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Sample records for high enery gamma

  1. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  2. Fourth Workshop on Science with the New Generation of High Energy Gamma-ray Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massai, Marco Maria; Omodei, Nicola; Spandre, Gloria

    I. Space-based telescope. Integral-4 years in orbit / P. Umbertini, P. Caraveo. The Suzaku mission / K. Yamaoka. The Swift mission: two years of operation / A. Moretti. Gamma-ray astrophysics with AGILE / F.Longo et al., The AGILE collaboration. The GLAST mission / J.E. McEnery -- II. Ground-based telescope. Recent results from CANGAROO / M. Mori for the CANGAROO team. The H.E.S.S. project / C. Masterson for the H.E.S.S. collaboration. The MAGIC experiment / N. Turini for the MAGIC collaboration. VERITAS: status and performance / J. Holder for the VERITAS collaboration -- III. Galactic variable sources. Galactic variable sky with EGRET and GLAST / S. Digel. Galactic variable sources observed with H.E.S.S. / N. Komin for the H.E.S.S collaboration. Gamma ray pulsars in the GLAST era / M. Razzano. Solving the riddle of unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources / P. Caraveo. Supernovae and gamma-ray burst / M. Della Valle. First cycle of MAGIC galactic observations / J. Cortina for the MAGIC collaboration. Gamma-rays and neutrinos from a SNR in the galactic center / V. Cavasinni, D. Grasso, L. Maccione. Solving GRBs and SGRs puzzles by precessing jets / D. Fargion, O. Lanciano, P. Oliva -- IV. Extragalactic sources. Multiwavelength observations and theories of blazers / G. Tosti. AGN observations with the MAGIC telescope / C. Bigongiari for the MAGIC collaboration. Gamma ray bursts/ L. Amati. X-rays and GeV flares in GRB light curves / A. Galli ... [et al.]. The highest energy emission from gamma ray bursts: MILAGRO's constraints and HAWC's potential / B. Dingus for the MILAGRO and HAWC collaborations. Observation of GRB with the MAGIC telescope / N. Galante, P. Piccioli for the MAGIC collaboration. GRB 060218 and the outliers with respect to the E-E correlation / G. Ghirlanda, G. Ghibellini -- V. Poster session. Study of the performance and calibration of the GLAST-LAT silicon tracker / M. Brigida, N. Giglietto, P. Spinelli. The online monitor for the GLAST

  3. Helios 2-Vela-Ariel 5 gamma-ray burst source position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Trainor, J.; Pizzichini, G.; Spizzichino, A.; Klebesadel, R.; Ricketts, M.; Helmken, H.

    1979-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst of January 28, 1976, one of 18 events thus far detected in interplanetary space with Helios 2, was also observed with the Vela 5A and 6A and the Ariel 5 satellites. A small source field is obtained from the intersection of the region derived from the observed time delays between Helios 2 and Vela 5A and 6A, with the source region independently found with the Ariel 5 X-ray detector. This area contains neither any steady X-ray source as scanned by HEAO 1 nor any previously cataloged X-ray, radio, or infrared sources, X-ray transients, quasars, Seyferts, globular clusters, flare stars, pulsars, white dwarfs, or high enery gamma-ray sources. The region is, however, within the source field of a gamma-ray transient observed in 1974 by Jacobson et al. (1978) which exhibited nuclear gamma-ray line structure.

  4. Exploring the High Energy Universe: GLAST Mission and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    GLAST, the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, is NASA's next-generation high-energy gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in Autumn 2007. GLAST will allow measurements of cosmic gamma-ray sources in the 10 MeV to 100 GeV energy band to be made with unprecedented sensitivity. Amongst its key scientific objectives are to understand particle acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei, Pulsars and Supernovae Remnants, to provide high resolution measurements of unidentified gamma-ray sources, to study transient high energy emission from objects such as gamma-ray bursts, and to probe Dark Matter and the early Universe. Dr. McEnery will present an overview of the GLAST mission and its scientific goals.

  5. High temperature spectral gamma well logging

    SciTech Connect

    Normann, R.A.; Henfling, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A high temperature spectral gamma tool has been designed and built for use in small-diameter geothermal exploration wells. Several engineering judgments are discussed regarding operating parameters, well model selection, and signal processing. An actual well log at elevated temperatures is given with spectral gamma reading showing repeatability.

  6. High energy gamma ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Michael Richard

    This thesis presents a design study into gamma ray collimation techniques for use in high energy radiation imaging devices for the nuclear industry. Such technology is required to provide information on the nature and location of isotopes within nuclear facilities that have reached the end of their useful life. The work has concentrated on the use of two different techniques, namely mechanical collimation using the Anger camera and electronic collimation using a Compton camera. The work has used computational models to evaluate the performance of such systems and thereby suggest optimal design parameters for use in prototype devices. Ray tracing models have been constructed to simulate both parallel hole and tapered bore diverging collimators. Investigations have been carried out to measure the effects on the spatial resolution of changing various design parameters of the collimators. The effects of varying the hole size, septal thickness and collimator length over a range of source to collimator distances likely to be encountered in an industrial scenario have been examined. Some new insight into the nature of the point spread function of mechanical collimators has been gained and the limitations of the conventional analytical approach to collimator evaluation have been highlighted. Modifications to the standard equations used in collimator design have subsequently been suggested. An analytical description of tapered bore collimators has been derived. Monte Carlo models have been developed to model a single scatter Compton camera. Germanium, silicon and sodium iodide have been investigated as candidates for the scattering detector in such a device. A model of a complete ring array Compton camera system has been used to evaluate performance. The data from the Monte Carlo model has been reconstructed to form images. The quality of the images generated have then been compared with images obtained from parallel hole and focusing mechanical collimators.

  7. Exploring the High Energy Universe: GLAST Mission and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    GLAST, the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, is NASA's next-generation high-energy gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in Autumn 2007. GLAST will allow measurements of cosmic gamma-ray sources in t he 10 MeV to 100 GeV energy band to be made with unprecedented sensi tivity. Amongst its key scientific objectives are to understand part icle acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei, Pulsars and Supernovae Remnants, to provide high resolution measurements of unidentified ga mma-ray sources, to study transient high energy emission from objects such as gamma-ray bursts, and to probe Dark Matter and the early Uni verse. Dr. McEnery will present an overview of the GLAST mission and its scientific goals.

  8. High temperature creep behavior of single crystal gamma prime and gamma alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Diaz, J. O.; Miner, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    The creep behavior of single crystals of gamma-prime and gamma alloys were investigated and compared to the response of two-phase superalloys tested previously. High temperature deformation in the gamma alloys was characteristic of a climb-controlled mechanism, whereas the gamma-prime based materials exhibited glide-controlled creep behavior. The superalloys were much more creep resistant than their constituent phases, which indicates the importance of the gamma/gamma-prime interface as a barrier for dislocation motion during creep.

  9. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

  10. Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Paula M

    2007-05-15

    Very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has undergone a transformation in the last few years, with telescopes of unprecedented sensitivity having greatly expanded the source catalogue. Such progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much more likely than previously. This paper describes the facilities currently operating and their chances for detecting gamma-ray bursts, and reviews predictions for VHE gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts. Results to date are summarized. PMID:17293337

  11. Very high energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results in ground based very high energy gamma ray astronomy are reviewed. The various modes of the atmospheric Cerenkov technique are described, and the importance of cosmic ray rejection methods is stressed. The positive detections of the Crab pulsar that suggest a very flat spectrum and time-variable pulse phase are discussed. Observations of other pulsars (particularly Vela) suggest these features may be general. Evidence that a 4.8 hr modulated effect was detected from Cyg X-3 is strengthened in that the exact period originally proposed agrees well with a recent determination of the X-ray period. The southern sky observations are reviewed, and the significance of the detection of an active galaxy (NGC 5128) is considered for source models and future observations.

  12. Analysis of High-Fold Gamma Data

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, C.J.; Cromaz, M.; Radford, D.C.

    1998-08-10

    Historically, {gamma}-{gamma} and {gamma}-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence spectra were utilized to build nuclear level schemes. With the development of large detector arrays, it has became possible to analyze higher fold coincidence data sets. This paper briefly reports on software to analyze 4-fold coincidence data sets that allows creation of 4-fold histograms (hypercubes) of at least 1024 channels per side (corresponding to a 43 gigachannel data space) that will fit onto a few gigabytes of disk space, and extraction of triple-gated spectra in a few seconds. Future detector arrays may have even higher efficiencies, and detect an many as 15 or 20 {gamma} rays simultaneously; such data will require very different algorithms for storage and analysis. Difficulties inherent in the analysis of such data are discussed, and two possible new solutions are presented, namely adaptive list-mode systems and list-list-mode storage.

  13. High-energy gamma rays from the intense 1993 January 31 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommer, M.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fishman, G. J.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Hurley, K.; Kanbach, G.

    1994-01-01

    The intense gamma-ray burst of 1993 January 31 was detected by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory. Sixteen gamma rays above 30 MeV were imaged in the telescope when only 0.04 gamma rays were expected by chance. Two of these gamma rays have energies of approximately 1 GeV, and the five bin spectrum of the 16 events is fitted by a power law of photon spectral index -2.0 +/- 0.4. The high-energy emission extends for at least 25 s. The most probable direction for this burst is determined from the directions of the 16 gamma rays observed by Egret and also by requiring the position to lie on annulus derived by the Interplanetary Network.

  14. MOLE: A new high-energy gamma-ray diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, M. J.; Chang, B.

    1992-01-01

    Continued interest in high-energy gamma rays associated with fusion reactions has motivated an ongoing search for simple, effective measurement techniques. Past experiments have measured 16.7-MeV gamma rays with Compton-magnetic spectrometers. Some measurements have been performed with threshold Cherenkov detectors with enhanced sensitivity to high-energy (gamma) rays. The Compton spectrometers work quite well, but they require extensive calibrations and tend to be expensive and cumbersome. The threshold Cherenkov detectors are simpler to calibrate and physically compact, but have poor spectral definition and are vulnerable to background signals. This report describes a new type of (gamma)-ray detector, the MOLE, that may retain the simplicity of a threshold Cherenkov detector while still having sufficient energy discrimination to be effective for measuring high-energy (gamma)-rays in the presence of lower-energy (gamma)-ray fluxes.

  15. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  16. GAMMA: a high performance dataflow database machine

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, D.J.; Gerber, R.H.; Graefe, G.; Heytens, M.L.; Kumar, K.B.; Muralikrishna, M.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper, the design, implementation techniques, and initial performance evaluation of Gamma are presented. Gamma is a new relational database machine that exploits dataflow query processing techniques. Ganma is a fully operational prototype consisting of 20 VAX 11/750 computers. The design of Gamma is based on an earlier multiprocessor database machine prototype (DIRECT) and several years of subsequent research on the problems raised by the DIRECT prototype. In addition to demonstrating that parallelism can really be made to work in a database machine context, the Gamma prototype shows how parallelism can be controlled with minimal control overhead through a combination of the use of algorithms based on hashing and the pipelining of data between processes. Except for 2 messages to initiate each operator of a query tree and 1 message when the operator terminates, the execution of a query is entirely self-scheduling. 52 refs., 12 figs.

  17. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Johnson, M; Navratil, P

    2007-09-28

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved.

  18. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  19. Monte Carlo calibration of the SMM gamma ray spectrometer for high energy gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Reppin, C.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft was primarily designed and calibrated for nuclear gamma ray line measurements, but also has a high energy mode which allows the detection of gamma rays at energies above 10 MeV and solar neutrons above 20 MeV. The GRS response has been extrapolated until now for high energy gamma rays from an early design study employing Monte Carlo calculations. The response to 50 to 600 MeV solar neutrons was estimated from a simple model which did not consider secondary charged particles escaping into the veto shields. In view of numerous detections by the GRS of solar flares emitting high energy gamma rays, including at least two emitting directly detectable neutrons, the calibration of the high energy mode in the flight model has been recalculated by the use of more sophisticated Monte Carlo computer codes. New results presented show that the GRS response to gamma rays above 20 MeV and to neutrons above 100 MeV is significantly lower than the earlier estimates.

  20. High-pressure xenon detectors for gamma-ray spectrometry

    PubMed

    Dmitrenko; Gratchev; Ulin; Uteshev; Viasik

    2000-03-01

    The main results of long-term research on compressed xenon detector properties conducted at the laboratory of cosmic physics of MEPhI are given along with a description of the latest gamma-ray spectrometers based on this work. It is shown that using xenon as working substance, it is possible to create a gamma-ray spectrometer with high energy resolution. The construction and the main physical, technical and operation performances of xenon gamma-ray spectrometers based on ionization chambers of various configurations are described. For a gamma-ray spectrometer with a cylindrical ionization chamber and shielding grid, an energy resolution of about 14 keV (10 keV intrinsic resolution) for gamma-ray line of 662 keV is obtained. The characteristics of these detectors allow one to apply them in various fields of science and engineering, moreover, their good spectrometric properties provide the opportunity to use them for metrology measurements. PMID:10724434

  1. Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamae, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Watanabe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Building on the success of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will make a major step in the study of such subjects as blazars, gamma Ray bursts, the search for dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, diffuse radiation, and unidentified high energy sources. The instrument will be built on new and mature detector technologies such as silicon strip detectors, low-power low-noise LSI, and a multilevel data acquisition system. GLAST is in the research and development phase, and one full tower (of 25 total) is now being built in collaborating institutes. The prototype tower will be tested thoroughly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the fall of 1999.

  2. Spectrometer of high energy gamma quantums

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokhintsev, I. D.; Melioranskiy, A. S.; Kalinkin, L. F.; Nagornykh, Y. I.; Pryakhin, Y. A.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed description of the apparatus GG-2M is given. The spectrometer contains a Cerenkov and scintillation (including anticoincidence) counter. The energies of the gamma quantums are measured by a shower calorimeter, in which scintillation counters are used in the capacity of detectors. Results are given for tuning the device on mu-mesons of cosmic rays. The data of physical tuning allow more reliable interpretation of the results of measurements which are received on the satellites.

  3. Measurement and analysis of quadruple ({alpha}{gamma}{gamma}) angular correlations for high spin states of {sup 24}Mg.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedenhover, I.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Lister, C. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Amro, H.; Caggiano, J.; Heinz, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Siem, S.; Sonzogni, A.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Devlin, M.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.

    2000-10-30

    The high-lying, {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 24}Mg have been studied by measuring the complete decay path of {alpha} and {gamma} emissions using five segmented Silicon detectors in conjunction with GAMMASPHERE. The authors analyzed the ({alpha}{gamma}) triple angular correlations and, for the first time, ({alpha}{gamma}{gamma}) quadruple correlations. The data analysis is based on a new Fourier transformation technique. The power of the technique is demonstrated.

  4. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1992-02-01

    The second reflector (project GRANITE) is on schedule. At present (January 1992) it and the 10 m reflector are obtaining stereoscopic views of gamma-ray air showers from the Crab Nebula which verify the expected performance of the twin reflector telescopes. With the additional improvements of the upgrade (a pending DOE proposal) the twin reflectors should reach a limiting intensity of 1% that of the Crab. The astonishing early results from the EGRET detector aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory indicate that distant quasars (powered by supermassive black holes) are active at GeV energies. The Whipple instruments are poised to see if such behavior continues above 100 GeV, as well as perform sensitive observations of previously reported GeV (Geminga) and TeV (Hercules X-1, etc.) sources. In addition to observing sources and identifying their location in the sky to one arcminute, experiments are planned to search for WIMPS in the mass range 0.1 to 1 TeV, and to determine the abundance of anti-protons in the cosmic rays. The successful performance of the stereoscopic reflectors demonstrates the feasibility of the concept of arrays of Cherenkov receivers. Design studies for a much larger array (CASITA) are just beginning.

  5. Enery Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Zwitter; Phillip Nash; Xiaoyan Xu; Chadwick Johnson

    2011-03-31

    This is the final technical report for the Department of Energy NETL project NT01931 Energy Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications. Titanium has been identified as one of the key materials with the required strength that can reduce the weight of automotive components and thereby reduce fuel consumption. Working with newly developed sources of titanium powder, Webster-Hoff will develop the processing technology to manufacture low cost vehicle components using the single press/single sinter techniques developed for iron based powder metallurgy today. Working with an automotive or truck manufacturer, Webster-Hoff will demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing a press and sinter titanium component for a vehicle application. The project objective is two-fold, to develop the technology for manufacturing press and sinter titanium components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle application. The lowest cost method for converting metal powder into a net shape part is the Powder Metallurgy Press and Sinter Process. The method involves compaction of the metal powder in a tool (usually a die and punches, upper and lower) at a high pressure (up to 60 TSI or 827 MPa) to form a green compact with the net shape of the final component. The powder in the green compact is held together by the compression bonds between the powder particles. The sinter process then converts the green compact to a metallurgically bonded net shape part through the process of solid state diffusion. The goal of this project is to expand the understanding and application of press and sinter technology to Titanium Powder applications, developing techniques to manufacture net shape Titanium components via the press and sinter process. In addition, working with a vehicle manufacturer, demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle. This is not a research program, but rather a

  6. Very high energy gamma ray extension of GRO observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1992-01-01

    This has been an exiciting year for high energy gamma-ray astronomy, both from space and from ground-based observatories. It has been a particularly active period for the Whipple Observatory gamma-ray group. In phase 1 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), there has not been too much opportunity for overlapping observations with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) and the other GRO telescopes; however, significant progress was made in the development of data analysis techniques and in improving the sensitivity of the technique which will have direct application in correlative observations in phase 2. Progress made during the period 1 Jul. 1991 - 31 Dec. 1991 is presented.

  7. Multiwavelength observations of unidentified high energy gamma ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1993-01-01

    As was the case for COS B, the majority of high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument on GRO are not immediately identifiable with cataloged objects at other wavelengths. These persistent gamma-ray sources are, next to the gamma-ray bursts, the least understood objects in the universe. Even a rudimentary understanding of their nature awaits identifications and follow-up work at other wavelengths to tell us what they are. The as yet unidentified sources are potentially the most interesting, since they may represent unrecognized new classes of astronomical objects, such as radio-quiet pulsars or new types of active galactic nuclei (AGN's). This two-year investigation is intended to support the analysis, correlation, and theoretical interpretation of data that we are obtaining at x ray, optical, and radio wavelengths in order to render the gamma-ray data interpretable. According to plan, in the first year concentration was on the identification and study of Geminga. The second year will be devoted to studies of similar unidentified gamma-ray sources which will become available in the first EGRET catalogs. The results obtained so far are presented in the two papers which are reproduced in the Appendix. In these papers, we discuss the pulse profiles of Geminga, the geometry and efficiency of the magnetospheric accelerator, the distance to Geminga, the implications for theories of polar cap heating, the effect of the magnetic field on the surface emission and environment of the neutron star, and possible interpretations of a radio-quiet Geminga. The implications of the other gamma-ray pulsars which were discovered to have high gamma-ray efficiency are also discussed, and the remaining unidentified COS B sources are attributed to a population of efficient gamma-ray sources, some of which may be radio quiet.

  8. High energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborra, Irene

    2016-05-01

    The diffuse high-energy neutrino emission from long and short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is studied within the fireball emission model. By requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions, we find that GRBs could contribute up to a few percents to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, if the latter has a diffuse origin. Our findings suggest that larger exposure is mandatory to detect neutrinos from GRBs in future stacking searches.

  9. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  10. The very-high-energy gamma-ray sky.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy has emerged as a truly observational discipline, with many detected sources representing different galactic and extragalactic source populations-supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, giant molecular clouds, star formation regions, compact binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. It is expected that observations with the next generation of stereoscopic arrays of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes over a very broad energy range from 10(10) to 10(15) electron volts will dramatically increase the number of very-high-energy gamma-ray sources, thus having a huge impact on the development of astrophysics, cosmology, and particle astrophysics. PMID:17204642

  11. Improved Gamma-Ray Flux Monitoring at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source (HIGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Robert

    2002-10-01

    An improved gamma-ray beam flux monitor has been built for use at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source at the Duke University Free Electron Laser Laboratories. It is important to know precisely the gamma-ray flux of this beam. It is also important to limit beam attenuation to a minimum while making an accurate flux measurement. The improvements from a more accurate gamma-ray intensity monitor will allow for more precise cross-section measurements and will be valuable to many of the experiments conducted at HIGS. The detector consists of a thin scintillator optically coupled to two photomultiplier tubes, a thin foil, and then another thin scintillator attached to two photomultiplier tubes. The front scintillator is used to veto counts from charged particles emitted upstream in the beam-line. The preliminary tests of the monitor show very promising results and after slight adjustments and calibrations, the detector will be ready to acquire accurate beam intensity measurements while contributing very little to beam attenuation.

  12. (Very)-high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics: The future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Several projects planned or proposed can significantly expand our knowledge of the high-energy Universe in gamma rays. Construction of the Cherenkov telescope array CTA is started, and other detectors are planned which will use the reconstruction of extensive air showers. This report explores the near future, and possible evolutions in a longer term.

  13. (Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses: quasielastic scattering studies on glycerol; gamma-ray scattering from alkali halides; lattice dynamics in metals; Moessbauer neutron scattering, x-ray diffraction, and macroscopic studies of high {Tc} superconductors containing tungsten; NiAl scattering studies; and atomic interference factors and nuclear Casimir effect.

  14. High-energy gamma radiation from Geminga observed by EGRET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K. T. S.; Chiang, J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fierro, J. M.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kwok, P. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has carried out extensive studies of the gamma-ray source Geminga. Following the detection of pulsed X-rays (Halpern and Holt 1992) from Geminga, Bertsch et al. (1992) reported the same 237 ms periodicity to be visible in the EGRET data. A full analysis of the Geminga source shows that the energy spectrum is compatible with a power law with a spectral index of -1.50 +/- 0.08 between 30 MeV and 2 GeV. A falloff relative to the power law is observed for energies above 2 GeV. Phase-resolved spectra also show power laws with high-energy cutoffs, but with significant variation of the spectral index with phase. No unpulsed emission is observed. No evidence for time variation was found within the EGRET observations.

  15. High-energy gamma-ray sources of cosmological origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Pierre; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann

    2016-06-01

    The current generation of instruments in gamma-ray astrophysics launched a new era in the search for a dark matter signal in the high-energy sky. Such searches are said indirect, in the sense that the presence of a dark matter particle is inferred from the detection of products of its pair-annihilation or decay. They have recently started to probe the natural domain of existence for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), the favorite dark matter candidates today. In this article, we review the basic framework for indirect searches and we present a status of current limits obtained with gamma-ray observations. We also devote a section to another possible class of cosmological gamma-ray sources, primordial black holes, also considered as a potential constituent of dark matter. xml:lang="fr"

  16. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  17. PANGU: A high resolution gamma-ray space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin; Su, Meng; Bravar, Alessandro; Chang, Jin; Fan, Yizhong; Pohl, Martin; Walter, Roland

    2014-07-01

    We describe the instrument concept of a high angular resolution telescope dedicated to the sub-GeV (from >=10 MeV to >=1 GeV) gamma-ray photon detection. This mission, named PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit), has been suggested as a candidate for the joint small mission between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). A wide range of topics of both astronomy and fundamental physics can be attacked with PANGU, covering Galactic and extragalactic cosmic-ray physics, extreme physics of a variety of extended (e.g. supernova remnants, galaxies, galaxy clusters) and compact (e.g. black holes, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts) objects, solar and terrestrial gamma-ray phenomena, and searching for dark matter decay and/or annihilation signature etc. The unprecedented point spread function can be achieved with a pair-production telescope with a large number of thin active tracking layers to precisely reconstruct the pair-produced electron and positron tracks. Scintillating fibers or thin silicon micro-strip detectors are suitable technology for such a tracker. The energy measurement is achieved by measuring the momentum of the electrons and positrons through a magnetic field. The innovated spectrometer approach provides superior photon pointing resolution, and is particular suitable in the sub-GeV range. The level of tracking precision makes it possible to measure the polarization of gamma rays, which would open up a new frontier in gamma-ray astronomy. The frequent full-sky survey at sub-GeV with PANGU's large field of view and significantly improved point spread function would provide crucial information to GeV-TeV astrophysics for current/future missions including Fermi, DAMPE, HERD, and CTA, and other multi-wavelength telescopes.

  18. Recent high energy gamma-ray results from SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Ogelman, H. B.; Ozel, M. E.; Tumer, T.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy due to the results from SAS-2 have focused on two areas. First, the emission from the plane of the Galaxy is the dominant feature in the gamma-ray sky. The galactic latitude and longitude distributions are consistent with the concept that the high-energy radiation originates from cosmic rays interacting with interstellar matter, and the measurements support a galactic origin for cosmic rays. Second, searches of the SAS-2 data for emission from localized sources have shown three strong discrete gamma-ray sources: the Crab nebula and PSR 0531 + 21, the Vela supernova remnant and PSR 0833-45, and a source near galactic coordinates 193 deg longitude, +3 deg latitude, which does not appear to be associated with other known celestial objects. Evidence has also been found for pulsed gamma-ray emission from two other radio pulsars, PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46. A localized source near longitudes 76-80 deg may be associated with the X-ray source Cyg X-3.

  19. PANGU: A High Resolution Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng

    2014-08-01

    We propose a high angular resolution telescope dedicated to the sub-GeV gamma-ray astronomy as a candidate for the CAS-ESA joint small mission. This mission, called PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit), will open up a unique window of electromagnetic spectrum that has never been explored with great precision. A wide range of topics of both astronomy and fundamental physics can be attacked with a telescope that has an angular resolution about one order of magnitude better than the currently operating Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) in the sub-GeV range, covering galactic and extragalactic cosmic-ray physics, extreme physics of a variety of extended (e.g. supernova remnants, galaxies, galaxy clusters) and compact (e.g. black holes, pulsars, gamma-ray bursts) objects, solar and terrestrial gamma-ray phenomena, and searching for Dark Matter (DM) decay and/or annihilation signature etc. The unprecedented resolution can be achieved with a pair-production telescope that, instead of the high-Z converter commonly used, relies on a large number of thin active tracking layers to increase the photon conversion probability, and to precisely reconstruct the pair-produced electron and positron tracks. Scintillating fibers or thin silicon micro-strip detectors are suitable technology for such a tracker. The energy measurement is achieved by measuring the momentum of the electrons and positrons through a magnetic field. The innovated spectrometer approach provides superior photon conversion identification and photon pointing resolution, and is particular suitable in the sub-GeV range, where the opening angle between the electron and positron is relatively large. The level of tracking precision makes it possible to measure the polarization of gamma rays, which would open up a new frontier in gamma-ray astronomy. The sub-GeV full sky survey by PANGU would provides crucial link with GeV to TeV maps from current/future missions including Fermi, DAMPE, HERD, and CTA.

  20. Localized high gamma motor oscillations respond to perceived biologic motion.

    PubMed

    Darvas, Felix; Rao, Rajesh P N; Murias, Micheal

    2013-06-01

    Power changes in the beta frequency range (17-25 Hz) in the human motor and premotor areas during action observation have been associated with the mirror neuron system and have been studied extensively. These changes mimic motor activity during actual motion execution, albeit reduced in strength. Recent noninvasive (EEG/magnetoencephalography) and invasive studies (electrocorticography) have shown that during actual motion, beta power changes are accompanied by highly localized changes in the high gamma band (70-100 Hz). In this study, we investigate, using 27-channel EEG in combination with a generic head model and a cortical mapping algorithm, whether such high gamma changes are also present during motion observation. Subjects were presented with a 2.7-second video of a moving hand, contrasted with a video of moving scenery of equal length. Our results show nonlateralized beta band decrease in power in response to the moving hand versus the response to the moving scenery. We also find significant increase in high gamma power. However, unlike the beta band response, increases in this band are lateralized, with a preference for the hemisphere of the dominant hand. PMID:23733096

  1. High Pressure XENON Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Field Use

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Wehe; Zong He; Glenn K. Knoll

    2004-02-16

    This project explored a new concept for high-pressure xenon ionization chambers by replacing the Frisch grid with coplanar grid electrodes similar to those used in wide bandgap semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers. This work is the first attempt to apply the coplanar grid anode design in a gas ionization chamber in order to achieve to improved energy resolution. Three prototype detectors, two cylindrical and one parallel plate configurations, were built and tested. While the detectors did not demonstrate energy resolutions as good as other high pressure xenon gamma-ray spectrometers, the results demonstrated that the concept of single polarity charge sending using coplanar grid electrodes will work in a gas detector.

  2. Finnish spectrolite as high-dose gamma detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, Patrícia L.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2015-11-01

    A natural material called spectrolite, from Finland, was studied in this work. The purpose was to test it in gamma radiation beams to verify its performance as a high-dose detector. From this material, pellets were manufactured with two different concentrations of Teflon and spectrolite, and their responses were verified using two luminescent techniques: thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The TL and OSL signals were evaluated by means of characterization tests of the material response, after exposure to a nominal absorbed dose interval of 5 Gy to 10 kGy. The results obtained, for both concentrations, showed a good performance of this material in beams of high-dose gamma radiation. Both techniques were utilized in order to investigate the properties of the spectrolite+Teflon samples for different applications.

  3. EXTRAGALACTIC VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Neronov, A.; Semikoz, D. V.

    2012-09-20

    We study the origin of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background using the data from the Fermi telescope. To estimate the background level, we count photons at high Galactic latitudes |b| > 60 Degree-Sign . Subtracting photons associated with known sources and the residual cosmic-ray and Galactic diffuse backgrounds, we estimate the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) flux. We find that the spectrum of EGB in the very high energy band above 30 GeV follows the stacked spectrum of BL Lac objects. Large Area Telescope data reveal the positive (1 + z) {sup k}, 1 < k < 4 cosmological evolution of the BL Lac source population consistent with that of their parent population, Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies. We show that EGB at E > 30 GeV could be completely explained by emission from unresolved BL Lac objects if k {approx_equal} 3.

  4. Characteristics of the telescope for high energy gamma-ray astronomy selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, E. B.; Hofstadter, R.; Rolfe, J.; Johansson, A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cruickshank, W. J.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray telescope selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory provides a substantial improvement in observational capability over earlier instruments. It will have about 20 times more sensitivity, cover a much broader energy range, have considerably better energy resolution and provide a significantly improved angular resolution. The design and performance are described.

  5. Characteristics of the Telescope for High Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy Selected for Definition Studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, E. B.; Hofstadter, R.; Johansson, A.; Rolfe, J.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cruickshank, W. J.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray selected for definition studies on the Gamma Ray Observatory provides a substantial improvement in observational capability over earlier instruments. It will have about 20 times more sensitivity, cover a much broader energy range, have considerably better energy resolution and provide a significantly improved angular resolution. The design and performance are described.

  6. High energy gamma-rays and hadrons at Mount Fuji

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amenomori, M.; Nanjo, H.; Konishi, E.; Hotta, N.; Mizutani, K.; Kasahara, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Mikumo, E.; Sato, K.; Yuda, T.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of high energy gamma-rays and hadrons were obtained by the emulsion chamber with 40 c.u. thickness at Mt. Fuji (3750 m). These results are compared with the Monte Carlo calculation based on the same model which is used in a family analysis. Our data are compatible with the model of heavy-enriched primary and scaling in the fragmentation region.

  7. High Energy Electron and Gamma - Ray Detection with ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon borne ionization calorimeter is well suited to record and identify high energy cosmic ray electrons, and at very high energies gamma-ray photons as well. We have simulated the performance of the instrument, and compare the simulations with actual high energy electron exposures at the CERN accelerator. Simulations and measurements do not compare exactly, in detail, but overall the simulations have predicted actual measured behavior quite well. ATIC has had its first 16 day balloon flight at the turn of the year over Antarctica, and first results obtained using the analysis methods derived from simulations and calibrations will be reported.

  8. High-energy gamma-ray observations of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1994-01-01

    During the period from 1992 May to early 1992 November, the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory obtained high-energy gamma-ray data for most of the sky. A total of 18 active galaxies have been seen with high certainty, and it is expected that more will be found in the data when a more thorough analysis is complete. All of those that have been seen are radio-loud quasars or BL Lacertae objects; most have already been identified as blazars. No Seyfert galaxies have been found thus far. If the spectra are represented as a power law in energy, spectral slopes ranging from approximately -1.7 to -2.4 are found. A wide range of z-values exits in the observed sample, eight having values in excess of 1.0. Time variations have been seen, with the timescale for a significant change being as short as days in at least one case. These results imply the existence of very large numbers of relativistic particles, probably close to the central object. Although a large extrapolation is required, their existence also suggests that these active galactic nuclei may be the source of the extragalactic cosmic rays.

  9. Basic characterization of highly enriched uranium by gamma spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Cong Tam; Zsigrai, József

    2006-05-01

    Gamma-spectrometric methods suitable for the characterization of highly enriched uranium samples encountered in illicit trafficking of nuclear materials are presented. In particular, procedures for determining the 234U, 235U, 238U, 232U and 236U contents and the age of highly enriched uranium are described. Consequently, the total uranium content and isotopic composition can be calculated. For determining the 238U and 232U contents a low-background chamber was used. In addition, age dating of uranium was also performed using low-background spectrometry.

  10. High resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy: The first 85 years

    SciTech Connect

    Deslattes, R.D.

    2000-02-01

    This opening review attempts to follow the main trends in crystal diffraction spectrometry of nuclear {gamma} rays from its 1914 beginning in Rutherford's laboratory to the ultra-high resolution instrumentation realized in the current generation of spectrometers at the Institute Laue Langeven (ILL). The authors perspective is that of an instrumentalist hoping to convey a sense of intellectual debt to a number of predecessors, each of whom realized a certain elegance in making the tools that have enabled much good science, including that to which the remainder of this workshop is dedicated. This overview follows some of the main ideas along a trajectory toward higher resolution at higher energies, thereby enabling not only the disentangling of dense spectra, but also allowing detailed study of aspects of spectral profiles sensitive to excited state lifetimes and interatomic potentials. The parallel evolution toward increasing efficiency while preserving needed resolution is also an interesting story of artful compromise that should not be neglected. Finally, it is the robustness of the measurement chain connecting {gamma}-ray wavelengths with optical wave-lengths associated with the Rydberg constant that only recently has allowed {gamma}-ray data to contribute to determine of particle masses and fundamental constants, as will be described in more detail in other papers from this workshop.

  11. Software developments for gamma-ray data with high multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Crowell, B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Software capabilities for angle sort of data from the new powerful gamma detector arrays like Gammasphere and EUROGAM which were developed in preceding years, were enhanced and extended to read new data formats. In addition, we can now sort the data for directional correlation ratios (DCO). This version of the software was exported to a university group. For the analysis of, e.g., the quasi-continuum of gamma-rays it is necessary to angle sort the high multiplicity data and perform a careful background subtraction in order to extract the continuum of gamma rays from the feeding and decay of superdeformed bands. We need to angle sort in order to untangle the parts of the spectra which are of E1 nature from those of quadrupole or of M1/E2 nature. We further developed software running on new fast SUN workstations. We now have two such workstations, each equipped with a stacker and a secondary 8-mm tape drive. We enhanced the software to apply an energy-dependent time gate. We can enhance the events that are in true prompt coincidence, and reject random and signals in the germanium detectors coming from neutrons hitting the detector in coincidence with the gamma-ray burst. By applying energy-dependent time gates, in form of a {open_quotes}reduced time{close_quotes}, we can perform this rejection without the loss of efficiency at low energy. Effort has gone into developing low-level tape reader routines for data from the new EUROGAM array with cluster detectors as well as from the new flexible data format from Gammasphere phase II. In addition, we developed software to read data tapes from the local DAPHNE and MSU data-acquisition systems on the new fast UNIX platforms.

  12. Development and Characterization of a High Resolution Portable Gamma Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Muhammad

    The recent disaster of Fukushima in Japan combined with the high demand to enhance nuclear safety and to minimize personal exposure to radioactive materials has a significant impact on research and development of radiation detection instrumentation. Currently, there is ample effort worldwide in the pursuit of radiation detection to maximize the accuracy and meet international standards in terms of size and specifications to enable radiation protection decision making. Among the requirements is the development of a portable, light-weight gamma-ray isotope identifier to be used by first responders in nuclear accidents as well as for radiation security and identification of illicit material isotopes. From nuclear security perspective, research into advanced screening technologies has become a high priority in all aspects, while for occupational safety, and environmental radiation protection, the regulatory authorities are requiring specific performance of radiation detection and measuring devices. At the applied radiation laboratory of the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, UOIT, the development of a high resolution spectrometer for medium and high energy gamma ray has been conducted. The spectrometer used a newly developed scintillator based on a LaBr3(Ce) crystal. The detector has been modeled using advanced Monte Carlo code (MCNP/X code) for the response function simulation and parameter characterization. The simulation results have been validated by experimental investigations using a wide range of gamma radiation energies. The developed spectrometer has been characterized in terms of resolution and response in different fields. It has also been compared with other crystals such as NaI(TI) and LiI(Eu).

  13. High-revolution gamma-ray imaging from the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, William A.

    1990-01-01

    An observatory is suggested for exploiting unique lunar features to perform sensitive, subarcsecond cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray imaging. The observatory would be built in an evolutionary manner and would eventually include several different position-sensitive detector systems which together would cover a broad energy range and address a wide variety of astrophysical problems. High angular resolution would be obtained by using a mobile crane on the flat lunar mare regions to move a coded aperture mask for source tracking with detector/mask separations of up to 5 kilometers.

  14. High-revolution gamma-ray imaging from the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, William A.

    1990-08-01

    An observatory is suggested for exploiting unique lunar features to perform sensitive, subarcsecond cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray imaging. The observatory would be built in an evolutionary manner and would eventually include several different position-sensitive detector systems which together would cover a broad energy range and address a wide variety of astrophysical problems. High angular resolution would be obtained by using a mobile crane on the flat lunar mare regions to move a coded aperture mask for source tracking with detector/mask separations of up to 5 kilometers.

  15. A New View of the High Energy Gamma-Ray Sky with the Ferrni Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have opened a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and the origin of cosmic rays, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as super symmetric dark matter annihilations. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from the first year of observations.

  16. Zinc oxide nanowire gamma ray detector with high spatiotemporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Daniel C.; Nolen, J. Ryan; Cook, Andrew; Mu, Richard R.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional scintillation detectors are typically single crystals of heavy-metal oxides or halides doped with rare-earth ions that record the recombination of electron-hole pairs by photon emission in the visible to ultraviolet. However, the light yields are typically low enough to require photomultiplier detection with the attendant instrumental complications. Here we report initial studies of gamma ray detection by zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, grown by vapor-solid deposition. The nanowires grow along the c-axis in a wurtzite structure; they are typically 80 nm in diameter and have lengths of 1- 2 μm. The nanowires are single crystals of high quality, with a photoluminescence (PL) yield from band-edge exciton emission in the ultraviolet that is typically one hundred times larger than the PL yield from defect centers in the visible. Nanowire ensembles were irradiated by 662 keV gamma rays from a Cs-137 source for periods of up to ten hours; gamma rays in this energy range interact by Compton scattering, which in ZnO creates F+ centers that relax to form singly-charged positive oxygen vacancies. Following irradiation, we fit the PL spectra of the visible emission with a sum of Gaussians at the energies of the known defects. We find highly efficient PL from the irradiated area, with a figure of merit approaching 106 photons/s/MeV of deposited energy. Over a period of days, the singly charged O+ vacancies relax to the more stable doubly charged O++ vacancies. However, the overall defect PL returns to pre-irradiation values after about a week, as the vacancies diffuse to the surface of these very thin nanowires, indicating that a self-healing process restores the nanowires to their original state.

  17. Prospects for High Energy Detection of Microquasars with the AGILE and GLAST Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Santolamazza, Patrizia; Pittori, Carlotta; Verrecchia, Francesco

    2007-08-21

    We estimate the sensitivities of the AGILE and GLAST {gamma}-ray experiments taking into account two cases for the galactic {gamma}-ray diffuse background (at high galactic latitude and toward the galactic center). Then we use sensitivities to estimate microquasar observability with the two experiments, assuming the {gamma}-ray emission above 100 MeV of a recent microquasar model.

  18. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  19. High-energy spectral breaks in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Cline, Thomas L.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Matteson, James L.; Band, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Model fits are presented for 18 gamma-ray burst spectra from 100 keV to 27 MeV made with the BATSE spectroscopy detectors on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Most of the bursts are well fitted as power laws with spectral indices between -1.36 and -2.29; however, five bursts show definite departures from a simple power-law fit at high energies. Three of these bursts are well fitted with broken power-law spectra and break energies of from 400 to 690 keV, such as might arise from photon-photon interactions. If so, then the source compactness and hence distance will be sharply constrained. Two of the bursts have spectra with sharply confined slope changes and are well fitted with broken power-law spectra with break energies of 1.2 and 1.6 MeV at peak, such as might arise from photon-magnetic field interactions. If so, then these spectral breaks provide strong evidence for the existence of high magnetic fields in the burst emission region.

  20. Search of the energetic gamma-ray experiment telescope (EGRET) data for high-energy gamma-ray microsecond bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Esposito, J. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Hawking (1974) and Page & Hawking (1976) investigated theoretically the possibility of detecting high-energy gamma rays produced by the quantum-mechanical decay of a small black hole created in the early universe. They concluded that, at the very end of the life of the small black hole, it would radiate a burst of gamma rays peaked near 250 MeV with a total energy of about 10(exp 34) ergs in the order of a microsecond or less. The characteristics of a black hole are determined by laws of physics beyond the range of current particle accelerators; hence, the search for these short bursts of high-energy gamma rays provides at least the possibility of being the first test of this region of physics. The Compton Observatory Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) has the capability of detecting directly the gamma rays from such bursts at a much fainter level than SAS 2, and a search of the EGRET data has led to an upper limit of 5 x 10(exp -2) black hole decays per cu pc per yr, placing constraints on this and other theories predicting microsecond high-energy gamma-ray bursts.

  1. Measuring high-energy {gamma} rays with Ge detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lipoglavsek, M.; Likar, A.; Vencelj, M.; Vidmar, T.; Bark, R. A.; Gueorguieva, E.; Komati, F.; Lawrie, J. J.; Maliage, S. M.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T.; Ramashidzha, T. M.

    2006-04-26

    Gamma rays with energies up to 21 MeV were measured with Ge detectors. Such {gamma} rays were produced in the 208Pb(p,{gamma})209Bi reaction. The position of the 2g9/2 single proton orbit in 209Bi has been determined indicating the size of the Z=126 shell gap.

  2. Detection of high-energy gamma rays from quasar PKS 0528 + 134 by EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, S. D.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The first several pointing directions of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, launched on 1991 April 5, were toward the Galactic anticenter. In addition to the known gamma-ray sources, Crab and Geminga, high-energy gamma-ray emission was observed from the quasar PKS 0528 + 134 by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). A redshift measurement, reported here, of 2.07 confirms the identification of this object as a quasar. The differential photon spectrum is well represented by a power law with an exponent of 2.56 +/- 0.09 and a photon intensity above 100 MeV of (8.4 +/- 1.0) x 10 exp -7 photons sq cm/s. There is evidence for time variability on a time scale of a few days.

  3. High-spin. gamma. -ray spectroscopy: past successes, future hopes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.

    1983-04-01

    Nuclei can carry angular momentum by aligning individual particles along the rotation axis or by rotation of a deformed nucleus as a whole. The interweaving of these modes leads to a variety of behavior that is just beginning to be observed and explained. The discrete ..gamma..-ray studies have led to a new backbending spectroscopy, which is telling us about the details of particle alignments and monopole and quadrupole pairing. The high-spin continuum studies, as yet less well developed, are indicating changes in shape and structure, as well as particle alignments from higher shells. New developments in detector systems and in theory promise much more detailed comparisons of experiment and theory and consequent increase in our knowledge of nuclear behavior at high spin.

  4. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  5. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew D.

    1999-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high-energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  6. High count rate gamma camera with independent modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2015-11-01

    Advances in nuclear medical imaging are based on the improvements of the detector's performance. Generally the research is focussed on the spatial resolution improvement. However, another important parameter is the acquisition time that can significantly affect performance in some clinical investigation (e.g. first-pass cardiac studies). At present, there are several clinical imaging systems which are able to solve these diagnostic requirements, such as the D-SPECT Cardiac Imaging System (Spectrum Dynamics) or the Nucline Cardiodesk Medical Imaging System (Mediso). Actually, these solutions are organ-specific dedicated systems, while it would be preferable having general purpose planar detectors with high counting rate. Our group has recently introduced the use of scintillation matrices whose size is equal to the overall area of a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) in order to design a modular gamma camera. This study allowed optimising the overall pixel identification by improving and controlling the light collection efficiency of each PSPMT. Although we achieved a solution for the problems about the dead area at the junction of the PSPMTs when they are set side by side. In this paper, we propose a modular gamma camera design as the basis to build large area detectors. The modular detector design allows us to achieve better counting performance. In this approach, each module that is made of one or more PSPMTs, can actually acquire data independently and simultaneously, increasing the overall detection efficiency. To verify the improvement in count rate capability we have built two detectors with a field of view of ~ 5 × 5cm2, by using four R8900-C12 PSPMTs (Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.). Each PSPMT was coupled to a dedicated discrete scintillation structure designed to obtain a good homogeneity, high imaging performance and high efficiency. One of the detectors was designed as a standard gamma camera, while the other was composed by four independent

  7. NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M.; Bruel, P.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Granot, J.; Longo, F.; Razzaque, S.; Zimmer, S. E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu

    2013-09-01

    Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

  8. High-z Universe with Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in space and trace the cosmic star formation history back to the first generations of stars. Their bright afterglows allow us to trace the abundances of heavy elements to large distances, thereby measuring cosmic chemical evolution. To date GRBs have been detected up to distances of z=8.23 and possibly even beyond z9. This makes GRBs a unique and powerful tool to probe the high-z Universe up to the re-ionization era. We discuss the current status of the field, place it in context with other probes, and also discuss new mission concepts that have been planned to utilize GRBs as probes.

  9. Neutrino beams from electron capture at high gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolinec, Mark; Sato, Joe

    2007-08-01

    We investigate the potential of a flavor pure high gamma electron capture electron neutrino beam directed towards a large Water Cherenkov detector with 500 kt fiducial mass. The energy of the neutrinos is reconstructed by the position measurement within the detector and superb energy resolution capabilities could be achieved. We estimate the requirements for such a scenario to be competitive to a neutrino/anti-neutrino running at a neutrino factory with less accurate energy resolution. Although the requirements turn out to be extreme, in principle such a scenario could achieve as good abilities to resolve correlations and degeneracies in the search for sin2 2θ13 and δCP as a standard neutrino factory experiment.

  10. GAMMA PROPORTIONAL COUNTER CONTAINING HIGH Z GAS AND LOW Z MODERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.

    1963-07-23

    A gamma radiation counter employing a gas proportional counter is described. The radiation counter comprises a cylindrical gas proportional counter which contains a high atomic number gas and is surrounded by a low atomic number gamma radiation moderator material. At least one slit is provided in the moderator to allow accident gamma radiation to enter the moderator in the most favorable manner for moderation, and also to allow low energy gamma radiation to enter the counter without the necessity of passing through the moderator. This radiation counter is capable of detecting and measuring gamma radiation in the energy range of 0.5-5 Mev. (AEC)

  11. High-redshift Gamma-Ray Burst Studies with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Calura, Francesco; Matteucci, Francesca

    2007-05-01

    We compare predicted Type Ib/c supernova (SN) rates with the observed long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) rates both locally and as a function of redshift. To do that, we assume different star formation histories in galaxies of different morphological type: ellipticals, spirals and irregulars. In particular, the predicted Type Ib/c SN rate (SNRIb/c) is always higher than the GRB rate, as expected, suggesting that only a small fraction (0.1-1%) of them become GRBs. We predict a ratio between the cosmic GRB rate and the cosmic SNRIb/c in the range 10-2 - 10-3, in agreement with previous estimates. Finally, due to the high star formation in spheroids at high redshift, we predict more GRBs at high redshift than previous estimates, a prediction which awaits to be proven by future observations by GLAST. Based on our studies and on the current LAT performance, an estimate of the detection possibility of this high-redshift burst population is finally presented.

  12. Accessing the population of high-redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Salvaterra, R.; Ghisellini, G.; Mereghetti, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Campana, S.; Osborne, J. P.; O'Brien, P.; Tanvir, N.; Willingale, D.; Amati, L.; Basa, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Burlon, D.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Frontera, F.; Götz, D.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Piro, L.; Vergani, S. D.

    2015-04-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are a powerful probe of the high-redshift Universe. We present a tool to estimate the detection rate of high-z GRBs by a generic detector with defined energy band and sensitivity. We base this on a population model that reproduces the observed properties of GRBs detected by Swift, Fermi and CGRO in the hard X-ray and γ-ray bands. We provide the expected cumulative distributions of the flux and fluence of simulated GRBs in different energy bands. We show that scintillator detectors, operating at relatively high energies (e.g. tens of keV to the MeV), can detect only the most luminous GRBs at high redshifts due to the link between the peak spectral energy and the luminosity (Epeak-Liso) of GRBs. We show that the best strategy for catching the largest number of high-z bursts is to go softer (e.g. in the soft X-ray band) but with a very high sensitivity. For instance, an imaging soft X-ray detector operating in the 0.2-5 keV energy band reaching a sensitivity, corresponding to a fluence, of ˜10-8 erg cm-2 is expected to detect ≈40 GRBs yr-1 sr-1 at z ≥ 5 (≈3 GRBs yr-1 sr-1 at z ≥ 10). Once high-z GRBs are detected the principal issue is to secure their redshift. To this aim we estimate their NIR afterglow flux at relatively early times and evaluate the effectiveness of following them up and construct usable samples of events with any forthcoming GRB mission dedicated to explore the high-z Universe.

  13. Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1994-01-01

    The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

  14. [Protection of cadaver tissues exposed to high gamma radiation].

    PubMed

    Matus-Jiménez, J; Flores-Fletes, J R; Carrillo, A

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue is the most widely used tissue for the treatment of various conditions. As a result of this, allografts are used at an increasing frequency and processes for their harvest, preservation and sterilization have improved. The sterilization method that grants the greatest sterilization is high-dose gamma radiation, which destroys prions and any microorganism thus assuring that patients will not experience any infection. But given that radiation use has proven to deteriorate bone and tendon tissue, efforts have been made to protect the latter. One way to do this is a commercially available substance called Clearant. Studies conducted elsewhere have found that it does protect bone and tendon tissue. This study was therefore conducted with allograft samples exposed to high-dose radiation. Its purpose was to assess, with photon microscopy using various dyes and electron microscopy, the presence of color changes as well as the destruction of the anatomical structure. The same tissue was followed-up throughout the process until it was placed in the patient. The review found no structural changes in bone and tendon tissues exposed to high radiation doses (60 kilograys) when the Clearant process was used, and concluded that the former may be used safely in orthopedic or traumatologic diseases. PMID:24707605

  15. Identifying high-redshift gamma-ray bursts with RATIR

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohns, O. M.; Butler, N. R.; Cucchiara, A.; Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G.; De Diego, J. A.; Georgiev, L.; González, J.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H.; Klein, C. R.; Fox, O. D.; Bloom, J. S.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present a template-fitting algorithm for determining photometric redshifts, z {sub phot}, of candidate high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using afterglow photometry, obtained by the Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, this algorithm accounts for the intrinsic GRB afterglow spectral energy distribution, host dust extinction, and the effect of neutral hydrogen (local and cosmological) along the line of sight. We present the results obtained by this algorithm and the RATIR photometry of GRB 130606A, finding a range of best-fit solutions, 5.6 < z {sub phot} < 6.0, for models of several host dust extinction laws (none, the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Clouds, and Small Magellanic Clouds), consistent with spectroscopic measurements of the redshift of this GRB. Using simulated RATIR photometry, we find that our algorithm provides precise measures of z {sub phot} in the ranges of 4 < z {sub phot} ≲ 8 and 9 < z {sub phot} < 10 and can robustly determine when z {sub phot} > 4. Further testing highlights the required caution in cases of highly dust-extincted host galaxies. These tests also show that our algorithm does not erroneously find z {sub phot} < 4 when z {sub sim} > 4, thereby minimizing false negatives and allowing us to rapidly identify all potential high-redshift events.

  16. Pulsed high-energy gamma rays from PSR 1055-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fierro, J. M.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K. T.; Chiang, J.; D'Amico, N.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Johnston, S.; Kanbach, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory has detected a high-energy gamma-ray source at a position coincident with that of the radio pulsar PSR 1055-52. Analysis of the EGRET data at the radio pulsar period of 197 ms has revealed pulsed gamma-radiation at energies above 300 MeV, making PSR 1055-52 the fifth detected high-energy gamma-ray pulsar. The pulsed radiation from PSR 1055-52 has a very hard photon spectral index of -1.18 +/- 0.16 and a high efficiency for converting its rotational energy into gamma-rays. No unpulsed emission was observed.

  17. Genetic basis of unstable expression of high gamma-tocopherol content in sunflower seeds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tocopherols are natural antioxidants with both in vivo (vitamin E) and in vitro activity. Sunflower seeds contain predominantly alpha-tocopherol (>90% of total tocopherols), with maximum vitamin E effect but lower in vitro antioxidant action than other tocopherol forms such as gamma-tocopherol. Sunflower germplasm with stable high levels of gamma-tocopherol (>85%) has been developed. The trait is controlled by recessive alleles at a single locus Tph2 underlying a gamma-tocopherol methyltransferase (gamma-TMT). Additionally, unstable expression of increased gamma-tocopherol content in the range from 5 to 85% has been reported. The objective of this research was to determine the genetic basis of unstable expression of high gamma-tocopherol content in sunflower seeds. Results Male sterile plants of nuclear male sterile line nmsT2100, with stable high gamma-tocopherol content, were crossed with plants of line IAST-1, with stable high gamma-tocopherol content but derived from a population that exhibited unstable expression of the trait. F2 seeds showed continuous segregation for gamma-tocopherol content from 1.0 to 99.7%. Gamma-tocopherol content in F2 plants (average of 24 individual F3 seeds) segregated from 59.4 to 99.4%. A genetic linkage map comprising 17 linkage groups (LGs) was constructed from this population using 109 SSR and 20 INDEL marker loci, including INDEL markers for tocopherol biosynthesis genes. QTL analysis revealed a major QTL on LG 8 that corresponded to the gamma-TMT Tph2 locus, which suggested that high gamma-tocopherol lines nmsT2100 and IAST-1 possess different alleles at this locus. Modifying genes were identified at LGs 1, 9, 14 and 16, corresponding in most cases with gamma-TMT duplicated loci. Conclusions Unstable expression of high gamma-tocopherol content is produced by the effect of modifying genes on tph2a allele at the gamma-TMT Tph2 gene. This allele is present in line IAST-1 and is different to allele tph2 present in line

  18. High Resolution Gamma Ray Analysis of Medical Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillery, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Compton-suppressed high-purity Germanium detectors at the University of Massachusetts Lowell have been used to study medical radioisotopes produced at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), in particular isotopes such as Pt-191 used for cancer therapy in patients. The ability to precisely analyze the concentrations of such radio-isotopes is essential for both production facilities such as Brookhaven and consumer hospitals across the U.S. Without accurate knowledge of the quantities and strengths of these isotopes, it is possible for doctors to administer incorrect dosages to patients, thus leading to undesired results. Samples have been produced at Brookhaven and shipped to UML, and the advanced electronics and data acquisition capabilities at UML have been used to extract peak areas in the gamma decay spectra. Levels of Pt isotopes in diluted samples have been quantified, and reaction cross-sections deduced from the irradiation parameters. These provide both cross checks with published work, as well as a rigorous quantitative framework with high quality state-of-the-art detection apparatus in use in the experimental nuclear physics community.

