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Sample records for high frequency oscillation

  1. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  2. High-Frequency Gated Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    New gated oscillator generates bursts of high-frequency sine waves, square waves, and triangular waves in response to control signals. Each burst starts at zero phase, with tight tolerances on signal amplitude and frequency. Frequencies in megahertz range are made possible by using high-speed comparators and high-speed flip-flop as fast-response threshold detector.

  3. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  4. High frequency oscillations in the intact brain

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, György; da Silva, Fernando Lopes

    2016-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs) constitute a novel trend in neurophysiology that is fascinating neuroscientists in general, and epileptologists in particular. But what are HFOs? What is the frequency range of HFOs? Are there different types of HFOs, physiological and pathological? How are HFOs generated? Can HFOs represent temporal codes for cognitive processes? These questions are pressing and this symposium volume attempts to give constructive answers. As a prelude to this exciting discussion, we summarize the physiological high frequency patterns in the intact brain, concentrating mainly on hippocampal patterns, where the mechanisms of high frequency oscillations are perhaps best understood. PMID:22449727

  5. High-frequency resonant-tunneling oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Calawa, A. R.; Manfra, M. J.; Chen, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in high-frequency resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) oscillators are described. Oscillations up to a frequency of 420 GHz have been achieved in the GaAs/AlAs system. Recent results obtained with In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs and InAs/AlSb RTDs show a greatly increased power density and indicate the potential for fundamental oscillations up to about 1 THz. These results are consistent with a lumped-element equivalent circuit model of the RTD. The model shows that the maximum oscillation frequency of the GaAs/AlAs RTDs is limited primarily by series resistance, and that the power density is limited by low peak-to-valley current ratio.

  6. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers.

    PubMed

    Vanapalli, S; ter Brake, H J M; Jansen, H V; Zhao, Y; Holland, H J; Burger, J F; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-04-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pressure oscillator is presented with the aim to power a micropulse tube cryocooler operating between 300 and 80 K, delivering a cooling power of 10 mW. Piezoelectric actuators operate efficiently at high frequencies and have high power density making them good candidates as drivers for high frequency pressure oscillator. The pressure oscillator described in this work consists of a membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator. A pressure ratio of about 1.11 was achieved with a filling pressure of 2.5 MPa and compression volume of about 22.6 mm(3) when operating the actuator with a peak-to-peak sinusoidal voltage of 100 V at a frequency of 1 kHz. The electrical power input was 2.73 W. The high pressure ratio and low electrical input power at high frequencies would herald development of microminiature cryocoolers. PMID:18447548

  7. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  8. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  9. High frequency oscillators for chaotic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, A. N.; Blakely, J. N.; Corron, N. J.; Dean, R. N.

    2016-05-01

    This work focuses on implementing a class of exactly solvable chaotic oscillators at speeds that allow real world radar applications. The implementation of a chaotic radar using a solvable system has many advantages due to the generation of aperiodic, random-like waveforms with an analytic representation. These advantages include high range resolution, no range ambiguity, and spread spectrum characteristics. These systems allow for optimal detection of a noise-like signal by the means of a linear matched filter using simple and inexpensive methods. This paper outlines the use of exactly solvable chaos in ranging systems, while addressing electronic design issues related to the frequency dependence of the system's stretching function introduced by the use of negative impedance converters (NICs).

  10. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz(-1) at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100 s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  11. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  12. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz-1 at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz-1 at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz-1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10-10 at 1-100 s integration time--orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  13. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Liqiu, Wei E-mail: weiliqiu@hit.edu.cn; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-07

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  14. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liqiu, Wei; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-01

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  15. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2005-09-27

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, a feedback network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, the feedback network being configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and a tuning circuit connected to the input of the amplifier, wherein the tuning circuit is continuously variable and consists of solid state electrical components with no mechanically adjustable devices including a pair of diodes connected to each other at their respective cathodes with a control voltage connected at the junction of the diodes. Another oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, a feedback network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, the feedback network being configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and transmission lines connected to the input of the amplifier with an input pad and a perpendicular transmission line extending from the input pad and forming a leg of a resonant "T", and wherein the feedback network is coupled to the leg of the resonant "T".

  16. High frequency microbubble-switched oscillations modulated by microfluidic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fanghao; Dai, Xianming; Li, Chen

    2012-08-01

    Creating high frequency two-phase oscillations (HF-TPOs) remains an important goal in advancing microscale fluidic logic devices, micro-mixers, micro-actuators, and flow controls. However, thermally driven TPO frequency has been hindered by confinements of compressible vapor bubbles and low thermal diffusivity in microfluidic systems. In this study, a mechanism creating high frequency microbubbles growth/collapse cycle has been developed to achieve HF-TPOs. A "microfluidic transistor" was conceptualized and fabricated to passively sustain and modulate HF-TPOs. Three orders of magnitude higher TPO frequency has been achieved compared to TPOs reported in literatures under similar working conditions.

  17. High-frequency oscillation of the airway and chest wall.

    PubMed

    Fink, James B; Mahlmeister, Michael J

    2002-07-01

    High-frequency oscillation (HFO), applied to either the airway or chest wall, has been associated with changes in sputum attributes and clearance. The evolution of evidence, both in vitro and in vivo, supporting the use of HFO is reviewed. Devices that apply HFO to the airway range from the relatively simple mechanical Flutter and Acapella devices to the more complex Percussionaire Intrapercussive Ventilators. and the Hayek Oscillator are designed to provide high-frequency chest wall compression. Operation and use of these devices are described with examples of differentiation of device types by characterization of flows, and airway and esophageal pressures. Although HFO devices span a broad range of costs, they provide a reasonable therapeutic option to support secretion clearance for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:12088550

  18. High-frequency oscillations and the neurobiology of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Uhlhaas, Peter J.; Singer, Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Neural oscillations at low- and high-frequency ranges are a fundamental feature of large-scale networks. Recent evidence has indicated that schizophrenia is associated with abnormal amplitude and synchrony of oscillatory activity, in particular, at high (beta/gamma) frequencies. These abnormalities are observed during task-related and spontaneous neuronal activity which may be important for understanding the pathophysiology of the syndrome. In this paper, we shall review the current evidence for impaired beta/gamma-band oscillations and their involvement in cognitive functions and certain symptoms of the disorder. In the first part, we will provide an update on neural oscillations during normal brain functions and discuss underlying mechanisms. This will be followed by a review of studies that have examined high-frequency oscillatory activity in schizophrenia and discuss evidence that relates abnormalities of oscillatory activity to disturbed excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) balance. Finally, we shall identify critical issues for future research in this area. PMID:24174902

  19. High-frequency voltage oscillations in cultured astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Wiebke; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Holland, Christine; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2015-01-01

    Because of their close interaction with neuronal physiology, astrocytes can modulate brain function in multiple ways. Here, we demonstrate a yet unknown astrocytic phenomenon: Astrocytes cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) exhibited extracellular voltage fluctuations in a broad frequency spectrum (100–600 Hz) after electrical stimulation. These aperiodic high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) could last several seconds and did not spread across the MEA. The voltage-gated calcium channel antagonist cilnidipine dose-dependently decreased the power of the oscillations. While intracellular calcium was pivotal, incubation with bafilomycin A1 showed that vesicular release of transmitters played only a minor role in the emergence of HFOs. Gap junctions and volume-regulated anionic channels had just as little functional impact, which was demonstrated by the addition of carbenoxolone (100 μmol/L) and NPPB (100 μmol/L). Hyperpolarization with low potassium in the extracellular solution (2 mmol/L) dramatically raised oscillation power. A similar effect was seen when we added extra sodium (+50 mmol/L) or if we replaced it with NMDG+ (50 mmol/L). The purinergic receptor antagonist PPADS suppressed the oscillation power, while the agonist ATP (100 μmol/L) had only an increasing effect when the bath solution pH was slightly lowered to pH 7.2. From these observations, we conclude that astrocytic voltage oscillations are triggered by activation of voltage-gated calcium channels and driven by a downstream influx of cations through channels that are permeable for large ions such as NMDG+. Most likely candidates are subtypes of pore-forming P2X channels with a low affinity for ATP. PMID:25969464

  20. Tracheal mucus clearance in high-frequency oscillation. II: Chest wall versus mouth oscillation.

    PubMed

    King, M; Phillips, D M; Zidulka, A; Chang, H K

    1984-11-01

    We compared the tracheal mucus clearance rate (TMCR) in anesthetized dogs during spontaneous breathing (SB), ventilation by high-frequency oscillation at the airway opening (HFO/AO), and ventilation by high-frequency oscillation of the chest wall (HFO/CW). The HFO/AO was carried out by using a piston pump with a high impedance transverse flow at the proximal end of the endotracheal tube; HFO/CW was effected by creating rapid pressure oscillations in an air-filled cuff wrapped around the lower thorax of the animal, causing small tidal volumes at the mouth. The TMCR was measured by observing the rate of displacement of a charcoal marker in the lower trachea; a fiberoptic bronchoscope was used to deposit the marker before each experiment and to relocate it after a 5-min run. In 7 dogs, mean TMCR during control (SB) was 8.9 +/- 3.5 mm/min. At 13 Hz with an oscillatory tidal volume (VTO) of 1.5 ml/kg, mean TMCR was 240% of control with HFO/CW (p less than 0.001) and 76% of control with HFO/AO (NS). During HFO/AO at 20 Hz and a VTO of 3 ml/kg, mean TMCR was 97% of control. We conclude that high-frequency ventilation by rapid chest wall compression enhances tracheal mucus clearance when compared with spontaneous breathing, whereas high-frequency oscillation at the mouth does not. PMID:6497152

  1. Interictal high-frequency oscillations in focal human epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Cimbalnik, Jan; Kucewicz, Michal T.; Worrell, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Localization of focal epileptic brain is critical for successful epilepsy surgery and focal brain stimulation. Despite significant progress, roughly half of all patients undergoing focal surgical resection, and most patients receiving focal electrical stimulation, are not seizure free. There is intense interest in high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) recorded with intracranial electroencephalography as potential biomarkers to improve epileptogenic brain localization, resective surgery, and focal electrical stimulation. The present review examines the evidence that HFOs are clinically useful biomarkers. Recent findings Performing the PubMed search ‘High-Frequency Oscillations and Epilepsy’ for 2013–2015 identifies 308 articles exploring HFO characteristics, physiological significance, and potential clinical applications. Summary There is strong evidence that HFOs are spatially associated with epileptic brain. There remain, however, significant challenges for clinical translation of HFOs as epileptogenic brain biomarkers: Differentiating true HFO from the high-frequency power changes associated with increased neuronal firing and bandpass filtering sharp transients. Distinguishing pathological HFO from normal physiological HFO. Classifying tissue under individual electrodes as normal or pathological. Sharing data and algorithms so research results can be reproduced across laboratories. Multicenter prospective trials to provide definitive evidence of clinical utility. PMID:26953850

  2. Recording and analysis techniques for high-frequency oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Worrell, G.A.; Jerbi, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Lina, J.M.; Zelmann, R.; Le Van Quyen, M.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, new recording technologies have advanced such that, at high temporal and spatial resolutions, high-frequency oscillations (HFO) can be recorded in human partial epilepsy. However, because of the deluge of multichannel data generated by these experiments, achieving the full potential of parallel neuronal recordings depends on the development of new data mining techniques to extract meaningful information relating to time, frequency and space. Here, we aim to bridge this gap by focusing on up-to-date recording techniques for measurement of HFO and new analysis tools for their quantitative assessment. In particular, we emphasize how these methods can be applied, what property might be inferred from neuronal signals, and potentially productive future directions. PMID:22420981

  3. Detection of high frequency oscillations from space experiments and eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Dipankar; Singh, Jagdev; Hasan, Siraj; Gupta, Girjesh R.; Nagaraju, K.

