated temperatures is given with spectral gamma reading showing repeatability.

  6. High energy gamma ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Michael Richard

    This thesis presents a design study into gamma ray collimation techniques for use in high energy radiation imaging devices for the nuclear industry. Such technology is required to provide information on the nature and location of isotopes within nuclear facilities that have reached the end of their useful life. The work has concentrated on the use of two different techniques, namely mechanical collimation using the Anger camera and electronic collimation using a Compton camera. The work has used computational models to evaluate the performance of such systems and thereby suggest optimal design parameters for use in prototype devices. Ray tracing models have been constructed to simulate both parallel hole and tapered bore diverging collimators. Investigations have been carried out to measure the effects on the spatial resolution of changing various design parameters of the collimators. The effects of varying the hole size, septal thickness and collimator length over a range of source to collimator distances likely to be encountered in an industrial scenario have been examined. Some new insight into the nature of the point spread function of mechanical collimators has been gained and the limitations of the conventional analytical approach to collimator evaluation have been highlighted. Modifications to the standard equations used in collimator design have subsequently been suggested. An analytical description of tapered bore collimators has been derived. Monte Carlo models have been developed to model a single scatter Compton camera. Germanium, silicon and sodium iodide have been investigated as candidates for the scattering detector in such a device. A model of a complete ring array Compton camera system has been used to evaluate performance. The data from the Monte Carlo model has been reconstructed to form images. The quality of the images generated have then been compared with images obtained from parallel hole and focusing mechanical collimators.

  7. Exploring the High Energy Universe: GLAST Mission and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    GLAST, the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, is NASA's next-generation high-energy gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in Autumn 2007. GLAST will allow measurements of cosmic gamma-ray sources in t he 10 MeV to 100 GeV energy band to be made with unprecedented sensi tivity. Amongst its key scientific objectives are to understand part icle acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei, Pulsars and Supernovae Remnants, to provide high resolution measurements of unidentified ga mma-ray sources, to study transient high energy emission from objects such as gamma-ray bursts, and to probe Dark Matter and the early Uni verse. Dr. McEnery will present an overview of the GLAST mission and its scientific goals.

  8. High temperature creep behavior of single crystal gamma prime and gamma alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Diaz, J. O.; Miner, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    The creep behavior of single crystals of gamma-prime and gamma alloys were investigated and compared to the response of two-phase superalloys tested previously. High temperature deformation in the gamma alloys was characteristic of a climb-controlled mechanism, whereas the gamma-prime based materials exhibited glide-controlled creep behavior. The superalloys were much more creep resistant than their constituent phases, which indicates the importance of the gamma/gamma-prime interface as a barrier for dislocation motion during creep.

  9. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

  10. Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Paula M

    2007-05-15

    Very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has undergone a transformation in the last few years, with telescopes of unprecedented sensitivity having greatly expanded the source catalogue. Such progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much more likely than previously. This paper describes the facilities currently operating and their chances for detecting gamma-ray bursts, and reviews predictions for VHE gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts. Results to date are summarized. PMID:17293337

  11. Very high energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results in ground based very high energy gamma ray astronomy are reviewed. The various modes of the atmospheric Cerenkov technique are described, and the importance of cosmic ray rejection methods is stressed. The positive detections of the Crab pulsar that suggest a very flat spectrum and time-variable pulse phase are discussed. Observations of other pulsars (particularly Vela) suggest these features may be general. Evidence that a 4.8 hr modulated effect was detected from Cyg X-3 is strengthened in that the exact period originally proposed agrees well with a recent determination of the X-ray period. The southern sky observations are reviewed, and the significance of the detection of an active galaxy (NGC 5128) is considered for source models and future observations.

  12. Analysis of High-Fold Gamma Data

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, C.J.; Cromaz, M.; Radford, D.C.

    1998-08-10

    Historically, {gamma}-{gamma} and {gamma}-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence spectra were utilized to build nuclear level schemes. With the development of large detector arrays, it has became possible to analyze higher fold coincidence data sets. This paper briefly reports on software to analyze 4-fold coincidence data sets that allows creation of 4-fold histograms (hypercubes) of at least 1024 channels per side (corresponding to a 43 gigachannel data space) that will fit onto a few gigabytes of disk space, and extraction of triple-gated spectra in a few seconds. Future detector arrays may have even higher efficiencies, and detect an many as 15 or 20 {gamma} rays simultaneously; such data will require very different algorithms for storage and analysis. Difficulties inherent in the analysis of such data are discussed, and two possible new solutions are presented, namely adaptive list-mode systems and list-list-mode storage.

  13. High-energy gamma rays from the intense 1993 January 31 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommer, M.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fishman, G. J.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Hurley, K.; Kanbach, G.

    1994-01-01

    The intense gamma-ray burst of 1993 January 31 was detected by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory. Sixteen gamma rays above 30 MeV were imaged in the telescope when only 0.04 gamma rays were expected by chance. Two of these gamma rays have energies of approximately 1 GeV, and the five bin spectrum of the 16 events is fitted by a power law of photon spectral index -2.0 +/- 0.4. The high-energy emission extends for at least 25 s. The most probable direction for this burst is determined from the directions of the 16 gamma rays observed by Egret and also by requiring the position to lie on annulus derived by the Interplanetary Network.

  14. MOLE: A new high-energy gamma-ray diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, M. J.; Chang, B.

    1992-01-01

    Continued interest in high-energy gamma rays associated with fusion reactions has motivated an ongoing search for simple, effective measurement techniques. Past experiments have measured 16.7-MeV gamma rays with Compton-magnetic spectrometers. Some measurements have been performed with threshold Cherenkov detectors with enhanced sensitivity to high-energy (gamma) rays. The Compton spectrometers work quite well, but they require extensive calibrations and tend to be expensive and cumbersome. The threshold Cherenkov detectors are simpler to calibrate and physically compact, but have poor spectral definition and are vulnerable to background signals. This report describes a new type of (gamma)-ray detector, the MOLE, that may retain the simplicity of a threshold Cherenkov detector while still having sufficient energy discrimination to be effective for measuring high-energy (gamma)-rays in the presence of lower-energy (gamma)-ray fluxes.

  15. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  16. GAMMA: a high performance dataflow database machine

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, D.J.; Gerber, R.H.; Graefe, G.; Heytens, M.L.; Kumar, K.B.; Muralikrishna, M.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper, the design, implementation techniques, and initial performance evaluation of Gamma are presented. Gamma is a new relational database machine that exploits dataflow query processing techniques. Ganma is a fully operational prototype consisting of 20 VAX 11/750 computers. The design of Gamma is based on an earlier multiprocessor database machine prototype (DIRECT) and several years of subsequent research on the problems raised by the DIRECT prototype. In addition to demonstrating that parallelism can really be made to work in a database machine context, the Gamma prototype shows how parallelism can be controlled with minimal control overhead through a combination of the use of algorithms based on hashing and the pipelining of data between processes. Except for 2 messages to initiate each operator of a query tree and 1 message when the operator terminates, the execution of a query is entirely self-scheduling. 52 refs., 12 figs.

  17. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Johnson, M; Navratil, P

    2007-09-28

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved.

  18. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  19. Monte Carlo calibration of the SMM gamma ray spectrometer for high energy gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Reppin, C.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft was primarily designed and calibrated for nuclear gamma ray line measurements, but also has a high energy mode which allows the detection of gamma rays at energies above 10 MeV and solar neutrons above 20 MeV. The GRS response has been extrapolated until now for high energy gamma rays from an early design study employing Monte Carlo calculations. The response to 50 to 600 MeV solar neutrons was estimated from a simple model which did not consider secondary charged particles escaping into the veto shields. In view of numerous detections by the GRS of solar flares emitting high energy gamma rays, including at least two emitting directly detectable neutrons, the calibration of the high energy mode in the flight model has been recalculated by the use of more sophisticated Monte Carlo computer codes. New results presented show that the GRS response to gamma rays above 20 MeV and to neutrons above 100 MeV is significantly lower than the earlier estimates.

  20. High-pressure xenon detectors for gamma-ray spectrometry

    PubMed

    Dmitrenko; Gratchev; Ulin; Uteshev; Viasik

    2000-03-01

    The main results of long-term research on compressed xenon detector properties conducted at the laboratory of cosmic physics of MEPhI are given along with a description of the latest gamma-ray spectrometers based on this work. It is shown that using xenon as working substance, it is possible to create a gamma-ray spectrometer with high energy resolution. The construction and the main physical, technical and operation performances of xenon gamma-ray spectrometers based on ionization chambers of various configurations are described. For a gamma-ray spectrometer with a cylindrical ionization chamber and shielding grid, an energy resolution of about 14 keV (10 keV intrinsic resolution) for gamma-ray line of 662 keV is obtained. The characteristics of these detectors allow one to apply them in various fields of science and engineering, moreover, their good spectrometric properties provide the opportunity to use them for metrology measurements. PMID:10724434

  1. Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamae, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Watanabe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Building on the success of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will make a major step in the study of such subjects as blazars, gamma Ray bursts, the search for dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, diffuse radiation, and unidentified high energy sources. The instrument will be built on new and mature detector technologies such as silicon strip detectors, low-power low-noise LSI, and a multilevel data acquisition system. GLAST is in the research and development phase, and one full tower (of 25 total) is now being built in collaborating institutes. The prototype tower will be tested thoroughly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the fall of 1999.

  2. Spectrometer of high energy gamma quantums

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokhintsev, I. D.; Melioranskiy, A. S.; Kalinkin, L. F.; Nagornykh, Y. I.; Pryakhin, Y. A.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed description of the apparatus GG-2M is given. The spectrometer contains a Cerenkov and scintillation (including anticoincidence) counter. The energies of the gamma quantums are measured by a shower calorimeter, in which scintillation counters are used in the capacity of detectors. Results are given for tuning the device on mu-mesons of cosmic rays. The data of physical tuning allow more reliable interpretation of the results of measurements which are received on the satellites.

  3. Measurement and analysis of quadruple ({alpha}{gamma}{gamma}) angular correlations for high spin states of {sup 24}Mg.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhover, I.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Lister, C. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Amro, H.; Caggiano, J.; Heinz, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Siem, S.; Sonzogni, A.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Devlin, M.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.

    2000-10-30

    The high-lying, {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 24}Mg have been studied by measuring the complete decay path of {alpha} and {gamma} emissions using five segmented Silicon detectors in conjunction with GAMMASPHERE. The authors analyzed the ({alpha}{gamma}) triple angular correlations and, for the first time, ({alpha}{gamma}{gamma}) quadruple correlations. The data analysis is based on a new Fourier transformation technique. The power of the technique is demonstrated.

  4. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1992-02-01

    The second reflector (project GRANITE) is on schedule. At present (January 1992) it and the 10 m reflector are obtaining stereoscopic views of gamma-ray air showers from the Crab Nebula which verify the expected performance of the twin reflector telescopes. With the additional improvements of the upgrade (a pending DOE proposal) the twin reflectors should reach a limiting intensity of 1% that of the Crab. The astonishing early results from the EGRET detector aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory indicate that distant quasars (powered by supermassive black holes) are active at GeV energies. The Whipple instruments are poised to see if such behavior continues above 100 GeV, as well as perform sensitive observations of previously reported GeV (Geminga) and TeV (Hercules X-1, etc.) sources. In addition to observing sources and identifying their location in the sky to one arcminute, experiments are planned to search for WIMPS in the mass range 0.1 to 1 TeV, and to determine the abundance of anti-protons in the cosmic rays. The successful performance of the stereoscopic reflectors demonstrates the feasibility of the concept of arrays of Cherenkov receivers. Design studies for a much larger array (CASITA) are just beginning.

  5. Very high energy gamma ray extension of GRO observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1992-01-01

    This has been an exiciting year for high energy gamma-ray astronomy, both from space and from ground-based observatories. It has been a particularly active period for the Whipple Observatory gamma-ray group. In phase 1 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), there has not been too much opportunity for overlapping observations with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) and the other GRO telescopes; however, significant progress was made in the development of data analysis techniques and in improving the sensitivity of the technique which will have direct application in correlative observations in phase 2. Progress made during the period 1 Jul. 1991 - 31 Dec. 1991 is presented.

  6. Multiwavelength observations of unidentified high energy gamma ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1993-01-01

    As was the case for COS B, the majority of high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument on GRO are not immediately identifiable with cataloged objects at other wavelengths. These persistent gamma-ray sources are, next to the gamma-ray bursts, the least understood objects in the universe. Even a rudimentary understanding of their nature awaits identifications and follow-up work at other wavelengths to tell us what they are. The as yet unidentified sources are potentially the most interesting, since they may represent unrecognized new classes of astronomical objects, such as radio-quiet pulsars or new types of active galactic nuclei (AGN's). This two-year investigation is intended to support the analysis, correlation, and theoretical interpretation of data that we are obtaining at x ray, optical, and radio wavelengths in order to render the gamma-ray data interpretable. According to plan, in the first year concentration was on the identification and study of Geminga. The second year will be devoted to studies of similar unidentified gamma-ray sources which will become available in the first EGRET catalogs. The results obtained so far are presented in the two papers which are reproduced in the Appendix. In these papers, we discuss the pulse profiles of Geminga, the geometry and efficiency of the magnetospheric accelerator, the distance to Geminga, the implications for theories of polar cap heating, the effect of the magnetic field on the surface emission and environment of the neutron star, and possible interpretations of a radio-quiet Geminga. The implications of the other gamma-ray pulsars which were discovered to have high gamma-ray efficiency are also discussed, and the remaining unidentified COS B sources are attributed to a population of efficient gamma-ray sources, some of which may be radio quiet.

  7. High energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborra, Irene

    2016-05-01

    The diffuse high-energy neutrino emission from long and short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is studied within the fireball emission model. By requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions, we find that GRBs could contribute up to a few percents to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, if the latter has a diffuse origin. Our findings suggest that larger exposure is mandatory to detect neutrinos from GRBs in future stacking searches.

  8. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  9. Enery Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Zwitter; Phillip Nash; Xiaoyan Xu; Chadwick Johnson

    2011-03-31

    This is the final technical report for the Department of Energy NETL project NT01931 Energy Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications. Titanium has been identified as one of the key materials with the required strength that can reduce the weight of automotive components and thereby reduce fuel consumption. Working with newly developed sources of titanium powder, Webster-Hoff will develop the processing technology to manufacture low cost vehicle components using the single press/single sinter techniques developed for iron based powder metallurgy today. Working with an automotive or truck manufacturer, Webster-Hoff will demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing a press and sinter titanium component for a vehicle application. The project objective is two-fold, to develop the technology for manufacturing press and sinter titanium components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle application. The lowest cost method for converting metal powder into a net shape part is the Powder Metallurgy Press and Sinter Process. The method involves compaction of the metal powder in a tool (usually a die and punches, upper and lower) at a high pressure (up to 60 TSI or 827 MPa) to form a green compact with the net shape of the final component. The powder in the green compact is held together by the compression bonds between the powder particles. The sinter process then converts the green compact to a metallurgically bonded net shape part through the process of solid state diffusion. The goal of this project is to expand the understanding and application of press and sinter technology to Titanium Powder applications, developing techniques to manufacture net shape Titanium components via the press and sinter process. In addition, working with a vehicle manufacturer, demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle. This is not a research program, but rather a

  10. The very-high-energy gamma-ray sky.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy has emerged as a truly observational discipline, with many detected sources representing different galactic and extragalactic source populations-supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, giant molecular clouds, star formation regions, compact binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. It is expected that observations with the next generation of stereoscopic arrays of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes over a very broad energy range from 10(10) to 10(15) electron volts will dramatically increase the number of very-high-energy gamma-ray sources, thus having a huge impact on the development of astrophysics, cosmology, and particle astrophysics. PMID:17204642

  11. Improved Gamma-Ray Flux Monitoring at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source (HIGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Robert

    2002-10-01

    An improved gamma-ray beam flux monitor has been built for use at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source at the Duke University Free Electron Laser Laboratories. It is important to know precisely the gamma-ray flux of this beam. It is also important to limit beam attenuation to a minimum while making an accurate flux measurement. The improvements from a more accurate gamma-ray intensity monitor will allow for more precise cross-section measurements and will be valuable to many of the experiments conducted at HIGS. The detector consists of a thin scintillator optically coupled to two photomultiplier tubes, a thin foil, and then another thin scintillator attached to two photomultiplier tubes. The front scintillator is used to veto counts from charged particles emitted upstream in the beam-line. The preliminary tests of the monitor show very promising results and after slight adjustments and calibrations, the detector will be ready to acquire accurate beam intensity measurements while contributing very little to beam attenuation.

  12. (Very)-high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics: The future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Several projects planned or proposed can significantly expand our knowledge of the high-energy Universe in gamma rays. Construction of the Cherenkov telescope array CTA is started, and other detectors are planned which will use the reconstruction of extensive air showers. This report explores the near future, and possible evolutions in a longer term.

  13. (Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses: quasielastic scattering studies on glycerol; gamma-ray scattering from alkali halides; lattice dynamics in metals; Moessbauer neutron scattering, x-ray diffraction, and macroscopic studies of high {Tc} superconductors containing tungsten; NiAl scattering studies; and atomic interference factors and nuclear Casimir effect.

  14. High-energy gamma radiation from Geminga observed by EGRET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K. T. S.; Chiang, J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fierro, J. M.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kwok, P. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has carried out extensive studies of the gamma-ray source Geminga. Following the detection of pulsed X-rays (Halpern and Holt 1992) from Geminga, Bertsch et al. (1992) reported the same 237 ms periodicity to be visible in the EGRET data. A full analysis of the Geminga source shows that the energy spectrum is compatible with a power law with a spectral index of -1.50 +/- 0.08 between 30 MeV and 2 GeV. A falloff relative to the power law is observed for energies above 2 GeV. Phase-resolved spectra also show power laws with high-energy cutoffs, but with significant variation of the spectral index with phase. No unpulsed emission is observed. No evidence for time variation was found within the EGRET observations.

  15. High-energy gamma-ray sources of cosmological origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Pierre; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann

    2016-06-01

    The current generation of instruments in gamma-ray astrophysics launched a new era in the search for a dark matter signal in the high-energy sky. Such searches are said indirect, in the sense that the presence of a dark matter particle is inferred from the detection of products of its pair-annihilation or decay. They have recently started to probe the natural domain of existence for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), the favorite dark matter candidates today. In this article, we review the basic framework for indirect searches and we present a status of current limits obtained with gamma-ray observations. We also devote a section to another possible class of cosmological gamma-ray sources, primordial black holes, also considered as a potential constituent of dark matter. xml:lang="fr"

  16. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  17. PANGU: A high resolution gamma-ray space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin; Su, Meng; Bravar, Alessandro; Chang, Jin; Fan, Yizhong; Pohl, Martin; Walter, Roland

    2014-07-01

    We describe the instrument concept of a high angular resolution telescope dedicated to the sub-GeV (from >=10 MeV to >=1 GeV) gamma-ray photon detection. This mission, named PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit), has been suggested as a candidate for the joint small mission between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). A wide range of topics of both astronomy and fundamental physics can be attacked with PANGU, covering Galactic and extragalactic cosmic-ray physics, extreme physics of a variety of extended (e.g. supernova remnants, galaxies, galaxy clusters) and compact (e.g. black holes, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts) objects, solar and terrestrial gamma-ray phenomena, and searching for dark matter decay and/or annihilation signature etc. The unprecedented point spread function can be achieved with a pair-production telescope with a large number of thin active tracking layers to precisely reconstruct the pair-produced electron and positron tracks. Scintillating fibers or thin silicon micro-strip detectors are suitable technology for such a tracker. The energy measurement is achieved by measuring the momentum of the electrons and positrons through a magnetic field. The innovated spectrometer approach provides superior photon pointing resolution, and is particular suitable in the sub-GeV range. The level of tracking precision makes it possible to measure the polarization of gamma rays, which would open up a new frontier in gamma-ray astronomy. The frequent full-sky survey at sub-GeV with PANGU's large field of view and significantly improved point spread function would provide crucial information to GeV-TeV astrophysics for current/future missions including Fermi, DAMPE, HERD, and CTA, and other multi-wavelength telescopes.

  18. Recent high energy gamma-ray results from SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Ogelman, H. B.; Ozel, M. E.; Tumer, T.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy due to the results from SAS-2 have focused on two areas. First, the emission from the plane of the Galaxy is the dominant feature in the gamma-ray sky. The galactic latitude and longitude distributions are consistent with the concept that the high-energy radiation originates from cosmic rays interacting with interstellar matter, and the measurements support a galactic origin for cosmic rays. Second, searches of the SAS-2 data for emission from localized sources have shown three strong discrete gamma-ray sources: the Crab nebula and PSR 0531 + 21, the Vela supernova remnant and PSR 0833-45, and a source near galactic coordinates 193 deg longitude, +3 deg latitude, which does not appear to be associated with other known celestial objects. Evidence has also been found for pulsed gamma-ray emission from two other radio pulsars, PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46. A localized source near longitudes 76-80 deg may be associated with the X-ray source Cyg X-3.

  19. PANGU: A High Resolution Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng

    2014-08-01

    We propose a high angular resolution telescope dedicated to the sub-GeV gamma-ray astronomy as a candidate for the CAS-ESA joint small mission. This mission, called PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit), will open up a unique window of electromagnetic spectrum that has never been explored with great precision. A wide range of topics of both astronomy and fundamental physics can be attacked with a telescope that has an angular resolution about one order of magnitude better than the currently operating Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) in the sub-GeV range, covering galactic and extragalactic cosmic-ray physics, extreme physics of a variety of extended (e.g. supernova remnants, galaxies, galaxy clusters) and compact (e.g. black holes, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts) objects, solar and terrestrial gamma-ray phenomena, and searching for Dark Matter (DM) decay and/or annihilation signature etc. The unprecedented resolution can be achieved with a pair-production telescope that, instead of the high-Z converter commonly used, relies on a large number of thin active tracking layers to increase the photon conversion probability, and to precisely reconstruct the pair-produced electron and positron tracks. Scintillating fibers or thin silicon micro-strip detectors are suitable technology for such a tracker. The energy measurement is achieved by measuring the momentum of the electrons and positrons through a magnetic field. The innovated spectrometer approach provides superior photon conversion identification and photon pointing resolution, and is particular suitable in the sub-GeV range, where the opening angle between the electron and positron is relatively large. The level of tracking precision makes it possible to measure the polarization of gamma rays, which would open up a new frontier in gamma-ray astronomy. The sub-GeV full sky survey by PANGU would provides crucial link with GeV to TeV maps from current/future missions including Fermi, DAMPE, HERD, and CTA.