  19. Gamma-ray burst high energy emission from internal shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, A.; Guetta, D.

    2008-03-01

    Aims:In this paper we study synchrotron and synchrotron self Compton (SSC) emission from internal shocks (IS) during the prompt and X-ray flare phases of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The aim is to test the IS model for the flare emission and for whether GRBs can be GeV sources. Methods: We determine the parameters for which the IS model can account for the observed prompt and X-ray flares emission, and study the detectability of the high energy SSC emission by the AGILE and GLAST satellites. Results: We find that the detectability of the SSC emission during the prompt phase of GRBs improves for higher values of the fireball Lorentz factor Γ and of the temporal variability t_v. If IS is the mechanism responsible for the flare emission, and the Lorentz factor of the shells producing the flare is Γ 100, the flare light curves are expected to present some substructures with temporal variability tv = 10-100 ms which are much smaller than the average duration of flares, and similar to those observed during the prompt phase of GRBs. If one assumes lower Lorentz factors, such as Γ 10 div 25, then a larger temporal variability tv 40 s can also account for the observed flare properties. However in this case we predict that X-ray flares do not have a counterpart at very high energies (MeV-GeV). Conclusions: An investigation on the substructures of the X-ray flare light curves, and simultaneous X-ray and high energy observations, will allow us to corroborate the hypothesis that late IS are responsible for the X-ray flares.

  20. Design of a compact spectrometer for high-flux MeV gamma-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Corvan, D. J. Sarri, G.; Zepf, M.

    2014-06-15

    A novel design for a compact gamma-ray spectrometer is presented. The proposed system allows for spectroscopy of high-flux multi-MeV gamma-ray beams with MeV energy resolution in a compact design. In its basic configuration, the spectrometer exploits conversion of gamma-rays into electrons via Compton scattering in a low-Z material. The scattered electron population is then spectrally resolved using a magnetic spectrometer. The detector is shown to be effective for gamma-ray energies between 3 and 20 MeV. The main properties of the spectrometer are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as a facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  2. Effects of Cosmic Infrared Background on High Energy Delayed Gamma-Rays From Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Asano, Katsuaki; Nagataki, Shigehiro; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-06

    Regenerated high energy emissions from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are studied in detail. If the primary emission spectrum extends to TeV range, these very high energy photons will be absorbed by the cosmic infrared background (CIB). The created high energy electron-positron pairs up-scatter not only cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons but also CIB photons, and secondary photons are generated in the GeV-TeV range. These secondary delayed photons may be observed in the near future, and useful for a consistency check for the primary spectra and GRB physical parameters. The up-scattered CIB photons cannot be neglected for low redshift bursts and/or GRBs with a relatively low maximum photon energy. The secondary gamma-rays also give us additional information on the CIB, which is uncertain in observations so far.

  3. The goals of gamma-ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Higdon, James C.; Leventhal, Marvin; Ramaty, Reuven; Woosley, Stanford E.

    1990-01-01

    The use of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in astrophysics is discussed with specific attention given to the application of the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE). The gamma-ray lines from nuclear transitions in radionucleic decay and positron annihilation permits the study of current sites, rates and models of nucleosynthesis, and galactic structure. Diffuse galactic emission is discussed, and the high-resolution observations of gamma-ray lines from discrete sites are also described. Interstellar mixing and elemental abundances can also be inferred from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of nucleosynthetic products. Compact objects can also be examined by means of gamma-ray emissions, allowing better understanding of neutron stars and the accreting black hole near the galactic center. Solar physics can also be investigated by examining such features as solar-flare particle acceleration and atmospheric abundances.

  4. The goals of gamma-ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Higdon, James C.; Leventhal, Marvin; Ramaty, Reuven; Woosley, Stanford E.

    1990-08-01

    The use of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in astrophysics is discussed with specific attention given to the application of the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE). The gamma-ray lines from nuclear transitions in radionucleic decay and positron annihilation permits the study of current sites, rates and models of nucleosynthesis, and galactic structure. Diffuse galactic emission is discussed, and the high-resolution observations of gamma-ray lines from discrete sites are also described. Interstellar mixing and elemental abundances can also be inferred from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of nucleosynthetic products. Compact objects can also be examined by means of gamma-ray emissions, allowing better understanding of neutron stars and the accreting black hole near the galactic center. Solar physics can also be investigated by examining such features as solar-flare particle acceleration and atmospheric abundances.

  5. Very-high-energy gamma rays from a distant quasar: how transparent is the universe?

    PubMed

    Albert, J; Aliu, E; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Curtef, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea Del Pozo, E; de Los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Goebel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kneiske, T M; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2008-06-27

    The atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope MAGIC, designed for a low-energy threshold, has detected very-high-energy gamma rays from a giant flare of the distant Quasi-Stellar Radio Source (in short: radio quasar) 3C 279, at a distance of more than 5 billion light-years (a redshift of 0.536). No quasar has been observed previously in very-high-energy gamma radiation, and this is also the most distant object detected emitting gamma rays above 50 gigaelectron volts. Because high-energy gamma rays may be stopped by interacting with the diffuse background light in the universe, the observations by MAGIC imply a low amount for such light, consistent with that known from galaxy counts. PMID:18583607

  6. Gamma ray spectroscopy at high energy and high time resolution at JET.

    PubMed

    Tardocchi, M; Proverbio, L I; Gorini, G; Grosso, G; Locatelli, M; Chugonov, I N; Gin, D B; Shevelev, A E; Murari, A; Kiptily, V G; Syme, B; Fernandes, A M; Pereira, R C; Sousa, J

    2008-10-01

    In fusion plasmas gamma ray emission is caused by reactions of fast particles, such as fusion alpha particles, with impurities. Gamma ray spectroscopy at JET has provided valuable diagnostic information on fast fuel as well as fusion product ions. Improvements of these measurements are needed to fully exploit the flux increase provided by future high power experiments at JET and ITER. Limiting aspects are, for instance, the count rate capability due to a high neutron/gamma background combined with slow detector response and a modest energy resolution due to the low light yield of the scintillators. This paper describes the solutions developed for achieving higher energy resolution, signal to background, and time resolution. The detector design is described based on the new BrLa3 scintillator crystal. The paper will focus on hardware development, including a photomultiplier tube capable of stable operation at counting rate as high as 1 MHz, the magnetic shielding, and the fast digital data acquisition system. PMID:19068513

  7. Gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Kane, W.R.; Markey, J.K.

    1994-08-01

    A prototype gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon gas near the critical point (166{degrees}C, 58 atm) is under development. The spectrometer will function as a room-temperature ionization chamber detecting gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. The energy resolution is superior to that of a NaI scintillation spectrometer by a substantial margin (approximately a factor 5), and accordingly, much more information can be extracted from a given gamma-ray spectrum. Unlike germanium detectors, the spectrometer possesses the capability for sustained operation under ambient temperature conditions without a requirement for liquid nitrogen.

  8. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    France, G. de

    2014-11-11

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.

  9. Development of a high resolution gamma camera system using finely grooved GAGG scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kataoka, Jun; Oshima, Tsubasa; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-06-01

    High resolution gamma cameras require small pixel scintillator blocks with high light output. However, manufacturing a small pixel scintillator block is difficult when the pixel size becomes small. To solve this limitation, we developed a high resolution gamma camera system using a finely grooved Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG) plate. Our gamma camera's detector consists of a 1-mm-thick finely grooved GAGG plate that is optically coupled to a 1-in. position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The grooved GAGG plate has 0.2×0.2 mm pixels with 0.05-mm wide slits (between the pixels) that were manufactured using a dicing saw. We used a Hamamatsu PSPMT with a 1-in. square high quantum efficiency (HQE) PSPMT (R8900-100-C12). The energy resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons (122 keV) was 18.5% FWHM. The intrinsic spatial resolution was estimated to be 0.7-mm FWHM. With a 0.5-mm diameter pinhole collimator mounted to its front, we achieved a high resolution, small field-of-view gamma camera. The system spatial resolution for the Co-57 gamma photons was 1.0-mm FWHM, and the sensitivity was 0.0025%, 10 mm from the collimator surface. The Tc-99m HMDP administered mouse images showed the fine structures of the mouse body's parts. Our developed high resolution small pixel GAGG gamma camera is promising for such small animal imaging.

  10. High Energy Astronomy with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2011-05-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, launched in 2008, has revolutionized our knowledge of the gamma-ray sky. After briefly summarizing the observing techniques of the Large Area Telescope on Fermi, major results are described. The source catalog made with the first 11 monts of science data contain 1451 sources and several new classes of gamma-ray sources, including millisecond pulsars, starburst galaxies and radio galaxies. This talk will emphasize Galactic and ultra-high energy cosmic rays, particle acceleration in GRBs and blazars, new physics results related to tests of Lorentz invariance violations, and measurements of the intergalactic magnetic field. Implications of bulk outflow Lorentz factors inferred from gamma-gamma opacity arguments will be considered in light of the search for high-energy neutrinos from black-hole jet sources.

  11. Effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the functional characteristics of amniotic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rita; Purohit, Sumita; Chacharkar, M. P.

    2007-06-01

    The effect of different doses of gamma radiation viz. 25, 36 and 50 kGy on the chemical and functional characteristics of the amniotic membrane was studied. The change in the chemical structure of amniotic membranes at high doses of gamma irradiation was evaluated by means of Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy. The degradation of amnion on irradiation with gamma rays could produce a relative variation in IR absorption troughs. This kind of variation was absent in the samples irradiated to doses of 25, 36 and 50 kGy indicating no qualitative change in the material property of amnion. No significant differences in the water absorption capacity and water vapour transmission rate of amniotic membranes irradiated to different doses were observed. Impermeability of the amniotic membranes to different microorganisms was also not affected at high doses of gamma radiation. Gamma irradiation at doses of 25-50 kGy did not evoke undesirable changes in the functional properties of the amniotic membrane.

  12. A high precision gamma-ray spectrometer for the Mars-94 mission

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrofanov, I.G.; Anfimov, D.S.; Chernenko, A.M.

    1994-06-01

    The high precision gamma-ray spectrometer (PGS) is scheduled to be launched on the Mars-94 mission in October 1994, and to go into an elliptical polar orbit around Mars. The PGS consists of two high-purity germanium (Ge) detectors, associated electronics, and a passive cooler and will be mounted on one of the solar panels. The PGS will measure nuclear gamma-ray emissions from the martian surface, cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and the high-energy component of solar flares in the broad energy range from 50 KeV to 8 MeV using 4096 energy channels.

  13. High energy gamma ray results from the second small astronomy satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. F.; Tuemer, T.

    1974-01-01

    A high energy (35 MeV) gamma ray telescope employing a thirty-two level magnetic core spark chamber system was flown on SAS 2. The high energy galactic gamma radiation is observed to dominate over the general diffuse radiation along the entire galactic plane, and when examined in detail, the longitudinal and latitudinal distribution seem generally correlated with galactic structural features, particularly with arm segments. The general high energy gamma radiation from the galactic plane, explained on the basis of its angular distribution and magnitude, probably results primarily from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar matter.

  14. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  15. Interplay of orientation selectivity and the power of low- and high-gamma bands in the cat primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bharmauria, Vishal; Bachatene, Lyes; Ouelhazi, Afef; Cattan, Sarah; Chanauria, Nayan; Etindele-Sosso, Faustin Armel; Rouat, Jean; Molotchnikoff, Stéphane

    2016-05-01

    Gamma oscillations are ubiquitous in brain and are believed to be inevitable for information processing in brain. Here, we report that distinct bands (low, 30-40Hz and high gamma, 60-80Hz) of stimulus-triggered gamma oscillations are systematically linked to the orientation selectivity index (OSI) of neurons in the cat primary visual cortex. The gamma-power is high for the highly selective neurons in the low-gamma band, whereas it is high for the broadly selective neurons in the high-gamma band. We suggest that the low-gamma band is principally implicated in feed-forward excitatory flow, whereas the high-gamma band governs the flow of this excitation. PMID:27033667

  16. Evidence for Temporally-Extended, High-Energy Emission from Gamma Ray Burst 990104

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wren, D. N.; Bertsch, D. L.; Ritz, S.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that high-energy emission (MeV - GeV) has been observed in several gamma ray bursts and temporally-extended emission from lower-energy gamma rays through radio wavelengths is well established. Observations of extended, high-energy emission are, however, scarce. Here we present evidence for a gamma ray burst emission that is both high-energy and extended, coincident with lower energy emissions. For the very bright and long burst, GRB 990104, we show light curves and spectra that confirm emission above 50 MeV, approximately 152 seconds after the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) trigger and initial burst emission. Between the initial output and the main peak, seen at both low and high energy, there was a period of approx. 100 s during which the burst was relatively quiet. This burst was found as part of an ongoing search for high-energy emission in gamma ray bursts.

  17. High and low energy gamma beam dump designs for the gamma beam delivery system at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Zafar; Matei, Catalin; Ur, Calin A.; Mitu, Iani-Octavian; Udup, Emil; Petcu, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Magurele, Bucharest, Romania. The facility will use two 10 PW lasers and a high intensity, narrow bandwidth gamma beam for stand-alone and combined laser-gamma experiments. The accurate estimation of particle doses and their restriction within the limits for both personel and general public is very important in the design phase of any nuclear facility. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations are performed using FLUKA and MCNPX to design 19.4 and 4 MeV gamma beam dumps along with shielding of experimental areas. Dose rate contour plots from both FLUKA and MCNPX along with numerical values of doses in experimental area E8 of the facility are performed. The calculated doses are within the permissible limits. Furthermore, a reasonable agreement between both codes enhances our confidence in using one or both of them for future calculations in beam dump designs, radiation shielding, radioactive inventory, and other calculations releated to radiation protection. Residual dose rates and residual activity calculations are also performed for high-energy beam dump and their effect is negligible in comparison to contributions from prompt radiation.

  18. High temperature oxidation behavior of gamma-nickel+gamma'-nickel aluminum alloys and coatings modified with platinum and reactive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nan

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000°C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455°C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain beta-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al2O3 scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used beta-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt+Hf-modified gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni 3Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al 2O3 formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower temperatures (˜970°C) in the very early stage of oxidation. It

  19. Prospects of High Energy Studies of Pulsars with the AGILE Gamma-ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzoni, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Tavani, M.; Chen, A.; Giuliani, A.; Vercellone, S.

    AGILE is a small gamma-ray astronomy mission of the Italian Space Agency, with good spatial resolution, excellent timing capability and an unprecedently large field of view (~1/4 of the sky). It will be the only mission dedicated to high energy astrophysics in the range 30 MeV-50 GeV during the period 2003-2006, before the launch of GLAST. Besides studying the small sample of known gamma-ray pulsars, AGILE will offer the first possibility to detect several young and energetic radio pulsars that have been discovered after the end of the CGRO mission. AGILE will contribute to the study of gamma-ray pulsars in several ways: (1) improving photon statistics for gamma-ray pulsations searches; (2) detecting possible secular variations of the gamma-ray emission from neutron star magnetospheres; (3) studying unpulsed gamma-ray emission from plerions in supernova remnants and searching for time variability of pulsar wind/nebula interactions; (4) helping to understand the population of unidentified EGRET sources that might consist in part of radio-quiet pulsars. We will describe the AGILE satellite and provide an estimate of the expected number of the detectable gamma-ray pulsars. The AGILE capabilities for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with small counting statistics will be presented based on the analysis of data from simulations and from the EGRET archive.

  20. Report on Ultra-high Resolution Gamma- / X-ray Analysis of Uranium Skull Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Velazquez, M; Drury, O; Salaymeh, S

    2009-11-02

    We have utilized the high energy resolution and high peak-to-background ratio of superconducting TES {gamma}-detectors at very low energies for non-destructive analysis of a skull oxide derived from reprocessed nuclear fuel. Specifically, we demonstrate that superconducting detectors can separate and analyze the strong actinide emission lines in the spectral region below 60 keV that are often obscured in {gamma}-measurements with conventional Ge detectors.

  1. Note on the detection of high energy primary cosmic gamma rays by air shower observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasahara, K.; Torii, S.; Yuda, T.

    1985-01-01

    A mountain altitude experiment is planned at Mt. Norikura in Japan to search for point sources of astrophysical high-energy gamma rays in the 10 to the 15th power eV range. The advantages of mountain level observation of IR showers is stressed, especially in the case of high-energy gamma primaries from Cygnus X3 and other similar point sources.

  2. High gamma oscillations of sensorimotor cortex during unilateral movement in the developing brain: a MEG study.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiaolin; Wang, Yingying; Kotecha, Rupesh; Kirtman, Elijah G; Fujiwara, Hisako; Hemasilpin, Nat; Degrauw, Ton; Rose, Douglas F; Xiang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies in adults have found consistent contralateral high gamma activities in the sensorimotor cortex during unilateral finger movement. However, no study has reported on this same phenomenon in children. We hypothesized that contralateral high gamma activities also exist in children during unilateral finger movement. Sixty normal children (6-17 years old) were studied with a 275-channel MEG system combined with synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM). Sixty participants displayed consistently contralateral event-related synchronization (C-ERS) within high gamma band (65-150 Hz) in the primary motor cortices (M1) of both hemispheres. Interestingly, nineteen younger children displayed ipsilateral event-related synchronization (I-ERS) within the high gamma band (65-150 Hz) just during their left finger movement. Both I-ERS and C-ERS were localized in M1. The incidence of I-ERS showed a significant decrease with age. Males had significantly higher odds of having ipsilateral activity compared to females. Noteworthy, high gamma C-ERS appeared consistently, while high gamma I-ERS changed with age. The asymmetrical patterns of neuromagnetic activities in the children's brain might represent the maturational lateralization and/or specialization of motor function. In conclusion, the present results have demonstrated that contralateral high-gamma neuromagnetic activities are potential biomarkers for the accurate localization of the primary motor cortex in children. In addition, the interesting finding of the ipsilateral high-gamma neuromagnetic activities opens a new window for us to understand the developmental changes of the hemispherical functional lateralization in the motor system. PMID:20577795

  3. Gamma rays made on Earth have unexpectedly high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Johanna

    2011-01-15

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are the source of the highest-energy nonanthropogenic photons produced on Earth. Associated with thunder-storms - and in fact, with individual lightning discharges - they are presumed to be the bremsstrahlung produced when relativistic electrons, accelerated by the storms' strong electric fields, collide with air molecules some 10-20 km above sea level. The TGFs last up to a few milliseconds and contain photons with energies on the order of MeV.

  4. An Investigation of High-Temperature Precipitation in Powder-Metallurgy, Gamma/Gamma-Prime Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Kim, S.-L.; Zhang, F.; Tiley, J. S.

    2015-04-01

    The high-temperature-precipitation behavior of a typical powder-metallurgy, gamma-gamma-prime, nickel-base superalloy (LSHR) was determined and used to develop and validate a quantitative fast-acting model. To this end, a series of experiments comprising supersolvus solution treatment followed by continuous cooling at rates typical of those experienced during the manufacture of full-scale components was conducted for LSHR. The nucleation and growth of secondary-gamma-prime precipitates were deduced via metallography on samples water quenched at various temperatures during the cooling cycle. Further insight on nucleation and the extent of retained supersaturation during cooling was obtained from in situ synchrotron (X-ray diffraction) experiments involving cooling of LSHR samples at identical rates with or without a hold time at an intermediate temperature. The observations were interpreted using a fast-acting (spreadsheet) model which incorporated the important aspects of classical, homogeneous-nucleation theory and growth by bulk diffusion. In this regard, particular attention was paid to the determination of model input parameters such as the composition, free energy of formation, and surface energy of precipitates, and an effective diffusivity; the values so determined contrasted with those from existing thermodynamic and diffusion databases. It was demonstrated that fast-acting-model calculations based on a nickel-chromium pseudo-binary system gave good agreement with measurements of the evolution of precipitate volume fraction, number density, and size during continuous cooling.

  5. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Second Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-2) high-energy (in excess of 35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope has detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks following the single radio peak by about 13 ms and 48 ms. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP 0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0002 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission, and the double peak structure, compared with the single pulse in the radio emission, suggest that the high-energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those at lower energies.

  6. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  7. Contraband detection using high-energy gamma rays from {sup 16}O*

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    High-energy monoenergetic gamma rays (6.13 and 7.12 MeV) from the decay of excited states of the {sup 16}O* nucleus are highly penetrating and thus offer potential for non-intrusive inspection of loaded containers for narcotics, explosives, and other contraband items. These excited states can be produced by irradiation of water with 14-MeV neutrons from a DT neutron generator or through the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O* reaction. Resonances in {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O* at proton energies between 340 keV and 2 MeV allow use of a low-energy accelerator to provide a compact, portable gamma source of reasonable intensity. The present work provides estimates of gamma source parameters and suggests how various types of contraband could be detected. Gamma rays can be used to perform transmission or emission radiography of containers or other objects. Through the use of ({gamma}, n) and ({gamma}, fission) reactions, this technique is also capable of detecting special nuclear materials such as deuterium, lithium, beryllium, uranium, and plutonium. Analytic and Monte Carlo techniques are used to model empty and loaded container inspection for accelerator-produced gamma, radioisotope, and x-ray sources.

  8. Contraband detection using high-energy gamma rays from 16O*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Sagalovsky, Leonid; Smith, Donald L.

    1997-02-01

    High-energy monoenergetic gamma rays (6.13 and 7.12 MeV) from the decay of excited states of the 16O* nucleus are highly penetrating and thus offer potential for non- intrusive inspection of loaded containers for narcotics, explosives, and other contraband items. These excited states can be produced by irradiation of water with 14-MeV neutrons from a DT neutron generator or through the 19F(p,alpha)16O* reaction. Resonances in 19F(p,alpha)16O* at proton energies between 340 keV and 2 MeV allow use of a low-energy accelerator to provide a compact, portable gamma source of reasonable intensity. The present work provides estimates of gamma source parameters and suggests how various types of contraband could be detected. Gamma rays can be used to perform transmission or emission radiography of containers or other objects. Through the use of (gamma,n) and (gamma,fission) reactions, this technique is also capable of detecting special nuclear materials such as deuterium, lithium, beryllium, uranium, and plutonium. Analytic and Monte Carlo techniques are used to model empty and loaded container inspection for accelerator-produced gamma, radioisotope, and x-ray sources.

  9. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-15

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  10. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-01

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  11. Superconducting High Energy Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, D T

    2002-02-22

    We have demonstrated that a bulk absorber coupled to a TES can serve as a good gamma-ray spectrometer. Our measured energy resolution of 70 eV at 60 keV is among the best measurements in this field. We have also shown excellent agreement between the noise predictions and measured noise. Despite this good result, we noted that our detector design has shortcomings with a low count rate and vulnerabilities with the linearity of energy response. We addressed these issues by implementation of an active negative feedback bias. We demonstrated the effects of active bias such as additional pulse shortening, reduction of TES change in temperature during a pulse, and linearization of energy response at low energy. Linearization at higher energy is possible with optimized heat capacities and thermal conductivities of the microcalorimeter. However, the current fabrication process has low control and repeatability over the thermal properties. Thus, optimization of the detector performance is difficult until the fabrication process is improved. Currently, several efforts are underway to better control the fabrication of our gamma-ray spectrometers. We are developing a full-wafer process to produce TES films. We are investigating the thermal conductivity and surface roughness of thicker SiN membranes. We are exploring alternative methods to couple the absorber to the TES film for reproducibility. We are also optimizing the thermal conductivities within the detector to minimize two-element phonon noise. We are experimenting with different absorber materials to optimize absorption efficiency and heat capacity. We are also working on minimizing Johnson noise from the E S shunt and SQUID amplifier noise. We have shown that our performance, noise, and active bias models agree very well with measured data from several microcalorimeters. Once the fabrication improvements have been implemented, we have no doubt that our gamma-ray spectrometer will achieve even more spectacular results.

  12. Detection of high-energy gamma rays from winter thunderclouds.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, H; Enoto, T; Yamada, S; Yuasa, T; Kawaharada, M; Kitaguchi, T; Kokubun, M; Kato, H; Okano, M; Nakamura, S; Makishima, K

    2007-10-19

    A report is made on a comprehensive observation of a burstlike gamma-ray emission from thunderclouds on the Sea of Japan, during strong thunderstorms on 6 January 2007. The detected emission, lasting for approximately 40 sec, preceded cloud-to-ground lightning discharges. The burst spectrum, extending to 10 MeV, can be interpreted as consisting of bremsstrahlung photons originating from relativistic electrons. This ground-based observation provides the first clear evidence that strong electric fields in thunderclouds can continuously accelerate electrons beyond 10 MeV prior to lightning discharges. PMID:17995261

  13. An imaging telescope for high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, G.; Jenkins, T. L.; Owen, A.; Ramsden, D.; Carter, J. N.; Hall, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    Recent tests of a gamma-ray imaging telescope, which incorporated a coded aperture mask and multiwire proportional counter system produced good images of a tritium target source which was used to generate the 20 MeV protons at a proton Van de Graaff accelerator. This paper indicates what performance might be expected if a large area drift chamber were used in conjunction with a coded aperture mask. The prospects for achieving significant scientific results if such a system were flown on a variety of space vehicles are discussed.

  14. Ceramic Matrix Composites Performances Under High Gamma Radiation Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cemmi, A.; Baccaro, S.; Fiore, S.; Gislon, P.; Serra, E.; Fassina, S.; Ferrari, E.; Ghisolfi, E.

    2014-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composites reinforced by continuous ceramic fibers (CMCs) represent a class of advanced materials developed for applications in automotive, aerospace, nuclear fusion reactors and in other specific systems for harsh environments. In the present work, the silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites, manufactured by Chemical Vapour Infiltration process at FN S.p.A. plant, have been evaluated in term of gamma radiation hardness at three different absorbed doses (up to around 3MGy). Samples behavior has been investigated before and after irradiation by means of mechanical tests (flexural strength) and by surface and structural analyses (X-ray diffraction, SEM, FTIR-ATR, EPR).

  15. An Analog Gamma Correction Scheme for High Dynamic Range CMOS Logarithmic Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. PMID:25517692

  16. The future of high energy gamma ray astronomy and its potential astrophysical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Future satellites should carry instruments having over an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than those flown thus far as well as improved energy and angular resolution. The information to be obtained from these experiments should greatly enhance knowledge of: the very energetic and nuclear processes associated with compact objects; the structure of our galaxy; the origin and dynamic pressure effects of the cosmic rays; the high energy particles and energetic processes in other galaxies; and the degree of matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe. The relevant aspects of extragalactic gamma ray phenomena are emphasized along with the instruments planned. The high energy gamma ray results of forthcoming programs such as GAMMA-1 and the Gamma Ray Observatory should justify even more sophisticated telescopes. These advanced instruments might be placed on the space station currently being considered by NASA.

  17. An analog gamma correction scheme for high dynamic range CMOS logarithmic image sensors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. PMID:25517692

  18. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  19. High-performance gamma spectroscopy for equipment retrieval from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Gary L.; Hillesand, K. E.; Goodwin, S. G.; Kessler, S. F.; Killian, E. W.; Legare, D.; Nelson, Joseph V., Jr.; Richard, R. F.; Nordquist, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to ninety per cent saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  20. The transient gamma-ray spectrometer: A new high resolution detector for gamma-ray burst spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, H.; Baker, R.; Cline, T.L.; Gehrels, N.; Jermakian, J.; Nolan, T.; Ramaty, R.; Sheppard, D.A.; Smith, G.; Stilwell, D.E.; Teegarden, B.J.; Trombka, J.; Owens, A.; Cork, C.P.; Landis, D.A.; Luke, P.N.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.; Pehl, R.H.; Yaver, H.; Hurley, K.; Mathias, S.; Post, A.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) to be flown aboard the WIND spacecraft is primarily designed to perform high resolution spectroscopy of transient gamma-ray events, such as cosmic [gamma]-ray bursts and solar flares, over the energy range 20 keV to 10 MeV with an expected spectroscopic resolution of E/[delta]E = 500. The detector itself consists of a 215 cm[sup 3] high purity n-type Ge crystal kept at cryogenic temperatures by a passive radiative cooler. The geometric field of view defined by the cooler is 170[degrees]. To avoid continuous triggers caused by soft solar events, a thin Be/Cu sun-shield around the sides of the cooler has been provided. A passive Mo/Pb occulter, which modulates signals from within [+-]5[degrees] of the ecliptic plane at the spacecraft spin frequency, is used to identify and study solar flares, as well as emission from the galactic plane and center. Thus, in addition to transient event measurements, the instrument will allow the search for possible diffuse background lines and monitor the 511 keV positron annihilation radiation from the galactic center. In order to handle the typically large burst count rates which can be in excess of 100 kHz, burst data are stored directly in an on-board 2.75 Mbit burst memory with an absolute timing accuracy of [+-]1.5 ms after ground processing. This capacity is sufficient to store the entire spectral data set of all but the largest bursts. The experiment is scheduled to be launched on a Delta II launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral in the fall of 1993.

  1. Development of a High-Average-Power Compton Gamma Source for Lepton Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Yakimenko, Vitaliy; Platonenko, Viktor T.

    2009-01-22

    Gamma-({gamma}{sup -}) ray beams of high average power and peak brightness are of demand for a number of applications in high-energy physics, material processing, medicine, etc. One of such examples is gamma conversion into polarized positrons and muons that is under consideration for projected lepton colliders. A {gamma}-source based on the Compton backscattering from the relativistic electron beam is a promising candidate for this application. Our approach to the high-repetition {gamma}-source assumes placing the Compton interaction point inside a CO{sub 2} laser cavity. A laser pulse interacts with periodical electron bunches on each round-trip inside the laser cavity producing the corresponding train of {gamma}-pulses. The round-trip optical losses can be compensated by amplification in the active laser medium. The major challenge for this approach is in maintaining stable amplification rate for a picosecond CO{sub 2}-laser pulse during multiple resonator round-trips without significant deterioration of its temporal and transverse profiles. Addressing this task, we elaborated on a computer code that allows identifying the directions and priorities in the development of such a multi-pass picosecond CO{sub 2} laser. Proof-of-principle experiments help to verify the model and show the viability of the concept. In these tests we demonstrated extended trains of picosecond CO{sub 2} laser pulses circulating inside the cavity that incorporates the Compton interaction point.

  2. The Prompt and High Energy Emission of Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, P.

    2009-05-25

    I discuss some recent developments concerning the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts, in particular the jet properties and radiation mechanisms, as exemplified by the naked-eye burst GRB 080319b, and the prompt X-ray emission of XRB080109/SN2008d, where the progenitor has, for the first time, been shown to contribute to the prompt emission. I discuss then some recent theoretical calculations of the GeV/TeV spectrum of GRB in the context of both leptonic SSC models and hadronic models. The recent observations by the Fermi satellite of GRB 080916C are then reviewed, and their implications for such models are discussed, together with its interesting determination of a bulk Lorentz factor, and the highest lower limit on the quantum gravity energy scale so far.

  3. TL kinetics study of LiF nanophosphors for high exposures of gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. K.; Vij, Ankush; Kumar, Ravi; Kumar, Satinder; Lochab, S. P.

    2013-02-05

    We report the thermoluminescence (TL) kinetics study of LiF nanophosphors synthesized by chemical co-precipitation at 8.00 pH and exposed to high gamma dose. XRD and TEM studies confirm the formation of single phase LiF nanophosphors. TL properties of LiF phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses of 100 Gy - 70 KGy shows a major peak around 395 K in addition to other low intensity peaks. The major peak in the TL glow curve is almost resolved from other peaks, which has been analyzed using Chen's peak shape method to determine the TL kinetic parameters. TL intensity almost increases linearly with gamma dose, however TL glow curve shift slightly to lower temperature values as a function of gamma exposure.

  4. Tabulated data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Ogelman, H. B.; Tuner, T.; Ozel, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    The second small astronomy satellite (SAS-2) carried a high energy gamma ray telescope into an equitorial orbit with a 2 D inclination, an apogee of 610 km, and a perigee of 440 km. The energy threshold of the instrument was about 30 MeV, the energy of the gamma rays could be measured up to about 200 MeV, and the integral intensity above 200 MeV could also be measured. Summary tables of the gamma ray data are presented in two energy bands, 35-100 MeV and 100 MeV. The sky was divided into 144 solid angle elements, and, in each solid angle element for which data exist, the number of gamma rays observed is given and also the exposure factor. Information is provided to permit conversion of these data into approximate intensities.

  5. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Young, C S; Fatherley, V E; Lopez, F E; Oertel, J A; Malone, R M; Rubery, M S; Horsfield, C J; Stoeffl, W; Zylstra, A B; Shmayda, W T; Batha, S H

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds. PMID:25430303

  6. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ˜400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  7. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H. W. Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2014-11-15

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  8. Development of platinum-modified gamma-nickel+gamma-nickel-aluminum-based alloys for high-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidloff, Andrew James

    Nickel-base superalloys have been used extensively in high-temperature applications where strength and structural stability are required, most notably in aero gas turbine engines. To increase the efficiency of such engines, a continuous increase in superalloy operating temperatures has been observed. As temperatures continue to increase, multiple aspects of alloy stability become increasingly important. In that regard, the high-temperature performance of superalloys can be generally discussed from two important standpoints, surface stability and structural stability. Historically, structural stability has been the primary concern to alloy designers, such that superalloys that may be exposed to high-temperature applications exceeding 1100°C typically utilize a coating for environmental protection. However, the use of coatings introduces potential deficiencies. For instance, aluminide coatings can lead to extensive instabilities when in contact with newer generation superalloys. Also, a few niche applications exist where the use of a coating is impractical. In such cases, the alloys require both environmental resistance and high-temperature strength. The primary goal of this study was to develop novel heat-treatable gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni 3Al-based alloys having excellent resistance to both high-temperature oxidation and creep. The alloys were developed in a systematic manner using multiple alloying additions, including Pt and Ir, i.e., platinum group metals (PGMs). The microstructures and environmental and thermal stabilities of the alloys studied were fully characterized through a series of experiments, including: oxidation (both isothermal and cyclic); hot corrosion (both Type I and Type II); microstructure analysis (including lattice misfit); and phase equilibria calculations with partitioning coefficient analysis. Pt modification was found to significantly affect the lattice misfit of an alloy by expanding the gamma' lattice parameter through its Ni sublattice site

  9. Design of a Multi-Channel Ultra-High Resolution Superconducting Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Terracol, S F; Miyazaki, T; Drury, O B; Ali, Z A; Cunningham, M F; Niedermayr, T R; Barbee Jr., T W; Batteux, J D; Labov, S E

    2004-11-29

    Superconducting Gamma-ray microcalorimeters operated at temperatures around {approx}0.1 K offer an order of magnitude improvement in energy resolution over conventional high-purity Germanium spectrometers. The calorimeters consist of a {approx}1 mm{sup 3} superconducting or insulating absorber and a sensitive thermistor, which are weakly coupled to a cold bath. Gamma-ray capture increases the absorber temperature in proportion to the Gamma-ray energy, this is measured by the thermistor, and both subsequently cool back down to the base temperature through the weak link. We are developing ultra-high-resolution Gamma-ray spectrometers based on Sn absorbers and superconducting Mo/Cu multilayer thermistors for nuclear non-proliferation applications. They have achieved an energy resolution between 60 and 90 eV for Gamma-rays up to 100 keV. We also build two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for user-friendly detector operation at 0.1 K. We present recent results on the performance of single pixel Gamma-ray spectrometers, and discuss the design of a large detector array for increased sensitivity.

  10. The High-energy Continuum Emission of the Gamma-Ray Blazar PKS 0528+134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Urry, C. Megan; Maraschi, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Mukherjee, R.; Pesce, Joseph E.; Wagner, S. J.; Wehrle, A. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lin, Y. C.; VonMintigny, C.

    1997-01-01

    We present Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observations of the gamma-ray blazar PKS 0528 + 134, obtained at two separate epochs in 1994 August and 1995 March. These data represent the first measurement of the X-ray continuum emission of this source in the medium-hard X-ray band. Both ASCA spectra are consistent with a single power law with photon index GAMMA approx. = 1.7-1.8 and column density N(sub H) approx. = 5 x 10(exp 21)/ sq cm, higher than Galactic. The X-ray flux increased by a factor of 4 in approx. 7 months without appreciable change of the spectral shape. During the lower state of 1994 August, PKS 0528 + 134 was observed simultaneously in the optical, X-rays, and at gamma-ray energies with Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). The gamma-ray intensity is the faintest detected thus far in the source, with a steep spectrum (GAMMA approx. = 2.7). The extrapolation of the X-ray continuum to the gamma-ray range requires a sharp spectral break at approx. 10(exp 22) Hz. We discuss the radio through gamma-ray spectral energy distribution of PKS 0528 + 134, comparing the low state of 1994 August with the flare state of 1993 March. We show that in PKS 0528 + 134, a non-negligible contribution from the external radiation field is present and that, although synchrotron self-Compton scenarios cannot be ruled out, inverse Compton upscattering of thermal seed photons may be the dominant cooling process for the production of the high-energy continuum in this blazar.

  11. Isotopic composition analysis and age dating of uranium samples by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, A. I.; Pantelica, A.; Sima, O.; Fugaru, V.

    2016-09-01

    Non-destructive methods were applied to determine the isotopic composition and the time elapsed since last chemical purification of nine uranium samples. The applied methods are based on measuring gamma and X radiations of uranium samples by high resolution low energy gamma spectrometric system with planar high purity germanium detector and low background gamma spectrometric system with coaxial high purity germanium detector. The "Multigroup γ-ray Analysis Method for Uranium" (MGAU) code was used for the precise determination of samples' isotopic composition. The age of the samples was determined from the isotopic ratio 214Bi/234U. This ratio was calculated from the analyzed spectra of each uranium sample, using relative detection efficiency. Special attention is paid to the coincidence summing corrections that have to be taken into account when performing this type of analysis. In addition, an alternative approach for the age determination using full energy peak efficiencies obtained by Monte Carlo simulations with the GESPECOR code is described.

  12. Status and future of high energy diffuse gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    There are two distinctly different high energy diffuse gamma-ray components, one well correlated with broad galactic features and the other apparently isotropic and presumably extragalactic. The observed diffuse galactic high energy gamma radiation is generally thought to be produced in interactions between the cosmic rays and the interstellar matter and photons. It should then ultimately be possible to obtain from the diffuse galactic emission a detailed picture of the galactic cosmic-ray distribution, a high contrast view of the general structure of the galaxy, and further insight into molecular clouds. Two of the candidates for the explanation of the extragalactic diffuse radiation are the sum of emission from active galaxies and matter-antimatter annihilation. A major advancement in the study of the properties of both galactic and extragalactic gamma radiation should occur over the next decade.

  13. Intergalactic Extinction of High Energy Gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the determination of the intergalactic pair-production absorption coefficient as derived by Stecker and De Jager by making use of a new empirically based calculation of the spectral energy distribution of the intergalactic infrared radiation field as given by Malkan and Stecker. We show that the results of the Malkan and Stecker calculation agree well with recent data on the infrared background. We then show that Whipple observations of the flaring gamma-ray spectrum of Mrk 421 hint at extragalactic absorption and that the HEGRA observations of the flaring spectrum of Mrk 501 appear to strongly indicate extragalactic absorption. We also discuss the determination of the y-ray opacity at higher redshifts, following the treatment of Salamon and Stecker. We give a predicted spectrum, with absorption included for PKS 2155-304. This XBL lies at a redshift of 0.12, the highest redshift source yet observed at an energy above 0.3 TeV. This source should have its spectrum steepened by approx. 1 in its spectral index between approx. 0.3 and approx. 3 TeV and should show an absorption cutoff above approx. 6 TeV.

  14. Common origin of the high energy astronomical gamma rays, neutrinos and cosmic ray positrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2016-03-01

    We show that the observed fluxes, spectra and sky distributions of the high energy astronomical neutrinos, gamma rays and cosmic ray positrons satisfy the simple relations expected from their common production in hadronic collisions in/near source of high energy cosmic rays with diffuse matter.

  15. High energy neutron and gamma-radiation generated during the solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocharov, G. E.; Mandzhavidze, N. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of high energy neutrons and gamma rays generation in the solar conditions is considered. It is shown that due to a peculiarity of generation and propagation of neutrons corresponding solar flares should be localized at high helio-longitudes.

  16. X- and gamma ray observations in high-altitude thunderstorms in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N. A.; Smith, D. M.; Lara, A.

    2014-12-01

    High-energy emission from lightning is more easily measured at high altitudes, close to or within the electric fields accelerating the energetic particles. Gamma rays from long duration glows and x-rays from stepped leaders attenuate with distance. From mountaintops, it may be possible to measure an amplified version of the x-rays commonly seen from stepped leaders. These amplified x-rays could arise from the thunderstorm electric field multiplying the energetic particles via Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanches (RREA). Amplified stepped leaders may be similar or even the same as terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), which need long-range electric fields to produce the intensities seen from space. We deployed two gamma-ray detectors at the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory site on the northeastern slope of the Sierra Negra near Puebla, Mexico at 4100 meters to search for amplified leader events and also for the minutes-long gamma-ray glows observed from thunderstorms by other groups from the ground, balloons, and aircraft. We will also examine the data from HAWC itself, a large array of water tanks viewed by photomultiplier tubes, to look for signals simultaneous with any in our scintillators. In principle, large Cherenkov detectors and small scintillators can give complementary data about the radiation field, emphasizing the total energy content and the number flux of particles, respectively. We will present results from the summer 2014 deployment and talk about future lightning gamma-ray detectors to be deployed at HAWC.

  17. High energy (gamma)-ray emission from the starburst nucleus of NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo-Santamaria, E; Torres, D F

    2005-06-15

    The high density medium that characterizes the central regions of starburst galaxies and its power to accelerate particles up to relativistic energies make these objects good candidates as {gamma}-rays sources. In this paper, a self-consistent model of the multifrequency emission of the starburst galaxy NGC 253, from radio to gamma-rays, is presented. The model is in agreement with all current measurements and provides predictions for the high energy behavior of the NGC 253 central region. Prospects for observations with the HESS array and GLAST satellite are especially discussed.

  18. Neutron detection in a high gamma ray background with liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Viesti, G.; Nebbia, G.

    2013-04-19

    The capability of liquid scintillator (namely 2'' Multiplication-Sign 2'' cells of EJ301 and EJ309) of detecting neutrons in a very high gamma ray background is explored. A weak {sup 252}Cf source has been detected in a high {sup 137}Cs gamma ray background corresponding to a dose rate of 100 {mu}Sv/h with probability of detection in compliance with IEC requirements for hand held instruments. Tests were performed with new generation of CAEN digitizers, in particular the V1720 (8 Channel 12bit 250 MS/s) one.

  19. CeBr3 as a Room-Temperature, High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Michael Reed, Ding Yuan, Alexis Reed, and Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2009-09-01

    Cerium bromide (CeBr3) has become a material of interest in the race for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at room temperature. This investigation quantified the potential of CeBr3 as a room temperature, high-resolution gamma-ray detector. The performance of CeBr3 crystals was compared to other scintillation crystals of similar dimensions and detection environments. Comparison of self-activity of CeBr3 to cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce) was performed. Energy resolution and relative intrinsic efficiency were measured and are presented.

  20. Title: MAGIC detects exceptionally high activity from PKS 1510-089 at very high energy gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2016-06-01

    The MAGIC telescopes have detected an increase in the Very High Energy gamma-ray flux from PKS 1510-089 (RA=15 12 50.5, dec=-09 06 00, J2000.0). The preliminary analysis of the MAGIC data taken on 2016/05/30 for 2.7 hours, indicates a highly significant signal (significance > 60 sigma).

  1. Fermi observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from GRB 080916C.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Burrows, D; Busetto, G; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, A; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Deklotz, M; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, J; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hernando Morat, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knödlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S-H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, S; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Mészáros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, V; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Preece, R; Rainò, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Reyes, L C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgrò, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, J-L; Stecker, F W; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tagliaferri, G; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-03-27

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass. PMID:19228997

  2. Modulated High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from the Microquasar Cygnus X-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi LAT Collaboration; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chaty, S.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbel, S.; Corbet, R.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dubus, G.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Koerding, E.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, J.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marchand, L.; Marelli, M.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McColl, N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Migliari, S.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Ong, R. A.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pooley, G.; Porter, T. A.; Pottschmidt, K.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Richards, J. L.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, J.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stevenson, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tomsick, J. A.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilms, J.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. W.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-12-01

    Microquasars are accreting black holes or neutron stars in binary systems with associated relativistic jets. Despite their frequent outburst activity, they have never been unambiguously detected emitting high-energy gamma rays. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected a variable high-energy source coinciding with the position of the x-ray binary and microquasar Cygnus X-3. Its identification with Cygnus X-3 is secured by the detection of its orbital period in gamma rays, as well as the correlation of the LAT flux with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The gamma-ray emission probably originates from within the binary system, opening new areas in which to study the formation of relativistic jets.

  3. Size distributions of air showers accompanied with high energy gamma ray bundles observed at Mt. Chacaltaya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matano, T.; Machida, M.; Tsuchima, I.; Kawasumi, N.; Honda, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Martinic, N.; Zapata, J.; Navia, C. E.; Aquirre, C.

    1985-01-01

    Size distributions of air showers accompanied with bundle of high energy gamma rays and/or large size bursts under emulsion chambers, to study the composition of primary cosmic rays and also characteristics of high energy nuclear interaction. Air showers initiated by particles with a large cross section of interaction may develop from narrow region of the atmosphere near the top. Starting levels of air showers by particles with smaller cross section fluctuate in wider region of the atmosphere. Air showers of extremely small size accompanied with bundle of gamma rays may be ones initiated by protons at lower level after penetrating deep atmosphere without interaction. It is determined that the relative size distribution according to the total energy of bundle of gamma rays and the total burst size observed under 15 cm lead absorber.

  4. Modulated high-energy gamma-ray emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-3.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chaty, S; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Corbel, S; Corbet, R; Dermer, C D; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dubus, G; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hill, A B; Hjalmarsdotter, L; Horan, D; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Koerding, E; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marchand, L; Marelli, M; Max-Moerbeck, W; Mazziotta, M N; McColl, N; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Migliari, S; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Ong, R A; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pooley, G; Porter, T A; Pottschmidt, K; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Readhead, A; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Richards, J L; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, J; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stevenson, M; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tomsick, J A; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Wilms, J; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-12-11

    Microquasars are accreting black holes or neutron stars in binary systems with associated relativistic jets. Despite their frequent outburst activity, they have never been unambiguously detected emitting high-energy gamma rays. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected a variable high-energy source coinciding with the position of the x-ray binary and microquasar Cygnus X-3. Its identification with Cygnus X-3 is secured by the detection of its orbital period in gamma rays, as well as the correlation of the LAT flux with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The gamma-ray emission probably originates from within the binary system, opening new areas in which to study the formation of relativistic jets. PMID:19965378

  5. High performance detectors for upgraded gamma ray diagnostics for JET DT campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zychor, I.; Boltruczyk, G.; Burakowska, A.; Craciunescu, T.; Fernandes, A.; Figueiredo, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Gierlik, M.; Gosk, M.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Kaveney, G.; Kiptily, V.; Korolczuk, S.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Mianowski, S.; Moszynski, M.; Murari, A.; Nocente, M.; Pereira, R. C.; Perseo, V.; Rigamonti, D.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Sibczynski, P.; Santos, B.; Soare, S.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Szawlowski, M.; Szczesniak, T.; Szewinski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Urban, A.; Zoita, V. L.; contributors, JET

    2016-06-01

    In forthcoming deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on JET a significant population of alpha-particles will be produced. For operating alpha-particle diagnostics at high DT neutron fluxes, specific improvements have to be made. Proposed new detectors for gamma-ray measurements will be based on CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce scintillators. They are characterized by a good energy resolution, a relatively high detection efficiency for a few MeV gamma-rays and a fast response time. An overview of scintillator parameters is presented. A description of the properties of photodetectors is given to indicate optimal setups. Results of measurements, using gamma-ray sources with energies up to a few MeV, are discussed with relation to the DT campaign requirements.

  6. The high-energy diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background radiation from blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Salamon, M. H.; Malkan, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    We predict the spectrum and flux of the high-energy diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background radiation produced by blazars. Our calculations are based on the Compton Observatory EGRET observations of high-energy gamma-rays from these objects, the Whipple observation of TeV gamma-rays from Mrk 421, and radio population studies of flat-spectrum radio sources. Our statistical analysis gives a result consistent with a linear correlation. We then use the radio luminosity function and redshift evolution to calculate the gamma-ray background. We find that blazars cannot account for the flux level or steep spectrum of the background observed by SAS 2 in the sub-GeV range, but could likely provide the dominant background component in the multi-GeV energy range and above. We predict a differential photon spectral index for this component of about 2 up to about 10 GeV. Above that energy, the spectrum should gradually steepen owing to pair production by interactions of the gamma-rays with intergalactic infrared photons. Using the calculations of this effect by Stecker et al. (1992), we estimate a spectral index of about 3.5 for energies above a TeV.

  7. Very high energy gamma rays from the Crab nebula and pulsar

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    This project is to search for very high energy (VHE) (10(exp 11) to 10(exp 14)eV) gamma rays from the Crab nebula and pulsar using the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique. The technique uses an array of 37 photomultiplier tubes to record the images of the Cherenkov light pulses generated by energetic particles in the air showers initiated by VHE gamma rays or charged cosmic rays. Gamma ray like events are selected from numerous cosmic ray events based on the predicted properties of the image, such as the size, shape, and orientation with respect to the axis of the detector. A steady weak flux of VHE gamma rays from the Crab is detected at high statistical significance (9 sigma), which is not usually achieved in VHE gamma ray astronomy. No strong evidence of pulsed emission is found when the same data is folded at the Crab pulsar's radio ephemeris. The angular resolution of the technique cannot separate the emission coming from the nebula from that from the pulsar. Although it is generally believed that the unpulsed emission is coming from the nebula, there may be an unpulsed component coming at only a couple of light cylinder radii away from the pulsar too. Using the outer gap model of pulsar, the spectrum is derived and is found to be compatible with the observations.

  8. Phase stability of {epsilon} and {gamma} HNIW (CL-20) at high-pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gump, Jared C.; Stoltz, Chad A.; Peiris, Suhithi M.

    2007-12-12

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is one of the few ingredients developed since World War II to be considered for transition to military use. Five polymorphs have been identified for CL-20 by FTIR measurements ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, {epsilon}, {zeta}). As CL-20 is transitioned into munitions it will become necessary to predict its response under conditions of detonation, for performance evaluation. Such predictive modeling requires a phase diagram and basic thermodynamic properties of the various phases at high pressure and temperature. Therefore, the epsilon and gamma phases of CL-20 at static high-pressure and temperature were investigated using synchrotron angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments. The samples were compressed and heated using diamond anvil cells (DAC). Pressures and temperatures achieved were around 5 GPa and 240 deg. C, respectively. The epsilon phase was stable to 6.3 GPa at ambient temperature. When heated at ambient pressure the epsilon phase was sustained to a temperature of 120 deg. C then underwent a transition to the gamma phase above 125 deg. C and then thermal decomposition occurred above 150 deg. C. Upon compression, the gamma phase underwent a phase transition at both ambient temperature and 140 deg. C. Pressure--volume data for the epsilon and gamma phase at ambient temperature and the epsilon phase at 75 deg. C were fit to the Birch-Murnaghan formalism to obtain isothermal equations of state.

  9. Ground-based very high energy gamma ray astronomy: Observational highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turver, K. E.

    1986-01-01

    It is now more than 20 years since the first ground based gamma ray experiments involving atmospheric Cerenkov radiation were undertaken. The present highlights in observational ground-based very high energy (VHE) gamma ray astronomy and the optimism about an interesting future for the field follow progress in these areas: (1) the detection at increased levels of confidence of an enlarged number of sources so that at present claims were made for the detection, at the 4 to 5 sd level of significance, of 8 point sources; (2) the replication of the claimed detections with, for the first time, confirmation of the nature and detail of the emission; and (3) the extension of gamma ray astronomy to the ultra high energy (UHE) domain. The pattern, if any, to emerge from the list of sources claimed so far is that X-ray binary sources appear to be copious emitters of gamma rays over at least 4 decades of energy. These X-ray sources which behave as VHE and UHE gamma ray emitters are examined.

  10. Microstructure of massively transformed {gamma}-TiAl phase studied by high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, E.; Kumagai, T.; Kajiwara, S.; Nakamura, M.

    1997-12-31

    A microstructure of the massively transformed {gamma}-TiAl ({gamma}{sub m}) phase in a Ti-48at.%Al alloy, which was heat treated in the high-temperature {alpha}-Ti (disordered hcp) single phase field (1,683 K), followed by ice water quenching, has been examined using high-resolution electron microscopy. The characteristic features of the microstructure originated from the {alpha}{yields}{gamma} massive transformation have been clarified in detail, which are as follows. (1) Extremely thin hcp plates (about 0.8--2nm in thickness), which are considered to be a retained {alpha} phase, are found to exist in the {gamma}{sub m} phase. (2) Twin boundaries are found to be not flat interfaces, that is, twin interfaces are not on the exact (111) mirror plane. This situation is attributed to the existence of a number of partial dislocations at the twin boundaries. (3) Antiphase relationship between the regions either side of the thin rotated domain wall is confirmed. The validity of this situation is explained by assuming that the thin rotated domain wall has been grown from a simple antiphase domain boundary. On the basis of these facts, mechanism of the {alpha}{yields}{gamma} massive transformation has been discussed.

  11. Some evidence for high energy gamma-ray sources at large galactic latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamenov, J. N.; Karakula, S.; Tkaczyk, W.

    1985-01-01

    The arrival directions of the gamma-quanta with energies of about 10 to 15th power eV which were registrated by Tien Shan experiment were compared with COS-B observations. On the basis of the Monte Carlo simulations it was shown with low probability that arrival directions of Tien Shan gamma-quanta initiated showers are not uniformly distributed. It is shown that in the region not seen by COS-B mission, the high energy gamma-ray sources should be located at position of 90 deg. 1 sup 11 130 deg and b sup 11 or = 50 deg. The integral intensity of these sources should be I ( 10 to the 15th power eV) = 4.8 + or - 1.7).10 to the 13th power/sq cm/s/str. There is no coincidence between the gamma-quanta registrated by Tien Shan experiment with Geminga intense COS-B gamma source. So it is shown that the integral photon spectrum of Geminga (I(e) approx E sup-Beta, where Beta = 0.8 for E 1 GeV) becomes steeper (Beta 1.2) in high energy region with probability 99.9.%.