    We performed high resolution spectroscopy of the solar corona during the total solar eclipse of July 22, 2009 in two emission lines, namely the red line at 530.3 nm due to [Fe xiv] and the green line at 637.4 nm due to [Fex] simultaneously from Anji, China. Two mirror coelostat with 100 cm focal length lens made 9.2 mm image of the sun. The spectrograph using 140 cm focal length lens in Littrow mode and a grating with 600 lines per mm blazed at 2 micron provided a dispersion of 30 mA and 42 mA per pixel in the 4th order around green line and 3rd order red emission line, respectively. Two Peltier cooled 1K x 1K CCD cameras with pixel size of 13 micron square and 14-bit read out at 10 MHz operated in frame transfer mode, were used to obtain the time sequence spectra in each emission lines simultaneously. We detected presence of high frequency oscillations in intensity, velocity and line widths. We also studied the variation of line widths with height. The results will be discussed in terms of different MHD waves. Possibility of detecting these oscillations from space based experiments will be addressed. India is going to launch a emission line coronagraph on a small satellite platform called Aditya. The scientific goals of Aditya in pursuit to wave detection will be presented.

  4. High Frequency Low Amplitude Temperature Oscillations in Loop Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. High frequency, low amplitude temperature oscillations: LHP operation - governing equations; interactions among LHP components; factors affecting low amplitude temperature oscillations. 2. Test results. 3. Conclusions.

  5. High-frequency resonant tunnelling diode oscillator with high-output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue; Alharbi, Khalid; Ofiare, Afesomeh; Khalid, Ata; Cumming, David; Wasige, Edward

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a prototype G-band (140 GHz-220 GHz) monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) resonant tunneling diode (RTD) oscillator is reported. The oscillator employs two In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs RTD devices in the circuit to increase the output power. The measured output power was about 0.34 mW (-4.7 dBm) at 165.7 GHz, which is the highest power reported for RTD oscillator in G-band frequency range. This result demonstrates the validity of the high frequency/high power RTD oscillator design. It indicates that RTD devices, as one of the terahertz (THz) source candidates, have promising future for room-temperature THz applications in such as imaging, wireless communication and spectroscopy analysis, etc. By optimizing RTD oscillator design, it is expected that considerably higher power (>1 mW) at THz frequencies (>300 GHz) will be obtained.

  6. Free-molecular gas flow through the high-frequency oscillating membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, V. L.; Yakunchikov, A. N.; Kosiantchouk, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of using a high frequency oscillating track membranes as diffusion membranes for gas separation was studied. High frequency forced oscillation of the membrane was considered because of assumption that the membrane conductivity for a given gas can be controlled by varying the frequency and amplitude of oscillation. The problem about free- molecular gas flow through a oscillating in its plane membrane was stated and the possibility of separation of gases using such a device was investigated. Also, optimal values of membrane oscillation parameters for most efficient gas separation have been found.

  7. High frequency oscillations can pinpoint seizures progressing to status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Salami, Pariya; Lévesque, Maxime; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is defined as a seizure lasting more than 5min or a period of recurrent seizures without recovery between them. SE is a serious emergency condition that requires immediate intervention; therefore, identifying SE electrophysiological markers may translate in prompt care to stop it. Here, we analyzed the EEG signals recorded from the CA3 region of the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex in rats that responded to systemic administration of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) by generating either isolated seizures or seizures progressing to SE. We found that high frequency oscillations (HFOs) - which can be categorized as ripples (80-200Hz) and fast ripples (250-500Hz) - had different patterns of occurrence in the two groups (n=5 for each group). Specifically, fast ripples in CA3 and entorhinal cortex of the SE group occurred at higher rates than ripples, both during the ictal and post-ictal periods when compared to the HFOs recorded from the isolated seizure group. Our data reveal that different patterns of HFO occurrence can pinpoint seizures progressing to SE, thus suggesting the involvement of different neuronal networks at the termination of seizure discharges. PMID:27018321

  8. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) in clinical epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, J.; Staba, R.; Asano, E.; Otsubo, H.; Wu, J.Y.; Zijlmans, M.; Mohamed, I.; Kahane, P.; Dubeau, F.; Navarro, V.; Gotman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequent neurological diseases. In focal medically refractory epilepsies, successful surgical treatment largely depends on the identification of epileptogenic zone. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) between 80 and 500 Hz, which can be recorded with EEG, may be novel markers of the epileptogenic zone. This review discusses the clinical importance of HFOs as markers of epileptogenicity and their application in different types of epilepsies. HFOs are clearly linked to the seizure onset zone, and the surgical removal of regions generating them correlates with a seizure free post-surgical outcome. Moreover, HFOs reflect the seizure-generating capability of the underlying tissue, since they are more frequent after the reduction of antiepileptic drugs. They can be successfully used in pediatric epilepsies such as epileptic spasms and help to understand the generation of this specific type of seizures. While mostly recorded on intracranial EEGs, new studies suggest that identification of HFOs on scalp EEG or magnetoencephalography (MEG) is possible as well. Thus not only patients with refractory epilepsies and invasive recordings but all patients might profit from the analysis of HFOs. Despite these promising results, the analysis of HFOs is not a routine clinical procedure; most results are derived from relatively small cohorts of patients and many aspects are not yet fully understood. Thus the review concludes that even if HFOs are promising biomarkers of epileptic tissue, there are still uncertainties about mechanisms of generation, methods of analysis, and clinical applicability. Large multicenter prospective studies are needed prior to widespread clinical application. PMID:22480752

  9. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) in clinical epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J; Staba, R; Asano, E; Otsubo, H; Wu, J Y; Zijlmans, M; Mohamed, I; Kahane, P; Dubeau, F; Navarro, V; Gotman, J

    2012-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequent neurological diseases. In focal medically refractory epilepsies, successful surgical treatment largely depends on the identification of epileptogenic zone. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) between 80 and 500Hz, which can be recorded with EEG, may be novel markers of the epileptogenic zone. This review discusses the clinical importance of HFOs as markers of epileptogenicity and their application in different types of epilepsies. HFOs are clearly linked to the seizure onset zone, and the surgical removal of regions generating them correlates with a seizure free post-surgical outcome. Moreover, HFOs reflect the seizure-generating capability of the underlying tissue, since they are more frequent after the reduction of antiepileptic drugs. They can be successfully used in pediatric epilepsies such as epileptic spasms and help to understand the generation of this specific type of seizures. While mostly recorded on intracranial EEGs, new studies suggest that identification of HFOs on scalp EEG or magnetoencephalography (MEG) is possible as well. Thus not only patients with refractory epilepsies and invasive recordings but all patients might profit from the analysis of HFOs. Despite these promising results, the analysis of HFOs is not a routine clinical procedure; most results are derived from relatively small cohorts of patients and many aspects are not yet fully understood. Thus the review concludes that even if HFOs are promising biomarkers of epileptic tissue, there are still uncertainties about mechanisms of generation, methods of analysis, and clinical applicability. Large multicenter prospective studies are needed prior to widespread clinical application. PMID:22480752

  10. Low Frequency High Amplitude Temperature Oscillations in Loop Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Rodriguez, Jose

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the low frequency high amplitude temperature oscillations observed in loop heat pipe operations. The topics include: 1) Proposed Theory; 2) Test Loop and Test Results; and 3) Effects of Various Parameters. The author also presents a short summary on the conditiions that must be met in order to sustain a low frequency high amplitude temperature oscillation.

  11. High-Frequency Oscillations and Seizure Generation in Neocortical Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Greg A.; Parish, Landi; Cranstoun, Stephen D.; Jonas, Rachel; Baltuch, Gordon; Litt, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Neocortical seizures are often poorly localized, explosive and widespread at onset, making them poorly amenable to epilepsy surgery in the absence of associated focal brain lesions. We describe, for the first time in an unselected group of patients with neocortical epilepsy, the finding that high-frequency (60--100 Hz) epileptiform oscillations…

  12. Stimulus-evoked high frequency oscillations are present in neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Chadwick M.; Zeller-Townson, Riley; Newman, Jonathan P.; Shoemaker, James T.; Killian, Nathan J.; Potter, Steve M.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological high frequency oscillations (250–600 Hz) are present in the brains of epileptic animals and humans. The etiology of these oscillations and how they contribute to the diseased state remains unclear. This work identifies the presence of microstimulation-evoked high frequency oscillations (250–400 Hz) in dissociated neuronal networks cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs). Oscillations are more apparent with higher stimulus voltages. As with in vivo studies, activity is isolated to a single electrode, however, the MEA provides improved spatial resolution with no spread of the oscillation to adjacent electrodes 200 μm away. Oscillations develop across four weeks in vitro. Oscillations still occur in the presence of tetrodotoxin and synaptic blockers, and they cause no apparent disruption in the ability of oscillation-presenting electrodes to elicit directly evoked action potentials (dAPs) or promote the spread of synaptic activity throughout the culture. Chelating calcium with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) causes a temporal prolongation of the oscillation. Finally, carbenoxolone significantly reduces or eliminates the high frequency oscillations. Gap junctions may play a significant role in maintaining the oscillation given the inhibitory effect of carbenoxolone, the propagating effect of reduced calcium conditions and the isolated nature of the activity as demonstrated in previous studies. This is the first demonstration of stimulus-evoked high frequency oscillations in dissociated cultures. Unlike current models that rely on complex in vivo recording conditions, this work presents a simple controllable model in neuronal cultures on MEAs to further investigate how the oscillations occur at the molecular level and how they may contribute to the pathophysiology of disease. PMID:22615686

  13. Graphene-hexagonal boron nitride resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, J.; Eaves, L.; Novoselov, K. S.; Mishchenko, A.; Geim, A. K.; Fromhold, T. M.; Greenaway, M. T.

    2015-09-01

    We assess the potential of two-terminal graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators, using self-consistent quantum transport and electrostatic simulations to determine the time-dependent response of the diodes in a resonant circuit. We quantify how the frequency and power of the current oscillations depend on the diode and circuit parameters including the doping of the graphene electrodes, device geometry, alignment of the graphene lattices, and the circuit impedances. Our results indicate that current oscillations with frequencies of up to several hundred GHz should be achievable.

  14. Graphene-hexagonal boron nitride resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Gaskell, J.; Fromhold, T. M.; Greenaway, M. T.; Eaves, L.; Novoselov, K. S.; Mishchenko, A.; Geim, A. K.

    2015-09-07

    We assess the potential of two-terminal graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene resonant tunneling diodes as high-frequency oscillators, using self-consistent quantum transport and electrostatic simulations to determine the time-dependent response of the diodes in a resonant circuit. We quantify how the frequency and power of the current oscillations depend on the diode and circuit parameters including the doping of the graphene electrodes, device geometry, alignment of the graphene lattices, and the circuit impedances. Our results indicate that current oscillations with frequencies of up to several hundred GHz should be achievable.

  15. Frequencies of solar oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libbrecht, K. G.; Woodard, M. F.; Kaufman, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Solar oscillations have been observed at three different spatial scales at Big Bear Solar Observatory during 1986-1987 and, using three data sets, a new and more accurate table of solar oscillation frequencies has been compiled. The oscillations, which are presented as functions of radial order n and spherical harmonic degree l, are averages over azimuthal order and therefore approximate the normal mode frequencies of a nonrotating, spherically symmetric sun, near solar minimum. The table contains frequencies for most of the solar p and f modes with l between 0 and 1860, n between 0 and 26, and oscillation mode frequencies between 1.0 and 5.3.