  20. Localized high gamma motor oscillations respond to perceived biologic motion.

    PubMed

    Darvas, Felix; Rao, Rajesh P N; Murias, Micheal

    2013-06-01

    Power changes in the beta frequency range (17-25 Hz) in the human motor and premotor areas during action observation have been associated with the mirror neuron system and have been studied extensively. These changes mimic motor activity during actual motion execution, albeit reduced in strength. Recent noninvasive (EEG/magnetoencephalography) and invasive studies (electrocorticography) have shown that during actual motion, beta power changes are accompanied by highly localized changes in the high gamma band (70-100 Hz). In this study, we investigate, using 27-channel EEG in combination with a generic head model and a cortical mapping algorithm, whether such high gamma changes are also present during motion observation. Subjects were presented with a 2.7-second video of a moving hand, contrasted with a video of moving scenery of equal length. Our results show nonlateralized beta band decrease in power in response to the moving hand versus the response to the moving scenery. We also find significant increase in high gamma power. However, unlike the beta band response, increases in this band are lateralized, with a preference for the hemisphere of the dominant hand. PMID:23733096

  1. EXTRAGALACTIC VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Neronov, A.; Semikoz, D. V.

    2012-09-20

    We study the origin of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background using the data from the Fermi telescope. To estimate the background level, we count photons at high Galactic latitudes |b| > 60 Degree-Sign . Subtracting photons associated with known sources and the residual cosmic-ray and Galactic diffuse backgrounds, we estimate the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) flux. We find that the spectrum of EGB in the very high energy band above 30 GeV follows the stacked spectrum of BL Lac objects. Large Area Telescope data reveal the positive (1 + z) {sup k}, 1 < k < 4 cosmological evolution of the BL Lac source population consistent with that of their parent population, Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies. We show that EGB at E > 30 GeV could be completely explained by emission from unresolved BL Lac objects if k {approx_equal} 3.

  2. Finnish spectrolite as high-dose gamma detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Patrícia L.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2015-11-01

    A natural material called spectrolite, from Finland, was studied in this work. The purpose was to test it in gamma radiation beams to verify its performance as a high-dose detector. From this material, pellets were manufactured with two different concentrations of Teflon and spectrolite, and their responses were verified using two luminescent techniques: thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The TL and OSL signals were evaluated by means of characterization tests of the material response, after exposure to a nominal absorbed dose interval of 5 Gy to 10 kGy. The results obtained, for both concentrations, showed a good performance of this material in beams of high-dose gamma radiation. Both techniques were utilized in order to investigate the properties of the spectrolite+Teflon samples for different applications.

  3. High Pressure XENON Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Field Use

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Wehe; Zong He; Glenn K. Knoll

    2004-02-16

    This project explored a new concept for high-pressure xenon ionization chambers by replacing the Frisch grid with coplanar grid electrodes similar to those used in wide bandgap semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers. This work is the first attempt to apply the coplanar grid anode design in a gas ionization chamber in order to achieve to improved energy resolution. Three prototype detectors, two cylindrical and one parallel plate configurations, were built and tested. While the detectors did not demonstrate energy resolutions as good as other high pressure xenon gamma-ray spectrometers, the results demonstrated that the concept of single polarity charge sending using coplanar grid electrodes will work in a gas detector.

  4. Characteristics of the telescope for high energy gamma-ray astronomy selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, E. B.; Hofstadter, R.; Rolfe, J.; Johansson, A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cruickshank, W. J.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray telescope selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory provides a substantial improvement in observational capability over earlier instruments. It will have about 20 times more sensitivity, cover a much broader energy range, have considerably better energy resolution and provide a significantly improved angular resolution. The design and performance are described.

  5. Characteristics of the Telescope for High Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy Selected for Definition Studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, E. B.; Hofstadter, R.; Johansson, A.; Rolfe, J.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cruickshank, W. J.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory provides a substantial improvement in observational capability over earlier instruments. It will have about 20 times more sensitivity, cover a much broader energy range, have considerably better energy resolution and provide a significantly improved angular resolution. The design and performance are described.

  6. High energy gamma-rays and hadrons at Mount Fuji

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amenomori, M.; Nanjo, H.; Konishi, E.; Hotta, N.; Mizutani, K.; Kasahara, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Mikumo, E.; Sato, K.; Yuda, T.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of high energy gamma-rays and hadrons were obtained by the emulsion chamber with 40 c.u. thickness at Mt. Fuji (3750 m). These results are compared with the Monte Carlo calculation based on the same model which is used in a family analysis. Our data are compatible with the model of heavy-enriched primary and scaling in the fragmentation region.

  7. High Energy Electron and Gamma - Ray Detection with ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon borne ionization calorimeter is well suited to record and identify high energy cosmic ray electrons, and at very high energies gamma-ray photons as well. We have simulated the performance of the instrument, and compare the simulations with actual high energy electron exposures at the CERN accelerator. Simulations and measurements do not compare exactly, in detail, but overall the simulations have predicted actual measured behavior quite well. ATIC has had its first 16 day balloon flight at the turn of the year over Antarctica, and first results obtained using the analysis methods derived from simulations and calibrations will be reported.

  8. High-energy gamma-ray observations of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1994-01-01

    During the period from 1992 May to early 1992 November, the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory obtained high-energy gamma-ray data for most of the sky. A total of 18 active galaxies have been seen with high certainty, and it is expected that more will be found in the data when a more thorough analysis is complete. All of those that have been seen are radio-loud quasars or BL Lacertae objects; most have already been identified as blazars. No Seyfert galaxies have been found thus far. If the spectra are represented as a power law in energy, spectral slopes ranging from approximately -1.7 to -2.4 are found. A wide range of z-values exits in the observed sample, eight having values in excess of 1.0. Time variations have been seen, with the timescale for a significant change being as short as days in at least one case. These results imply the existence of very large numbers of relativistic particles, probably close to the central object. Although a large extrapolation is required, their existence also suggests that these active galactic nuclei may be the source of the extragalactic cosmic rays.

  9. Basic characterization of highly enriched uranium by gamma spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Cong Tam; Zsigrai, József

    2006-05-01

    Gamma-spectrometric methods suitable for the characterization of highly enriched uranium samples encountered in illicit trafficking of nuclear materials are presented. In particular, procedures for determining the 234U, 235U, 238U, 232U and 236U contents and the age of highly enriched uranium are described. Consequently, the total uranium content and isotopic composition can be calculated. For determining the 238U and 232U contents a low-background chamber was used. In addition, age dating of uranium was also performed using low-background spectrometry.

  10. High resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy: The first 85 years

    SciTech Connect

    Deslattes, R.D.

    2000-02-01

    This opening review attempts to follow the main trends in crystal diffraction spectrometry of nuclear {gamma} rays from its 1914 beginning in Rutherford's laboratory to the ultra-high resolution instrumentation realized in the current generation of spectrometers at the Institute Laue Langeven (ILL). The authors perspective is that of an instrumentalist hoping to convey a sense of intellectual debt to a number of predecessors, each of whom realized a certain elegance in making the tools that have enabled much good science, including that to which the remainder of this workshop is dedicated. This overview follows some of the main ideas along a trajectory toward higher resolution at higher energies, thereby enabling not only the disentangling of dense spectra, but also allowing detailed study of aspects of spectral profiles sensitive to excited state lifetimes and interatomic potentials. The parallel evolution toward increasing efficiency while preserving needed resolution is also an interesting story of artful compromise that should not be neglected. Finally, it is the robustness of the measurement chain connecting {gamma}-ray wavelengths with optical wave-lengths associated with the Rydberg constant that only recently has allowed {gamma}-ray data to contribute to determine of particle masses and fundamental constants, as will be described in more detail in other papers from this workshop.

  11. Software developments for gamma-ray data with high multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Crowell, B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Software capabilities for angle sort of data from the new powerful gamma detector arrays like Gammasphere and EUROGAM which were developed in preceding years, were enhanced and extended to read new data formats. In addition, we can now sort the data for directional correlation ratios (DCO). This version of the software was exported to a university group. For the analysis of, e.g., the quasi-continuum of gamma-rays it is necessary to angle sort the high multiplicity data and perform a careful background subtraction in order to extract the continuum of gamma rays from the feeding and decay of superdeformed bands. We need to angle sort in order to untangle the parts of the spectra which are of E1 nature from those of quadrupole or of M1/E2 nature. We further developed software running on new fast SUN workstations. We now have two such workstations, each equipped with a stacker and a secondary 8-mm tape drive. We enhanced the software to apply an energy-dependent time gate. We can enhance the events that are in true prompt coincidence, and reject random and signals in the germanium detectors coming from neutrons hitting the detector in coincidence with the gamma-ray burst. By applying energy-dependent time gates, in form of a {open_quotes}reduced time{close_quotes}, we can perform this rejection without the loss of efficiency at low energy. Effort has gone into developing low-level tape reader routines for data from the new EUROGAM array with cluster detectors as well as from the new flexible data format from Gammasphere phase II. In addition, we developed software to read data tapes from the local DAPHNE and MSU data-acquisition systems on the new fast UNIX platforms.

  12. Development and Characterization of a High Resolution Portable Gamma Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Muhammad

    The recent disaster of Fukushima in Japan combined with the high demand to enhance nuclear safety and to minimize personal exposure to radioactive materials has a significant impact on research and development of radiation detection instrumentation. Currently, there is ample effort worldwide in the pursuit of radiation detection to maximize the accuracy and meet international standards in terms of size and specifications to enable radiation protection decision making. Among the requirements is the development of a portable, light-weight gamma-ray isotope identifier to be used by first responders in nuclear accidents as well as for radiation security and identification of illicit material isotopes. From nuclear security perspective, research into advanced screening technologies has become a high priority in all aspects, while for occupational safety, and environmental radiation protection, the regulatory authorities are requiring specific performance of radiation detection and measuring devices. At the applied radiation laboratory of the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, UOIT, the development of a high resolution spectrometer for medium and high energy gamma ray has been conducted. The spectrometer used a newly developed scintillator based on a LaBr3(Ce) crystal. The detector has been modeled using advanced Monte Carlo code (MCNP/X code) for the response function simulation and parameter characterization. The simulation results have been validated by experimental investigations using a wide range of gamma radiation energies. The developed spectrometer has been characterized in terms of resolution and response in different fields. It has also been compared with other crystals such as NaI(TI) and LiI(Eu).

  13. High-revolution gamma-ray imaging from the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, William A.

    1990-01-01

    An observatory is suggested for exploiting unique lunar features to perform sensitive, subarcsecond cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray imaging. The observatory would be built in an evolutionary manner and would eventually include several different position-sensitive detector systems which together would cover a broad energy range and address a wide variety of astrophysical problems. High angular resolution would be obtained by using a mobile crane on the flat lunar mare regions to move a coded aperture mask for source tracking with detector/mask separations of up to 5 kilometers.

  14. High-revolution gamma-ray imaging from the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, William A.

    1990-08-01

    An observatory is suggested for exploiting unique lunar features to perform sensitive, subarcsecond cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray imaging. The observatory would be built in an evolutionary manner and would eventually include several different position-sensitive detector systems which together would cover a broad energy range and address a wide variety of astrophysical problems. High angular resolution would be obtained by using a mobile crane on the flat lunar mare regions to move a coded aperture mask for source tracking with detector/mask separations of up to 5 kilometers.

  15. A New View of the High Energy Gamma-Ray Sky with the Ferrni Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have opened a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and the origin of cosmic rays, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as super symmetric dark matter annihilations. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from the first year of observations.

  16. Zinc oxide nanowire gamma ray detector with high spatiotemporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Daniel C.; Nolen, J. Ryan; Cook, Andrew; Mu, Richard R.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional scintillation detectors are typically single crystals of heavy-metal oxides or halides doped with rare-earth ions that record the recombination of electron-hole pairs by photon emission in the visible to ultraviolet. However, the light yields are typically low enough to require photomultiplier detection with the attendant instrumental complications. Here we report initial studies of gamma ray detection by zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, grown by vapor-solid deposition. The nanowires grow along the c-axis in a wurtzite structure; they are typically 80 nm in diameter and have lengths of 1- 2 μm. The nanowires are single crystals of high quality, with a photoluminescence (PL) yield from band-edge exciton emission in the ultraviolet that is typically one hundred times larger than the PL yield from defect centers in the visible. Nanowire ensembles were irradiated by 662 keV gamma rays from a Cs-137 source for periods of up to ten hours; gamma rays in this energy range interact by Compton scattering, which in ZnO creates F+ centers that relax to form singly-charged positive oxygen vacancies. Following irradiation, we fit the PL spectra of the visible emission with a sum of Gaussians at the energies of the known defects. We find highly efficient PL from the irradiated area, with a figure of merit approaching 106 photons/s/MeV of deposited energy. Over a period of days, the singly charged O+ vacancies relax to the more stable doubly charged O++ vacancies. However, the overall defect PL returns to pre-irradiation values after about a week, as the vacancies diffuse to the surface of these very thin nanowires, indicating that a self-healing process restores the nanowires to their original state.

  17. Prospects for High Energy Detection of Microquasars with the AGILE and GLAST Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Santolamazza, Patrizia; Pittori, Carlotta; Verrecchia, Francesco

    2007-08-21

    We estimate the sensitivities of the AGILE and GLAST {gamma}-ray experiments taking into account two cases for the galactic {gamma}-ray diffuse background (at high galactic latitude and toward the galactic center). Then we use sensitivities to estimate microquasar observability with the two experiments, assuming the {gamma}-ray emission above 100 MeV of a recent microquasar model.

  18. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  19. High-energy spectral breaks in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Cline, Thomas L.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Matteson, James L.; Band, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Model fits are presented for 18 gamma-ray burst spectra from 100 keV to 27 MeV made with the BATSE spectroscopy detectors on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Most of the bursts are well fitted as power laws with spectral indices between -1.36 and -2.29; however, five bursts show definite departures from a simple power-law fit at high energies. Three of these bursts are well fitted with broken power-law spectra and break energies of from 400 to 690 keV, such as might arise from photon-photon interactions. If so, then the source compactness and hence distance will be sharply constrained. Two of the bursts have spectra with sharply confined slope changes and are well fitted with broken power-law spectra with break energies of 1.2 and 1.6 MeV at peak, such as might arise from photon-magnetic field interactions. If so, then these spectral breaks provide strong evidence for the existence of high magnetic fields in the burst emission region.

  20. Search of the energetic gamma-ray experiment telescope (EGRET) data for high-energy gamma-ray microsecond bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Esposito, J. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Hawking (1974) and Page & Hawking (1976) investigated theoretically the possibility of detecting high-energy gamma rays produced by the quantum-mechanical decay of a small black hole created in the early universe. They concluded that, at the very end of the life of the small black hole, it would radiate a burst of gamma rays peaked near 250 MeV with a total energy of about 10(exp 34) ergs in the order of a microsecond or less. The characteristics of a black hole are determined by laws of physics beyond the range of current particle accelerators; hence, the search for these short bursts of high-energy gamma rays provides at least the possibility of being the first test of this region of physics. The Compton Observatory Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) has the capability of detecting directly the gamma rays from such bursts at a much fainter level than SAS 2, and a search of the EGRET data has led to an upper limit of 5 x 10(exp -2) black hole decays per cu pc per yr, placing constraints on this and other theories predicting microsecond high-energy gamma-ray bursts.

  1. Measuring high-energy {gamma} rays with Ge detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lipoglavsek, M.; Likar, A.; Vencelj, M.; Vidmar, T.; Bark, R. A.; Gueorguieva, E.; Komati, F.; Lawrie, J. J.; Maliage, S. M.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T.; Ramashidzha, T. M.

    2006-04-26

    Gamma rays with energies up to 21 MeV were measured with Ge detectors. Such {gamma} rays were produced in the 208Pb(p,{gamma})209Bi reaction. The position of the 2g9/2 single proton orbit in 209Bi has been determined indicating the size of the Z=126 shell gap.

  2. Detection of high-energy gamma rays from quasar PKS 0528 + 134 by EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, S. D.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The first several pointing directions of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, launched on 1991 April 5, were toward the Galactic anticenter. In addition to the known gamma-ray sources, Crab and Geminga, high-energy gamma-ray emission was observed from the quasar PKS 0528 + 134 by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). A redshift measurement, reported here, of 2.07 confirms the identification of this object as a quasar. The differential photon spectrum is well represented by a power law with an exponent of 2.56 +/- 0.09 and a photon intensity above 100 MeV of (8.4 +/- 1.0) x 10 exp -7 photons sq cm/s. There is evidence for time variability on a time scale of a few days.

  3. High-spin. gamma. -ray spectroscopy: past successes, future hopes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.

    1983-04-01

    Nuclei can carry angular momentum by aligning individual particles along the rotation axis or by rotation of a deformed nucleus as a whole. The interweaving of these modes leads to a variety of behavior that is just beginning to be observed and explained. The discrete ..gamma..-ray studies have led to a new backbending spectroscopy, which is telling us about the details of particle alignments and monopole and quadrupole pairing. The high-spin continuum studies, as yet less well developed, are indicating changes in shape and structure, as well as particle alignments from higher shells. New developments in detector systems and in theory promise much more detailed comparisons of experiment and theory and consequent increase in our knowledge of nuclear behavior at high spin.

  4. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  5. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew D.

    1999-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high-energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  6. High count rate gamma camera with independent modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2015-11-01

    Advances in nuclear medical imaging are based on the improvements of the detector's performance. Generally the research is focussed on the spatial resolution improvement. However, another important parameter is the acquisition time that can significantly affect performance in some clinical investigation (e.g. first-pass cardiac studies). At present, there are several clinical imaging systems which are able to solve these diagnostic requirements, such as the D-SPECT Cardiac Imaging System (Spectrum Dynamics) or the Nucline Cardiodesk Medical Imaging System (Mediso). Actually, these solutions are organ-specific dedicated systems, while it would be preferable having general purpose planar detectors with high counting rate. Our group has recently introduced the use of scintillation matrices whose size is equal to the overall area of a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) in order to design a modular gamma camera. This study allowed optimising the overall pixel identification by improving and controlling the light collection efficiency of each PSPMT. Although we achieved a solution for the problems about the dead area at the junction of the PSPMTs when they are set side by side. In this paper, we propose a modular gamma camera design as the basis to build large area detectors. The modular detector design allows us to achieve better counting performance. In this approach, each module that is made of one or more PSPMTs, can actually acquire data independently and simultaneously, increasing the overall detection efficiency. To verify the improvement in count rate capability we have built two detectors with a field of view of ~ 5 × 5cm2, by using four R8900-C12 PSPMTs (Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.). Each PSPMT was coupled to a dedicated discrete scintillation structure designed to obtain a good homogeneity, high imaging performance and high efficiency. One of the detectors was designed as a standard gamma camera, while the other was composed by four independent

  7. NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M.; Bruel, P.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Granot, J.; Longo, F.; Razzaque, S.; Zimmer, S. E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu

    2013-09-01

    Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

  8. High-z Universe with Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in space and trace the cosmic star formation history back to the first generations of stars. Their bright afterglows allow us to trace the abundances of heavy elements to large distances, thereby measuring cosmic chemical evolution. To date GRBs have been detected up to distances of z=8.23 and possibly even beyond z9. This makes GRBs a unique and powerful tool to probe the high-z Universe up to the re-ionization era. We discuss the current status of the field, place it in context with other probes, and also discuss new mission concepts that have been planned to utilize GRBs as probes.

  9. Neutrino beams from electron capture at high gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinec, Mark; Sato, Joe

    2007-08-01

    We investigate the potential of a flavor pure high gamma electron capture electron neutrino beam directed towards a large Water Cherenkov detector with 500 kt fiducial mass. The energy of the neutrinos is reconstructed by the position measurement within the detector and superb energy resolution capabilities could be achieved. We estimate the requirements for such a scenario to be competitive to a neutrino/anti-neutrino running at a neutrino factory with less accurate energy resolution. Although the requirements turn out to be extreme, in principle such a scenario could achieve as good abilities to resolve correlations and degeneracies in the search for sin2 2θ13 and δCP as a standard neutrino factory experiment.

  10. GAMMA PROPORTIONAL COUNTER CONTAINING HIGH Z GAS AND LOW Z MODERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.

    1963-07-23

    A gamma radiation counter employing a gas proportional counter is described. The radiation counter comprises a cylindrical gas proportional counter which contains a high atomic number gas and is surrounded by a low atomic number gamma radiation moderator material. At least one slit is provided in the moderator to allow accident gamma radiation to enter the moderator in the most favorable manner for moderation, and also to allow low energy gamma radiation to enter the counter without the necessity of passing through the moderator. This radiation counter is capable of detecting and measuring gamma radiation in the energy range of 0.5-5 Mev. (AEC)

  11. High-redshift Gamma-Ray Burst Studies with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Calura, Francesco; Matteucci, Francesca

    2007-05-01

    We compare predicted Type Ib/c supernova (SN) rates with the observed long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) rates both locally and as a function of redshift. To do that, we assume different star formation histories in galaxies of different morphological type: ellipticals, spirals and irregulars. In particular, the predicted Type Ib/c SN rate (SNRIb/c) is always higher than the GRB rate, as expected, suggesting that only a small fraction (0.1-1%) of them become GRBs. We predict a ratio between the cosmic GRB rate and the cosmic SNRIb/c in the range 10-2 - 10-3, in agreement with previous estimates. Finally, due to the high star formation in spheroids at high redshift, we predict more GRBs at high redshift than previous estimates, a prediction which awaits to be proven by future observations by GLAST. Based on our studies and on the current LAT performance, an estimate of the detection possibility of this high-redshift burst population is finally presented.

  12. Accessing the population of high-redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Salvaterra, R.; Ghisellini, G.; Mereghetti, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Campana, S.; Osborne, J. P.; O'Brien, P.; Tanvir, N.; Willingale, D.; Amati, L.; Basa, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Burlon, D.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Frontera, F.; Götz, D.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Piro, L.; Vergani, S. D.

    2015-04-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are a powerful probe of the high-redshift Universe. We present a tool to estimate the detection rate of high-z GRBs by a generic detector with defined energy band and sensitivity. We base this on a population model that reproduces the observed properties of GRBs detected by Swift, Fermi and CGRO in the hard X-ray and γ-ray bands. We provide the expected cumulative distributions of the flux and fluence of simulated GRBs in different energy bands. We show that scintillator detectors, operating at relatively high energies (e.g. tens of keV to the MeV), can detect only the most luminous GRBs at high redshifts due to the link between the peak spectral energy and the luminosity (Epeak-Liso) of GRBs. We show that the best strategy for catching the largest number of high-z bursts is to go softer (e.g. in the soft X-ray band) but with a very high sensitivity. For instance, an imaging soft X-ray detector operating in the 0.2-5 keV energy band reaching a sensitivity, corresponding to a fluence, of ˜10-8 erg cm-2 is expected to detect ≈40 GRBs yr-1 sr-1 at z ≥ 5 (≈3 GRBs yr-1 sr-1 at z ≥ 10). Once high-z GRBs are detected the principal issue is to secure their redshift. To this aim we estimate their NIR afterglow flux at relatively early times and evaluate the effectiveness of following them up and construct usable samples of events with any forthcoming GRB mission dedicated to explore the high-z Universe.