  12. Generating Polarized High-Brightness Muon Beams With High-Energy Gammas

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2009-01-22

    Hadron colliders are impractical at very high energies as effective interaction energy is a fraction of the energies of the beams and luminosity must rise as energy squared. Further, the prevailing gluon-gluon background radiation makes it difficult to sort out events. e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, on other hand, are constrained at TeV energies by beamstrahlung radiation and also by cost as long linacs are required to avoid synchrotron radiation in the rings. A muon collider will have the same advantages in energy reach as an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, but without prohibitive beamstrahlung- and synchrotron- radiation. Generation of the high-brightness polarized muon ({mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +}) beams through gamma conversion into pairs in the nuclei field is considered in this paper. The dominant effect in the interaction of the high-energy photons with the solid target will be the production of electron-positron pairs. The low-phase space of the resulting muon beams adequately compensates for the small probability of generating a {mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +} pair.

  13. An enhanced high-resolution EMCCD-based gamma camera using SiPM side detection.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, J W T; Korevaar, M A N; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schaart, D R; Goorden, M C; Beekman, F J

    2010-11-21

    Electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) coupled to scintillation crystals can be used for high-resolution imaging of gamma rays in scintillation counting mode. However, the detection of false events as a result of EMCCD noise deteriorates the spatial and energy resolution of these gamma cameras and creates a detrimental background in the reconstructed image. In order to improve the performance of an EMCCD-based gamma camera with a monolithic scintillation crystal, arrays of silicon photon-multipliers (SiPMs) can be mounted on the sides of the crystal to detect escaping scintillation photons, which are otherwise neglected. This will provide a priori knowledge about the correct number and energies of gamma interactions that are to be detected in each CCD frame. This information can be used as an additional detection criterion, e.g. for the rejection of otherwise falsely detected events. The method was tested using a gamma camera based on a back-illuminated EMCCD, coupled to a 3 mm thick continuous CsI:Tl crystal. Twelve SiPMs have been mounted on the sides of the CsI:Tl crystal. When the information of the SiPMs is used to select scintillation events in the EMCCD image, the background level for (99m)Tc is reduced by a factor of 2. Furthermore, the SiPMs enable detection of (125)I scintillations. A hybrid SiPM-/EMCCD-based gamma camera thus offers great potential for applications such as in vivo imaging of gamma emitters. PMID:21030743

  14. The High-Energy Continuum Emission of the Gamma-Ray Blazar PKS 0528+134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Urry, C. Megan; Maraschi, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Mukherjee, R.; Pesce, Joseph E.; Wagner, S. J.; Wehrle, A. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lin, Y. C.

    1997-01-01

    We present Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observations of the gamma-ray blazar PKS 0528 + 134, obtained at two separate epochs in 1994 August and 1995 March. These data represent the first measurement of the X-ray continuum emission of this source in the medium-hard X-ray band. Both ASCA spectra are consistent with a single power law with photon index GAMMA approximate 1.7-1.8 and column density N(sub H) approximately 5 x 10(exp 21) /sq cm, higher than Galactic. The X-ray flux increased by a factor of 4 in approximately 7 months without appreciable change of the spectral shape. During the lower state of 1994 August, PKS 0528 + 134 was observed simultaneously in the optical, X-rays, and at gamma-ray energies with EGRET. The gamma-ray intensity is the faintest detected thus far in the source, with a steep spectrum (GAMMA approximately 2.7). The extrapolation of the X-ray continuum to the gamma-ray range requires a sharp spectral break at approximately 10(exp 22) Hz. We discuss the radio through gamma-ray spectral energy distribution of PKS 0528 + 134, comparing the low state of 1994 August with the flare state of 1993 March. We show that in PKS 0528 + 134, a non-negligible contribution from the external radiation field is present and that, although synchrotron self-Compton scenarios cannot be ruled out, inverse Compton upscattering of thermal seed photons may be the dominant cooling process for the production of the high-energy continuum in this blazar.

  15. Very high energy gamma-ray emission from Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxon, Dana Boltuch

    Supernova remnant (SNR) G120.1+1.4 (also known as Tycho's SNR) is the remnant of one of only five confirmed historical supernovae. As such, it has been well studied across the electromagnetic spectrum. This thesis describes the first statistically significant detection of very high energy (VHE) (˜ 100 GeV to 100 TeV) gamma rays from Tycho's SNR, reported in 2011 by the VERITAS collaboration. The analysis that led to that detection was performed by this author, and this dissertation will discuss the process in detail. Subsequently, a statistically significant detection in high energy (HE) (˜ 30 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma rays was reported by other authors using data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Comparison of models to the spectral energy distribution of the photon flux from this remnant in HE and VHE gamma rays favors a hadronic origin for the emission, particularly when combined with current X-ray data, although a leptonic origin cannot be ruled out at this time. This is significant because a confirmed hadronic origin for the gamma-ray emission would identify this SNR as a site of cosmic ray acceleration, providing observational evidence for the idea that SNRs are the source of the Galactic cosmic ray population. Chapter 1 of this dissertation will provide historical background on Tycho's SNR, along with a summary of modern observations of the remnant across the electromagnetic spectrum. Chapter 2 is a discussion of the role played by SNRs in the process of cosmic ray acceleration, including both theoretical underpinnings and observational evidence. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the field of VHE gamma-ray astronomy, with discussions of gamma-ray production mechanisms and gamma-ray source classes. Chapter 4 describes the instruments used to observe HE and VHE gamma rays. Chapter 5 is a discussion of general analysis methods and techniques for data from Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). Chapter 6 provides details about the specific

  16. High energy gamma-ray astronomy; Proceedings of the International Conference, ANN Arbor, MI, Oct. 2-5, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James

    The present volume on high energy gamma-ray astronomy discusses the composition and properties of heavy cosmic rays greater than 10 exp 12 eV, implications of the IRAS Survey for galactic gamma-ray astronomy, gamma-ray emission from young neutron stars, and high-energy diffuse gamma rays. Attention is given to observations of TeV photons at the Whipple Observatory, TeV gamma rays from millisecond pulsars, recent data from the CYGNUS experiment, and recent results from the Woomera Telescope. Topics addressed include bounds on a possible He/VHE gamma-ray line signal of Galactic dark matter, albedo gamma rays from cosmic ray interactions on the solar surface, source studies, and the CANGAROO project. Also discussed are neural nets and other methods for maximizing the sensitivity of a low-threshold VHE gamma-ray telescope, a prototype water-Cerenkov air-shower detector, detection of point sources with spark chamber gamma-ray telescopes, and real-time image parameterization in high energy gamma-ray astronomy using transputers. (For individual items see A93-25002 to A93-25039)

  17. A field-deployable gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Salwen, C.; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Prototype gamma-ray spectrometers utilizing xenon gas at high pressure, suitable for applications in the nuclear safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation communities, have been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). These spectrometers function as ambient-temperature ionization chambers detecting gamma rays with good efficiency in the energy range 50 keV - 2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. They are capable of prolonged, low-power operation without a requirement for cryogenic fluids or other cooling mechanisms, and with the addition of small quantities of {sup 3}He gas, can function simultaneously as efficient thermal neutron detectors.

  18. SAS-2 observations of high energy gamma rays from discrete sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The SAS-2 identified six localized high energy (greater than 35 MeV) gamma ray sources. Four of these are the radio pulsars, PSR 0531+21, PSR 0833-45, PSR 1818-04, and PSR 1717-46 discovered in a search of 75 radio pulsars. The fact that only one of these is observed in X-rays, and the significant differences in pulse profiles in the gamma ray and radio observations, leads to the speculation that different mechanisms are involved.

  19. ADONIS, high count-rate HP-Ge {gamma} spectrometry algorithm: Irradiated fuel assembly measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, P.; Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T.; Normand, S.

    2011-07-01

    ADONIS is a digital system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by CEA. This system achieves high count-rate gamma-ray spectrometry with correct dynamic dead-time correction, up to, at least, more than an incoming count rate of 3.10{sup 6} events per second. An application of such a system at AREVA NC's La Hague plant is the irradiated fuel scanning facility before reprocessing. The ADONIS system is presented, then the measurement set-up and, last, the measurement results with reference measurements. (authors)

  20. High temperature matter and gamma ray spectra from microscopic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghigh, Ramin; Kapusta, Joseph

    2002-03-01

    The relativistic viscous fluid equations describing the outflow of high temperature matter created via Hawking radiation from microscopic black holes are solved numerically for a realistic equation of state. We focus on black holes with initial temperatures greater than 100 GeV and lifetimes less than 6 days. The spectra of direct photons and photons from π0 decay are calculated for energies greater than 1 GeV. We calculate the diffuse gamma ray spectrum from black holes distributed in our galactic halo. However, the most promising route for their observation is to search for point sources emitting gamma rays of ever-increasing energy.

  1. A Luminous High-Mass Gamma-ray Binary in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbet, Robin; Cheung, Chi C.; Chomiuk, Laura; Coe, Malcolm J.; Coley, Joel Barry; Dubus, Guillaume; Edwards, Philip; Martin, Pierrick; McBride, Vanessa; Stevens, Jamie; Strader, Jay; Townsend, Lee

    2016-04-01

    We have been undertaking a search for gamma-ray binaries from the detection of periodic modulation in light curves from all sources in the Fermi LAT 3FGL catalog. From this search we identified a 10 day modulation in the direction of the LMC. A localization of the modulation indicates that it arises from a point source identified in a recent Fermi-LAT survey of the LMC. The nature and identification of this source had been uncertain. We find that the counterpart is a previously reported candidate high-mass X-ray binary with an O6III(f) primary located in a supernova remnant. Swift XRT observations of this source show modulation on the 10 day gamma-ray period, but with a different epoch of maximum flux. ATCA radio observations (5.5 and 9 GHz) also reveal variable radio emission from this source. Optical spectroscopy (SAAO and SOAR) show that while there are no large changes in the spectrum, there is apparent radial velocity modulation. At all wavebands this new gamma-ray binary is significantly more luminous than comparable Galactic systems, even though very few of these are known. The discovery of this extragalactic gamma-ray binary may have implications for the overall population of gamma-ray binaries and their evolutionary pathways and lifetimes.

  2. A review of recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from high-altitude balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1994-06-01

    This paper reviews recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from experiments flown on high-altitude balloons. New generation balloon-borne imaging experiments have produced the first gamma-ray maps of the Galactic center (GC) region. Balloon flights of new gamma-ray spectrometers with improved sensitivity have provided important new information on the GC annihilation line. For the first time, the narrow 511 keV line as been resolved (FWHM approx. = 3 keV). A very interesting spectral feature at approximately 170 keV has been attributed to backscattered annihilation, probably from the vicinity of a compact object. New results from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO)/OSSE and Granat/SIGMA experiments on the annihilation line, when considered together with the recent balloon results, have added greatly to our knowledge and understanding of the origin and distribution of this emission. Balloon-borne instruments have made important measurements of gamma-ray continuum and line emission from SN 1987A. The GRIS spectrometer unambiguously resolved the 847 and 1238 keV line emission from radioactive Co-56 synthesized during the explosion. This data indicated that simple spherically symmetric and homogeneous models did not provide an adequate description of the expanding SN shell.

  3. Radio galaxies dominate the high-energy diffuse gamma-ray background

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim; Lopez, Alejandro

    2016-08-09

    It has been suggested that unresolved radio galaxies and radio quasars (sometimes referred to as misaligned active galactic nuclei) could be responsible for a significant fraction of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background. In this study, we use the latest data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to characterize the gamma-ray emission from a sample of 51 radio galaxies. In addition to those sources that had previously been detected using Fermi data, we report here the first statistically significant detection of gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxies 3C 212, 3C 411, and B3 0309+411B. Combining this information with the radio fluxes,more » radio luminosity function, and redshift distribution of this source class, we find that radio galaxies dominate the diffuse gamma-ray background, generating 77.2(+25.4)(-9.4)% of this emission at energies above ~1 GeV . We discuss the implications of this result and point out that it provides support for scenarios in which IceCube's high-energy astrophysical neutrinos also originate from the same population of radio galaxies.« less

  4. A review of recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from high-altitude balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from experiments flown on high-altitude balloons. New generation balloon-borne imaging experiments have produced the first gamma-ray maps of the Galactic center (GC) region. Balloon flights of new gamma-ray spectrometers with improved sensitivity have provided important new information on the GC annihilation line. For the first time, the narrow 511 keV line as been resolved (FWHM approx. = 3 keV). A very interesting spectral feature at approximately 170 keV has been attributed to backscattered annihilation, probably from the vicinity of a compact object. New results from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO)/OSSE and Granat/SIGMA experiments on the annihilation line, when considered together with the recent balloon results, have added greatly to our knowledge and understanding of the origin and distribution of this emission. Balloon-borne instruments have made important measurements of gamma-ray continuum and line emission from SN 1987A. The GRIS spectrometer unambiguously resolved the 847 and 1238 keV line emission from radioactive Co-56 synthesized during the explosion. This data indicated that simple spherically symmetric and homogeneous models did not provide an adequate description of the expanding SN shell.

  5. Radio galaxies dominate the high-energy diffuse gamma-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim; Lopez, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested that unresolved radio galaxies and radio quasars (sometimes referred to as misaligned active galactic nuclei) could be responsible for a significant fraction of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background. In this study, we use the latest data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to characterize the gamma-ray emission from a sample of 51 radio galaxies. In addition to those sources that had previously been detected using Fermi data, we report here the first statistically significant detection of gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxies 3C 212, 3C 411, and B3 0309+411B. Combining this information with the radio fluxes, radio luminosity function, and redshift distribution of this source class, we find that radio galaxies dominate the diffuse gamma-ray background, generating 77.2+25.4‑9.4% of this emission at energies above ~1 GeV . We discuss the implications of this result and point out that it provides support for scenarios in which IceCube's high-energy astrophysical neutrinos also originate from the same population of radio galaxies.

  6. Spatial Working Memory in Humans Depends on Theta and High Gamma Synchronization in the Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Alekseichuk, Ivan; Turi, Zsolt; Amador de Lara, Gabriel; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2016-06-20

    Previous, albeit correlative, findings have shown that the neural mechanisms underlying working memory critically require cross-structural and cross-frequency coupling mechanisms between theta and gamma neural oscillations. However, the direct causality between cross-frequency coupling and working memory performance remains to be demonstrated. Here we externally modulated the interaction of theta and gamma rhythms in the prefrontal cortex using novel cross-frequency protocols of transcranial alternating current stimulation to affect spatial working memory performance in humans. Enhancement of working memory performance and increase of global neocortical connectivity were observed when bursts of high gamma oscillations (80-100 Hz) coincided with the peaks of the theta waves, whereas superimposition on the trough of the theta wave and low gamma frequency protocols were ineffective. Thus, our results demonstrate the sensitivity of working memory performance and global neocortical connectivity to the phase and rhythm of the externally driven theta-gamma cross-frequency synchronization. PMID:27238283

  7. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  8. Conducting High Cycle Fatigue Strength Step Tests on Gamma TiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad; Draper, Sue; Pereira, J. Mike

    2002-01-01

    High cycle fatigue strength testing of gamma TiAl by the step test method is investigated. A design of experiments was implemented to determine if the coaxing effect occurred during testing. Since coaxing was not observed, step testing was deemed a suitable method to define the fatigue strength at 106 cycles.

  9. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  10. Chemical synthesis of nucleoside-gamma-[32P]triphosphates of high specific activity.

    PubMed

    Janecka, A; Panusz, H; Pankowski, J; Koziołkiewicz, W

    1980-01-01

    A simple chemical procedure for the preparation of four common ribonucleoside 5-gamma-[32P]triphosphates of high specific activity (up to 10 Ci/mmole) based on the condensation of orthophosphoric acid with the corresponding nucleoside 5-diphosphate in the presence of ethyl chloroformate as well as the methods of purification and identification of the products are described. PMID:7375446

  11. A new ultra high energy gamma ray telescope at Ohya mine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoki, T.; Higashi, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Kitamura, T.; Matsuno, S.; Mizutani, K.; Mitsui, K.; Muraki, Y.; Okada, A.; Ohashi, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The search for ultra high energy gamma rays coming from point sources is one of the main experimental aims. A fast air shower timing system was constructed at ICRR for the study of the angular resolution of the system and operated approximately half a year. The characteristics of the surface array of Ohya air shower telescope is described.

  12. Search for very high energy gamma rays from the galactic plane and other possible galactic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Periale, L.; Vallania, P.

    An extensive air shower array is operating at the Plateau Rosa station (3.500 m.a.s.l.) since 1980 in the search for very high energy gamma-ray sources. The authors discuss the stability of the array and present the results obtained from Feb. 1982 to Aug. 1985, concerning D.C., periodic and sporadic emissions.

  13. Monitoring performance of the cameras under the high dose-rate gamma ray environments.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min

    2014-05-01

    CCD/CMOS cameras, loaded on a robot system, are generally used as the eye of the robot and monitoring unit. A major problem that arises when dealing with images provided by CCD/CMOS cameras under severe accident situations of a nuclear power plant is the presence of speckles owing to the high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. To use a CCD/CMOS camera as a monitoring unit in a high radiation area, the legibility of the camera image in such intense gamma-radiation fields should therefore be defined. In this paper, the authors describe the monitoring index as a figure of merit of the camera's legibleness under a high dose-rate gamma ray irradiation environment. From a low dose-rate (10 Gy h) to a high dose-rate (200 Gy h) level, the legible performances of the cameras owing to the speckles are evaluated. The numbers of speckles generated by gamma ray irradiation in the camera image are calculated by an image processing technique. The legibility of the sensor indicator (thermo/hygrometer) owing to the number of speckles is also presented. PMID:24667385

  14. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 080825C

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E. E-mail: j.granot@herts.ac.u

    2009-12-10

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. We also present some theoretical interpretation of GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.

  15. The estimation of background production by cosmic rays in high-energy gamma ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, H. L.; Nolan, P. L.; Lin, Y. C.; Koch, D. G.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hughes, E. B.

    1991-01-01

    A calculational method of estimating instrumental background in high-energy gamma-ray telescopes, using the hadronic Monte Carlo code FLUKA87, is presented. The method is applied to the SAS-2 and EGRET telescope designs and is also used to explore the level of background to be expected for alternative configurations of the proposed GRITS telescope, which adapts the external fuel tank of a Space Shuttle as a gamma-ray telescope with a very large collecting area. The background produced in proton-beam tests of EGRET is much less than the predicted level. This discrepancy appears to be due to the FLUKA87 inability to transport evaporation nucleons. It is predicted that the background in EGRET will be no more than 4-10 percent of the extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation.

  16. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-01-01

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  17. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of culverts containing transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.

    1990-12-31

    A number of concrete culverts used to retrievably store drummed, dry, radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS), were suspected of containing ambiguous quantities of transuranic (TRU) nuclides. These culverts were assayed in place for Pu-239 content using thermal and fast neutron counting techniques. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy on 17 culverts, having neutron emission rates several times higher than expected, showed characteristic gamma-ray signatures of neutron emitters other than Pu-239 (e.g., Pu-238, Pu/Be, or Am/Be neutron sources). This study confirmed the Pu-239 content of the culverts with anomalous neutron rates and established limits on the Pu-239 mass in each of the 17 suspect culverts by in-field, non-intrusive gamma-ray measurements.

  18. High-energy gamma-ray emission from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Ramaty, Reuven

    1992-01-01

    The production of high-energy gamma rays resulting from pion decay in a solar flare magnetic loop is investigated. Magnetic mirroring, MHD pitch-angle scattering, and all of the relevant loss processes and photon production mechanisms are taken into account. The transport of both the primary ions and the secondary positrons resulting from the decay of the positive pions, as well as the transport of the produced gamma-ray emission are considered. The distributions of the gamma rays as a function of atmospheric depth, time, emission angle, and photon energy are calculated and the dependence of these distributions on the model parameters are studied. The obtained angular distributions are not sufficiently anisotropic to account for the observed limb brightening of the greater than 10 MeV flare emission, indicating that the bulk of this emission is bremsstrahlung from primary electrons.

  19. Opportunities for Fundamental and New Physics with Very High Energy Gamma-ray Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtol, Keith

    2016-04-01

    Astronomical observations with the highest energy gamma rays enable a wide range of fundamental physics measurements as well as searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this presentation, I will discuss indirect dark matter searches, intergalactic magnetic field constraints, and tests of Lorentz invariance with an emphasis on sensitivity gains that could be achieved with two new ground-based gamma-ray telescopes operating at the TeV energy scale: the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory (HAWC) and the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Multiwavelength and multimessenger observations are an essential component of these studies needed to characterize the environments in which the highest energy gamma rays are produced, the conditions encountered while traversing interstellar and intergalactic distances, and "conventional" astrophysical backgrounds.

  20. SAS-2 observations of the high energy gamma radiation from the Vela region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-B high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg smaller than 12 smaller than 290 deg show a statistically significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy larger than 100 MeV. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from the supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, than on the order of 3 x 10 to the 50th power ergs would have been released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  1. Fermi Observations of High-energy Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 080825C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Chaplin, V.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Gibby, L.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Komin, N.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. We also present some theoretical interpretation of GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.

  2. Effect of gamma irradiation on high temperature hardness of low-density polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei-Yun; Yang, Fuqian; Lee, Sanboh

    2015-11-01

    Gamma irradiation can cause the change of microstructure and molecular structure of polymer, resulting in the change of mechanical properties of polymers. Using the hardness measurement, the effect of gamma irradiation on the high temperature hardness of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was investigated. The gamma irradiation caused the increase in the melting point, the enthalpy of fusion, and the portion of crystallinity of LDPE. The Vickers hardness of the irradiated LDPE increases with increasing the irradiation dose, annealing temperature, and annealing time. The activation energy for the rate process controlling the reaction between defects linearly decreases with the irradiation dose. The process controlling the hardness evolution in LDPE is endothermic because LDPE is semi-crystalline.

  3. Observation of high-energy gamma rays from the quasi-stellar object CTA 102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    The quasar CTA 102 (QSO 2230 + 114) was observed four times in 1991-1992 by the EGRET high-energy gamma-ray telescope on the Compton GRO satellite. In the 1992 January 23-February 6 observation, emission was detected at the level (2.4 +/- 0.5) x 10 exp 7 photons/sq cm s (E is greater than 100 MeV). The other observations produced upper limits or detections with lower significance which are consistent with the same flux. The photon spectrum can be represented by a power law with a number index of 2.6 +/- 0.2, the softest so far observed by EGRET. The emitted gamma-ray luminosity, if isotropic, is 5 x 10 exp 47 ergs/s (H(0) = 75 km/s Mpc , q(0) = 0.5), although there are good reasons to believe that the gamma emission is strongly beamed.

  4. Gamma-ray astronomy: From Fermi up to the HAWC high-energy {gamma}-ray observatory in Sierra Negra

    SciTech Connect

    Carraminana, Alberto; Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration

    2013-06-12

    Gamma-rays represent the most energetic electromagnetic window for the study of the Universe. They are studied both from space at MeV and GeV energies, with instruments like the Fermi{gamma}-ray Space Telescope, and at TeV energies with ground based instruments profiting of particle cascades in the atmosphere and of the Cerenkov radiation of charged particles in the air or in water. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory represented the first instrument to successfully implement the water Cerenkov technique for {gamma}-ray astronomy, opening the ground for the more sensitive HAWC {gamma}-ray observatory, currently under development in the Sierra Negra site and already providing early science results.

  5. High voltage stability performance of a gamma ray detection device

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Lombigit, Lojius; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd

    2014-02-12

    An industrial grade digital radiation survey meter device is currently being developed at Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This device used a cylindrical type Geiger Mueller (GM) which acts as a detector. GM detector operates at relatively high direct current voltages depend on the type of GM tube. This thin/thick walled cylindrical type of GM tube operates at 450-650 volts range. Proper value and stability performance of high voltage are important parameters to ensure that this device give a reliable radiation dose measurement. This paper will present an assessment of the stability and performance of the high voltage supply for radiation detector. The assessment is performed using System Identification tools box in MATLAB and mathematical statistics.

  6. THE HIGH ENERGY BUDGET ALLOCATIONS IN SHOCKS AND GAMMA RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David; Guetta, Dafne; Pohl, Martin

    2010-10-10

    The statistical distribution of energies among particles responsible for long gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission is analyzed in light of recent results of the Fermi Observatory. The all-sky flux, F{sub {gamma}}, recorded by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is shown, despite its larger energy range, to be not significantly larger than that reported by the Burst and Transient Explorer, suggesting a relatively small flux in the 3-30 MeV energy range. The present-day energy input rate in {gamma}-rays recorded by the GBM from long GRBs is found, assuming star formation rates in the literature, to be W-dot(0)=0.5 F{sub {gamma}H}/c=5x10{sup 42}erg Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}. The Large Area Telescope fluence, when observed, is about 5%-10% per decade of the total, in good agreement with the predictions of saturated, nonlinear shock acceleration. The high-energy component of long GRBs, as measured by Fermi, is found to contain only {approx}10{sup -2.5} of the energy needed to produce ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) above 4 EeV, assuming the latter to be extragalactic, when various numerical factors are carefully included, if the cosmic-ray source spectrum has a spectral index of -2. The observed {gamma}-ray fraction of the required UHECR energy is even smaller if the source spectrum is softer than E {sup -2}. The AMANDA II limits rule out such a GRB origin for UHECRs if much more than 10{sup -2} of the cosmic-ray energy goes into neutrinos that are within, and simultaneous with, the {gamma}-ray beam. It is suggested that 'orphan' neutrinos out of the {gamma}-ray beam might be identifiable via orphan afterglow or other wide angle signatures of GRBs in lieu of coincidence with prompt {gamma}-rays, and it is recommended that feasible single neutrino trigger criteria be established to search for such coincidences.

  7. High resolution bone mineral densitometry with a gamma camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Jhingran, S.; Johnson, P.

    1983-01-01

    A technique by which the regional distribution of bone mineral can be determined in bone samples from small animals is described. The technique employs an Anger camera interfaced to a medical computer. High resolution imaging is possible by producing magnified images of the bone samples. Regional densitometry of femurs from oophorectomised and bone mineral loss.

  8. HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINO AND GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM TRANS-RELATIVISTIC SUPERNOVA SHOCK BREAKOUTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Gao, Shan; Meszaros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2013-05-20

    Trans-relativistic shocks that accompany some supernovae (SNe) produce X-ray burst emissions as they break out in the dense circumstellar medium around the progenitors. This phenomenon is sometimes associated with peculiar low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (LL GRBs). Here, we investigate the high-energy neutrino and gamma-ray counterparts of such a class of SNe. Just beyond the shock breakout radius, particle acceleration in the collisionless shock starts to operate in the presence of breakout photons. We show that protons may be accelerated to sufficiently high energies and produce high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays via the photomeson interaction. These neutrinos and gamma rays may be detectable from {approx}< 10 Mpc away by IceCube/KM3Net as multi-TeV transients almost simultaneously with the X-ray breakout, and even from {approx}< 100 Mpc away with follow-up observations by the Cherenkov Telescope Array using a wide-field sky monitor like Swift as a trigger. A statistical technique using a stacking approach could also be possible for the detection, with the aid of the SN optical/infrared counterparts. Such multi-messenger observations offer the possibility to probe the transition of trans-relativistic shocks from radiation-mediated to collisionless ones, and would also constrain the mechanisms of particle acceleration and emission in LL GRBs.

  9. SAS-2 High energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Oegelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The second Small Astronomy Satellite high-energy (35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks, one following the radio peak by about 13 msec, and the other 0.4 period after the first. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0004 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission and the double peak structure, compared to the single pulse in the radio emission, suggests that the high energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those found at lower energies.

  10. Neutron detection in a high-gamma field using solution-grown stilbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. M.; Clarke, S. D.; Adamowicz, N.; Pozzi, S. A.; Zaitseva, N.; Carman, L.

    2016-01-01

    A solution-based technique for growing large-volume stilbene scintillators was developed in 2013; crystals up to diameters of 10 cm, or larger, have been grown while preserving excellent pulse shape discrimination (PSD) properties. The goal of this study is to evaluate the PSD capabilities of 5.08 by 5.08-cm stilbene crystals grown by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Inrad Optics when exposed to a 1000 to 1 gamma ray-neutron ratio and operating at a 100-kHz count rate. Results were compared to an equivalent EJ-309 liquid scintillation detector. 252Cf neutron pulses were recorded in two experiments where 60Co and 137Cs sources created the high-gamma field. The high count rate created numerous double pulses that were cleaned using fractional and template approaches designed to remove double pulses while preserving neutron counts. PSD was performed at a threshold of 42 keVee (440-keV proton) for stilbene and 60 keVee (610-keV proton) for EJ-309 liquid. The lower threshold in stilbene resulted in a neutron intrinsic efficiency of approximately 14.5%, 10% higher than EJ-309 liquid, for bare 252Cf and 13% for 252Cf in the high-gamma field. Despite the lower threshold, the gamma misclassification rate in stilbene was approximately 3×10-6, nearly a factor-of-five lower than what we found with the EJ-309 liquid.

  11. MEG sensor and source measures of visually induced gamma-band oscillations are highly reliable.

    PubMed

    Tan, H-R M; Gross, J; Uhlhaas, P J

    2016-08-15

    High frequency brain oscillations are associated with numerous cognitive and behavioral processes. Non-invasive measurements using electro-/magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG) have revealed that high frequency neural signals are heritable and manifest changes with age as well as in neuropsychiatric illnesses. Despite the extensive use of EEG/MEG-measured neural oscillations in basic and clinical research, studies demonstrating test-retest reliability of power and frequency measures of neural signals remain scarce. Here, we evaluated the test-retest reliability of visually induced gamma (30-100Hz) oscillations derived from sensor and source signals acquired over two MEG sessions. The study required participants (N=13) to detect the randomly occurring stimulus acceleration while viewing a moving concentric grating. Sensor and source MEG measures of gamma-band activity yielded comparably strong reliability (average intraclass correlation, ICC=0.861). Peak stimulus-induced gamma frequency (53-72Hz) yielded the highest measures of stability (ICCsensor=0.940; ICCsource=0.966) followed by spectral signal change (ICCsensor=0.890; ICCsource=0.893) and peak frequency bandwidth (ICCsensor=0.856; ICCsource=0.622). Furthermore, source-reconstruction significantly improved signal-to-noise for spectral amplitude of gamma activity compared to sensor estimates. Our assessments highlight that both sensor and source derived estimates of visually induced gamma-band oscillations from MEG signals are characterized by high test-retest reliability, with source derived oscillatory measures conferring an improvement in the stability of peak-frequency estimates. Importantly, our finding of high test-retest reliability supports the feasibility of pharma-MEG studies and longitudinal aging or clinical studies. PMID:27153980

  12. Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Jonathan Glen

    Superconducting high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers based on molybdenum/ copper transition edge sensors (TES) with tin absorbers have been developed for nuclear safeguard applications. This dissertation focuses on plutonium analysis, specifically the direct measurement of the 242Pu gamma-ray signature at 44.915 keV. As existing nondestructive analysis methods cannot directly measure this or any other 242Pu signature, the feasibility of making such a measurement using a TES based system is presented. Analysis from of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical noise models shows that the direct detection of this gamma-ray line of is possible and can be quantified in the presence of a 240Pu gamma-ray line with a line separation of 324 eV, even if the emission from the 240Pu is several orders of magnitude stronger. Spectroscopic measurements conducted in a liquid cryogen system offered an energy resolution of 180 eV, adequate for the measurement of 242Pu; however, TES operation in a liquid-cryogen-free pulse tube refrigerator degraded sensor performance such that this measurement was no longer possible. The numerical noise model indicates that the energy resolution of this device is adequate to demonstrate a direct measurement of 242Pu if the noise pickup from the mechanical cooler can be suppressed. This work shows that the precise measurement of low-intensity gamma-ray signatures, such as the 44.915 keV gamma ray from 242Pu, will require arrays of low-noise TES sensors and that such a system would offer invaluable information in the analysis of plutonium bearing materials.

  13. High-energy gamma-ray and neutrino backgrounds from clusters of galaxies and radio constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandanel, Fabio; Tamborra, Irene; Gabici, Stefano; Ando, Shin'ichiro

    2015-06-01

    Cosmic-ray protons accumulate for cosmological times in clusters of galaxies because their typical radiative and diffusive escape times are longer than the Hubble time. Their hadronic interactions with protons of the intra-cluster medium generate secondary electrons, gamma rays, and neutrinos. In light of the high-energy neutrino events recently discovered by the IceCube neutrino observatory, for which galaxy clusters have been suggested as possible sources, and the forthcoming results from the Fermi gamma-ray survey, we here estimate the contribution from galaxy clusters to the diffuse gamma-ray and neutrino backgrounds. We modelled the cluster population by means of their mass function, using a phenomenological luminosity-mass relation applied to all clusters, as well as a detailed semi-analytical model. In the latter model, we divide clusters into cool-core/non-cool-core, and loud/quiet subsamples, as suggested by observations, and model the cosmic-ray proton population according to state-of-the-art hydrodynamic numerical simulations. Additionally, we consider observationally-motivated values for the cluster magnetic field. This is a crucial parameter since the observed radio counts of clusters need to be respected owing to synchrotron emission by secondary electrons. For a choice of parameters respecting current constraints from radio to gamma rays, and assuming a proton spectral index of -2, we find that hadronic interactions in clusters contribute less than 10% to the IceCube flux and much less to the total extragalactic gamma-ray background observed by Fermi. They account for less than 1% for spectral indices ≤-2. The high-energy neutrino flux observed by IceCube can be reproduced without violating radio constraints only if a very hard (and speculative) spectral index >-2 is adopted. However, this scenario is in tension with the high-energy IceCube data, which seems to suggest a spectral energy distribution of the neutrino flux that decreases with the

  14. Performances of a specific denoising wavelet process for high-resolution gamma imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse, Annie; Dornier, Christophe; Parmentier, Michel; Kastler, Bruno; Chavanelle, Jerome

    2004-02-01

    Due to its functional capabilities, gamma imaging is an interesting tool for medical diagnosis. Recent developments lead to improved intrinsic resolution. However this gain is impaired by the poor activity detected and the Poissonian feature of gamma ray emission. High resolution gamma images are grainy. This is a real nuisance for detecting cold nodules in an emitting organ. A specific translation wavelet filter which takes into account the Poissonian feature of noise, has been developed in order to improve the diagnostic capabilities of radioisotopic high resolution images. Monte Carlo simulations of a hot thyroid phantom in which cold spheres, 3-7 mm in diameter, could be included were performed. The loss of activity induced by cold nodules was determined on filtered images by using catchment basins determination. On the original images, only 5-7 mm cold spheres were clearly visible. On filtered images, 3 and 4 mm spheres were put in prominent. The limit of the developed filter is approximately the detection of 3 mm spherical cold nodule in acquisition and activity conditions which mimic a thyroid examination. Furthermore, no disturbing artifacts are generated. It is therefore a powerful tool for detecting small cold nodules in a gamma emitting medium.

  15. ADVANCED X-BAND TEST ACCELERATOR FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON AND GAMMA RAY BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Chu, T S; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E N; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, J W

    2010-05-12

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  16. Advanced X-Band Test Accelerator for High Brightness Electron and Gamma Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Chu, Tak Sum; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Hartemann, Fred; Adolphsen, Chris; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  17. LuAlO3: A high density, high speed scintillator for gamma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, W. W.; Derenzo, S. E.; Fyodorov, A.; Korzhik, M.; Gektin, A.; Minkov, B.; Aslanov, V.

    1994-11-01

    We present measurements of the scintillation properties cerium doped lutetium aluminum perovskite, LuAlO3:Ce, new dense ((rho)=8.34 g/cm(sup 3)) inorganic scintillator. This material has a 511 keV interaction length and photoelectric fraction 1.1 cm and 32% respectively, which are well suited to gamma ray detection. In powdered form with 0.5% cerium concentration, the scintillation light output is estimated to be 9,600 photons/MeV of deposited energy, the emission spectrum is a single peak centered at 390 nm, and the fluorescence lifetime is described by the sum of 3 exponential terms, with 60% of the light being emitted with a 11 ns decay time, 26% with a 28 ns decay time, and 13% with a 835 ns decay time. Single crystals contaminated with =10% lutetium aluminum garnet (Lu3Al5Ol2) have significantly altered scintillation properties. The light output is 26,000 photons/MeV (3.2 times that of BGO), but the decay time increases significantly (1% of the light is emitted with a 10 ns decay time, 15% with a 245 ns decay time, and 85% with a 2010 ns decay time) and the emission spectrum is dominated by a peak centered at 315 nm with a secondary peak centered at 500 rum. The short decay lifetime, high density, and reasonable light output of LuAlO3:Ce (the perovskite phase) suggest that it is useful for applications where high counting rates, good stopping power, good energy resolution, and fast timing are important. However, it is necessary to grow single crystals that are uncontaminated by the garnet phase to realize these properties.

  18. LuAlO{sub 3}: A high density, high speed scintillator for gamma detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Fyodorov, A.; Korzhik, M.; Gektin, A.; Minkov, B.; Aslanov, V.

    1994-11-01

    We present measurements of the scintillation properties cerium doped lutetium aluminum perovskite, LuAlO{sub 3}:C, new dense ({rho}=8.34 g/cm{sup 3}) inorganic scintillator. This material has a 511 keV interaction length and photoelectric fraction 1.1 cm and 32% respectively, which are well suited to gamma ray detection. In powdered form with 0.5% cerium concentration, the scintillation light output is estimated to be 9,600 photons/MeV of deposited energy, the emission spectrum is a single peak centered at 390 nm, and the fluorescence lifetime is described by the sum of 3 exponential terms, with 60% of the light being emitted with a 11 ns decay time, 26% with a 28 ns decay time, and 13% with a 835 ns decay time. Single crystals contaminated with =10% lutetium aluminum garnet (Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub l2}) have significantly altered scintillation properties. The light output is 26,000 photons/MeV (3.2 times that of BGO), but the decay time increases significantly (1% of the light is emitted with a 10 ns decay time, 15% with a 245 ns decay time, and 85% with a 2010 ns decay time) and the emission spectrum is dominated by a peak centered at 315 nm with a secondary peak centered at 500 rum. The short decay lifetime, high density, and reasonable light output of LuAlO{sub 3}:C (the perovskite phase) suggest that it is useful for applications where high counting rates, good stopping power, good energy resolution, and fast timing are important. However, it is necessary to grow single crystals that are uncontaminated by the garnet phase to realize these properties.

  19. A New View of the High Energy Gamma-ray Sky with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the findings that have been made possible by the use of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It describes the current status of the Fermi Telescope and reviews some of the science highlights.

  20. The Impact of Electromagnetic Cascades of Very-high Energy Gamma Rays on the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, Tonia

    2012-01-01

    As very high energy (VHE) photons propagate through the extragalactic background light (EBL), they interact with the soft photons of the EBL and initiate electromagnetic cascades of photons and electrons. The collective intensity of a cosmological population emitting at VHEs (such as blazars) will be attenuated at the highest energies through interactions with the EBL and enhanced at lower energies by the resulting cascade. As such, depending on the space density and spectra of the sources and the model of the EBL, cascade radiation can provide a significant contribution to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB). Through deflections of the charged particles of the cascade, an intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the anisotropy properties of the EGB. The impact of a strong IGMF is to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the EGB. We discuss the implications of cascade radiation for the origins of the EGB and the nature of the IGMF, as well as insight that will be provided by data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the upcoming years.

  1. Laboratory laser acceleration and high energy astrophysics: {gamma}-ray bursts and cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.

    1998-08-20

    Recent experimental progress in laser acceleration of charged particles (electrons) and its associated processes has shown that intense electromagnetic pulses can promptly accelerate charged particles to high energies and that their energy spectrum is quite hard. On the other hand some of the high energy astrophysical phenomena such as extremely high energy cosmic rays and energetic components of {gamma}-ray bursts cry for new physical mechanisms for promptly accelerating particles to high energies. The authors suggest that the basic physics involved in laser acceleration experiments sheds light on some of the underlying mechanisms and their energy spectral characteristics of the promptly accelerated particles in these high energy astrophysical phenomena.

  2. Two cis-DNA elements involved in myeloid-cell-specific expression and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) activation of the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor gene: a novel IFN regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, C; Wietzerbin, J; Benech, P D

    1993-01-01

    The human high-affinity receptor for the constant region of immunoglobulin G (human Fc gamma R1) is encoded by two mRNAs induced selectively by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and expressed in cells of myeloid lineage. The cis-DNA element (GRR) previously found to confer IFN-gamma responsiveness to this gene acts as an inducible enhancer and is the target of an IFN-gamma-activated factor(s) (GIRE-BP) in cells of different origins. Although the GRR motif is not related to the DNA elements involved in the regulation of other IFN-stimulated genes, GIRE-BP binding depends on the IFN-gamma-dependent activation of the 91-kDa protein known to be one of the factors of a transcriptional complex activated by IFN-alpha. Deletions of the Fc gamma R1 promoter allowed us to identify a 25-bp element, downstream from the GRR motif, conferring cell-type-specific expression. This element, called MATE (myeloid activating transcription element), is the DNA target for constitutive factors forming two complexes, MATE-BP1 and MATE-BP2. In accordance with the functional analysis, MATE-BP binding activities were detected in extracts prepared from myeloid cell lines such as THP-1, HL-60, and U-937 but not in HeLa cell extracts. The MATE motif is present not only in the promoter of other Fc receptor genes but also in several promoters of genes whose expression is restricted to monocytic cells. Our results suggest that human Fc gamma R1 gene expression in myeloid cells is initiated by the interaction of IFN-gamma-activated factors with cell-type-specific factors through their binding to the GRR and MATE motifs. Images PMID:8455606

  3. A field-deployable gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing high pressure xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, Bo; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1997-05-01

    Most nuclear materials in the nuclear energy, safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation regimes emit gamma rays with a unique signature. Currently, two categories of spectrometers are available to evaluate these materials: (1) Semiconductors, with excellent energy resolution, which operate at cryogenic temperatures. (2) Scintillation detectors, which function at ambient temperature, but with poor energy resolution. A detector which functions for extended periods in a range of environments, with an energy resolution superior to that of a scintillation spectrometer, would have evident utility. Recently, in the research community, such a device has evolved, an ionization chamber utilizing xenon gas at very high pressure (60 atm). Its energy resolution, typically, is 20 keV for the 661 keV gamma ray of {sup 137}Cs. With high xenon density and its high atomic number (Z=54), and superior energy resolution, its sensitivity is comparable to that of a scintillator.

  4. Ultra high energy gamma rays, cosmic rays and neutrinos from accreting degenerate stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecher, K.; Chanmugam, G.

    1985-01-01

    Super-Eddington accretion for a recently proposed unipolar induction model of cosmic ray acceleration in accreting binary star systems containing magnetic white dwarfs or neutron stars is considered. For sufficiently high accretion rates and low magnetic fields, the model can account for: (1) acceleration of cosmic ray nuclei up to energies of 10 to the 19th power eV; (2) production of more or less normal solar cosmic ray composition; (3) the bulk of cosmic rays observed with energies above 1 TeV, and probably even down to somewhat lower energies as well; and (4) possibly the observed antiproton cosmic ray flux. It can also account for the high ultra high energy (UHE) gamma ray flux observed from several accreting binary systems (including Cygnus X-3), while allowing the possibility of an even higher neutrino flux from these sources, with L sub nu/L sub gamma is approximately 100.

  5. CONSTRAINING THE HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH FERMI

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C.; Bouvier, A.; Brigida, M.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A. E-mail: kocevski@slac.stanford.edu E-mail: connauv@uah.edu E-mail: michael.briggs@nasa.gov; Collaboration: Fermi Large Area Telescope Team; Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor Team; and others

    2012-08-01

    We examine 288 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) that fell within the field of view of Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) during the first 2.5 years of observations, which showed no evidence for emission above 100 MeV. We report the photon flux upper limits in the 0.1-10 GeV range during the prompt emission phase as well as for fixed 30 s and 100 s integrations starting from the trigger time for each burst. We compare these limits with the fluxes that would be expected from extrapolations of spectral fits presented in the first GBM spectral catalog and infer that roughly half of the GBM-detected bursts either require spectral breaks between the GBM and LAT energy bands or have intrinsically steeper spectra above the peak of the {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectra (E{sub pk}). In order to distinguish between these two scenarios, we perform joint GBM and LAT spectral fits to the 30 brightest GBM-detected bursts and find that a majority of these bursts are indeed softer above E{sub pk} than would be inferred from fitting the GBM data alone. Approximately 20% of this spectroscopic subsample show statistically significant evidence for a cutoff in their high-energy spectra, which if assumed to be due to {gamma}{gamma} attenuation, places limits on the maximum Lorentz factor associated with the relativistic outflow producing this emission. All of these latter bursts have maximum Lorentz factor estimates that are well below the minimum Lorentz factors calculated for LAT-detected GRBs, revealing a wide distribution in the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB outflows and indicating that LAT-detected bursts may represent the high end of this distribution.

  6. High-precision source location of the 1978 November 19 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Pizzichini, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.

    1981-01-01

    The celestial source location of the November 19, 1978, intense gamma ray burst has been determined from data obtained with the interplanetary gamma-ray sensor network by means of long-baseline wave front timing instruments. Each of the instruments was designed for studying events with observable spectra of approximately greater than 100 keV, and each provides accurate event profile timing in the several millisecond range. The data analysis includes the following: the triangulated region is centered at (gamma, delta) 1950 = (1h16m32s, -28 deg 53 arcmin), at -84 deg galactic latitude, where the star density is very low and the obscuration negligible. The gamma-ray burst source region, consistent with that of a highly polarized radio source described by Hjellming and Ewald (1981), may assist in the source modeling and may facilitate the understanding of the source process. A marginally identifiable X-ray source was also found by an Einstein Observatory investigation. It is concluded that the burst contains redshifted positron annihilation and nuclear first-excited iron lines, which is consistent with a neutron star origin.

  7. VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM PASSIVE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES: CONSTRAINTS FOR NGC 1399

    SciTech Connect

    Pedaletti, G.; Wagner, S. J.; Rieger, F. M.

    2011-09-10

    Very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) {gamma}-rays are expected to be emitted from the vicinity of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), irrespective of their activity state. In the magnetosphere of rotating SMBH, efficient acceleration of charged particles can take place through various processes. These particles could reach energies up to E {approx} 10{sup 19} eV. VHE {gamma}-ray emission from these particles is then feasible via leptonic or hadronic processes. Therefore, passive systems, where the lack of a strong photon field allows the VHE {gamma}-rays to escape, are expected to be detected by Cherenkov telescopes. We present results from recent VHE experiments on the passive SMBH in the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 1399. No {gamma}-ray signal has been found, neither by the H.E.S.S. experiment nor in the Fermi data analyzed here. We discuss possible implications for the physical characteristics of the system. We conclude that in a scenario where particles are accelerated in vacuum gaps in the magnetosphere, only a fraction {approx}0.3 of the gap is available for particle acceleration, indicating that the system is unlikely to be able to accelerate protons up to E {approx} 10{sup 19} eV.

  8. Gamma-resonance Contraband Detection using a high current tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B. F.; Beis, J.; Dale, D.; Rogers, J.; Ruegg, R.; Debiak, T.; Kamykowski, E.; Melnychuk, S.; Rathke, J.; Sredniawski, J.

    1999-04-26

    TRIUMF and Northrop Grumman have developed a new system for the detection of concealed explosives and drugs. This Contraband Detection System (CDS) is based on the resonant absorption by {sup 14}N of gammas produced using {sup 13}C(p,{gamma}){sup 14}N. The chosen reaction uses protons at 1.75 MeV and the gammas have an energy of 9.17 MeV. By measuring both the resonant and the non-resonant absorption using detectors with good spatial resolution, and applying standard tomographic techniques, we are able to produce 3D images of both the nitrogen partial density and the total density. The images together may be utilized with considerable confidence to determine if small amounts of nitrogen based explosives, heroin or cocaine are present in the interrogated containers. Practical Gamma Resonant Absorption (GRA) scanning requires an intense source of protons. However this proton source must also be very stable, have low energy spread, and have good spatial definition. These demands suggested a tandem as the accelerator of choice. We have therefore constructed a 2 MeV H{sup -} tandem optimized for high current (10 mA) operation, while minimizing the overall size of the accelerator. This has required several special innovations which will be presented in the paper. We will also present initial commissioning results.

  9. High-spin structure and multiphonon {gamma} vibrations in very neutron-rich {sup 114}Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, E. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Ding, H. B.; Gu, L.; Xu, Q.; Xiao, Z. G.; Zhu, S. J.; Hamilton, J. H.; Li, K.; Ramayya, A. V.; Hwang, J. K.; Liu, Y. X.; Liu, S. H.; Sheikh, J. A.; Bhat, G. H.; Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Lee, I. Y.; Ma, W. C.

    2011-05-15

    High-spin levels of the neutron-rich {sup 114}Ru have been investigated by measuring the prompt {gamma} rays in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. The ground-state band and one-phonon {gamma}-vibrational band have been extended up to 14{sup +} and 9{sup +}, respectively. Two levels are proposed as the members of a two-phonon {gamma}-vibrational band. A back bending (band crossing) has been observed in the ground-state band at ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}{approx_equal} 0.40 MeV. Using the triaxial deformation parameters, the cranked shell model calculations indicate that this back bending in {sup 114}Ru should originate from the alignment of a pair of h{sub 11/2} neutrons. Triaxial projected shell model calculations for the {gamma}-vibrational band structures of {sup 114}Ru are in good agreement with the experimental data. However, when using the oblate deformation parameters, both of the above-calculated results are not in agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Constraining Very High-Energy Gamma Ray Sources Using IceCube Neutrino Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Gregory; Feintzeig, J.; Karle, A.; IceCube Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Modern gamma ray astronomy has revealed the most violent, energetic objects in the known universe, from nearby supernova remnants to distant active galactic nuclei. In an effort to discover more about the fundamental nature of such objects, we present searches for astrophysical neutrinos in coincidence with known gamma ray sources. Searches were conducted using data from IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic-kilometer neutrino detector that is sensitive to astrophysical particles with energies above 1 TeV. The detector is situated at the South Pole, and uses more than 5,000 photomultiplier tubes to detect Cherenkov light from the interactions of particles within the ice. Existing models of proton-proton interactions allow us to link gamma ray fluxes to the production of high-energy neutrinos, so neutrino data from IceCube can be used to constrain the mechanisms by which gamma ray sources create such energetic photons. For a few particularly bright sources, such as the blazar Markarian 421, IceCube is beginning to reach the point where actual constraints can be made. As more years of data are analyzed, the limits will improve and stronger constraints will become possible. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation's REU Program through NSF Award AST-1004881 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  11. Ge-diode detector combined with crystal-diffraction spectrometer permits high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namenson, A. I.; Smither, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    Crystal-diffraction spectrometer, combined with a lithium-drifted Ge-diode detector, performs high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy on the complicated neutron-capture gamma ray spectra. The system is most useful in the 1-3 MeV energy range and improves the signal to background ratio.

  12. Nonthermal processes around collapsed objects: High energy gamma ray sources in the radio sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.; Ruderman, Malvin; Applegate, James H.; Becker, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    In our proposal responding to the initial Guest Observer NRA for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, 'Nonthermal Processes Around Collapsed Objects: High Energy Gamma Ray Sources in the Radio Sky', we stated that 'At high energies - the identity of the principal Galactic source population remains unknown' although the 'one certain source of high energy emission is young radio pulsars'. These two statements remain true, although at this writing, eighteen months after the beginning of the Compton allsky survey, much of the gamma-ray data required to greatly extend our knowledge of the Galaxy's high energy emission has been collected. The thrust of the program supported by our grant was to collect and analyze a complementary set of data on the Milky Way at radio wavelengths in order to help identify the dominant Pop 1 component of the Galaxy's gamma ray sources, and to pursue theoretical investigations on the origins and emission mechanisms of young pulsars, the one component of this population identified to date. We summarize here our accomplishments under the grant. In Section 2, we describe our VLA surveys of the Galactic Plane along with the current status of the radio source catalogs derived therefrom; unfortunately, owing to the TDRSS antenna problem and subsequent extension of the Sky Survey, we were not able to carry out a comparison with the EGRET data directly, although everything is now in place to do so as soon as it becomes available. In Section 2, we summarize our progress on the theoretical side, including the substantial completion of a dissertation on pulsar origins and work on the high energy emission mechanisms of isolated pulsars. We list the personnel supported by the grant in section 4 and provide a complete bibliography of publications supported in whole or in part by the grant in the final section.

  13. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  14. High Energy Neutrinos and Cosmic-Rays From Low-Luminosity Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Ioka, Kunihito; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Nakamura, Takashi; /Kyoto U.

    2006-07-10

    The recently discovered gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060218/SN 2006aj is classified as an X-ray Flash with very long duration driven possibly by a neutron star. Since GRB 060218 is very near {approx} 140 Mpc and very dim, one-year observation by Swift suggests that the true rate of GRB 060218-like events might be very high so that such low luminosity GRBs (LL-GRBs) might form a different population of GRBs from the cosmological high luminosity GRBs (HL-GRBs). We found that the high energy neutrino background from such LL-GRBs could be comparable with or larger than that from HL-GRBs. If each neutrino event is detected by IceCube, later optical-infrared follow-up observations such as by Subaru could identify a Type Ibc supernova associated with LL-GRBs, even if gamma- and X-rays are not observed by Swift. This is in a sense a new window from neutrino astronomy, which might enable us to confirm the existence of LL-GRBs and to obtain information about their rate and origin. We also argue LL-GRBs as high energy gamma-ray and cosmic-ray sources.

  15. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bieberle, A.; Nehring, H.; Berger, R.; Arlit, M.; Haerting, H.-U.; Schubert, M.; Hampel, U.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated {sup 137}Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0 Degree-Sign (horizontal) to 90 Degree-Sign (vertical).

  16. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieberle, A.; Nehring, H.; Berger, R.; Arlit, M.; Härting, H.-U.; Schubert, M.; Hampel, U.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated 137Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0° (horizontal) to 90° (vertical).

  17. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  18. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2007-07-12

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected at GeV energies by EGRET and models predict emission at > 100 GeV. Milagro is a wide field (2 sr) high duty cycle (> 90%) ground based water Cherenkov detector that records extensive air showers in the energy range 100 GeV to 100 TeV. We have searched for very high energy emission from a sample of 106 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected since the beginning of 2000 by BATSE, BeppoSax, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift or the IPN. No evidence for emission from any of the bursts has been found and we present upper limits from these bursts.

  19. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOEpatents

    Friedrich, Stephan; , Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Labov, Simon E.

    2008-11-04

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  20. Compact high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography system for multiphase flow studies.