  16. The detection and characterization of high frequency and high wavenumber solar oscillations. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandes, David Neil

    1992-01-01

    Doppler shift measurements of the Na D(sub 1) absorption line have revealed solar oscillations in a new regime of frequency and wavenumber. Oscillations of vertical velocities in the temperature minimum and low chromosphere of the Sun are observed with frequencies ranging up to 9.5 mHz. There is no evidence for chromospheric modes of 3 minute period. This indicates that the chromosphere does not form a good cavity for acoustic waves. The fundamental-modes appear with wavenumbers up to 5.57 M per m (equivalent spherical harmonic degree, 3877). The frequencies lie below the predicted values at wavenumbers above 1 M per m. The values are in agreement with previous measurements that exist for wavenumbers up to 2.67 M per m. Spatial maps of velocity power show that high wavenumber oscillations are suppressed in active regions. The shape of the power depression indicates that wave motion is affected in the layer of atmosphere where the measurement is made. The f-modes are suppressed in the same way as p-modes, indicating that the mechanism for wave suppression affects velocity fluctuations. Mode frequencies are not affected by the magnetic fields by more than 50 micro Hz, the precision of the measurement.

  17. A Resonantly Excited Disk-Oscillation Model of High-Frequency QPOs of Microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shoji

    2012-12-01

    A possible model of twin high-frequency QPOs (HF QPOs) of microquasars is examined. The disk is assumed to have global magnetic fields and to be deformed with a two-armed pattern. In this deformed disk, a set of a two-armed (m = 2) vertical p-mode oscillation and an axisymmetric (m = 0) g-mode oscillation is considered. They resonantly interact through the disk deformation when their frequencies are the same. This resonant interaction amplifies the set of the above oscillations in the case where these two oscillations have wave energies of opposite signs. These oscillations are assumed to be excited most efficiently in the case where the radial group velocities of these two waves vanish at the same place. The above set of oscillations is not unique, depending on the node number n, of oscillations in the vertical direction. We consider that the basic two sets of oscillations correspond to the twin QPOs. The frequencies of these oscillations depend on the disk parameters, such as the strength of the magnetic fields. For observational mass ranges of GRS 1915+ 105, GRO J1655-40, XTE J1550-564, and HEAO H1743-322, the spins of these sources are estimated. High spins of these sources can be described if the disks have weak poloidal magnetic fields as well as toroidal magnetic fields of moderate strength. In this model the 3:2 frequency ratio of high-frequency QPOs is not related to their excitation, but occurs by chance.

  18. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber. PMID:25167146

  19. [High-frequency active oscillation of the head in testing vestibuloocular reflex in healthy subjects].

    PubMed

    Pal'chun, V T; Derevianko, S N

    2000-01-01

    An original device has been designed in the ENT clinic of the Russian Medical University in cooperation with GUTA-clinic laboratory. The device registers high-frequency active oscillation of the head. This oscillation test was tried in 20 healthy individuals aged 20 to 60 years and was found easy to perform and highly informative. This technique can be used as an additional vestibular test in assessing function of the vestibular analyser. PMID:10771602

  20. High-frequency voltage-controlled-oscillator for use with inverted- mesa quartz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, K.O.

    1996-08-01

    An oscillator circuit has been developed that uses inverted mesa resonators, in a high precision VCO application, at frequencies historically dominated by SAW designs. This design incorporates a frequency tripler that provides a 600 MHz output capability using a 200 MHz 3{sup rd} overtone resonator. This design has advantages over equivalent SAW alternatives: lower power consumption, superior aging characteristics, linear frequency pulling and low frequency versus temperature sensitivity. The VCO presented demonstrates {gt} +/- 60 ppm pullability (0 to 7V control), tuning linearity better than +/- 5% with phase noise at 1 kHz {lt} -110 DBc/Hz. this oscillator- tripler exploits the nonlinear characteristics of an emitter-coupled pair differential amplifier to obtain a high performance oscillator design.

  1. High-frequency neural oscillations and visual processing deficits in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Heng-Ru May; Lana, Luiz; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Visual information is fundamental to how we understand our environment, make predictions, and interact with others. Recent research has underscored the importance of visuo-perceptual dysfunctions for cognitive deficits and pathophysiological processes in schizophrenia. In the current paper, we review evidence for the relevance of high frequency (beta/gamma) oscillations towards visuo-perceptual dysfunctions in schizophrenia. In the first part of the paper, we examine the relationship between beta/gamma band oscillations and visual processing during normal brain functioning. We then summarize EEG/MEG-studies which demonstrate reduced amplitude and synchrony of high-frequency activity during visual stimulation in schizophrenia. In the final part of the paper, we identify neurobiological correlates as well as offer perspectives for future research to stimulate further inquiry into the role of high-frequency oscillations in visual processing impairments in the disorder. PMID:24130535

  2. High power single frequency solid state master oscillator power amplifier for gravitational wave detection.

    PubMed

    Basu, Chandrajit; Wessels, Peter; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar

    2012-07-15

    High power single frequency, single mode, linearly polarized laser output at the 1 μm regime is in demand for the interferometric gravitational wave detectors (GWDs). A robust single frequency solid state master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) is a promising candidate for such applications. We present a single frequency solid state multistage MOPA system delivering 177 W of linearly polarized output power at 1 μm with 83.5% TEM(00) mode content. PMID:22825159

  3. Interictal high-frequency oscillations (80-500 Hz) in the human epileptic brain: entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Bragin, Anatol; Wilson, Charles L; Staba, Richard J; Reddick, Mark; Fried, Itzhak; Engel, Jerome

    2002-10-01

    Unique high-frequency oscillations of 250 to 500 Hz, termed fast ripples, have been identified in seizure-generating limbic areas in rats made epileptic by intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid, and in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. In the rat, fast ripples clearly are generated by a different neuronal population than normally occurring endogenous ripple oscillations (100-200 Hz), but this distinction has not been previously evaluated in humans. The characteristics of oscillations in the ripple and fast ripple frequency bands were compared in the entorhinal cortex of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy using local field potential and unit recordings from chronically implanted bundles of eight microelectrodes with tips spaced 500 microm apart. The results showed that ripple oscillations possessed different voltage versus depth profiles compared with fast ripple oscillations. Fast ripple oscillations usually demonstrated a reversal of polarity in the middle layers of entorhinal cortex, whereas ripple oscillations rarely showed reversals across entorhinal cortex layers. There was no significant difference in the amplitude distributions of ripple and fast ripple oscillations. Furthermore, multiunit synchronization was significantly increased during fast ripple oscillations compared with ripple oscillations (p < 0.001). These data recorded from the mesial temporal lobe of epileptic patients suggest that the cellular networks underlying fast ripple generation are more localized than those involved in the generation of normally occurring ripple oscillations. Results from this study are consistent with previous studies in the intrahippocampal kainic acid rat model of chronic epilepsy that provide evidence supporting the view that fast ripples in the human brain reflect localized pathological events related to epileptogenesis. PMID:12325068

  4. Ictal high frequency oscillations distinguish two types of seizure territories in humans

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Shennan A.; Banks, Garrett P.; McKhann, Guy M.; Goodman, Robert R.; Emerson, Ronald G.; Trevelyan, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    High frequency oscillations have been proposed as a clinically useful biomarker of seizure generating sites. We used a unique set of human microelectrode array recordings (four patients, 10 seizures), in which propagating seizure wavefronts could be readily identified, to investigate the basis of ictal high frequency activity at the cortical (subdural) surface. Sustained, repetitive transient increases in high gamma (80–150 Hz) amplitude, phase-locked to the low-frequency (1–25 Hz) ictal rhythm, correlated with strong multi-unit firing bursts synchronized across the core territory of the seizure. These repetitive high frequency oscillations were seen in recordings from subdural electrodes adjacent to the microelectrode array several seconds after seizure onset, following ictal wavefront passage. Conversely, microelectrode recordings demonstrating only low-level, heterogeneous neural firing correlated with a lack of high frequency oscillations in adjacent subdural recording sites, despite the presence of a strong low-frequency signature. Previously, we reported that this pattern indicates a failure of the seizure to invade the area, because of a feedforward inhibitory veto mechanism. Because multi-unit firing rate and high gamma amplitude are closely related, high frequency oscillations can be used as a surrogate marker to distinguish the core seizure territory from the surrounding penumbra. We developed an efficient measure to detect delayed-onset, sustained ictal high frequency oscillations based on cross-frequency coupling between high gamma amplitude and the low-frequency (1–25 Hz) ictal rhythm. When applied to the broader subdural recording, this measure consistently predicted the timing or failure of ictal invasion, and revealed a surprisingly small and slowly spreading seizure core surrounded by a far larger penumbral territory. Our findings thus establish an underlying neural mechanism for delayed-onset, sustained ictal high frequency oscillations, and

  5. Respiratory Control in Stuttering Speakers: Evidence from Respiratory High-Frequency Oscillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Margaret; Smith, Anne

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether stuttering speakers (N=10) differed from fluent speakers in relations between the neural control systems for speech and life support. It concluded that in some stuttering speakers the relations between respiratory controllers are atypical, but that high participation by the high frequency oscillation-producing circuitry…

  6. High-frequency current oscillations in graphene-boron nitride resonant tunnel diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenaway, Mark; Gaskell, Jenn; Eaves, Laurence; Novoselov, Kostya; Mishchenko, Artem; Geim, Andre; Fromhold, Mark

    The successful realisation of multilayer graphene-hBN-graphene resonant tunnelling diodes (graphene- RTDs) with negative differential conductance (NDC) and MHz current oscillations offers the exciting possibility of exploiting them as high-frequency oscillators and mixers. In this paper, we examine their potential for generating higher frequencies by simulating the oscillations in the tunnel current and charge that arise when the device is biased in the NDC region and placed in a resonant circuit. Using the Bardeen transfer Hamiltonian method, we examine the effect on the device characteristics of the twist angle, θ, between the two graphene electrodes, the hBN barrier thickness and of the carrier density in the graphene electrodes, which can be adjusted by chemical doping or by an applied bias voltage. The simulations accurately reproduce our recently-reported measurements on these RTDs (Fig. 4,). The results of simulations show that frequencies of tens of GHz are achievable by optimising the device parameters. Leverhulme Trust, UK.

  7. High Frequency Low Amplitude Temperature Oscillations in Loop Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2003-01-01

    The operating temperature of a loop heat pipe (LHP) with a single evaporator is governed by the compensation chamber (CC) temperature, which in turn is a finction of the evaporator power, condenser sink temperature, and ambient temperature. As the operating condition changes, the CC temperature will change during the transient but eventually reach a new steady temperature. Under certain conditions, however, the LHP never really reaches a true steady state, but instead displays an oscillatory behavior. This paper presents a study on the oscillation of the loop operating temperature with amplitudes on the order of one degree Kelvin and frequencies on the order of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -2) Hertz. The source of the high frequency temperature oscillation is the fast movement of the vapor front in the condenser section, which usually occurs when the vapor front is near the condenser inlet or the condenser outlet. At these locations, the vapor front is unable to find a stable position for the given operating conditions, and will move back and forth. The movement of the vapor front causes the movement of the liquid in the condenser and the liquid line, leading to oscillations of the CC and the loop temperatures. Factors that affect the vapor front movement include evaporator power, condenser sink temperature, body forces and whether or the CC temperature is actively controlled. As long as there are no large thermal masses attached to the evaporator, the loop can self adjust rather quickly and the vapor front will move rapidly around the condenser inlet or outlet, leading to high frequency temperature oscillations. The amplitude of temperature oscillation is usually the largest in the liquid line, up to 20 degrees Kelvin in many cases, but diminishes to less than one degree Kelvin in the CC. Furthermore, the high frequency temperature oscillation can occur at any CC temperature when the right combination of the evaporator power and condenser sink temperature prevails.