  13. Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1994-01-01

    The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

  14. Identifying high-redshift gamma-ray bursts with RATIR

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohns, O. M.; Butler, N. R.; Cucchiara, A.; Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G.; De Diego, J. A.; Georgiev, L.; González, J.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H.; Klein, C. R.; Fox, O. D.; Bloom, J. S.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present a template-fitting algorithm for determining photometric redshifts, z {sub phot}, of candidate high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using afterglow photometry, obtained by the Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, this algorithm accounts for the intrinsic GRB afterglow spectral energy distribution, host dust extinction, and the effect of neutral hydrogen (local and cosmological) along the line of sight. We present the results obtained by this algorithm and the RATIR photometry of GRB 130606A, finding a range of best-fit solutions, 5.6 < z {sub phot} < 6.0, for models of several host dust extinction laws (none, the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Clouds, and Small Magellanic Clouds), consistent with spectroscopic measurements of the redshift of this GRB. Using simulated RATIR photometry, we find that our algorithm provides precise measures of z {sub phot} in the ranges of 4 < z {sub phot} ≲ 8 and 9 < z {sub phot} < 10 and can robustly determine when z {sub phot} > 4. Further testing highlights the required caution in cases of highly dust-extincted host galaxies. These tests also show that our algorithm does not erroneously find z {sub phot} < 4 when z {sub sim} > 4, thereby minimizing false negatives and allowing us to rapidly identify all potential high-redshift events.

  15. [Protection of cadaver tissues exposed to high gamma radiation].

    PubMed

    Matus-Jiménez, J; Flores-Fletes, J R; Carrillo, A

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue is the most widely used tissue for the treatment of various conditions. As a result of this, allografts are used at an increasing frequency and processes for their harvest, preservation and sterilization have improved. The sterilization method that grants the greatest sterilization is high-dose gamma radiation, which destroys prions and any microorganism thus assuring that patients will not experience any infection. But given that radiation use has proven to deteriorate bone and tendon tissue, efforts have been made to protect the latter. One way to do this is a commercially available substance called Clearant. Studies conducted elsewhere have found that it does protect bone and tendon tissue. This study was therefore conducted with allograft samples exposed to high-dose radiation. Its purpose was to assess, with photon microscopy using various dyes and electron microscopy, the presence of color changes as well as the destruction of the anatomical structure. The same tissue was followed-up throughout the process until it was placed in the patient. The review found no structural changes in bone and tendon tissues exposed to high radiation doses (60 kilograys) when the Clearant process was used, and concluded that the former may be used safely in orthopedic or traumatologic diseases. PMID:24707605

  16. Pulsed high-energy gamma rays from PSR 1055-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fierro, J. M.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K. T.; Chiang, J.; D'Amico, N.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Johnston, S.; Kanbach, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory has detected a high-energy gamma-ray source at a position coincident with that of the radio pulsar PSR 1055-52. Analysis of the EGRET data at the radio pulsar period of 197 ms has revealed pulsed gamma-radiation at energies above 300 MeV, making PSR 1055-52 the fifth detected high-energy gamma-ray pulsar. The pulsed radiation from PSR 1055-52 has a very hard photon spectral index of -1.18 +/- 0.16 and a high efficiency for converting its rotational energy into gamma-rays. No unpulsed emission was observed.

  17. Genetic basis of unstable expression of high gamma-tocopherol content in sunflower seeds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tocopherols are natural antioxidants with both in vivo (vitamin E) and in vitro activity. Sunflower seeds contain predominantly alpha-tocopherol (>90% of total tocopherols), with maximum vitamin E effect but lower in vitro antioxidant action than other tocopherol forms such as gamma-tocopherol. Sunflower germplasm with stable high levels of gamma-tocopherol (>85%) has been developed. The trait is controlled by recessive alleles at a single locus Tph2 underlying a gamma-tocopherol methyltransferase (gamma-TMT). Additionally, unstable expression of increased gamma-tocopherol content in the range from 5 to 85% has been reported. The objective of this research was to determine the genetic basis of unstable expression of high gamma-tocopherol content in sunflower seeds. Results Male sterile plants of nuclear male sterile line nmsT2100, with stable high gamma-tocopherol content, were crossed with plants of line IAST-1, with stable high gamma-tocopherol content but derived from a population that exhibited unstable expression of the trait. F2 seeds showed continuous segregation for gamma-tocopherol content from 1.0 to 99.7%. Gamma-tocopherol content in F2 plants (average of 24 individual F3 seeds) segregated from 59.4 to 99.4%. A genetic linkage map comprising 17 linkage groups (LGs) was constructed from this population using 109 SSR and 20 INDEL marker loci, including INDEL markers for tocopherol biosynthesis genes. QTL analysis revealed a major QTL on LG 8 that corresponded to the gamma-TMT Tph2 locus, which suggested that high gamma-tocopherol lines nmsT2100 and IAST-1 possess different alleles at this locus. Modifying genes were identified at LGs 1, 9, 14 and 16, corresponding in most cases with gamma-TMT duplicated loci. Conclusions Unstable expression of high gamma-tocopherol content is produced by the effect of modifying genes on tph2a allele at the gamma-TMT Tph2 gene. This allele is present in line IAST-1 and is different to allele tph2 present in line

  18. High Resolution Gamma Ray Analysis of Medical Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillery, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Compton-suppressed high-purity Germanium detectors at the University of Massachusetts Lowell have been used to study medical radioisotopes produced at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), in particular isotopes such as Pt-191 used for cancer therapy in patients. The ability to precisely analyze the concentrations of such radio-isotopes is essential for both production facilities such as Brookhaven and consumer hospitals across the U.S. Without accurate knowledge of the quantities and strengths of these isotopes, it is possible for doctors to administer incorrect dosages to patients, thus leading to undesired results. Samples have been produced at Brookhaven and shipped to UML, and the advanced electronics and data acquisition capabilities at UML have been used to extract peak areas in the gamma decay spectra. Levels of Pt isotopes in diluted samples have been quantified, and reaction cross-sections deduced from the irradiation parameters. These provide both cross checks with published work, as well as a rigorous quantitative framework with high quality state-of-the-art detection apparatus in use in the experimental nuclear physics community.

  19. Gamma-ray burst high energy emission from internal shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, A.; Guetta, D.

    2008-03-01

    Aims:In this paper we study synchrotron and synchrotron self Compton (SSC) emission from internal shocks (IS) during the prompt and X-ray flare phases of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The aim is to test the IS model for the flare emission and for whether GRBs can be GeV sources. Methods: We determine the parameters for which the IS model can account for the observed prompt and X-ray flares emission, and study the detectability of the high energy SSC emission by the AGILE and GLAST satellites. Results: We find that the detectability of the SSC emission during the prompt phase of GRBs improves for higher values of the fireball Lorentz factor Γ and of the temporal variability t_v. If IS is the mechanism responsible for the flare emission, and the Lorentz factor of the shells producing the flare is Γ 100, the flare light curves are expected to present some substructures with temporal variability tv = 10-100 ms which are much smaller than the average duration of flares, and similar to those observed during the prompt phase of GRBs. If one assumes lower Lorentz factors, such as Γ 10 div 25, then a larger temporal variability tv 40 s can also account for the observed flare properties. However in this case we predict that X-ray flares do not have a counterpart at very high energies (MeV-GeV). Conclusions: An investigation on the substructures of the X-ray flare light curves, and simultaneous X-ray and high energy observations, will allow us to corroborate the hypothesis that late IS are responsible for the X-ray flares.

  20. Design of a compact spectrometer for high-flux MeV gamma-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Corvan, D. J. Sarri, G.; Zepf, M.

    2014-06-15

    A novel design for a compact gamma-ray spectrometer is presented. The proposed system allows for spectroscopy of high-flux multi-MeV gamma-ray beams with MeV energy resolution in a compact design. In its basic configuration, the spectrometer exploits conversion of gamma-rays into electrons via Compton scattering in a low-Z material. The scattered electron population is then spectrally resolved using a magnetic spectrometer. The detector is shown to be effective for gamma-ray energies between 3 and 20 MeV. The main properties of the spectrometer are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as a facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  2. Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed Gamma-Rays From Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Asano, Katsuaki; Nagataki, Shigehiro; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-06

    Regenerated high energy emissions from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are studied in detail. If the primary emission spectrum extends to TeV range, these very high energy photons will be absorbed by the cosmic infrared background (CIB). The created high energy electron-positron pairs up-scatter not only cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons but also CIB photons, and secondary photons are generated in the GeV-TeV range. These secondary delayed photons may be observed in the near future, and useful for a consistency check for the primary spectra and GRB physical parameters. The up-scattered CIB photons cannot be neglected for low redshift bursts and/or GRBs with a relatively low maximum photon energy. The secondary gamma-rays also give us additional information on the CIB, which is uncertain in observations so far.

  3. Very-high-energy gamma rays from a distant quasar: how transparent is the universe?

    PubMed

    Albert, J; Aliu, E; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Curtef, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea Del Pozo, E; de Los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Goebel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kneiske, T M; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2008-06-27

    The atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope MAGIC, designed for a low-energy threshold, has detected very-high-energy gamma rays from a giant flare of the distant Quasi-Stellar Radio Source (in short: radio quasar) 3C 279, at a distance of more than 5 billion light-years (a redshift of 0.536). No quasar has been observed previously in very-high-energy gamma radiation, and this is also the most distant object detected emitting gamma rays above 50 gigaelectron volts. Because high-energy gamma rays may be stopped by interacting with the diffuse background light in the universe, the observations by MAGIC imply a low amount for such light, consistent with that known from galaxy counts. PMID:18583607

  4. The goals of gamma-ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Higdon, James C.; Leventhal, Marvin; Ramaty, Reuven; Woosley, Stanford E.

    1990-01-01

    The use of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in astrophysics is discussed with specific attention given to the application of the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE). The gamma-ray lines from nuclear transitions in radionucleic decay and positron annihilation permits the study of current sites, rates and models of nucleosynthesis, and galactic structure. Diffuse galactic emission is discussed, and the high-resolution observations of gamma-ray lines from discrete sites are also described. Interstellar mixing and elemental abundances can also be inferred from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of nucleosynthetic products. Compact objects can also be examined by means of gamma-ray emissions, allowing better understanding of neutron stars and the accreting black hole near the galactic center. Solar physics can also be investigated by examining such features as solar-flare particle acceleration and atmospheric abundances.

  5. The goals of gamma-ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Higdon, James C.; Leventhal, Marvin; Ramaty, Reuven; Woosley, Stanford E.

    1990-08-01

    The use of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in astrophysics is discussed with specific attention given to the application of the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE). The gamma-ray lines from nuclear transitions in radionucleic decay and positron annihilation permits the study of current sites, rates and models of nucleosynthesis, and galactic structure. Diffuse galactic emission is discussed, and the high-resolution observations of gamma-ray lines from discrete sites are also described. Interstellar mixing and elemental abundances can also be inferred from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of nucleosynthetic products. Compact objects can also be examined by means of gamma-ray emissions, allowing better understanding of neutron stars and the accreting black hole near the galactic center. Solar physics can also be investigated by examining such features as solar-flare particle acceleration and atmospheric abundances.

  6. Gamma ray spectroscopy at high energy and high time resolution at JET.

    PubMed

    Tardocchi, M; Proverbio, L I; Gorini, G; Grosso, G; Locatelli, M; Chugonov, I N; Gin, D B; Shevelev, A E; Murari, A; Kiptily, V G; Syme, B; Fernandes, A M; Pereira, R C; Sousa, J

    2008-10-01

    In fusion plasmas gamma ray emission is caused by reactions of fast particles, such as fusion alpha particles, with impurities. Gamma ray spectroscopy at JET has provided valuable diagnostic information on fast fuel as well as fusion product ions. Improvements of these measurements are needed to fully exploit the flux increase provided by future high power experiments at JET and ITER. Limiting aspects are, for instance, the count rate capability due to a high neutron/gamma background combined with slow detector response and a modest energy resolution due to the low light yield of the scintillators. This paper describes the solutions developed for achieving higher energy resolution, signal to background, and time resolution. The detector design is described based on the new BrLa3 scintillator crystal. The paper will focus on hardware development, including a photomultiplier tube capable of stable operation at counting rate as high as 1 MHz, the magnetic shielding, and the fast digital data acquisition system. PMID:19068513

  7. Gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Kane, W.R.; Markey, J.K.

    1994-08-01

    A prototype gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon gas near the critical point (166{degrees}C, 58 atm) is under development. The spectrometer will function as a room-temperature ionization chamber detecting gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. The energy resolution is superior to that of a NaI scintillation spectrometer by a substantial margin (approximately a factor 5), and accordingly, much more information can be extracted from a given gamma-ray spectrum. Unlike germanium detectors, the spectrometer possesses the capability for sustained operation under ambient temperature conditions without a requirement for liquid nitrogen.

  8. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    France, G. de

    2014-11-11

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.

  9. Development of a high resolution gamma camera system using finely grooved GAGG scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kataoka, Jun; Oshima, Tsubasa; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-06-01

    High resolution gamma cameras require small pixel scintillator blocks with high light output. However, manufacturing a small pixel scintillator block is difficult when the pixel size becomes small. To solve this limitation, we developed a high resolution gamma camera system using a finely grooved Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG) plate. Our gamma camera's detector consists of a 1-mm-thick finely grooved GAGG plate that is optically coupled to a 1-in. position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The grooved GAGG plate has 0.2×0.2 mm pixels with 0.05-mm wide slits (between the pixels) that were manufactured using a dicing saw. We used a Hamamatsu PSPMT with a 1-in. square high quantum efficiency (HQE) PSPMT (R8900-100-C12). The energy resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons (122 keV) was 18.5% FWHM. The intrinsic spatial resolution was estimated to be 0.7-mm FWHM. With a 0.5-mm diameter pinhole collimator mounted to its front, we achieved a high resolution, small field-of-view gamma camera. The system spatial resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons was 1.0-mm FWHM, and the sensitivity was 0.0025%, 10 mm from the collimator surface. The Tc-99m HMDP administered mouse images showed the fine structures of the mouse body's parts. Our developed high resolution small pixel GAGG gamma camera is promising for such small animal imaging.

  10. High Energy Astronomy with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2011-05-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, launched in 2008, has revolutionized our knowledge of the gamma-ray sky. After briefly summarizing the observing techniques of the Large Area Telescope on Fermi, major results are described. The source catalog made with the first 11 monts of science data contain 1451 sources and several new classes of gamma-ray sources, including millisecond pulsars, starburst galaxies and radio galaxies. This talk will emphasize Galactic and ultra-high energy cosmic rays, particle acceleration in GRBs and blazars, new physics results related to tests of Lorentz invariance violations, and measurements of the intergalactic magnetic field. Implications of bulk outflow Lorentz factors inferred from gamma-gamma opacity arguments will be considered in light of the search for high-energy neutrinos from black-hole jet sources.

  11. Effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the functional characteristics of amniotic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rita; Purohit, Sumita; Chacharkar, M. P.

    2007-06-01

    The effect of different doses of gamma radiation viz. 25, 36 and 50 kGy on the chemical and functional characteristics of the amniotic membrane was studied. The change in the chemical structure of amniotic membranes at high doses of gamma irradiation was evaluated by means of Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy. The degradation of amnion on irradiation with gamma rays could produce a relative variation in IR absorption troughs. This kind of variation was absent in the samples irradiated to doses of 25, 36 and 50 kGy indicating no qualitative change in the material property of amnion. No significant differences in the water absorption capacity and water vapour transmission rate of amniotic membranes irradiated to different doses were observed. Impermeability of the amniotic membranes to different microorganisms was also not affected at high doses of gamma radiation. Gamma irradiation at doses of 25-50 kGy did not evoke undesirable changes in the functional properties of the amniotic membrane.

  12. High energy gamma ray results from the second small astronomy satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. F.; Tuemer, T.

    1974-01-01

    A high energy (35 MeV) gamma ray telescope employing a thirty-two level magnetic core spark chamber system was flown on SAS 2. The high energy galactic gamma radiation is observed to dominate over the general diffuse radiation along the entire galactic plane, and when examined in detail, the longitudinal and latitudinal distribution seem generally correlated with galactic structural features, particularly with arm segments. The general high energy gamma radiation from the galactic plane, explained on the basis of its angular distribution and magnitude, probably results primarily from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar matter.

  13. A high precision gamma-ray spectrometer for the Mars-94 mission

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrofanov, I.G.; Anfimov, D.S.; Chernenko, A.M.

    1994-06-01

    The high precision gamma-ray spectrometer (PGS) is scheduled to be launched on the Mars-94 mission in October 1994, and to go into an elliptical polar orbit around Mars. The PGS consists of two high-purity germanium (Ge) detectors, associated electronics, and a passive cooler and will be mounted on one of the solar panels. The PGS will measure nuclear gamma-ray emissions from the martian surface, cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and the high-energy component of solar flares in the broad energy range from 50 KeV to 8 MeV using 4096 energy channels.

  14. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  15. Interplay of orientation selectivity and the power of low- and high-gamma bands in the cat primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bharmauria, Vishal; Bachatene, Lyes; Ouelhazi, Afef; Cattan, Sarah; Chanauria, Nayan; Etindele-Sosso, Faustin Armel; Rouat, Jean; Molotchnikoff, Stéphane

    2016-05-01

    Gamma oscillations are ubiquitous in brain and are believed to be inevitable for information processing in brain. Here, we report that distinct bands (low, 30-40Hz and high gamma, 60-80Hz) of stimulus-triggered gamma oscillations are systematically linked to the orientation selectivity index (OSI) of neurons in the cat primary visual cortex. The gamma-power is high for the highly selective neurons in the low-gamma band, whereas it is high for the broadly selective neurons in the high-gamma band. We suggest that the low-gamma band is principally implicated in feed-forward excitatory flow, whereas the high-gamma band governs the flow of this excitation. PMID:27033667

  16. Evidence for Temporally-Extended, High-Energy Emission from Gamma Ray Burst 990104

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wren, D. N.; Bertsch, D. L.; Ritz, S.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that high-energy emission (MeV - GeV) has been observed in several gamma ray bursts and temporally-extended emission from lower-energy gamma rays through radio wavelengths is well established. Observations of extended, high-energy emission are, however, scarce. Here we present evidence for a gamma ray burst emission that is both high-energy and extended, coincident with lower energy emissions. For the very bright and long burst, GRB 990104, we show light curves and spectra that confirm emission above 50 MeV, approximately 152 seconds after the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) trigger and initial burst emission. Between the initial output and the main peak, seen at both low and high energy, there was a period of approx. 100 s during which the burst was relatively quiet. This burst was found as part of an ongoing search for high-energy emission in gamma ray bursts.

  17. High and low energy gamma beam dump designs for the gamma beam delivery system at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Zafar; Matei, Catalin; Ur, Calin A.; Mitu, Iani-Octavian; Udup, Emil; Petcu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Magurele, Bucharest, Romania. The facility will use two 10 PW lasers and a high intensity, narrow bandwidth gamma beam for stand-alone and combined laser-gamma experiments. The accurate estimation of particle doses and their restriction within the limits for both personel and general public is very important in the design phase of any nuclear facility. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations are performed using FLUKA and MCNPX to design 19.4 and 4 MeV gamma beam dumps along with shielding of experimental areas. Dose rate contour plots from both FLUKA and MCNPX along with numerical values of doses in experimental area E8 of the facility are performed. The calculated doses are within the permissible limits. Furthermore, a reasonable agreement between both codes enhances our confidence in using one or both of them for future calculations in beam dump designs, radiation shielding, radioactive inventory, and other calculations releated to radiation protection. Residual dose rates and residual activity calculations are also performed for high-energy beam dump and their effect is negligible in comparison to contributions from prompt radiation.

  18. High temperature oxidation behavior of gamma-nickel+gamma'-nickel aluminum alloys and coatings modified with platinum and reactive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nan

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000°C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455°C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain beta-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al2O3 scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used beta-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt+Hf-modified gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni 3Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al 2O3 formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower temperatures (˜970°C) in the very early stage of oxidation. It

  19. Prospects of High Energy Studies of Pulsars with the AGILE Gamma-ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzoni, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Tavani, M.; Chen, A.; Giuliani, A.; Vercellone, S.

    AGILE is a small gamma-ray astronomy mission of the Italian Space Agency, with good spatial resolution, excellent timing capability and an unprecedently large field of view (~1/4 of the sky). It will be the only mission dedicated to high energy astrophysics in the range 30 MeV-50 GeV during the period 2003-2006, before the launch of GLAST. Besides studying the small sample of known gamma-ray pulsars, AGILE will offer the first possibility to detect several young and energetic radio pulsars that have been discovered after the end of the CGRO mission. AGILE will contribute to the study of gamma-ray pulsars in several ways: (1) improving photon statistics for gamma-ray pulsations searches; (2) detecting possible secular variations of the gamma-ray emission from neutron star magnetospheres; (3) studying unpulsed gamma-ray emission from plerions in supernova remnants and searching for time variability of pulsar wind/nebula interactions; (4) helping to understand the population of unidentified EGRET sources that might consist in part of radio-quiet pulsars. We will describe the AGILE satellite and provide an estimate of the expected number of the detectable gamma-ray pulsars. The AGILE capabilities for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with small counting statistics will be presented based on the analysis of data from simulations and from the EGRET archive.

  20. Report on Ultra-high Resolution Gamma- / X-ray Analysis of Uranium Skull Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Velazquez, M; Drury, O; Salaymeh, S

    2009-11-02

    We have utilized the high energy resolution and high peak-to-background ratio of superconducting TES {gamma}-detectors at very low energies for non-destructive analysis of a skull oxide derived from reprocessed nuclear fuel. Specifically, we demonstrate that superconducting detectors can separate and analyze the strong actinide emission lines in the spectral region below 60 keV that are often obscured in {gamma}-measurements with conventional Ge detectors.

  1. Note on the detection of high energy primary cosmic gamma rays by air shower observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasahara, K.; Torii, S.; Yuda, T.

    1985-01-01

    A mountain altitude experiment is planned at Mt. Norikura in Japan to search for point sources of astrophysical high-energy gamma rays in the 10 to the 15th power eV range. The advantages of mountain level observation of IR showers is stressed, especially in the case of high-energy gamma primaries from Cygnus X3 and other similar point sources.

  2. High gamma oscillations of sensorimotor cortex during unilateral movement in the developing brain: a MEG study.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiaolin; Wang, Yingying; Kotecha, Rupesh; Kirtman, Elijah G; Fujiwara, Hisako; Hemasilpin, Nat; Degrauw, Ton; Rose, Douglas F; Xiang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies in adults have found consistent contralateral high gamma activities in the sensorimotor cortex during unilateral finger movement. However, no study has reported on this same phenomenon in children. We hypothesized that contralateral high gamma activities also exist in children during unilateral finger movement. Sixty normal children (6-17 years old) were studied with a 275-channel MEG system combined with synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM). Sixty participants displayed consistently contralateral event-related synchronization (C-ERS) within high gamma band (65-150 Hz) in the primary motor cortices (M1) of both hemispheres. Interestingly, nineteen younger children displayed ipsilateral event-related synchronization (I-ERS) within the high gamma band (65-150 Hz) just during their left finger movement. Both I-ERS and C-ERS were localized in M1. The incidence of I-ERS showed a significant decrease with age. Males had significantly higher odds of having ipsilateral activity compared to females. Noteworthy, high gamma C-ERS appeared consistently, while high gamma I-ERS changed with age. The asymmetrical patterns of neuromagnetic activities in the children's brain might represent the maturational lateralization and/or specialization of motor function. In conclusion, the present results have demonstrated that contralateral high-gamma neuromagnetic activities are potential biomarkers for the accurate localization of the primary motor cortex in children. In addition, the interesting finding of the ipsilateral high-gamma neuromagnetic activities opens a new window for us to understand the developmental changes of the hemispherical functional lateralization in the motor system. PMID:20577795

  3. Gamma rays made on Earth have unexpectedly high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Johanna

    2011-01-15

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are the source of the highest-energy nonanthropogenic photons produced on Earth. Associated with thunder-storms - and in fact, with individual lightning discharges - they are presumed to be the bremsstrahlung produced when relativistic electrons, accelerated by the storms' strong electric fields, collide with air molecules some 10-20 km above sea level. The TGFs last up to a few milliseconds and contain photons with energies on the order of MeV.