    PubMed

    Bieberle, A; Nehring, H; Berger, R; Arlit, M; Härting, H-U; Schubert, M; Hampel, U

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a compact high-resolution gamma-ray Computed Tomography (CompaCT) measurement system for multiphase flow studies and tomographic imaging of technical objects is presented. Its compact and robust design makes it particularly suitable for studies on industrial facilities and outdoor applications. Special care has been given to thermal ruggedness, shock resistance, and radiation protection. Main components of the system are a collimated (137)Cs isotopic source, a thermally stabilised modular high-resolution gamma-ray detector arc with 112 scintillation detector elements, and a transportable rotary unit. The CompaCT allows full CT scans of objects with a diameter of up to 130 mm and can be operated with any tilting angle from 0° (horizontal) to 90° (vertical). PMID:23556806

  1. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons.

  2. Modeling high-energy gamma-rays from the Fermi Bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Splettstoesser, Megan

    2015-09-17

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 55° in galactic latitude and 20°-30° in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields- both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to second order Fermi acceleration. I compare the analytical solutions of the proton spectrum to a numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution to the transport equation converges to the analytical solution in all cases. The gamma-ray spectrum due to proton-proton interaction is compared to Fermi Bubble data (from Ackermann et al. 2014), and I find that second order Fermi acceleration is a good fit for the gamma-ray spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles at low energies with an injection source term of S = 1.5 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹. I find that a non-steady-state solution to the gamma-ray spectrum with an injection source term of S = 2 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹ matches the bubble data at high energies.

  3. Determination of impurities in (124)I samples by high resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, M C M; da Silva, R L; Delgado, J U; Poledna, R; de Araújo, M T F; Laranjeira, A S; de Veras, E; Braghirolli, A M S; dos Santos, G R; Lopes, R T

    2016-03-01

    (124)I is a radionuclide used in the diagnosis of tumors. The National Health Agency requires identification and activity measurement of impurities. Using gamma spectrometry with an efficiency calibrated high-purity germanium detector, impurities (125)I and (126)I in an (1)(24)I production sample were identified. Activity ratios of (125)I and (126)I to (124)I were approximately 0.5% and 98%, respectively. PMID:26653211

  4. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    A high resolution X-ray spectrometer and large area phoswich detector were designed and co-aligned in a common elevation mounting in order to measure solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma ray emission in the 13 to 600 KeV energy range from a balloon. The instrument is described and results obtained for the Crab Nebula, the supernova remnant Cas A, and the Sun are discussed and analyzed.

  5. Radiation studies of optical interferometric modulators with fast neutrons and high energy gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Radeka, V. ); Bulmer, C.H.; Burns, W.K. )

    1991-11-01

    The possibility of using Ti : LiNbO{sub 3} and single mode fibers for nuclear particle detection and transmission in large-scale machines, such as Superconducting Super Collider, calls for a detailed radiation damage study. In this report, we present radiation studies on Ti : LiNbO{sub 3} Mach-Zehnder interferometric optical modulators with fast neutrons and high energy Gamma-rays.

  6. New drift chamber technology for high energy gamma-ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; Cuddapah, Rajani

    1990-01-01

    Work to develop a low-power amplifier and discriminator for use on space qualifiable drift chambers is discussed. Consideration is given to the goals of the next generation of high-energy gamma-ray telescope design and to how the goals can be achieved using xenon gas drift chambers. The design and construction of a low power drift chamber amplifier and discriminator are described, and the design of a quad-time-to-amplitude converter is outlined.

  7. Kosmos 856 and Kosmos 914 measurements of high-energy diffuse gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinkin, L.F.; Nagornykh, Y.I.

    1982-09-01

    The measurements by the Kosmos 856 and Kosmos 914 satellites of diffuse cosmic ..gamma.. rays with photon energies above 100 MeV are discussed. Integrated energy spectra for the 100--4000 MeV energy range are given for galactic lattitudes Vertical BarbVertical Bar< or =30/sup 0/ and Vertical BarbVertical Bar>30/sup 0/. The form of the spectra suggests that at high lattitudes there may still be some contribution from the galactic component.

  8. Ground-based detectors in very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Naurois, Mathieu; Mazin, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Following the discovery of the cosmic rays by Victor Hess in 1912, more than 70 years and numerous technological developments were needed before an unambiguous detection of the first very-high-energy gamma-ray source in 1989 was made. Since this discovery, the field on very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy experienced a true revolution: a second, then a third generation of instruments were built, observing the atmospheric cascades from the ground, either through the atmospheric Cherenkov light they comprise, or via the direct detection of the charged particles they carry. Present arrays, 100 times more sensitive than the pioneering experiments, have detected a large number of astrophysical sources of various types, thus opening a new window on the non-thermal Universe. New, even more sensitive instruments are currently being built; these will allow us to explore further this fascinating domain. In this article we describe the detection techniques, the history of the field and the prospects for the future of ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. xml:lang="fr"

  9. High-energy gamma rays in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Implications for risk and W{sub R}

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.

    1995-12-01

    Based on the DS86 dosimetry system, nearly all of the dose to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was due to unusually high-energy gamma rays, predominantly in the 2- to 5-MeV range. These high energies resulted in part from neutron capture gamma rays as the bomb neutrons penetrated large distances of air. Because of the inverse relationship between energy and biological effectiveness, these high-energy gamma rays are expected to be substantially less effective in producing biological damage than the radiations commonly used in radiobiology and risk assessment. This observation has implications for radiation protection and risk assessment.

  10. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  11. Unraveling the high-energy emission components of gamma-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabalza, V.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Aharonian, F.; Khangulyan, D.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The high and very high energy spectrum of gamma-ray binaries has become a challenge for all theoretical explanations since the detection of powerful, persistent GeV emission from LS 5039 and LS I +61 303 by Fermi/LAT. The spectral cutoff at a few GeV indicates that the GeV component and the fainter, hard TeV emission above 100 GeV are not directly related. Aims: We explore the possible origins of these two emission components in the framework of a young, non-accreting pulsar orbiting the massive star, and initiating the non-thermal emission through the interaction of the stellar and pulsar winds. Methods: The pulsar/stellar wind interaction in a compact-orbit binary gives rise to two potential locations for particle acceleration: the shocks at the head-on collision of the winds and the termination shock caused by Coriolis forces on scales larger than the binary separation. We explore the suitability of these two locations to host the GeV and TeV emitters, respectively, through the study of their non-thermal emission along the orbit. We focus on the application of this model to LS 5039 given its well-determined stellar wind with respect to other gamma-ray binaries. Results: The application of the proposed model to LS 5039 indicates that these two potential emitter locations provide the necessary conditions for reproduction of the two-component high-energy gamma-ray spectrum of LS 5039. In addition, the ambient postshock conditions required at each of the locations are consistent with recent hydrodynamical simulations. Conclusions: The scenario based on the interaction of the stellar and pulsar winds is compatible with the GeV and TeV emission observed from gamma-ray binaries with unknown compact objects, such as LS 5039 and LS I +61 303.

  12. Development of a Broad High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescope using Silicon Strip Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.

    1998-01-01

    The research effort has led to the development and demonstration of technology to enable the design and construction of a next-generation high-energy gamma-ray telescope that operates in the pair-production regime (E greater than 10 MeV). In particular, the technology approach developed is based on silicon-strip detector technology. A complete instrument concept based on this technology for the pair-conversion tracker and the use of CsI(T1) crystals for the calorimeter is now the baseline instrument concept for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission. GLAST is NASA's proposed high-energy gamma-ray mission designed to operate in the energy range from 10 MeV to approximately 300 GeV. GLAST, with nearly 100 times the sensitivity of EGRET, operates through pair conversion of gamma-rays and measurement of the direction and energy of the resulting e (+) - e (-) shower. The baseline design, developed with support from NASA includes a charged particle anticoincidence shield, a tracker/converter made of thin sheets of high-Z material interspersed with Si strip detectors, a CsI calorimeter and a programmable data trigger and acquisition system. The telescope is assembled as an array of modules or towers. Each tower contains elements of the tracker, calorimeter, and anticoincidence system. As originally proposed, the telescope design had 49 modules. In the more optimized design that emerged at the end of the grant period the individual modules are larger and the total number in the GLAST array is 25. Also the calorimeter design was advanced substantially to the point that it has a self-contained imaging capability, albeit much cruder than the tracker.

  13. Early results utilizing high-energy fission product (gamma) rays to detect fissionable material in cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D R; Accatino, M R; Bernstein, A; Church, J A; Descalle, M A; Gosnell, T B; Hall, J M; Loshak, A; Manatt, D R; Mauger, G J; McDowell, M; Moore, T M; Norman, E B; Pohl, B A; Pruet, J A; Petersen, D C; Walling, R S; Weirup, D L; Prussin, S G

    2004-09-30

    A concept for detecting the presence of special nuclear material ({sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu) concealed in intermodal cargo containers is described. It is based on interrogation with a pulsed beam of 7 MeV neutrons that produce fission events and their {beta}-delayed neutron emission or {beta}-delayed high-energy {gamma}-radiation between beam pulses provide the detection signature. Fission product {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays above 3 MeV are nearly ten times more abundant than {beta}-delayed neutrons and are distinct from natural radioactivity and from nearly all of the induced activity in a normal cargo. Detector backgrounds and potential interferences with the fission signature radiation have been identified and quantified. An important goal in the US is the detection of nuclear weapons or special nuclear material (SNM) concealed in intermodal cargo containers. This must be done with high detection probability, low false alarm rates, and without impeding commerce, i.e. about one minute for an inspection. The concept for inspection has been described before and its components are now being evaluated. While normal radiations emitted from plutonium may allow its detection, the majority of {sup 235}U {gamma} ray emission is at 186 keV, is readily attenuated by cargo, and thus not a reliable detection signature for passive detection. Delayed neutron detection following a neutron or photon beam pulse has been used successfully to detect lightly or unshielded SNM targets. While delayed neutrons can be easily distinguished from beam neutrons they have relatively low yield in fission, approximately 0.008 per fission in {sup 239}Pu and 0.017 per fission in {sup 235}U, and are rapidly attenuated in hydrogenous materials making that technique unreliable when challenged by thick hydrogenous cargo overburden. They propose detection of {beta}-delayed high-energy {gamma} radiation as a more robust signature characteristic of SNM.

  14. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baerwald, Philipp; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2015-03-01

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because (a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and (b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corresponding neutrino bound. On the other hand, GRBs may account for the UHECRs in the ankle transition model if cosmic rays leak out from the source at the highest energies. In that case, we demonstrate that future neutrino observations can efficiently test most of the parameter space - unless the baryonic loading is much larger than previously anticipated.

  15. Deficits in high- (>60 Hz) gamma-band oscillations during visual processing in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grützner, Christine; Wibral, Michael; Sun, Limin; Rivolta, Davide; Singer, Wolf; Maurer, Konrad; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Current theories of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia have focused on abnormal temporal coordination of neural activity. Oscillations in the gamma-band range (>25 Hz) are of particular interest as they establish synchronization with great precision in local cortical networks. However, the contribution of high gamma (>60 Hz) oscillations toward the pathophysiology is less established. To address this issue, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data from 16 medicated patients with chronic schizophrenia and 16 controls during the perception of Mooney faces. MEG data were analysed in the 25–150 Hz frequency range. Patients showed elevated reaction times and reduced detection rates during the perception of upright Mooney faces while responses to inverted stimuli were intact. Impaired processing of Mooney faces in schizophrenia patients was accompanied by a pronounced reduction in spectral power between 60–120 Hz (effect size: d = 1.26) which was correlated with disorganized symptoms (r = −0.72). Our findings demonstrate that deficits in high gamma-band oscillations as measured by MEG are a sensitive marker for aberrant cortical functioning in schizophrenia, suggesting an important aspect of the pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:23532620

  16. High photopeak efficiency gamma-ray detector for upcoming Laue Lens missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. J.; Dean, A. J.; Bird, A. J.

    2006-06-01

    We present the design for a new detector configuration, specifically tailored to suit the needs of prospective Laue Lens Gamma-ray astronomy missions in the 10keV to 1MeV energy range. A Laue Lens uses transmission diffraction through crystal planes to focus the incoming gamma-rays. Diffraction is highly energy dependant and in order to recreate high resolution images, very accurate measurements of the total energy of the incident photon are necessary, as well as good spatial resolution. The aim is to absorb all the Compton scattered products of the incoming photons. The design uses a cavity geometry with the main germanium pixilated imaging detector embedded position sensitive cavity. The germanium is then enclosed in a veto to reduce background and to clean the imaging of unwanted non-photopeak events. This allows the majority of backscattered photons to be captured producing a detector with a photopeak efficiency of ~90% at 511keV and millimetric spatial resolution. The detector system has the added advantage that it functions extremely efficiently as a gamma-ray polarimeter.

  17. VERY HIGH ENERGY OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH STACEE

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, A.; Ong, R. A.; Ball, J.; Carson, J. E.; Zweerink, J.; Williams, D. A.; Aune, T.; Covault, C. E.; Driscoll, D. D.; Fortin, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hanna, D. S.; Kildea, J.; Lindner, T.; Mueller, C.; Ragan, K.

    2010-10-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions known in the universe. Sensitive measurements of the high-energy spectra of GRBs can place important constraints on the burst environments and radiation processes. Until recently, there were no observations during the first few minutes of GRB afterglows in the energy range between 30 GeV and {approx}1 TeV. With the launch of the Swift GRB Explorer in late 2004, GRB alerts and localizations within seconds of the bursts became available. The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) was a ground-based, gamma-ray telescope with an energy threshold of {approx}150 GeV for sources at zenith. At the time of Swift's launch, STACEE was in a rare position to provide >150 GeV follow-up observations of GRBs as fast as three minutes after the burst alert. In addition, STACEE performed follow-up observations of several GRBs that were localized by the HETE-2 and INTEGRAL satellites. Between 2002 June and 2007 July, STACEE made follow-up observations of 23 GRBs. Upper limits are placed on the high-energy gamma-ray fluxes from 21 of these bursts.

  18. Effect of particle size in the TL response of natural quartz sensitized with high gamma dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, A. B., Jr.; Guzzo, P. L.; Sullasi, H. L.; Khoury, H. J.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of particle size in the thermoluminescence (TL) response of natural quartz sensitized with high gamma dose. For this, fragments of a single crystal taken from the Solonópole district (Brazil) were crushed and classified into ten size fractions ranging from 38 μm to 5 mm. Aliquots of each size fraction were sensitized with 25 kGy of gamma dose of 60Co and heat-treated in a muffle furnace at 400oC. The non-sensitized samples were exposed to test doses between 50 Gy and 5 kGy and the sensitized samples were exposed to a unique test dose equal to 50 mGy. For non-sensitized samples, the TL peak near 325 °C increases with the particle size decreasing. However, in the case of sensitized samples, the TL output near 280 °C increases with the increasing of particle size up to mean grain size equal to 308 μm. Above 308 μm, an abrupt reduction in the TL intensity was noticed. These effects are discussed in relation to the specific surface area and the different interaction of high gamma doses with fine and coarse particles of quartz.

  19. The Third EGRET Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Chen, A. W.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Friedlander, D. P.; Hunter, S. D.; McDonald, L. M.; Sreekumar, P.; Thompson, D. J.; Jones, B. B.; Lin, Y. C.; Michelson, P. F.; Nolan, P. L.; Tompkins, W. F.; Kanbach, G.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Muecke, A.

    1998-01-01

    The third catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory includes data from 1991 April 22 to 1995 October 3 (Cycles 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the mission). In addition to including more data than the second EGRET catalog (Thompson et al. 1995) and its supplement (Thompson et al. 1996), this catalog uses completely reprocessed data (to correct a number of mostly minimal errors and problems). The 271 sources (E greater than 100 MeV) in the catalog include the single 1991 solar flare bright enough to be detected as a source, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one probable radio galaxy detection (Cen A), and 66 high-confidence identifications of blazars (BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, or unidentified flat-spectrum radio sources). In addition, 27 lower-confidence potential blazar identifications are noted. Finally, the catalog contains 170 sources not yet identified firmly with known objects, although potential identifications have been suggested for a number of those. A figure is presented that gives approximate upper limits for gamma-ray sources at any point in the sky, as well as information about sources listed in the second catalog and its supplement which do not appear in this catalog.

  20. The Third EGRET Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Chen, A. W.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Friedlander, D. P.; Hunter, S. D.; McDonald, L. M.; Sreekumar, P.; Thompson, D. J.; Jones, B. B.; Lin, Y. C.; Michelson, P. F.; Nolan, P. L.; Tompkins, W. F.; Kanbach, G.; Mayer-Hasselwander, A.; Muecke, A.

    1998-01-01

    The third catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory includes data from 1991 April 22 to 1995 October 3 (Cycles 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the mission). In addition to including more data than the second EGRET catalog and its supplement, this catalog uses completely reprocessed data (to correct a number of mostly minimal errors and problems). The 271 sources (E greater than 100 MeV) in the catalog include the single 1991 solar flare bright enough to be detected as a source, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one probable radio galaxy detection (Cen A), and 66 high-confidence identifications of blazars (BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, or unidentified flat-spectrum radio sources). In addition, 27 lower-confidence potential blazar identifications are noted. Finally, the catalog contains 170 sources not yet identified firmly with known objects, although potential identifications have been suggested for a number of those. A figure is presented that gives approximate upper limits for gamma-ray sources at any point in the sky, as well as information about sources listed in the second catalog and its supplement which do not appear in this catalog.

  1. Monte Carlo Simulations of Ultra-High Energy Resolution Gamma Detectors for Nuclear Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Robles, A; Drury, O B; Friedrich, S

    2009-08-19

    Ultra-high energy resolution superconducting gamma-ray detectors can improve the accuracy of non-destructive analysis for unknown radioactive materials. These detectors offer an order of magnitude improvement in resolution over conventional high purity germanium detectors. The increase in resolution reduces errors from line overlap and allows for the identification of weaker gamma-rays by increasing the magnitude of the peaks above the background. In order to optimize the detector geometry and to understand the spectral response function Geant4, a Monte Carlo simulation package coded in C++, was used to model the detectors. Using a 1 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber and a monochromatic gamma source, different absorber geometries were tested. The simulation was expanded to include the Cu block behind the absorber and four layers of shielding required for detector operation at 0.1 K. The energy spectrum was modeled for an Am-241 and a Cs-137 source, including scattering events in the shielding, and the results were compared to experimental data. For both sources the main spectral features such as the photopeak, the Compton continuum, the escape x-rays and the backscatter peak were identified. Finally, the low energy response of a Pu-239 source was modeled to assess the feasibility of Pu-239 detection in spent fuel. This modeling of superconducting detectors can serve as a guide to optimize the configuration in future spectrometer designs.

  2. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Suehnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-15

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662 keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2 line pairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  3. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applied to bulk sample analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kosanke, K.L.; Koch, C.D.; Wilson, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A high resolution Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometer has been installed and made operational for use in routine bulk sample analysis by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) geochemical analysis department. The Ge(Li) spectrometer provides bulk sample analyses for potassium, uranium, and thorium that are superior to those obtained by the BFEC sodium iodide spectrometer. The near term analysis scheme permits a direct assay for uranium that corrects for bulk sample self-absorption effects and is independent of the uranium/radium disequilibrium condition of the sample. A more complete analysis scheme has been developed that fully utilizes the gamma-ray data provided by the Ge(Li) spectrometer and that more properly accounts for the sample self-absorption effect. This new analysis scheme should be implemented on the BFEC Ge(Li) spectrometer at the earliest date.

  4. Locating very high energy gamma ray sources with arc minute accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Harris, K.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.; Lawrence, M. A.; Lang, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of point-like sources were detected by the COS-B satellite, only two were unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of Very High Energy gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arc minute accuracy. This was demonstrated using Cerenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  5. Pure LiF nanophosphors for high exposures of gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. K.; Kumar, Satinder; Dogra, R.; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2012-06-05

    Nanocrystalline lithium fluoride (LiF) phosphors have been prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method at different pH values (7.0, 8.0, 9.0 and 10.00). The formation of nanocrystalline structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Thermoluminescence (TL) properties of LiF phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses of 10 Gy - 70 kGy have been further studied. The analysis of TL glow curve revealed the existence of three well resolved glow peaks, first low temperature peak at around 82 deg. C, second at 125 deg. C and third one at higher temperature around 303 deg. C. The LiF nano-crystallites synthesized at 8.00 pH with maximum TL sensitivity at studied gamma doses ranging from threshold to high exposures are potential candidate for dosimetry applications.

  6. SONGS - A high resolution imaging gamma-ray spectrometer for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Chase, L. F.; Kilner, J. R.; Sandie, W. G.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    The overall design and the instrumental features of the Space-Station Observer for Nuclear Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (SONGS) instrument are described. SONGS comprises an array of 19 two-segment n-type Ge detectors, which have the capability of determining the interaction site in either the upper or the lower segment or in both segments. The detectors provide high energy resolution of 1 keV at 100 keV and of 2 keV at 1 MeV. The close-packed Ge sensor array provides a natural sensitivity for the measurement of gamma ray polarization in the 100 keV to 1 MeV energy range, making it possible to obtain information on the structure of the magnetosphere of neutron stars and of the accretion disk of black holes.

  7. High-energy gamma-rays from GRB X-ray flares

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. Y.; Li, Z.; Meszaros, P.

    2007-07-12

    The recent detection of X-ray flares during the afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) suggests an inner-engine origin, at radii inside the forward shock. There must be inverse Compton (IC) emission arising from such flare photons scattered by forward shock afterglow electrons when they are passing through the forward shock. We find that this IC emission produces high energy gamma-ray flares, which may be detected by AGILE, GLAST and ground-based TeV telescopes. The anisotropic IC scattering between flare photons and forward shock electrons does not affect the total IC component intensity, but cause a time delay of the IC component peak relative to the flare peak. We speculate that this IC component may already have been detected by EGRET from a very strong burst--GRB940217. Future observations by GLAST may help to distinguish whether X-ray flares originate from late central engine activity or from external shocks.

  8. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Sühnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-01

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2linepairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  9. Constraining the High-Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Racusin, J. L.; Sonbas, E.; Stamatikos, M.; Guirec, S.

    2012-01-01

    We examine 288 GRBs detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) that fell within the field-of-view of Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) during the first 2.5 years of observations, which showed no evidence for emission above 100 MeV. We report the photon flux upper limits in the 0.1-10 GeV range during the prompt emission phase as well as for fixed 30 s and 100 s integrations starting from the trigger time for each burst. We compare these limits with the fluxes that would be expected from extrapolations of spectral fits presented in the first GBM spectral catalog and infer that roughly half of the GBM-detected bursts either require spectral breaks between the GBM and LAT energy bands or have intrinsically steeper spectra above the peak of the nuF(sub v) spectra (E(sub pk)). In order to distinguish between these two scenarios, we perform joint GBM and LAT spectral fits to the 30 brightest GBM-detected bursts and find that a majority of these bursts are indeed softer above E(sub pk) than would be inferred from fitting the GBM data alone. Approximately 20% of this spectroscopic subsample show statistically significant evidence for a cut-off in their high-energy spectra, which if assumed to be due to gamma gamma attenuation, places limits on the maximum Lorentz factor associated with the relativistic outflow producing this emission. All of these latter bursts have maximum Lorentz factor estimates that are well below the minimum Lorentz factors calculated for LAT-detected GRBs, revealing a wide distribution in the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB outflows and indicating that LAT-detected bursts may represent the high end of this distribution.

  10. High Energy Observations of X-Ray Binaries and Gamma-Ray Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The report discusses the CGRO observation of X-ray binary systems and studies of gamma-ray blasars. Numerous authors have suggested mechanisms for particle acceleration within X-Ray Binary (XRB) systems. Among the acceleration mechanisms that have been applied are pulsar acceleration, shock acceleration at an accretion shock front, shock acceleration at a pulsar wind termination shock, plasma turbulence excited by the accretion flow, and a number of electrodynamic mechanisms. There are therefore many mechanisms which are capable of generating very energetic particles in the XRB environment. If the reports of TeV/PeV gamma-ray generation in XRBs are correct, then one can show that the accelerated particles must be hadrons and that the most likely gamma-ray production mechanism is the decay of collisionally-produced (or photoproduced) neutral pions. At these ultra-high energies, the emission is so strongly beamed that the target conditions are constrained by the requirement that the column depth be large enough to efficiently generate gamma-rays, but not so large that the gamma-rays are absorbed. These constraints naturally lead to models that explain the periodic, narrow duty-cycle pulses observed at TeV/PeV energies as arising from interactions with, either, the atmosphere of the binary companion, an accretion column, or an accretion disk. The production of these TeV/PeV gamma-rays by the decay of pions from "leading isobars" must also be accompanied by a more isotropic emission component in the EGRET energy band from the decay of slower pions (i.e. the "pionization" component). Since the attenuation of 35 MeV-1 GeV photons by photon-photon pair production is not likely to be significant in most XRBs, the TeV/PeV reports therefore strongly suggest sporadic emission in the EGRET energy band. One of the key unresolved issues for understanding AGN is the relationship between XBLs and RBLs.To test the "reunification" hypothesis, authors conducted a multiwavelength

  11. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  12. Thermal, tensile and rheological properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) processed and irradiated by gamma-ray in different atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreto, H. F. R. E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Oliveira, A. C. F. E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Parra, D. F. E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Lugão, A. B. E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Gaia, R.

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate structural changes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) modified by ionizing radiation (gamma rays) in different atmospheres. The gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals which can induce chain scission or recombination, providing its annihilation, branching or crosslinking. This polymer was irradiated with gamma source of {sup 60}Co at doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The changes in molecular structure of HDPE, after gamma irradiations were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile machine and oscillatory rheology. The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the dose at each atmosphere.

  13. Final report: VHE [very high energy] gamma-ray astronomy at Iowa State University, 1991-2000

    SciTech Connect

    Carter-Lewis, D.

    2001-01-30

    A brief summary of the important results and a listing of publications which have resulted from the Iowa State University Very High Energy Gamma-ray Astrophysics Program for the decade 1991-2000 are given.

  14. The BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog. 1; High Time Resolution Spectroscopy of Bright Bursts Using High Energy Resolution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Band, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first in a series of gamma-ray burst spectroscopy catalogs from the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Abstract: Observatory, each covering a different aspect of burst phenomenology. In this paper, we present time-sequences of spectral fit parameters for 156 bursts selected either for their high peak flux or fluence.

  15. Nonuniform High-Gamma (60–500 Hz) Power Changes Dissociate Cognitive Task and Anatomy in Human Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gaona, Charles M.; Sharma, Mohit; Freudenburg, Zachary V.; Breshears, Jonathan D.; Bundy, David T.; Roland, Jarod; Barbour, Dennis L.; Schalk, Gerwin

    2011-01-01

    High-gamma-band (>60 Hz) power changes in cortical electrophysiology are a reliable indicator of focal, event-related cortical activity. Despite discoveries of oscillatory subthreshold and synchronous suprathreshold activity at the cellular level, there is an increasingly popular view that high-gamma-band amplitude changes recorded from cellular ensembles are the result of asynchronous firing activity that yields wideband and uniform power increases. Others have demonstrated independence of power changes in the low- and high-gamma bands, but to date, no studies have shown evidence of any such independence above 60 Hz. Based on nonuniformities in time-frequency analyses of electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals, we hypothesized that induced high-gamma-band (60–500 Hz) power changes are more heterogeneous than currently understood. Using single-word repetition tasks in six human subjects, we showed that functional responsiveness of different ECoG high-gamma sub-bands can discriminate cognitive task (e.g., hearing, reading, speaking) and cortical locations. Power changes in these sub-bands of the high-gamma range are consistently present within single trials and have statistically different time courses within the trial structure. Moreover, when consolidated across all subjects within three task-relevant anatomic regions (sensorimotor, Broca's area, and superior temporal gyrus), these behavior- and location-dependent power changes evidenced nonuniform trends across the population. Together, the independence and nonuniformity of power changes across a broad range of frequencies suggest that a new approach to evaluating high-gamma-band cortical activity is necessary. These findings show that in addition to time and location, frequency is another fundamental dimension of high-gamma dynamics. PMID:21307246

  16. Aging of magnesium stearate under high doses gamma irradiation and oxidative conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeau, D.; Beuvier, L.; Cornaton, M.; Miserque, F.; Tabarant, M.; Esnouf, S.; Ferry, M.

    2015-05-01

    In nuclear waste packages conditioning processes, magnesium stearate is widely used because of its high lubricating properties. For safety purposes, the radiolytic degradation of these organic materials has to be better understood to be able to predict their aging in repository conditions. This study reports the radiolytic degradation of magnesium stearate, using gamma-rays at room temperature and under air. Modifications were followed using different analytical tools (XPS, ATR-FTIR, ICP-AES, ATG and mass spectrometry). It has been observed that molecules mainly formed up to 1000 kGy of gamma irradiation dose under radio-oxidation are alkanes, hydroperoxides, double bonds in the aliphatic chain, carboxylates with aliphatic chain shorter than the one of stearate and ketones. At a dose of 4000 kGy, dicarboxylic acids are observed: the formation of these molecules needs a dose of at least 1000 kGy to be created under radio-oxidation. These observations allow us to propose a non-exhaustive degradation mechanism of magnesium stearate under gamma-irradiation at room temperature and under air.

  17. Modeling High-Energy Gamma-Rays from the Fermi Bubbles - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Splettstoesser, Megan

    2015-08-25

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 50 degrees in galactic latitude and 20-30 degrees in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration is responsible for the high-energy emission of the bubbles. Second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields—both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. I use the assumption of second order Fermi acceleration in the transport equation, which describes the diffusion of particles. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to Fermi second order acceleration and compare this analytical solution to a numerical solution provided by Dr. P. Mertsch. Analytical solutions to the transport equation are taken from Becker, Le, & Dermer and are used to further test the numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution converges to the analytical solution in all cases. Thus, we know the numerical solution accurately calculates the proton spectrum. The gamma-ray spectrum follows the proton spectrum, and will be computed in the future.

  18. Local Absorption of High-energy Emission from Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, R.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2010-09-01

    High-energy photons emitted from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are subject to pair-production interactions with lower energy photons, leading to an effective optical depth. In this paper, we estimate the opacity resulting from photon fields located at various distances from long GRB sites: those of the binary companion to the massive stellar progenitor, the star-forming molecular cloud containing the GRB, and the total photon field of the host galaxy. The first two photon fields are found to be transparent for most reasonable sets of assumptions about these systems. In the case of galactic radiation fields, we have performed several numerical simulations to calculate the expected opacities for two different line-of-sight geometries through the host galaxy and include a full accounting of the infrared radiation produced by the absorption and re-radiation of starlight by dust. The optical depth for GeV gamma rays due to direct starlight is less than unity for all host galaxies. At higher energies, >10 TeV, a spectral cutoff can occur due to the rapidly increasing number of mid- to far-IR intragalactic photons re-radiated by dust. Photons in the extragalactic background light therefore remain the only relevant source of photon-photon opacity for ongoing GRB observations with Fermi-LAT and potential future detections with ground-based gamma-ray telescopes.

  19. High-redshift gamma-ray bursts: observational signatures of superconducting cosmic strings?

    PubMed

    Cheng, K S; Yu, Yun-Wei; Harko, T

    2010-06-18

    The high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), GRBs 080913 and 090423, challenge the conventional GRB progenitor models by their short durations, typical for short GRBs, and their high energy releases, typical for long GRBs. Meanwhile, the GRB rate inferred from high-redshift GRBs also remarkably exceeds the prediction of the collapsar model, with an ordinary star formation history. We show that all these contradictions could be eliminated naturally, if we ascribe some high-redshift GRBs to electromagnetic bursts of superconducting cosmic strings. High-redshift GRBs could become a reasonable way to test the superconducting cosmic string model because the event rate of cosmic string bursts increases rapidly with increasing redshifts, whereas the collapsar rate decreases. PMID:20867291

  20. Scintillator gamma-ray detectors with silicon photomultiplier readouts for high-energy astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Legere, Jason; Bancroft, Christopher; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.; Schwadron, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    Space-based gamma-ray detectors for high-energy astronomy face strict constraints of mass, volume, and power, and must endure harsh operating environments. Scintillator materials have a long history of successful operation under these conditions, and new materials offer greatly improved performance in terms of efficiency, time response, and energy resolution. The use of scintillators in space remains constrained, however, by the mass, volume, and fragility of the associated light readout device, typically a vacuum photomultiplier tube (PMT). Recently developed silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) offer gains and efficiencies similar to those of PMTs, but with greatly reduced mass and volume, high ruggedness, and no high-voltage requirements. We have therefore been investigating the use of SiPM readouts for scintillator gamma-ray detectors, with an emphasis on their suitability for space- and balloonbased instruments for high-energy astronomy. We present our most recent results, including spectroscopy measurements for lanthanum bromide scintillators with SiPM readouts, and pulse-shape discrimination using organic scintillators with SiPM readouts. We also describe potential applications of SiPM readouts to specific highenergy astronomy instrument concepts.

  1. THE HIGH-ENERGY, ARCMINUTE-SCALE GALACTIC CENTER GAMMA-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyakova, M.; Malyshev, D.; Aharonian, F. A.; Crocker, R. M.; Jones, D. I.

    2011-01-10

    Employing data collected during the first 25 months of observations by the Fermi-LAT, we describe and subsequently seek to model the very high energy (>300 MeV) emission from the central few parsecs of our Galaxy. We analyze the morphological, spectral, and temporal characteristics of the central source, 1FGL J1745.6-2900. The data show a clear, statistically significant signal at energies above 10 GeV, where the Fermi-LAT has angular resolution comparable to that of HESS at TeV energies. This makes a meaningful joint analysis of the data possible. Our analysis of the Fermi data (alone) does not uncover any statistically significant variability of 1FGL J1745.6-2900 at GeV energies on the month timescale. Using the combination of Fermi data on 1FGL J1745.6-2900 and HESS data on the coincident, TeV source HESS J1745-290, we show that the spectrum of the central gamma-ray source is inflected with a relatively steep spectral region matching between the flatter spectrum found at both low and high energies. We model the gamma-ray production in the inner 10 pc of the Galaxy and examine cosmic ray (CR) proton propagation scenarios that reproduce the observed spectrum of the central source. We show that a model that instantiates a transition from diffusive propagation of the CR protons at low energy to almost rectilinear propagation at high energies can explain well the spectral phenomenology. We find considerable degeneracy between different parameter choices which will only be broken with the addition of morphological information that gamma-ray telescopes cannot deliver given current angular resolution limits. We argue that a future analysis performed in combination with higher-resolution radio continuum data holds out the promise of breaking this degeneracy.

  2. High gamma oscillations in medial temporal lobe during overt production of speech and gestures.

    PubMed

    Marstaller, Lars; Burianová, Hana; Sowman, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    The study of the production of co-speech gestures (CSGs), i.e., meaningful hand movements that often accompany speech during everyday discourse, provides an important opportunity to investigate the integration of language, action, and memory because of the semantic overlap between gesture movements and speech content. Behavioral studies of CSGs and speech suggest that they have a common base in memory and predict that overt production of both speech and CSGs would be preceded by neural activity related to memory processes. However, to date the neural correlates and timing of CSG production are still largely unknown. In the current study, we addressed these questions with magnetoencephalography and a semantic association paradigm in which participants overtly produced speech or gesture responses that were either meaningfully related to a stimulus or not. Using spectral and beamforming analyses to investigate the neural activity preceding the responses, we found a desynchronization in the beta band (15-25 Hz), which originated 900 ms prior to the onset of speech and was localized to motor and somatosensory regions in the cortex and cerebellum, as well as right inferior frontal gyrus. Beta desynchronization is often seen as an indicator of motor processing and thus reflects motor activity related to the hand movements that gestures add to speech. Furthermore, our results show oscillations in the high gamma band (50-90 Hz), which originated 400 ms prior to speech onset and were localized to the left medial temporal lobe. High gamma oscillations have previously been found to be involved in memory processes and we thus interpret them to be related to contextual association of semantic information in memory. The results of our study show that high gamma oscillations in medial temporal cortex play an important role in the binding of information in human memory during speech and CSG production. PMID:25340347

  3. Direct transitions from high-K isomers to low-K bands -- {gamma} softness or coriolis coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Narimatsu, Kanako; Ohtsubo, Shin-Ichi

    1996-12-31

    Recent measurements of direct transitions from high-K isomers to low-K bands reveal severe break-down of the K-selection rule and pose the problem of how to understand the mechanism of such K-violation. The authors recent systematic calculations by using a simple {gamma}-tunneling model reproduced many of the observed hindrances, indicating the importance of the {gamma} softness. However, there are some data which cannot be explained in terms of the {gamma}-degree of freedom. In this talk, the authors also discuss the results of conventional Coriolis coupling calculations, which is considered to be another important mechanism.

  4. In situ calibration of a high-resolution gamma-ray borehole sonde for assaying uranium-bearing sandstone deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, J.H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for assaying radioactive sandstone deposits in situ by using a high-resolution borehole gamma-ray spectrometer. Gamma-ray photopeaks from the same spectrum acquired to analyze a sample are used to characterize gamma-ray attenuation properties, from which a calibration function is determined. Assay results are independent of differences between properties of field samples and those of laboratory or test-hole standards generally used to calibrate a borehole sonde. This assaying technique is also independent of the state of radioactive disequilibrium that usually exists in nature among members of the natural-decay chains. ?? 1985.

  5. On The Origin Of High Energy Correlations in Gamma-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2012-04-03

    I investigate the origin of the observed correlation between a gamma-ray burst's {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectral peak E{sub pk} and its isotropic equivalent energy E{sub iso} through the use of a population synthesis code to model the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRBs. By using prescriptions for the distribution of prompt spectral parameters as well as the population's luminosity function and co-moving rate density, I generate a simulated population of GRBs and examine how bursts of varying spectral properties and redshift would appear to a gamma-ray detector here on Earth. I find that a strong observed correlation can be produced between the source frame Epk and Eiso for the detected population despite the existence of only a weak and broad correlation in the original simulated population. The energy dependance of a gamma-ray detector's flux-limited detection threshold acts to produce a correlation between the source frame E{sub pk} and E{sub iso} for low luminosity GRBs, producing the left boundary of the observed correlation. Conversely, very luminous GRBs are found at higher redshifts than their low luminosity counterparts due to the standard Malquest bias, causing bursts in the low E{sub pk}, high E{sub iso} regime to go undetected because their E{sub pk} values would be redshifted to energies at which most gamma-ray detectors become less sensitive. I argue that it is this previously unexamined effect which produces the right boundary of the observed correlation. Therefore, the origin of the observed correlation is a complex combination of the instrument's detection threshold, the intrinsic cutoff in the GRB luminosity function, and the broad range of redshifts over which GRBs are detected. Although the GRB model presented here is a very simplified representation of the complex nature of GRBs, these simulations serve to demonstrate how selection effects caused by a combination of instrumental sensitivity and the cosmological nature of an astrophysical population

  6. Simulating the High Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Seen by the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, F.; Azzi, P.; Bastieri, D.; Busetto, P.; Lei, Y.; Rando, R.; Tibolla, O.; Baldini, L.; Kuss, M.; Latronico, L.; Omodei, N.; Razzano, M.; Spandre, G.; Boinee, P.; de Angelis, A.; Frailis, M.; Brigida, M.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Loparco, F.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Cecchi, C.; Lubrano, P.; Marcucci, F.; Pepe, M.; Tosti, G.; Lionetto, A.; Morselli, A.; Pittori, C.

    This paper presents the simulation of the GLAST high energy gamma-ray telescope. The simulation package, written in C++, is based on the Geant4 toolkit, and it is integrated into a general framework used to process events. A detailed simulation of the electronic signals inside Silicon detectors has been provided and it is used for the particle tracking, which is handled by a dedicated software. A unique repository for the geometrical description of the detector has been realized using the XML language and a C++ library to access this information has been designed and implemented. A new event display based on the HepRep protocol was implemented.

  7. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  8. The University of Durham Mark 3 very high energy gamma ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadwick, P. M.; Dipper, N. A.; Dowthwaite, J. C.; Kirkman, I. W.; Mccomb, T. J.; Orford, K. J.; Turver, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    A new very high energy gamma-ray telescope employing the atmospheric Cerenkov light technique and currently nearing completion is described. The telescope is designed to have capability as both a wide angle instrument (4 degree field of view) for sky survey work and as a narrow field of view instrument (1.35 degrees) for conventional drift-scanning and tracking modes of operation. The telescope consists of two 10 sq. m. mirrors operated in fast coincidence with multiple phototube assemblies at the prime focus of each mirror. The design philosophy of the instrument is discussed and comparisons of its performance with our previous telescopes are made.

  9. High resolution spectroscopy of two gamma-ray bursts in November 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Cline, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    The first results from the ISSEE-3 radiatively colled germanium gamma ray burst spectrometer are presented. Spectra and time histories from two events on the 1978 November 4 and 1978 November 19 are given. A significant difference in the continuum spectra for the two events was observed. Evidence is presented for two spectral features in the features in the November 19 events, a broad one at approximately 420 key KeV and a narrower one at 740 KeV with a suggestion of an accompanying high energy tail.

  10. Calculated Neutron and Gamma-ray Spectra across the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Sterbentz

    2008-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra are calculated using the MCNP5 computer code and a one-sixth core model of a prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor based on the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor. Spectra are calculated in the five inner reflector graphite block rings, three annular active core fuel rings, three outer graphite reflector block rings, and the core barrel. The neutron spectra are block and fuel pin averages and are calculated as a function of temperature and burnup. Also provided are the total, fast, and thermal radial profile fluxes and core barrel dpa rates.

  11. High spatial resolution gamma imaging detector based on a 5 inch diameter R3292 Hamamatsu PSPMT

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, R.; Majewski, S.; Kross, B.; Weisenberger, A.G.; Steinbach, D.

    1998-06-01

    High resolution imaging gamma-ray detectors were developed using Hamamatsu`s 5 inch diameter R3292 position sensitive PMT (PSPMT) and a variety of crystal scintillator arrays. Special readout techniques were used to maximize the active imaging area while reducing the number of readout channels. Spatial resolutions approaching 1 mm were obtained in a broad energy range from 20 to 511 keV. Results are also presented of coupling the scintillator arrays to the PMT via imaging light guides consisting of acrylic optical fibers.

  12. High-resolution spectroscopy of two gamma-ray bursts in 1978 November

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Cline, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The first results from the ISEE 3 radiatively cooled germanium gamma-ray burst spectrometer are presented. Spectra and time histories from two events on 1978 November 4 and 19 are given. A significant difference in the continuum spectra for the two events was observed. Evidence is presented for two spectral features in the November 19 event, a broad one at about 420 keV and a narrower one at about 740 keV with a suggestion of an accompanying high-energy tail.

  13. Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Both radiation and increased iron stores can independently increase oxidative damage, resulting in protein, lipid and DNA oxidation. Oxidative stress increases the risk of many health problems including cancer, cataracts, and heart disease. This study, a subset of a larger interdisciplinary investigation of the combined effect of iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury, monitored immune parameters in the peripheral blood of rats subjected to gamma radiation, high dietary iron or both. Specific immune measures consisted of: (1) peripheral leukocyte distribution, (2) plasma cytokine levels and (3) cytokine production profiles following whole blood mitogenic stimulation

  14. A pixilated design of high pressure xenon gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuxin; Baciak, James E.; Sullivan, Clair; Gardner, Gary

    2007-08-01

    A pixilated anode design of a high pressure xenon gamma-ray spectrometer is investigated. This design is composed of a single planar cathode and four anode pixels embedded in the center of a "non-collecting" anode plate. This design removes the Frisch grid which can suffer from excessive micro-phonics in real-world applications. To investigate the energy resolution of this design, the charge collecting efficiency and waveform of induced charge on each anode were calculated via tracking electron cloud drifting.

  15. A high temperature transfer procedure for detection of G protein gamma subunits by immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Robishaw, J D; Balcueva, E A

    1993-02-01

    The production of antibodies against synthetic peptides derived from amino acid sequences common or unique to a particular protein(s) is an important tool in the identification of structurally related members of an ever-increasing number of protein families. The successful use of anti-peptide antibodies requires that the protein(s) of interest be properly transferred and fully denatured prior to detection by Western-type immunoblotting. In this paper, we demonstrate that conventional transfer procedures are not successful in presenting the G protein gamma subunits in a suitable state for immunodetection. We describe a high temperature (70 degrees C) transfer procedure that results in a more than 20-fold enhancement in the sensitivity of immunodetection of the various G protein gamma subunits. The effect of high temperature transfer could not be duplicated by including 0.2% SDS in the buffer during transfer to nitrocellulose, or by baking or autoclaving the nitrocellulose after transfer. Thus, high temperature transfer is a powerful procedure for enhancing immunoblot detection of protein(s) that may be resistant to denaturation and/or subject to renaturation during the transfer and/or binding to nitrocellulose. PMID:7680843

  16. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 090217A

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M. E-mail: piron@lpta.in2p3.f

    2010-07-10

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more than seven decades in energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here, we report on the observation of the long GRB 090217A which triggered the GBM and has been detected by the LAT with a significance greater than 9{sigma}. We present the GBM and LAT observations and on-ground analyses, including the time-resolved spectra and the study of the temporal profile from 8 keV up to {approx}1 GeV. All spectra are well reproduced by a Band model. We compare these observations to the first two LAT-detected, long bursts GRB 080825C and GRB 080916C. These bursts were found to have time-dependent spectra and exhibited a delayed onset of the high-energy emission, which are not observed in the case of GRB 090217A. We discuss some theoretical implications for the high-energy emission of GRBs.

  17. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy for enhancing production and application of medical isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Smith, S. V.; Muench, L.; Nino, M.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Zhu, S.; Chillery, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Harding, R.; Lister, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear medicine is a field which requires precise decay data for use in planning radionuclide production and in imaging and therapeutic applications. To address deficiencies in decay data, sources of medical isotopes were produced and purified at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) then shipped to Argonne National Laboratory where high-precision, gamma-ray measurements were performed using Gammasphere. New decay schemes for a number of PET isotopes and the impact on dose calculations will be presented. To investigate the production of next-generation theranostic or radiotherapeutic isotopes, cross section measurements with high energy protons have also been explored at BLIP. The 100-200 MeV proton energy regime is relatively unexplored for isotope production, thus offering high discovery potential but at the same time a challenging analysis due to the large number of open channels at these energies. Results of cross sections deduced from Compton-suppressed, coincidence gamma-ray spectroscopy performed at Lowell will be presented, focusing on the production of platinum isotopes by irradiating natural platinum foils with 100 to 200 MeV protons. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contracts DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. Fermi Observations of High-energy Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 090217A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rau, A.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ripken, J.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Fermi GBM Collaboration

    2010-07-01

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more than seven decades in energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here, we report on the observation of the long GRB 090217A which triggered the GBM and has been detected by the LAT with a significance greater than 9σ. We present the GBM and LAT observations and on-ground analyses, including the time-resolved spectra and the study of the temporal profile from 8 keV up to ~1 GeV. All spectra are well reproduced by a Band model. We compare these observations to the first two LAT-detected, long bursts GRB 080825C and GRB 080916C. These bursts were found to have time-dependent spectra and exhibited a delayed onset of the high-energy emission, which are not observed in the case of GRB 090217A. We discuss some theoretical implications for the high-energy emission of GRBs.

  19. Development of a High-Average-Power Compton Gamma Source for Lepton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Yakimenko, Vitaliy; Platonenko, Viktor T.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma- (γ-) ray beams of high average power and peak brightness are of demand for a number of applications in high-energy physics, material processing, medicine, etc. One of such examples is gamma conversion into polarized positrons and muons that is under consideration for projected lepton colliders. A γ-source based on the Compton backscattering from the relativistic electron beam is a promising candidate for this application. Our approach to the high-repetition γ-source assumes placing the Compton interaction point inside a CO2 laser cavity. A laser pulse interacts with periodical electron bunches on each round-trip inside the laser cavity producing the corresponding train of γ-pulses. The round-trip optical losses can be compensated by amplification in the active laser medium. The major challenge for this approach is in maintaining stable amplification rate for a picosecond CO2-laser pulse during multiple resonator round-trips without significant deterioration of its temporal and transverse profiles. Addressing this task, we elaborated on a computer code that allows identifying the directions and priorities in the development of such a multi-pass picosecond CO2 laser. Proof-of-principle experiments help to verify the model and show the viability of the concept. In these tests we demonstrated extended trains of picosecond CO2 laser pulses circulating inside the cavity that incorporates the Compton interaction point.

  20. LIMITS TO THE FRACTION OF HIGH-ENERGY PHOTON EMITTING GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Akerlof, Carl W.; Zheng, WeiKang

    2013-02-20

    After almost four years of operation, the two instruments on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have shown that the number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV cannot exceed roughly 9% of the total number of all such events, at least at the present detection limits. In a recent paper, we found that GRBs with photons detected in the Large Area Telescope have a surprisingly broad distribution with respect to the observed event photon number. Extrapolation of our empirical fit to numbers of photons below our previous detection limit suggests that the overall rate of such low flux events could be estimated by standard image co-adding techniques. In this case, we have taken advantage of the excellent angular resolution of the Swift mission to provide accurate reference points for 79 GRB events which have eluded any previous correlations with high-energy photons. We find a small but significant signal in the co-added field. Guided by the extrapolated power-law fit previously obtained for the number distribution of GRBs with higher fluxes, the data suggest that only a small fraction of GRBs are sources of high-energy photons.

  1. Constraining the High-energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi Large Area Telescope Team; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brigida, M.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J.; McGlynn, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Ryde, F.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stawarz, Łukasz; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Uehara, T.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor Team; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Guirec, S.; Goldstein, A.; Burgess, J. M.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Fishman, J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; Tierney, D.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Xiong, S.

    2012-08-01

    We examine 288 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) that fell within the field of view of Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) during the first 2.5 years of observations, which showed no evidence for emission above 100 MeV. We report the photon flux upper limits in the 0.1-10 GeV range during the prompt emission phase as well as for fixed 30 s and 100 s integrations starting from the trigger time for each burst. We compare these limits with the fluxes that would be expected from extrapolations of spectral fits presented in the first GBM spectral catalog and infer that roughly half of the GBM-detected bursts either require spectral breaks between the GBM and LAT energy bands or have intrinsically steeper spectra above the peak of the νF ν spectra (E pk). In order to distinguish between these two scenarios, we perform joint GBM and LAT spectral fits to the 30 brightest GBM-detected bursts and find that a majority of these bursts are indeed softer above E pk than would be inferred from fitting the GBM data alone. Approximately 20% of this spectroscopic subsample show statistically significant evidence for a cutoff in their high-energy spectra, which if assumed to be due to γγ attenuation, places limits on the maximum Lorentz factor associated with the relativistic outflow producing this emission. All of these latter bursts have maximum Lorentz factor estimates that are well below the minimum Lorentz factors calculated for LAT-detected GRBs, revealing a wide distribution in the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB outflows and indicating that LAT-detected bursts may represent the high end of this distribution.

  2. GAMMA-RAY VARIABILITY FROM WIND CLUMPING IN HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES WITH JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Owocki, S. P.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Romero, G. E.; Araudo, A. T.

    2009-05-01

    In the subclass of high-mass X-ray binaries known as 'microquasars', relativistic hadrons in the jets launched by the compact object can interact with cold protons from the star's radiatively driven wind, producing pions that then quickly decay into gamma rays. Since the resulting gamma-ray emissivity depends on the target density, the detection of rapid variability in microquasars with Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope and the new generation of Cherenkov imaging arrays could be used to probe the clumped structure of the stellar wind. We show here that the fluctuation in gamma rays can be modeled using a 'porosity length' formalism, usually applied to characterize clumping effects. In particular, for a porosity length defined by h {identical_to} l/f, i.e., as the ratio of the characteristic size l of clumps to their volume filling factor f, we find that the relative fluctuation in gamma-ray emission in a binary with orbital separation a scales as {radical}(h/{pi}a) in the 'thin-jet' limit, and is reduced by a factor 1/{radical}(1 +{phi}a/2l) for a jet with a finite opening angle {phi}. For a thin jet and quite moderate porosity length h {approx} 0.03a, this implies a ca. 10% variation in the gamma-ray emission. Moreover, the illumination of individual large clumps might result in isolated flares, as has been recently observed in some massive gamma-ray binaries.

  3. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons. Specifically, SiC radiation detectors with larger areas and 100-micrometer thick active regions have been designed and manufactured according to detector-design specifications. Detectors based on a Schottky diode design were specified in order to minimize the effects of the detector entrance window on alpha particle measurements. During manufacture of the Schottky diodes, the manufacturer also provided a set of large-volume SiC p-i-n diodes for testing Extensive alpha particle measurements have been carried out to test and quantify the response of the SiC Schottky diodes. Exposures to 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, 221-Fr, 225-Ac, 237-Np, 238-Pu, 240-Pu, and 242-Pu sources were used to obtain detailed alpha response data in the alpha energy range from 3182.787 keV to 8375.9 ke

  4. Sensitivity of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Experiment to observe Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. M.

    Ground based telescopes have marginally observed very high energy emission (>100GeV) from gamma-ray bursts(GRB). For instance, Milagrito observed GRB970417a with a significance of 3.7 sigmas over the background. Milagro have not yet observed TeV emission from a GRB with its triggered and untriggered searches or GeV emission with a triggered search using its scalers. These results suggest the need of new observatories with higher sensitivity to transient sources. The HAWC (High Altitute Water Cherenkov) observatory is proposed as a combination of the Milagro tecnology with a very high altitude (>4000m over see level) site. The expected HAWC sensitivity for GRBs is at least >10 times the Milagro sensitivity. In this work HAWC sensitivity for GRBs is discussed for different detector configurations such as altitude, distance between PMTs, depth under water of PMTs, number of PMTs required for a trigger, etc.

  5. Automatic Quenching of High Energy gamma-ray Sources by Synchrotron Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, Lukasz; Kirk, John; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.

    2007-02-02

    Here we investigate evolution of a magnetized system, in which continuously produced high energy emission undergoes annihilation on a soft photon field, such that the synchrotron radiation of the created electron-positron pairs increases number density of the soft photons. This situation is important in high energy astrophysics, because, for an extremely wide range of magnetic field strengths (nano to mega Gauss), it involves {gamma}-ray photons with energies between 0.3GeV and 30TeV. We derive and analyze the conditions for which the system is unstable to runaway production of soft photons and ultrarelativistic electrons, and for which it can reach a steady state with an optical depth to photon-photon annihilation larger than unity, as well those for which efficient pair loading of the emitting volume takes place. We also discuss the application of our analysis to a realistic situation involving astrophysical sources of a broad-band {gamma}-ray emission and briefly consider the particular case of sources close to active supermassive black holes.

  6. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, F. Gugiu, M. Petrascu, H. Petrone, C. Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  7. High sensitivity gamma spectrometry of air samples near SRS during 1985-1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.; Cadieux, J.R.