  8. High-frequency and type-C QPOs from oscillating, precessing hot, thick flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragile, P. Chris; Straub, Odele; Blaes, Omer

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by recent studies showing an apparent correlation between the high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and the low-frequency, type-C QPO in black hole low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), we explore a model that explains all three QPOs in terms of an oscillating, precessing hot flow in the truncated-disc geometry. Our model favours attributing the two high-frequency QPOs, often occurring in a near 3:2 frequency ratio, to the breathing and vertical epicyclic frequency modes of the hot, thick flow, although we cannot rule out the Keplerian and m = -1 radial epicyclic modes. In either case, the type-C QPO is attributed to precession. The correlation of the QPOs comes from the fact that all three frequencies are associated with the same geometrical structure. While the exact QPO frequencies are sensitive to the black hole mass and spin, their evolution over the course of an outburst is mainly tied to the truncation radius between the geometrically thin, optically thick disc and the inner, hot flow. We show that, in the case of the LMXB GRO J1655-40, this model can explain the one simultaneous observation of all three QPOs and that an extrapolation of the model appears to match lower frequency observations where only two of the three components are seen. Thus, this model may be able to unify multiple QPO observations using the properties of a single, simple, geometrical model.

  9. The location of the source of high-frequency solar acoustic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Lu, Edward )

    1991-07-01

    Recently Libbrecht and Jefferies et al. have reported regular peaks in the solar oscillation power spectrum extending well above 5.3 mHz, the maximum frequency of trapped acoustic modes. Kumar et al. argued that these peaks are primarily due to the interference of traveling waves which are excited due to acoustic emission from turbulent convection. In contrast with the standing wave P-mode frequencies below 5.3 mHz, the positions of the high-frequency interference peaks (HIPs) are dependent on the location of the source of the acoustic oscillations. In the present work, Kumar et al.'s argument is strengthened, and more importantly, use is made of the above dependence to determine the acoustic source strength as a function of depth. It is found that the acoustic source profile, and thus the convective velocity, is peaked about 200 km deeper than what is expected from standard mixing length theory. 13 refs.

  10. Experience with high frequency oscillation ventilation during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Boots, R J; Lipman, J; Lassig-Smith, M; Stephens, D P; Thomas, J; Shehabi, Y; Bass, F; Anthony, A; Long, D; Seppelt, I M; Weisbrodt, L; Erickson, S; Beca, J; Sherring, C; McGuiness, S; Parke, R; Stachowski, E R; Boyd, R; Howet, B

    2011-09-01

    During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, large numbers of patients had severe respiratory failure. High frequency oscillation ventilation was used as a salvage technique for profound hypoxaemia. Our aim was to compare this experience with high frequency oscillation ventilation during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic with the same period in 2008 by performing a three-month period prevalence study in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units. The main study end-points were clinical demographics, care delivery and survival. Nine intensive care units contributed data. During 2009 there were 22 H1N1 patients (17 adults, five children) and 10 non-H1N1 patients (five adults, five children), while in 2008, 18 patients (two adults, 16 children) received high frequency oscillation ventilation. The principal non-H1N1 high frequency oscillation ventilation indication was bacterial or viral pneumonia (56%). For H1N1 patients, the median duration of high frequency oscillation ventilation was 3.7 days (interquartile range 1.8 to 5) with concomitant therapies including recruitment manoeuvres (22%), prone ventilation (41%), inhaled prostacyclins (18%) and inhaled nitric oxide (36%). Seven patients received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, six having H1N1. Three patients had extracorporeal membrane oxygenation concurrently, two as salvage therapy following the commencement of high frequency oscillation ventilation. In 2008, no high frequency oscillation ventilation patient received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Overall hospital survival was 77% in H1N1 patients, while survival in patients having adjunctive extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was similar to those receiving high frequency oscillation ventilation alone (65% compared to 71%, P = 1.00). Survival rates were comparable to published extracorporeal membrane oxygenation outcomes. High frequency oscillation ventilation was used successfully as a rescue therapy for severe respiratory failure. High frequency oscillation ventilation

  11. Ultrabroadband generators of noiselike high-frequency and microwave oscillations with electron feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Yu. A.; Starodubov, A. V.; Volkova, L. N.

    2010-02-01

    It is experimentally established that oscillators, such as a low-voltage vircator with electron feedback, are characterized by an ultrabroad generation band (up to four octaves and above). The minimum frequency of oscillations is on the order of 50 MHz, while the maximum frequency is about 3-3.5 GHz. The low-frequency part of the spectrum is related to the oscillations of positive ions in the interaction space.

  12. High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation Successful in Controlling Refractory Asthma

    PubMed Central

    BOSE, SONALI; JUN, JONATHAN; DIETTE, GREGORY B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) has been traditionally implemented for airway secretion clearance in conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and bronchiectasis. There have been few reports of its use in refractory asthma. Case report A 36-year-old, non-smoker male presented with a lifelong history of poorly controlled asthma. Despite multiple controller medications, he reported daily chest congestion, copious phlegm, and frequent exacerbations. Imaging, blood work, and bronchoscopy ruled out atypical infections, immunodeficiency, CF, and other chronic conditions. Pulmonary function tests supported a diagnosis of asthma. Results We initiated HFCWO therapy twice daily in addition to standard inhaled pharmacological therapy. After 2 months, the patient noted resolution of respiratory symptoms as well as improvement in lung function. He remained symptom-free at his 2-year follow-up. Conclusion High-frequency chest oscillation may be useful in phenotypes of asthma characterized by prominent mucus hypersecretion. PMID:23394251

  13. ON THE HIGH-FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Erkut, M. Hakan

    2011-12-10

    We apply the global mode analysis, which has been recently developed for the modeling of kHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from neutron stars, to the inner region of an accretion disk around a rotating black hole. Within a pseudo-Newtonian approach that keeps the ratio of the radial epicyclic frequency {kappa} to the orbital frequency {Omega} the same as the corresponding ratio for a Kerr black hole, we determine the innermost disk region where the hydrodynamic modes grow in amplitude. We find that the radiation flux emerging from the inner disk has the highest values within the same region. Using the flux-weighted averages of the frequency bands over this region we identify the growing modes with highest frequency branches {Omega} + {kappa} and {Omega} to be the plausible candidates for the high-frequency QPO pairs observed in black hole systems. The observed frequency ratio around 1.5 can therefore be understood naturally in terms of the global free oscillations in the innermost region of a viscous accretion disk around a black hole without invoking a particular resonance to produce black hole QPOs. Although the frequency ratio ({Omega} + {kappa})/({Omega}) is found to be not sensitive to the black hole's spin which is good for explaining the high-frequency QPOs, it may work as a limited diagnostic of the spin parameter to distinguish black holes with very large spin from the slowly rotating ones. Within our model we estimate the frequency ratio of a high-frequency QPO pair to be greater than 1.5 if the black hole is a slow rotator. For fast rotating black holes, we expect the same ratio to be less than 1.5.

  14. Low Frequency High Amplitude Temperature Oscillations in Loop Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Rodriquez, Jose; Simpson, Alda D. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a theory that explains low frequency, high amplitude temperature oscillations in loop heat pipe (LHP) operation. Oscillations of the CC temperature with amplitudes on the order of tens of degrees Kelvin and periods on the order of hours have been observed in some LHPs during ambient testing. There are presently no satisfactory explanations for such a phenomenon in the literature. It is well-known that the operating temperature of an LHP with a single evaporator is governed by the compensation chamber (CC) temperature, which in turn is a function of the evaporator heat load, sink temperature, and ambient temperature. As the operating condition changes, the CC temperature will change during the transient but eventually reach a new steady temperature. Under certain conditions, however, the LHP never really reaches a true steady state, but instead displays an oscillatory behavior. The proposed new theory describes why low frequency, high amplitude oscillations may occur when the LHP has a low evaporator power, a low heat sink temperature (below ambient temperature), and a large thermal mass attached to the evaporator. When this condition prevails, there are some complex interactions between the CC, condenser, thermal mass and ambient. The temperature oscillation is a result of the large movement of the vapor front inside the condenser, which is caused by a change in the net evaporator power modulated by the large thermal mass through its interaction with the sink and CC. The theory agrees very well with previously published test data. Effects of various parameters on the amplitude and frequency of the temperature oscillation are also discussed.

  15. Energy Spectra and High Frequency Oscillations in 4U 0614+091

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, E. C.; Kaaret, P.; Chen, K.; Tavani, M.; Barret, D.; Bloser, P.; Grindlay, J.; Harmon, B. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of the high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in 4U 0614+091, combining timing and spectral analysis of RXTE (Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer) observations. The energy spectrum of the source can be described by a power law plus a blackbody component. The blackbody has a variable temperature (kT approximately 0.8 to 1.4 keV) and accounts for 10 to 25% of the total energy flux. The power law flux and photon index also vary (F approximately 0.8 to 1.6 x 10(exp -9) erg/sq cm.s and alpha approximately 2.0 to 2.8 respectively). We find a robust correlation of the frequency of the higher frequency QPO with the flux of the blackbody. The source follows the same relation even in observations separated by several months. The QPO frequency does not have a similarly unique correlation with the total flux or the flux of the power law component. The RMS amplitudes of the higher frequency QPO rise with energy but are consistent with a constant for the lower frequency QPO. These results may be interpreted in terms of a beat frequency model for the production of the high frequency QPOs.

  16. High repetition frequency PPMgOLN mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Liu, Q.; Yan, X.; Chen, H.; Gong, M.

    2010-09-01

    A mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with the idler wavelengths of 3591 nm, 3384 nm, and 3164 nm at the repetition of 76.8 kHz is reported, and a high repetition frequency acousto-optic Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser is used as the pump source. The OPO is designed as an external non-colinear single-resonator optical parametric oscillator. When the power of the pump light is 25.1 W, the idler with the wavelength of 3164 nm and the power of 4.3 W is generated. The corresponding signal light is 1603 nm with the power of 3.1 W. The efficiency from 1064 nm to 3160 nm can reach as high as 17.1%, and the efficiency of the OPO is 29.5%.

  17. High-frequency optical oscillation during the flare phase of the red dwarf EV Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Avgoloupis, S.; Seiradakis, J.

    2006-01-01

    The observational support of the presence of high frequency low amplitude oscillations reported by Zhillyaev et al. 2000 and Contadakis et al. 2004, is highly demanding and will be done by the future observations and by carefully reanalysing the data from our files. In this paper we present the results of the analysis of the B-light curve for a flare of magnitude 1.01,which was observed on September,1993. Despite the low time resolution (sampling interval 12s) we were able to detect transient low amplitude oscillations with period ranging between 30s and 125s with a confidence level higher than 70%. This result is in favour of (or does not contradict) the suggested explanation i.e the evolution of a fast mode magneto-acoustic wave generated at the impulsive phase of the flare and travelling through the magnetic loop

  18. High-frequency optical oscillation during the flare phase of the red dwarf EV Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M.; Avgoloupis, S.; Seiradakis, J.