  4. An Investigation of High-Temperature Precipitation in Powder-Metallurgy, Gamma/Gamma-Prime Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Kim, S.-L.; Zhang, F.; Tiley, J. S.

    2015-04-01

    The high-temperature-precipitation behavior of a typical powder-metallurgy, gamma-gamma-prime, nickel-base superalloy (LSHR) was determined and used to develop and validate a quantitative fast-acting model. To this end, a series of experiments comprising supersolvus solution treatment followed by continuous cooling at rates typical of those experienced during the manufacture of full-scale components was conducted for LSHR. The nucleation and growth of secondary-gamma-prime precipitates were deduced via metallography on samples water quenched at various temperatures during the cooling cycle. Further insight on nucleation and the extent of retained supersaturation during cooling was obtained from in situ synchrotron (X-ray diffraction) experiments involving cooling of LSHR samples at identical rates with or without a hold time at an intermediate temperature. The observations were interpreted using a fast-acting (spreadsheet) model which incorporated the important aspects of classical, homogeneous-nucleation theory and growth by bulk diffusion. In this regard, particular attention was paid to the determination of model input parameters such as the composition, free energy of formation, and surface energy of precipitates, and an effective diffusivity; the values so determined contrasted with those from existing thermodynamic and diffusion databases. It was demonstrated that fast-acting-model calculations based on a nickel-chromium pseudo-binary system gave good agreement with measurements of the evolution of precipitate volume fraction, number density, and size during continuous cooling.

  5. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Second Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-2) high-energy (in excess of 35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope has detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks following the single radio peak by about 13 ms and 48 ms. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP 0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0002 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission, and the double peak structure, compared with the single pulse in the radio emission, suggest that the high-energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those at lower energies.

  6. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  7. Contraband detection using high-energy gamma rays from 16O*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Sagalovsky, Leonid; Smith, Donald L.

    1997-02-01

    High-energy monoenergetic gamma rays (6.13 and 7.12 MeV) from the decay of excited states of the 16O* nucleus are highly penetrating and thus offer potential for non- intrusive inspection of loaded containers for narcotics, explosives, and other contraband items. These excited states can be produced by irradiation of water with 14-MeV neutrons from a DT neutron generator or through the 19F(p,alpha)16O* reaction. Resonances in 19F(p,alpha)16O* at proton energies between 340 keV and 2 MeV allow use of a low-energy accelerator to provide a compact, portable gamma source of reasonable intensity. The present work provides estimates of gamma source parameters and suggests how various types of contraband could be detected. Gamma rays can be used to perform transmission or emission radiography of containers or other objects. Through the use of (gamma,n) and (gamma,fission) reactions, this technique is also capable of detecting special nuclear materials such as deuterium, lithium, beryllium, uranium, and plutonium. Analytic and Monte Carlo techniques are used to model empty and loaded container inspection for accelerator-produced gamma, radioisotope, and x-ray sources.

  8. Contraband detection using high-energy gamma rays from {sup 16}O*

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    High-energy monoenergetic gamma rays (6.13 and 7.12 MeV) from the decay of excited states of the {sup 16}O* nucleus are highly penetrating and thus offer potential for non-intrusive inspection of loaded containers for narcotics, explosives, and other contraband items. These excited states can be produced by irradiation of water with 14-MeV neutrons from a DT neutron generator or through the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O* reaction. Resonances in {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O* at proton energies between 340 keV and 2 MeV allow use of a low-energy accelerator to provide a compact, portable gamma source of reasonable intensity. The present work provides estimates of gamma source parameters and suggests how various types of contraband could be detected. Gamma rays can be used to perform transmission or emission radiography of containers or other objects. Through the use of ({gamma}, n) and ({gamma}, fission) reactions, this technique is also capable of detecting special nuclear materials such as deuterium, lithium, beryllium, uranium, and plutonium. Analytic and Monte Carlo techniques are used to model empty and loaded container inspection for accelerator-produced gamma, radioisotope, and x-ray sources.

  9. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-01

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  10. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-15

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  11. Superconducting High Energy Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, D T

    2002-02-22

    We have demonstrated that a bulk absorber coupled to a TES can serve as a good gamma-ray spectrometer. Our measured energy resolution of 70 eV at 60 keV is among the best measurements in this field. We have also shown excellent agreement between the noise predictions and measured noise. Despite this good result, we noted that our detector design has shortcomings with a low count rate and vulnerabilities with the linearity of energy response. We addressed these issues by implementation of an active negative feedback bias. We demonstrated the effects of active bias such as additional pulse shortening, reduction of TES change in temperature during a pulse, and linearization of energy response at low energy. Linearization at higher energy is possible with optimized heat capacities and thermal conductivities of the microcalorimeter. However, the current fabrication process has low control and repeatability over the thermal properties. Thus, optimization of the detector performance is difficult until the fabrication process is improved. Currently, several efforts are underway to better control the fabrication of our gamma-ray spectrometers. We are developing a full-wafer process to produce TES films. We are investigating the thermal conductivity and surface roughness of thicker SiN membranes. We are exploring alternative methods to couple the absorber to the TES film for reproducibility. We are also optimizing the thermal conductivities within the detector to minimize two-element phonon noise. We are experimenting with different absorber materials to optimize absorption efficiency and heat capacity. We are also working on minimizing Johnson noise from the E S shunt and SQUID amplifier noise. We have shown that our performance, noise, and active bias models agree very well with measured data from several microcalorimeters. Once the fabrication improvements have been implemented, we have no doubt that our gamma-ray spectrometer will achieve even more spectacular results.

  12. An imaging telescope for high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, G.; Jenkins, T. L.; Owen, A.; Ramsden, D.; Carter, J. N.; Hall, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    Recent tests of a gamma-ray imaging telescope, which incorporated a coded aperture mask and multiwire proportional counter system produced good images of a tritium target source which was used to generate the 20 MeV protons at a proton Van de Graaff accelerator. This paper indicates what performance might be expected if a large area drift chamber were used in conjunction with a coded aperture mask. The prospects for achieving significant scientific results if such a system were flown on a variety of space vehicles are discussed.

  13. Detection of high-energy gamma rays from winter thunderclouds.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, H; Enoto, T; Yamada, S; Yuasa, T; Kawaharada, M; Kitaguchi, T; Kokubun, M; Kato, H; Okano, M; Nakamura, S; Makishima, K

    2007-10-19

    A report is made on a comprehensive observation of a burstlike gamma-ray emission from thunderclouds on the Sea of Japan, during strong thunderstorms on 6 January 2007. The detected emission, lasting for approximately 40 sec, preceded cloud-to-ground lightning discharges. The burst spectrum, extending to 10 MeV, can be interpreted as consisting of bremsstrahlung photons originating from relativistic electrons. This ground-based observation provides the first clear evidence that strong electric fields in thunderclouds can continuously accelerate electrons beyond 10 MeV prior to lightning discharges. PMID:17995261

  14. Ceramic Matrix Composites Performances Under High Gamma Radiation Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cemmi, A.; Baccaro, S.; Fiore, S.; Gislon, P.; Serra, E.; Fassina, S.; Ferrari, E.; Ghisolfi, E.

    2014-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composites reinforced by continuous ceramic fibers (CMCs) represent a class of advanced materials developed for applications in automotive, aerospace, nuclear fusion reactors and in other specific systems for harsh environments. In the present work, the silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites, manufactured by Chemical Vapour Infiltration process at FN S.p.A. plant, have been evaluated in term of gamma radiation hardness at three different absorbed doses (up to around 3MGy). Samples behavior has been investigated before and after irradiation by means of mechanical tests (flexural strength) and by surface and structural analyses (X-ray diffraction, SEM, FTIR-ATR, EPR).

  15. The future of high energy gamma ray astronomy and its potential astrophysical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Future satellites should carry instruments having over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than those flown thus far as well as improved energy and angular resolution. The information to be obtained from these experiments should greatly enhance knowledge of: the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects; the structure of our galaxy; the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays; the high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies; and the degree of matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe. The relevant aspects of extragalactic gamma ray phenomena are emphasized along with the instruments planned. The high energy gamma ray results of forthcoming programs such as GAMMA-1 and the Gamma Ray Observatory should justify even more sophisticated telescopes. These advanced instruments might be placed on the space station currently being considered by NASA.

  16. An Analog Gamma Correction Scheme for High Dynamic Range CMOS Logarithmic Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. PMID:25517692

  17. An analog gamma correction scheme for high dynamic range CMOS logarithmic image sensors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. PMID:25517692

  18. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  19. High-performance gamma spectroscopy for equipment retrieval from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Gary L.; Hillesand, K. E.; Goodwin, S. G.; Kessler, S. F.; Killian, E. W.; Legare, D.; Nelson, Joseph V., Jr.; Richard, R. F.; Nordquist, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to ninety per cent saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  20. The transient gamma-ray spectrometer: A new high resolution detector for gamma-ray burst spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, H.; Baker, R.; Cline, T.L.; Gehrels, N.; Jermakian, J.; Nolan, T.; Ramaty, R.; Sheppard, D.A.; Smith, G.; Stilwell, D.E.; Teegarden, B.J.; Trombka, J.; Owens, A.; Cork, C.P.; Landis, D.A.; Luke, P.N.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.; Pehl, R.H.; Yaver, H.; Hurley, K.; Mathias, S.; Post, A.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) to be flown aboard the WIND spacecraft is primarily designed to perform high resolution spectroscopy of transient gamma-ray events, such as cosmic [gamma]-ray bursts and solar flares, over the energy range 20 keV to 10 MeV with an expected spectroscopic resolution of E/[delta]E = 500. The detector itself consists of a 215 cm[sup 3] high purity n-type Ge crystal kept at cryogenic temperatures by a passive radiative cooler. The geometric field of view defined by the cooler is 170[degrees]. To avoid continuous triggers caused by soft solar events, a thin Be/Cu sun-shield around the sides of the cooler has been provided. A passive Mo/Pb occulter, which modulates signals from within [+-]5[degrees] of the ecliptic plane at the spacecraft spin frequency, is used to identify and study solar flares, as well as emission from the galactic plane and center. Thus, in addition to transient event measurements, the instrument will allow the search for possible diffuse background lines and monitor the 511 keV positron annihilation radiation from the galactic center. In order to handle the typically large burst count rates which can be in excess of 100 kHz, burst data are stored directly in an on-board 2.75 Mbit burst memory with an absolute timing accuracy of [+-]1.5 ms after ground processing. This capacity is sufficient to store the entire spectral data set of all but the largest bursts. The experiment is scheduled to be launched on a Delta II launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral in the fall of 1993.

  1. Development of a High-Average-Power Compton Gamma Source for Lepton Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Yakimenko, Vitaliy; Platonenko, Viktor T.

    2009-01-22

    Gamma-({gamma}{sup -}) ray beams of high average power and peak brightness are of demand for a number of applications in high-energy physics, material processing, medicine, etc. One of such examples is gamma conversion into polarized positrons and muons that is under consideration for projected lepton colliders. A {gamma}-source based on the Compton backscattering from the relativistic electron beam is a promising candidate for this application. Our approach to the high-repetition {gamma}-source assumes placing the Compton interaction point inside a CO{sub 2} laser cavity. A laser pulse interacts with periodical electron bunches on each round-trip inside the laser cavity producing the corresponding train of {gamma}-pulses. The round-trip optical losses can be compensated by amplification in the active laser medium. The major challenge for this approach is in maintaining stable amplification rate for a picosecond CO{sub 2}-laser pulse during multiple resonator round-trips without significant deterioration of its temporal and transverse profiles. Addressing this task, we elaborated on a computer code that allows identifying the directions and priorities in the development of such a multi-pass picosecond CO{sub 2} laser. Proof-of-principle experiments help to verify the model and show the viability of the concept. In these tests we demonstrated extended trains of picosecond CO{sub 2} laser pulses circulating inside the cavity that incorporates the Compton interaction point.

  2. The Prompt and High Energy Emission of Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, P.

    2009-05-25

    I discuss some recent developments concerning the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts, in particular the jet properties and radiation mechanisms, as exemplified by the naked-eye burst GRB 080319b, and the prompt X-ray emission of XRB080109/SN2008d, where the progenitor has, for the first time, been shown to contribute to the prompt emission. I discuss then some recent theoretical calculations of the GeV/TeV spectrum of GRB in the context of both leptonic SSC models and hadronic models. The recent observations by the Fermi satellite of GRB 080916C are then reviewed, and their implications for such models are discussed, together with its interesting determination of a bulk Lorentz factor, and the highest lower limit on the quantum gravity energy scale so far.

  3. TL kinetics study of LiF nanophosphors for high exposures of gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. K.; Vij, Ankush; Kumar, Ravi; Kumar, Satinder; Lochab, S. P.

    2013-02-05

    We report the thermoluminescence (TL) kinetics study of LiF nanophosphors synthesized by chemical co-precipitation at 8.00 pH and exposed to high gamma dose. XRD and TEM studies confirm the formation of single phase LiF nanophosphors. TL properties of LiF phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses of 100 Gy - 70 KGy shows a major peak around 395 K in addition to other low intensity peaks. The major peak in the TL glow curve is almost resolved from other peaks, which has been analyzed using Chen's peak shape method to determine the TL kinetic parameters. TL intensity almost increases linearly with gamma dose, however TL glow curve shift slightly to lower temperature values as a function of gamma exposure.

  4. Tabulated data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Ogelman, H. B.; Tuner, T.; Ozel, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    The second small astronomy satellite (SAS-2) carried a high energy gamma ray telescope into an equitorial orbit with a 2 D inclination, an apogee of 610 km, and a perigee of 440 km. The energy threshold of the instrument was about 30 MeV, the energy of the gamma rays could be measured up to about 200 MeV, and the integral intensity above 200 MeV could also be measured. Summary tables of the gamma ray data are presented in two energy bands, 35-100 MeV and 100 MeV. The sky was divided into 144 solid angle elements, and, in each solid angle element for which data exist, the number of gamma rays observed is given and also the exposure factor. Information is provided to permit conversion of these data into approximate intensities.

  5. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ˜400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  6. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H. W. Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2014-11-15

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  7. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Young, C S; Fatherley, V E; Lopez, F E; Oertel, J A; Malone, R M; Rubery, M S; Horsfield, C J; Stoeffl, W; Zylstra, A B; Shmayda, W T; Batha, S H

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds. PMID:25430303

  8. Development of platinum-modified gamma-nickel+gamma-nickel-aluminum-based alloys for high-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidloff, Andrew James

    Nickel-base superalloys have been used extensively in high-temperature applications where strength and structural stability are required, most notably in aero gas turbine engines. To increase the efficiency of such engines, a continuous increase in superalloy operating temperatures has been observed. As temperatures continue to increase, multiple aspects of alloy stability become increasingly important. In that regard, the high-temperature performance of superalloys can be generally discussed from two important standpoints, surface stability and structural stability. Historically, structural stability has been the primary concern to alloy designers, such that superalloys that may be exposed to high-temperature applications exceeding 1100°C typically utilize a coating for environmental protection. However, the use of coatings introduces potential deficiencies. For instance, aluminide coatings can lead to extensive instabilities when in contact with newer generation superalloys. Also, a few niche applications exist where the use of a coating is impractical. In such cases, the alloys require both environmental resistance and high-temperature strength. The primary goal of this study was to develop novel heat-treatable gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni 3Al-based alloys having excellent resistance to both high-temperature oxidation and creep. The alloys were developed in a systematic manner using multiple alloying additions, including Pt and Ir, i.e., platinum group metals (PGMs). The microstructures and environmental and thermal stabilities of the alloys studied were fully characterized through a series of experiments, including: oxidation (both isothermal and cyclic); hot corrosion (both Type I and Type II); microstructure analysis (including lattice misfit); and phase equilibria calculations with partitioning coefficient analysis. Pt modification was found to significantly affect the lattice misfit of an alloy by expanding the gamma' lattice parameter through its Ni sublattice site

  9. Design of a Multi-Channel Ultra-High Resolution Superconducting Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Terracol, S F; Miyazaki, T; Drury, O B; Ali, Z A; Cunningham, M F; Niedermayr, T R; Barbee Jr., T W; Batteux, J D; Labov, S E

    2004-11-29

    Superconducting Gamma-ray microcalorimeters operated at temperatures around {approx}0.1 K offer an order of magnitude improvement in energy resolution over conventional high-purity Germanium spectrometers. The calorimeters consist of a {approx}1 mm{sup 3} superconducting or insulating absorber and a sensitive thermistor, which are weakly coupled to a cold bath. Gamma-ray capture increases the absorber temperature in proportion to the Gamma-ray energy, this is measured by the thermistor, and both subsequently cool back down to the base temperature through the weak link. We are developing ultra-high-resolution Gamma-ray spectrometers based on Sn absorbers and superconducting Mo/Cu multilayer thermistors for nuclear non-proliferation applications. They have achieved an energy resolution between 60 and 90 eV for Gamma-rays up to 100 keV. We also build two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for user-friendly detector operation at 0.1 K. We present recent results on the performance of single pixel Gamma-ray spectrometers, and discuss the design of a large detector array for increased sensitivity.

  10. The High-energy Continuum Emission of the Gamma-Ray Blazar PKS 0528+134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Urry, C. Megan; Maraschi, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Mukherjee, R.; Pesce, Joseph E.; Wagner, S. J.; Wehrle, A. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lin, Y. C.; VonMintigny, C.

    1997-01-01

    We present Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observations of the gamma-ray blazar PKS 0528 + 134, obtained at two separate epochs in 1994 August and 1995 March. These data represent the first measurement of the X-ray continuum emission of this source in the medium-hard X-ray band. Both ASCA spectra are consistent with a single power law with photon index GAMMA approx. = 1.7-1.8 and column density N(sub H) approx. = 5 x 10(exp 21)/ sq cm, higher than Galactic. The X-ray flux increased by a factor of 4 in approx. 7 months without appreciable change of the spectral shape. During the lower state of 1994 August, PKS 0528 + 134 was observed simultaneously in the optical, X-rays, and at gamma-ray energies with Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). The gamma-ray intensity is the faintest detected thus far in the source, with a steep spectrum (GAMMA approx. = 2.7). The extrapolation of the X-ray continuum to the gamma-ray range requires a sharp spectral break at approx. 10(exp 22) Hz. We discuss the radio through gamma-ray spectral energy distribution of PKS 0528 + 134, comparing the low state of 1994 August with the flare state of 1993 March. We show that in PKS 0528 + 134, a non-negligible contribution from the external radiation field is present and that, although synchrotron self-Compton scenarios cannot be ruled out, inverse Compton upscattering of thermal seed photons may be the dominant cooling process for the production of the high-energy continuum in this blazar.

  11. Status and future of high energy diffuse gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    There are two distinctly different high energy diffuse gamma-ray components, one well correlated with broad galactic features and the other apparently isotropic and presumably extragalactic. The observed diffuse galactic high energy gamma radiation is generally thought to be produced in interactions between the cosmic rays and the interstellar matter and photons. It should then ultimately be possible to obtain from the diffuse galactic emission a detailed picture of the galactic cosmic-ray distribution, a high contrast view of the general structure of the galaxy, and further insight into molecular clouds. Two of the candidates for the explanation of the extragalactic diffuse radiation are the sum of emission from active galaxies and matter-antimatter annihilation. A major advancement in the study of the properties of both galactic and extragalactic gamma radiation should occur over the next decade.

  12. Isotopic composition analysis and age dating of uranium samples by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, A. I.; Pantelica, A.; Sima, O.; Fugaru, V.

    2016-09-01

    Non-destructive methods were applied to determine the isotopic composition and the time elapsed since last chemical purification of nine uranium samples. The applied methods are based on measuring gamma and X radiations of uranium samples by high resolution low energy gamma spectrometric system with planar high purity germanium detector and low background gamma spectrometric system with coaxial high purity germanium detector. The "Multigroup γ-ray Analysis Method for Uranium" (MGAU) code was used for the precise determination of samples' isotopic composition. The age of the samples was determined from the isotopic ratio 214Bi/234U. This ratio was calculated from the analyzed spectra of each uranium sample, using relative detection efficiency. Special attention is paid to the coincidence summing corrections that have to be taken into account when performing this type of analysis. In addition, an alternative approach for the age determination using full energy peak efficiencies obtained by Monte Carlo simulations with the GESPECOR code is described.

  13. Intergalactic Extinction of High Energy Gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the determination of the intergalactic pair-production absorption coefficient as derived by Stecker and De Jager by making use of a new empirically based calculation of the spectral energy distribution of the intergalactic infrared radiation field as given by Malkan and Stecker. We show that the results of the Malkan and Stecker calculation agree well with recent data on the infrared background. We then show that Whipple observations of the flaring gamma-ray spectrum of Mrk 421 hint at extragalactic absorption and that the HEGRA observations of the flaring spectrum of Mrk 501 appear to strongly indicate extragalactic absorption. We also discuss the determination of the y-ray opacity at higher redshifts, following the treatment of Salamon and Stecker. We give a predicted spectrum, with absorption included for PKS 2155-304. This XBL lies at a redshift of 0.12, the highest redshift source yet observed at an energy above 0.3 TeV. This source should have its spectrum steepened by approx. 1 in its spectral index between approx. 0.3 and approx. 3 TeV and should show an absorption cutoff above approx. 6 TeV.

  14. Common origin of the high energy astronomical gamma rays, neutrinos and cosmic ray positrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2016-03-01

    We show that the observed fluxes, spectra and sky distributions of the high energy astronomical neutrinos, gamma rays and cosmic ray positrons satisfy the simple relations expected from their common production in hadronic collisions in/near source of high energy cosmic rays with diffuse matter.

  15. High energy neutron and gamma-radiation generated during the solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocharov, G. E.; Mandzhavidze, N. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of high energy neutrons and gamma rays generation in the solar conditions is considered. It is shown that due to a peculiarity of generation and propagation of neutrons corresponding solar flares should be localized at high helio-longitudes.

  16. X- and gamma ray observations in high-altitude thunderstorms in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N. A.; Smith, D. M.; Lara, A.