    1997-07-01

    High sensitivity gamma analysis of off-site air samples near the Savannah River Site (SRS) is achieved by collecting large volume air samples for analysis by ultra-low-level gamma spectrometry. A review of the 1985-1995 measurements has highlighted local and distant releases of man-made radionuclides, along with cosmogenic radionuclides which correlate with both solar and seasonal phenomena. Measurements typically involve 2-day air collection of a 70,000 m{sup 3} sample on a 51 cm x 51 cm cellulose filter using a high-capacity pump. Short-lived radon background activity is allowed to decay a few days, and then the filter is configured into a smaller calibrated volume and counted 1-3 days on a 30 percent-efficient HPGe in the Ultra-Low-Level Counting Facility. Representative detection limits for this method are shown in Table 1, and even lower limits are achievable by counting on the low-background 160 percent-efficient HPGe of the Underground Counting Facility.

  8. A Concept for a High-Energy Gamma-ray Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloser, P. F.; Hunter, S. D.; Depaola, G. O.; Longo, F.

    2003-01-01

    We present a concept for an imaging gamma-ray polarimeter operating from approx. 50 MeV to approx. 1 GeV. Such an instrument would be valuable for the study of high-energy pulsars, active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants, and gamma-ray bursts. The concept makes use of pixelized gas micro-well detectors, under development at Goddard Space Flight Center, to record the electron-positron tracks from pair-production events in a large gas volume. Pixelized micro-well detectors have the potential to form large-volume 3-D track imagers with approx. 100 micron (rms) position resolution at moderate cost. The combination of high spatial resolution and a continuous low-density gas medium permits many thousands of measurements per radiation length, allowing the particle tracks to be imaged accurately before multiple scattering masks their original directions. The polarization of the incoming radiation may then be determined from the azimuthal distribution of the electron-positron pairs. We have performed Geant4 simulations of these processes to estimate the polarization sensitivity as a function of instrument parameters and event selection criteria.

  9. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-02-07

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  10. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-01-01

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  11. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined detection of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, M.M.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1987-02-27

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation event count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  12. Milagro Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2006-05-19

    The recently launched Swift satellite is providing an unprecedented number of rapid and accurate Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) localizations, facilitating a flurry of follow-up observations by a large number of telescopes at many different wavelengths. The Very High Energy (VHE, >100 GeV) regime has so far been relatively unexplored. Milagro is a wide field of view (2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 90%) ground-based gamma-ray telescope which employs a water Cherenkov detector to monitor the northern sky almost continuously in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. We have searched the Milagro data for emission from the most recent GRBs identified within our field of view. These include three Swift bursts which also display late-time X-ray flares. We have searched for emission coincident with these flares. No significant detection was made. A 99% confidence upper limit is provided for each of the GRBs, as well as the flares.

  13. High Purity Germanium Gamma-PHA Assay of Uranium Scrap Cans Used in 321-M Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaymeh, S. R.; Dewberry, R. A.; Casella, V.

    2001-12-01

    The Analytical Development Section of SRTC was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The facility also includes the 324-M storage building and the passageway connecting it to 321-M. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Solid Waste's Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control & Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report describes and documents the use of a portable HPGe detector and EG&G DART system that contains a high voltage power supply, signal processing electronics, a personal computer with Gamma-Vision software, and space to store and manipulate multiple 4096-channel gamma-ray spectra to assay for 235U content. The system was used to assay a large number of scrap cans used to store highly enriched uranium (HEU) chips and filings. This report includes a description of two efficiency calibration configurations and also the results of the assay. A description of the quality control checks is included as well.

  14. Upright face-preferential high-gamma responses in lower-order visual areas: evidence from intracranial recordings in children

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Schwarzlose, Rebecca F.; Nishida, Masaaki; Ofen, Noa; Asano, Eishi

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral studies demonstrate that a face presented in the upright orientation attracts attention more rapidly than an inverted face. Saccades toward an upright face take place in 100-140 ms following presentation. The present study using electrocorticography determined whether upright face-preferential neural activation, as reflected by augmentation of high-gamma activity at 80-150 Hz, involved the lower-order visual cortex within the first 100 ms post-stimulus presentation. Sampled lower-order visual areas were verified by the induction of phosphenes upon electrical stimulation. These areas resided in the lateral-occipital, lingual, and cuneus gyri along the calcarine sulcus, roughly corresponding to V1 and V2. Measurement of high-gamma augmentation during central (circular) and peripheral (annular) checkerboard reversal pattern stimulation indicated that central-field stimuli were processed by the more polar surface whereas peripheral-field stimuli by the more anterior medial surface. Upright face stimuli, compared to inverted ones, elicited up to 23% larger augmentation of high-gamma activity in the lower-order visual regions at 40-90 ms. Upright face-preferential high-gamma augmentation was more highly correlated with high-gamma augmentation for central than peripheral stimuli. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that lower-order visual regions, especially those for the central field, are involved in visual cues for rapid detection of upright face stimuli. PMID:25579446

  15. Upright face-preferential high-gamma responses in lower-order visual areas: evidence from intracranial recordings in children.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Schwarzlose, Rebecca F; Nishida, Masaaki; Ofen, Noa; Asano, Eishi

    2015-04-01

    Behavioral studies demonstrate that a face presented in the upright orientation attracts attention more rapidly than an inverted face. Saccades toward an upright face take place in 100-140 ms following presentation. The present study using electrocorticography determined whether upright face-preferential neural activation, as reflected by augmentation of high-gamma activity at 80-150 Hz, involved the lower-order visual cortex within the first 100 ms post-stimulus presentation. Sampled lower-order visual areas were verified by the induction of phosphenes upon electrical stimulation. These areas resided in the lateral-occipital, lingual, and cuneus gyri along the calcarine sulcus, roughly corresponding to V1 and V2. Measurement of high-gamma augmentation during central (circular) and peripheral (annular) checkerboard reversal pattern stimulation indicated that central-field stimuli were processed by the more polar surface whereas peripheral-field stimuli by the more anterior medial surface. Upright face stimuli, compared to inverted ones, elicited up to 23% larger augmentation of high-gamma activity in the lower-order visual regions at 40-90 ms. Upright face-preferential high-gamma augmentation was more highly correlated with high-gamma augmentation for central than peripheral stimuli. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that lower-order visual regions, especially those for the central field, are involved in visual cues for rapid detection of upright face stimuli. PMID:25579446

  16. Observation of the Milky Way with the High Energy Gamma-Ray Satellite GLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, H.; Ohto, A.; Mizuno, T.; Yoshida, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ohsugi, T.; Ozaki, M.; Tajima, H.; Kamae, T.

    Gamma-ray observations of the universe have revealed that pulsars and Active Galactic Nuclei as well as the Milky Way are gamma-ray emitters, and thus gamma-ray observation is very important for the study of these objects. GLAST (Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope) is a gamma-ray satellite which will be launched in 2006. GLAST has a wide energy range, large field of view, and good angular resolution and energy resolution. In this paper, some of the scientific topics planned for GLAST are presented, in addition to the developments of the background simulator which will be necessary to analyze the GLAST data.

  17. HAND-HELD GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER BASED ON HIGH-EFFICIENCY FRISCH-RING CdZnTe DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI,Y.

    2007-05-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution, el% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. This technique facilitates the application of CdZnTe materials for high efficiency gamma-ray detection. A hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8x8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so that detection efficiency is significantly improved. By using the front-end ASICs developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy resolution. The spectrometer includes signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuit, high-voltage module, and USB interface. In this paper, we introduce the details of the system structure and report our test results with it.

  18. The High Altitude Water Cherenlov (HAWC) Gamma ray Detector Response to Atmospheric Electric Field Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, A.

    2015-12-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is located at 4100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. HAWC's primary purpose is the study of both: galactic and extra-galactic sources of high energy gamma rays. HAWC consists of 300 large water Cherenkov detectors (WCD), each instrumented with 4 photo-multipliers (PMTs). The HAWC scaler system records the rates of individual PMTs giving the opportunity of study relatively low energy transients as solar energetic particles, the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays and possible variations of the cosmic ray rate due to atmospheric electric field changes. In this work, we present the observations of scaler rate enhancements associated with thunderstorm activity observed at the HAWC site.In particular, we present preliminary results of the analysis of the time coincidence of the electric field changes and the scaler enhancements.

  19. High Precision Grids for Neutron, Hard X-Ray, and Gamma-Ray Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Fourier telescopes permit observations over a very broad band of energy. They generally include synthetic spatial filtering structures, known as multilayer grids or grid pairs consisting of alternate layers of absorbing and transparent materials depending on whether neutrons or photons are being imaged. For hard x-rays and gamma rays high (absorbing) and low (transparent) atomic number elements, termed high-Z and low-Z materials may be used. Fabrication of these multilayer grid structures is not without its difficulties. Herein the alternate layers of the higher material and the lower material are inserted in a polyhedron, transparent to photons of interest, through an open face of the polyhedron. The inserted layers are then uniformly compressed to form a multilayer grid.

  20. PoGOLite A high sensitivity balloon-borne soft gamma-ray polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Andersson, Viktor; Arimoto, Makoto; Axelsson, Magnus; Marini Bettolo, Cecilia; Björnsson, Claes-Ingvar; Bogaert, Gilles; Carlson, Per; Craig, William; Ekeberg, Tomas; Engdegård, Olle; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Gunji, Shuichi; Hjalmarsdotter, Linnea; Iwan, Bianca; Kanai, Yoshikazu; Kataoka, Jun; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kazejev, Jaroslav; Kiss, Mózsi; Klamra, Wlodzimierz; Larsson, Stefan; Madejski, Grzegorz; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Ng, Johnny; Pearce, Mark; Ryde, Felix; Suhonen, Markus; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takuya; Thurston, Timothy; Ueno, Masaru; Varner, Gary; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Yamashita, Yuichiro; Ylinen, Tomi; Yoshida, Hiroaki

    2008-09-01

    We describe a new balloon-borne instrument (PoGOLite) capable of detecting 10% polarisation from 200 mCrab point-like sources between 25 and 80 keV in one 6-h flight. Polarisation measurements in the soft gamma-ray band are expected to provide a powerful probe into high energy emission mechanisms as well as the distribution of magnetic fields, radiation fields and interstellar matter. Synchrotron radiation, inverse Compton scattering and propagation through high magnetic fields are likely to produce high degrees of polarisation in the energy band of the instrument. We demonstrate, through tests at accelerators, with radioactive sources and through computer simulations, that PoGOLite will be able to detect degrees of polarisation as predicted by models for several classes of high energy sources. At present, only exploratory polarisation measurements have been carried out in the soft gamma-ray band. Reduction of the large background produced by cosmic-ray particles while securing a large effective area has been the greatest challenge. PoGOLite uses Compton scattering and photo-absorption in an array of 217 well-type phoswich detector cells made of plastic and BGO scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence shield and a thick polyethylene neutron shield. The narrow field of view (FWHM = 1.25 msr, 2.0 deg × 2.0 deg) obtained with detector cells and the use of thick background shields warrant a large effective area for polarisation measurements (˜228 cm 2 at E = 40 keV) without sacrificing the signal-to-noise ratio. Simulation studies for an atmospheric overburden of 3-4 g/cm 2 indicate that neutrons and gamma-rays entering the PDC assembly through the shields are dominant backgrounds. Off-line event selection based on recorded phototube waveforms and Compton kinematics reduce the background to that expected for a ˜100 mCrab source between 25 and 50 keV. A 6-h observation of the Crab pulsar will differentiate between the Polar Cap/Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and

  1. Ultra-High Rate Measurements of Spent Fuel Gamma-Ray Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Douglas; Vandevender, Brent; Wood, Lynn; Glasgow, Brian; Taubman, Matthew; Wright, Michael; Dion, Michael; Pitts, Karl; Runkle, Robert; Campbell, Luke; Fast, James

    2014-03-01

    Presently there are over 200,000 irradiated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies in the world, each containing a concerning amount of weapons-usable material. Both facility operators and safeguards inspectors want to improve composition determination. Current measurements are expensive and difficult so new methods are developed through models. Passive measurements are limited since a few specific decay products and the associated down-scatter overwhelm the gamma rays of interest. Active interrogation methods produce gamma rays beyond 3 MeV, minimizing the impact of the passive emissions that drop off sharply above this energy. New devices like the Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) detector are being developed to advance these novel measurement methods. Designed for reasonable resolution at 106 s-1 output rates (compared to ~ 1 - 10 e 3 s-1 standards), SNF samples were directly measured using UHRGe and compared to models. Model verification further enables using Los Alamos National Laboratory SNF assembly models, developed under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, to determine emission and signal expectations. Measurement results and future application requirements for UHRGe will be discussed.

  2. POCI: A compact high resolution {gamma} camera for intra-operative surgical use

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, L.; Charon, Y.; Solal, M.; Laniece, P.; Mastrippolito, R.; Pinot, L.; Ploux, L.; Valentin, L. |; Ricard, M.

    1998-06-01

    The development of a hand-held {gamma} imaging probe for inside body localization of small tumors is of first interest for radio-guided operative cancer surgery. In that context, the authors have developed a sub-millimeter spatial resolution, small field of view, {gamma} per-operative compact imager (POCI). It consists of a head module composed of a high resolution tungsten collimator and a YAP:Ce crystal plate, optically coupled to an intensified position sensitive diode (IPSD). The authors report here the essential imaging performance characteristics of the POCI camera (spatial resolution, position linearity, efficiency and energy response). These were obtained by studying the influence of the collimator and the crystal design to evaluate the optimal configuration. The present version of POCI has a 24 mm diameter usable field of view and an intrinsic spatial resolution of 0.9 mm to 1.2 mm FWHM at 120 keV. These good detection performance characteristics combined with the small size of the camera make the device well suited to provide intra-operative monitoring in several medical procedures, such as thyroid and breast tumor removal.

  3. Discovery of a Highly Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar in a Gamma-Ray-Detected Globular Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Kaplan, D. L.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We report on the Green Bank Telescope discovery of a highly eccentric binary millisecond pulsar (MSP) in NGC 6652, the first MSP to be detected in this globular cluster. The pulsar search was guided by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, which detected NGC 6652 at GeV energies, identifying the cluster as a likely host of a population of gamma-ray-emitting MSPs. Initial timing of the MSP yielded an eccentricity of ~0.95 and a minimum companion mass of 0.73 solar masses, assuming a neutron star mass of 1.4 solar masses. These results strongly indicate that the pulsar has undergone one or more companion exchanges in the dense stellar environment of the cluster, and that the current companion is a compact object, likely a massive white dwarf or a neutron star. Further timing of this system will result in a measurement of the post-Keplerian rate of periastron advance and therefore a direct measurement of the total system mass, allowing additional constraints to be placed on both the pulsar and companion masses. The timing solution will also be used to search for gamma-ray pulsations from the MSP.

  4. High spectral resolution studies of gamma ray bursts on new missions

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, U. D.; Acuna, M. H.; Cline, T. L.; Dennis, B. R.; Orwig, L. E.; Trombka, J. I.; Starr, R. D.

    1996-08-01

    Two new missions will be launched in 1996 and 1997, each carrying X-ray and gamma ray detectors capable of high spectral resolution at room temperature. The Argentine Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas (SAC-B) and the Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative (SSTI) Clark missions will each carry several arrays of X-ray detectors primarily intended for the study of solar flares and gamma-ray bursts. Arrays of small (1 cm{sup 2}) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) units will provide x-ray measurements in the 10 to 80 keV range with an energy resolution of {approx_equal}6 keV. Arrays of both silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD) and P-intrinsic-N (PIN) photodiodes (for the SAC-B mission only) will provide energy coverage from 2-25 keV with {approx_equal}1 keV resolution. For SAC-B, higher energy spectral data covering the 30-300 keV energy range will be provided by CsI(Tl) scintillators coupled to silicon APDs, resulting in similar resolution but greater simplicity relative to conventional CsI/PMT systems. Because of problems with the Pegasus launch vehicle, the launch of SAC-B has been delayed until 1997. The launch of the SSTI Clark mission is scheduled for June 1996.

  5. Amorphous and crystalline optical materials used as instruments for high gamma radiation doses estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioan, M.-R.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear radiation induce some changes to the structure of exposed materials. The main effect of ionizing radiation when interacting with optical materials is the occurrence of color centers, which are quantitatively proportional to the up-taken doses. In this paper, a relation between browning effect magnitude and dose values was found. Using this relation, the estimation of a gamma radiation dose can be done. By using two types of laser wavelengths (532 nm and 633 nm), the optical powers transmitted thru glass samples irradiated to different doses between 0 and 59.1 kGy, were measured and the associated optical browning densities were determined. The use of laser light gives the opportunity of using its particularities: monochromaticity, directionality and coherence. Polarized light was also used for enhancing measurements quality. These preliminary results bring the opportunity of using glasses as detectors for the estimation of the dose in a certain point in space and for certain energy, especially in particles accelerators experiments, where the occurred nuclear reactions are involving the presence of high gamma rays fields.

  6. Very high-energy gamma ray astronomy. [using the atmospheric cerenkov technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results in ground-based very high-energy (less than 10 to the eleventh power eV) gamma-ray astronomy are reviewed. The various modes of the atmospheric Cerenkov technique are described, and the importance of cosmic ray rejection methods is stressed. The positive detections (at approximately less than 10 to the 12th power eV) of the Crab pulsar that suggest a very flat spectrum and time-variable pulse phase are discussed. Observations of other pulsars (particularly Vela) suggest that these features may be general. The steady flux upper limits for the Crab Nebula are thus reconsidered, and a new value of the implied (Compton-synchrotron) magnetic field in the Nebula is reported. Evidence that a 4.8-hour modulated effect was detected at E sub gamma is less than 10 to the 12th power eV from Cyg X-3 is strengthened in that the exact period originally proposed agrees well with a recent determination of the X-ray period. The southern sky observations are reviewed, and the significance of the detection of an active galaxy (NGC 5128) is considered for source models and future observations.

  7. Radioactivity of a Rock Profile from Rio do Rasto Formation Measured by High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Rodrigo O.; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Pinese, José P. P.

    2011-08-01

    Natural occurring radionuclides are present in different concentrations in sedimentary rocks. Generally, their distribution correlates reasonably with their geo-physicochemical behavior during sediment deposition and rock consolidation. This fact permits to study some geological characteristics of the rocks by analyzing the radionuclide distribution in the rocks, as it might reflect the origin of the sediments, the depositional environment, and more recent events such as weathering and erosion. In this work, rocks from an exposed profile of the Rio do Rasto Formation were collected and analyzed in laboratory by high resolution gamma spectrometry for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K determination. It was employed a standard gamma ray spectrometry electronic chain, with a 66% relative efficiency HPGe detector. The efficiency calibration, as well as its validation, was accomplished with eight International Atomic Energy Agency certified samples. The outcrop exposes layers of sandstone and siltstone and, secondarily, claystone, with varying colors (gray, red and green). The rocks were collected along this profile, each of them was dried in the open air during 48 hours, grounded, sieved through 4 mm mesh and sealed in cylindrical recipients. The 226Ra, 232Th and 40K activity concentrations are presented, their distribution and the possible relations among activities are analyzed. The general pattern of radionuclides distribution respects well the hypotheses on geo-physicochemical behavior of radioactive elements.

  8. High-resolution imaging gamma-ray spectroscopy with externally segmented germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. An angular resolution of 0.2 deg becomes practical by combining position-sensitive germanium detectors having a segment thickness of a few millimeters with a one-dimensional coded aperture located about a meter from the detectors. Correspondingly higher angular resolutions are possible with larger separations between the detectors and the coded aperture. Two-dimensional images can be obtained by rotating the instrument. Although the basic concept is similar to optical or X-ray coded-aperture imaging techniques, several complicating effects arise because of the penetrating nature of gamma rays. The complications include partial transmission through the coded aperture elements, Compton scattering in the germanium detectors, and high background count rates. Extensive electron-photon Monte Carlo modeling of a realistic detector/coded-aperture/collimator system has been performed. Results show that these complicating effects can be characterized and accounted for with no significant loss in instrument sensitivity.

  9. Connection of Very High Energy Gamma-ray Flares in Blazars to Activity at Lower Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.

    2016-04-01

    The author will briefly review the results of multi-wavelength observations of blazars that emit very high-energy (VHE) gamma rays. The VHE gamma-ray emission is generally episodic, including flares that are often very short-lived. While many of these flares have counterparts only at X-ray energies, or no counterparts at all, some events are seen also at optical wavelengths, and a number are associated with the passage of new superluminal knots passing through the core in mm-wave VLBA images. Two explanations for the short-term VHE flares in the relativistic jets are supersonic turbulence and ultra-fast plasma jets resulting from magnetic reconnections. Observations of frequency-dependent linear polarization during flares can potentially decide between these models. VLBA images can help to locate VHE events that are seen at millimeter wavelengths. In some cases, the flares take place near the parsec-scale core, while in others they occur closer to the black hole.This research is supported in part by NASA through Swift Guest Investigator grants NNX15AR45G and NNX15AR34G.

  10. Modelling the high-energy emission from gamma-ray binaries using numerical relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubus, G.; Lamberts, A.; Fromang, S.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Detailed modelling of the high-energy emission from gamma-ray binaries has been propounded as a path to pulsar wind physics. Aims: Fulfilling this ambition requires a coherent model of the flow and its emission in the region where the pulsar wind interacts with the stellar wind of its companion. Methods: We have developed a code that follows the evolution and emission of electrons in the shocked pulsar wind based on inputs from a relativistic hydrodynamical simulation. The code is used to model the well-documented spectral energy distribution and orbital modulations from LS 5039. Results: The pulsar wind is fully confined by a bow shock and a back shock. The particles are distributed into a narrow Maxwellian, emitting mostly GeV photons, and a power law radiating very efficiently over a broad energy range from X-rays to TeV gamma rays. Most of the emission arises from the apex of the bow shock. Doppler boosting shapes the X-ray and very high energy (VHE) lightcurves, constraining the system inclination to i ≈ 35°. There is tension between the hard VHE spectrum and the level of X-ray to MeV emission, which requires differing magnetic field intensities that are hard to achieve with constant magnetisation σ and Lorentz factor Γp of the pulsar wind. Our best compromise implies σ ≈ 1 and Γp ≈ 5 × 103, so respectively higher and lower than the typical values in pulsar wind nebulae. Conclusions: The high value of σ derived here, where the wind is confined close to the pulsar, supports the classical picture that has pulsar winds highly magnetised at launch. However, such magnetisations will require that further investigations are based on relativistic MHD simulations. Movies associated to Figs. A.1-A.4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struminsky, A.; Gan, W.

    2015-08-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV γ-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these γ-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and π0-decay γ-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X- ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard y-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and subsequently trapped by some magnetic structure. In-situ energetic particle measurements by GOES and STEREO (High Energy Telescope, HET) shows that five of these y-events were not accompanied by SEP events at 1 AU, even when multi-point measurements including STEREO are taken into account. Therefore accelerated protons are not always released into the heliosphere. A longer delay between the maximum temperature and the maximum emission measure characterises flares with prolonged high energy γ-emission and solar proton events.

  12. A study of the sensitivity of an imaging telescope (GRITS) for high energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yearian, Mason R.

    1990-01-01

    When a gamma-ray telescope is placed in Earth orbit, it is bombarded by a flux of cosmic protons much greater than the flux of interesting gammas. These protons can interact in the telescope's thermal shielding to produce detectable gamma rays, most of which are vetoed. Since the proton flux is so high, the unvetoed gamma rays constitute a significant background relative to some weak sources. This background increases the observing time required to pinpoint some sources and entirely obscures other sources. Although recent telescopes have been designed to minimize this background, its strength and spectral characteristics were not previously calculated in detail. Monte Carlo calculations are presented which characterize the strength, spectrum and other features of the cosmic proton background using FLUKA, a hadronic cascade program. Several gamma-ray telescopes, including SAS-2, EGRET and the Gamma Ray Imaging Telescope System (GRITS), are analyzed, and their proton-induced backgrounds are characterized. In all cases, the backgrounds are either shown to be low relative to interesting signals or suggestions are made which would reduce the background sufficiently to leave the telescope unimpaired. In addition, several limiting cases are examined for comparison to previous estimates and calibration measurements.

  13. High resolution phoswich gamma-ray imager utilizing monolithic MPPC arrays with submillimeter pixelized crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Kawabata, N.; Ikeda, H.; Kamada, K.

    2013-05-01

    We report the development of a high spatial resolution tweezers-type coincidence gamma-ray camera for medical imaging. This application consists of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) and submillimeter pixelized scintillator matrices. The MPPC array has 4 × 4 channels with a three-side buttable, very compact package. For typical operational gain of 7.5 × 105 at + 20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ± 5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to <= 400 kcps per channel. We selected Ce-doped (Lu,Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) and a brand-new scintillator, Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (Ce:GAGG) due to their high light yield and density. To improve the spatial resolution, these scintillators were fabricated into 15 × 15 matrices of 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 pixels. The Ce:LYSO and Ce:GAGG scintillator matrices were assembled into phosphor sandwich (phoswich) detectors, and then coupled to the MPPC array along with an acrylic light guide measuring 1 mm thick, and with summing operational amplifiers that compile the signals into four position-encoded analog outputs being used for signal readout. Spatial resolution of 1.1 mm was achieved with the coincidence imaging system using a 22Na point source. These results suggest that the gamma-ray imagers offer excellent potential for applications in high spatial medical imaging.

  14. Imaging of radiocesium uptake dynamics in a plant body by using a newly developed high-resolution gamma camera.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, Naoki; Yin, Yong-Gen; Suzui, Nobuo; Ishii, Satomi; Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Watabe, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Fujimaki, Shu

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new gamma camera specifically for plant nutritional research and successfully performed live imaging of the uptake and partitioning of (137)Cs in intact plants. The gamma camera was specially designed for high-energy gamma photons from (137)Cs (662 keV). To obtain reliable images, a pinhole collimator made of tungsten heavy alloy was used to reduce penetration and scattering of gamma photons. A single-crystal scintillator, Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12, with high sensitivity, no natural radioactivity, and no hygroscopicity was used. The array block of the scintillator was coupled to a high-quantum efficiency position sensitive photomultiplier tube to obtain accurate images. The completed gamma camera had a sensitivity of 0.83 count s(-1) MBq(-1) for (137)Cs with an energy window from 600 keV to 730 keV, and a spatial resolution of 23.5 mm. We used this gamma camera to study soybean plants that were hydroponically grown and fed with 2.0 MBq of (137)Cs for 6 days to visualize and investigate the transport dynamics in aerial plant parts. (137)Cs gradually appeared in the shoot several hours after feeding, and then accumulated preferentially and intensively in growing pods and seeds; very little accumulation was observed in mature leaves. Our results also suggested that this gamma-camera method may serve as a practical analyzing tool for breeding crops and improving cultivation techniques resulting in low accumulation of radiocesium into the consumable parts of plants. PMID:25959930

  15. Gamma delta T cells promote inflammation and insulin resistance during high fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma delta T cells are resident in adipose tissue and increase during diet-induced obesity. Their possible contribution to the inflammatory response that accompanies diet-induced obesity was investigated in mice after a 5-10 week high milk fat diet. The high milk fat diet resulted in significant in...

  16. THE EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT FROM THE MEASUREMENTS OF THE ATTENUATION OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Yan; Cooray, Asantha

    2013-07-20

    The attenuation of high-energy gamma-ray spectrum due to the electron-positron pair production against the extragalactic background light (EBL) provides an indirect method to measure the EBL of the universe. We use the measurements of the absorption features of the gamma-rays from blazars as seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to explore the EBL flux density and constrain the EBL spectrum, star formation rate density (SFRD), and photon escape fraction from galaxies out to z = 6. Our results are basically consistent with the existing determinations of the quantities. We find a larger photon escape fraction at high redshifts, especially at z = 3, compared to the result from recent Ly{alpha} measurements. Our SFRD result is consistent with the data from both gamma-ray burst and ultraviolet (UV) observations in the 1{sigma} level. However, the average SFRD we obtain at z {approx}> 3 matches the gamma-ray data better than the UV data. Thus our SFRD result at z {approx}> 6 favors the fact that star formation alone is sufficiently high enough to reionize the universe.

  17. Limits on the high-energy gamma and neutrino fluxes from the SGR 1806-20 giant flare of 27 December 2004 with the AMANDA-II detector.

    PubMed

    Achterberg, A; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Ahrens, J; Andeen, K; Atlee, D W; Bahcall, J N; Bai, X; Baret, B; Bartelt, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Becka, T; Becker, J K; Becker, K-H; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Blaufuss, E; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bolmont, J; Böser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Braun, J; Burgess, C; Burgess, T; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Davour, A; Day, C T; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; Deyoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Edwards, W R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Feser, T; Filimonov, K; Fox, B D; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Ganugapati, R; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Gozzini, R; Grullon, S; Gross, A; Gunasingha, R M; Gurtner, M; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Hardtke, D; Hardtke, R; Harenberg, T; Hart, J E; Hauschildt, T; Hays, D; Heise, J; Helbing, K; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hodges, J; Hoffman, K D; Hommez, B; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Hughey, B; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Hülss, J-P; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jones, A; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K-H; Karle, A; Kawai, H; Kelley, J L; Kestel, M; Kitamura, N; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Krasberg, M; Kuehn, K; Landsman, H; Leich, H; Liubarsky, I; Lundberg, J; Madsen, J; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McCauley, T; McParland, C P; Meli, A; Messarius, T; Mészáros, P; Miyamoto, H; Mokhtarani, A; Montaruli, T; Morey, A; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Münich, K; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Olbrechts, Ph; Olivas, A; Patton, S; Peña-Garay, C; Pérez de Los Heros, C; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Pretz, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Razzaque, S; Refflinghaus, F; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Robbins, S; Roth, P; Rott, C; Rutledge, D; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H-G; Sarkar, S; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Smith, A J; Solarz, M; Song, C; Sopher, J E; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Steffen, P; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoufer, M C; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sulanke, K-H; Sullivan, G W; Sumner, T J; Taboada, I; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Thollander, L; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Turcan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; Voigt, B; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Waldmann, H; Walter, M; Wang, Y-R; Wendt, C; Wiebusch, C H; Wikström, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zornoza, J D

    2006-12-01

    On 27 December 2004, a giant gamma flare from the Soft Gamma-Ray Repeater 1806-20 saturated many satellite gamma-ray detectors, being the brightest transient event ever observed in the Galaxy. AMANDA-II was used to search for down-going muons indicative of high-energy gammas and/or neutrinos from this object. The data revealed no significant signal, so upper limits (at 90% C.L.) on the normalization constant were set: 0.05(0.5) TeV-1 m;{-2} s;{-1} for gamma=-1.47 (-2) in the gamma flux and 0.4(6.1) TeV-1 m;{-2} s;{-1} for gamma=-1.47 (-2) in the high-energy neutrino flux. PMID:17155787

  18. Axion-like particle effects on the polarization of cosmic high-energy gamma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bassan, Nicola; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Roncadelli, Marco E-mail: alessandro.mirizzi@desy.de

    2010-05-01

    Various satellite-borne missions are being planned to measure the polarization of a large number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We show that the polarization pattern resulting from the current models of GRB emission can be drastically modified by the existence of very light axion-like particles (ALPs), which are predicted by many extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. Basically, the propagation of photons emitted by a GRB through cosmic magnetic fields with a domain-like structure induces photon-ALP mixing, which is expected to produce a strong modification of the initial photon polarization. Because of the random orientation of the magnetic field in each domain, this effect strongly depends on the orientation of the line of sight. As a consequence, photon-ALP conversion considerably broadens the initial polarization distribution. Searching for such a peculiar feature through future high-statistics polarimetric measurements therefore offers a new opportunity to discover very light ALPs.

  19. Compact, high-resolution, gamma ray imaging for scintimammography and other medical diagostic applications

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph F.; Steinbach, Daniela

    1999-01-01

    A high resolution gamma ray imaging device includes an aluminum housing, a lead screen collimator at an opened end of the housing, a crystal scintillator array mounted behind the lead screen collimator, a foam layer between the lead screen collimator and the crystal scintillator array, a photomultiplier window coupled to the crystal with optical coupling grease, a photomultiplier having a dynode chain body and a base voltage divider with anodes, anode wire amplifiers each connected to four anodes and a multi pin connector having pin connections to each anode wire amplifier. In one embodiment the crystal scintillator array includes a yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) crystal array. In an alternate embodiment, the crystal scintillator array includes a gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (GSO) crystal array.

  20. The star formation history inferred from long gamma-ray bursts with high pseudo-redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wei-Wei; Cao, Xiao-Feng; Yu, Yun-Wei

    2015-07-01

    By employing a simple semi-analytical star formation model where the formation rates of Population (Pop) I/II and III stars can be calculated, respectively, we account for the number distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high pseudo-redshifts that was derived from an empirical luminosity-indictor relationship. It is suggested that a considerable number of Pop III GRBs could exist in the present sample of Swift GRBs. By further combining the implication for the star formation history from the optical depth of the CMB photons, it is also suggested that only a very small fraction (∼ 0.6 %) of Pop III GRBs could have triggered the Swift BAT. These results could provide an useful basis for estimating future detectability of Pop III stars and their produced transient phenomena.

  1. Beyond VERITAS: High-Energy Gamma-Rays with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David A.; CTA Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be a new observatory for the study of very-high-energy gamma-ray sources, designed to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity in the ~30 GeV to ~100 TeV energy band compared to currently operating instruments: VERITAS, MAGIC, and H.E.S.S. CTA will probe known sources with unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution, and spectral coverage, while also detecting hundreds of new sources. CTA will provide access to data in this energy band to members of the wider astronomical community for the first time. The CTA Consortium will also conduct a number of Key Science Projects, including a Galactic Plane survey and a survey of one quarter of the extragalactic sky, creating legacy data sets that will also be available to the public. This presentation will describe how CTA will bring new opportunities for the solution of astrophysical puzzles.

  2. Characterization Studies of Radioactive Waste Drums Using High Resolution Gamma Spectrometric Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, M.; Cristache, C.; Done, L.; Dragolici, F.; Sima, O.

    2010-01-21

    The problem of radioactive waste has become a critical issue in the country and worldwide. The radioactive waste containers, containing different radioactive materials, have to be characterized before their final disposal. Destructive methods, although being the most precise, are also the most expensive and not the easiest ones from the radioprotection point of view. In this situation, high resolution gamma spectrometry proved to be a reliable method for the non destructive assay method. However, the non-homogenous composition of the radioactive waste inside the drum makes the quantitative characterization of the radioactive waste drum a difficult task. Experimental studies and computed results, combined with Monte Carlo simulations using GESPECOR, are presented in this paper as a possibility to achieve this task.

  3. The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction studied at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, Michele

    2010-03-01

    The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction is the bottleneck of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle. Recent studies of this reaction have been performed in the low energy range E<500 keV. However, also data at higher energy are necessary to extrapolate the S-factor down to the energy range of astrophysical interest. Up to now, only one set of data from an experiment performed in 1987 extends up to 2.5 MeV. A new study has been carried out at the high-current FZD Tandetron in Dresden, in the energy region from 0.6 to 2.5 MeV. The astrophysics motivations, setup and on-going analysis are presented.

  4. A Search for Early High-Energy Afterglows in BATSE Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, Timothy W.

    2003-01-01

    The scope of this project was to perform a detailed search for the early high-energy afterglow component of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the BATSE GRB data archive. GRBs are believed to be the product of shock waves generated in a relativistic outflow from the demise of extremely massive stars and/or binary neutron star mergers. The outflow undeniably encounters the ambient medium of the progenitor object and another shock wave is set up. A forward shock propagates into the medium and a reverse shock propagates through the ejecta. This "external" shock dissipates the kinetic energy of the ejecta in the form of radiation via synchrotron losses and slows the outflow eventually to a non-relativistic state. Radiation from the forward external shock is therefore expected to be long-lived, lasting days, weeks, and even months. This radiation is referred to as the 'afterglow'.

  5. High-density plasma production with potential confinement in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, M.; Cho, T.; Hirata, M.; Hojo, H.; Ishii, K.; Itakura, A.; Katanuma, I.; Kohagura, J.; Nakashima, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamano, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yatsu, K.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2001-05-01

    The improvement of potential confinement was attained in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 939 (1985); Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Washington, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 2, p. 539] by axisymmetrization of heating systems for the plasma production, heating, and potential formation. A significant increase of the density and diamagnetism by the potential confinement was observed. In the previous experiment, it was difficult to increase the central cell density higher than 2.7×1018m-3. One of the possible mechanisms is the density clamping due to the eigenmode formation of the ion-cyclotron-range of frequency (ICRF) waves in the axial direction. With high harmonic ICRF waves (RF3), the experiments to overcome this problem have been performed. In preliminary experiments with RF3 and NBI the maximum density of 4×1018m-3 was attained.

  6. Evaluation of the cosmic-ray induced background in coded aperture high energy gamma-ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Alan; Barbier, Loius M.; Frye, Glenn M.; Jenkins, Thomas L.

    1991-01-01

    While the application of coded-aperture techniques to high-energy gamma-ray astronomy offers potential arc-second angular resolution, concerns were raised about the level of secondary radiation produced in a thick high-z mask. A series of Monte-Carlo calculations are conducted to evaluate and quantify the cosmic-ray induced neutral particle background produced in a coded-aperture mask. It is shown that this component may be neglected, being at least a factor of 50 lower in intensity than the cosmic diffuse gamma-rays.

  7. High energy galactic gamma radiation from cosmic rays concentrated in spiral arms. [using SAS-B satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    A model for the emission of high energy ( 100 MeV) gamma rays from the galactic disk was developed and compared to recent SAS-2 observations. In the calculation, it is assumed that (1) the high energy galactic gamma rays result primarily from the interaction of cosmic rays with galactic matter; (2) on the basis of theoretical and experimental arguments the cosmic ray density is proportional to the matter density on the scale of galactic arms; and (3) the matter in the galaxy, atomic and molecular, is distributed in a spiral pattern consistent with density wave theory and the experimental data on the matter distribution.

  8. On Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays and Their Resultant Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavish, Eyal; Eichler, David

    2016-05-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope collaboration has recently reported on 50 months of measurements of the isotropic extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB) spectrum between 100 MeV and 820 GeV. Ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) protons interact with the cosmic microwave background photons and produce cascade photons of energies 10 MeV–1 TeV that contribute to the EGRB flux. We examine seven possible evolution models for UHECRs and find that UHECR sources that evolve as the star formation rate (SFR), medium low luminosity active galactic nuclei type-1 (L = 1043.5 erg s‑1 in the [0.5–2] KeV band), and BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) are the most acceptable given the constraints imposed by the observed EGRB. Other possibilities produce too much secondary γ-radiation. In all cases, the decaying dark matter (DM) contribution improves the fit at high energy, but the contribution of still unresolved blazars, which would leave the smallest role for decaying DM, may yet provide an alternative improvement. The possibility that the entire EGRB can be fitted with resolvable but not-yet-resolved blazars, as recently claimed by Ajello et al., would leave little room in the EGRB to accommodate γ-rays from extragalactic UHECR production, even for many source evolution rates that would otherwise be acceptable. We find that under the assumption of UHECRs being mostly protons, there is not enough room for producing extragalactic UHECRs with active galactic nucleus, gamma-ray burst, or even SFR source evolution. Sources that evolve as BL Lacs, on the other hand, would produce much less secondary γ-radiation and would remain a viable source of UHECRs, provided that they dominate.

  9. LONG-TERM MONITORING OF MRK 501 FOR ITS VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma} EMISSION AND A FLARE IN 2011 OCTOBER

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoli, B.; Catalanotti, S.; Bernardini, P.; Bleve, C.; Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, Y.; Bolognino, I.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Calabrese Melcarne, A. K.; Cardarelli, R.; Cattaneo, C.; Chen, T. L.; Creti, P.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Ali Staiti, G.; Collaboration: ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; and others

    2012-10-10

    As one of the brightest active blazars in both X-ray and very high energy {gamma}-ray bands, Mrk 501, is very useful for physics associated with jets from active galactic nuclei. The ARGO-YBJ experiment has monitored Mrk 501 for {gamma}-rays above 0.3 TeV since 2007 November. The largest flare since 2005 was observed from 2011 October and lasted until about 2012 April. In this paper, a detailed analysis of this event is reported. During the brightest {gamma}-ray flaring episodes from 2011 October 17 to November 22, an excess of the event rate over 6{sigma} is detected by ARGO-YBJ in the direction of Mrk 501, corresponding to an increase of the {gamma}-ray flux above 1 TeV by a factor of 6.6 {+-} 2.2 from its steady emission. In particular, the {gamma}-ray flux above 8 TeV is detected with a significance better than 4{sigma}. Based on time-dependent synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) processes, the broadband energy spectrum is interpreted as the emission from an electron energy distribution parameterized with a single power-law function with an exponential cutoff at its high-energy end. The average spectral energy distribution for the steady emission is well described by this simple one-zone SSC model. However, the detection of {gamma}-rays above 8 TeV during the flare challenges this model due to the hardness of the spectra. Correlations between X-rays and {gamma}-rays are also investigated.

  10. A model of unpulsed very high energy gamma rays from the Crab Nebula and pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, P. W.; Cheng, K. S.; Lau, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    The angular resolution of gamma-ray detectors does not allow one to separate the nebula from the pulsar in the Crab. It is generally assumed that the steady emission of gamma rays comes from the nebula. Using the 'outer magnetospheric gap' model, an alternative mechanism in which the steady emission of gamma rays could come from a compact region, a couple of light cylinder radii beyond the pulsar.

  11. Gamma detectors based on high-pressure xenon: their development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin, Sergey E.; Dmitrenko, Valery V.; Grachev, V. M.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Dukhvalov, A. G.; Kotler, F. G.; Pushkin, K. N.

    2004-10-01

    Various modifications of xenon detectors and their parameters in comparison with gamma-detectors of other types are considered. Prospects of xenon detectors' applicatins in gamma-spectroscopy based on experimental results are discussed including detection and control of radioactive and fissile materials displacement, definition of uranium enrichment rate, and measurements of nuclear reactor radioactive gas waste concentration. Possibilities for xenon detector use for environmental control and measurement of cosmic gamma radiation on orbital stations are considered.

  12. Gamma detectors based on high pressure xenon: their development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin, Sergey E.; Dmitrenko, Valery V.; Grachev, V. M.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasic, K. F.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Duhvalov, A. G.; Kotler, F. G.; Pushkin, K. N.

    2004-01-01

    Various modifications of xenon detectors and their parameters in comparison with gamma-detectors of other types are considered. Prospects of xenon detectors' applications in gamma-spectroscopy based on experimental results are discussed including detection and control of radioactive and fissile materials displacement, definition of uranium enrichment rate, and measurements of nuclear reactor radioactive gas waste concentration. Possibilities for xenon detector use for environmental control and measurement of cosmic gamma radiation on orbital stations are considered.

  13. The high energy gamma-ray background and the interstellar radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Ranga-Ram

    This thesis provides an independent estimate of the high latitude (! b! > 20°) contribution to the E > 30 MeV gamma-ray background from Galactic nucleon-nucleon, electron bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton processes. In particular, the inverse Compton contribution has been estimated for different cosmic ray electron distributions and after factoring in the anisotropy in the interstellar radiation field and the anisotropic Klein-Nishina scattering cross section. A model for the interstellar radiation field from 0.1 μm to 1000 μm is also presented to fit the intensities observed by recent satellite experiments, especially the DIRBE and FIRAS instruments on COBE. I find that the emission from the inverse Compton process when the anisotropy in the radiation field is included can be higher by up to 50% when compared to estimates that adopt an isotropic radiation field. Simulated inverse Compton maps with a cosmic ray electron distribution represented by a ``pill box'' extending up to a distance of 5 kpc above the Galactic plane provide better fits to the EGRET intensity maps suggesting that the cosmic ray halo may be larger than previously thought. With this distribution, I find that the net contribution from the IC process to the gamma-ray background can be as high as 20% at high Galactic latitudes. Fitting for the Galactic components of gamma-ray emission confirms the existence of an isotropic component with an intensity that can be represented by the form 27.7 × E(MeV)-2.16 photons m-2 s-1 sr -1 MeV-1, in excellent agreement with previous estimates. The spectrum of the isotropic component further argues strongly in favor of unresolved gamma-ray blazars being the source of this emission. Introduction of an anisotropic component improves the quality of the fits. However, this component, which could potentially arise from the dark matter in the Galactic halo, is not well characterized by a single power law which might be associated with any single dark matter

  14. Gamma ray bursts: A review of recent high-precision measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent measurements and discoveries in gamma ray bursts and transients are reviewed including observations of the red shifted annihilation line in two kinds of slow transients (in 'classical' gamma ray bursts and in the unique 1979 March 5th event); of red shifted nuclear lines in a slow transient and in one gamma ray burst; and of the positions of precise source locations of gamma ray bursts and of the March 5th event, within the supernova remnant N49 in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  15. High-energy neutrinos from the gravitational wave event GW150914 possibly associated with a short gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moharana, Reetanjali; Razzaque, Soebur; Gupta, Nayantara; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-06-01

    High-energy neutrinos (HEN) and gravitational waves (GW) can probe astrophysical sources in addition to electromagnetic observations. Multimessenger studies can reveal the nature of the sources, which may not be discerned from one type of signal alone. We discuss HEN emission in connection with the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory event GW150914, which could be associated with a short gamma-ray burst detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor 0.4 s after the GW event and within localization uncertainty of the GW event. We calculate HEN flux from this short gamma-ray burst, GW150914-GBM, and show that nondetection of a high-energy starting event by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory can constrain the total isotropic-equivalent jet energy of this short burst to be less than 3 ×1052 erg .

  16. Gamma-ray bursts from the accretion of solid bodies onto high-velocity Galactic neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Leonard, P.J.T.

    1993-12-31

    We propose a simple model for the gamma-ray bursts based on high- velocity Galactic neutron stars that have accretion disks. The latter are formed from a mixture of material from the supernova shell and that ablated from a pre-supernova binary companion. Accretion onto the neutron star from this disk when the disk is still largely gaseous may result in a soft gamma-ray repeater phase. Much later, after the neutron star has moved away from its birthplace, solid bodies form in the disk, and some are perturbed into hitting the neutron star to create gamma-ray bursts. This model makes several predictions that are consistent with the observations. The observed combination of a high degree of isotropy on the sky coupled with the observed value of < V/V{sub max}> is not, at first glance, predicted, but is not impossible to attain in our model.

  17. THE {gamma}-RAY SPECTRUM OF GEMINGA AND THE INVERSE COMPTON MODEL OF PULSAR HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-09-20

    We reanalyze the Fermi spectra of the Geminga and Vela pulsars. We find that the spectrum of Geminga above the break is well approximated by a simple power law without the exponential cutoff, making Geminga's spectrum similar to that of Crab. Vela's broadband {gamma}-ray spectrum is equally well fit with both the exponential cutoff and the double power-law shapes. In the broadband double power-law fits, for a typical Fermi spectrum of a bright {gamma}-ray pulsar, most of the errors accumulate due to the arbitrary parameterization of the spectral roll-off. In addition, a power law with an exponential cutoff gives an acceptable fit for the underlying double power-law spectrum for a very broad range of parameters, making such fitting procedures insensitive to the underlying Fermi photon spectrum. Our results have important implications for the mechanism of pulsar high-energy emission. A number of observed properties of {gamma}-ray pulsars-i.e., the broken power-law spectra without exponential cutoffs and stretching in the case of Crab beyond the maximal curvature limit, spectral breaks close to or exceeding the maximal breaks due to curvature emission, patterns of the relative intensities of the leading and trailing pulses in the Crab repeated in the X-ray and {gamma}-ray regions, presence of profile peaks at lower energies aligned with {gamma}-ray peaks-all point to the inverse Compton origin of the high-energy emission from majority of pulsars.

  18. Application of FEL technique for constructing high-intensity, monochromatic, polarized gamma-sources at storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N.

    1995-12-31

    A possibility to construct high-intensity tunable monochromatic{gamma}-source at high energy storage rings is discussed. It is proposed to produce {gamma}-quanta by means of Compton backscattering of laser photons on electrons circulating in the storage. The laser light wavelength is chosen in such a way that after the scattering, the electron does not leave the separatrix. So as the probability of the scattering is rather small, energy oscillations are damped prior the next scattering. As a result, the proposed source can operate in {open_quotes}parasitic{close_quote} mode not interfering with the main mode of the storage ring operation. Analysis of parameters of existent storage rings (PETRA, ESRF, Spring-8, etc) shows that the laser light wavelength should be in infrared, {lambda}{approximately} 10 - 400 {mu}m, wavelength band. Installation at storage rings of tunable free-electron lasers with the peak and average output power {approximately} 10 MW and {approximately} 1 kW, respectively, will result in the intensity of the {gamma}-source up to {approximately} 10{sup 14}s{sup -1} with tunable {gamma}-quanta energy from several MeV up to several hundreds MeV. Such a {gamma}-source will reveal unique possibilities for precision investigations in nuclear physics.

  19. Prospects for exploring the local galaxies through the study of their high-energy gamma-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozel, Mehmet E.; Fichtel, Carl E.

    1988-01-01

    In the near future, high-energy (E greater than 20 MeV) gamma-ray astronomy offers the promise of a new means of examining the closest galaxies. Three local galaxies, the SMCs, LMCs, and M31, should be visible to the high-energy gamma-ray telescope on the Gamma Ray Observatory and the first two should be seen by GAMMA-1. It is expected that the intensity and the structure of both of the Magellanic Clouds can be examined in sufficient detail to study the cosmic-ray density and its variation, and, thereby, to determine the relevant scale of coupling for the cosmic rays and diffuse matter. With the assumptions of adequate sources and reasonable magnetic field strengths, both of which should likely be satisfied, very specific predictions of the gamma-ray emission can be made separating the three current cosmic-ray containment concepts, namely that it is on the scale of one to a few kiloparsec mass clustering, the whole galaxy, or some much larger scale. Further, because of the markedly different distributions of molecular and atomic hydrogen in the galaxies and the differences between the galaxies, an independent measure of the normalization of the diffuse molecular hydrogen density is possible.

  20. High Energy Electrons and Gamma Rays from the ATIC-2 Balloon Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbert, J. B.; ATIC Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment is primarily designed to measure the spectra of nuclear cosmic rays (protons to nickel). It is composed of a segmented BGO calorimeter (18 radiation lengths deep) following a carbon target (0.75 nuclear interaction lengths) interleaved with scintillator tracking layers. A Silicon matrix detector at the entrance identifies the incident particle charge. Utilizing simulations such as Fluka and Geant we have investigated the ability of this design to differentiate electron (gamma) initiated showers from hadronic showers. The differences in shower development between the two populations are sufficient to differentiate them for measurements of electron spectra into the TeV region, as confirmed by accelerator tests at CERN and by the ATIC-1 test flight in 2000-01. ATIC had a successful science flight in 2002-03 from McMurdo, Antarctica returning about 19 days of flight data. This exposure is sufficient to record electrons into the TeV region and measure gamma rays at 100's of GeV. The majority of gamma rays are of atmospheric origin and provide a test for this technique. The preliminary electron spectrum from the ATIC-2 flight is presented and compared to previous high energy measurements, principally from emulsion chambers. Possible astrophysical interpretations of the results are discussed. The ATIC Collaboration: J.H. Adams,2 H.S. Ahn,3 G.L. Bashindzhagyan,4 K.E. Batkov,4 J. Chang,6,7 M. Christl,2 A.R. Fazely,5, O. Ganel,3 R.M. Gunasingha,5 T.G. Guzik,1 J. Isbert,1 K.C. Kim,3 E.N. Kouznetsov,4 M.I. Panasyuk,4 A.D. Panov,4 W.K.H. Schmidt,6 E.S. Seo,3 N.V. Sokolskaya,4 J.Z. Wang,3 J.P. Wefel,1 J. Wu,3 V.I. Zatsepin,4 (1) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA (2) Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, USA (3) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA (4) Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia (5) Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA (6

  1. Inspecting the supernova-gamma-ray-burst connection with high-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborra, Irene; Ando, Shin'ichiro

    2016-03-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been often considered as the natural evolution of some core-collapse supernovae (SNe). While GRBs with relativistic jets emit an electromagnetic signal, GRBs with mildly relativistic jets are opaque to photons and therefore could be detectable through neutrinos only. We discuss the possibility that successful GRBs and mildly relativistic jets belong to the same class of astrophysical transients with different Lorentz factor Γb and study the production of high-energy neutrinos as a function of Γb, by including both proton-photon and proton-proton interactions. By assuming a SN-GRB connection, we find that the diffuse neutrino emission from optically thick jets with Lorentz factors lower than the ones of successful GRBs can be one of the main components of the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux. Moreover, under the assumption that all these jets belong to the same class of astrophysical transients, we show that the IceCube high-energy neutrino data provide indirect constraints on the rate of nonsuccessful jets, favoring a local rate lower than tens of percent of the local SN rate. These limits are currently comparable to dedicated searches on choked sources and are expected to become tighter with the accumulation of more high-energy neutrino data.

  2. EGRET upper limits to the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the millisecond pulsars in nearby globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, P. F.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K.; Chiang, J.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fierro, J.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.

    1994-01-01

    We report upper limits to the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a number of globular clusters. The observations were done as part of an all-sky survey by the energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) during Phase I of the CGRO mission (1991 June to 1992 November). Several theoretical models suggest that MSPs may be sources of high-energy gamma radiation emitted either as primary radiation from the pulsar magnetosphere or as secondary radiation generated by conversion into photons of a substantial part of the relativistic e(+/-) pair wind expected to flow from the pulsar. To date, no high-energy emission has been detected from an individual MSP. However, a large number of MSPs are expected in globular cluster cores where the formation rate of accreting binary systems is high. Model predictions of the total number of pulsars range in the hundreds for some clusters. These expectations have been reinforced by recent discoveries of a substantial number of radio MSPs in several clusters; for example, 11 have been found in 47 Tucanae (Manchester et al.). The EGRET observations have been used to obtain upper limits for the efficiency eta of conversion of MSP spin-down power into hard gamma rays. The upper limits are also compared with the gamma-ray fluxes predicted from theoretical models of pulsar wind emission (Tavani). The EGRET limits put significant constraints on either the emission models or the number of pulsars in the globular clusters.

  3. Managing NIF safety equipment in a high neutron and gamma radiation environment.

    PubMed

    Datte, Philip; Eckart, Mark; Jackson, Mark; Khater, Hesham; Manuel, Stacie; Newton, Mark

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility that supports the Inertial Confinement Fusion program. During the ignition experimental campaign, the NIF is expected to perform shots with varying fusion yield producing 14 MeV neutrons up to 20 MJ or 7.1 × 10(18) neutrons per shot and a maximum annual yield of 1,200 MJ. Several infrastructure support systems will be exposed to varying high yield shots over the facility's 30-y life span. In response to this potential exposure, analysis and testing of several facility safety systems have been conducted. A detailed MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) model has been developed for the NIF facility, and it includes most of the major structures inside the Target Bay. The model has been used in the simulation of expected neutron and gamma fluences throughout the Target Bay. Radiation susceptible components were identified and tested to fluences greater than 10(13) (n cm(-2)) for 14 MeV neutrons and γ-ray equivalent. The testing includes component irradiation using a 60Co gamma source and accelerator-based irradiation using 4- and 14- MeV neutron sources. The subsystem implementation in the facility is based on the fluence estimates after shielding and survivability guidelines derived from the dose maps and component tests results. This paper reports on the evaluation and implementation of mitigations for several infrastructure safety support systems, including video, oxygen monitoring, pressure monitors, water sensing systems, and access control interfaces found at the NIF. PMID:23629064

  4. High Purity Germanium Gamma-PHA Assay of U-Al Alloy in Scrap Cans

    SciTech Connect

    Salaymeh, S.R.