    2006-01-01

    The observational support of the presence of high frequency low amplitude oscillations reported by Zhillyaev et al. 2000 and Contadakis et al. 2004, is highly demanding and will be done by the future observations and by carefully reanalysing the data from our files. In this paper we present the results of the analysis of the B-light curve for a flare of magnitude 1.01,which was observed on September,1993. Despite the low time resolution (sampling interval 12s) we were able to detect transient low amplitude oscillations with period ranging between 30s and 125s with a confidence level higher than 70%. This result is in favour of (or does not contradict) the suggested explanation i.e the evolution of a fast mode magneto-acoustic wave generated at the impulsive phase of the flare and travelling through the magnetic loop From: Michael E.Contadakis Address: kodadaki@vergina.eng.auth.gr Database: phy

  19. LDRD final report on Bloch Oscillations in two-dimensional nanostructure arrays for high frequency applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Pan, Wei; Reno, John Louis; Wendt, Joel Robert; Barton, Daniel Lee

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the physics of Bloch oscillations (BO) of electrons, engineered in high mobility quantum wells patterned into lateral periodic arrays of nanostructures, i.e. two-dimensional (2D) quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs). A BO occurs when an electron moves out of the Brillouin zone (BZ) in response to a DC electric field, passing back into the BZ on the opposite side. This results in quantum oscillations of the electron--i.e., a high frequency AC current in response to a DC voltage. Thus, engineering a BO will yield continuously electrically tunable high-frequency sources (and detectors) for sensor applications, and be a physics tour-de-force. More than a decade ago, Bloch oscillation (BO) was observed in a quantum well superlattice (QWSL) in short-pulse optical experiments. However, its potential as electrically biased high frequency source and detector so far has not been realized. This is partially due to fast damping of BO in QWSLs. In this project, we have investigated the possibility of improving the stability of BO by fabricating lateral superlattices of periodic coupled nanostructures, such as metal grid, quantum (anti)dots arrays, in high quality GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As heterostructures. In these nanostructures, the lateral quantum confinement has been shown theoretically to suppress the optical-phonon scattering, believed to be the main mechanism for fast damping of BO in QWSLs. Over the last three years, we have made great progress toward demonstrating Bloch oscillations in QDSLs. In the first two years of this project, we studied the negative differential conductance and the Bloch radiation induced edge-magnetoplasmon resonance. Recently, in collaboration with Prof. Kono's group at Rice University, we investigated the time-domain THz magneto-spectroscopy measurements in QDSLs and two-dimensional electron systems. A surprising DC electrical field induced THz phase flip was observed. More measurements are planned to investigate this

  20. Phase reduction of a limit cycle oscillator perturbed by a strong amplitude-modulated high-frequency force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyragas, Kestutis; Novičenko, Viktor

    2015-07-01

    The phase reduction method for a limit cycle oscillator subjected to a strong amplitude-modulated high-frequency force is developed. An equation for the phase dynamics is derived by introducing a new, effective phase response curve. We show that if the effective phase response curve is everywhere positive (negative), then an entrainment of the oscillator to an envelope frequency is possible only when this frequency is higher (lower) than the natural frequency of the oscillator. Also, by using the Pontryagin maximum principle, we have derived an optimal waveform of the perturbation that ensures an entrainment of the oscillator with minimal power. The theoretical results are demonstrated with the Stuart-Landau oscillator and model neurons.

  1. A noninvasive high frequency oscillation ventilator: Achieved by utilizing a blower and a valve.

    PubMed

    Yuan, YueYang; Sun, JianGuo; Wang, Baicun; Feng, Pei; Yang, ChongChang

    2016-02-01

    After the High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (HFOV) has been applied in the invasive ventilator, the new technique of noninvasive High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (nHFOV) which does not require opening the patient's airway has attracted much attention from the field. This paper proposes the design of an experimental positive pressure-controlled nHFOV ventilator which utilizes a blower and a special valve and has three ventilation modes: spontaneous controlled ventilation combining HFOV, time-cycled ventilation combining HFOV (T-HFOV), and continuous positive airway pressure ventilation combining HFOV. Experiments on respiratory model are conducted and demonstrated the feasibility of using nHFOV through the control of fan and valve. The experimental ventilator is able to produce an air flow with small tidal volume (VT) and a large minute ventilation volume (MV) using regular breath tubes and nasal mask (e.g., under T-HFOV mode, with a maximum tidal volume of 100 ml, the minute ventilation volume reached 14 400 ml). In the process of transmission, there is only a minor loss of oscillation pressure. (Under experimental condition and with an oscillation frequency of 2-10 Hz, peak pressure loss was around 0%-50% when it reaches the mask.). PMID:26931897

  2. A noninvasive high frequency oscillation ventilator: Achieved by utilizing a blower and a valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, YueYang; Sun, JianGuo; Wang, Baicun; Feng, Pei; Yang, ChongChang

    2016-02-01

    After the High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (HFOV) has been applied in the invasive ventilator, the new technique of noninvasive High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation (nHFOV) which does not require opening the patient's airway has attracted much attention from the field. This paper proposes the design of an experimental positive pressure-controlled nHFOV ventilator which utilizes a blower and a special valve and has three ventilation modes: spontaneous controlled ventilation combining HFOV, time-cycled ventilation combining HFOV (T-HFOV), and continuous positive airway pressure ventilation combining HFOV. Experiments on respiratory model are conducted and demonstrated the feasibility of using nHFOV through the control of fan and valve. The experimental ventilator is able to produce an air flow with small tidal volume (VT) and a large minute ventilation volume (MV) using regular breath tubes and nasal mask (e.g., under T-HFOV mode, with a maximum tidal volume of 100 ml, the minute ventilation volume reached 14 400 ml). In the process of transmission, there is only a minor loss of oscillation pressure. (Under experimental condition and with an oscillation frequency of 2-10 Hz, peak pressure loss was around 0%-50% when it reaches the mask.)

  3. A model of the spectra and high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-07-01

    High-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) in black hole X-ray binaries have frequencies comparable to the orbital frequency at the innermost stable circular orbit, and therefore may encode information about strong field general relativity. However, the origin of the oscillations and the associated X-ray spectra remain uncertain. I will discuss a new model for these spectra, which also acts to filter coherent QPOs from local accretion disk oscillations. This model explains many puzzling aspects of HFQPOs, makes predictions which are testable with archival and future X-ray data, and can in principle be used as a new method to measure black hole spin.

  4. High-frequency sea level oscillations in the Mediterranean and their connection to synoptic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šepić, Jadranka; Vilibić, Ivica; Lafon, Amaury; Macheboeuf, Loïc; Ivanović, Zvonko

    2015-09-01

    This paper contains a basin-wide assessment of high-frequency sea level oscillations in the Mediterranean Sea for the period from 2010 to 2014. Sea level series with temporal resolutions of 1 min were taken from 29 tide gauges that had been operational for at least 4 years with high-quality time series. The contribution of high-frequency sea level variance (2 min-6 h) to the total and residual sea level variance was estimated to vary between 0.4% and 9.5% and between 0.6% and 12.1%, respectively, but to become dominant at some stations during extreme high-frequency events. A total of 36 high-frequency sea level events were extracted from the series, with some occurring locally in one of the four selected regions of Spain, Sardinia, Sicily and the Greece-Ionian Sea (6 events), some occurring over two or three regions (19 events), and some occurring in all of the selected regions within a period of 1-3 days (11 events). The basin-wide events normally propagate from the western to the eastern parts of the basin, with an average velocity of approximately 30 km/h. Synoptic patterns associated with high-frequency events were analysed, and a high resemblance to patterns associated with meteotsunamis was observed: (i) a cyclone with a centre W-NW from the affected area, (ii) a strong thermal front in the lower troposphere, and (iii) a forefront of an unstable strong mid-tropospheric jet placed over the affected area. The strong coherence between high-frequency sea level events and synoptic patterns introduces the possibility of a timely forecast of these events.

  5. High-Frequency QPOs and Overstable Oscillations of Black-Hole Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong; Fu, Wen; Tsang, David; Horak, Jiri; Yu, Cong

    2013-02-01

    The physical origin of high-frequency QPOs (HFQPOs) in black-hole X-ray binaries remains an enigma despite many years of detailed observational studies. Although there exists a number of models for HFQPOs, many of these are simply ``notions'' or ``concepts'' without actual calculation derived from fluid or disk physics. Future progress requires a combination of numerical simulations and semi-analytic studies to extract physical insights. We review recent works on global oscillation modes in black-hole accretion disks, and explain how, with the help of general relativistic effects, the energy stored in the disk differential rotation can be pumped into global spiral density modes in the disk, making these modes grow to large amplitudes under certain conditions (``corotational instability''). These modes are robust in the presence of disk magnetic fields and turbulence. The computed oscillation mode frequencies are largely consistent with the observed values for HFQPOs in BH X-ray binaries. The approximate 2:3 frequency ratio is also expected from this model. The connection of HFQPOs with other disk properties (such as production of episodic jets) is also discussed.

  6. Highly Stable Wideband Microwave Extraction by Synchronizing Widely Tunable Optoelectronic Oscillator with Optical Frequency Comb

    PubMed Central

    Hou, D.; Xie, X. P.; Zhang, Y. L.; Wu, J. T.; Chen, Z. Y.; Zhao, J. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Optical frequency combs (OFCs), based on mode-locked lasers (MLLs), have attracted considerable attention in many fields over recent years. Among the applications of OFCs, one of the most challenging works is the extraction of a highly stable microwave with low phase noise. Many synchronisation schemes have been exploited to synchronise an electronic oscillator with the pulse train from a MLL, helping to extract an ultra-stable microwave. Here, we demonstrate novel wideband microwave extraction from a stable OFC by synchronising a single widely tunable optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) with an OFC at different harmonic frequencies, using an optical phase detection technique. The tunable range of the proposed microwave extraction extends from 2 GHz to 4 GHz, and in a long-term synchronisation experiment over 12 hours, the proposed synchronisation scheme provided a rms timing drift of 18 fs and frequency instabilities at 1.2 × 10−15/1 s and 2.2 × 10−18/10000 s. PMID:24336459

  7. Low power high-performance radio frequency oscillator for driving ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Benito, F. M.; Partner, H.; Schwindt, P. D. D.

    2011-02-15

    We report a simple, efficient, high voltage radio frequency (RF) generator powered by a single voltage source (1.5-7 V) to resonantly drive ion traps or other capacitive loads. Our circuit is able to deliver RF voltages > 500 V{sub p-p} at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 MHz. This RF oscillator uses low-cost, commercially available components, and can be easily assembled onto a circuit board of a few cm{sup 2}. Because of its simplicity and good efficiency, this circuit is useful in applications requiring small size and low power consumption such as portable ion trap systems where the duration of operation under battery power is of concern.

  8. High frequency stimulation abolishes thalamic network oscillations: an electrophysiological and computational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kendall H.; Hitti, Frederick L.; Chang, Su-Youne; Lee, Dongchul C.; Roberts, David W.; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Leiter, James C.

    2011-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the thalamus has been demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of epilepsy. To investigate the mechanism of action of thalamic DBS, we examined the effects of high frequency stimulation (HFS) on spindle oscillations in thalamic brain slices from ferrets. We recorded intracellular and extracellular electrophysiological activity in the nucleus reticularis thalami (nRt) and in thalamocortical relay (TC) neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus, stimulated the slice using a concentric bipolar electrode, and recorded the level of glutamate within the slice. HFS (100 Hz) of TC neurons generated excitatory post-synaptic potentials, increased the number of action potentials in both TC and nRt neurons, reduced the input resistance, increased the extracellular glutamate concentration, and abolished spindle wave oscillations. HFS of the nRt also suppressed spindle oscillations. In both locations, HFS was associated with significant and persistent elevation in extracellular glutamate levels and suppressed spindle oscillations for many seconds after the cessation of stimulation. We simulated HFS within a computational model of the thalamic network, and HFS also disrupted spindle wave activity, but the suppression of spindle activity was short-lived. Simulated HFS disrupted spindle activity for prolonged periods of time only after glutamate release and glutamate-mediated activation of a hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) was incorporated into the model. Our results suggest that the mechanism of action of thalamic DBS as used in epilepsy may involve the prolonged release of glutamate, which in turn modulates specific ion channels such as Ih, decreases neuronal input resistance, and abolishes thalamic network oscillatory activity.