    2014-12-01

    High-energy emission from lightning is more easily measured at high altitudes, close to or within the electric fields accelerating the energetic particles. Gamma rays from long duration glows and x-rays from stepped leaders attenuate with distance. From mountaintops, it may be possible to measure an amplified version of the x-rays commonly seen from stepped leaders. These amplified x-rays could arise from the thunderstorm electric field multiplying the energetic particles via Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanches (RREA). Amplified stepped leaders may be similar or even the same as terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), which need long-range electric fields to produce the intensities seen from space. We deployed two gamma-ray detectors at the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory site on the northeastern slope of the Sierra Negra near Puebla, Mexico at 4100 meters to search for amplified leader events and also for the minutes-long gamma-ray glows observed from thunderstorms by other groups from the ground, balloons, and aircraft. We will also examine the data from HAWC itself, a large array of water tanks viewed by photomultiplier tubes, to look for signals simultaneous with any in our scintillators. In principle, large Cherenkov detectors and small scintillators can give complementary data about the radiation field, emphasizing the total energy content and the number flux of particles, respectively. We will present results from the summer 2014 deployment and talk about future lightning gamma-ray detectors to be deployed at HAWC.

  17. Neutron detection in a high gamma ray background with liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Viesti, G.; Nebbia, G.

    2013-04-19

    The capability of liquid scintillator (namely 2'' Multiplication-Sign 2'' cells of EJ301 and EJ309) of detecting neutrons in a very high gamma ray background is explored. A weak {sup 252}Cf source has been detected in a high {sup 137}Cs gamma ray background corresponding to a dose rate of 100 {mu}Sv/h with probability of detection in compliance with IEC requirements for hand held instruments. Tests were performed with new generation of CAEN digitizers, in particular the V1720 (8 Channel 12bit 250 MS/s) one.

  18. High energy (gamma)-ray emission from the starburst nucleus of NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo-Santamaria, E; Torres, D F

    2005-06-15

    The high density medium that characterizes the central regions of starburst galaxies and its power to accelerate particles up to relativistic energies make these objects good candidates as {gamma}-rays sources. In this paper, a self-consistent model of the multifrequency emission of the starburst galaxy NGC 253, from radio to gamma-rays, is presented. The model is in agreement with all current measurements and provides predictions for the high energy behavior of the NGC 253 central region. Prospects for observations with the HESS array and GLAST satellite are especially discussed.

  19. CeBr3 as a Room-Temperature, High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Michael Reed, Ding Yuan, Alexis Reed, and Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2009-09-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr3) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr3 as a room temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  20. Title: MAGIC detects exceptionally high activity from PKS 1510-089 at very high energy gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2016-06-01

    The MAGIC telescopes have detected an increase in the Very High Energy gamma-ray flux from PKS 1510-089 (RA=15 12 50.5, dec=-09 06 00, J2000.0). The preliminary analysis of the MAGIC data taken on 2016/05/30 for 2.7 hours, indicates a highly significant signal (significance > 60 sigma).

  1. Fermi observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from GRB 080916C.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Burrows, D; Busetto, G; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, A; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Deklotz, M; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, J; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hernando Morat, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knödlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S-H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, S; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Mészáros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, V; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Preece, R; Rainò, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Reyes, L C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgrò, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, J-L; Stecker, F W; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tagliaferri, G; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-03-27

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass. PMID:19228997

  2. High performance detectors for upgraded gamma ray diagnostics for JET DT campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zychor, I.; Boltruczyk, G.; Burakowska, A.; Craciunescu, T.; Fernandes, A.; Figueiredo, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Gierlik, M.; Gosk, M.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Kaveney, G.; Kiptily, V.; Korolczuk, S.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Mianowski, S.; Moszynski, M.; Murari, A.; Nocente, M.; Pereira, R. C.; Perseo, V.; Rigamonti, D.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Sibczynski, P.; Santos, B.; Soare, S.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Szawlowski, M.; Szczesniak, T.; Szewinski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Urban, A.; Zoita, V. L.; contributors, JET

    2016-06-01

    In forthcoming deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on JET a significant population of alpha-particles will be produced. For operating alpha-particle diagnostics at high DT neutron fluxes, specific improvements have to be made. Proposed new detectors for gamma-ray measurements will be based on CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce scintillators. They are characterized by a good energy resolution, a relatively high detection efficiency for a few MeV gamma-rays and a fast response time. An overview of scintillator parameters is presented. A description of the properties of photodetectors is given to indicate optimal setups. Results of measurements, using gamma-ray sources with energies up to a few MeV, are discussed with relation to the DT campaign requirements.

  3. Size distributions of air showers accompanied with high energy gamma ray bundles observed at Mt. Chacaltaya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matano, T.; Machida, M.; Tsuchima, I.; Kawasumi, N.; Honda, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Martinic, N.; Zapata, J.; Navia, C. E.; Aquirre, C.

    1985-01-01

    Size distributions of air showers accompanied with bundle of high energy gamma rays and/or large size bursts under emulsion chambers, to study the composition of primary cosmic rays and also characteristics of high energy nuclear interaction. Air showers initiated by particles with a large cross section of interaction may develop from narrow region of the atmosphere near the top. Starting levels of air showers by particles with smaller cross section fluctuate in wider region of the atmosphere. Air showers of extremely small size accompanied with bundle of gamma rays may be ones initiated by protons at lower level after penetrating deep atmosphere without interaction. It is determined that the relative size distribution according to the total energy of bundle of gamma rays and the total burst size observed under 15 cm lead absorber.

  4. Modulated high-energy gamma-ray emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-3.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chaty, S; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Corbel, S; Corbet, R; Dermer, C D; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dubus, G; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hill, A B; Hjalmarsdotter, L; Horan, D; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Koerding, E; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marchand, L; Marelli, M; Max-Moerbeck, W; Mazziotta, M N; McColl, N; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Migliari, S; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Ong, R A; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pooley, G; Porter, T A; Pottschmidt, K; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Readhead, A; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Richards, J L; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, J; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stevenson, M; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tomsick, J A; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Wilms, J; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-12-11

    Microquasars are accreting black holes or neutron stars in binary systems with associated relativistic jets. Despite their frequent outburst activity, they have never been unambiguously detected emitting high-energy gamma rays. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected a variable high-energy source coinciding with the position of the x-ray binary and microquasar Cygnus X-3. Its identification with Cygnus X-3 is secured by the detection of its orbital period in gamma rays, as well as the correlation of the LAT flux with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The gamma-ray emission probably originates from within the binary system, opening new areas in which to study the formation of relativistic jets. PMID:19965378

  5. Modulated High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from the Microquasar Cygnus X-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi LAT Collaboration; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chaty, S.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbel, S.; Corbet, R.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dubus, G.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Koerding, E.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, J.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marchand, L.; Marelli, M.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McColl, N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Migliari, S.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Ong, R. A.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pooley, G.; Porter, T. A.; Pottschmidt, K.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Richards, J. L.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, J.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stevenson, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tomsick, J. A.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilms, J.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. W.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-12-01

    Microquasars are accreting black holes or neutron stars in binary systems with associated relativistic jets. Despite their frequent outburst activity, they have never been unambiguously detected emitting high-energy gamma rays. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected a variable high-energy source coinciding with the position of the x-ray binary and microquasar Cygnus X-3. Its identification with Cygnus X-3 is secured by the detection of its orbital period in gamma rays, as well as the correlation of the LAT flux with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The gamma-ray emission probably originates from within the binary system, opening new areas in which to study the formation of relativistic jets.

  6. Some evidence for high energy gamma-ray sources at large galactic latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamenov, J. N.; Karakula, S.; Tkaczyk, W.

    1985-01-01

    The arrival directions of the gamma-quanta with energies of about 10 to 15th power eV which were registrated by Tien Shan experiment were compared with COS-B observations. On the basis of the Monte Carlo simulations it was shown with low probability that arrival directions of Tien Shan gamma-quanta initiated showers are not uniformly distributed. It is shown that in the region not seen by COS-B mission, the high energy gamma-ray sources should be located at position of 90 deg. 1 sup 11 130 deg and b sup 11 or = 50 deg. The integral intensity of these sources should be I ( 10 to the 15th power eV) = 4.8 + or - 1.7).10 to the 13th power/sq cm/s/str. There is no coincidence between the gamma-quanta registrated by Tien Shan experiment with Geminga intense COS-B gamma source. So it is shown that the integral photon spectrum of Geminga (I(e) approx E sup-Beta, where Beta = 0.8 for E 1 GeV) becomes steeper (Beta 1.2) in high energy region with probability 99.9.%.

  7. Ground-based very high energy gamma ray astronomy: Observational highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turver, K. E.

    1986-01-01

    It is now more than 20 years since the first ground based gamma ray experiments involving atmospheric Cerenkov radiation were undertaken. The present highlights in observational ground-based very high energy (VHE) gamma ray astronomy and the optimism about an interesting future for the field follow progress in these areas: (1) the detection at increased levels of confidence of an enlarged number of sources so that at present claims were made for the detection, at the 4 to 5 sd level of significance, of 8 point sources; (2) the replication of the claimed detections with, for the first time, confirmation of the nature and detail of the emission; and (3) the extension of gamma ray astronomy to the ultra high energy (UHE) domain. The pattern, if any, to emerge from the list of sources claimed so far is that X-ray binary sources appear to be copious emitters of gamma rays over at least 4 decades of energy. These X-ray sources which behave as VHE and UHE gamma ray emitters are examined.

  8. The high-energy diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background radiation from blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Salamon, M. H.; Malkan, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    We predict the spectrum and flux of the high-energy diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background radiation produced by blazars. Our calculations are based on the Compton Observatory EGRET observations of high-energy gamma-rays from these objects, the Whipple observation of TeV gamma-rays from Mrk 421, and radio population studies of flat-spectrum radio sources. Our statistical analysis gives a result consistent with a linear correlation. We then use the radio luminosity function and redshift evolution to calculate the gamma-ray background. We find that blazars cannot account for the flux level or steep spectrum of the background observed by SAS 2 in the sub-GeV range, but could likely provide the dominant background component in the multi-GeV energy range and above. We predict a differential photon spectral index for this component of about 2 up to about 10 GeV. Above that energy, the spectrum should gradually steepen owing to pair production by interactions of the gamma-rays with intergalactic infrared photons. Using the calculations of this effect by Stecker et al. (1992), we estimate a spectral index of about 3.5 for energies above a TeV.

  9. Very high energy gamma rays from the Crab nebula and pulsar

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    This project is to search for very high energy (VHE) (10(exp 11) to 10(exp 14)eV) gamma rays from the Crab nebula and pulsar using the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique. The technique uses an array of 37 photomultiplier tubes to record the images of the Cherenkov light pulses generated by energetic particles in the air showers initiated by VHE gamma rays or charged cosmic rays. Gamma ray like events are selected from numerous cosmic ray events based on the predicted properties of the image, such as the size, shape, and orientation with respect to the axis of the detector. A steady weak flux of VHE gamma rays from the Crab is detected at high statistical significance (9 sigma), which is not usually achieved in VHE gamma ray astronomy. No strong evidence of pulsed emission is found when the same data is folded at the Crab pulsar's radio ephemeris. The angular resolution of the technique cannot separate the emission coming from the nebula from that from the pulsar. Although it is generally believed that the unpulsed emission is coming from the nebula, there may be an unpulsed component coming at only a couple of light cylinder radii away from the pulsar too. Using the outer gap model of pulsar, the spectrum is derived and is found to be compatible with the observations.

  10. Phase stability of {epsilon} and {gamma} HNIW (CL-20) at high-pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gump, Jared C.; Stoltz, Chad A.; Peiris, Suhithi M.

    2007-12-12

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is one of the few ingredients developed since World War II to be considered for transition to military use. Five polymorphs have been identified for CL-20 by FTIR measurements ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, {epsilon}, {zeta}). As CL-20 is transitioned into munitions it will become necessary to predict its response under conditions of detonation, for performance evaluation. Such predictive modeling requires a phase diagram and basic thermodynamic properties of the various phases at high pressure and temperature. Therefore, the epsilon and gamma phases of CL-20 at static high-pressure and temperature were investigated using synchrotron angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments. The samples were compressed and heated using diamond anvil cells (DAC). Pressures and temperatures achieved were around 5 GPa and 240 deg. C, respectively. The epsilon phase was stable to 6.3 GPa at ambient temperature. When heated at ambient pressure the epsilon phase was sustained to a temperature of 120 deg. C then underwent a transition to the gamma phase above 125 deg. C and then thermal decomposition occurred above 150 deg. C. Upon compression, the gamma phase underwent a phase transition at both ambient temperature and 140 deg. C. Pressure--volume data for the epsilon and gamma phase at ambient temperature and the epsilon phase at 75 deg. C were fit to the Birch-Murnaghan formalism to obtain isothermal equations of state.

  11. Microstructure of massively transformed {gamma}-TiAl phase studied by high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, E.; Kumagai, T.; Kajiwara, S.; Nakamura, M.

    1997-12-31

    A microstructure of the massively transformed {gamma}-TiAl ({gamma}{sub m}) phase in a Ti-48at.%Al alloy, which was heat treated in the high-temperature {alpha}-Ti (disordered hcp) single phase field (1,683 K), followed by ice water quenching, has been examined using high-resolution electron microscopy. The characteristic features of the microstructure originated from the {alpha}{yields}{gamma} massive transformation have been clarified in detail, which are as follows. (1) Extremely thin hcp plates (about 0.8--2nm in thickness), which are considered to be a retained {alpha} phase, are found to exist in the {gamma}{sub m} phase. (2) Twin boundaries are found to be not flat interfaces, that is, twin interfaces are not on the exact (111) mirror plane. This situation is attributed to the existence of a number of partial dislocations at the twin boundaries. (3) Antiphase relationship between the regions either side of the thin rotated domain wall is confirmed. The validity of this situation is explained by assuming that the thin rotated domain wall has been grown from a simple antiphase domain boundary. On the basis of these facts, mechanism of the {alpha}{yields}{gamma} massive transformation has been discussed.

  12. Generating Polarized High-Brightness Muon Beams With High-Energy Gammas

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2009-01-22

    Hadron colliders are impractical at very high energies as effective interaction energy is a fraction of the energies of the beams and luminosity must rise as energy squared. Further, the prevailing gluon-gluon background radiation makes it difficult to sort out events. e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, on other hand, are constrained at TeV energies by beamstrahlung radiation and also by cost as long linacs are required to avoid synchrotron radiation in the rings. A muon collider will have the same advantages in energy reach as an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, but without prohibitive beamstrahlung- and synchrotron- radiation. Generation of the high-brightness polarized muon ({mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}) beams through gamma conversion into pairs in the nuclei field is considered in this paper. The dominant effect in the interaction of the high-energy photons with the solid target will be the production of electron-positron pairs. The low-phase space of the resulting muon beams adequately compensates for the small probability of generating a {mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +} pair.

  13. An enhanced high-resolution EMCCD-based gamma camera using SiPM side detection.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, J W T; Korevaar, M A N; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schaart, D R; Goorden, M C; Beekman, F J

    2010-11-21

    Electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) coupled to scintillation crystals can be used for high-resolution imaging of gamma rays in scintillation counting mode. However, the detection of false events as a result of EMCCD noise deteriorates the spatial and energy resolution of these gamma cameras and creates a detrimental background in the reconstructed image. In order to improve the performance of an EMCCD-based gamma camera with a monolithic scintillation crystal, arrays of silicon photon-multipliers (SiPMs) can be mounted on the sides of the crystal to detect escaping scintillation photons, which are otherwise neglected. This will provide a priori knowledge about the correct number and energies of gamma interactions that are to be detected in each CCD frame. This information can be used as an additional detection criterion, e.g. for the rejection of otherwise falsely detected events. The method was tested using a gamma camera based on a back-illuminated EMCCD, coupled to a 3 mm thick continuous CsI:Tl crystal. Twelve SiPMs have been mounted on the sides of the CsI:Tl crystal. When the information of the SiPMs is used to select scintillation events in the EMCCD image, the background level for (99m)Tc is reduced by a factor of 2. Furthermore, the SiPMs enable detection of (125)I scintillations. A hybrid SiPM-/EMCCD-based gamma camera thus offers great potential for applications such as in vivo imaging of gamma emitters. PMID:21030743

  14. The High-Energy Continuum Emission of the Gamma-Ray Blazar PKS 0528+134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Urry, C. Megan; Maraschi, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Mukherjee, R.; Pesce, Joseph E.; Wagner, S. J.; Wehrle, A. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lin, Y. C.

    1997-01-01

    We present Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observations of the gamma-ray blazar PKS 0528 + 134, obtained at two separate epochs in 1994 August and 1995 March. These data represent the first measurement of the X-ray continuum emission of this source in the medium-hard X-ray band. Both ASCA spectra are consistent with a single power law with photon index GAMMA approximate 1.7-1.8 and column density N(sub H) approximately 5 x 10(exp 21) /sq cm, higher than Galactic. The X-ray flux increased by a factor of 4 in approximately 7 months without appreciable change of the spectral shape. During the lower state of 1994 August, PKS 0528 + 134 was observed simultaneously in the optical, X-rays, and at gamma-ray energies with EGRET. The gamma-ray intensity is the faintest detected thus far in the source, with a steep spectrum (GAMMA approximately 2.7). The extrapolation of the X-ray continuum to the gamma-ray range requires a sharp spectral break at approximately 10(exp 22) Hz. We discuss the radio through gamma-ray spectral energy distribution of PKS 0528 + 134, comparing the low state of 1994 August with the flare state of 1993 March. We show that in PKS 0528 + 134, a non-negligible contribution from the external radiation field is present and that, although synchrotron self-Compton scenarios cannot be ruled out, inverse Compton upscattering of thermal seed photons may be the dominant cooling process for the production of the high-energy continuum in this blazar.

  15. Very high energy gamma-ray emission from Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxon, Dana Boltuch

    Supernova remnant (SNR) G120.1+1.4 (also known as Tycho's SNR) is the remnant of one of only five confirmed historical supernovae. As such, it has been well studied across the electromagnetic spectrum. This thesis describes the first statistically significant detection of very high energy (VHE) (˜ 100 GeV to 100 TeV) gamma rays from Tycho's SNR, reported in 2011 by the VERITAS collaboration. The analysis that led to that detection was performed by this author, and this dissertation will discuss the process in detail. Subsequently, a statistically significant detection in high energy (HE) (˜ 30 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma rays was reported by other authors using data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Comparison of models to the spectral energy distribution of the photon flux from this remnant in HE and VHE gamma rays favors a hadronic origin for the emission, particularly when combined with current X-ray data, although a leptonic origin cannot be ruled out at this time. This is significant because a confirmed hadronic origin for the gamma-ray emission would identify this SNR as a site of cosmic ray acceleration, providing observational evidence for the idea that SNRs are the source of the Galactic cosmic ray population. Chapter 1 of this dissertation will provide historical background on Tycho's SNR, along with a summary of modern observations of the remnant across the electromagnetic spectrum. Chapter 2 is a discussion of the role played by SNRs in the process of cosmic ray acceleration, including both theoretical underpinnings and observational evidence. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the field of VHE gamma-ray astronomy, with discussions of gamma-ray production mechanisms and gamma-ray source classes. Chapter 4 describes the instruments used to observe HE and VHE gamma rays. Chapter 5 is a discussion of general analysis methods and techniques for data from Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). Chapter 6 provides details about the specific

  16. High energy gamma-ray astronomy; Proceedings of the International Conference, ANN Arbor, MI, Oct. 2-5, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James

    The present volume on high energy gamma-ray astronomy discusses the composition and properties of heavy cosmic rays greater than 10 exp 12 eV, implications of the IRAS Survey for galactic gamma-ray astronomy, gamma-ray emission from young neutron stars, and high-energy diffuse gamma rays. Attention is given to observations of TeV photons at the Whipple Observatory, TeV gamma rays from millisecond pulsars, recent data from the CYGNUS experiment, and recent results from the Woomera Telescope. Topics addressed include bounds on a possible He/VHE gamma-ray line signal of Galactic dark matter, albedo gamma rays from cosmic ray interactions on the solar surface, source studies, and the CANGAROO project. Also discussed are neural nets and other methods for maximizing the sensitivity of a low-threshold VHE gamma-ray telescope, a prototype water-Cerenkov air-shower detector, detection of point sources with spark chamber gamma-ray telescopes, and real-time image parameterization in high energy gamma-ray astronomy using transputers. (For individual items see A93-25002 to A93-25039)

  17. SAS-2 observations of high energy gamma rays from discrete sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The SAS-2 identified six localized high energy (greater than 35 MeV) gamma ray sources. Four of these are the radio pulsars, PSR 0531+21, PSR 0833-45, PSR 1818-04, and PSR 1717-46 discovered in a search of 75 radio pulsars. The fact that only one of these is observed in X-rays, and the significant differences in pulse profiles in the gamma ray and radio observations, leads to the speculation that different mechanisms are involved.

  18. ADONIS, high count-rate HP-Ge {gamma} spectrometry algorithm: Irradiated fuel assembly measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, P.; Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T.; Normand, S.

    2011-07-01

    ADONIS is a digital system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by CEA. This system achieves high count-rate gamma-ray spectrometry with correct dynamic dead-time correction, up to, at least, more than an incoming count rate of 3.10{sup 6} events per second. An application of such a system at AREVA NC's La Hague plant is the irradiated fuel scanning facility before reprocessing. The ADONIS system is presented, then the measurement set-up and, last, the measurement results with reference measurements. (authors)

  19. High temperature matter and gamma ray spectra from microscopic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghigh, Ramin; Kapusta, Joseph

    2002-03-01

    The relativistic viscous fluid equations describing the outflow of high temperature matter created via Hawking radiation from microscopic black holes are solved numerically for a realistic equation of state. We focus on black holes with initial temperatures greater than 100 GeV and lifetimes less than 6 days. The spectra of direct photons and photons from π0 decay are calculated for energies greater than 1 GeV. We calculate the diffuse gamma ray spectrum from black holes distributed in our galactic halo. However, the most promising route for their observation is to search for point sources emitting gamma rays of ever-increasing energy.

  20. A field-deployable gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Salwen, C.; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Prototype gamma-ray spectrometers utilizing xenon gas at high pressure, suitable for applications in the nuclear safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation communities, have been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). These spectrometers function as ambient-temperature ionization chambers detecting gamma rays with good efficiency in the energy range 50 keV - 2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. They are capable of prolonged, low-power operation without a requirement for cryogenic fluids or other cooling mechanisms, and with the addition of small quantities of {sup 3}He gas, can function simultaneously as efficient thermal neutron detectors.

  1. A review of recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from high-altitude balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from experiments flown on high-altitude balloons. New generation balloon-borne imaging experiments have produced the first gamma-ray maps of the Galactic center (GC) region. Balloon flights of new gamma-ray spectrometers with improved sensitivity have provided important new information on the GC annihilation line. For the first time, the narrow 511 keV line as been resolved (FWHM approx. = 3 keV). A very interesting spectral feature at approximately 170 keV has been attributed to backscattered annihilation, probably from the vicinity of a compact object. New results from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO)/OSSE and Granat/SIGMA experiments on the annihilation line, when considered together with the recent balloon results, have added greatly to our knowledge and understanding of the origin and distribution of this emission. Balloon-borne instruments have made important measurements of gamma-ray continuum and line emission from SN 1987A. The GRIS spectrometer unambiguously resolved the 847 and 1238 keV line emission from radioactive Co-56 synthesized during the explosion. This data indicated that simple spherically symmetric and homogeneous models did not provide an adequate description of the expanding SN shell.