    2002-05-31

    The Measurement Technology Department of SRTC was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium-aluminum alloy (U-Al) fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The project included the dismantling and removal of all highly enriched uranium (HEU) to the extent practical. A large number of scrap cans was used by the facility to store HEU chips and filings for reprocessing. The scrap cans were designed to be critically safe, which made them extremely useful during the deactivation of the facility. These cans provided a geometrically safe container for placement of the residue, filings, chips, and sweepings of HEU remaining in the building and a fixed geometry for assay of UEU content in them. Since the results of the assays are essential for determining compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control and Accountability (MC and A), and to meet Criticality Safety Controls, and Waste Management purposes, it was important to obtain the best HEU gram value possible. We set up an assay station that consisted of a turntable and a portable HPGe gamma pulse height analysis system (Gamma-PHA). It was especially suited to obtain a transmission-corrected assay of 108 scrap cans in a fixed geometry that had contents of HEU ranging from less than 0.1 g up to 88 g. This paper includes a description of two efficiency calibration configurations to obtain an assay of 235U content in each scrap can. A description of the quality control checks is included as well.

  5. A Multi-Contact, Low Capacitance HPGe Detector for High Rate Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Christopher

    2014-12-04

    The detection, identification and non-destructive assay of special nuclear materials and nuclear fission by-products are critically important activities in support of nuclear non-proliferation programs. Both national and international nuclear safeguard agencies recognize that current accounting methods for spent nuclear fuel are inadequate from a safeguards perspective. Radiation detection and analysis by gamma-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in this field, but no instrument exists that can deliver the required performance (energy resolution and detection sensitivity) in the presence of very high background count rates encountered in the nuclear safeguards arena. The work of this project addresses this critical need by developing a unique gamma-ray detector based on high purity germanium that has the previously unachievable property of operating in the 1 million counts-per-second range while achieving state-of-the-art energy resolution necessary to identify and analyze the isotopes of interest. The technical approach was to design and fabricate a germanium detector with multiple segmented electrodes coupled to multi-channel high rate spectroscopy electronics. Dividing the germanium detector’s signal electrode into smaller sections offers two advantages; firstly, the energy resolution of the detector is potentially improved, and secondly, the detector is able to operate at higher count rates. The design challenges included the following; determining the optimum electrode configuration to meet the stringent energy resolution and count rate requirements; determining the electronic noise (and therefore energy resolution) of the completed system after multiple signals are recombined; designing the germanium crystal housing and vacuum cryostat; and customizing electronics to perform the signal recombination function in real time. In this phase I work, commercial off-the-shelf electrostatic modeling software was used to develop the segmented germanium crystal geometry

  6. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons. Specifically, SiC radiation detectors with larger areas and 100-micrometer thick active regions have been designed and manufactured according to detector-design specifications. Detectors based on a Schottky diode design were specified in order to minimize the effects of the detector entrance window on alpha particle measurements. During manufacture of the Schottky diodes, the manufacturer also provided a set of large-volume SiC p-i-n diodes for testing Extensive alpha particle measurements have been carried out to test and quantify the response of the SiC Schottky diodes. Exposures to 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, 221-Fr, 225-Ac, 237-Np, 238-Pu, 240-Pu, and 242-Pu sources were used to obtain detailed alpha response data in the alpha energy range from 3182.787 keV to 8375.9 ke

  7. A Search for Ultra--High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Five Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. E.; Berley, D.; Biller, S.; Burman, R. L.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chang, C. Y.; Chen, M. L.; Chumney, P.; Coyne, D.; Dion, C. L.; Dorfan, D.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Goodman, J. A.; Haines, T. J.; Hoffman, C. M.; Kelley, L.; Klein, S.; Schmidt, D. M.; Schnee, R.; Shoup, A.; Sinnis, C.; Stark, M. J.; Williams, D. A.; Wu, J.-P.; Yang, T.; Yodh, G. B.

    1995-07-01

    The majority of the cosmic rays in our Galaxy with energies in the range of ~1010--1014 eV are thought to be accelerated in supernova remnants (SNRs). Measurements of SNR gamma-ray spectra in this energy region could support or contradict this concept. The Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) collaboration has reported six sources of gamma rays above 108 eV whose coordinates are coincident with SNRs. Five of these sources are within the field of view of the CYGNUS extensive air shower detector. A search of the CYGNUS data set reveals no evidence of gamma-ray emission at energies ~1014 eV for these five SNRs. The flux upper limits from the CYGNUS data are compared to the lower energy fluxes measured with the EGRET detector using Drury, Aharonian, & Volk's recent model of gamma-ray production in the shocks of SNRs. The results suggest one or more of the following: (1) the gamma-ray spectra for these five SNRs soften by about 1014 eV, (2) the integral gamma-ray spectra of the SNRs are steeper than about E-1.3, or (3) most of the gamma rays detected with the EGRET instrument for each SNR are not produced in the SNR's shock but are produced at some other site (such as a pulsar).

  8. High-entropy fireballs and jets in gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Two mechanisms whereby compact coalescing binaries can produce relatively 'clean' fireballs via neutrino-antineutrino annihilation are proposed. Preejected mass due to tidal heating will collimate the fireball into jets. The resulting anisotropic gamma-ray emission can be efficient and intense enough to provide an acceptable model for gamma-ray bursts, if these originate at cosmological distances.

  9. Neutron interrogation system using high gamma ray signature to detect contraband special nuclear materials in cargo

    DOEpatents

    Slaughter, Dennis R.; Pohl, Bertram A.; Dougan, Arden D.; Bernstein, Adam; Prussin, Stanley G.; Norman, Eric B.

    2008-04-15

    A system for inspecting cargo for the presence of special nuclear material. The cargo is irradiated with neutrons. The neutrons produce fission products in the special nuclear material which generate gamma rays. The gamma rays are detecting indicating the presence of the special nuclear material.

  10. a Quantitative Method for Analyzing Radioactive Nuclides in Infinite Composite Materials Using High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, John Henry, Jr.

    1982-03-01

    A theory is formulated in which the concentration of a radionuclide uniformly distributed throughout an infinite medium is related to the photopeak count rate of a signature gamma ray acquired by a detector within the medium. The mass fraction of the i('th) radionuclide in the medium is given by f(,i) = W(,i)(psi)(,i) (E)/(lamda)(,i)I(,I)(E)K(E); where (psi)(,i)(E) and I(,i)(E) are the observed photopeak count rate and absolute intensity for a gamma-ray emission of energy E. (lamda)(,i) and W(,i) are the decay constant and isotopic mass, respectively. It is shown that the function K(E) is a source volume integration over(' )(epsilon)(E,R)B(E,R)exp( -(SIGMA)(mu)(E)r(R))/(VBAR)R(VBAR)('2) which depends on gamma-ray energy only. Values of the narrow-beam attenuation coefficient (mu) are known for many materials. However, several laboratory experiments are performed in order to obtain data from which to empirically determine the detector response function (epsilon)(E,R)(' )and the gamma-ray build -up-factor(' )B(E,R). Special experimental instrumentation for analyzing radionuclides in infinite composite materials using high -resolution gamma-ray spectrometry is introduced. A probe is constructed which contains a coaxial high-purity germanium crystal to detect the gamma rays, a cryostat to cool the crystal and electronic circuitry to process the signal from the detector. Laboratory models of natural formations are prepared using high-grade radioactive samples diluted with silicon dioxide to obtain the desired concentrations. Each model is sampled to obtain X-ray fluorescence, delayed neutron and fluorimetric analysis from independent laboratories to compare with results using the method presented in this work.

  11. Gamma-Ray Polarization of the Synchrotron Self-compton Process from a Highly Relativistic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan

    2014-11-01

    The high polarization observed in the prompt phase of some gamma-ray bursts invites extensive study of the emission mechanism. In this paper, we investigate the polarization properties of the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process from a highly relativistic jet. A magnetic-dominated, baryon-loaded jet ejected from the central engine travels with a large Lorentz factor. Shells with slightly different velocities collide with each other and produce shocks. The shocks accelerate electrons to a power-law distribution and, at the same time, magnify the magnetic field. Electrons move in the magnetic field and produce synchrotron photons. Synchrotron photons suffer from the Compton scattering (CS) process and then are detected by an observer located slightly off-axis. We analytically derive the formulae of photon polarization in the SSC process in two magnetic configurations: a magnetic field in the shock plane and perpendicular to the shock plane. We show that photons induced by the SSC process can be highly polarized, with the maximum polarization Π ~ 24% in the energy band [0.5, 5] MeV. The polarization depends on the viewing angles, peaking in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. In the energy band [0.05, 0.5] MeV, in which most γ-ray polarimeters are active, the polarization is about twice that in the Thomson limit, reaching Π ~ 20%. This implies that the Klein-Nishina effect, which is often neglected in the literature, should be carefully considered.

  12. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Rao, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the possibility that soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are powered by highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). We take a sample of SGRs and AXPs and provide the possible parameter space in mass, radius, and surface magnetic field based on their observed properties (period and its derivative) and the assumption that these sources obey the mass-radius relation derived for the B-WDs. The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. In addition, B-WDs also adequately explain the perplexing radio transient GCRT J1745-3009 as a white dwarf pulsar. Note that the radius and magnetic fields of B-WDs are neither extreme (unlike of highly magnetized neutron stars) nor ordinary (unlike of magnetized white dwarfs, yet following the Chandrasekhar's mass-radius relation (C-WDs)). In order to explain SGRs/AXPs, while the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, source of energy, the C-WDs predict large ultra-violet luminosity which is observationally constrained from a strict upper limit. Finally, we provide a set of basic differences between the magnetar and B-WD hypotheses for SGRs/AXPs.

  13. Multiscale Aspects of Generation of High-Gamma Activity during Seizures in Human Neocortex123

    PubMed Central

    Marcuccilli, Charles J.; Ben-Mabrouk, Faiza; Lew, Sean M.; Goodman, Robert R.; McKhann, Guy M.; Frim, David M.; Kohrman, Michael H.; Schevon, Catherine A.; van Drongelen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    High-gamma (HG; 80-150 Hz) activity in macroscopic clinical records is considered a marker for critical brain regions involved in seizure initiation; it is correlated with pathological multiunit firing during neocortical seizures in the seizure core, an area identified by correlated multiunit spiking and low frequency seizure activity. However, the effects of the spatiotemporal dynamics of seizure on HG power generation are not well understood. Here, we studied HG generation and propagation, using a three-step, multiscale signal analysis and modeling approach. First, we analyzed concurrent neuronal and microscopic network HG activity in neocortical slices from seven intractable epilepsy patients. We found HG activity in these networks, especially when neurons displayed paroxysmal depolarization shifts and network activity was highly synchronized. Second, we examined HG activity acquired with microelectrode arrays recorded during human seizures (n = 8). We confirmed the presence of synchronized HG power across microelectrode records and the macroscale, both specifically associated with the core region of the seizure. Third, we used volume conduction-based modeling to relate HG activity and network synchrony at different network scales. We showed that local HG oscillations require high levels of synchrony to cross scales, and that this requirement is met at the microscopic scale, but not within macroscopic networks. Instead, we present evidence that HG power at the macroscale may result from harmonics of ongoing seizure activity. Ictal HG power marks the seizure core, but the generating mechanism can differ across spatial scales. PMID:27257623

  14. Gamma-ray polarization of the synchrotron self-compton process from a highly relativistic jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan

    2014-11-01

    The high polarization observed in the prompt phase of some gamma-ray bursts invites extensive study of the emission mechanism. In this paper, we investigate the polarization properties of the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process from a highly relativistic jet. A magnetic-dominated, baryon-loaded jet ejected from the central engine travels with a large Lorentz factor. Shells with slightly different velocities collide with each other and produce shocks. The shocks accelerate electrons to a power-law distribution and, at the same time, magnify the magnetic field. Electrons move in the magnetic field and produce synchrotron photons. Synchrotron photons suffer from the Compton scattering (CS) process and then are detected by an observer located slightly off-axis. We analytically derive the formulae of photon polarization in the SSC process in two magnetic configurations: a magnetic field in the shock plane and perpendicular to the shock plane. We show that photons induced by the SSC process can be highly polarized, with the maximum polarization Π ∼ 24% in the energy band [0.5, 5] MeV. The polarization depends on the viewing angles, peaking in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. In the energy band [0.05, 0.5] MeV, in which most γ-ray polarimeters are active, the polarization is about twice that in the Thomson limit, reaching Π ∼ 20%. This implies that the Klein-Nishina effect, which is often neglected in the literature, should be carefully considered.

  15. GeV gamma-ray astronomy telescopes with high angular resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbreen, B.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma-ray telescopes flown on satellites have poor angular resolution with typical point source error circles of a few square degrees. It is shown that a major improvement in angular resolution for the detection of gamma-rays in the GeV region can be obtained with a single crystal as converter. The electron produced by a gamma ray incident at a small angle to a major crystal axis or plane is captured into channeling and radiates gamma rays. The channeling radiation and the electron-positron pair can be detected and yield point source locations with a precision of 5 arcseconds at 10 GeV. This is an improvement of three orders of magnitude on the angular precision of telescopes sensitive to gamma-rays above 50 MeV flown on Satellites.

  16. A search for sources of ultra high energy gamma rays at air shower energies with Ooty EAS array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, N. V.; Sreekantan, B. V.; Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    A 24 detector extensive air shower array is being operated at Ootacamund (2200 m altitude, 11.4 deg N latitude) in southern India to search for sources of Cosmic gamma rays of energies greater then 5 x 10 to the 13th power eV. The angular resolution of the array has been experimentally estimated to be better than about 2 deg. Since June '84, nearly 2.5 million showers have been collected and their arrival directions determined. These showers are being studied to search for very high energy gamma ray emission from interesting astrophysical objects such as Cygnus X-3, Crab pulsar and Geminga.

  17. Observation and Simulations of the Backsplash Effects in High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes Containing a Massive Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander A.; Ormes, Jonathan F.; Hartman, Robert C.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Mitchell, John W.; Thompson, David J.

    1999-01-01

    Beam test and simulation results are presented for a study of the backsplash effects produced in a high-energy gamma-ray detector containing a massive calorimeter. An empirical formula is developed to estimate the probability (per unit area) of backsplash for different calorimeter materials and thicknesses, different incident particle energies, and at different distances from the calorimeter. The results obtained are applied to the design of Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST).

  18. Crystal growth and thermoluminescence response of NaZr2(PO4)3 at high gamma radiation doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Regil, E.; Contreras-Ramírez, A.; Fernández-Valverde, S. M.; González-Martínez, P. R.; Carrasco-Ábrego, H.

    2013-11-01

    This work describes the synthesis and characterization of NaZr2(PO4)3. The stability of this material under high doses of gamma radiation was investigated in the range of 10-50 MGy. Samples of unaltered and gamma irradiated NaZr2(PO4)3 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermoluminescence. The results showed that while functional groups were not affected by the gamma irradiation, morphology changes were observed with increasing doses of gamma irradiation. The morphology of the non-irradiated compound is agglomerated flakes; however, irradiation at 10 MGy splits the flakes inducing the formation of well-defined cubes. Gamma irradiation induced the crystal size of the NaZr2(PO4)3 to grow. The heat treatment (973 K) of samples irradiated at 50 MGy resulted in the recovery of the original morphology. Furthermore, the thermoluminescence analysis of the irradiated compound is reported.

  19. Effects of gamma-ray and high energy carbon ion irradiation on swimming velocity of Euglena gracilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakashita, T.; Doi, M.; Yasuda, H.; Fuma, S.; Häder, D.-P.

    The effects of gamma-ray and high energy carbon ion irradiation on the swimming velocity of the photosynthetic flagellate Euglena gracilis strain Z were studied, focusing on a dose-effect relationship. Cells were exposed to 60Co gamma-rays at 6 doses of 10, 15, 20, 40, 100 and 200 Gy for water, and also to 290 MeV/amu carbon ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at 7 doses (5, 10, 15, 20, 50, 100 and 200 Gy for water). The swimming velocity was measured by a biomonitoring system, called ECOTOX. The swimming velocities of Euglena gracilis cells were significantly decreased by >40 Gy gamma-rays and >5 Gy carbon ions, respectively. The 50% effective doses for inhibition, 34±4 Gy (gamma-rays) and 13±1 Gy (290 MeV/amu carbon ions), were estimated from the best fit to data of the logistic model. The relative biological effectiveness (2.6±0.4) was calculated by the ratio of 50% effective doses. The inhibition of the swimming velocity of the cells irradiated with gamma-rays was still present after 3 days, while recovery of the swimming velocity was shown in the cells exposed to 290 MeV/amu carbon ions. It is suggested that ionizing radiation inhibits ATP production and/or increases frictional drag on beating of the flagellum, thus decreasing swimming velocity.

  20. Effects of high-temperature anneals and {sup 60}Co gamma-ray irradiation on strained silicon on insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Park, K.; Canonico, M.; Celler, G. K.; Seacrist, M.; Chan, J.; Gelpey, J.; Holbert, K. E.; Nakagawa, S.; Tajima, M.; Schroder, D. K.

    2007-10-01

    Strained silicon on insulator was exposed to high-temperature annealing and high-dose {sup 60}Co gamma ({gamma})-ray irradiation to study the tenacity of the bond between the strained Si film and the underlying buried oxide. During the high-temperature anneals, the samples were ramped at a rate of 150 deg. C/s to 850 deg. C then ramped to 1200, 1250, and 1300 deg. C at a rate of approximately 5x10{sup 5} deg. C/s for millisecond duration anneals. For the irradiation experiments, the samples were irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays to a dose of 51.5 kGy. All samples were characterized by ultraviolet (UV) Raman, pseudo metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor ({psi}-MOSFET) current voltage, Hall mobility, and photoluminescence (PL) to verify changes in strain. UV Raman, PL, and {psi}-MOSFET measurements show no strain relaxation for the high-temperature annealed samples and only very slight relaxation for the {gamma}-ray irradiated samples.

  1. Microstructure, mechanical properties, and high-temperature oxidation resistance of boronized {gamma}-TiAl(Mn)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, H.; Park, K.

    1997-12-31

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) based intermetallic compounds are considered as potential materials for high-performance automobile and aircraft engine components and airframe applications because of their low density (3.8 g/cm{sup 3}), high melting temperature (1,480 C), and good elevated temperature strength retention. To improve the wear and high-temperature oxidation resistance of reactively sintered {gamma}-TiAl(Mn) intermetallic compounds, they were boronized in the temperature range of 900 to 1,100 C for 5 to 11 hours with powder mixtures of B{sub 4}C and Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. It was found that the coating layer consisted of three sublayers, i.e., outer, middle, and inner sublayers. The outer, middle, and inner sublayers were identified as a mixture of TiB{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}, a mixture of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}, and Ti-rich TiAl based compounds, respectively. The coating layer significantly improved the surface hardness and the wear and high-temperature oxidation resistances. The highest surface hardness (Hv {approx} 2,720) was obtained at 900 C for 11 hours. This surface hardness is much higher than that of TiAl(Mn) (Hv {approx} 400). In addition, the specimens boronized at both 1,000 and 1,050 C for 9 hours showed an excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance. It is believed that the boronizing on the TiAl(Mn) intermetallics is very effective to improve the wear and high-temperature oxidation resistances.

  2. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  3. A likelihood search for very high-energy gamma-ray bursts with the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodle, Kathryne Sparks

    Gamma-Ray bursts (GRBs) are extremely powerful transient events that occur at cosmological distances. Observations of energy spectra of GRBs can provide information about the intervening space between the burst and Earth as well as about the source itself. GRBs have been observed up to nearly 100 GeV by satellite instruments; however, ground-based detectors are needed to provide enough exposure and statistics to determine the behavior of GRBs at those energies. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is a second-generation extensive air shower detector that primarily observes very high-energy (VHE) photons, where VHE is defined as hundreds of GeV to hundreds of TeV. HAWC is built near the peak of Sierra Negra in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m. The high altitude allows the detector to observe air showers when more information is available for reconstruction. Due to its wide field of view (˜2 sr) and high duty cycle (>90%), the HAWC observatory is sensitive to gamma rays in the sub-TeV to TeV energy range and can constrain the shape and cutoff of high-energy GRB spectra, especially in conjunction with observations from other detectors such as the Fermi LAT satellite. We present a likelihood-based search for VHE emission from the Fermi LAT GRBs that occurred in the field of view of HAWC during the last two years of its construction. Of the five bursts analyzed, no significant detections were observed; upper limits have been placed for each of the bursts. With less than 1/3 of the array active, the HAWC observatory limits for GRB 130702A, which is at a close redshift of z = 0.145, reach comparable sensitivity to lower energy instruments and are not limited by the EBL. With the array complete in March 2015, the sensitivity of HAWC is now greatly enhanced compared to the data analyzed in this dissertation. The future for a VHE GRB detetion by the HAWC observatory is bright.

  4. SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, H.

    2009-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

  5. Modeling the Delayed Emission in the 2005 Mkn 501 Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Flare

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarek, Wlodek; Wagner, Robert

    2008-12-24

    Recently, the MAGIC collaboration reported evidence for a delay in the arrival times of photons of different energies during a {gamma}-ray flare from the blazar Markarian 501 on 2005 July 9. We describe the observed delayed high-energy emission by applying a homogeneous synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model under the assumption that the blob, containing relativistic electrons, was observed in its acceleration phase. This modified SSC model predicts the appearance of a {gamma}-ray flare first at lower energies and subsequently at higher energies. Based on the reported time delay, we predict a delay on the order of 1 h if observed between 10 GeV and 100 GeV, which can be tested in the future by simultaneous flare observations using, e.g., the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope and Cerenkov telescopes.

  6. Mechanical Behavior of Gamma-Met PX under Uniaxial Loading at Elevated Temperatures and High Strain Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminides have received considerable attention over the last decade. These alloys are known to have low density, good high temperature strength retention and good oxidation and corrosion resistance. However, poor ductility and low fracture toughness have been the key limiting factors in the full utilization of these alloys. More recently, a new generation of gamma titanium aluminide alloys, commonly referred to as Gamma-met PX, has been developed by GKSS, Germany. These alloys have been observed to have superior strength and better oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures when compared with conventional gamma titanium aluminides. The present paper discusses results of a study to understand the uniaxial mechanical behavior in both compression and tension of Gamma-Met PX at elevated temperatures and high strain rates. The compression and tensile tests are conducted using a modified split-Hopkinson bar apparatus at test temperatures ranging from room temperature to 900 C and strain rates of up to 3500/s. Under uniaxial compression, in the temperature range from room to 600 C, the flow stress is observed to be nearly independent of test temperature. However, at temperatures higher than 600 C thermal softening is observed at all strain rates with the rate of thermal softening increasing dramatically between 800 C and 900 C. The room temperature tensile tests show negligible strain-rate dependence on both yield stress and flow stress. With an increase in test temperature from room to 900 C the material shows a drop in both yield and flow stress at all levels of plastic strain. However, the measured flow stress is still higher when compared to nickel based super-alloys and other gamma titanium aluminides under similar test conditions. Also, no anomaly in yield stress is observed up to 900 C.

  7. Application of Gamma code coupled with turbomachinery models for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh

    2008-02-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of a toxic gas, CO, and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. GAMMA code is being developed to implement turbomachinery models in the power conversion unit (PCU) and ultimately models associated with the hydrogen plant. Some preliminary results will be described in this paper.

  8. Development of GAMMA Code and Evaluation for a Very High Temperature gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chang H; Lim, H.S.; Kim, E.S.; NO, H.C.

    2007-06-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gasses (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. This paper will also include what improvements will be made in the Gamma code for the VHTR.

  9. Probing Cosmic Dust of the Early Universe through High-Redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, S. L.; Li, Aigen

    2009-01-01

    We explore the extinction properties of the dust in the distant universe through the afterglows of high-redshifted gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) based on the "Drude" model which, unlike previous studies, does not require a prior assumption of template extinction laws. We select GRB 070802 at z ≈ 2.45 (which shows clear evidence for the 2175 Å extinction bump) and GRB 050904 at z ≈ 6.29, the second most distant GRB observed to date. We fit their afterglow spectra to determine the extinction of their host galaxies. We find that (1) their extinction curves differ substantially from that of the Milky Way and the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (which were widely adopted as template extinction laws in the literature); (2) the 2175 Å extinction feature appears to be also present in GRB 050904 at z ≈ 6.29; and (3) there does not appear to be strong evidence for the dependence of dust extinction on redshifts. The inferred extinction curves are closely reproduced in terms of a mixture of amorphous silicate and graphite, both of which are expected supernova condensates and have been identified in primitive meteorites as presolar grains originating from supernovae (which are considered as the main source of dust at high-z).

  10. New frontiers in nuclear physics with high-power lasers and brilliant monochromatic gamma beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Negoita, F.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C. A.; Ursescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of high power lasers and the combination of such novel devices with accelerator technology has enlarged the science reach of many research fields, in particular particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics as well as societal applications in material science, nuclear energy and applications for medicine. The European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures has selected a proposal based on these new premises called the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI). The ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for nuclear physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10 PW lasers and a Compton back-scattering high-brilliance and intense low-energy gamma beam, a combination of laser and accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. This unique combination of beams that are unique worldwide allows us to develop an experimental program in nuclear physics at the frontiers of present-day knowledge as well as society driven applications. In the present paper, the technical description of the facility as well as the new perspectives in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics will be presented.

  11. Model-dependent high-energy neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Kumar, Pawan

    2013-03-22

    The IceCube Collaboration recently reported a stringent upper limit on the high energy neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which provides a meaningful constraint on the standard internal shock model. Recent broadband electromagnetic observations of GRBs also challenge the internal shock paradigm for GRBs, and some competing models for γ-ray prompt emission have been proposed. We describe a general scheme for calculating the GRB neutrino flux, and compare the predicted neutrino flux levels for different models. We point out that the current neutrino flux upper limit starts to constrain the standard internal shock model. The dissipative photosphere models are also challenged if the cosmic ray luminosity from GRBs is at least 10 times larger than the γ-ray luminosity. If the neutrino flux upper limit continues to go down in the next few years, then it would suggest the following possibilities: (i) the photon-to-proton luminosity ratio in GRBs is anomalously high for shocks, which may be achieved in some dissipative photosphere models and magnetic dissipation models; or (ii) the GRB emission site is at a larger radius than the internal shock radius, as expected in some magnetic dissipation models such as the internal collision-induced magnetic reconnection and turbulence model. PMID:25166786

  12. The high-redshift gamma-ray burst GRB 140515A

    SciTech Connect

    Melandri, A.; Bernardini, M. G.; D'Avanzo, P. D.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Nappo, F.; Nava, L.; Japelj, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Oates, S.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gafton, E.; Ghisellini, G.; Gnedin, N.; Goldoni, P.; Gorosabel, J.; Libbrecht, T.; Malesani, D.; Salvaterra, R.; Thone, C. C.; Vergani, S. D.; Xu, D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2015-09-09

    High-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer several advantages when studying the distant Universe, providing unique information about the structure and properties of the galaxies in which they exploded. Spectroscopic identification with large ground-based telescopes has improved our knowledge of this kind of distant events. We present the multi-wavelength analysis of the high-zSwift GRB GRB 140515A (z = 6.327). The best estimate of the neutral hydrogen fraction of the intergalactic medium towards the burst is xHI ≤ 0.002. The spectral absorption lines detected for this event are the weakest lines ever observed in GRB afterglows, suggesting that GRB 140515A exploded in a very low-density environment. Its circum-burst medium is characterised by an average extinction (AV ~ 0.1) that seems to be typical of z ≥ 6 events. The observed multi-band light curves are explained either with a very hard injected spectrum (p = 1.7) or with a multi-component emission (p = 2.1). In the second case a long-lasting central engine activity is needed in order to explain the late time X-ray emission. Furthermore, the possible origin of GRB 140515A in a Pop III (or in a Pop II star with a local environment enriched by Pop III) massive star is unlikely.

  13. The high-redshift gamma-ray burst GRB 140515A

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Melandri, A.; Bernardini, M. G.; D'Avanzo, P. D.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Nappo, F.; Nava, L.; Japelj, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Oates, S.; Campana, S.; et al

    2015-09-09

    High-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer several advantages when studying the distant Universe, providing unique information about the structure and properties of the galaxies in which they exploded. Spectroscopic identification with large ground-based telescopes has improved our knowledge of this kind of distant events. We present the multi-wavelength analysis of the high-zSwift GRB GRB 140515A (z = 6.327). The best estimate of the neutral hydrogen fraction of the intergalactic medium towards the burst is xHI ≤ 0.002. The spectral absorption lines detected for this event are the weakest lines ever observed in GRB afterglows, suggesting that GRB 140515A exploded in amore » very low-density environment. Its circum-burst medium is characterised by an average extinction (AV ~ 0.1) that seems to be typical of z ≥ 6 events. The observed multi-band light curves are explained either with a very hard injected spectrum (p = 1.7) or with a multi-component emission (p = 2.1). In the second case a long-lasting central engine activity is needed in order to explain the late time X-ray emission. Furthermore, the possible origin of GRB 140515A in a Pop III (or in a Pop II star with a local environment enriched by Pop III) massive star is unlikely.« less

  14. TARGET: A multi-channel digitizer chip for very-high-energy gamma-ray telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Okumura, A.; Ruckman, L.; Simons, A.; Tajima, H.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Varner, G.; /Hawaii U.

    2011-08-11

    The next-generation very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array, will feature dozens of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs), each with thousands of pixels of photosensors. To be affordable and reliable, reading out such a mega-channel array requires event recording technology that is highly integrated and modular, with a low cost per channel. We present the design and performance of a chip targeted to this application: the TeV Array Readout with GSa/s sampling and Event Trigger (TARGET). This application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) has 16 parallel input channels, a 4096-sample buffer for each channel, adjustable input termination, self-trigger functionality, and tight window-selected readout. We report the performance of TARGET in terms of sampling frequency, power consumption, dynamic range, current-mode gain, analog bandwidth, and cross talk. The large number of channels per chip allows a low cost per channel ($10 to $20 including front-end and back-end electronics but not including photosensors) to be achieved with a TARGET-based IACT readout system. In addition to basic performance parameters of the TARGET chip itself, we present a camera module prototype as well as a second-generation chip (TARGET 2), both of which have been produced.

  15. High doses of gamma radiation suppress allergic effect induced by food lectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Antônio F. M.; Souza, Marthyna P.; Vieira, Leucio D.; Aguiar, Jaciana S.; Silva, Teresinha G.; Medeiros, Paloma L.; Melo, Ana M. M. A.; Silva-Lucca, Rosemeire A.; Santana, Lucimeire A.; Oliva, Maria L. V.; Perez, Katia R.; Cuccovia, Iolanda M.; Coelho, Luana C. B. B.; Correia, Maria T. S.

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for the development of functional foods lies in the development of effective methods to reduce or eliminate food allergenicity, but few reports have summarized information concerning the progress made with food irradiation. In this study, we investigated the relationship between allergenicity and molecular structure of a food allergen after gamma irradiation and evaluate the profile of the allergic response to irradiated allergens. Cramoll, a lectin isolated from a bean and used as a food allergen, was irradiated and the possible structural changes were accompanied by spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism and microcalorimetry. Subsequently, sensitized animals subjected to intragastric administration of non-irradiated and irradiated Cramoll were treated for 7 days. Then, body weight, leukocytes, cytokine profiles and histological parameters were also determined. Cramoll showed complete inhibition of intrinsic activity after high radiation doses. Changes in fluorescence and CD spectra with a simultaneous collapse of the tertiary structure followed by a pronounced decrease of native secondary structure were observed after irradiation. After oral challenge, sensitized mice demonstrate an association between Cramoll intake, body weight loss, eosinophilia, lymphocytic infiltrate in the gut and Eotaxin secretion. Irradiation significantly reduces, according to the dose, the effects observed by non-irradiated food allergens. We confirm that high-dose radiation may render protein food allergens innocuous by irreversibly compromising their molecular structure.

  16. Dictyostelium possesses highly diverged presenilin/gamma-secretase that regulates growth and cell-fate specification and can accurately process human APP: a system for functional studies of the presenilin/gamma-secretase complex.

    PubMed

    McMains, Vanessa C; Myre, Michael; Kreppel, Lisa; Kimmel, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    Presenilin (PS) is the catalytic moiety of the gamma-secretase complex. PS and other gamma-secretase components are well conserved among metazoa, but their presence and function in more-distant species are not resolved. Because inappropriate gamma-secretase processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in humans is associated with familial Alzheimer's disease, understanding essential elements within each gamma-secretase component is crucial to functional studies. Diverged proteins have been identified in primitive plants but experiments have failed to demonstrate gamma-secretase activity. We have identified highly diverged orthologs for each gamma-secretase component in the ancient eukaryote Dictyostelium, which lacks equivalents of APP, Notch and other characterized PS/gamma-secretase substrates. We show that wild-type (WT) Dictyostelium is capable of amyloidogenic processing of ectopically expressed human APP to generate amyloid-beta peptides Abeta(40) and Abeta(42); strains deficient in gamma-secretase cannot produce Abeta peptides but accumulate processed intermediates of APP that co-migrate with the C-terminal fragments alpha- and beta-CTF of APP that are found in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that Dictyostelium requires PS for phagocytosis and cell-fate specification in a cell-autonomous manner, and show that regulation of phagocytosis requires an active gamma-secretase, a pathway suggested, but not proven, to occur in mammalian and Drosophila cells. Our results indicate that PS signaling is an ancient process that arose prior to metazoan radiation, perhaps independently of Notch. Dictyostelium might serve to identify novel PS/gamma-secretase signaling targets and provide a unique system for high-throughput screening of small-molecule libraries to select new therapeutic targets for diseases associated with this pathway. PMID:20699477

  17. IN-SITU ASSAY OF TRANSURANIC RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRAL GAMMA LOGGING - A HANFORD CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    ROHAY VJ; HENWOOD P; MCCAIN R

    2009-11-30

    High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

  18. Prospects for compact high-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray and gamma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.

    1997-03-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the laser synchrotron source (LSS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power CO2 laser may be used for prototype LSS demonstration. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps CO2 laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 50 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of collimated 4.7 keV (2.6 Å) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of ˜1019photons/sec, will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to the e-beam energy. A rational short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to the 1022 photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO2 laser upgrade to 5 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps is realized. In the future, exploiting the promising approach of a high-gradient laser wake field accelerator, a compact "table-top" LSS of monochromatic gamma radiation may become feasible.

  19. Features of >130 Gamma-Ray Bursts at high energy: towards the 2nd Fermi LAT GRB catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, Giacomo; Omodei, Nicola; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high-energy emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts is a formidable probe for extreme physics, calling for highly relativistic sources with very large Lorentz factors. Despite the advancements prompted by observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope and the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, as well as other observatories, many questions remain open, especially on radiative processes and mechanisms. We present here the most extensive search for GRBs at high energies performed so far, featuring a detection efficiency more than 50% better than previous works, and returning more than 130 detections. With this sample size, much larger than the 35 detections presented in the first Fermi/LAT GRB catalog, we are able to assess the characteristics of the population of GRBs at high energy with unprecedented sensitivity. We will review the preliminary results of this work, as well as their interpretation.

  20. Detection system for high-resolution gamma radiation spectroscopy with neutron time-of-flight filtering

    DOEpatents

    Dioszegi, Istvan; Salwen, Cynthia; Vanier, Peter

    2014-12-30

    A .gamma.-radiation detection system that includes at least one semiconductor detector such as HPGe-Detector, a position-sensitive .alpha.-Detector, a TOF Controller, and a Digitizer/Integrator. The Digitizer/Integrator starts to process the energy signals of a .gamma.-radiation sent from the HPGe-Detector instantly when the HPGe-Detector detects the .gamma.-radiation. Subsequently, it is determined whether a coincidence exists between the .alpha.-particles and .gamma.-radiation signal, based on a determination of the time-of-flight of neutrons obtained from the .alpha.-Detector and the HPGe-Detector. If it is determined that the time-of-flight falls within a predetermined coincidence window, the Digitizer/Integrator is allowed to continue and complete the energy signal processing. If, however, there is no coincidence, the Digitizer/Integrator is instructed to be clear and reset its operation instantly.

  1. HIGH ENERGY DELAYED GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY FOR PLUTONIUM ASSAY OF SPENT REACTOR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, L. E.; Misner, Alex C.

    2011-07-18

    Nuclear safeguards requires accountancy of plutonium present in spent reactor fuels. Current non-destructive methods do not directly measure plutonium content but instead rely on indirect measurements that require operator declarations of the fuel history. Delayed gamma spectroscopy is one method being investigated which can overcome these limitations. Delayed gamma rays from fission depend on the isotopic fission yield of the fissile isotope, and thus can be used to fingerprint the isotopes undergoing fission. However, difficulties arise because of the intense background due to long lived fission radionuclides already present in the fuel. We report on progress on simulated measurements of the delayed gamma spectrum in the presence of this background, using neutrons from a D-T source thermalized in an interrogation chamber slipped over a fuel assembly. By focusing on delayed gammas in the 3 to 4 MeV range, the passive spectrum becomes negligible, while allowing the preferential attenuation of the passive background to acceptable levels.

  2. Picosecond Pulse Recirculation for High Average Brightness Thomson Scattering-based Gamma-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V

    2009-05-28

    Pulse recirculation has been successfully demonstrated with the interaction laser system of LLNL's Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-ray (T-REX) source. The recirculation increased twenty-eight times the intensity of the light coming out of the laser system, demonstrating the capability of increasing the gamma-ray flux emitted by T-REX. The technical approach demonstrated could conceivably increase the average gamma-ray flux output by up to a hundred times.

  3. SAS 2 observation of pulsed high-energy gamma radiation from Geminga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, J. R.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Following the detection of pulsed X-rays and gamma rays from Geminga, the 1972-1973 SAS 2 data which first revealed this source have been reanalyzed. The 237 ms periodicity is visible in those observations. The phase of the SAS 2 periodicity is consistent with that of COS B suggesting that the gamma-ray data allow an accounting for every revolution of the Geminga pulsar between 1972 and 1982.

  4. The mirror illusion induces high gamma oscillations in the absence of movement.

    PubMed

    Butorina, A; Prokofyev, A; Nazarova, M; Litvak, V; Stroganova, T

    2014-12-01

    We tested whether mirror visual feedback (MVF) from a moving hand induced high gamma oscillation (HGO) response in the hemisphere contralateral to the mirror and ipsilateral to the self-paced movement. MEG was recorded in 14 subjects under three conditions: bilateral synchronous movements of both index fingers (BILATERAL), movements of the right hand index finger while observing the immobile left index finger (NOMIRROR), and movements of the right hand index finger while observing its mirror reflection (MIRROR). The right hemispheric spatiospectral regions of interests (ROIs) in the sensor space, sensitive to bilateral movements, were found by statistical comparison of the BILATERAL spectral responses to baseline. For these ROIs, the post-movement HGO responses were compared between the MIRROR and NOMIRROR conditions. We found that MVF from the moving hand, similarly to the real movements of the opposite hand, induced HGOs (55-85Hz) in the sensorimotor cortex. This MVF effect was frequency-specific and did not spread to oscillations in other frequency bands. This is the first study demonstrating movement-related HGO induced by MVF from the moving hand in the absence of proprioceptive feedback signaling. Our findings support the hypothesis that MVF can trigger the feedback-based control processes specifically associated with perception of one's own movements. PMID:25241908

  5. High Purity Germanium Gamma-PHA Assay of Uranium Storage Pigs for 321-M Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.A.

    2001-09-18

    The Analytical Development Section of SRTC was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The facility also includes the 324-M storage building and the passageway connecting it to 321-M. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Solid Waste's Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control and Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report describes and documents the use of a portable HPGe detector and EG and G Dart system that contains a high voltage power supply, signal processing electronics, a personal computer with Gamma-Vision software, and space to store and manipulate multiple 4096-channel g-ray spectra to assay for 235U content in 268 uranium shipping and storage pigs. This report includes a description of three efficiency calibration configurations and also the results of the assay. A description of the quality control checks is included as well.

  6. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos: Expectation from gamma-ray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahakyan, N.

    2016-07-01

    The recent results from ground based γ-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) provide a population of TeV galactic γ-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE) neutrinos. Since the γ-rays and ν-s are produced from decays of neutral and charged pions, the flux of TeV γ-rays can be used to estimate the upper limit of ν flux and vice versa; the detectability of ν flux implies a minimum flux of the accompanying γ-rays (assuming the internal and the external absorption of γ-rays is negligible). Using this minimum flux, it is possible to find the sources which can be detected with cubic-kilometer telescopes. I will discuss the possibility to detect HE neutrinos from powerful galactic accelerators, such as Supernova Remnants (SNRs) and Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) and show that likely only RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622 and Vela X can be detected by current generation of instruments (IceCube and Km3Net). It will be shown also, that galactic binary systems could be promising sources of HE ν-s. In particular, ν-s and γ-rays from Cygnus X-3 will be discussed during recent gamma-ray activity, showing that in the future such kind of activities could produce detectable flux of HE ν-s.

  7. HEGRS: Mechanical design of a high-energy, gamma-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, K.B.

    1993-06-04

    A large, 3200-kg (7000-lb) gamma-ray spectrometer was designed to move in a 1500 arc with an arc accuracy of 0.50, and to move radially over a distance of 650 mm (25 in.). The entire structure is aluminum rather than steel because of the high neutron background. The two-layer support accommodates rapid, accurate positioning of the spectrometer in both the rotational and radial directions within 0.1 mm (0.004 in.). All movements and positioning are computer-controlled. The centerline deviation over the entire surface is 0.25 mm (0.0100 in.). The bottom layer, called the table, permits arc motion. The table is a baseplate consisting of two 3.6-m {times} 1.2-m (12-ft {times} 4-ft) cast-aluminum jig plates. The top layer, called the sled, is an aluminum plate 2.12-m {times} 1.22-m (83.38-in. {times} 48-in.) wide, which provides for radial motion. Due to the large mass of the spectrometer and the accurate positioning required, air pads are used to facilitate movement. Hydraulic brakes are applied when the detector is in its rest position to comply with the seismic requirements of the installation.

  8. Design and performance of a new high accuracy combined small sample neutron/gamma detector

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.; Davidson, D.; Verplancke, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Wagner, H.G.; Wellum, R.; Brandelise, B.; Mayer, K.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes the design of an optimized combined neutron and gamma detector installed around a measurement well protruding from the floor of a glove box. The objective of this design was to achieve an overall accuracy for the plutonium element concentration in gram-sized samples of plutonium oxide powder approaching the {approximately}0.1--0.2% accuracies routinely achieved by inspectors` chemical analysis. The efficiency of the clam-shell neutron detector was increased and the flat response zone extended in axial and radial directions. The sample holder introduced from within the glove box was designed to form the upper reflector, while two graphite half-shells fitted around the thin neck of the high-resolution LEGE detector replaced the lower plug. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel prepared special plutonium oxide test samples whose plutonium concentration was determined to better than 0.05%. During a three week initial performance test in July 1992 at ITU Karlsruhe and in long term tests, it was established that the target accuracy can be achieved provided sufficient care is taken to assure the reproducibility of sample bottling and sample positioning. The paper presents and discusses the results of all test measurements.

  9. Design and performance of a new high accuracy combined small sample neutron/gamma detector

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.; Davidson, D.; Verplancke, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Wagner, H.G.; Wellum, R.; Brandelise, B.; Mayer, K.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the design of an optimized combined neutron and gamma detector installed around a measurement well protruding from the floor of a glove box. The objective of this design was to achieve an overall accuracy for the plutonium element concentration in gram-sized samples of plutonium oxide powder approaching the {approximately}0.1--0.2% accuracies routinely achieved by inspectors` chemical analysis. The efficiency of the clam-shell neutron detector was increased and the flat response zone extended in axial and radial directions. The sample holder introduced from within the glove box was designed to form the upper reflector, while two graphite half-shells fitted around the thin neck of the high-resolution LEGe detector replaced the lower plug. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel prepared special plutonium oxide test samples whose plutonium concentration was determined to better than 0.05%. During a three week initial performance test in July 1992 at ITU Karlsruhe and in long term tests, it was established that the target accuracy can be achieved provided sufficient care is taken to assure the reproducibility of sample bottling and sample positioning. The paper presents and discusses the results of all test measurements.

  10. Evaluation of High-Throughput Genomic Assays for the Fc Gamma Receptor Locus.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Chantal E; Iriyama, Chisako; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J J; Nagelkerke, Sietse Q; Hussain, Khiyam; Ganderton, Rosalind; Lee, Charlotte; Machado, Lee R; Hollox, Edward J; Parker, Helen; Latham, Kate V; Kuijpers, Taco W; Potter, Kathleen N; Coupland, Sarah E; Davies, Andrew; Stackpole, Michael; Oates, Melanie; Pettitt, Andrew R; Glennie, Martin J; Cragg, Mark S; Strefford, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been revolutionised by the use monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that function through their interaction with Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs). The low-affinity FcγR genes are highly homologous, map to a complex locus at 1p23 and harbour single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variation (CNV) that can impact on receptor function and response to therapeutic mAbs. This complexity can hinder accurate characterisation of the locus. We therefore evaluated and optimised a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus amenable to peripheral blood mononuclear cells and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material that can be employed in a high-throughput manner. Assessment of TaqMan genotyping for FCGR2A-131H/R, FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs demonstrated the need for additional methods to discriminate genotypes for the FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs due to sequence homology and CNV in the region. A multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay provided high quality SNP and CNV data in PBMC cases, but there was greater data variability in FFPE material in a manner that was predicted by the BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR protocol. In conclusion, we have evaluated a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus that are scalable for application in large clinical trials of mAb therapy. These assays will ultimately help establish the importance of FcγR genetics in predicting response to antibody therapeutics. PMID:26545243

  11. Evaluation of High-Throughput Genomic Assays for the Fc Gamma Receptor Locus

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Chantal E.; Iriyama, Chisako; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J. J.; Nagelkerke, Sietse Q.; Hussain, Khiyam; Ganderton, Rosalind; Lee, Charlotte; Machado, Lee R.; Hollox, Edward J.; Parker, Helen; Latham, Kate V.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Potter, Kathleen N.; Coupland, Sarah E.; Davies, Andrew; Stackpole, Michael; Oates, Melanie; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Glennie, Martin J.; Cragg, Mark S.; Strefford, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been revolutionised by the use monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that function through their interaction with Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs). The low-affinity FcγR genes are highly homologous, map to a complex locus at 1p23 and harbour single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variation (CNV) that can impact on receptor function and response to therapeutic mAbs. This complexity can hinder accurate characterisation of the locus. We therefore evaluated and optimised a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus amenable to peripheral blood mononuclear cells and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material that can be employed in a high-throughput manner. Assessment of TaqMan genotyping for FCGR2A-131H/R, FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs demonstrated the need for additional methods to discriminate genotypes for the FCGR3A-158F/V and FCGR2B-232I/T SNPs due to sequence homology and CNV in the region. A multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay provided high quality SNP and CNV data in PBMC cases, but there was greater data variability in FFPE material in a manner that was predicted by the BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR protocol. In conclusion, we have evaluated a suite of assays for the genomic analysis of the FcγR locus that are scalable for application in large clinical trials of mAb therapy. These assays will ultimately help establish the importance of FcγR genetics in predicting response to antibody therapeutics. PMID:26545243

  12. Exploring the nature of the unidentified very-high-energy gamma-ray source HESS J1507-622

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domainko, W.; Ohm, S.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Several extended sources of very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma rays have been found that lack counterparts belonging to an established class of VHE gamma-ray emitters. Aims: The nature of the first unidentified VHE gamma-ray source with significant angular offset from the Galactic plane of 3.5°, HESS J1507-622, is explored. Methods.Fermi-LAT data in the high-energy (HE, 100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) gamma-ray range collected over 34 month are used to describe the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source. Additionally, implications of the off-plane location of the source for a leptonic and hadronic gamma-ray emission model are investigated. Results: HESS J1507-622 is detected in the Fermi energy range and its spectrum is best described by a power law in energy with Γ = 1.7 ± 0.1stat ± 0.2sys and integral flux between (0.3-300) GeV of F = (2.0 ± 0.5stat ± 1.0sys) × 10-9 cm-2 s-1. The SED constructed from the Fermi and H.E.S.S. data for this source does not support a smooth power-law continuation from the VHE to the HE gamma-ray range. With the available data it is not possible to discriminate between a hadronic and a leptonic scenario for HESS J1507-622. The location and compactness of the source indicate a considerable physical offset from the Galactic plane for this object. In case of a multiple-kpc distance, this challenges a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) origin for HESS J1507-622 since the time of travel for a pulsar born in the Galactic disk to reach such a location would exceed the inverse Compton (IC) cooling time of electrons that are energetic enough to produce VHE gamma-rays. However, an origin of this gamma-ray source connected to a pulsar that was born off the Galactic plane in the explosion of a hypervelocity star cannot be excluded. Conclusions: The nature of HESS J1507-622 is still unknown to date, and a PWN scenario cannot be ruled out in general. On the contrary HESS J1507-622 could be the first discovered representative of a

  13. Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Based on High-Efficiency Frisch-Ring Cdznte Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Y.; Bolotnikov, A; Camarda, G; Hossain, A; James, R; DeGeronimo, G; Fried, J; O'Connor, P; Kargar, A; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated both good energy resolution, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency in detecting gamma rays, highlighting the strong potential of CdZnTe materials for such applications. We are designing a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8 times 8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so greatly improving detection efficiency. By using the front-end application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy-resolution. It includes a signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuits, a high-voltage module, and a universal serial bus (USB) interface. In this paper, we detail the system's structure and report the results of our tests with it.

  14. Gamma background studies for the XENON experiment using a High Purity Germanium Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angle, Jesse Isaac

    The XENON Dark Matter Experiment, deployed at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy on March 2006, is a liquid noble gas detector designed to directly detect dark matter. The detector uses a dual-phase (gas/liquid) Xenon target to search for nuclear recoils associated with nucleus-WIMP interactions. Due to the high sensitivity needed in such an experiment, it is vital to not only reduce the background but to also understand the remaining background so as to aid in the understanding of the data as well as to facilitate upgrades beyond the early Research and Development phases. Many of the components of the XENON10 detector have been screened using a High Purity Germanium Detector known as the GATOR detector. Full analysis of the screening data requires Monte Carlo simulations of the GATOR detector and the sample. Results from this screening will be presented. Using the information obtained from the screening operation, Monte Carlo simulations of the XENON10 electron recoil background will be examined and compared to the actual detector data. The success of this simulation to data comparison indicates that we have a good understanding of the XENON10 gamma background and will be able to make more informed decisions regarding the next stage of detector development. This type of analysis has aided in the selection and design of many of the materials and components being incorporated into the new XENON100 detector, the next generation detector which will be capable of improving the limit set by XENON10 by at least an order of magnitude. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http:/ /www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  15. High-energy cosmic-ray nuclei from high- and low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts and implications for multimessenger astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-07-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are one of the candidates of ultrahigh-energy (> or approx. 10{sup 18.5} eV) cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources. We investigate high-energy cosmic-ray acceleration including heavy nuclei in GRBs by using Geant 4, and discuss its various implications, taking both high-luminosity (HL) and low-luminosity (LL) GRBs into account. This is because LL GRBs may also make a significant contribution to the observed UHECR flux if they form a distinct population. We show that not only protons, but also heavier nuclei can be accelerated up to ultrahigh energies in the internal, (external) reverse, and forward shock models. We also show that the condition for ultrahigh-energy heavy nuclei such as iron to survive is almost the same as that for {approx}TeV gamma rays to escape from the source and for high-energy neutrinos not to be much produced. The multimessenger astronomy by neutrino and GeV-TeV gamma-ray telescopes such as IceCube and KM3Net, GLAST and MAGIC will be important to see whether GRBs can be accelerators of ultrahigh-energy heavy nuclei. We also demonstrate expected spectra of high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays, and discuss their detectabilities. In addition, we discuss implications of the GRB-UHECR hypothesis. We point out, since the number densities of HL GRBs and LL GRBs are quite different, its determination by UHECR observations is also important.

  16. PKS 2123-463: A Confirmed Gamma-ray Blazar at High Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAmmando, F.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Finke, J.; Orienti, M.; Greiner, J.; Kann, D. A.; Ojha, R.; Foley, A. R.; Stevens, J.; Blanchard, J. M.; Edwards, P. G.; Kadler, M.; Lovell, J. E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 2123-463 was associated in the First Fermi-LAT source catalog with the gamma-ray source 1FGL J2126.1-4603, but when considering the full first two years of Fermi observations, no gamma-ray source at a position consistent with this FSRQ was detected, and thus PKS 2123-463 was not reported in the Second Fermi-LAT source catalog. On 2011 December 14 a gamma-ray source positionally consistent with PKS 2123-463 was detected in flaring activity by Fermi-LAT. This activity triggered radio-to-X-ray observations by the Swift, GROND, ATCA, Ceduna, and KAT-7 observatories. Results of the localization of the gamma-ray source over 41 months of Fermi-LAT operation are reported here in conjunction with the results of the analysis of radio, optical, UV and X-ray data collected soon after the gamma-ray flare. The strict spatial association with the lower energy counterpart together with a simultaneous increase of the activity in optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray bands led to a firm identification of the gamma-ray source with PKS 2123-463. A new photometric redshift has been estimated as z = 1.46 +/- 0.05 using GROND and Swift/UVOT observations, in rough agreement with the disputed spectroscopic redshift of z = 1.67. We fit the broadband spectral energy distribution with a synchrotron/external Compton model. We find that a thermal disk component is necessary to explain the optical/UV emis- sion detected by Swift/UVOT. This disk has a luminosity of 1.8x1046 erg s-1, and a fit to the disk emission assuming a Schwarzschild (i.e., nonrotating) black hole gives a mass of 2 x 109 M(solar mass). This is the first black hole mass estimate for this source.