  9. Computer simulation of respiratory impedance and flow transfer functions during high frequency oscillations.

    PubMed

    Peslin, R

    1989-01-01

    The usefulness of measuring respiratory flow in the airway and at the chest wall and of measuring respiratory input impedance (Z) to monitor high frequency ventilation was investigated by computer simulation using a monoalveolar 10-coefficient model. The latter included a central airway with its resistance (Rc) and inertance (lc), a resistive peripheral airway (Rp), a lumped bronchial compliance (Cb), alveolar gas compliance (Cgas), lung tissue with its resistance (RL) and compliance (CL), and chest wall resistance (RW), inertance (lw) and compliance (Cw). Gas flow in the peripheral airway (Vp), shunt flow through Cb (Vb), gas compression flow (Vgas) and rate of volume change of the lung (VL) and of the chest (VW) were computed and expressed as a function of gas flow in the central airway (Vc). For normal values of the coefficients, Vp/Vc was found to decrease moderately with increasing frequency and was still 0.75 at 20 Hz. Peripheral airway obstruction (Rp x 5) considerably decreased Vp/Vc, particularly at high frequency. It did not change the relationship between the two measurable flows, Vc and Vw, but increased the effective resistance at low frequency and shifted the reactance curve to the right. A reduced lung or chest wall compliance produced little change in Vp/Vc and Z except at very low frequencies; however, it decreased the phase lag between Vw and Vc. Finally, an increased airway wall compliance decreased Vp/Vc, but had little effect on Z and Vw/Vc. It is concluded that measuring respiratory impedance may help in detecting some, but not all of the conditions in which peripheral flow convection is decreased during high frequency oscillations. PMID:2611083

  10. High-Frequency Oscillations Are Not Necessary for Simple Olfactory Discriminations in Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Max L.; Smith, Abigail M.; Best, Aaron R.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Individual olfactory bulb mitral/tufted cells respond preferentially to groups of molecularly similar odorants. Bulbar interneurons such as periglomerular and granule cells are thought to influence mitral/tufted odorant receptive fields through mechanisms such as lateral inhibition. The mitral– granule cell circuit is also important in the generation of the odor-evoked fast oscillations seen in the olfactory bulb local field potentials and hypothesized to be an important indicator of odor quality coding. Infant rats, however, lack a majority of these inhibitory interneurons until the second week of life. It is unclear if these developmental differences affect olfactory bulb odor coding or behavioral odor discrimination. The following experiments are aimed at better understanding odor coding and behavioral odor discrimination in the developing olfactory system. Single-unit recordings from mitral/tufted cells and local field-potential recordings from both the olfactory bulb and anterior piriform cortex were performed in freely breathing urethane-anesthetized rats (postnatal day 7 to adult). Age-dependent behavioral odor discrimination to a homologous series of ethyl esters was also examined using a cross-habituation paradigm. Odorants were equated in all experiments for concentration (150 ppm) using a flow dilution olfactometer. In concordance with the reduced interneuron population, local field potentials in neonates lacked detectable odor-evoked γ-frequency oscillations that were observed in mature animals. However, mitral/tufted cell odorant receptive fields and behavioral odor discrimination did not significantly change, despite known substantial changes in local circuitry and neuronal populations, over the age range examined. The results suggest that high-frequency local field-potential oscillations do not reflect processes critical for simple odor discrimination. PMID:15673658

  11. High-frequency oscillations in human and monkey neocortex during the wake-sleep cycle.

    PubMed

    Le Van Quyen, Michel; Muller, Lyle E; Telenczuk, Bartosz; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G; Dehghani, Nima; Destexhe, Alain

    2016-08-16

    Beta (β)- and gamma (γ)-oscillations are present in different cortical areas and are thought to be inhibition-driven, but it is not known if these properties also apply to γ-oscillations in humans. Here, we analyze such oscillations in high-density microelectrode array recordings in human and monkey during the wake-sleep cycle. In these recordings, units were classified as excitatory and inhibitory cells. We find that γ-oscillations in human and β-oscillations in monkey are characterized by a strong implication of inhibitory neurons, both in terms of their firing rate and their phasic firing with the oscillation cycle. The β- and γ-waves systematically propagate across the array, with similar velocities, during both wake and sleep. However, only in slow-wave sleep (SWS) β- and γ-oscillations are associated with highly coherent and functional interactions across several millimeters of the neocortex. This interaction is specifically pronounced between inhibitory cells. These results suggest that inhibitory cells are dominantly involved in the genesis of β- and γ-oscillations, as well as in the organization of their large-scale coherence in the awake and sleeping brain. The highest oscillation coherence found during SWS suggests that fast oscillations implement a highly coherent reactivation of wake patterns that may support memory consolidation during SWS. PMID:27482084

  12. Towards high-frequency operation of polarization oscillations in spin vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, Markus; Höpfner, Henning; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.; Pusch, Tobias; Michalzik, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Compared to purely charge based devices, spintronic lasers offer promising perspectives for new superior device concepts. Especially vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with spin-polarization (spin-VCSELs) feature ultrafast spin and polarization dynamics. Oscillations in the circular polarization degree can be generated using pulsed spin-injection. The oscillations evolve due to the carrier-spin-photon system that is coupled for the linear modes in the VCSEL's cavity via the birefringence. The polarization oscillations are independent of the conventional relaxation oscillations and have the potential to exceed frequencies of 100 GHz. The oscillations are switchable and can be the basis for ultrafast directly modulated spin-VCSELs for, e.g., communication purposes. The polarization oscillation frequency is mainly determined by the birefringence. We show a method to tune the birefringence and thus the polarization oscillation frequency by adding mechanical strain to the substrate in the vicinity of the laser. We achieved first experimental results for high-frequency operation using 850 nm oxide-confined single-mode VCSELs. The results are compared with simulations using the spin-flip-model for high birefringence values.

  13. High frequency spin torque oscillators with composite free layer spin valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Kanimozhi; Arumugam, Brinda; Rajamani, Amuda

    2016-07-01

    We report the oscillations of magnetic spin components in a composite free layer spin valve. The associated Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski (LLGS) equation is studied by stereographically projecting the spin on to a complex plane and the spin components were found. A fourth order Runge-Kutta numerical integration on LLGS equation also confirms the similar trajectories of the spin components. This study establishes the possibility of a Spin Torque Oscillator in a composite free layer spin valve, where the exchange coupling is ferromagnetic in nature. In-plane and out-of-plane precessional modes of magnetization oscillations were found in zero applied magnetic field and the frequencies of the oscillations were calculated from Fast Fourier Transform of the components of magnetization. Behavior of Power Spectral Density for a range of current density is studied. Finally our analysis shows the occurrence of highest frequency 150 GHz, which is in the second harmonics for the specific choice of system parameters.

  14. High-frequency current oscillations in doped GaAs/AlAs superlattices by travelling dipole domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomburg, E.; Blomeier, T.; Grenzer, J.; Hofbeck, K.; Lingott, I.; Brandl, S.; Ignatov, A. A.; Renk, K. F.; Pavel'ev, D. G.; Koschurinov, Yu.; Melzer, B. Ya.; Ustinov, V.; Ivanov, S.; Zhukov, A.; Kop'ev, P. S.

    1998-07-01

    We report on current oscillations at different oscillation frequencies (2-46 GHz) in GaAs/AlAs superlattices with different miniband widths (16-55 meV) and on the application in microwave oscillators.

  15. Neuromagnetic correlates of developmental changes in endogenous high-frequency brain oscillations in children: a wavelet-based beamformer study.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jing; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yingying; Kotecha, Rupesh; Kirtman, Elijah G; Chen, Yangmei; Huo, Xiaolin; Fujiwara, Hisako; Hemasilpin, Nat; DeGrauw, Ton; Rose, Douglas

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies have found that the brain generates very fast oscillations. The objective of the present study was to investigate the spectral, spatial and coherent features of high-frequency brain oscillations in the developing brain. Sixty healthy children and 20 healthy adults were studied using a 275-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system. MEG data were digitized at 12,000 Hz. The frequency characteristics of neuromagnetic signals in 0.5-2000 Hz were quantitatively determined with Morlet wavelet transform. The magnetic sources were volumetrically estimated with wavelet-based beamformer at 2.5 mm resolution. The neural networks of endogenous brain oscillations were analyzed with coherent imaging. Neuromagnetic activities in 8-12 Hz and 800-900 Hz were found to be the most reliable frequency bands in healthy children. The neuromagnetic signals were localized in the occipital, temporal and frontal cortices. The activities in the occipital and temporal cortices were strongly correlated in 8-12 Hz but not in 800-900 Hz. In comparison to adults, children had brain oscillations in intermingled frequency bands. Developmental changes in children were identified for both low- and high-frequency brain activities. The results of the present study suggest that the development of the brain is associated with spatial and coherent changes of endogenous brain activities in both low- and high-frequency ranges. Analysis of high-frequency neuromagnetic oscillation may provide novel insights into cerebral mechanisms of brain function. The noninvasive measurement of neuromagnetic brain oscillations in the developing brain may open a new window for analysis of brain function. PMID:19362072

  16. High-frequency sarcomeric auto-oscillations induced by heating in living neonatal cardiomyocytes of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Shintani, Seine A.; Oyama, Kotaro; Fukuda, Norio; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • We tested the effects of infra-red laser irradiation on cardiac sarcomere dynamics. • A rise in temperature (>∼38 °C) induced high-frequency sarcomeric auto-oscillations. • These oscillations occurred with and without blockade of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores. • Cardiac sarcomeres can play a role as a temperature-dependent rhythm generator. - Abstract: In the present study, we investigated the effects of infra-red laser irradiation on sarcomere dynamics in living neonatal cardiomyocytes of the rat. A rapid increase in temperature to >∼38 °C induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-independent high-frequency (∼5–10 Hz) sarcomeric auto-oscillations (Hyperthermal Sarcomeric Oscillations; HSOs). In myocytes with the intact sarcoplasmic reticular functions, HSOs coexisted with [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent spontaneous beating in the same sarcomeres, with markedly varying frequencies (∼10 and ∼1 Hz for the former and latter, respectively). HSOs likewise occurred following blockade of the sarcoplasmic reticular functions, with the amplitude becoming larger and the frequency lower in a time-dependent manner. The present findings suggest that in the mammalian heart, sarcomeres spontaneously oscillate at higher frequencies than the sinus rhythm at temperatures slightly above the physiologically relevant levels.