  2. Radio galaxies dominate the high-energy diffuse gamma-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim; Lopez, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested that unresolved radio galaxies and radio quasars (sometimes referred to as misaligned active galactic nuclei) could be responsible for a significant fraction of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background. In this study, we use the latest data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to characterize the gamma-ray emission from a sample of 51 radio galaxies. In addition to those sources that had previously been detected using Fermi data, we report here the first statistically significant detection of gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxies 3C 212, 3C 411, and B3 0309+411B. Combining this information with the radio fluxes, radio luminosity function, and redshift distribution of this source class, we find that radio galaxies dominate the diffuse gamma-ray background, generating 77.2+25.4‑9.4% of this emission at energies above ~1 GeV . We discuss the implications of this result and point out that it provides support for scenarios in which IceCube's high-energy astrophysical neutrinos also originate from the same population of radio galaxies.

  3. Spatial Working Memory in Humans Depends on Theta and High Gamma Synchronization in the Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Alekseichuk, Ivan; Turi, Zsolt; Amador de Lara, Gabriel; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2016-06-20

    Previous, albeit correlative, findings have shown that the neural mechanisms underlying working memory critically require cross-structural and cross-frequency coupling mechanisms between theta and gamma neural oscillations. However, the direct causality between cross-frequency coupling and working memory performance remains to be demonstrated. Here we externally modulated the interaction of theta and gamma rhythms in the prefrontal cortex using novel cross-frequency protocols of transcranial alternating current stimulation to affect spatial working memory performance in humans. Enhancement of working memory performance and increase of global neocortical connectivity were observed when bursts of high gamma oscillations (80-100 Hz) coincided with the peaks of the theta waves, whereas superimposition on the trough of the theta wave and low gamma frequency protocols were ineffective. Thus, our results demonstrate the sensitivity of working memory performance and global neocortical connectivity to the phase and rhythm of the externally driven theta-gamma cross-frequency synchronization. PMID:27238283

  4. A Luminous High-Mass Gamma-ray Binary in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbet, Robin; Cheung, Chi C.; Chomiuk, Laura; Coe, Malcolm J.; Coley, Joel Barry; Dubus, Guillaume; Edwards, Philip; Martin, Pierrick; McBride, Vanessa; Stevens, Jamie; Strader, Jay; Townsend, Lee

    2016-04-01

    We have been undertaking a search for gamma-ray binaries from the detection of periodic modulation in light curves from all sources in the Fermi LAT 3FGL catalog. From this search we identified a 10 day modulation in the direction of the LMC. A localization of the modulation indicates that it arises from a point source identified in a recent Fermi-LAT survey of the LMC. The nature and identification of this source had been uncertain. We find that the counterpart is a previously reported candidate high-mass X-ray binary with an O6III(f) primary located in a supernova remnant. Swift XRT observations of this source show modulation on the 10 day gamma-ray period, but with a different epoch of maximum flux. ATCA radio observations (5.5 and 9 GHz) also reveal variable radio emission from this source. Optical spectroscopy (SAAO and SOAR) show that while there are no large changes in the spectrum, there is apparent radial velocity modulation. At all wavebands this new gamma-ray binary is significantly more luminous than comparable Galactic systems, even though very few of these are known. The discovery of this extragalactic gamma-ray binary may have implications for the overall population of gamma-ray binaries and their evolutionary pathways and lifetimes.

  5. A review of recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from high-altitude balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1994-06-01

    This paper reviews recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from experiments flown on high-altitude balloons. New generation balloon-borne imaging experiments have produced the first gamma-ray maps of the Galactic center (GC) region. Balloon flights of new gamma-ray spectrometers with improved sensitivity have provided important new information on the GC annihilation line. For the first time, the narrow 511 keV line as been resolved (FWHM approx. = 3 keV). A very interesting spectral feature at approximately 170 keV has been attributed to backscattered annihilation, probably from the vicinity of a compact object. New results from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO)/OSSE and Granat/SIGMA experiments on the annihilation line, when considered together with the recent balloon results, have added greatly to our knowledge and understanding of the origin and distribution of this emission. Balloon-borne instruments have made important measurements of gamma-ray continuum and line emission from SN 1987A. The GRIS spectrometer unambiguously resolved the 847 and 1238 keV line emission from radioactive Co-56 synthesized during the explosion. This data indicated that simple spherically symmetric and homogeneous models did not provide an adequate description of the expanding SN shell.

  6. Radio galaxies dominate the high-energy diffuse gamma-ray background

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim; Lopez, Alejandro

    2016-08-09

    It has been suggested that unresolved radio galaxies and radio quasars (sometimes referred to as misaligned active galactic nuclei) could be responsible for a significant fraction of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background. In this study, we use the latest data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to characterize the gamma-ray emission from a sample of 51 radio galaxies. In addition to those sources that had previously been detected using Fermi data, we report here the first statistically significant detection of gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxies 3C 212, 3C 411, and B3 0309+411B. Combining this information with the radio fluxes,more » radio luminosity function, and redshift distribution of this source class, we find that radio galaxies dominate the diffuse gamma-ray background, generating 77.2(+25.4)(-9.4)% of this emission at energies above ~1 GeV . We discuss the implications of this result and point out that it provides support for scenarios in which IceCube's high-energy astrophysical neutrinos also originate from the same population of radio galaxies.« less

  7. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  8. A new ultra high energy gamma ray telescope at Ohya mine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoki, T.; Higashi, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Kitamura, T.; Matsuno, S.; Mizutani, K.; Mitsui, K.; Muraki, Y.; Okada, A.; Ohashi, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The search for ultra high energy gamma rays coming from point sources is one of the main experimental aims. A fast air shower timing system was constructed at ICRR for the study of the angular resolution of the system and operated approximately half a year. The characteristics of the surface array of Ohya air shower telescope is described.

  9. Conducting High Cycle Fatigue Strength Step Tests on Gamma TiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad; Draper, Sue; Pereira, J. Mike

    2002-01-01

    High cycle fatigue strength testing of gamma TiAl by the step test method is investigated. A design of experiments was implemented to determine if the coaxing effect occurred during testing. Since coaxing was not observed, step testing was deemed a suitable method to define the fatigue strength at 106 cycles.

  10. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  11. Chemical synthesis of nucleoside-gamma-[32P]triphosphates of high specific activity.

    PubMed

    Janecka, A; Panusz, H; Pankowski, J; Koziołkiewicz, W

    1980-01-01

    A simple chemical procedure for the preparation of four common ribonucleoside 5-gamma-[32P]triphosphates of high specific activity (up to 10 Ci/mmole) based on the condensation of orthophosphoric acid with the corresponding nucleoside 5-diphosphate in the presence of ethyl chloroformate as well as the methods of purification and identification of the products are described. PMID:7375446

  12. Search for very high energy gamma rays from the galactic plane and other possible galactic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Periale, L.; Vallania, P.

    An extensive air shower array is operating at the Plateau Rosa station (3.500 m.a.s.l.) since 1980 in the search for very high energy gamma-ray sources. The authors discuss the stability of the array and present the results obtained from Feb. 1982 to Aug. 1985, concerning D.C., periodic and sporadic emissions.

  13. Monitoring performance of the cameras under the high dose-rate gamma ray environments.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min

    2014-05-01

    CCD/CMOS cameras, loaded on a robot system, are generally used as the eye of the robot and monitoring unit. A major problem that arises when dealing with images provided by CCD/CMOS cameras under severe accident situations of a nuclear power plant is the presence of speckles owing to the high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. To use a CCD/CMOS camera as a monitoring unit in a high radiation area, the legibility of the camera image in such intense gamma-radiation fields should therefore be defined. In this paper, the authors describe the monitoring index as a figure of merit of the camera's legibleness under a high dose-rate gamma ray irradiation environment. From a low dose-rate (10 Gy h) to a high dose-rate (200 Gy h) level, the legible performances of the cameras owing to the speckles are evaluated. The numbers of speckles generated by gamma ray irradiation in the camera image are calculated by an image processing technique. The legibility of the sensor indicator (thermo/hygrometer) owing to the number of speckles is also presented. PMID:24667385

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation on high temperature hardness of low-density polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei-Yun; Yang, Fuqian; Lee, Sanboh

    2015-11-01

    Gamma irradiation can cause the change of microstructure and molecular structure of polymer, resulting in the change of mechanical properties of polymers. Using the hardness measurement, the effect of gamma irradiation on the high temperature hardness of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was investigated. The gamma irradiation caused the increase in the melting point, the enthalpy of fusion, and the portion of crystallinity of LDPE. The Vickers hardness of the irradiated LDPE increases with increasing the irradiation dose, annealing temperature, and annealing time. The activation energy for the rate process controlling the reaction between defects linearly decreases with the irradiation dose. The process controlling the hardness evolution in LDPE is endothermic because LDPE is semi-crystalline.

  15. Opportunities for Fundamental and New Physics with Very High Energy Gamma-ray Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtol, Keith

    2016-04-01

    Astronomical observations with the highest energy gamma rays enable a wide range of fundamental physics measurements as well as searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this presentation, I will discuss indirect dark matter searches, intergalactic magnetic field constraints, and tests of Lorentz invariance with an emphasis on sensitivity gains that could be achieved with two new ground-based gamma-ray telescopes operating at the TeV energy scale: the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory (HAWC) and the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Multiwavelength and multimessenger observations are an essential component of these studies needed to characterize the environments in which the highest energy gamma rays are produced, the conditions encountered while traversing interstellar and intergalactic distances, and "conventional" astrophysical backgrounds.

  16. SAS-2 observations of the high energy gamma radiation from the Vela region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-B high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg smaller than 12 smaller than 290 deg show a statistically significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy larger than 100 MeV. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from the supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, than on the order of 3 x 10 to the 50th power ergs would have been released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  17. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 080825C

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E. E-mail: j.granot@herts.ac.u

    2009-12-10

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. We also present some theoretical interpretation of GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.

  18. The estimation of background production by cosmic rays in high-energy gamma ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, H. L.; Nolan, P. L.; Lin, Y. C.; Koch, D. G.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hughes, E. B.

    1991-01-01

    A calculational method of estimating instrumental background in high-energy gamma-ray telescopes, using the hadronic Monte Carlo code FLUKA87, is presented. The method is applied to the SAS-2 and EGRET telescope designs and is also used to explore the level of background to be expected for alternative configurations of the proposed GRITS telescope, which adapts the external fuel tank of a Space Shuttle as a gamma-ray telescope with a very large collecting area. The background produced in proton-beam tests of EGRET is much less than the predicted level. This discrepancy appears to be due to the FLUKA87 inability to transport evaporation nucleons. It is predicted that the background in EGRET will be no more than 4-10 percent of the extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation.

  19. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-01-01

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  20. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-12-31

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  1. High-energy gamma-ray emission from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Ramaty, Reuven

    1992-01-01

    The production of high-energy gamma rays resulting from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop is investigated. Magnetic mirroring, MHD pitch-angle scattering, and all of the relevant loss processes and photon production mechanisms are taken into account. The transport of both the primary ions and the secondary positrons resulting from the decay of the positive pions, as well as the transport of the produced gamma-ray emission are considered. The distributions of the gamma rays as a function of atmospheric depth, time, emission angle, and photon energy are calculated and the dependence of these distributions on the model parameters are studied. The obtained angular distributions are not sufficiently anisotropic to account for the observed limb brightening of the greater than 10 MeV flare emission, indicating that the bulk of this emission is bremsstrahlung from primary electrons.

  2. Observation of high-energy gamma rays from the quasi-stellar object CTA 102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    The quasar CTA 102 (QSO 2230 + 114) was observed four times in 1991-1992 by the EGRET high-energy gamma-ray telescope on the Compton GRO satellite. In the 1992 January 23-February 6 observation, emission was detected at the level (2.4 +/- 0.5) x 10 exp 7 photons/sq cm s (E is greater than 100 MeV). The other observations produced upper limits or detections with lower significance which are consistent with the same flux. The photon spectrum can be represented by a power law with a number index of 2.6 +/- 0.2, the softest so far observed by EGRET. The emitted gamma-ray luminosity, if isotropic, is 5 x 10 exp 47 ergs/s (H(0) = 75 km/s Mpc , q(0) = 0.5), although there are good reasons to believe that the gamma emission is strongly beamed.

  3. Fermi Observations of High-energy Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 080825C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Chaplin, V.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Gibby, L.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Komin, N.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. We also present some theoretical interpretation of GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.

  4. Gamma-ray astronomy: From Fermi up to the HAWC high-energy {gamma}-ray observatory in Sierra Negra

    SciTech Connect

    Carraminana, Alberto; Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration

    2013-06-12

    Gamma-rays represent the most energetic electromagnetic window for the study of the Universe. They are studied both from space at MeV and GeV energies, with instruments like the Fermi{gamma}-ray Space Telescope, and at TeV energies with ground based instruments profiting of particle cascades in the atmosphere and of the Cerenkov radiation of charged particles in the air or in water. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory represented the first instrument to successfully implement the water Cerenkov technique for {gamma}-ray astronomy, opening the ground for the more sensitive HAWC {gamma}-ray observatory, currently under development in the Sierra Negra site and already providing early science results.

  5. High voltage stability performance of a gamma ray detection device

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Lombigit, Lojius; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd

    2014-02-12

    An industrial grade digital radiation survey meter device is currently being developed at Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This device used a cylindrical type Geiger Mueller (GM) which acts as a detector. GM detector operates at relatively high direct current voltages depend on the type of GM tube. This thin/thick walled cylindrical type of GM tube operates at 450-650 volts range. Proper value and stability performance of high voltage are important parameters to ensure that this device give a reliable radiation dose measurement. This paper will present an assessment of the stability and performance of the high voltage supply for radiation detector. The assessment is performed using System Identification tools box in MATLAB and mathematical statistics.

  6. THE HIGH ENERGY BUDGET ALLOCATIONS IN SHOCKS AND GAMMA RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David; Guetta, Dafne; Pohl, Martin

    2010-10-10

    The statistical distribution of energies among particles responsible for long gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission is analyzed in light of recent results of the Fermi Observatory. The all-sky flux, F{sub {gamma}}, recorded by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is shown, despite its larger energy range, to be not significantly larger than that reported by the Burst and Transient Explorer, suggesting a relatively small flux in the 3-30 MeV energy range. The present-day energy input rate in {gamma}-rays recorded by the GBM from long GRBs is found, assuming star formation rates in the literature, to be W-dot(0)=0.5 F{sub {gamma}H}/c=5x10{sup 42}erg Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}. The Large Area Telescope fluence, when observed, is about 5%-10% per decade of the total, in good agreement with the predictions of saturated, nonlinear shock acceleration. The high-energy component of long GRBs, as measured by Fermi, is found to contain only {approx}10{sup -2.5} of the energy needed to produce ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) above 4 EeV, assuming the latter to be extragalactic, when various numerical factors are carefully included, if the cosmic-ray source spectrum has a spectral index of -2. The observed {gamma}-ray fraction of the required UHECR energy is even smaller if the source spectrum is softer than E {sup -2}. The AMANDA II limits rule out such a GRB origin for UHECRs if much more than 10{sup -2} of the cosmic-ray energy goes into neutrinos that are within, and simultaneous with, the {gamma}-ray beam. It is suggested that 'orphan' neutrinos out of the {gamma}-ray beam might be identifiable via orphan afterglow or other wide angle signatures of GRBs in lieu of coincidence with prompt {gamma}-rays, and it is recommended that feasible single neutrino trigger criteria be established to search for such coincidences.

  7. High resolution bone mineral densitometry with a gamma camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Jhingran, S.; Johnson, P.

    1983-01-01

    A technique by which the regional distribution of bone mineral can be determined in bone samples from small animals is described. The technique employs an Anger camera interfaced to a medical computer. High resolution imaging is possible by producing magnified images of the bone samples. Regional densitometry of femurs from oophorectomised and bone mineral loss.

  8. HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINO AND GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM TRANS-RELATIVISTIC SUPERNOVA SHOCK BREAKOUTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Gao, Shan; Meszaros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2013-05-20

    Trans-relativistic shocks that accompany some supernovae (SNe) produce X-ray burst emissions as they break out in the dense circumstellar medium around the progenitors. This phenomenon is sometimes associated with peculiar low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (LL GRBs). Here, we investigate the high-energy neutrino and gamma-ray counterparts of such a class of SNe. Just beyond the shock breakout radius, particle acceleration in the collisionless shock starts to operate in the presence of breakout photons. We show that protons may be accelerated to sufficiently high energies and produce high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays via the photomeson interaction. These neutrinos and gamma rays may be detectable from {approx}< 10 Mpc away by IceCube/KM3Net as multi-TeV transients almost simultaneously with the X-ray breakout, and even from {approx}< 100 Mpc away with follow-up observations by the Cherenkov Telescope Array using a wide-field sky monitor like Swift as a trigger. A statistical technique using a stacking approach could also be possible for the detection, with the aid of the SN optical/infrared counterparts. Such multi-messenger observations offer the possibility to probe the transition of trans-relativistic shocks from radiation-mediated to collisionless ones, and would also constrain the mechanisms of particle acceleration and emission in LL GRBs.

  9. SAS-2 High energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Oegelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The second Small Astronomy Satellite high-energy (35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks, one following the radio peak by about 13 msec, and the other 0.4 period after the first. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0004 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission and the double peak structure, compared to the single pulse in the radio emission, suggests that the high energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those found at lower energies.

  10. Neutron detection in a high-gamma field using solution-grown stilbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. M.; Clarke, S. D.; Adamowicz, N.; Pozzi, S. A.; Zaitseva, N.; Carman, L.

    2016-01-01

    A solution-based technique for growing large-volume stilbene scintillators was developed in 2013; crystals up to diameters of 10 cm, or larger, have been grown while preserving excellent pulse shape discrimination (PSD) properties. The goal of this study is to evaluate the PSD capabilities of 5.08 by 5.08-cm stilbene crystals grown by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Inrad Optics when exposed to a 1000 to 1 gamma ray-neutron ratio and operating at a 100-kHz count rate. Results were compared to an equivalent EJ-309 liquid scintillation detector. 252Cf neutron pulses were recorded in two experiments where 60Co and 137Cs sources created the high-gamma field. The high count rate created numerous double pulses that were cleaned using fractional and template approaches designed to remove double pulses while preserving neutron counts. PSD was performed at a threshold of 42 keVee (440-keV proton) for stilbene and 60 keVee (610-keV proton) for EJ-309 liquid. The lower threshold in stilbene resulted in a neutron intrinsic efficiency of approximately 14.5%, 10% higher than EJ-309 liquid, for bare 252Cf and 13% for 252Cf in the high-gamma field. Despite the lower threshold, the gamma misclassification rate in stilbene was approximately 3×10-6, nearly a factor-of-five lower than what we found with the EJ-309 liquid.

  11. MEG sensor and source measures of visually induced gamma-band oscillations are highly reliable.

    PubMed

    Tan, H-R M; Gross, J; Uhlhaas, P J

    2016-08-15

    High frequency brain oscillations are associated with numerous cognitive and behavioral processes. Non-invasive measurements using electro-/magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG) have revealed that high frequency neural signals are heritable and manifest changes with age as well as in neuropsychiatric illnesses. Despite the extensive use of EEG/MEG-measured neural oscillations in basic and clinical research, studies demonstrating test-retest reliability of power and frequency measures of neural signals remain scarce. Here, we evaluated the test-retest reliability of visually induced gamma (30-100Hz) oscillations derived from sensor and source signals acquired over two MEG sessions. The study required participants (N=13) to detect the randomly occurring stimulus acceleration while viewing a moving concentric grating. Sensor and source MEG measures of gamma-band activity yielded comparably strong reliability (average intraclass correlation, ICC=0.861). Peak stimulus-induced gamma frequency (53-72Hz) yielded the highest measures of stability (ICCsensor=0.940; ICCsource=0.966) followed by spectral signal change (ICCsensor=0.890; ICCsource=0.893) and peak frequency bandwidth (ICCsensor=0.856; ICCsource=0.622). Furthermore, source-reconstruction significantly improved signal-to-noise for spectral amplitude of gamma activity compared to sensor estimates. Our assessments highlight that both sensor and source derived estimates of visually induced gamma-band oscillations from MEG signals are characterized by high test-retest reliability, with source derived oscillatory measures conferring an improvement in the stability of peak-frequency estimates. Importantly, our finding of high test-retest reliability supports the feasibility of pharma-MEG studies and longitudinal aging or clinical studies. PMID:27153980

  12. Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Jonathan Glen

    Superconducting high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers based on molybdenum/ copper transition edge sensors (TES) with tin absorbers have been developed for nuclear safeguard applications. This dissertation focuses on plutonium analysis, specifically the direct measurement of the 242Pu gamma-ray signature at 44.915 keV. As existing nondestructive analysis methods cannot directly measure this or any other 242Pu signature, the feasibility of making such a measurement using a TES based system is presented. Analysis from of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical noise models shows that the direct detection of this gamma-ray line of is possible and can be quantified in the presence of a 240Pu gamma-ray line with a line separation of 324 eV, even if the emission from the 240Pu is several orders of magnitude stronger. Spectroscopic measurements conducted in a liquid cryogen system offered an energy resolution of 180 eV, adequate for the measurement of 242Pu; however, TES operation in a liquid-cryogen-free pulse tube refrigerator degraded sensor performance such that this measurement was no longer possible. The numerical noise model indicates that the energy resolution of this device is adequate to demonstrate a direct measurement of 242Pu if the noise pickup from the mechanical cooler can be suppressed. This work shows that the precise measurement of low-intensity gamma-ray signatures, such as the 44.915 keV gamma ray from 242Pu, will require arrays of low-noise TES sensors and that such a system would offer invaluable information in the analysis of plutonium bearing materials.