  17. HESPERIA studies on the nature of high-energy solar gamma-ray events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, Pietro; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Share, Gerry; Vilmer, Nicole; Malandraki, Olga; Miteva, Rositsa; Heber, Bernd; Hamadache, Clarisse; Kiener, Juergen; Tatischeff, Vincent; Vainio, Rami

    2016-04-01

    The FERMI/LAT gamma-ray experiment, thanks to its large effective are, observed about 25 solar events with gamma-ray emission above photon energies of 100 MeV. The emission is attributed to pion-decay photons. This implies that the acceleration of protons in the solar corona to energies above 300 MeV is a frequent phenomenon, probably more so than previously thought. In some cases the emission persists over several hours. In the frame of the HESPERIA project, funded by the Horizon 2020 programme of the European Union, we conduct an extensive study on the relationship between these gamma-ray emissions and electromagnetic signatures of accelerated electrons in the corona on the one hand, solar energetic particles (SEPs) detected in space on the other hand. This contribution is to present first results on the sample of 25 gamma-ray events, mainly addressing two subjects: (1) We compare the durations of the gamma-ray emission with the durations of hard X-ray and microwave signatures of electrons in the solar atmosphere, in the attempt to see if long-duration gamma-ray events are accompanied by signatures of long-duration electron acceleration. (2) We show that in each gamma-ray event electrons had rapid access to interplanetary space since the impulsive flare phase. This suggests that particles accelerated during the flare could escape to interplanetary space. We compare the hardness of the proton spectra detected in interplanetary space with the prediction using the properties of the solar microwave bursts. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324.

  18. High Resolution Gamma Ray Tomography and its Application to the Measurement of Phase Fractions in Chemical Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Uwe; Bieberle, Andre; Schleicher, Eckhard; Hessel, Günther; Zippe, Cornelius; Friedrich, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    We applied gamma ray tomography to the problem of phase fraction measurement in chemical reactors. Therefore, we used a new tomography device that is operated with a Cs-137 source and a high resolution gamma ray detector. One application example is the reconstruction of the fluid distribution and the measurement of radial gas fraction profiles in a laboratory scale stirred vessel. The tomograph was used to obtain radiographic projections of the averaged gamma ray attenuation for different stirrer speeds along the height of the vessel. With tomographic reconstruction techniques we calculated the angularly averaged radial distribution of the attenuation coefficient for as many as 150 single cross-sectional planes and synthesised from this data set the axial and radial fluid distribution pattern. Further, we exemplarily reconstructed the radial gas fraction distributions induced by the stirrer in the area of the stirrer blades. In a second application the gamma ray measurement system was used to visualise gas inclusions in a water cleaning column that is used to remove hazardous heavy metal species from water.

  19. High energy gamma-ray observations of the Crab Nebula and pulsar with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oser, Scott Michael

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a new ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for gamma-ray astronomy. STACEE uses the large mirror area of a solar heliostat facility to achieve a low energy threshold. A prototype experiment which uses 32 heliostat mirrors with a total mirror area of ~1200 m2 has been constructed. This prototype, called STACEE-32, was used to search for high energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar. Observations taken between November 1998 and February 1999 yield a strong statistical excess of gamma- like events from the Crab, with a significance of +6.75σ in 43 hours of on-source observing time. No evidence for pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar was found, and the upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the observed excess was < 5.5% at the 90% confidence level. A subset of the data was used to determine the integral flux of gamma rays from the Crab. We report an energy threshold of Eth = 190 +/- 60 GeV, and a measured integral flux of I(E > Eth) = (2.2 +/- 0.6 +/- 0.2) × 10-10 photons cm-2 s-1. The observed flux is in agreement with a continuation to lower energies of the power law spectrum seen at TeV energies.

  20. Studies on High Energy Radiation Mechanisms and Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most violent high-energy explosion in the universe. They are randomly happened, pulse-like phenomena with short durations. Since its discovery in 1960's by Vela satellite, GRBs have become a hot topic for astrophysical research. In 1997 the BeppoSAX satellite discovered afterglows of GRBs, and then helped to measure GRB redshifts. Thus it was found that GRBs are the events occurred at cosmological distances. Now it is widely accepted that the long bursts with durations longer than 2 s are from the collapsing massive stars, while the short bursts with durations less than 2 s are results of the merging compact binaries. By studying GRBs, the physical processes in ultrarelativistic and very high energy conditions can be investigated, and the researches on other fields, including constraining the cosmological models, can also get helped. The goal of this thesis is to present some discussions on possible radiation mechanisms and prompt light curves of GRBs. Since radiation mechanisms and prompt emissions are related to GRB central engines directly, studying these topics can help us to get a better understanding of some properties of the central engine. In Chapter 1, we review the discovery and observations of GRBs, presenting major achievements from major GRB-monitoring satellites including Compton Gamma-ray Observatory, BeppoSAX satellite, Swift satellite, as well as the latest Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The multi-wavelength properties of prompt emission as well as afterglows of GRBs are also summarized in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 the current GRB standard model is presented. According to standard model, a fireball is ejected by the central engine. The internal shock is produced by collisions between various shells with different velocities inside the fireball. The directional kinetic energy of the fireball is then converted to internal energy, and finally the non-thermal radiation (the prompt emission) is produced by internal shocks

  1. Studies on High Energy Radiation Mechanisms and Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most violent high-energy explosion in the universe. They are randomly happened, pulse-like phenomena with short durations. Since its discovery in 1960's by Vela satellite, GRBs have become a hot topic for astrophysical research. In 1997 the BeppoSAX satellite discovered afterglows of GRBs, and then helped to measure GRB redshifts. Thus it was found that GRBs are the events occurred at cosmological distances. Now it is widely accepted that the long bursts with durations longer than 2 s are from the collapsing massive stars, while the short bursts with durations less than 2 s are results of the merging compact binaries. By studying GRBs, the physical processes in ultrarelativistic and very high energy conditions can be investigated, and the researches on other fields, including constraining the cosmological models, can also get helped. The goal of this thesis is to present some discussions on possible radiation mechanisms and prompt light curves of GRBs. Since radiation mechanisms and prompt emissions are related to GRB central engines directly, studying these topics can help us to get a better understanding of some properties of the central engine. In Chapter 1, we review the discovery and observations of GRBs, presenting major achievements from major GRB-monitoring satellites including Compton Gamma-ray Observatory, BeppoSAX satellite, Swift satellite, as well as the latest Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The multi-wavelength properties of prompt emission as well as afterglows of GRBs are also summarized in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 the current GRB standard model is presented. According to standard model, a fireball is ejected by the central engine. The internal shock is produced by collisions between various shells with different velocities inside the fireball. The directional kinetic energy of the fireball is then converted to internal energy, and finally the non-thermal radiation (the prompt emission) is produced by internal shocks

  2. Enhancing MQMAS of low-gamma nuclei by using a high B(1) field balanced probe circuit.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhehong; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Sideris, Paul J; Grey, Clare P

    2009-09-01

    A balanced probe circuit is used to generate high B(1) magnetic field for sensitivity enhancement of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) experiment applied to low-gamma quadrupolar nuclei. Electrical balancing of the sample coil can cut the peak voltage by a half, therefore improving the power handling when generating a two-fold higher B(1) field. Experimental results, illustrated here with (25)Mg data for two layered double hydroxides, show that the MQMAS efficiency increases more than linearly with the B(1) field strength. The multiplicative enhancements from high B(0) and B(1) fields and an optimized MQMAS pulse sequence provide the critically needed sensitivity for acquiring MQMAS spectra of low-gamma quadrupolar nuclei such as (25)Mg at natural abundance. PMID:19595617

  3. Observation of celestial high energy gamma rays from SAS-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)-II, launched on Nov. 15, 1973, carried into orbit a 32-deck magnetic-core digitized-spark-chamber gamma-ray telescope to study celestial gamma radiation in the energy range above 30 MeV. As of May 21, 1973, SAS-II had viewed approximately half the sky, including the galactic center region, the galactic anti-center, and several regions off the galactic plane, and about one-third of the data from eight weeks of viewing has been analyzed. A finite diffuse flux for regions with galactic latitudes greater than 20 deg has been detected with a very steep energy spectrum. Combining this result with low-energy gamma-ray data yields a picture suggesting a cosmological origin for this radiation.

  4. Can Life Survive Gamma-Ray Bursts in the High-redshift Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Nearby gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a possible cause of mass extinctions on Earth. Due to the higher event rate of GRBs at higher redshifts, it has been speculated that life as we know it may not survive above a certain redshift (e.g., z\\gt 0.5). We examine the duty cycle of lethal (life-threatening) GRBs in the solar neighborhood, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies, and GRB host galaxies, with the dependence of the long GRB rate on star formation and metallicity properly taken into account. We find that the number of lethal GRBs attacking Earth within the past 500 Myr (∼epoch of the Ordovician mass extinction) is 0.93. The number of lethal GRBs hitting a certain planet increases with redshift, as a result of the increasing star formation rate (SFR) and decreasing metallicity in high-z galaxies. Taking 1 per 500 Myr as a conservative duty cycle for life to survive, as evidenced by our existence, we find that there is still a good fraction of SDSS galaxies beyond z=0.5 where the GRB rate at half-mass radius is lower than this value. We derive the fraction of such benign galaxies as a function of redshift through Monte Carlo simulations, and we find that the fraction is ∼ 50% at z∼ 1.5 and ∼ 10% even at z∼ 3. The mass distribution of benign galaxies is dominated by Milky Way–like ones, due to their commonness, relatively large mass, and low SFR. GRB host galaxies are among the most dangerous ones.

  5. Radioisotope guided surgery with imaging probe, a hand-held high-resolution gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soluri, A.; Trotta, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Tofani, A.; D'Alessandria, C.; Pasta, V.; Stella, S.; Massari, R.

    2007-12-01

    Since 1997, our group of Physics together with Nuclear Physicians studies imaging probes (IP), hand-held, high-resolution gamma cameras for radio-guided surgery (RGS). Present work is aimed to verify the usefulness of two updated IP in different surgical operations. Forty patients scheduled for breast cancer sentinel node (SN) biopsy, five patients with nodal recurrence of thyroid cancer, seven patients with parathyroid adenomas, five patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET), were operated under the guide of IP. We used two different IP with field of view of 1 and 4 in. 2, respectively and intrinsic spatial resolution of about 2 mm. Radioisotopes were 99mTc, 123I and 111In. The 1 in. 2 IP detected SN in all the 40 patients and more than one node in 24, whereas anger camera (AC) failed locating SN in four patients and detected true positive second nodes in only nine patients. The 4 in. 2 IP was used for RGS of thyroid, parathyroid and NETs. It detected eight latero-cervical nodes. In the same patients, AC detected five invaded nodes. Parathyroid adenomas detected by IP were 10 in 7 patients, NET five in five patients. One and 4 in. 2 IPs showed usefulness in all operations. Initial studies on SN biopsy were carried out on small series of patients to validate IP and to demonstrate the effectiveness and usefulness of IP alone or against conventional probes. We propose the use of the IP as control method for legal documentation and surgeon strategy guide before and after lesion(s) removal.

  6. A HIGH SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO COMPOSITE SPECTRUM OF GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Prochaska, J. X.; Jakobsson, P.

    2011-02-01

    We present a composite spectrum of 60 long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows with redshifts in the range 0.35 < z < 6.7 observed with low-resolution optical spectra. The composite spectrum covers the wavelength range 700-6600 A in the rest frame and has a mean signal-to-noise ratio of 150 per 1 A pixel and reaches a maximum of {approx}300 in the range 2500-3500 A. Equivalent widths are measured from metal absorption lines from the Ly{alpha} line to {approx}5200 A, and associated metal and hydrogen lines are identified between the Lyman break and Ly{alpha} line. The average transmission within the Lyman forest is consistent with that found along quasar lines of sight. We find a temporal variation in fine-structure lines when dividing the sample into bursts observed within 2 hr from their trigger and those observed later. Other lines in the predominantly neutral gas show variations too, but this is most likely a random effect caused by weighting of individual strong absorption lines and which mimics a temporal variation. Bursts characterized with high- or low-prompt GRB energy release produce afterglows with similar absorption line strengths, and likewise for bursts with bright or faint optical afterglows. Bursts defined as dark from their optical to X-ray spectral index have stronger absorption lines relative to the optically bright bursts. The composite spectrum has strong Ca II and Mg II absorption lines as commonly found in dusty galaxies, however, we find no evidence for dust or a significant molecular content based on the non-detection of diffuse interstellar bands. Compared to starburst galaxy spectra, the GRB composite has much stronger fine-structure lines, while metal absorption lines are weaker.

  7. A High Signal-to-noise Ratio Composite Spectrum of Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, L.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Prochaska, J. X.; Thöne, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Jakobsson, P.

    2011-02-01

    We present a composite spectrum of 60 long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows with redshifts in the range 0.35 < z < 6.7 observed with low-resolution optical spectra. The composite spectrum covers the wavelength range 700-6600 Å in the rest frame and has a mean signal-to-noise ratio of 150 per 1 Å pixel and reaches a maximum of ~300 in the range 2500-3500 Å. Equivalent widths are measured from metal absorption lines from the Lyα line to ~5200 Å, and associated metal and hydrogen lines are identified between the Lyman break and Lyα line. The average transmission within the Lyman forest is consistent with that found along quasar lines of sight. We find a temporal variation in fine-structure lines when dividing the sample into bursts observed within 2 hr from their trigger and those observed later. Other lines in the predominantly neutral gas show variations too, but this is most likely a random effect caused by weighting of individual strong absorption lines and which mimics a temporal variation. Bursts characterized with high- or low-prompt GRB energy release produce afterglows with similar absorption line strengths, and likewise for bursts with bright or faint optical afterglows. Bursts defined as dark from their optical to X-ray spectral index have stronger absorption lines relative to the optically bright bursts. The composite spectrum has strong Ca II and Mg II absorption lines as commonly found in dusty galaxies, however, we find no evidence for dust or a significant molecular content based on the non-detection of diffuse interstellar bands. Compared to starburst galaxy spectra, the GRB composite has much stronger fine-structure lines, while metal absorption lines are weaker.

  8. SEARCH FOR A CORRELATION BETWEEN VERY-HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS AND GIANT RADIO PULSES IN THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bouvier, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Benbow, W.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S. E-mail: mccann@kicp.uchicago.edu; and others

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays (E {sub {gamma}} > 150 GeV) and giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15,366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hr of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in 2008 December and in 2009 November and December. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, eight different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Furthermore, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pulsed VHE emission was found in any of the preformed searches. We set upper limits of 5-10 times the average VHE flux of the Crab pulsar on the flux simultaneous with interpulse GRPs on single-rotation-period timescales. On {approx}8 s timescales around interpulse GRPs, we set an upper limit of 2-3 times the average VHE flux. Within the framework of recent models for pulsed VHE emission from the Crab pulsar, the expected VHE-GRP emission correlations are below the derived limits.

  9. Impulsive and long duration high-energy gamma-ray emission from the very bright 2012 March 7 solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Charles, E.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P. A. E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu; and others

    2014-07-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detected gamma-rays up to 4 GeV from two bright X-class solar flares on 2012 March 7, showing both an impulsive and temporally extended emission phases. The gamma-rays appear to originate from the same active region as the X-rays associated with these flares. The >100 MeV gamma-ray flux decreases monotonically during the first hour (impulsive phase) followed by a slower decrease for the next 20 hr. A power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff can adequately describe the photon spectrum. Assuming that the gamma rays result from the decay of pions produced by accelerated protons and ions with a power-law spectrum, we find that the index of that spectrum is ∼3, with minor variations during the impulsive phase. During the extended phase the photon spectrum softens monotonically, requiring the proton index varying from ∼4 to >5. The >30 MeV proton flux observed by the GOES satellites also shows a flux decrease and spectral softening, but with a harder spectrum (index ∼2-3). Based on these observations, we explore the relative merits of prompt or continuous acceleration scenarios, hadronic or leptonic emission processes, and acceleration at the solar corona or by the fast coronal mass ejections. We conclude that the most likely scenario is continuous acceleration of protons in the solar corona that penetrate the lower solar atmosphere and produce pions that decay into gamma rays. However, acceleration in the downstream of the shock cannot be definitely ruled out.

  10. Search for a Correlation Between Very-High-Energy Gamma Rays and Giant Radio Pulses in the Crab Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Perkins, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays ( E(sub Gamma) > 150 GeV) and giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15,366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hr of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in 2008 December and in 2009 November and December. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, eight different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Furthermore, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pulsed VHE emission was found in any of the preformed searches. We set upper limits of 5-10 times the average VHE flux of the Crab pulsar on the flux simultaneous with interpulse GRPs on single-rotation-period timescales. On approx. 8 s timescales around interpulse GRPs, we set an upper limit of 2-3 times the average VHE flux. Within the framework of recent models for pulsed VHE emission from the Crab pulsar, the expected VHE-GRP emission correlations are below the derived limits.

  11. Comparative toxicity and micronuclei formation in Tribolium castaneum, Callosobruchus maculatus and Sitophilus oryzae exposed to high doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mehrdad; Mozdarani, Hossein; Abd-Alla, Adly M M

    2015-07-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on mortality and micronucleus formation in Tribolium castaneum Herbst, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) and Sitophilus oryzae (L.) genital cells were evaluated. Two groups of healthy and active adult insects 1-3 and 8-10 days old were irradiated with various doses (50-200 Gy) gamma ray. Seven days post-irradiation; mortality rates and micronucleus formation were assessed in genital cells of the irradiated insects. The results show that with increasing gamma doses, the mortality rate of each species increased and T. castaneum and S. oryzae showed the low and high sensitivity respectively. It was shown that the micronucleus appearance in the tested insects had correlation with amount and intensity of radiation doses. Moreover our results indicate different levels in the genotoxicity of gamma radiation among the insects' genital cells under study. The frequency of micronuclei in genital cells of 1-3 days old insects exposed to 50 and 200 Gy were 12.6 and 38.8 Mn/1000 cells in T. castaneum, 20.8 and 46.8 Mn/1000 cells in C. maculatus and 16.8 and 57.2 Mn/1000 cells in S. oryzae respectively. A high sensitivity of the genital cells to irradiation exposure was seen in S. oryzae correlated with its high mortality rate compared with the other two species. These results might be indicative of inflicting chromosomal damage expressed as micronucleus in high mortality rates observed in the pest population; an indication of genotoxic effects of radiation on the studied species. PMID:25898238

  12. PKS 2123-463: A Confirmed Gamma-ray Blazar at High Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Finke, J.; Orienti, M.; Greiner, J.; Kann, D. A.; Ojha, R.; Foley, A. R.; Stevens, J.; Blanchard, J. M.; Edwards, P. G.; Kadler, M.; Lovell, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    The flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 2123-463 was associated in the first Fermi- Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalogue with the gamma-ray source 1FGL J2126.1-4603, but when considering the full first two years of Fermi observations, no gamma-ray source at a position consistent with this FSRQ was detected, and thus PKS 2123-463 was not reported in the second Fermi-LAT source catalogue. On 2011 December 14 a gamma-ray source positionally consistent with PKS 2123-463 was detected in flaring activity by Fermi-LAT. This activity triggered radio-to-X-ray observations by the Swift,Gamma-ray Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND), Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Ceduna and Seven Dishes Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) observatories. Results of the localization of the gamma-ray source over 41 months of Fermi-LAT operation are reported here in conjunction with the results of the analysis of radio, optical, ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray data collected soon after the gamma-ray flare. The strict spatial association with the lower energy counterpart together with a simultaneous increase of the activity in optical, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray bands led to a firm identification of the gamma-ray source with PKS 2123-463. A new photometric redshift has been estimated as z = 1.46 plus or minus 0.05 using GROND and Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) observations, in rough agreement with the disputed spectroscopic redshift of z = 1.67.We fit the broad-band spectral energy distribution with a synchrotron/external Compton model. We find that a thermal disc component is necessary to explain the optical/UV emission detected by Swift/UVOT. This disc has a luminosity of approximately 1.8 x 10(exp 46) erg s(exp -1), and a fit to the disc emission assuming a Schwarzschild (i.e. non-rotating) black hole gives a mass of approximately 2 x 10(exp 9) solar mass. This is the first black hole mass estimate for this source.

  13. Variable very-high-energy gamma-ray emission from the microquasar LS I +61 303.

    PubMed

    Albert, J; Aliu, E; Anderhub, H; Antoranz, P; Armada, A; Asensio, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartelt, M; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Bavikadi, S R; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bisesi, E; Bock, R K; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Ciprini, S; Coarasa, J A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Curtef, V; Danielyan, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; de Los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; Domingo-Santamaría, E; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Flix, J; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Fuchs, M; Galante, N; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Giller, M; Goebel, F; Hakobyan, D; Hayashida, M; Hengstebeck, T; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Isar, P G; Jacon, P; Kalekin, O; Kosyra, R; Kranich, D; Laatiaoui, M; Laille, A; Lenisa, T; Liebing, P; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, J; López, M; Lorenz, E; Lucarelli, F; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mannheim, K; Mansutti, O; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mase, K; Mazin, D; Merck, C; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moralejo, A; Nilsson, K; Oña-Wilhelmi, E; Orduña, R; Otte, N; Oya, I; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pavel, N; Pegna, R; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Poller, M; Pooley, G; Prandini, E; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Riegel, B; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Romero, G E; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Sánchez, A; Sartori, P; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tonello, N; Torres, A; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wibig, T; Wittek, W; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2006-06-23

    Microquasars are binary star systems with relativistic radio-emitting jets. They are potential sources of cosmic rays and can be used to elucidate the physics of relativistic jets. We report the detection of variable gamma-ray emission above 100 gigaelectron volts from the microquasar LS I 61 + 303. Six orbital cycles were recorded. Several detections occur at a similar orbital phase, which suggests that the emission is periodic. The strongest gamma-ray emission is not observed when the two stars are closest to one another, implying a strong orbital modulation of the emission or absorption processes. PMID:16709745

  14. Spirogyra varians mutant generated by high dose gamma-irradiation shows increased antioxidant properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hak-Jyung; Yoon, Minchul; Sung, Nak-Yun; Choi, Jong-il

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of a Spirogyra varians mutant (Mut) produced by gamma irradiation. Methanol extracts were prepared from Spirogyra varians wild-type and Mut plants, and their antioxidant activities and total phenolic content (TPC) were determined. Antioxidant parameters, including the 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity and ferric-reducing/antioxidant power, were higher in the Mut extract. Moreover, the TPC level was higher (P<0.05) in the Mut methanol extract. Therefore, these results suggest that gamma irradiation-induced S. varians Mut has superior antioxidant properties.

  15. Development of a high resolution liquid xenon imaging chamber for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to develop the technology of liquid xenon (LXe) detectors for spectroscopy and imaging of gamma rays from astrophysical sources emitting in the low to medium energy regime. In particular, the technical challenges and the physical processes relevant to the realization of the LXe detector operated as a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) were addressed and studied. Experimental results were obtained on the following topics: (1) long distance drift of free electrons in LXe (purity); (2) scintillation light yield for electrons and alphas in LXe (triggering); and (3) ionization yield for electrons and gamma rays in LXe (energy resolution). The major results from the investigations are summarized.

  16. PROBING PRE-GALACTIC METAL ENRICHMENT WITH HIGH-REDSHIFT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G.; Bromm, Volker; Greif, Thomas H.; Stacy, Athena; Loeb, Abraham; Cheng, K. S.

    2012-11-20

    We explore high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as promising tools to probe pre-galactic metal enrichment. We utilize the bright afterglow of a Population III (Pop III) GRB exploding in a primordial dwarf galaxy as a luminous background source, and calculate the strength of metal absorption lines that are imprinted by the first heavy elements in the intergalactic medium (IGM). To derive the GRB absorption line diagnostics, we use an existing highly resolved simulation of the formation of a first galaxy which is characterized by the onset of atomic hydrogen cooling in a halo with virial temperature {approx}> 10{sup 4} K. We explore the unusual circumburst environment inside the systems that hosted Pop III stars, modeling the density evolution with the self-similar solution for a champagne flow. For minihalos close to the cooling threshold, the circumburst density is roughly proportional to (1 + z) with values of about a few cm{sup -3}. In more massive halos, corresponding to the first galaxies, the density may be larger, n {approx}> 100 cm{sup -3}. The resulting afterglow fluxes are weakly dependent on redshift at a fixed observed time, and may be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope and Very Large Array in the near-IR and radio wavebands, respectively, out to redshift z {approx}> 20. We predict that the maximum of the afterglow emission shifts from near-IR to millimeter bands with peak fluxes from mJy to Jy at different observed times. The metal absorption line signature is expected to be detectable in the near future. GRBs are ideal tools for probing the metal enrichment in the early IGM, due to their high luminosities and featureless power-law spectra. The metals in the first galaxies produced by the first supernova (SN) explosions are likely to reside in low-ionization stages (C II, O I, Si II and Fe II). We show that, if the afterglow can be observed sufficiently early, analysis of the metal lines may distinguish whether the first heavy elements were

  17. Probing Pre-Galactic Metal Enrichment with High-Redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, F. Y.; Bromm, Volker; Greif, Thomas H.; Stacy, Athena; Dai, Z. G.; Loeb, Abraham; Cheng, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    We explore high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as promising tools to probe pre-galactic metal enrichment. We utilize the bright afterglow of a Population III (Pop III) GRB exploding in a primordial dwarf galaxy as a luminous background source, and calculate the strength of metal absorption lines that are imprinted by the first heavy elements in the intergalactic medium (IGM). To derive the GRB absorption line diagnostics, we use an existing highly resolved simulation of the formation of a first galaxy which is characterized by the onset of atomic hydrogen cooling in a halo with virial temperature approximately greater than10(exp 4) K.We explore the unusual circumburst environment inside the systems that hosted Pop III stars, modeling the density evolution with the self-similar solution for a champagne flow. For minihalos close to the cooling threshold, the circumburst density is roughly proportional to (1 + z) with values of about a few cm(exp -3). In more massive halos, corresponding to the first galaxies, the density may be larger, n approximately greater than100 cm(exp -3). The resulting afterglow fluxes are weakly dependent on redshift at a fixed observed time, and may be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope and Very Large Array in the near-IR and radio wavebands, respectively, out to redshift z approximately greater than 20. We predict that the maximum of the afterglow emission shifts from near-IR to millimeter bands with peak fluxes from mJy to Jy at different observed times. The metal absorption line signature is expected to be detectable in the near future. GRBs are ideal tools for probing the metal enrichment in the early IGM, due to their high luminosities and featureless power-law spectra. The metals in the first galaxies produced by the first supernova (SN) explosions are likely to reside in low-ionization stages (C II, O I, Si II and Fe II). We show that, if the afterglow can be observed sufficiently early, analysis of the metal lines may

  18. Probing Pre-galactic Metal Enrichment with High-redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. Y.; Bromm, Volker; Greif, Thomas H.; Stacy, Athena; Dai, Z. G.; Loeb, Abraham; Cheng, K. S.

    2012-11-01

    We explore high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as promising tools to probe pre-galactic metal enrichment. We utilize the bright afterglow of a Population III (Pop III) GRB exploding in a primordial dwarf galaxy as a luminous background source, and calculate the strength of metal absorption lines that are imprinted by the first heavy elements in the intergalactic medium (IGM). To derive the GRB absorption line diagnostics, we use an existing highly resolved simulation of the formation of a first galaxy which is characterized by the onset of atomic hydrogen cooling in a halo with virial temperature >~ 104 K. We explore the unusual circumburst environment inside the systems that hosted Pop III stars, modeling the density evolution with the self-similar solution for a champagne flow. For minihalos close to the cooling threshold, the circumburst density is roughly proportional to (1 + z) with values of about a few cm-3. In more massive halos, corresponding to the first galaxies, the density may be larger, n >~ 100 cm-3. The resulting afterglow fluxes are weakly dependent on redshift at a fixed observed time, and may be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope and Very Large Array in the near-IR and radio wavebands, respectively, out to redshift z >~ 20. We predict that the maximum of the afterglow emission shifts from near-IR to millimeter bands with peak fluxes from mJy to Jy at different observed times. The metal absorption line signature is expected to be detectable in the near future. GRBs are ideal tools for probing the metal enrichment in the early IGM, due to their high luminosities and featureless power-law spectra. The metals in the first galaxies produced by the first supernova (SN) explosions are likely to reside in low-ionization stages (C II, O I, Si II and Fe II). We show that, if the afterglow can be observed sufficiently early, analysis of the metal lines may distinguish whether the first heavy elements were produced in a pair

  19. Changes in the energy response of a dedicated gamma camera after exposure to a high-flux irradiation.

    PubMed

    Matheoud, R; Zito, F; Canzi, C; Voltini, F; Gerundini, P

    1999-06-01

    This work reports the effects of the gain variation of the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) observed on a cardiac dedicated gamma camera after accidental high-flux irradiation. One detector of this dual-headed 90 degrees-fixed gamma camera was accidentally left uncollimated during a quality assurance procedure on the other detector with a 57Co flood source (259 MBq) and received a non-uniform high flux of 1.9-0.6 Mcps over 25000 mm2 areas for about 30 min. To evaluate the severity and the duration of the perturbation effect on the energy response of the detector, the photopeak position was monitored for about 1 month with a 99mTc point source. The 140 keV photopeak shifted to 158 keV soon after irradiation, reached the correct position after 9 days and moved to a stable value of 132 keV after 15 days. Afterwards, a new energy calibration reset the photopeak position at 140 keV and the correct energy response of the gamma camera. This experience suggests that particular care should be taken to avoid exposures to high radiation fluxes that induce persistent gain shifts on the PMTs of this system. PMID:10498509

  20. Gamma watermarking

    DOEpatents

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  1. Remote distributed optical fibre dose measuring of high gamma-irradiation with highly sensitive Al- and P-doped fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, A. V.; Gusarov, A.; Wuilpart, M.; Fotiadi, A.; Liokumivich, L. B.; Zolotovskiy, I. O.; Tomashuk, A. L.; de Schoutheete, T.; Mégret, P.

    2013-05-01

    We present our results on measuring distributed Radiation-Induced Absorption (RIA) by means of a commercially available Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) system. We also compare distributed OFDR RIA measurements with spatially integrated spectral transmission detection using an Optical Spectra Analyser (OSA). We have chosen four different highly gamma-radiation sensitive fibres, two of which were doped with Al and two with P. The dose rate during irradiations was about 590 Gy/h. The irradiations were conducted at temperatures of 30°C and 80°C. Different temperatures were needed for studying the temperature dependence of the annealing speed of RIA. All four fibres demonstrated a strong saturation-like increase of RIA with the dose accumulation up to several tens of dB/m as detected by the OSA. In case of the OFDR measurements the change of the absorption in an optical fibre resulted in a clear change of the slope of the corresponding Rayleigh backscattering trace. The RIA dependences measured with the OFDR were in a reasonable agreement with the measurements obtained with the OSA. This allows us to use the RIA dependences on absorption dose obtained by means of OSA for the distributed dose reconstruction based on the OFDR technique. We also irradiated different lengths of one of the P-doped fibers to see if it influences accuracy of the distributed dose detection and to find out the minimal possible length of the probe. The results of the presented experiments provide a basis for a dose estimation model based on RIA in which temperature oscillations are taken into account.

  2. R&D for high energy gamma-ray telescope using scintillation fiber with image intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, T.; Muraki, Y.; Matsubara, Y.; Sato, M.; Niwa, K.; Nakamura, M.; Sato, S.; Nakano, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Okuno, H.

    1996-02-01

    A new gamma-ray telescope using scintillation fiber together with an image intensifier is presented. The image intensifier we used has been improved in the sensitive range of the wavelength (beyond 300 nm) and the quantum efficiency (maximum 20%). The results of the beam test using the accelerator and the Monte Carlo simulation for the prototype telescope show that the device has the angular resolution of 0.5° at 900 MeV. On the basis of results of the prototype telescope, we propose a new SCIFI (SCIntillation FIber) telescope for future gamma-ray astronomy. The new telescope has achieved a large solid angle. With this merit, the new telescope can investigate very dark gamma-ray sources and monitor transient events such as gamma-ray burst. In addition, the cost of devices used in the telescope is not expensive so that an extension of the area of the telescope is easily realized in comparison with telescopes using silicon detector such as GLAST.

  3. On the possibility of observing cosmic ray sources in high energy gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    If cosmic rays are accelerated by strong shocks, then cosmic ray sources should be characterized by spectra, dN/dE alpha E exp -(2.0-2.2), reflecting the strength of those shocks. This is expected from the 'standard leaky box' model of cosmic ray propagation in which the source spectra are harder than the observed spectra because higher energy particles have shorter residence times in the galactic magnetic fields. Furthermore, data on cosmic ray nucleons suggest that these sources might be surrounded by material. If the latter is true, such sources should be observable in gamma rays at energies beyond 1 GeV where the angular resolution of gamma-ray telescopes is optimized and the background is significantly reduced. For identified sources, the source location accuracy can be shown to improve with increasing energy in spite of the decreasing statistics, as long as the gamma-ray spectrum is harder than dN/dE alpha E exp -gamma. A Monte Carlo model is used to predict the photon spectra which would be expected from cosmic ray sources under varying assumptions about the strength of the shocks in the acceleration region.

  4. FIGARO : detecting nuclear materials using high-energy gamma rays for oxygen.

    SciTech Connect

    Michlich, B. J.; Smith, D. L.; Massey, T. N.; Ingram, D.; Fessler, A.

    2000-10-10

    Potential diversion of nuclear materials is a major international concern. Fissile (e.g., U, Pu) and other nuclear materials (e.g., D, Be) can be detected using 6-7 MeV gamma rays produced in the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction. These gamma rays will induce neutron emission via the photoneutron and photofission processes in nuclear materials. However, they are not energetic enough to generate significant numbers of neutrons from most common benign materials, thereby reducing the false alarm rate. Neutrons are counted using an array of BF3 counters in a polyethylene moderator. Experiments have shown a strong increase in neutron count rates for depleted uranium, Be, D{sub 2}O, and {sup 6}Li, and little or no increase for other materials (e.g., H{sub 2}O, SS, Cu, Al, C, {sup 7}Li). Gamma source measurements using solid targets of CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} and a SF{sub 6} gas target show that proton accelerator of 3 MeV and 10-100 microampere average current could lead to acceptable detection sensitivity.

  5. A LEPTONIC MODEL OF STEADY HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM Sgr A*

    SciTech Connect

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Takahara, Fumio E-mail: takahara@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2012-03-20

    Recent observations of Sgr A* by Fermi and HESS have detected steady {gamma}-ray emission in the GeV and TeV bands. We present a new model to explain the GeV {gamma}-ray emission by inverse Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons supplied by the NIR/X-ray flares of Sgr A*. The escaping electrons from the flare regions accumulate in a region with a size of {approx}10{sup 18} cm and magnetic fields of {approx}< 10{sup -4} G. Those electrons produce {gamma}-rays by inverse Compton scattering off soft photons emitted by stars and dust around the central black hole. By fitting the GeV spectrum, we find constraints on the magnetic field and the energy density of optical-UV radiation in the central 1 pc region around the supermassive black hole. While the GeV spectrum is well fitted by our model, the TeV {gamma}-rays, whose spectral index is different from that of the GeV emission, may be from different sources such as pulsar wind nebulae.

  6. The Signature of Large Scale Structures on the Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Sky

    SciTech Connect

    Cuoco, A.; Hannestad, S.; Haugbolle, T.; Miele, G.; Serpico, P.D.; Tu, H.; /Aarhus U. /UC, Irvine

    2006-12-01

    If the diffuse extragalactic gamma ray emission traces the large scale structures of the universe, peculiar anisotropy patterns are expected in the gamma ray sky. In particular, because of the cutoff distance introduced by the absorption of 0.1-10 TeV photons on the infrared/optical background, prominent correlations with the local structures within a range of few hundreds Mpc should be present. We provide detailed predictions of the signal based on the PSCz map of the local universe. We also use mock N-body catalogues complemented with the halo model of structures to study some statistical features of the expected signatures. The results are largely independent from cosmological details, and depend mostly on the index of correlation (or bias) of the sources with respect to the large scale distribution of galaxies. For instance, the predicted signal in the case of a quadratic correlation (as it may happen for a dark matter annihilation contribution to the diffuse gamma flux) differs substantially from a linear correlation case, providing a complementary tool to unveil the nature of the sources of the diffuse gamma ray emission. The chances of the present and future space and ground based observatories to measure these features are discussed.

  7. THE STELLAR CONTRIBUTION TO THE EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT AND ABSORPTION OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Razzaque, Soebur; Finke, Justin D.; Dermer, Charles D.

    2009-05-20

    TeV {gamma}-rays from distant astrophysical sources are attenuated due to electron-positron pair creation by interacting with ultraviolet/optical to infrared photons which fill the universe and are collectively known as the extragalactic background light (EBL). We model the {approx}0.1-10 eV starlight component of the EBL derived from expressions for the stellar initial mass function (IMF), star formation history of the universe, and wavelength-dependent absorption of a large sample of galaxies in the local universe. These models are simultaneously fitted to the EBL data as well as to the data on the stellar luminosity density in our local universe. We find that the models with modified Salpeter A IMF together with Cole et al. or Hopkins and Beacom star formation history best represent available data. Since no dust emission is included, our calculated EBL models can be interpreted as the lower limits in the {approx}0.1-1 eV range. We present simple analytic fits to the best-fit EBL model evolving with redshift. We then proceed to calculate {gamma}-ray opacities and absorption of {approx}10-300 GeV {gamma}-rays coming from different redshifts. We discuss implications of our results for the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope and ground-based Air Cherenkov Telescopes.

  8. A New Paradigm for Identification of Classes of High Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D F; Reimer, O

    2005-04-08

    A large fraction of the expected number of source detections of the forthcoming observatory Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be initially unidentified. We argue that traditional methodological approaches to identify individual detections and/or populations of gamma-ray sources present procedural limitations. These limitations will hamper our ability to classify the populations lying in the anticipated dataset with the required degree of confidence, in particular for those for which no member has yet been detected convincingly with the predecessor experiment EGRET. Here we suggest a new paradigm for achieving the classification of gamma-ray source populations that is based on implementing an a priori protocol to search for theoretically-motivated candidates. It is essential that such paradigm will be defined before the data is unblinded, in order to protect the discovery potential of the sample. Key to the new procedure is a quantitative assessment of the confidence level by which new populations can be claimed to have been discovered. When needed, small number statistics is applied for population studies in gamma-ray astronomy. Although we refer here explicitly only to the case of GLAST, the scheme we present can certainly be adapted to other experiments confronted with a similar combination of problems.

  9. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of additional data from SAS-2 experiment and improvements in the orbit-attitude data and analysis procedures have produced revised values for the flux from the Vela gamma-ray source. The pulsar phase plot shows two peaks, neither of which is in phase with the single radio pulse.

  10. Measurement of Short-Lived Fission-Product Yields of URANIUM-235 Using High-Resolution Gamma Spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipnis, Sameer Vijay

    Independent yields of short-lived fission products produced by the thermal neutron induced fission of ^{235}U were determined from the measurements of high resolution gamma spectra. Comparisons were made to the recommended yield values tabulated in the ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-product data base. Measurements of the gamma spectra were made with a high purity germanium detector (HPGe) using a NaI(Tl) annulus for Compton suppression. Use of beta-gamma coincidence reduced the random background and also allowed a precise definition of the delay time. The experiment was carried out at the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff facility at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. Rapid transfer of the fission fragments to a low background counting environment, a crucial factor in determining the yields of short-lived fission products, was enabled by a helium -jet tape transport system. The recommended yields in the evaluated data file are a combination of experimental and model-predicted values. The latter source is used since data from many short-lived fission products is still missing or poorly known. The results presented here, especially the ones for the very short-lived isotopes may be used to reduce the uncertainties associated with some of the existing values or to replace model-predicted yields. Gaussian distributions of elemental yields, based on the set of experimentally determined independent yields were examined. The feasibility of predicting unmeasured yields on the basis of charge and mass complementarity was also addressed.

  11. Very-high-energy gamma-ray emission from the direction of the Galactic globular cluster Terzan 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Behera, B.; Bernlöhr, K.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Gast, H.; Gérard, L.; Gerbig, D.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Göring, D.; Häffner, S.; Hague, J. D.; Hampf, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Keogh, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, D.; Maxted, N.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann, C. L.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, D.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Ryde, F.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schöck, F. M.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sikora, M.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2011-07-01

    The HESS very-high-energy (VHE, E > 0.1 TeV) gamma-ray telescope system has discovered a new source, HESS J1747-248. The measured integral flux is (1.2 ± 0.3) × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 above 440 GeV for a power-law photon spectral index of 2.5 ± 0.3stat ± 0.2sys. The VHE gamma-ray source is located in the close vicinity of the Galactic globular cluster Terzan 5 and extends beyond the HESS point spread function (0.07°). The probability of a chance coincidence with Terzan 5 and an unrelated VHE source is quite low (~10-4). With the largest population of identified millisecond pulsars (msPSRs), a very high core stellar density and the brightest GeV range flux as measured by Fermi-LAT, Terzan 5 stands out among Galactic globular clusters. The properties of the VHE source are briefly discussed in the context of potential emission mechanisms, notably in relation to msPSRs. Interpretation of the available data accommodates several possible origins for this VHE gamma-ray source, although none of them offers a satisfying explanation of its peculiar morphology.

  12. {sup 7}Be(p, {gamma}){sup 8}B and the high-energy solar neutrino flux

    SciTech Connect

    Csoto, A.

    1997-08-01

    Despite thirty years of extensive experimental and theoretical work, the predicted solar neutrino flux is still in sharp disagreement with measurements. The solar neutrino measurements strongly suggest that the problem cannot be solved within the standard electroweak and astrophysical theories. Thus, the solar neutrino problem constitutes the strongest evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. Whatever the solution of the solar neutrino problem turns out to be, it is of paramount importance that the input parameters of the underlying electroweak and solar theories rest upon solid ground. The most uncertain nuclear input parameter in standard solar models is the low-energy {sup 7}Be(p, {gamma}){sup 8}B radiative capture cross section. This reaction produces {sup 8}B in the Sun, whose {beta}{sup +} decay is the main source of the high-energy solar neutrinos. Here, the importance of the {sup 7}Be(p, {gamma}){sup 8}B reaction in predicting the high energy solar neutrino flux is discussed. The author presents a microscopic eight-body model and a potential model for the calculation of the {sup 7}Be(p, {gamma}){sup 8}B cross section.

  13. Lateral distribution of high energy hadrons and gamma ray in air shower cores observed with emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matano, T.; Machida, M.; Honda, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Navia, C. E.; Kawasumi, N.; Tsushima, I.; Matinic, N.; Aquirre, C.

    1985-01-01

    A high energy event of a bundle of electrons, gamma rays and hadronic gamma rays in an air shower core were observed. The bundles were detected with an emulsion chamber with thickness of 15 cm lead. This air shower is estimated to be initiated with a proton with energy around 10 to the 17th power to 10 to the 18th power eV at an altitude of around 100 gmc/2. Lateral distributions of the electromagnetic component with energy above 2 TeV and also the hadronic component of energy above 6 TeV of this air shower core were determined. Particles in the bundle are produced with process of the development of the nuclear cascade, the primary energy of each interaction in the cascade which produces these particles is unknown. To know the primary energy dependence of transverse momentum, the average products of energy and distance for various average energies of secondary particles are studied.

  14. Practical considerations for TLD-400/700-based gamma ray dosimetry for BNCT applications in a high thermal neutron fluence.

    PubMed

    Martsolf, S W; Johnson, J E; Vostmyer, C E; Albertson, B D; Binney, S E

    1995-12-01

    Operating experience with thermoluminescent dosimeters used in a boron neutron capture therapy research project is reported. In particular, certain facets of the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters for gamma ray dose measurements in the presence of a high thermal neutron fluence are discussed, including a comparison of TLD-400 and TLD-700 for gamma ray dosimetry, annealing procedures, and the effects of neutrons (56Mn activation) on TLD-400. The TLD-400 were observed to have a thermal neutron sensitivity (due to 56Mn beta decay) of 1.5 x 10(-13) Gy per n cm-2. An algorithm was developed to correct for the 56Mn beta decay thermal neutron-induced effects on TLD-400 by using a two-stage thermoluminescent readout for the thermoluminescent dosimeter chips. PMID:7493815

  15. Generation of fluorescent silver nanoclusters in reverse micelles using gamma irradiation: low vs. high dosages and spectral evolution with time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Brett D.; Fontana, Jake; Wang, Zheng; Trammell, Scott A.

    2015-04-01

    Reverse micelles (RMs) containing aqueous solutions of Ag+ ions in their core produce fluorescent Ag nanoclusters (NCs), upon exposure to gamma irradiation. The fluorescence spectra of the NCs evolve over days to weeks after the exposure, and usually show large increases in intensity. Responses of as high as 2.8 × 104 CPS/Gy were reached. A dosage as low as 0.5 Gy (10 % of the lethal dosage for humans) produces NCs having fluorescence intensities higher than background. The RMs can be employed in novel gamma radiation detectors with appearance of fluorescence indicating that radiation was once present. In applications involving detection and tracking of fissile materials, the evolution of the fluorescence spectra over time may provide additional information about the radiation source. A two-phase liquid system is used for RM formation in a simple procedure. It is likely that this synthesis method may be adapted to produce NCs from other metal ions.

  16. NEW CLASS OF VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMITTERS: RADIO-DARK MINI SHELLS SURROUNDING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Motoki; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Orienti, Monica

    2013-02-20

    We explore non-thermal emission from a shocked interstellar medium, which is identified as an expanding shell, driven by a relativistic jet in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In this work, we particularly focus on parsec-scale size mini shells surrounding mini radio lobes. From the radio to X-ray band, the mini radio lobe emission dominates the faint emission from the mini shell. On the other hand, we find that inverse-Compton (IC) emission from the shell can overwhelm the associated lobe emission at the very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray range, because energy densities of synchrotron photons from the lobe and/or soft photons from the AGN nucleus are large and IC scattering works effectively. The predicted IC emission from nearby mini shells can be detected with the Cherenkov Telescope Array and they are potentially a new class of VHE {gamma}-ray emitters.

  17. SEARCH FOR VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM PULSAR-PULSAR WIND NEBULA SYSTEMS WITH THE MAGIC TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Anderhub, H.; Biland, A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Balestra, S.; Barrio, J. A.; Bose, D.; Backes, M.; Becker, J. K.; Baixeras, C.; Bastieri, D.; Bock, R. K.; Gonzalez, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Tridon, D. Borla E-mail: miguel@gae.ucm.e

    2010-02-10

    The MAGIC collaboration has searched for high-energy gamma-ray emission of some of the most promising pulsar candidates above an energy threshold of 50 GeV, an energy not reachable up to now by other ground-based instruments. Neither pulsed nor steady gamma-ray emission has been observed at energies of 100 GeV from the classical radio pulsars PSR J0205+6449 and PSR J2229+6114 (and their nebulae 3C58 and Boomerang, respectively) and the millisecond pulsar PSR J0218+4232. Here, we present the flux upper limits for these sources and discuss their implications in the context of current model predictions.

  18. A high-resolution gamma-ray and hard X-ray spectrometer for solar flare observations in Max 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Curtis, D. W.; Harvey, P.; Hurley, K.; Primbsch, J. H.; Smith, D. M.; Pelling, R. M.; Duttweiler, F.

    1988-01-01

    A long duration balloon flight instrument for Max 1991 designed to study the acceleration of greater than 10 MeV ions and greater than 15 keV electrons in solar flares through high resolution spectroscopy of the gamma ray lines and hard X-ray and gamma ray continuum is described. The instrument, HIREGS, consists of an array of high-purity, n-type coaxial germanium detectors (HPGe) cooled to less than 90 K and surrounded by a bismuth germanate (BGO) anticoincidence shield. It will cover the energy range 15 keV to 20 MeV with keV spectral resolution, sufficient for accurate measurement of all parameters of the expected gamma ray lines with the exception of the neutron capture deuterium line. Electrical segmentation of the HPGe detector into a thin front segment and a thick rear segment, together with pulse-shape discrimination, provides optimal dynamic range and signal-to-background characteristics for flare measurements. Neutrons and gamma rays up to approximately 0.1 to 1 GeV can be detected and identified with the combination of the HPGe detectors and rear BGO shield. The HIREGS is planned for long duration balloon flights (LDBF) for solar flare studies during Max 1991. The two exploratory LDBFs carried out at mid-latitudes in 1987 to 1988 are described, and the LDBFs in Antarctica, which could in principle provide 24 hour/day solar coverage and very long flight durations (20 to 30 days) because of minimal ballast requirements are discussed.

  19. Use of a Shielded High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry System to Segregate LLW from Contact Handleable ILW Containing Plutonium - 13046

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, Rosemary; Wilkins, Colin; Chard, Patrick; Jaederstroem, Henrik; LeBlanc, Paul; Mowry, Rick; MacDonald, Sanders; Gunn, William

    2013-07-01

    Dounreay Site Restoration Limited (DSRL) have a number of drums of solid waste that may contain Plutonium Contaminated Material. These are currently categorised as Contact Handleable Intermediate Level Waste (CHILW). A significant fraction of these drums potentially contain waste that is in the Low Level Waste (LLW) category. A Canberra Q2 shielded high resolution gamma spectrometry system is being used to quantify the total activity of drums that are potentially in the LLW category in order to segregate those that do contain LLW from CHILW drums and thus to minimise the total volume of waste in the higher category. Am-241 is being used as an indicator of the presence of plutonium in the waste from its strong 59.54 keV gamma-ray; a knowledge of the different waste streams from which the material originates allows a pessimistic waste 'fingerprint' to be used in order to determine an upper limit to the activities of the weak and non-gamma-emitting plutonium and associated radionuclides. This paper describes the main features of the high resolution gamma spectrometry system being used by DSRL to perform the segregation of CHILW and LLW and how it was configured and calibrated using the Canberra In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS). It also describes how potential LLW drums are selected for assay and how the system uses the existing waste stream fingerprint information to determine a reliable upper limit for the total activity present in each measured drum. Results from the initial on-site commissioning trials and the first measurements of waste drums using the new monitor are presented. (authors)

  20. Effect of annealing on electronic carrier transport properties of gamma-irradiated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Anupama; Schwarz, Casey; Shatkhin, Max; Wang, Luther; Flitsiyan, Elena; Chernyak, Leonid; Liu, Lu; Hwang, Ya; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen; Department of Physics, University of Central Florida Collaboration; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida Collaboration; Department of Materials Science; Engineering, University of Florida Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors were irradiated with 60Co gamma-ray doses from 100Gy to 1000Gy, in order to analyze the effects of irradiation on the devices' transport properties. Temperature dependent Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) measurements, conducted on the devices before and after exposure to gamma-irradiation, allowed for the obtaining of activation energy related to radiation-induced defects due to nitrogen vacancies. Later, the devices were annealed at 200o C for 25 minutes. All the measurements were performed again to study the effect of annealing on the gamma-irradiated devices. Annealing of gamma-irradiated transistors shows that partial recovery of device performance is possible at this temperature. DC current-voltage measurements were also conducted on the transistors to assess the impact of gamma-irradiation and annealing on transfer, gate and drain characteristics.

  1. Workshop on Cosmic Ray and High Energy Gamma Ray Experiments for the Space Station Era, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, October 17-20, 1984, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V. (Editor); Wefel, J. P. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The potential of the Space Station as a platform for cosmic-ray and high-energy gamma-ray astronomy is discussed in reviews, reports, and specific proposals. Topics examined include antiparticles and electrons, science facilities and new technology, high-energy nuclear interactions, nuclear composition and energy spectra, Space Shuttle experiments, Space Station facilities and detectors, high-energy gamma rays, and gamma-ray facilities and techniques. Consideration is given to universal-baryon-symmetry testing on the scale of galactic clusters, particle studies in a high-inclination orbit, balloon-borne emulsion-chamber results on ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions, ionization states of low-energy cosmic rays, a large gamma-ray telescope for point-source studies above 1 GeV, and the possible existence of stable quark matter.

  2. A balloon-borne high-resolution spectrometer for observations of gamma-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Starr, R.; Stottlemyre, A. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1984-01-01

    The design, development, and balloon-flight verification of a payload for observations of gamma-ray emission from solar flares are reported. The payload incorporates a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector, standard NIM and CAMAC electronics modules, a thermally stabilized pressure housing, and regulated battery power supplies. The flight system is supported on the ground with interactive data-handling equipment comprised of similar electronics hardware. The modularity and flexibility of the payload, together with the resolution and stability obtained throughout a 30-hour flight, make it readily adaptable for high-sensitivity, long-duration balloon fight applications.

  3. Search for High-energy Gamma-ray Emission from Tidal Disruption Events with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fang-Kun; Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Massive black holes at galaxy center may tear apart a star when the star passes occasionally within the disruption radius, which is the so-called tidal disruption event (TDE). Most TDEs radiate with thermal emission resulting from the acceleration disk, but three TDEs have been detected in bright nonthermal X-ray emission, which is interpreted as arising from the relativistic jets. A search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from one relativistic TDE (Swift J164449.3+573451) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has yielded nondetection. In this paper, we report the search for high-energy emission from the other two relativistic TDEs (Swift J2058.4+0516 and Swift J1112.2-8238) during the flare period. No significant GeV emission is found, with an upper limit fluence in the LAT energy range being less than 1% of that in X-rays. Compared with gamma-ray bursts and blazars, these TDEs have the lowest flux ratio between GeV emission and X-ray emission. The nondetection of high-energy emission from relativistic TDEs could be due to the fact that the high-energy emission is absorbed by soft photons in the source. Based on this hypothesis, upper limits on the bulk Lorentz factors, {{Γ }}≲ 30, are then obtained for the jets in these TDEs. We also search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from the nearest TDE discovered to date, ASASSN-14li. No significant GeV emission is found, and an upper limit of L(0.1{--}10 {GeV})≤slant 4.4× {10}42 erg s‑1 (at 95% confidence level) is obtained for the first 107 s after the disruption.

  4. High-bandwidth multichannel fiber optic system for measuring gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Roeske, F.; Smith, D.E.; Pruett, B.L.; Reedy, R.P.

    1984-07-01

    We describe an analog fiber optic gamma-ray diagnostic system that can transmit signals through fiber cables 600 to 700 m long with a system bandwidth exceeding 1 GHz and measure the relative timing between signals to within 0.3 ns. Gamma rays are converted to visible light via the Cerenkov process in a short length of a radiation-resistant optical fiber. A graded-index optical fiber transmits this pulse to a recording station where the broadened pulse is compensated for material dispersion and recorded using a streak camera. The streak camera can simultaneously record 20 to 30 data channels on a single piece of film. The system has been calibrated using electron linear accelerators and fielded on two experiments.