  17. Interplay of Intrinsic and Synaptic Conductances in the Generation of High-Frequency Oscillations in Interneuronal Networks with Irregular Spiking

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Fabiano; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Grayden, David B.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations (above 30 Hz) have been observed in sensory and higher-order brain areas, and are believed to constitute a general hallmark of functional neuronal activation. Fast inhibition in interneuronal networks has been suggested as a general mechanism for the generation of high-frequency oscillations. Certain classes of interneurons exhibit subthreshold oscillations, but the effect of this intrinsic neuronal property on the population rhythm is not completely understood. We study the influence of intrinsic damped subthreshold oscillations in the emergence of collective high-frequency oscillations, and elucidate the dynamical mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon. We simulate neuronal networks composed of either Integrate-and-Fire (IF) or Generalized Integrate-and-Fire (GIF) neurons. The IF model displays purely passive subthreshold dynamics, while the GIF model exhibits subthreshold damped oscillations. Individual neurons receive inhibitory synaptic currents mediated by spiking activity in their neighbors as well as noisy synaptic bombardment, and fire irregularly at a lower rate than population frequency. We identify three factors that affect the influence of single-neuron properties on synchronization mediated by inhibition: i) the firing rate response to the noisy background input, ii) the membrane potential distribution, and iii) the shape of Inhibitory Post-Synaptic Potentials (IPSPs). For hyperpolarizing inhibition, the GIF IPSP profile (factor iii)) exhibits post-inhibitory rebound, which induces a coherent spike-mediated depolarization across cells that greatly facilitates synchronous oscillations. This effect dominates the network dynamics, hence GIF networks display stronger oscillations than IF networks. However, the restorative current in the GIF neuron lowers firing rates and narrows the membrane potential distribution (factors i) and ii), respectively), which tend to decrease synchrony. If inhibition is shunting instead of

  18. The role of high-frequency oscillations in epilepsy surgery planning

    PubMed Central

    Gloss, David; Nolan, Sarah J; Staba, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a serious brain disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Approximately two-thirds of seizures can be controlled with antiepileptic medications (Kwan 2000). For some of the others, surgery can completely eliminate or significantly reduce the occurrence of disabling seizures. Localization of epileptogenic areas for resective surgery is far from perfect, and new tools are being investigated to more accurately localize the epileptogenic zone (the zone of the brain where the seizures begin) and improve the likelihood of freedom from postsurgical seizures. Recordings of pathological high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) may be one such tool. Objectives To assess the ability of HFOs to improve the outcomes of epilepsy surgery by helping to identify more accurately the epileptogenic areas of the brain. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (15 April 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 3), MEDLINE (Ovid) (1946 to 15 April 2013), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (15 April 2013), Web of Knowledge (Thomson Reuters) (15 April 2013), www.clinicaltrials.gov (15 April 2013), and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (15 April 2013). Selection criteria We included studies that provided information on the outcomes of epilepsy surgery at at least six months and which used high-frequency oscillations in making decisions about epilepsy surgery. Data collection and analysis The primary outcome of the review was the Engel Class Outcome System. Secondary outcomes were responder rate, International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) epilepsy surgery outcome, frequency of adverse events from any source and quality of life outcomes. We intended to analyse outcomes via an aggregated data fixed-effect model meta-analysis. Main results Two studies met the inclusion criteria. Both studies were small non-randomised trials, with no

  19. High frequency stability oscillator for surface acoustic wave-based gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; He, Shitang; Li, Shunzhou; Pan, Yong

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a 158 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) oscillator used for a gas sensor. As the oscillator element, a SAW delay line on ST-X quartz substrate with low insertion loss (<8 dB) and single mode selection capability was developed. Low insertion loss was achieved by an electrode width control single phase unidirectional transducer (EWC/SPUDT) configuration. Single mode selection was simply accomplished by a comb transducer which is a means of combining the frequency selectivity of two interdigital transducers (IDTs). Coupling of modes (COM) simulation was performed to predict device performance prior to fabrication. The measured frequency response S12 showed a good agreement with simulated results. The effect of the oscillator circuit system temperature shift upon frequency stability was observed in detail. The experimental results showed that the baseline noise was typically up to ~0.7 × 10-7 in a laboratory environment with temperature control. The oscillator was successfully applied to a gas sensor coated self-assembled composite monolayer as a sensor material for dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate (DMMP). The sensitivity for low DMMP concentration detection was evaluated as ~25 Hz mg-1 m-3, and the threshold detection limit was up to 0.5 mg m-3.

  20. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  1. Detection of High-Frequency Oscillations by Hybrid Depth Electrodes in Standard Clinical Intracranial EEG Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Kondylis, Efstathios D.; Wozny, Thomas A.; Lipski, Witold J.; Popescu, Alexandra; DeStefino, Vincent J.; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Raghu, Vineet K.; Bagic, Anto; Richardson, R. Mark

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) have been proposed as a novel marker for epileptogenic tissue, spurring tremendous research interest into the characterization of these transient events. A wealth of continuously recorded intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG) data is currently available from patients undergoing invasive monitoring for the surgical treatment of epilepsy. In contrast to data recorded on research-customized recording systems, data from clinical acquisition systems remain an underutilized resource for HFO detection in most centers. The effective and reliable use of this clinically obtained data would be an important advance in the ongoing study of HFOs and their relationship to ictogenesis. The diagnostic utility of HFOs ultimately will be limited by the ability of clinicians to detect these brief, sporadic, and low amplitude events in an electrically noisy clinical environment. Indeed, one of the most significant factors limiting the use of such clinical recordings for research purposes is their low signal to noise ratio, especially in the higher frequency bands. In order to investigate the presence of HFOs in clinical data, we first obtained continuous intracranial recordings in a typical clinical environment using a commercially available, commonly utilized data acquisition system and “off the shelf” hybrid macro-/micro-depth electrodes. These data were then inspected for the presence of HFOs using semi-automated methods and expert manual review. With targeted removal of noise frequency content, HFOs were detected on both macro- and micro-contacts, and preferentially localized to seizure onset zones. HFOs detected by the offline, semi-automated method were also validated in the clinical viewer, demonstrating that (1) this clinical system allows for the visualization of HFOs and (2) with effective signal processing, clinical recordings can yield valuable information for offline analysis. PMID:25147541

  2. Entorhinal cortex lesions result in adenosine-sensitive high frequency oscillations in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Franco; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2015-09-01

    Entorhinal cortex (EC) projections to the hippocampus run along the perforant path and activate the hippocampal area CA3 and the dentate gyrus (DG), which, in turn, drives CA3. Because cortical trauma damages the source of inputs to the hippocampus, we hypothesize that such an event can be reflected in immediate alterations of the hippocampal oscillatory activity. We here explore whether acute, localized disruption of EC-EC connectivity is involved in the generation or modulation of high frequency oscillations (HFOs) in the hippocampus. We conducted in vitro electrophysiological recordings in CA3 and DG of combined EC-hippocampal transversal slices prepared from intact brains and from brains with a spatially defined, transversal cut of the EC made in situ, 2h before in vitro recordings commenced. We also determined if pharmacological manipulations of the adenosine system modulated the fast oscillatory activity. EC-hippocampal slices prepared from brains, in which a transversal lesion of the EC was uni- or bilaterally conducted in situ, displayed spontaneous epileptiform events with superimposed ripples (150-250 Hz) and fast ripples (>250 Hz), whereas those obtained from non-lesioned brains did not have spontaneous HFOs. However, in the latter, high frequency stimulation applied to the perforant path produced ripple activity in area CA3. Spontaneous fast ripples were prevented by conducting the slicing procedure and incubating the slices both in a Na(+)-free medium and in a low Ca(++)-high Mg(++) medium for an hour before recording commenced, under normal Na(+) concentration. Activation of A1, but not A2, receptors produced a strong inhibition of the incidence and spectral power of fast ripples but did not change their intrinsic frequency. Our data show that the disruption of EC-to-EC connections can immediately disinhibit hippocampal CA3 area to generate HFOs on top of epileptiform events, probably constituting an irritating focus long before overt epileptic

  3. Clinical Utility of Interictal High-Frequency Oscillations Recorded with Subdural Macroelectrodes in Partial Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jounhong Ryan; Joo, Eun Yeon; Koo, Dae Lim; Hong, Seung Chyul

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is growing interest in high-frequency oscillations (HFO) as electrophysiological biomarkers of the epileptic brain. We evaluated the clinical utility of interictal HFO events, especially their occurrence rates, by comparing the spatial distribution with a clinically determined epileptogenic zone by using subdural macroelectrodes. Methods We obtained intracranial electroencephalogram data with a high temporal resolution (2000 Hz sampling rate, 0.05-500 Hz band-pass filter) from seven patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Three epochs of 5-minute, artifact-free data were selected randomly from the interictal period. HFO candidates were first detected by an automated algorithm and subsequently screened to discard false detections. Validated events were further categorized as fast ripple (FR) and ripple (R) according to their spectral profiles. The occurrence rate of HFOs was calculated for each electrode contact. An HFO events distribution map (EDM) was constructed for each patient to allow visualization of the spatial distribution of their HFO events. Results The subdural macroelectrodes were capable of detecting both R and FR events from the epileptic neocortex. The occurrence rate of HFO events, both FR and R, was significantly higher in the seizure onset zone (SOZ) than in other brain regions. Patient-specific HFO EDMs can facilitate the identification of the location of HFO-generating tissue, and comparison with findings from ictal recordings can provide additional useful information regarding the epileptogenic zone. Conclusions The distribution of interictal HFOs was reasonably consistent with the SOZ. The detection of HFO events and construction of spatial distribution maps appears to be useful for the presurgical mapping of the epileptogenic zone. PMID:22523510

  4. Automatic oscillator frequency control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A frequency control system makes an initial correction of the frequency of its own timing circuit after comparison against a frequency of known accuracy and then sequentially checks and corrects the frequencies of several voltage controlled local oscillator circuits. The timing circuit initiates the machine cycles of a central processing unit which applies a frequency index to an input register in a modulo-sum frequency divider stage and enables a multiplexer to clock an accumulator register in the divider stage with a cyclical signal derived from the oscillator circuit being checked. Upon expiration of the interval, the processing unit compares the remainder held as the contents of the accumulator against a stored zero error constant and applies an appropriate correction word to a correction stage to shift the frequency of the oscillator being checked. A signal from the accumulator register may be used to drive a phase plane ROM and, with periodic shifts in the applied frequency index, to provide frequency shift keying of the resultant output signal. Interposition of a phase adder between the accumulator register and phase plane ROM permits phase shift keying of the output signal by periodic variation in the value of a phase index applied to one input of the phase adder.

  5. Dynamics of interictal spikes and high-frequency oscillations during epileptogenesis in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Salami, Pariya; Lévesque, Maxime; Benini, Ruba; Behr, Charles; Gotman, Jean; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is characterized in humans and in animal models by a seizure-free latent phase that follows an initial brain insult; this period is presumably associated to plastic changes in temporal lobe excitability and connectivity. Here, we analyzed the occurrence of interictal spikes and high frequency oscillations (HFOs; ripples: 80–200 Hz and fast ripples: 250–500 Hz) from 48 h before to 96 h after the first seizure in the rat pilocarpine model of MTLE. Interictal spikes recorded with depth EEG electrodes from the hippocampus CA3 area and entorhinal cortex (EC) were classified as type 1 (characterized by a spike followed by a wave) or type 2 (characterized by a spike with no wave). We found that: (i) there was a switch in the distribution of both types of interictal spikes before and after the occurrence of the first seizure; during the latent phase both types of interictal spikes predominated in the EC whereas during the chronic phase both types of spikes predominated in CA3; (ii) type 2 spike duration decreased in both regions from the latent to the chronic phase; (iii) type 2 spikes associated to fast ripples occurred at higher rates in EC compared to CA3 during the latent phase while they occurred at similar rates in both regions in the chronic phase; and (iv) rates of fast ripples outside of spikes were higher in EC compared to CA3 during the latent phase. Our findings demonstrate that the transition from the latent to the chronic phase is paralleled by dynamic changes in interictal spike and HFO expression in EC and CA3. We propose that these changes may represent biomarkers of epileptogenicity in MTLE. PMID:24686305