  13. High-energy gamma-ray and neutrino backgrounds from clusters of galaxies and radio constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandanel, Fabio; Tamborra, Irene; Gabici, Stefano; Ando, Shin'ichiro

    2015-06-01

    Cosmic-ray protons accumulate for cosmological times in clusters of galaxies because their typical radiative and diffusive escape times are longer than the Hubble time. Their hadronic interactions with protons of the intra-cluster medium generate secondary electrons, gamma rays, and neutrinos. In light of the high-energy neutrino events recently discovered by the IceCube neutrino observatory, for which galaxy clusters have been suggested as possible sources, and the forthcoming results from the Fermi gamma-ray survey, we here estimate the contribution from galaxy clusters to the diffuse gamma-ray and neutrino backgrounds. We modelled the cluster population by means of their mass function, using a phenomenological luminosity-mass relation applied to all clusters, as well as a detailed semi-analytical model. In the latter model, we divide clusters into cool-core/non-cool-core, and loud/quiet subsamples, as suggested by observations, and model the cosmic-ray proton population according to state-of-the-art hydrodynamic numerical simulations. Additionally, we consider observationally-motivated values for the cluster magnetic field. This is a crucial parameter since the observed radio counts of clusters need to be respected owing to synchrotron emission by secondary electrons. For a choice of parameters respecting current constraints from radio to gamma rays, and assuming a proton spectral index of -2, we find that hadronic interactions in clusters contribute less than 10% to the IceCube flux and much less to the total extragalactic gamma-ray background observed by Fermi. They account for less than 1% for spectral indices ≤-2. The high-energy neutrino flux observed by IceCube can be reproduced without violating radio constraints only if a very hard (and speculative) spectral index >-2 is adopted. However, this scenario is in tension with the high-energy IceCube data, which seems to suggest a spectral energy distribution of the neutrino flux that decreases with the

  14. ADVANCED X-BAND TEST ACCELERATOR FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON AND GAMMA RAY BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Chu, T S; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E N; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, J W

    2010-05-12

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  15. Advanced X-Band Test Accelerator for High Brightness Electron and Gamma Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Chu, Tak Sum; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Hartemann, Fred; Adolphsen, Chris; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  16. Performances of a specific denoising wavelet process for high-resolution gamma imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse, Annie; Dornier, Christophe; Parmentier, Michel; Kastler, Bruno; Chavanelle, Jerome

    2004-02-01

    Due to its functional capabilities, gamma imaging is an interesting tool for medical diagnosis. Recent developments lead to improved intrinsic resolution. However this gain is impaired by the poor activity detected and the Poissonian feature of gamma ray emission. High resolution gamma images are grainy. This is a real nuisance for detecting cold nodules in an emitting organ. A specific translation wavelet filter which takes into account the Poissonian feature of noise, has been developed in order to improve the diagnostic capabilities of radioisotopic high resolution images. Monte Carlo simulations of a hot thyroid phantom in which cold spheres, 3-7 mm in diameter, could be included were performed. The loss of activity induced by cold nodules was determined on filtered images by using catchment basins determination. On the original images, only 5-7 mm cold spheres were clearly visible. On filtered images, 3 and 4 mm spheres were put in prominent. The limit of the developed filter is approximately the detection of 3 mm spherical cold nodule in acquisition and activity conditions which mimic a thyroid examination. Furthermore, no disturbing artifacts are generated. It is therefore a powerful tool for detecting small cold nodules in a gamma emitting medium.

  17. LuAlO3: A high density, high speed scintillator for gamma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, W. W.; Derenzo, S. E.; Fyodorov, A.; Korzhik, M.; Gektin, A.; Minkov, B.; Aslanov, V.

    1994-11-01

    We present measurements of the scintillation properties cerium doped lutetium aluminum perovskite, LuAlO3:Ce, new dense ((rho)=8.34 g/cm(sup 3)) inorganic scintillator. This material has a 511 keV interaction length and photoelectric fraction 1.1 cm and 32% respectively, which are well suited to gamma ray detection. In powdered form with 0.5% cerium concentration, the scintillation light output is estimated to be 9,600 photons/MeV of deposited energy, the emission spectrum is a single peak centered at 390 nm, and the fluorescence lifetime is described by the sum of 3 exponential terms, with 60% of the light being emitted with a 11 ns decay time, 26% with a 28 ns decay time, and 13% with a 835 ns decay time. Single crystals contaminated with =10% lutetium aluminum garnet (Lu3Al5Ol2) have significantly altered scintillation properties. The light output is 26,000 photons/MeV (3.2 times that of BGO), but the decay time increases significantly (1% of the light is emitted with a 10 ns decay time, 15% with a 245 ns decay time, and 85% with a 2010 ns decay time) and the emission spectrum is dominated by a peak centered at 315 nm with a secondary peak centered at 500 rum. The short decay lifetime, high density, and reasonable light output of LuAlO3:Ce (the perovskite phase) suggest that it is useful for applications where high counting rates, good stopping power, good energy resolution, and fast timing are important. However, it is necessary to grow single crystals that are uncontaminated by the garnet phase to realize these properties.

  18. LuAlO{sub 3}: A high density, high speed scintillator for gamma detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Fyodorov, A.; Korzhik, M.; Gektin, A.; Minkov, B.; Aslanov, V.

    1994-11-01

    We present measurements of the scintillation properties cerium doped lutetium aluminum perovskite, LuAlO{sub 3}:C, new dense ({rho}=8.34 g/cm{sup 3}) inorganic scintillator. This material has a 511 keV interaction length and photoelectric fraction 1.1 cm and 32% respectively, which are well suited to gamma ray detection. In powdered form with 0.5% cerium concentration, the scintillation light output is estimated to be 9,600 photons/MeV of deposited energy, the emission spectrum is a single peak centered at 390 nm, and the fluorescence lifetime is described by the sum of 3 exponential terms, with 60% of the light being emitted with a 11 ns decay time, 26% with a 28 ns decay time, and 13% with a 835 ns decay time. Single crystals contaminated with =10% lutetium aluminum garnet (Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub l2}) have significantly altered scintillation properties. The light output is 26,000 photons/MeV (3.2 times that of BGO), but the decay time increases significantly (1% of the light is emitted with a 10 ns decay time, 15% with a 245 ns decay time, and 85% with a 2010 ns decay time) and the emission spectrum is dominated by a peak centered at 315 nm with a secondary peak centered at 500 rum. The short decay lifetime, high density, and reasonable light output of LuAlO{sub 3}:C (the perovskite phase) suggest that it is useful for applications where high counting rates, good stopping power, good energy resolution, and fast timing are important. However, it is necessary to grow single crystals that are uncontaminated by the garnet phase to realize these properties.

  19. A New View of the High Energy Gamma-ray Sky with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the findings that have been made possible by the use of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It describes the current status of the Fermi Telescope and reviews some of the science highlights.

  20. The Impact of Electromagnetic Cascades of Very-high Energy Gamma Rays on the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, Tonia

    2012-01-01

    As very high energy (VHE) photons propagate through the extragalactic background light (EBL), they interact with the soft photons of the EBL and initiate electromagnetic cascades of photons and electrons. The collective intensity of a cosmological population emitting at VHEs (such as blazars) will be attenuated at the highest energies through interactions with the EBL and enhanced at lower energies by the resulting cascade. As such, depending on the space density and spectra of the sources and the model of the EBL, cascade radiation can provide a significant contribution to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB). Through deflections of the charged particles of the cascade, an intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the anisotropy properties of the EGB. The impact of a strong IGMF is to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the EGB. We discuss the implications of cascade radiation for the origins of the EGB and the nature of the IGMF, as well as insight that will be provided by data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the upcoming years.

  1. Laboratory laser acceleration and high energy astrophysics: {gamma}-ray bursts and cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.

    1998-08-20

    Recent experimental progress in laser acceleration of charged particles (electrons) and its associated processes has shown that intense electromagnetic pulses can promptly accelerate charged particles to high energies and that their energy spectrum is quite hard. On the other hand some of the high energy astrophysical phenomena such as extremely high energy cosmic rays and energetic components of {gamma}-ray bursts cry for new physical mechanisms for promptly accelerating particles to high energies. The authors suggest that the basic physics involved in laser acceleration experiments sheds light on some of the underlying mechanisms and their energy spectral characteristics of the promptly accelerated particles in these high energy astrophysical phenomena.

  2. Ultra high energy gamma rays, cosmic rays and neutrinos from accreting degenerate stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecher, K.; Chanmugam, G.

    1985-01-01

    Super-Eddington accretion for a recently proposed unipolar induction model of cosmic ray acceleration in accreting binary star systems containing magnetic white dwarfs or neutron stars is considered. For sufficiently high accretion rates and low magnetic fields, the model can account for: (1) acceleration of cosmic ray nuclei up to energies of 10 to the 19th power eV; (2) production of more or less normal solar cosmic ray composition; (3) the bulk of cosmic rays observed with energies above 1 TeV, and probably even down to somewhat lower energies as well; and (4) possibly the observed antiproton cosmic ray flux. It can also account for the high ultra high energy (UHE) gamma ray flux observed from several accreting binary systems (including Cygnus X-3), while allowing the possibility of an even higher neutrino flux from these sources, with L sub nu/L sub gamma is approximately 100.

  3. A field-deployable gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing high pressure xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, Bo; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1997-05-01

    Most nuclear materials in the nuclear energy, safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation regimes emit gamma rays with a unique signature. Currently, two categories of spectrometers are available to evaluate these materials: (1) Semiconductors, with excellent energy resolution, which operate at cryogenic temperatures. (2) Scintillation detectors, which function at ambient temperature, but with poor energy resolution. A detector which functions for extended periods in a range of environments, with an energy resolution superior to that of a scintillation spectrometer, would have evident utility. Recently, in the research community, such a device has evolved, an ionization chamber utilizing xenon gas at very high pressure (60 atm). Its energy resolution, typically, is 20 keV for the 661 keV gamma ray of {sup 137}Cs. With high xenon density and its high atomic number (Z=54), and superior energy resolution, its sensitivity is comparable to that of a scintillator.

  4. Two cis-DNA elements involved in myeloid-cell-specific expression and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) activation of the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor gene: a novel IFN regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, C; Wietzerbin, J; Benech, P D

    1993-01-01

    The human high-affinity receptor for the constant region of immunoglobulin G (human Fc gamma R1) is encoded by two mRNAs induced selectively by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and expressed in cells of myeloid lineage. The cis-DNA element (GRR) previously found to confer IFN-gamma responsiveness to this gene acts as an inducible enhancer and is the target of an IFN-gamma-activated factor(s) (GIRE-BP) in cells of different origins. Although the GRR motif is not related to the DNA elements involved in the regulation of other IFN-stimulated genes, GIRE-BP binding depends on the IFN-gamma-dependent activation of the 91-kDa protein known to be one of the factors of a transcriptional complex activated by IFN-alpha. Deletions of the Fc gamma R1 promoter allowed us to identify a 25-bp element, downstream from the GRR motif, conferring cell-type-specific expression. This element, called MATE (myeloid activating transcription element), is the DNA target for constitutive factors forming two complexes, MATE-BP1 and MATE-BP2. In accordance with the functional analysis, MATE-BP binding activities were detected in extracts prepared from myeloid cell lines such as THP-1, HL-60, and U-937 but not in HeLa cell extracts. The MATE motif is present not only in the promoter of other Fc receptor genes but also in several promoters of genes whose expression is restricted to monocytic cells. Our results suggest that human Fc gamma R1 gene expression in myeloid cells is initiated by the interaction of IFN-gamma-activated factors with cell-type-specific factors through their binding to the GRR and MATE motifs. Images PMID:8455606

  5. CONSTRAINING THE HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH FERMI

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C.; Bouvier, A.; Brigida, M.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A. E-mail: kocevski@slac.stanford.edu E-mail: connauv@uah.edu E-mail: michael.briggs@nasa.gov; Collaboration: Fermi Large Area Telescope Team; Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor Team; and others

    2012-08-01

    We examine 288 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) that fell within the field of view of Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) during the first 2.5 years of observations, which showed no evidence for emission above 100 MeV. We report the photon flux upper limits in the 0.1-10 GeV range during the prompt emission phase as well as for fixed 30 s and 100 s integrations starting from the trigger time for each burst. We compare these limits with the fluxes that would be expected from extrapolations of spectral fits presented in the first GBM spectral catalog and infer that roughly half of the GBM-detected bursts either require spectral breaks between the GBM and LAT energy bands or have intrinsically steeper spectra above the peak of the {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectra (E{sub pk}). In order to distinguish between these two scenarios, we perform joint GBM and LAT spectral fits to the 30 brightest GBM-detected bursts and find that a majority of these bursts are indeed softer above E{sub pk} than would be inferred from fitting the GBM data alone. Approximately 20% of this spectroscopic subsample show statistically significant evidence for a cutoff in their high-energy spectra, which if assumed to be due to {gamma}{gamma} attenuation, places limits on the maximum Lorentz factor associated with the relativistic outflow producing this emission. All of these latter bursts have maximum Lorentz factor estimates that are well below the minimum Lorentz factors calculated for LAT-detected GRBs, revealing a wide distribution in the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB outflows and indicating that LAT-detected bursts may represent the high end of this distribution.

  6. Gamma-resonance Contraband Detection using a high current tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B. F.; Beis, J.; Dale, D.; Rogers, J.; Ruegg, R.; Debiak, T.; Kamykowski, E.; Melnychuk, S.; Rathke, J.; Sredniawski, J.

    1999-04-26

    TRIUMF and Northrop Grumman have developed a new system for the detection of concealed explosives and drugs. This Contraband Detection System (CDS) is based on the resonant absorption by {sup 14}N of gammas produced using {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N. The chosen reaction uses protons at 1.75 MeV and the gammas have an energy of 9.17 MeV. By measuring both the resonant and the non-resonant absorption using detectors with good spatial resolution, and applying standard tomographic techniques, we are able to produce 3D images of both the nitrogen partial density and the total density. The images together may be utilized with considerable confidence to determine if small amounts of nitrogen based explosives, heroin or cocaine are present in the interrogated containers. Practical Gamma Resonant Absorption (GRA) scanning requires an intense source of protons. However this proton source must also be very stable, have low energy spread, and have good spatial definition. These demands suggested a tandem as the accelerator of choice. We have therefore constructed a 2 MeV H{sup -} tandem optimized for high current (10 mA) operation, while minimizing the overall size of the accelerator. This has required several special innovations which will be presented in the paper. We will also present initial commissioning results.

  7. High-precision source location of the 1978 November 19 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Pizzichini, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.

    1981-01-01

    The celestial source location of the November 19, 1978, intense gamma ray burst has been determined from data obtained with the interplanetary gamma-ray sensor network by means of long-baseline wave front timing instruments. Each of the instruments was designed for studying events with observable spectra of approximately greater than 100 keV, and each provides accurate event profile timing in the several millisecond range. The data analysis includes the following: the triangulated region is centered at (gamma, delta) 1950 = (1h16m32s, -28 deg 53 arcmin), at -84 deg galactic latitude, where the star density is very low and the obscuration negligible. The gamma-ray burst source region, consistent with that of a highly polarized radio source described by Hjellming and Ewald (1981), may assist in the source modeling and may facilitate the understanding of the source process. A marginally identifiable X-ray source was also found by an Einstein Observatory investigation. It is concluded that the burst contains redshifted positron annihilation and nuclear first-excited iron lines, which is consistent with a neutron star origin.

  8. VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM PASSIVE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES: CONSTRAINTS FOR NGC 1399

    SciTech Connect

    Pedaletti, G.; Wagner, S. J.; Rieger, F. M.

    2011-09-10

    Very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) {gamma}-rays are expected to be emitted from the vicinity of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), irrespective of their activity state. In the magnetosphere of rotating SMBH, efficient acceleration of charged particles can take place through various processes. These particles could reach energies up to E {approx} 10{sup 19} eV. VHE {gamma}-ray emission from these particles is then feasible via leptonic or hadronic processes. Therefore, passive systems, where the lack of a strong photon field allows the VHE {gamma}-rays to escape, are expected to be detected by Cherenkov telescopes. We present results from recent VHE experiments on the passive SMBH in the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 1399. No {gamma}-ray signal has been found, neither by the H.E.S.S. experiment nor in the Fermi data analyzed here. We discuss possible implications for the physical characteristics of the system. We conclude that in a scenario where particles are accelerated in vacuum gaps in the magnetosphere, only a fraction {approx}0.3 of the gap is available for particle acceleration, indicating that the system is unlikely to be able to accelerate protons up to E {approx} 10{sup 19} eV.

  9. High-spin structure and multiphonon {gamma} vibrations in very neutron-rich {sup 114}Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, E. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Ding, H. B.; Gu, L.; Xu, Q.; Xiao, Z. G.; Zhu, S. J.; Hamilton, J. H.; Li, K.; Ramayya, A. V.; Hwang, J. K.; Liu, Y. X.; Liu, S. H.; Sheikh, J. A.; Bhat, G. H.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Lee, I. Y.; Ma, W. C.

    2011-05-15

    High-spin levels of the neutron-rich {sup 114}Ru have been investigated by measuring the prompt {gamma} rays in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. The ground-state band and one-phonon {gamma}-vibrational band have been extended up to 14{sup +} and 9{sup +}, respectively. Two levels are proposed as the members of a two-phonon {gamma}-vibrational band. A back bending (band crossing) has been observed in the ground-state band at ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}{approx_equal} 0.40 MeV. Using the triaxial deformation parameters, the cranked shell model calculations indicate that this back bending in {sup 114}Ru should originate from the alignment of a pair of h{sub 11/2} neutrons. Triaxial projected shell model calculations for the {gamma}-vibrational band structures of {sup 114}Ru are in good agreement with the experimental data. However, when using the oblate deformation parameters, both of the above-calculated results are not in agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Constraining Very High-Energy Gamma Ray Sources Using IceCube Neutrino Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Gregory; Feintzeig, J.; Karle, A.; IceCube Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Modern gamma ray astronomy has revealed the most violent, energetic objects in the known universe, from nearby supernova remnants to distant active galactic nuclei. In an effort to discover more about the fundamental nature of such objects, we present searches for astrophysical neutrinos in coincidence with known gamma ray sources. Searches were conducted using data from IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic-kilometer neutrino detector that is sensitive to astrophysical particles with energies above 1 TeV. The detector is situated at the South Pole, and uses more than 5,000 photomultiplier tubes to detect Cherenkov light from the interactions of particles within the ice. Existing models of proton-proton interactions allow us to link gamma ray fluxes to the production of high-energy neutrinos, so neutrino data from IceCube can be used to constrain the mechanisms by which gamma ray sources create such energetic photons. For a few particularly bright sources, such as the blazar Markarian 421, IceCube is beginning to reach the point where actual constraints can be made. As more years of data are analyzed, the limits will improve and stronger constraints will become possible. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation's REU Program through NSF Award AST-1004881 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  11. Ge-diode detector combined with crystal-diffraction spectrometer permits high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namenson, A. I.; Smither, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    Crystal-diffraction spectrometer, combined with a lithium-drifted Ge-diode detector, performs high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy on the complicated neutron-capture gamma ray spectra. The system is most useful in the 1-3 MeV energy range and improves the signal to background ratio.

  12. Nonthermal processes around collapsed objects: High energy gamma ray sources in the radio sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.; Ruderman, Malvin; Applegate, James H.; Becker, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    In our proposal responding to the initial Guest Observer NRA for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, 'Nonthermal Processes Around Collapsed Objects: High Energy Gamma Ray Sources in the Radio Sky', we stated that 'At high energies - the identity of the principal Galactic source population remains unknown' although the 'one certain source of high energy emission is young radio pulsars'. These two statements remain true, although at this writing, eighteen months after the beginning of the Compton allsky survey, much of the gamma-ray data required to greatly extend our knowledge of the Galaxy's high energy emission has been collected. The thrust of the program supported by our grant was to collect and analyze a complementary set of data on the Milky Way at radio wavelengths in order to help identify the dominant Pop 1 component of the Galaxy's gamma ray sources, and to pursue theoretical investigations on the origins and emission mechanisms of young pulsars, the one component of this population identified to date. We summarize here our accomplishments under the grant. In Section 2, we describe our VLA surveys of the Galactic Plane along with the current status of the radio source catalogs derived therefrom; unfortunately, owing to the TDRSS antenna problem and subsequent extension of the Sky Survey, we were not able to carry out a comparison with the EGRET data directly, although everything is now in place to do so as soon as it becomes available. In Section 2, we summarize our progress on the theoretical side, including the substantial completion of a dissertation on pulsar origins and work on the high energy emission mechanisms of isolated pulsars. We list the personnel supported by the grant in section 4 and provide a complete bibliography of publications supported in whole or in part by the grant in the final section.

  13. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  14. High Energy Neutrinos and Cosmic-Rays From Low-Luminosity Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Ioka, Kunihito; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Nakamura, Takashi; /Kyoto U.

    2006-07-10

    The recently discovered gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060218/SN 2006aj is classified as an X-ray Flash with very long duration driven possibly by a neutron star. Since GRB 060218 is very near {approx} 140 Mpc and very dim, one-year observation by Swift suggests that the true rate of GRB 060218-like events might be very high so that such low luminosity GRBs (LL-GRBs) might form a different population of GRBs from the cosmological high luminosity GRBs (HL-GRBs). We found that the high energy neutrino background from such LL-GRBs could be comparable with or larger than that from HL-GRBs. If each neutrino event is detected by IceCube, later optical-infrared follow-up observations such as by Subaru could identify a Type Ibc supernova associated with LL-GRBs, even if gamma- and X-rays are not observed by Swift. This is in a sense a new window from neutrino astronomy, which might enable us to confirm the existence of LL-GRBs and to obtain information about their rate and origin. We also argue LL-GRBs as high energy gamma-ray and cosmic-ray sources.

  15. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bieberle, A.; Nehring, H.; Berger, R.; Arlit, M.; Haerting, H.-U.; Schubert, M.; Hampel, U.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated {sup 137}Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0 Degree-Sign (horizontal) to 90 Degree-Sign (vertical).

  16. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieberle, A.; Nehring, H.; Berger, R.; Arlit, M.; Härting, H.-U.; Schubert, M.; Hampel, U.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated 137Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0° (horizontal) to 90° (vertical).

  17. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOEpatents

    Friedrich, Stephan; , Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Labov, Simon E.

    2008-11-04

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  18. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies.

    PubMed

    Bieberle, A; Nehring, H; Berger, R; Arlit, M; Härting, H-U; Schubert, M; Hampel, U

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated (137)Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0° (horizontal) to 90° (vertical). PMID:23556806

  19. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2007-07-12

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected at GeV energies by EGRET and models predict emission at > 100 GeV. Milagro is a wide field (2 sr) high duty cycle (> 90%) ground based water Cherenkov detector that records extensive air showers in the energy range 100 GeV to 100 TeV. We have searched for very high energy emission from a sample of 106 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected since the beginning of 2000 by BATSE, BeppoSax, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift or the IPN. No evidence for emission from any of the bursts has been found and we present upper limits from these bursts.

  20. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  1. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons.

  2. Modeling high-energy gamma-rays from the Fermi Bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Splettstoesser, Megan

    2015-09-17

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 55° in galactic latitude and 20°-30° in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields- both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to second order Fermi acceleration. I compare the analytical solutions of the proton spectrum to a numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution to the transport equation converges to the analytical solution in all cases. The gamma-ray spectrum due to proton-proton interaction is compared to Fermi Bubble data (from Ackermann et al. 2014), and I find that second order Fermi acceleration is a good fit for the gamma-ray spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles at low energies with an injection source term of S = 1.5 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹. I find that a non-steady-state solution to the gamma-ray spectrum with an injection source term of S = 2 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹ matches the bubble data at high energies.

  3. Radiation studies of optical interferometric modulators with fast neutrons and high energy gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Radeka, V. ); Bulmer, C.H.; Burns, W.K. )

    1991-11-01

    The possibility of using Ti : LiNbO{sub 3} and single mode fibers for nuclear particle detection and transmission in large-scale machines, such as Superconducting Super Collider, calls for a detailed radiation damage study. In this report, we present radiation studies on Ti : LiNbO{sub 3} Mach-Zehnder interferometric optical modulators with fast neutrons and high energy Gamma-rays.