  5. On the high-energy gamma-ray signature of cosmic-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, J. F.; Ozel, M. E.; Morris, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the gamma-ray emission from hypothetical cosmic-ray sources are performed. Sources which might correspond to acceleration by supernova shocks in 'average' interstellar conditions and deep within giant molecular clouds are considered. The consequences of dropping the common assumption that the cosmic-ray spectrum at the sources is the same as that observed at earth are examined. Spectral effects which can be related to the depth of the material shroud and the population of accelerated particles are explored using these simulations and are described. The results are compared with the COS B catalog of gamma-ray sources, and the implications for the underlying particle populations and source mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Locating very high energy gamma-ray sources with arcminute accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Harris, K.; Lawrence, M. A.; Fegan, D. J.; Lang, M. J.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of pointlike sources were detected by the COS B satellite, only two have been unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of VHE gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arcminute accuracy. This has now been demonstrated with new data analysis procedures applied to observations of the Crab Nebula using Cherenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  7. High energy irradiations simulating cosmic-ray-induced planetary gamma ray production. I - Fe target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Yellin, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two thick Fe targets were bombarded by a series of 6 GeV proton irradiations for the purpose of simulating the cosmic ray bombardment of planetary objects in space. Gamma ray energy spectra were obtained with a germanium solid state detector during the bombardment, and 46 of the gamma ray lines were ascribed to the Fe targets. A comparison between observed and predicted values showed good agreement for Fe lines from neutron inelastic scattering and spallation reactions, and less satisfactory agreement for neutron capture reactions, the latter attributed to the difference in composition between the Fe target and the mean lunar abundance used in the modeling. Through an analysis of the irradiation results together with continuum data obtained in lunar orbit, it was found that 100 hours of measurement with a current instrument should generate a spectrum containing approximately 20 lines due to Fe alone, with a 2-sigma sensitivity for detection of about 0.2 percent.

  8. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Two Brightest Unidentified High Galactic Latitude Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Giroletti, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present Chandra ACIS-I X-ray observations of 0FGL J1311.9-3419 and 0FGL J1653.4-0200, the two brightest high Galactic latitude (absolute value (beta) >10 deg) gamma-ray sources from the three-month Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) bright source list that are still unidentified. Both were also detected previously by EGRET, and despite dedicated multi-wavelength follow-up, they are still not associated with established classes of gamma-ray emitters like pulsars or radio-loud active galactic nuclei. X-ray sources found in the ACIS-I fields of view are cataloged, and their basic properties are determined. These are discussed as candidate counterparts to 0FGL J1311.9-3419 and 0FGL J1653.4-0200, with particular emphasis on the brightest of the 9 and 13 Chandra sources detected within the respective Fermi-LAT 95% confidence regions. Further follow-up studies, including optical photometric and spectroscopic observations, are necessary to identify these X-ray candidate counterparts in order to ultimately reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray objects.

  9. High-precision (p,t) reaction to determine {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Matic, A.; Berg, A. M. van den; Harakeh, M. N.; Woertche, H. J.; Berg, G. P. A.; Couder, M.; Goerres, J.; LeBlanc, P.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Since the identification of ongoing {sup 26}Al production in the universe, the reaction sequence {sup 24}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 25}Al({beta}{sup +{nu}}){sup 25}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Al has been studied intensively. At temperatures where the radiative capture on {sup 25}Al (t{sub 1/2}=7.2 s) becomes faster than the {beta}{sup +} decay, the production of {sup 26}Al can be reduced due to the depletion of {sup 25}Al. To determine the resonances relevant for the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si bypass reaction, we measured the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction with high-energy precision using the Grand Raiden spectrometer at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Several new energy levels were found above the p threshold and for known states excitation energies were determined with smaller uncertainties. The calculated stellar rates of the bypass reaction agree well with previous results, suggesting that these rates are well established.

  10. EGRET detection of high-energy gamma radiation from the OVV quasar 3C 454.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    High-energy gamma radiation has been observed from the optically violent variable quasar 3C 454.3 (PKS 2251 + 158) by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope on the Compton Observatory. During the 1992 January-February observation, the emission showed a power-law photon spectrum with an exponent of -2.18 +/- 0.08. The flux density (greater than 100 MeV) was observed to vary within the range (0.4-1.4) x 10 exp -6 photon/sq cm s on a time scale of less than a week. Lower sensitivity observations during 1992 April and May also detected emission within that range, but with lower statistical significance. An earlier low-sensitivity exposure during 1991 August gave a 95 percent confidence upper limit of 0.26 x 10 exp 6 photon/sq cm s. The similarity of the gamma-ray emission of 3C 454.3 to that of 3C 279 parallels the similarity of these two objects at lower frequencies.

  11. Time-dependent absorption of very high-energy gamma-rays from the Galactic center by pair-production

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowski, Attila; Horns, Dieter; Ripken, Joachim; Gillessen, Stefan; Eldik, Christopher van

    2008-12-24

    Very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays have been detected from the direction of the Galactic center. The H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescopes have located this {gamma}-ray source with a preliminary position uncertainty of 8.5'' per axis (6'' statistic+6'' sytematic per axis). Within the uncertainty region several possible counterpart candidates exist: the Super Massive Black Hole Sgr A*, the Pulsar Wind Nebula candidate G359.95-0.04, the Low Mass X-Ray Binary-system J174540.0-290031, the stellar cluster IRS 13, as well as self-annihilating dark matter. It is experimentally very challenging to further improve the positional accuracy in this energy range and therefore, it may not be possible to clearly associate one of the counterpart candidates with the VHE-source. Here, we present a new method to investigate a possible link of the VHE-source with the near environment of Sgr A*(within approximately 1000 Schwarzschild radii). This method uses the time- and energy-dependent effect of absorption of VHE {gamma}-rays by pair-production (in the following named pair-eclipse) with low-energy photons of stars closely orbiting the SMBH Sgr A*.

  12. The difference of mutation in the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma2 gene among people at high altitudes and low altitudes in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Yuji; Kashiwazaki, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma is present in two isoforms generated by alternative splicing, PPAR gamma 1 and PPAR gamma 2. A Pro12Ala polymorphism in human PPAR gamma 2 moderately reduces its transcriptional activity, and thus PPAR gamma 2 is thought to be a promising candidate gene for several human disorders, including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this report, we examined the polymorphism of the PPAR gamma 2 gene in people at high and low altitudes in Bolivia, and found a significant difference in the frequency of Ala carriers (Pro/Ala and Ala/Ala) between 153 native high-altitude Bolivian subjects (64.1%) and 288 low-altitude Bolivian subjects (37.9%). The frequency of this Ala allele in Bolivian subjects was fairly higher than that in other ethnic groups. As body mass index, however, was not associated with Pro12Ala polymorphism of the PPAR gamma 2 gene among either the high altitude Bolivians or low altitude Bolivians, Pro12Ala polymorphism of the gene has little relationship to obesity in Bolivians. PMID:16180511

  13. High resolution gamma-ray astronomy - Observations and predictions of line shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipen; Gehrels, Neil

    1991-01-01

    The shapes of gamma-ray lines carry unique information about the physical processes and conditions in astrophysical sites. Galactic center and SN 1987A lines have been observationally resolved allowing their shapes to be studied. There are also significant new theoretical results concerning line shapes from Type I supernovae, supernova remnants and the interstellar medium. New work is presented on a simple treatment of line profiles for rotating disks and spherical shells.

  14. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A balloon-borne X- and gamma-ray instrument was developed, fabricated, and flown. This instrument has the highest energy resolution of any instrument flown to date for measurements of solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray emission in the 13 to 600 keV energy range. The purpose of the solar measurements was to study electron acceleration and solar flare energy release processes. The cosmic observations were to search for cyclotron line features from neutron stars and for low energy gamma-ray lines from nucleosynthesis. The instrument consists of four 4 cm diameter, 1.3 cm thick, planar intrinsic germanium detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen and surrounded by CsI and NaI anti-coincidence scintillation crystals. A graded z collimator limited the field of view to 3 deg x 6 deg and a gondola pointing system provided 0.3 deg pointing accuracy. A total of four flights were made with this instrument. Additional funding was obtained from NSF for the last three flights, which had primarily solar objectives. A detailed instrument description is given. The main scientific results and the data analysis are discussed. Current work and indications for future work are summarized. A bibliography of publications resulting from this work is given.

  15. Active Detection and Imaging of Nuclear Materials with High-Brightness Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Gibson, D J; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G G; Betts, S M; Berry, R D; Fisher, S E; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P

    2009-02-26

    A Compton scattering {gamma}-ray source, capable of producing photons with energies ranging from 0.1 MeV to 0.9 MeV has been commissioned and characterized, and then used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and {gamma}-ray results are presented. The key source parameters are the size (0.01 mm{sup 2}), horizontal and vertical divergence (6 x 10 mrad{sup 2}), duration (10 ps), spectrum and intensity (10{sup 5} photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brightness, 1.5 x 10{sup 15} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1% bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photo-electron bunch, {gamma}-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on {sup 7}Li in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

  16. Development of a high-resolution room-temperature compressed-xenon cylindrical ionization-chamber gamma radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Gary C.; Losee, Jon R.; Palmer, Robert L.

    1998-07-01

    Highly compressed and purified xenon is emerging as an important detection medium for high resolution, room temperature gamma radiation spectroscopy. Detectors based on compressed xenon offer a unique combination of thermal stability, high energy resolution and large volume. Furthermore, fluid based detectors are not susceptible to radiation damage, and can be constructed in a variety of geometries. However, some important factors have delayed the development of practical xenon detectors for widespread use. These factors include the relatively high operational pressures and voltages and the need to maintain extremely high xenon purity. We have recently developed a 0.7 liter gridded ionization chamber xenon gamma radiation detector in a cylindrical geometry. The detector operates at room temperature and provides an intrinsic energy resolution of 1.8% at 662 keV which is five times greater than scintillation based spectrometers. The detector design and performance variables are discussed in comparison to a previous detector constructed in a planar geometry. Our results indicate that practical xenon detectors can now be developed for a wide variety of applications.

  17. The expected high-energy to ultra-high-energy gamma-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Jager, O. C.; Harding, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    The inverse Compton scattering model for the unpulsed TeV emission from the Crab Nebula is reexamined using the magnetic field distribution derived from MHD flow models of the nebula. It is shown that the observed flux can be explained if the average nebular field is indeed about 0.0003, as is predicted by the spectral break between radio and optical. The brightness distribution of the TeV gamma-ray signal is expected to extend out to about 1.5 arcmin from the pulsar. The present estimates predict a steady flux of unpulsed ultrahigh-energy gamma-rays due to the inverse Compton scattering of soft photons by shock-accelerated electrons and/or positrons in the vicinity of the shock.

  18. Suzaku Observation of the Unidentified Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Source HESS J1702-420

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinaga, Takahisa; Bamba, Aya; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ozaki, Masanobu; Pü:Hlhofer, Gerd; Wagner, Stefan; Reimer, Olaf; Funk, Stefan; Hinton, Jim

    2011-11-01

    A deep X-ray observation of the unidentified very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray source HESS J1702-420, for the first time, was carried out by Suzaku. No bright sources were detected in the XIS field of view (FOV), except for two faint point-like sources. The two sources, however, are considered not to be related to HESS J1702-420, because their fluxes in the 2-10 keV band (˜10-14 erg s-1 cm-2) are ˜3 orders of magnitude smaller than the VHE gamma-ray flux in the 1-10 TeV band (FTeV = 3.1 × 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2). We compared the energy spectrum of diffuse emission, extracted from the entire XIS FOV with those from nearby observations. If we consider the systematic error of background subtraction, no significant diffuse emission was detected with an upper limit of FX < 2.7 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 in the 2-10 keV band for an assumed power-law spectrum of Γ = 2.1 and a source size same as that in the VHE band. The upper limit of the X-ray flux is twelve-times as small as the VHE gamma-ray flux. The large flux ratio (FTeV/FX) indicates that HESS J1702-420 is another example of a ``dark'' particle accelerator. If we use a simple one-zone leptonic model, in which VHE gamma-rays are produced through inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background and interstellar far-infrared emission, and the X-rays via the synchrotron mechanism, an upper limit of the magnetic field (1.7μG), is obtained from the flux ratio. Because the magnetic field is weaker than the typical value in the galactic plane (3-10 νG), the simple one-zone model may not work for HESS J1702-420 and a significant fraction of the VHE gamma-rays may originate from protons.

  19. Gamma-ray astronomy using a high pressure gas scintillation drift chamber with a waveshifting fiber readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, J.; Edberg, T. K.; Parsons, A.; Sadoulet, B.; Weiss, S.; Smith, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a balloon-borne hard X-ray telescope called SIGHT (Scintillation Imaging Gas-filled Hard X-ray Telescope). SIGHT is a high sensitivity, good energy resolution instrument that images in the 30 to 300 keV region. We discuss the development of a large area, 20 atmosphere, position sensitive xenon gas scintillation drift chamber which is the gamma-ray detector at the heart of the telescope package. Results of the development of the novel waveshifting fiber readout for this chamber are presented.

  20. A high resolution gamma-ray and hard X-ray spectrometer (HIREGS) for long duration balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelling, M.; Feffer, P. T.; Hurley, K.; Kane, S. R.; Lin, R. P.; Mcbride, S.; Primbsch, J. H.; Smith, D. M.; Youseffi, K.; Zimmer, G.

    1992-01-01

    The elements of a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer, developed for observations of solar flares, are described. Emphasis is given to those aspects of the system that relate to its operation on a long duration balloon platform. The performance of the system observed in its first flight, launched from McMurdo Station, Antarctica on 10 January, 1992, is discussed. Background characteristics of the antarctic balloon environment are compared with those observed in conventional mid-latitude balloon flights and the general advantages of long duration ballooning are discussed.

  1. High-current pulsed electron accelerator “Gamma-1” with output power up to 1.5 TW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, N. V.; Gordeev, V. S.; Punin, V. T.; Grishin, A. V.; Myskov, G. A.; Nazarenko, S. T.; Mikhailov, E. S.; Kalashnikov, D. A.; Kozachek, A. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Strabykin, K. V.; Glushkov, S. L.; Puchagin, S. Yu.; Mayornikova, V. L.; Mayorov, R. A.; Moiseevskikh, M. A.

    2014-08-01

    A multi-module multi-terawatt electrophysical facility “Gamma” is being developed at RFNCVNIIEF, Sarov, Russia. The facility will be used for conducting experiments in different fields of radiation physics. The first module of the facility - a high-current electron accelerator “Gamma-1” has been created. The output electric parameters of the module are as follows: electron energy ≤2.0 MeV, diode current 0.75 MA, maximal electric power 1.5 TW. Description of accelerator design and principles of its operation are presented. Results of experiments as well as further prospects on building a full-scale facility are given.

  2. Ultra-high Energy Neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows Using the Swift-UVOT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nir, Guy; Guetta, Dafne; Landsman, Hagar; Behar, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    We consider a sample of 107 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for which early ultra-violet emission was measured by Swift and extrapolate the photon intensity to lower energies. Protons accelerated in the GRB jet may interact with such photons to produce charged pions and subsequently ultra high energy neutrinos {\\varepsilon }ν ≥slant {10}16 eV. We use simple energy conversion efficiency arguments to predict the maximal neutrino flux expected from each GRB. We estimate the neutrino detection rate at large area radio based neutrino detectors and conclude that the early afterglow neutrino emission is too weak to be detected even by next generation neutrino observatories.

  3. High-energy emissions from the gamma-ray binary LS 5039

    SciTech Connect

    Takata, J.; Leung, Gene C. K.; Cheng, K. S.; Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H.; Hui, C. Y. E-mail: gene930@connect.hku.hk

    2014-07-20

    We study mechanisms of multi-wavelength emissions (X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-rays) from the gamma-ray binary LS 5039. This paper is composed of two parts. In the first part, we report on results of observational analysis using 4 yr data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Due to the improvement of instrumental response function and increase of the statistics, the observational uncertainties of the spectrum in the ∼100-300 MeV bands and >10 GeV bands are significantly improved. The present data analysis suggests that the 0.1-100 GeV emissions from LS 5039 contain three different components: (1) the first component contributes to <1 GeV emissions around superior conjunction, (2) the second component dominates in the 1-10 GeV energy bands, and (3) the third component is compatible with the lower-energy tail of the TeV emissions. In the second part, we develop an emission model to explain the properties of the phase-resolved emissions in multi-wavelength observations. Assuming that LS 5039 includes a pulsar, we argue that emissions from both the magnetospheric outer gap and the inverse-Compton scattering process of cold-relativistic pulsar wind contribute to the observed GeV emissions. We assume that the pulsar is wrapped by two kinds of termination shock: Shock-I due to the interaction between the pulsar wind and the stellar wind and Shock-II due to the effect of the orbital motion. We propose that the X-rays are produced by the synchrotron radiation at the Shock-I region and the TeV gamma-rays are produced by the inverse-Compton scattering process at the Shock-II region.

  4. New room temperature high resolution solid-state detector (CdZnTe) for hard x rays and gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Amyelizabeth C.; Desai, Upendra D.

    1993-01-01

    The new CdZnTe high 'Z' material represents a significant improvement in detectors for high energy photons. With the thicknesses available, photons up to 100 keV can be efficiently detected. This material has a wide band gap of 1.5 - 2.2 eV which allows it to operate at room temperature while providing high spectral resolution. Results of resolution evaluations are presented. This detector can be used for high resolution spectral measurements of photons in x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, offering a significant reduction in the weight, power, and volume of the detector system compared to more conventional detector types such as scintillation counters. In addition, the detector will have the simplicity and reliability of solid-state construction. The CdZnTe detector, as a new development, has not yet been evaluated in space. The Get Away Special program can provide this opportunity.

  5. Gamma-ray burst high time-resolution spectral observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, U. D.; Cline, T. L.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Norris, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The gamma-ray bursts of April 19 and 21, 1980, and March 1, 1981, are characterized on the basis of observations obtained at 25-500 keV and time resolution 128 msec using the hard-X-ray-burst spectrometer of the SMM satellite. The data are presented graphically, and the parameters determined by fitting three theoretical models to the data for each phase (rising phase, decay phase, and valleys between pulses) are given in tables. Models used are thin thermal bremsstrahlung with or without absorption lines, thermal synchrotron with or without absorption lines, and power law with exponential cutoff.

  6. Detecting special nuclear materials in containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Eric B.; Prussin, Stanley G.

    2007-10-02

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a container. The system and its method include irradiating the container with an energetic beam, so as to induce a fission in the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  7. Preliminary tests of a high performance LaBr3 gamma imager for small animals .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jianguo; Bradley, Eric; Majewski, Stan; McKisson, John; Popov, Vladimir; Proffitt, James; Saha, Margaret; Sutton, Jonathan; Weisenberger, Andrew; Welsh, Robert; Yazdi, Amir

    2007-10-01

    A novel medical gamma ray imager comprised of an array of four Hamamatsu H9500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT) coupled directly to a single slab of LaBr3 scintillator has been designed and tested. The phototube-scintillator array, fabricated by Bicron-St. Gobain Inc (France), is the first such device made. A special resistive readout array designed here permits signals from the 256 anode pads in each PSPMT to be read out on only 16 data lines. Preliminary tests of uniformity, sensitivity and resolution will be described along with initial images of mice obtained with this new device.

  8. A new array for the study of ultra high energy gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, G.; Lambert, A.; Ogden, P. A.; Reid, R. J. O.; Patel, M.; Ferrett, J. C.; Watson, A. A.; West, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    The design and operation of a 32 x 1 10 to the 15th power sq m array of scintillation detectors for the detection of 10 to the 15th power eV cosmic rays is described with an expected angular resolution of 1 deg, thus improving the present signal/background ratio for gamma ray sources. Data are recorded on a hybrid CAMAC, an in-house system which uses a laser and Pockel-Cell arrangement to routinely calibrate the timing stability of the detectors.

  9. Limits on the High-Energy Gamma and Neutrino Fluxes from the SGR 1806-20 Giant Flare of 27 December 2004 with the AMANDA-II Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achterberg, A.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Ahrens, J.; Andeen, K.; Atlee, D. W.; Bahcall, J. N.; Bai, X.; Baret, B.; Bartelt, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Becka, T.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bolmont, J.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Braun, J.; Burgess, C.; Burgess, T.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Davour, A.; Day, C. T.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; De Young, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Edwards, W. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Feser, T.; Filimonov, K.; Fox, B. D.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Gozzini, R.; Grullon, S.; Groß, A.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, D.; Hardtke, R.; Harenberg, T.; Hart, J. E.; Hauschildt, T.; Hays, D.; Heise, J.; Helbing, K.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G. C.; Hodges, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hommez, B.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Hughey, B.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Hülß, J.-P.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jones, A.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Karle, A.; Kawai, H.; Kelley, J. L.; Kestel, M.; Kitamura, N.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Krasberg, M.; Kuehn, K.; Landsman, H.; Leich, H.; Liubarsky, I.; Lundberg, J.; Madsen, J.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McCauley, T.; McParland, C. P.; Meli, A.; Messarius, T.; Mészáros, P.; Miyamoto, H.; Mokhtarani, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morey, A.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Münich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Ögelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Olivas, A.; Patton, S.; Peña-Garay, C.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Pohl, A. C.; Porrata, R.; Pretz, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Razzaque, S.; Refflinghaus, F.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Robbins, S.; Roth, P.; Rott, C.; Rutledge, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Seckel, D.; Seo, S. H.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, A. J.; Solarz, M.; Song, C.; Sopher, J. E.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Steffen, P.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoufer, M. C.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sumner, T. J.; Taboada, I.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; Voigt, B.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Waldmann, H.; Walter, M.; Wang, Y.-R.; Wendt, C.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zornoza, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    On 27 December 2004, a giant γ flare from the Soft Gamma-Ray Repeater 1806-20 saturated many satellite gamma-ray detectors, being the brightest transient event ever observed in the Galaxy. AMANDA-II was used to search for down-going muons indicative of high-energy gammas and/or neutrinos from this object. The data revealed no significant signal, so upper limits (at 90% C.L.) on the normalization constant were set: 0.05(0.5)TeV-1m-2s-1 for γ=-1.47 (-2) in the gamma flux and 0.4(6.1)TeV-1m-2s-1 for γ=-1.47 (-2) in the high-energy neutrino flux.

  10. Magnetic Microcalorimeter Gamma Detectors for High-Precision Non-Destructive Analysis, FY14 Extended Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S.

    2015-02-06

    Cryogenic gamma (γ) detectors with operating temperatures of ~0.1 K or below offer 10× better energy resolution than conventional high-purity germanium detectors that are currently used for non-destructive analysis (NDA) of nuclear materials. This can greatly increase the accuracy of NDA, especially at low-energies where gamma rays often have similar energies and cannot be resolved by Ge detectors. We are developing cryogenic γ–detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), which have the potential of higher resolution, faster count rates and better linearity than other cryogenic detector technologies. High linearity is essential to add spectra from different pixels in detector arrays that are needed for high sensitivity. Here we discuss the fabrication of a new generation of MMC γ–detectors in FY2014, and the resulting improvements in energy resolution and linearity of the new design. As an example of the type of NDA that cryogenic detectors enable, we demonstrate the direct detection of Pu-242 emissions with our MMC γ–detectors in the presence of Pu-240, and show that a quantitative NDA analysis agrees with the mass spectrometry

  11. A high speed digital data acquisition system for the Indian National Gamma Array at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, R.; Saha, S.; Sethi, J.; Trivedi, T.; Sharma, S.; Naidu, B. S.; Jadhav, S.; Donthi, R.; Chavan, P. B.; Tan, H.; Hennig, W.

    2012-07-01

    A digital data acquisition system for the Compton suppressed clover detector array has been implemented at the TIFR-BARC accelerator facility for the high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy using the Pixie-16 Digital Gamma Finder modules by XIA LLC. This system has a provision for simultaneous digitization of 96 preamplifier signals of high purity germanium crystals. The energy and timing characteristics of the clover detectors have been investigated in detail. In-beam data has been collected both in singles and in the coincidence mode. The system has been tested with 64 channels with each of the 64 crystals having an event rate up to 5 kHz and 2-fold clover coincidence rate up to 15 kHz. The use of the digital data acquisition system has improved the high counting rate handling capabilities for the clover array. Conventional systems with analog shaping are being replaced by digital system that provides higher throughput, better energy resolution and better stability for the multi-detector Compton suppressed clover array.

  12. A thermostable high pressure xenon gamma-ray detector for monitoring concentration of KCl during fertilizer manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, V. V.; Dvornyak, A. G.; Gratchev, V. M.; Kondakova, O. N.; Krivova, K. V.; Papchenko, A. Yu; Sokolov, D. V.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    1999-02-01

    The abundance of 40K isotope in natural K is about 10 -4. Therefore, measurements of the intensity of the 1.46 MeV gamma line from 40K allows to estimate the concentration of KCl in various mixtures and solutions. However, during the technological procedure it is necessary to carry out the measurements at a relatively high temperature, typically at about 120°C, where traditional detectors cannot be used. A high pressure xenon gamma-detector has been developed for these kinds of measurements. The detector is a cylindrical ionization chamber with a sensitive volume of 5 l. The pressure of xenon gas inside the chamber is 40 atm. A special charge sensitive amplifier capable to operate at high temperatures up to 200°C was designed for these measurements. The detector test under real industrial conditions at "Silvinit" - a company located in the North East of European part of Russia - proved that the concentration of KCl can be measured directly during the manufacturing process with an accuracy better than 1% in the temperature between 15°C and 120°C.

  13. Mechanism of action for anti-radiation vaccine in reducing the biological impact of high-dose gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after high-dose gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naïve animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which they mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  14. Assay for uranium and determination of disequilibrium by means of in situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Allan B.; Moxham, Robert M.; Senftle, F.E.

    1977-01-01

    Two sealed sondes, using germanium gamma-ray detectors cooled by melting propane, have been field tested to depths of 79 m in water-filled boreholes at the Pawnee Uranium Mine in Bee Co., Texas. When, used as total-count devices, the sondes are comparable in logging speed and counting rate with conventional scintillation detectors for locating zones of high radioactivity. When used with a multichannel analyzer, the sondes are detectors with such high resolution that individual lines from the complex spectra of the uranium and thorium series can be distinguished. Gamma rays from each group of the uranium series can be measured in ore zones permitting determination of the state of equilibrium at each measurement point. Series of 10-minute spectra taken at 0.3- to 0.5-m intervals in several holes showed zones where maxima from the uranium group and from the 222Rn group were displaced relative to each other. Apparent excesses of 230Th at some locations suggest that uranium-group concentrations at those locations were severalfold greater some tens of kiloyears, ago. At the current state of development a 10-minute count yields a sensitivity of about 80 ppm U308. Data reduction could in practice be accomplished in about 5 minutes. The result is practically unaffected by disequilibrium or radon contamination. In comparison with core assay, high-resolution spectrometry samples a larger volume; avoids problems due to incomplete core recovery, loss of friable material to drilling fluids, and errors in depth and marking; and permits use of less expensive drilling methods. Because gamma rays from the radionuclides are accumulated simultaneously, it also avoids the problems inherent in trying to correlate logs made in separate runs with different equipment. Continuous-motion delayed-gamma activation by a 163-?g 252Cf neutron source attached to the sonde yielded poor sensitivity. A better neutron-activation method, in which the sonde is moved in steps so as to place the detector

  15. Recent progress of MPPC-based scintillation detectors in high precision X-ray and gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Fujita, T.; Nishiyama, T.; Kurei, Y.; Tsujikawa, T.; Oshima, T.; Taya, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Ogata, H.; Okochi, H.; Ohsuka, S.; Ikeda, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    2015-06-01

    The multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) is a promising light sensor for various applications, not only in physics experiments but also in nuclear medicine, industry, and even high-energy astrophysics. In this paper, we present the current status and most recent progress of the MPPC-based scintillation detectors, such as (1) a high-precision X-ray and gamma-ray spectral image sensor, (2) next-generation PET detectors with MRI, TOF, and DOI measurement capabilities, and (3) a compact gamma camera for environmental radiation surveys. We first present a new method of fabricating a Ce:GAGG scintillator plate (1 or 2 mm thick) with ultra-fine resolution (0.2 mm/pixel), cut using a dicing saw to create 50 μm wide micro-grooves. When the plate is optically coupled with a large-area MPPC array, excellent spatial resolution of 0.48 mm (FWHM) and energy resolution of 14% (FWHM) are obtained for 122 keV gamma rays. Hence, the detector can act as a convenient "multi-color" imaging device that can potentially be used for future SPECT and photon-counting CT. We then show a prototype system for a high-resolution MPPC-based PET scanner that can realize ≃1 mm (FWHM) spatial resolution, even under a strong magnetic field of 4.7 T. We develop a front-end ASIC intended for future TOF-PET scanner with a 16-channel readout that achieves a coincidence time resolution of 489 ps (FWHM). A novel design for a module with DOI-measurement capability for gamma rays is also presented by measuring the pulse height ratio of double-sided MPPCs coupled at both ends of scintillation crystal block. Finally, we present the concept of a two-plane Compton camera consisting of Ce:GAGG scintillator arrays coupled with thin MPPC arrays. As a result of the thin and compact features of the MPPC device, the camera not only achieves a small size (14×14×15 cm3) and light weight (1.9 kg) but also excellent sensitivity, compared to the conventional PMT-based pinhole camera used in Fukushima. Finally, we briefly

  16. The 2010 Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Flare and 10 Years of Multi-Wavelength Observations of M87

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A G.; Anton, G.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Behera, B.; Bernlohr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, P.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Busching, I.; Perkins, J. S.; McConville, W.

    2011-01-01

    The giant radio galaxy M87 with its proximity (16 Mpc), famous jet, and very massive black hole ((3-6) X 10(exp 9) Solar Mass) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the origin of very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray emission generated in relativistic outflows and the surroundings of super-massive black holes. M87 has been established as a VHE gamma -ray emitter since 2006. The VHE gamma -ray emission displays strong variability on timescales as short as a day. In this paper, results from a joint VHE monitoring campaign on M87 by the MAGIC and VERITAS instruments in 2010 are reported. During the campaign, a flare at VHE was detected. triggering further observations at VHE (H.E.S.S.), X-rays (Chandra), and radio (43 GHz VLBA). The excellent sampling of the VHE gamma-ray light curve enables one to derive a precise temporal characterization of the flare: the single, isolated flare is well described by a two-sided exponential function with significantly different flux rise and decay times of rise tau ((sup rise sub d) = (1:69 +/- 0:30) days and tau(sup decay sub d = (0:611 +/- 0:080) days, respectively. While the overall variability pattern of the 2010 flare appears somewhat different from that of previous VHE flares in 2005 and 2008, they share very similar timescales (approx day), peak fluxes (Phi (sub > 0:35 TeV) approx. equals (1 - 3) X 10(exp -11) ph / square cm/s), and VHE spectra. 43 GHz VLBA radio observations of the inner jet regions indicate no enhanced flux in 2010 in contrast to observations in 2008, where an increase of the radio flux of the innermost core regions coincided with a VHE flare. On the other hand, Chandra X-ray observations taken approx 3 days after the peak of the VHE gamma -ray emission reveal an enhanced flux from the core (flux increased by factor approx 2; variability timescale < 2 days). The long-term (2001-2010) multi-wavelength (MWL) light curve of M87, spanning from radio to VHE and including data from HST, LT, VLA and

  17. THE 2010 VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY FLARE AND 10 YEARS OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF M 87

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Behera, B.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bolmont, J.; Collaboration: H.E.S.S. Collaboration; MAGIC Collaboration; VERITAS Collaboration; and others

    2012-02-20

    The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity (16 Mpc), famous jet, and very massive black hole ((3 - 6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the origin of very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray emission generated in relativistic outflows and the surroundings of supermassive black holes. M 87 has been established as a VHE {gamma}-ray emitter since 2006. The VHE {gamma}-ray emission displays strong variability on timescales as short as a day. In this paper, results from a joint VHE monitoring campaign on M 87 by the MAGIC and VERITAS instruments in 2010 are reported. During the campaign, a flare at VHE was detected triggering further observations at VHE (H.E.S.S.), X-rays (Chandra), and radio (43 GHz Very Long Baseline Array, VLBA). The excellent sampling of the VHE {gamma}-ray light curve enables one to derive a precise temporal characterization of the flare: the single, isolated flare is well described by a two-sided exponential function with significantly different flux rise and decay times of {tau}{sup rise}{sub d} = (1.69 {+-} 0.30) days and {tau}{sup decay}{sub d} = (0.611 {+-} 0.080) days, respectively. While the overall variability pattern of the 2010 flare appears somewhat different from that of previous VHE flares in 2005 and 2008, they share very similar timescales ({approx}day), peak fluxes ({Phi}{sub >0.35TeV} {approx_equal} (1-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}), and VHE spectra. VLBA radio observations of 43 GHz of the inner jet regions indicate no enhanced flux in 2010 in contrast to observations in 2008, where an increase of the radio flux of the innermost core regions coincided with a VHE flare. On the other hand, Chandra X-ray observations taken {approx}3 days after the peak of the VHE {gamma}-ray emission reveal an enhanced flux from the core (flux increased by factor {approx}2; variability timescale <2 days). The long-term (2001-2010) multi-wavelength (MWL

  18. Timing the Geminga Pulsar with High-Energy Gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1997-01-01

    This is a continuing program to extend and refine the ephemeris of the Geminga pulsar with annual observations for the remaining lifetime of EGRET. The data show that every revolution of Geminga is accounted for during the EGRET epoch, and that a coherent timing solution linking the phase between EGRET, COS-B, amd SAS-2, observations has now been achieved. The accuracy of the gamma-ray timing is such that the proper motion of the pulsar can now be detected, consistent with the optical determination. The measured braking index over the 24.2 yr baseline is 17 +/- 1. Further observation is required to ascertain whether this very large braking index truly represents the energy loss mechanism, perhaps related to the theory in which Geminga is near its gamma-ray death line, or whether it is a manifestation of timing noise. Statistically significant timing residuals are detected in the EGRET data; they depart from the cubic ephemeris at a level of 23 milliperiods. The residuals appear to have a sinusoidal modulation with a period of about 5.1 yr. This could simply be a manifestation of timing noise, or it could be consistent with a planet of mass 1.7/sin i solar mass orbiting Geminga at a radius of 3.3/sin i AU.

  19. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics. Technical progress report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, R.C.; Lewis, D.A.

    1992-02-01

    The second reflector (project GRANITE) is on schedule. At present (January 1992) it and the 10 m reflector are obtaining stereoscopic views of gamma-ray air showers from the Crab Nebula which verify the expected performance of the twin reflector telescopes. With the additional improvements of the upgrade (a pending DOE proposal) the twin reflectors should reach a limiting intensity of 1% that of the Crab. The astonishing early results from the EGRET detector aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory indicate that distant quasars (powered by supermassive black holes) are active at GeV energies. The Whipple instruments are poised to see if such behavior continues above 100 GeV, as well as perform sensitive observations of previously reported GeV (Geminga) and TeV (Hercules X-1, etc.) sources. In addition to observing sources and identifying their location in the sky to one arcminute, experiments are planned to search for WIMPS in the mass range 0.1 to 1 TeV, and to determine the abundance of anti-protons in the cosmic rays. The successful performance of the stereoscopic reflectors demonstrates the feasibility of the concept of arrays of Cherenkov receivers. Design studies for a much larger array (CASITA) are just beginning.

  20. High-efficiency biosynthesis of hypocrellin A in Shiraia sp. using gamma-ray mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Yao; Shen, Xiao-Ye; Fan, Li; Gao, Jian; Hou, Cheng-Lin

    2016-06-01

    Hypocrellin A (HA), well known as one of the best natural pigments and bioactive agent to treat skin diseases, is further anticipated to play a vital role in photodynamic therapy (PDT) in anticancer and antiviral treatments. In this study, an HA-producing strain ZZZ816 (Shiraia sp.) was isolated from the moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) seeds, and gamma irradiation was used to mutagenize spores of the original strain. After treatment with cobalt-60 gamma ((60)Coγ) with different doses (20, 50, 80, 100, 150, 180, 300, and 500 Gy), the 100 Gy was selected as the optimal condition, which led to 77.2 % lethality of spores and 35 % positive mutant frequency. The extracted compound of the most excellent HA-producing strain (H-4-2) was precisely analyzed by a combination of seven detection methods, and the maximum HA content was shown to reach 2018.3 mg/L. HA production in H-4-2 increased by 414.9 % compared to that of original strain ZZZ816 (392 mg/L) and was significantly higher than all the other industrial HA-producing strains in published reports. PMID:26767989

  1. A high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer based on superconducting microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D. A.; Horansky, R. D.; Schmidt, D. R.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Kotsubo, V.; Mates, J. A. B.; Hoover, A. S.; Winkler, R.; Rabin, M. W.; Alpert, B. K.; Beall, J. A.; Fitzgerald, C. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; O'Neil, G. C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Schima, F. J.; Swetz, D. S.; Vale, L. R.; and others

    2012-09-15

    Improvements in superconductor device fabrication, detector hybridization techniques, and superconducting quantum interference device readout have made square-centimeter-sized arrays of gamma-ray microcalorimeters, based on transition-edge sensors (TESs), possible. At these collecting areas, gamma microcalorimeters can utilize their unprecedented energy resolution to perform spectroscopy in a number of applications that are limited by closely-spaced spectral peaks, for example, the nondestructive analysis of nuclear materials. We have built a 256 pixel spectrometer with an average full-width-at-half-maximum energy resolution of 53 eV at 97 keV, a useable dynamic range above 400 keV, and a collecting area of 5 cm{sup 2}. We have demonstrated multiplexed readout of the full 256 pixel array with 236 of the pixels (91%) giving spectroscopic data. This is the largest multiplexed array of TES microcalorimeters to date. This paper will review the spectrometer, highlighting the instrument design, detector fabrication, readout, operation of the instrument, and data processing. Further, we describe the characterization and performance of the newest 256 pixel array.

  2. A Search for High-Energy Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehorn, Nathan

    2012-05-01

    A century after their discovery, the origin of cosmic rays remains one of the most enduring mysteries in physics. They can have energies that exceed 1020 eV, a hundred million times as energetic as the most powerful Earth-bound particle accelerators and must therefore be produced in the universe's most violent environments. Direct observation of their origins, however, has proven difficult due to deflection of charged cosmic ray particles in galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields, obscuring their true origins. Astronomy using electrically neutral particles, such as photons and neutrinos, does not, however, share this difficulty. This work presents a search for neutrino emission from one of the primary candidates for the sources of the highest-energy cosmic rays, Gamma-Ray Bursts, using the recently-completed IceCube neutrino telescope located at the South Pole. The null result obtained from this search contradicts well-established predictions for the neutrino flux from Gamma-Ray Bursts if they are the cosmic ray sources, forcing a reevaluation of these theoretical models.

  3. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics. Technical progress report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, R C; Lewis, D A

    1993-02-01

    The Crab-Nebula continues to be the standard candle'' of TeV gamma-ray astronomy. The Whipple Collaboration's observations of it are now confirmed by two French groups. Application of the supercuts'' technique, developed on the Crab database, has resulted in the observation of a distant, active galaxy, Markarian 421. Markarian 421 is one of 16 active galactic nuclei (AGN's) observed by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The EGRET observations and the expected attenuation of TeV photons from very distant AGN's gives added impetus to efforts in upgrading the present steoscopic detection system. The upgrade not only improves the sensitivity of the twin telescopes, but also reduces the energy threshold to 100 GeV, at which energy attenuation effects for distant sources are greatly reduced. During the past year the llm reflector was operated as a 37-pixel camera, with its performance matching design expectations. During the coming year, its camera will be upgraded to 109 pixels, the 10m camera electronics made to conform to the llm electronics, and both systems interfaced to a single, faster computer. Observations of Markarian 421, simultaneous with EGRET, are scheduled for May, 1993.

  4. Applications Using High Flux LCS gamma-ray Beams: Nuclear Security and Contributions to Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Mamoru

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear nonproliferation and security are an important issue for the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Many countries now collaborate together for preventing serious accidents from nuclear terrorism. Detection of hidden long-lived radioisotopes and fissionable nuclides in a non-destructive manner is useful for nuclear safeguards and management of nuclear wastes as well as nuclear security. After introducing the present situation concerning the nuclear nonproliferation and security in Japan, we plan to show the present activities of JAEA to detect the hidden nuclear materials by means of the nuclear resonance fluorescence with energy-tunable, monochromatic gamma-rays generated by Laser Compton Scattering (LCS) with an electron beam. The energy recovery linac (ERL) machine is now under development with the KEK-JAEA collaboration for realizing the new generation of gamma-ray sources. The detection technologies of nuclear materials are currently developed using the existing electron beam facilities at Duke University and at NewSubaru. These developments in Japan will contribute to the nuclear security program in Japan and to the assay of melted nuclear fuels in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants.

  5. Probing The Cosmic History of Light With High-Energy Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) holds answers to many questions of moderrn cosmology. The origin of the CMB lies in the early universe, and when it was released during the recombination phase the conditions were not yet right for new sources of light. But the first generation of stars born in a mostly neutral universe quickly re-ionized their surroubding baryonic environments, and dust was produced which allowed reprocessing of some star light into the infrared specral region. Black holes and other compact objects were born and the emissions from their accretion processes and relativistic jetted outflws contributed new light. Today, we observe this evolving radiation field as the Extragalactic Backgroud Light (EBL), ranging from the radio- to the gamma-ray band. The evolution of the diffuse electromagnetic energy content of the universe is the focus of this special session, and I will discuss its importance within the context of modern cosmology. I will emphasize the role of gamma-ray astronomy, which probes the EBL and the CMB through the opacity created by photon-photon pair production.

  6. Treatment of high numbers of brain metastases with Gamma Knife radiosurgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Hatiboglu, Mustafa Aziz; Tuzgen, Saffet; Akdur, Kerime; Chang, Eric L

    2016-04-01

    Effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been shown in patients with one to four brain metastases. Work has been done to evaluate the role of SRS alone treatment without whole-brain radiation therapy in patients with more than four metastases. A recent multiinstitutional JLGK 0901 prospective study revealed the class-2 evidence that SRS without whole-brain radiation therapy is an effective treatment for patients up to 10 metastatic lesions. Several retrospective studies exist to show the efficacy and safety of SRS for patients with even more than 10 lesions. However, patient selection is very critical for SRS alone treatment. The PubMed database was searched using combinations of search terms and synonyms for multiple brain metastases, Gamma Knife and SRS published between January 1, 2005 and January 1, 2015 in order to address the effectiveness of Gamma Knife for patients with multiple brain metastases. Good performance status, controlled primary disease, total treated tumor volume of 15 cm(3) or less have been found to be significant predictors for survival among patients with two or more brain lesions. The data suggest that SRS can be used and whole brain radiation therapy can be withheld in selected patients with multiple lesions to avoid acute or chronic adverse effects, especially neurocognitive decline, without causing survival disadvantage. In this review, we assessed the evidence for SRS treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. PMID:26811300

  7. Tityus gamma toxin, a high affinity effector of the Na+ channel in muscle, with a selectivity for channels in the surface membrane.

    PubMed

    Barhanin, J; Ildefonse, M; Rougier, O; Sampaio, S V; Giglio, J R; Lazdunski, M

    1984-01-01

    Toxin gamma from the venom of Tityus serrulatus scorpion produces a partial block of the surface Na+ channel in frog muscle. This block occurs with no change in the voltage-dependence or in the kinetics of the remaining surface Na+ current. The partial blockade of Na+ channel activity occurs with no change in tubular Na+ currents nor in twitch tension. The maximum effect of the toxin is attained at concentrations as low as 3 X 10(-10) M. Hyperpolarization to potentials more negative than the resting potential (E = -90 mV) reduces or abolishes the effect of the toxin. Radioiodinated toxin gamma binds to frog muscle membranes with a very high affinity corresponding to a dissociation constant of about 1 X 10(-11) M. Data obtained with both rabbit and frog muscle indicate that toxin gamma is specific for Na+ channels in surface membranes. Toxin gamma does not seem to bind to Na+ channels in T-tubule membranes. The biochemical data are in good agreement with electrophysiological studies and data on contraction. There is one Tityus gamma toxin binding site per tetrodotoxin binding site in surface membranes. Competition experiments have confirmed that Tityus gamma toxin binds to a new toxin receptor site on the Na+ channel structure. This site is the same that the toxin II from Centruroides suffusus binding site, but this toxin has 100 times less affinity for the Na+ channel than Tityus gamma toxin. PMID:6324066

  8. Fermi LAT detection of a new high-energy transient gamma-ray source Fermi J0751-5136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, D.; Buson, S.

    2016-08-01

    During the week from 18 July through 25 July, 2016, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed gamma-ray activity from a previously unidentified transient source.

  9. Suitable gamma energy for gamma-spectrometric determination of (238)U in surface soil samples of a high rainfall area in India.

    PubMed

    Lenka, P; Jha, S K; Gothankar, S; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D

    2009-06-01

    The paper presents a systematic study on suitability of various gamma lines for monitoring of (238)U activity in soil samples around a uranium mineralized zone of Kylleng Pyndengsohiong Mawthabah (Domiasiat), Meghalaya in India. The area lies in a plateau region which recieves the highest average annual rainfall (12,000mm) in the world. The geochemical behaviour of the uranium and its daughter products at such wet climatic conditions imposes restrictions to assess (238)U through gamma lines of radon decay products. Soil samples were collected from nine locations around the uranium mineralization zone for analysis. The ratio of the concentration of uranium obtained from gamma energies of radium daughter products to the 63.29keV of (234)Th was found to vary from 1.01 to 2.07, which indicates a pronounced disequilibrium between uranium and radium daughters. The results obtained from various gamma energies were validated from the data generated by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) technique. The (238)U activities from the two analytical methods show a well fitted regression line with correlation coefficient 0.99 which validates the reliability of 63.29keV energy for estimation of uranium in such conditions. PMID:19375833

  10. Circulating gamma delta T cells are activated and depleted during progression of high-grade gliomas: Implications for gamma delta T cell therapy of GBM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains frustratingly impervious to any existing therapy. We have previously shown that GBM is sensitive to recognition and lysis by ex vivo activated gamma delta T cells, a minor subset of lymphocytes that innately recognize autologous stress-associated target antigens...

  11. DISCOVERY OF VARIABILITY IN THE VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION OF 1ES 1218+304 WITH VERITAS

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Boltuch, D.; Boettcher, M.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Fortson, L.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; Finnegan, G.; Furniss, A.

    2010-02-01

    We present results from an intensive VERITAS monitoring campaign of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1218+304 in 2008/2009. Although 1ES 1218+304 was detected previously by MAGIC and VERITAS at a persistent level of {approx}6% of the Crab Nebula flux, the new VERITAS data reveal a prominent flare reaching {approx}20% of the Crab. While very high energy (VHE) flares are quite common in many nearby blazars, the case of 1ES 1218+304 (redshift z = 0.182) is particularly interesting since it belongs to a group of blazars that exhibit unusually hard VHE spectra considering their redshifts. When correcting the measured spectra for absorption by the extragalactic background light, 1ES 1218+304 and a number of other blazars are found to have differential photon indices {gamma}{<=} 1.5. The difficulty in modeling these hard spectral energy distributions in blazar jets has led to a range of theoretical {gamma}-ray emission scenarios, one of which is strongly constrained by these new VERITAS observations. We consider the implications of the observed light curve of 1ES 1218+304, which shows day scale flux variations, for shock acceleration scenarios in relativistic jets, and in particular for the viability of kiloparsec-scale jet emission scenarios.

  12. Mechanism of Action for Anti-radiation Vaccine in Reducing the Biological Impact of High-dose Gamma Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then collected and circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naive animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which the mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  13. Development of a High Resolution Liquid Xenon Imaging Telescope for Medium Energy Gamma Ray Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena

    1992-01-01

    In the third year of the research project, we have (1) tested a 3.5 liter prototype of the Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chamber, (2) used a prototype having a 4.4 cm drift gap to study the charge and energy resolution response of the 3.5 liter chamber, (3) obtained an energy resolution as good as that previously measured by us using chambers with drift gaps of the order of millimeters, (4) observed the induction signals produced by MeV gamma rays, (4) used the 20 hybrid charge sensitive preamplifiers for a nondestructive readout of the electron image on the induction wires, (5) performed extensive Monte Carlo simulations to obtain results on efficiency, background rejection capability, and source flux sensitivity, and (6) developed a reconstruction algorithm for events with multiple interaction points.

  14. High performance gamma-ray spectrometer for runaway electron studies on the FT-2 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevelev, A. E.; Khilkevitch, E. M.; Lashkul, S. I.; Rozhdestvensky, V. V.; Altukhov, A. B.; Chugunov, I. N.; Doinikov, D. N.; Esipov, L. A.; Gin, D. B.; Iliasova, M. V.; Naidenov, V. O.; Nersesyan, N. S.; Polunovsky, I. A.; Sidorov, A. V.; Kiptily, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    A gamma-ray spectrometer based on LaBr3(Ce) scintillator has been used for measurements of hard X-ray emission generated by runaway electrons in the FT-2 tokamak plasmas. Using of the fast LaBr3(Ce) has allowed extending count rate range of the spectrometer by a factor of 10. A developed digital processing algorithm of the detector signal recorded with a digitizer sampling rate of 250 MHz has provided a pulse height analysis at count rates up to 107 s-1. A spectrum deconvolution code DeGaSum has been applied for inferring the energy distribution of runaway electrons escaping from the plasma and interacting with materials of the FT-2 limiter in the vacuum chamber. The developed digital signal processing technique for LaBr3(Ce) spectrometer has allowed studying the evolution of runaways energy distribution in the FT-2 plasma discharges with time resolution of 1-5 ms.

  15. Time correlations between low and high energy gamma rays from discrete sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    Activities covered the following areas: (1) continuing analysis of the Cygnus Experiment data on the shadowing of cosmic rays by the moon and sun, which led to a direct confirmation of the angular resolution of the CYGNUS EAS array; and (2) development of analysis methods for the daily search overlapping with EGRET targets. To date, no steady emission of ultrahigh energy (UHE) gamma rays from any source has been detected by the Cygnus Experiment, but some evidence for sporadic emission had been found. Upper limits on steady fluxes from 49 sources in the northern hemisphere have been published. In addition, a daily search of 51 possible sources over the interval April 1986 to June 1992 found no evidence for emission. From these source lists, four candidates were selected for comparison with EGRET data.

  16. Cesium hafnium chloride: A high light yield, non-hygroscopic cubic crystal scintillator for gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Arnold; Rowe, Emmanuel; Groza, Michael; Morales Figueroa, Kristle; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Beck, Patrick R.; Hunter, Steven; Payne, Stephen A.

    2015-10-05

    We report on the scintillation properties of Cs{sub 2}HfCl{sub 6} (cesium hafnium chloride or CHC) as an example of a little-known class of non-hygroscopic compounds having the generic cubic crystal structure of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}. The crystals are easily growable from the melt using the Bridgman method with minimal precursor treatments or purification. CHC scintillation is centered at 400 nm, with a principal decay time of 4.37 μs and a light yield of up to 54 000 photons/MeV when measured using a silicon CCD photodetector. The light yield is the highest ever reported for an undoped crystal, and CHC also exhibits excellent light yield nonproportionality. These desirable properties allowed us to build and test CHC gamma-ray spectrometers providing energy resolution of 3.3% at 662 keV.

  17. High-energy gamma-ray and hard X-ray observations of Cyg X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermsen, W.; Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Jansen, F. A.; Bennett, K.; Buccheri, R.; Mastichiadis, A.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Strong, A. W.; Oezel, M. E.; Pollock, A. M. T.

    1987-01-01

    COS-B viewed the Cyg X-3 region seven times between November, 1975, and February, 1982; a search for steady gamma-ray emission pulsed at the characteristic 4.8-hour period did not reveal its source. Leiden-MIT balloon experiment observations of Cyg X-3 in May, 1979 show the 4.8-hour modulation with sinusoidal light curve and modulation depth of 0.30, for energies of up to about 140 keV. The strong variability of Cyg X-3 over more than one order of magnitude at energies below 20 keV does not emerge in the data collected at hard X-ray energies.

  18. Operating characteristics of a prototype high energy gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, T. L.; Frye, G. M., Jr.; Hall, C. J.; Pendleton, G. N.; Ramsden, D.; Agrinier, B.; Bonfand, E.; Owens, G. N.; Carter, J. N.; Refloch, A.

    1985-01-01

    The field of gamma-ray astronomy in the energy range from ten to several hundred MeV is severely limited by the angular resolution that can be achieved by present instruments. The identification of some of the point sources found by the COS-B mission and the resolution of detailed structure existing in those sources may depend on the development of a new class of instrument. The coded aperture mask telescope, used successfully at X-ray energies hold the promise of being such an instrument. A prototype coded aperture telescope was operated in a tagged photon beam ranging in energy from 23 to 123 MeV. The purpose of the experiment was to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a coded aperture mask telescope in this energy region. Some preliminary results and conclusions drawn from some of the data resulting from this experiment are presented.

  19. Studies of Avalanche Photodiodes (APDS) as Readout Devices for Scintillating Fibers for High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasile, Stefan; Shera, Suzanne; Shamo, Denis

    1998-01-01

    New gamma ray and charged particle telescope designs based on scintillating fiber arrays could provide low cost, high resolution, lightweight, very large area and multi radiation length instrumentation for planned NASA space exploration. The scintillating fibers low visible light output requires readout sensors with single photon detection sensitivity and low noise. The sensitivity of silicon Avalanche Photodiodes (APDS) matches well the spectral output of the scintillating fibers. Moreover, APDs have demonstrated single photon capability. The global aim of our work is to make available to NASA a novel optical detector concept to be used as scintillating fiber readouts and meeting the requirements of the new generations of space-borne gamma ray telescopes. We proposed to evaluate the feasibility of using RMD's small area APDs ((mu)APD) as scintillating fiber readouts and to study possible alternative (mu)APD array configurations for space borne readout scintillating fiber systems, requiring several hundred thousand to one million channels. The evaluation has been conducted in accordance with the task description and technical specifications detailed in the NASA solicitation "Studies of Avalanche Photodiodes (APD as readout devices for scintillating fibers for High Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy Telescopes" (#8-W-7-ES-13672NAIS) posted on October 23, 1997. The feasibility study we propose builds on recent developments of silicon APD arrays and light concentrators advances at RMD, Inc. and on more than 5 years of expertise in scintillating fiber detectors. In a previous program we carried out the initial research to develop a high resolution, small pixel, solid-state, silicon APD array which exhibited very high sensitivity in the UV-VIS spectrum. This (mu)APD array is operated in Geiger mode and results in high gain (greater than 10(exp 8)), extremely low noise, single photon detection capability, low quiescent power (less than 10 (mu)W/pixel for 30 micrometers sensitive

  20. Thermal properties of a fiber-optic radiation sensor for measuring gamma-rays in high-temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Dayeong; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Hong, Seunghan; Sim, Hyeok In; Kim, Seon Geun; Jang, Jae Seok; Jang, Kyoung Won; Lee, Bongsoo; Park, Byung Gi; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) was fabricated using a cerium-doped silicate-yttriumlutetium (LYSO:Ce) scintillator crystal and a silica optical fiber (SOF) to measure gamma-rays accurately in elevated temperature conditions. Throughout this study, a LYSO:Ce crystal was employed as a sensing material of the FORS due to its high light yield (32,000 photons/MeV), fast decay time (≤ 47 ns) and high detection efficiency. Although the LYSO:Ce crystal has many desirable qualities, the thermoluminescence (TL) should be eliminated by using a heat annealing process because the light yield of the LYSO:Ce crystal varies with its TL. In this study, therefore, we obtained the TL curve of the LYSO:Ce crystal by increasing the temperature up to 280 ℃, and we demonstrated that almost all of the TL of the LYSO:Ce crystal was eliminated by the heat annealing process.