  4. New drift chamber technology for high energy gamma-ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; Cuddapah, Rajani

    1990-01-01

    Work to develop a low-power amplifier and discriminator for use on space qualifiable drift chambers is discussed. Consideration is given to the goals of the next generation of high-energy gamma-ray telescope design and to how the goals can be achieved using xenon gas drift chambers. The design and construction of a low power drift chamber amplifier and discriminator are described, and the design of a quad-time-to-amplitude converter is outlined.

  5. Determination of impurities in (124)I samples by high resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, M C M; da Silva, R L; Delgado, J U; Poledna, R; de Araújo, M T F; Laranjeira, A S; de Veras, E; Braghirolli, A M S; dos Santos, G R; Lopes, R T

    2016-03-01

    (124)I is a radionuclide used in the diagnosis of tumors. The National Health Agency requires identification and activity measurement of impurities. Using gamma spectrometry with an efficiency calibrated high-purity germanium detector, impurities (125)I and (126)I in an (1)(24)I production sample were identified. Activity ratios of (125)I and (126)I to (124)I were approximately 0.5% and 98%, respectively. PMID:26653211

  6. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    A high resolution X-ray spectrometer and large area phoswich detector were designed and co-aligned in a common elevation mounting in order to measure solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma ray emission in the 13 to 600 KeV energy range from a balloon. The instrument is described and results obtained for the Crab Nebula, the supernova remnant Cas A, and the Sun are discussed and analyzed.

  7. Kosmos 856 and Kosmos 914 measurements of high-energy diffuse gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinkin, L.F.; Nagornykh, Y.I.

    1982-09-01

    The measurements by the Kosmos 856 and Kosmos 914 satellites of diffuse cosmic ..gamma.. rays with photon energies above 100 MeV are discussed. Integrated energy spectra for the 100--4000 MeV energy range are given for galactic lattitudes Vertical BarbVertical Bar< or =30/sup 0/ and Vertical BarbVertical Bar>30/sup 0/. The form of the spectra suggests that at high lattitudes there may still be some contribution from the galactic component.

  8. Ground-based detectors in very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Naurois, Mathieu; Mazin, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Following the discovery of the cosmic rays by Victor Hess in 1912, more than 70 years and numerous technological developments were needed before an unambiguous detection of the first very-high-energy gamma-ray source in 1989 was made. Since this discovery, the field on very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy experienced a true revolution: a second, then a third generation of instruments were built, observing the atmospheric cascades from the ground, either through the atmospheric Cherenkov light they comprise, or via the direct detection of the charged particles they carry. Present arrays, 100 times more sensitive than the pioneering experiments, have detected a large number of astrophysical sources of various types, thus opening a new window on the non-thermal Universe. New, even more sensitive instruments are currently being built; these will allow us to explore further this fascinating domain. In this article we describe the detection techniques, the history of the field and the prospects for the future of ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. xml:lang="fr"

  9. High-energy gamma rays in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Implications for risk and W{sub R}

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.

    1995-12-01

    Based on the DS86 dosimetry system, nearly all of the dose to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was due to unusually high-energy gamma rays, predominantly in the 2- to 5-MeV range. These high energies resulted in part from neutron capture gamma rays as the bomb neutrons penetrated large distances of air. Because of the inverse relationship between energy and biological effectiveness, these high-energy gamma rays are expected to be substantially less effective in producing biological damage than the radiations commonly used in radiobiology and risk assessment. This observation has implications for radiation protection and risk assessment.

  10. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  11. Unraveling the high-energy emission components of gamma-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabalza, V.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Aharonian, F.; Khangulyan, D.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The high and very high energy spectrum of gamma-ray binaries has become a challenge for all theoretical explanations since the detection of powerful, persistent GeV emission from LS 5039 and LS I +61 303 by Fermi/LAT. The spectral cutoff at a few GeV indicates that the GeV component and the fainter, hard TeV emission above 100 GeV are not directly related. Aims: We explore the possible origins of these two emission components in the framework of a young, non-accreting pulsar orbiting the massive star, and initiating the non-thermal emission through the interaction of the stellar and pulsar winds. Methods: The pulsar/stellar wind interaction in a compact-orbit binary gives rise to two potential locations for particle acceleration: the shocks at the head-on collision of the winds and the termination shock caused by Coriolis forces on scales larger than the binary separation. We explore the suitability of these two locations to host the GeV and TeV emitters, respectively, through the study of their non-thermal emission along the orbit. We focus on the application of this model to LS 5039 given its well-determined stellar wind with respect to other gamma-ray binaries. Results: The application of the proposed model to LS 5039 indicates that these two potential emitter locations provide the necessary conditions for reproduction of the two-component high-energy gamma-ray spectrum of LS 5039. In addition, the ambient postshock conditions required at each of the locations are consistent with recent hydrodynamical simulations. Conclusions: The scenario based on the interaction of the stellar and pulsar winds is compatible with the GeV and TeV emission observed from gamma-ray binaries with unknown compact objects, such as LS 5039 and LS I +61 303.

  12. Development of a Broad High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescope using Silicon Strip Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.

    1998-01-01

    The research effort has led to the development and demonstration of technology to enable the design and construction of a next-generation high-energy gamma-ray telescope that operates in the pair-production regime (E greater than 10 MeV). In particular, the technology approach developed is based on silicon-strip detector technology. A complete instrument concept based on this technology for the pair-conversion tracker and the use of CsI(T1) crystals for the calorimeter is now the baseline instrument concept for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission. GLAST is NASA's proposed high-energy gamma-ray mission designed to operate in the energy range from 10 MeV to approximately 300 GeV. GLAST, with nearly 100 times the sensitivity of EGRET, operates through pair conversion of gamma-rays and measurement of the direction and energy of the resulting e (+) - e (-) shower. The baseline design, developed with support from NASA includes a charged particle anticoincidence shield, a tracker/converter made of thin sheets of high-Z material interspersed with Si strip detectors, a CsI calorimeter and a programmable data trigger and acquisition system. The telescope is assembled as an array of modules or towers. Each tower contains elements of the tracker, calorimeter, and anticoincidence system. As originally proposed, the telescope design had 49 modules. In the more optimized design that emerged at the end of the grant period the individual modules are larger and the total number in the GLAST array is 25. Also the calorimeter design was advanced substantially to the point that it has a self-contained imaging capability, albeit much cruder than the tracker.

  13. Early results utilizing high-energy fission product (gamma) rays to detect fissionable material in cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D R; Accatino, M R; Bernstein, A; Church, J A; Descalle, M A; Gosnell, T B; Hall, J M; Loshak, A; Manatt, D R; Mauger, G J; McDowell, M; Moore, T M; Norman, E B; Pohl, B A; Pruet, J A; Petersen, D C; Walling, R S; Weirup, D L; Prussin, S G

    2004-09-30

    A concept for detecting the presence of special nuclear material ({sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu) concealed in intermodal cargo containers is described. It is based on interrogation with a pulsed beam of 7 MeV neutrons that produce fission events and their {beta}-delayed neutron emission or {beta}-delayed high-energy {gamma}-radiation between beam pulses provide the detection signature. Fission product {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays above 3 MeV are nearly ten times more abundant than {beta}-delayed neutrons and are distinct from natural radioactivity and from nearly all of the induced activity in a normal cargo. Detector backgrounds and potential interferences with the fission signature radiation have been identified and quantified. An important goal in the US is the detection of nuclear weapons or special nuclear material (SNM) concealed in intermodal cargo containers. This must be done with high detection probability, low false alarm rates, and without impeding commerce, i.e. about one minute for an inspection. The concept for inspection has been described before and its components are now being evaluated. While normal radiations emitted from plutonium may allow its detection, the majority of {sup 235}U {gamma} ray emission is at 186 keV, is readily attenuated by cargo, and thus not a reliable detection signature for passive detection. Delayed neutron detection following a neutron or photon beam pulse has been used successfully to detect lightly or unshielded SNM targets. While delayed neutrons can be easily distinguished from beam neutrons they have relatively low yield in fission, approximately 0.008 per fission in {sup 239}Pu and 0.017 per fission in {sup 235}U, and are rapidly attenuated in hydrogenous materials making that technique unreliable when challenged by thick hydrogenous cargo overburden. They propose detection of {beta}-delayed high-energy {gamma} radiation as a more robust signature characteristic of SNM.

  14. Monte Carlo Simulations of Ultra-High Energy Resolution Gamma Detectors for Nuclear Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Robles, A; Drury, O B; Friedrich, S

    2009-08-19

    Ultra-high energy resolution superconducting gamma-ray detectors can improve the accuracy of non-destructive analysis for unknown radioactive materials. These detectors offer an order of magnitude improvement in resolution over conventional high purity germanium detectors. The increase in resolution reduces errors from line overlap and allows for the identification of weaker gamma-rays by increasing the magnitude of the peaks above the background. In order to optimize the detector geometry and to understand the spectral response function Geant4, a Monte Carlo simulation package coded in C++, was used to model the detectors. Using a 1 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber and a monochromatic gamma source, different absorber geometries were tested. The simulation was expanded to include the Cu block behind the absorber and four layers of shielding required for detector operation at 0.1 K. The energy spectrum was modeled for an Am-241 and a Cs-137 source, including scattering events in the shielding, and the results were compared to experimental data. For both sources the main spectral features such as the photopeak, the Compton continuum, the escape x-rays and the backscatter peak were identified. Finally, the low energy response of a Pu-239 source was modeled to assess the feasibility of Pu-239 detection in spent fuel. This modeling of superconducting detectors can serve as a guide to optimize the configuration in future spectrometer designs.

  15. VERY HIGH ENERGY OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH STACEE

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, A.; Ong, R. A.; Ball, J.; Carson, J. E.; Zweerink, J.; Williams, D. A.; Aune, T.; Covault, C. E.; Driscoll, D. D.; Fortin, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hanna, D. S.; Kildea, J.; Lindner, T.; Mueller, C.; Ragan, K.

    2010-10-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions known in the universe. Sensitive measurements of the high-energy spectra of GRBs can place important constraints on the burst environments and radiation processes. Until recently, there were no observations during the first few minutes of GRB afterglows in the energy range between 30 GeV and {approx}1 TeV. With the launch of the Swift GRB Explorer in late 2004, GRB alerts and localizations within seconds of the bursts became available. The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) was a ground-based, gamma-ray telescope with an energy threshold of {approx}150 GeV for sources at zenith. At the time of Swift's launch, STACEE was in a rare position to provide >150 GeV follow-up observations of GRBs as fast as three minutes after the burst alert. In addition, STACEE performed follow-up observations of several GRBs that were localized by the HETE-2 and INTEGRAL satellites. Between 2002 June and 2007 July, STACEE made follow-up observations of 23 GRBs. Upper limits are placed on the high-energy gamma-ray fluxes from 21 of these bursts.

  16. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baerwald, Philipp; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2015-03-01

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because (a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and (b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space - unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  17. Deficits in high- (>60 Hz) gamma-band oscillations during visual processing in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grützner, Christine; Wibral, Michael; Sun, Limin; Rivolta, Davide; Singer, Wolf; Maurer, Konrad; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Current theories of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia have focused on abnormal temporal coordination of neural activity. Oscillations in the gamma-band range (>25 Hz) are of particular interest as they establish synchronization with great precision in local cortical networks. However, the contribution of high gamma (>60 Hz) oscillations toward the pathophysiology is less established. To address this issue, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data from 16 medicated patients with chronic schizophrenia and 16 controls during the perception of Mooney faces. MEG data were analysed in the 25–150 Hz frequency range. Patients showed elevated reaction times and reduced detection rates during the perception of upright Mooney faces while responses to inverted stimuli were intact. Impaired processing of Mooney faces in schizophrenia patients was accompanied by a pronounced reduction in spectral power between 60–120 Hz (effect size: d = 1.26) which was correlated with disorganized symptoms (r = −0.72). Our findings demonstrate that deficits in high gamma-band oscillations as measured by MEG are a sensitive marker for aberrant cortical functioning in schizophrenia, suggesting an important aspect of the pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:23532620

  18. High photopeak efficiency gamma-ray detector for upcoming Laue Lens missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. J.; Dean, A. J.; Bird, A. J.

    2006-06-01

    We present the design for a new detector configuration, specifically tailored to suit the needs of prospective Laue Lens Gamma-ray astronomy missions in the 10keV to 1MeV energy range. A Laue Lens uses transmission diffraction through crystal planes to focus the incoming gamma-rays. Diffraction is highly energy dependant and in order to recreate high resolution images, very accurate measurements of the total energy of the incident photon are necessary, as well as good spatial resolution. The aim is to absorb all the Compton scattered products of the incoming photons. The design uses a cavity geometry with the main germanium pixilated imaging detector embedded position sensitive cavity. The germanium is then enclosed in a veto to reduce background and to clean the imaging of unwanted non-photopeak events. This allows the majority of backscattered photons to be captured producing a detector with a photopeak efficiency of ~90% at 511keV and millimetric spatial resolution. The detector system has the added advantage that it functions extremely efficiently as a gamma-ray polarimeter.

  19. The Third EGRET Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Chen, A. W.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Friedlander, D. P.; Hunter, S. D.; McDonald, L. M.; Sreekumar, P.; Thompson, D. J.; Jones, B. B.; Lin, Y. C.; Michelson, P. F.; Nolan, P. L.; Tompkins, W. F.; Kanbach, G.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Muecke, A.

    1998-01-01

    The third catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory includes data from 1991 April 22 to 1995 October 3 (Cycles 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the mission). In addition to including more data than the second EGRET catalog (Thompson et al. 1995) and its supplement (Thompson et al. 1996), this catalog uses completely reprocessed data (to correct a number of mostly minimal errors and problems). The 271 sources (E greater than 100 MeV) in the catalog include the single 1991 solar flare bright enough to be detected as a source, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one probable radio galaxy detection (Cen A), and 66 high-confidence identifications of blazars (BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, or unidentified flat-spectrum radio sources). In addition, 27 lower-confidence potential blazar identifications are noted. Finally, the catalog contains 170 sources not yet identified firmly with known objects, although potential identifications have been suggested for a number of those. A figure is presented that gives approximate upper limits for gamma-ray sources at any point in the sky, as well as information about sources listed in the second catalog and its supplement which do not appear in this catalog.

  20. The Third EGRET Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Chen, A. W.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Friedlander, D. P.; Hunter, S. D.; McDonald, L. M.; Sreekumar, P.; Thompson, D. J.; Jones, B. B.; Lin, Y. C.; Michelson, P. F.; Nolan, P. L.; Tompkins, W. F.; Kanbach, G.; Mayer-Hasselwander, A.; Muecke, A.

    1998-01-01

    The third catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory includes data from 1991 April 22 to 1995 October 3 (Cycles 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the mission). In addition to including more data than the second EGRET catalog and its supplement, this catalog uses completely reprocessed data (to correct a number of mostly minimal errors and problems). The 271 sources (E greater than 100 MeV) in the catalog include the single 1991 solar flare bright enough to be detected as a source, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one probable radio galaxy detection (Cen A), and 66 high-confidence identifications of blazars (BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, or unidentified flat-spectrum radio sources). In addition, 27 lower-confidence potential blazar identifications are noted. Finally, the catalog contains 170 sources not yet identified firmly with known objects, although potential identifications have been suggested for a number of those. A figure is presented that gives approximate upper limits for gamma-ray sources at any point in the sky, as well as information about sources listed in the second catalog and its supplement which do not appear in this catalog.

  1. Effect of particle size in the TL response of natural quartz sensitized with high gamma dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, A. B., Jr.; Guzzo, P. L.; Sullasi, H. L.; Khoury, H. J.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of particle size in the thermoluminescence (TL) response of natural quartz sensitized with high gamma dose. For this, fragments of a single crystal taken from the Solonópole district (Brazil) were crushed and classified into ten size fractions ranging from 38 μm to 5 mm. Aliquots of each size fraction were sensitized with 25 kGy of gamma dose of 60Co and heat-treated in a muffle furnace at 400oC. The non-sensitized samples were exposed to test doses between 50 Gy and 5 kGy and the sensitized samples were exposed to a unique test dose equal to 50 mGy. For non-sensitized samples, the TL peak near 325 °C increases with the particle size decreasing. However, in the case of sensitized samples, the TL output near 280 °C increases with the increasing of particle size up to mean grain size equal to 308 μm. Above 308 μm, an abrupt reduction in the TL intensity was noticed. These effects are discussed in relation to the specific surface area and the different interaction of high gamma doses with fine and coarse particles of quartz.

  2. Locating very high energy gamma ray sources with arc minute accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Harris, K.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.; Lawrence, M. A.; Lang, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of point-like sources were detected by the COS-B satellite, only two were unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of Very High Energy gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arc minute accuracy. This was demonstrated using Cerenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  3. Pure LiF nanophosphors for high exposures of gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. K.; Kumar, Satinder; Dogra, R.; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2012-06-05

    Nanocrystalline lithium fluoride (LiF) phosphors have been prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method at different pH values (7.0, 8.0, 9.0 and 10.00). The formation of nanocrystalline structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Thermoluminescence (TL) properties of LiF phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses of 10 Gy - 70 kGy have been further studied. The analysis of TL glow curve revealed the existence of three well resolved glow peaks, first low temperature peak at around 82 deg. C, second at 125 deg. C and third one at higher temperature around 303 deg. C. The LiF nano-crystallites synthesized at 8.00 pH with maximum TL sensitivity at studied gamma doses ranging from threshold to high exposures are potential candidate for dosimetry applications.

  4. SONGS - A high resolution imaging gamma-ray spectrometer for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Chase, L. F.; Kilner, J. R.; Sandie, W. G.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    The overall design and the instrumental features of the Space-Station Observer for Nuclear Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (SONGS) instrument are described. SONGS comprises an array of 19 two-segment n-type Ge detectors, which have the capability of determining the interaction site in either the upper or the lower segment or in both segments. The detectors provide high energy resolution of 1 keV at 100 keV and of 2 keV at 1 MeV. The close-packed Ge sensor array provides a natural sensitivity for the measurement of gamma ray polarization in the 100 keV to 1 MeV energy range, making it possible to obtain information on the structure of the magnetosphere of neutron stars and of the accretion disk of black holes.

  5. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Suehnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-15

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662 keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2 line pairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  6. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applied to bulk sample analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kosanke, K.L.; Koch, C.D.; Wilson, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A high resolution Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometer has been installed and made operational for use in routine bulk sample analysis by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) geochemical analysis department. The Ge(Li) spectrometer provides bulk sample analyses for potassium, uranium, and thorium that are superior to those obtained by the BFEC sodium iodide spectrometer. The near term analysis scheme permits a direct assay for uranium that corrects for bulk sample self-absorption effects and is independent of the uranium/radium disequilibrium condition of the sample. A more complete analysis scheme has been developed that fully utilizes the gamma-ray data provided by the Ge(Li) spectrometer and that more properly accounts for the sample self-absorption effect. This new analysis scheme should be implemented on the BFEC Ge(Li) spectrometer at the earliest date.

  7. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Sühnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-01

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2linepairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  8. High-energy gamma-rays from GRB X-ray flares

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. Y.; Li, Z.; Meszaros, P.

    2007-07-12

    The recent detection of X-ray flares during the afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) suggests an inner-engine origin, at radii inside the forward shock. There must be inverse Compton (IC) emission arising from such flare photons scattered by forward shock afterglow electrons when they are passing through the forward shock. We find that this IC emission produces high energy gamma-ray flares, which may be detected by AGILE, GLAST and ground-based TeV telescopes. The anisotropic IC scattering between flare photons and forward shock electrons does not affect the total IC component intensity, but cause a time delay of the IC component peak relative to the flare peak. We speculate that this IC component may already have been detected by EGRET from a very strong burst--GRB940217. Future observations by GLAST may help to distinguish whether X-ray flares originate from late central engine activity or from external shocks.

  9. Constraining the High-Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Racusin, J. L.; Sonbas, E.; Stamatikos, M.; Guirec, S.

    2012-01-01

    We examine 288 GRBs detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) that fell within the field-of-view of Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) during the first 2.5 years of observations, which showed no evidence for emission above 100 MeV. We report the photon flux upper limits in the 0.1-10 GeV range during the prompt emission phase as well as for fixed 30 s and 100 s integrations starting from the trigger time for each burst. We compare these limits with the fluxes that would be expected from extrapolations of spectral fits presented in the first GBM spectral catalog and infer that roughly half of the GBM-detected bursts either require spectral breaks between the GBM and LAT energy bands or have intrinsically steeper spectra above the peak of the nuF(sub v) spectra (E(sub pk)). In order to distinguish between these two scenarios, we perform joint GBM and LAT spectral fits to the 30 brightest GBM-detected bursts and find that a majority of these bursts are indeed softer above E(sub pk) than would be inferred from fitting the GBM data alone. Approximately 20% of this spectroscopic subsample show statistically significant evidence for a cut-off in their high-energy spectra, which if assumed to be due to gamma gamma attenuation, places limits on the maximum Lorentz factor associated with the relativistic outflow producing this emission. All of these latter bursts have maximum Lorentz factor estimates that are well below the minimum Lorentz factors calculated for LAT-detected GRBs, revealing a wide distribution in the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB outflows and indicating that LAT-detected bursts may represent the high end of this distribution.

  10. High Energy Observations of X-Ray Binaries and Gamma-Ray Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The report discusses the CGRO observation of X-ray binary systems and studies of gamma-ray blasars. Numerous authors have suggested mechanisms for particle acceleration within X-Ray Binary (XRB) systems. Among the acceleration mechanisms that have been applied are pulsar acceleration, shock acceleration at an accretion shock front, shock acceleration at a pulsar wind termination shock, plasma turbulence excited by the accretion flow, and a number of electrodynamic mechanisms. There are therefore many mechanisms which are capable of generating very energetic particles in the XRB environment. If the reports of TeV/PeV gamma-ray generation in XRBs are correct, then one can show that the accelerated particles must be hadrons and that the most likely gamma-ray production mechanism is the decay of collisionally-produced (or photoproduced) neutral pions. At these ultra-high energies, the emission is so strongly beamed that the target conditions are constrained by the requirement that the column depth be large enough to efficiently generate gamma-rays, but not so large that the gamma-rays are absorbed. These constraints naturally lead to models that explain the periodic, narrow duty-cycle pulses observed at TeV/PeV energies as arising from interactions with, either, the atmosphere of the binary companion, an accretion column, or an accretion disk. The production of these TeV/PeV gamma-rays by the decay of pions from "leading isobars" must also be accompanied by a more isotropic emission component in the EGRET energy band from the decay of slower pions (i.e. the "pionization" component). Since the attenuation of 35 MeV-1 GeV photons by photon-photon pair production is not likely to be significant in most XRBs, the TeV/PeV reports therefore strongly suggest sporadic emission in the EGRET energy band. One of the key unresolved issues for understanding AGN is the relationship between XBLs and RBLs.To test the "reunification" hypothesis, authors conducted a multiwavelength