  6. High-frequency oscillations in epilepsy and surgical outcome. A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Höller, Yvonne; Kutil, Raoul; Klaffenböck, Lukas; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Höller, Peter M.; Bathke, Arne C.; Jacobs, Julia; Taylor, Alexandra C.; Nardone, Raffaele; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs) are estimated as a potential marker for epileptogenicity. Current research strives for valid evidence that these HFOs could aid the delineation of the to-be resected area in patients with refractory epilepsy and improve surgical outcomes. In the present meta-analysis, we evaluated the relation between resection of regions from which HFOs can be detected and outcome after epilepsy surgery. We conducted a systematic review of all studies that related the resection of HFO-generating areas to postsurgical outcome. We related the outcome (seizure freedom) to resection ratio, that is, the ratio between the number of channels on which HFOs were detected and, among these, the number of channels that were inside the resected area. We compared the resection ratio between seizure free and not seizure free patients. In total, 11 studies were included. In 10 studies, ripples (80–200 Hz) were analyzed, and in 7 studies, fast ripples (>200 Hz) were studied. We found comparable differences (dif) and largely overlapping confidence intervals (CI) in resection ratios between outcome groups for ripples (dif = 0.18; CI: 0.10–0.27) and fast ripples (dif = 0.17; CI: 0.01–0.33). Subgroup analysis showed that automated detection (dif = 0.22; CI: 0.03–0.41) was comparable to visual detection (dif = 0.17; CI: 0.08–0.27). Considering frequency of HFOs (dif = 0.24; CI: 0.09–0.38) was related more strongly to outcome than considering each electrode that was showing HFOs (dif = 0.15; CI = 0.03–0.27). The effect sizes found in the meta-analysis are small but significant. Automated detection and application of a detection threshold in order to detect channels with a frequent occurrence of HFOs is important to yield a marker that could be useful in presurgical evaluation. In order to compare studies with different methodological approaches, detailed and standardized reporting is warranted. PMID:26539097

  7. Detection of High-Frequency Oscillations and Damping from Multi-slit Spectroscopic Observations of the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, T.; Singh, J.; Sindhuja, G.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-01-01

    During the total solar eclipse of 11 July 2010, multi-slit spectroscopic observations of the solar corona were performed from Easter Island, Chile. To search for high-frequency waves, observations were taken at a high cadence in the green line at 5303 Å that is due to [Fe xiv] and the red line at 6374 Å that is due to [Fe x]. The data were analyzed to study the periodic variations in intensity, Doppler velocity, and line width using wavelet analysis. The data with high spectral and temporal resolution enabled us to study the rapid dynamical changes within coronal structures. We find that at certain locations, each parameter shows significant oscillation with periods ranging from 6 - 25 s. For the first time, we were able to detect damping of high-frequency oscillations with periods of about 10 s. If the observed damped oscillations are due to magnetohydrodynamic waves, then they can contribute significantly to the heating of the corona. From a statistical study we try to characterize the nature of the observed oscillations while considering the distribution of power in different line parameters.

  8. A PK-PD model of ketamine-induced high-frequency oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Francisco J.; Ching, ShiNung; Hartnack, Katharine; Fath, Amanda B.; Purdon, Patrick L.; Wilson, Matthew A.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Ketamine is a widely used drug with clinical and research applications, and also known to be used as a recreational drug. Ketamine produces conspicuous changes in the electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals observed both in humans and rodents. In rodents, the intracranial ECoG displays a high-frequency oscillation (HFO) which power is modulated nonlinearly by ketamine dose. Despite the widespread use of ketamine there is no model description of the relationship between the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamics (PK-PDs) of ketamine and the observed HFO power. Approach. In the present study, we developed a PK-PD model based on estimated ketamine concentration, its known pharmacological actions, and observed ECoG effects. The main pharmacological action of ketamine is antagonism of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), which in rodents is accompanied by an HFO observed in the ECoG. At high doses, however, ketamine also acts at non-NMDAR sites, produces loss of consciousness, and the transient disappearance of the HFO. We propose a two-compartment PK model that represents the concentration of ketamine, and a PD model based in opposing effects of the NMDAR and non-NMDAR actions on the HFO power. Main results. We recorded ECoG from the cortex of rats after two doses of ketamine, and extracted the HFO power from the ECoG spectrograms. We fit the PK-PD model to the time course of the HFO power, and showed that the model reproduces the dose-dependent profile of the HFO power. The model provides good fits even in the presence of high variability in HFO power across animals. As expected, the model does not provide good fits to the HFO power after dosing the pure NMDAR antagonist MK-801. Significance. Our study provides a simple model to relate the observed electrophysiological effects of ketamine to its actions at the molecular level at different concentrations. This will improve the study of ketamine and rodent models of schizophrenia to better understand the wide and divergent

  9. High-frequency oscillation in the hippocampus of the behaving rat and its modulation by the histaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Knoche, A; Yokoyama, H; Ponomarenko, A; Frisch, C; Huston, J; Haas, H L

    2003-01-01

    The histaminergic neurons located in the posterior hypothalamus modulate whole brain activity in a manner dependent on behavioral state. We have investigated their influence on high-frequency oscillation (200-Hz ripples) in the hippocampal CA1 region of freely moving rats. The occurrence of these ripples, assumed to be involved in memory trace formation, was markedly enhanced after injection of the H1-antagonists pyrilamine and ketotifen in a lateral ventricle, indicating a tonic activity of the histaminergic system. The H2- and H3-antagonists cimetidine and thioperamide were ineffective. We suggest a mediation of these effects through blocking the known histaminergic excitation of septal neurons. Histamine administered by the intracerebroventricular route had an inhibitory action on ripples. H1-receptor activation, which has been shown to inhibit learning and memory, thus shifts hippocampal activity away from high-frequency oscillation toward theta activity. PMID:12699334

  10. Micromagnetic model analysis of integrated single-pole-type head with tilted spin-torque oscillator for high-frequency microwave-assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Takuto; Kanai, Yasushi; Yoshida, Kazuetsu; Greaves, Simon; Muraoka, Hiroaki

    2015-05-07

    The spin-torque oscillator (STO) is the most important component in microwave-assisted magnetic recording. Some requirements for the STO are: large amplitude and stable oscillation, small injected current, and oscillation at a frequency that excites resonance in a recording medium. It is also necessary for the STO oscillation to closely follow the head coil current. In this paper, STOs were integrated into write heads and micromagnetic analyses carried out to obtain a write head structure with stable STO oscillation that could follow a high-frequency head coil current.

  11. High-Frequency Oscillations Recorded on the Scalp of Patients With Epilepsy Using Tripolar Concentric Ring Electrodes.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most prevalent neurological disorder ([Formula: see text]% prevalence) affecting [Formula: see text] million people worldwide with up to 75% from developing countries. The conventional electroencephalogram is plagued with artifacts from movements, muscles, and other sources. Tripolar concentric ring electrodes automatically attenuate muscle artifacts and provide improved signal quality. We performed basic experiments in healthy humans to show that tripolar concentric ring electrodes can indeed record the physiological alpha waves while eyes are closed. We then conducted concurrent recordings with conventional disc electrodes and tripolar concentric ring electrodes from patients with epilepsy. We found that we could detect high frequency oscillations, a marker for early seizure development and epileptogenic zone, on the scalp surface that appeared to become more narrow-band just prior to seizures. High frequency oscillations preceding seizures were present in an average of 35.5% of tripolar concentric ring electrode data channels for all the patients with epilepsy whose seizures were recorded and absent in the corresponding conventional disc electrode data. An average of 78.2% of channels that contained high frequency oscillations were within the seizure onset or irritative zones determined independently by three epileptologists based on conventional disc electrode data and videos. PMID:27170874

  12. [Low-Frequency Flow Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.

    1997-01-01

    The results of the research conducted under this grant are presented in detail in three Master theses, by Heinrich, Balow, and Broeren. Additional analysis of the experimental data can be found in two AIAA Journal articles and two conference papers. Citations for all of the studies' publications can be found in the bibliography which is attached. The objective of Heinrich's study was to document the low-frequency flow oscillation on the LRN-1007 airfoil, which had been previously observed at low Reynolds number, to determine its origin, and explore the phenomenon at higher Reynolds number. Heinrich performed detailed flow visualization on the airfoil using surface fluorescent oil and laser-sheet off-body visualization. A large leading-edge separation bubble and trailing-edge separation was identified on the airfoil just prior to the onset of the unsteady stall flow oscillation. From the laser-sheet data, the unsteady flow appeared as a massive boundary-layer separation followed by flow reattachment. Hot-wire data were taken in the wake to identify the presence of the flow oscillation and the dominant frequency. The oscillation was found in the flow from a Reynolds number of 0.3 to 1.3 x 10 exp 6. The Strouhal number based on airfoil projected height was nominally 0.02 and increased slightly with increasing Reynolds number and significantly with increasing airfoil angle of attack. Balow focused his research on the leading-edge separation bubble which was hypothesized to be the origin of the low-frequency oscillation. Initially, experimental measurements in the bubble at the onset of the low-frequency oscillation were attempted to study the characteristics of the bubble and explain possible relationships to the shear-layer-flapping phenomena. Unfortunately, the bubble proved to be extremely sensitive to the probe interference and it drastically reduced the size of the bubble. These detailed measurements were then abandoned by Balow. However, this led to a series of

  13. Aminergic control of high-frequency (approximately 200 Hz) network oscillations in the hippocampus of the behaving rat.

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, Alexei A; Knoche, Anja; Korotkova, Tatiana M; Haas, Helmut L

    2003-09-11

    Hippocampal high-frequency (200 Hz, 'ripple') oscillations were recorded in the CA1 area of behaving rats. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist pyrilamine facilitated while the H2-antagonist zolantidine (5 mg/kg i.p) transiently decreased ripple occurrence. Thioperamide, an H3 antagonist, had no effect. The 5-HT1A-receptor antagonist WAY100635 (50 microg i.c.v.) reduced the occurrence and the intrinsic frequency of ripples. The 5-HT3-receptor antagonist Y-25130 (i.c.v.) increased the number but reduced the amplitude of ripples. All the treatments affected sharp-waves and ripple oscillations to the same extent. Changes of ripple occurrence were not secondary to alterations of behavior. In the light of these divergent actions via different receptor subtypes the net effect of aminergic innervations will be determined by their state-dependent activities and mutual interactions as well as receptor localizations. PMID:12902028

  14. Evolution of High-Frequency Turbulence During Limit-Cycle Oscillations on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, J. C.; Marinoni, A.; Davis, E. M.; Porkolab, M.; Burrell, K. H.

    2014-10-01

    Limit-cycle oscillations (LCO) can provide insight into the interplay between shear and turbulence in triggering the H-mode transition. The Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic on DIII-D is particularly sensitive to density fluctuations in the highly sheared flow in the H-mode/LCO edge due to sensitivity to finite radial wave number (kr ~kθ) and large bandwidth (10 kHz < f < 2 MHz). Each roughly 1 ms oscillation in the LCO (10s of ms) exhibits a period of highly Doppler shifted, highly sheared turbulence which terminates at a burst of low-f turbulence. As the Doppler backscattering (DBS) diagnostic records a gradual increase in fluctuation amplitude rather than a burst, the PCI signal can be explained by a sudden decrease in radial correlation length caused by a burst in zonal flows. Both diagnostics are consistent with results of 1D models. Comparison of LCOs of different durations reveals a threshold-like behavior in mean flow. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-94ER54235 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  15. High-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in the Black Hole X-Ray Transient XTE J1650-500

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Jeroen; Klein-Wolt, Marc; Rossi, Sabrina; Miller, Jon M.; Wijnands, Rudy; Belloni, Tomaso; VanDerKlis, Michiel; Lewin, Walter H. G.

    2003-01-01

    We report the detection of high-frequency variability in the black hole X-ray transient XTE 51650-500. A quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) was found at 250 Hz during a transition from the hard to the soft state. We also detected less coherent variability around 50 Hz that disappeared when the 250 Hz QPO showed up. There are indications that when the energy spectrum hardened the QPO frequency increased from approx. 110 to approx. 270 Hz, although the observed frequencies are also consistent with being 1 : 2 : 3 harmonics of each other. Interpreting the 250 Hz as the orbital frequency at the innermost stable orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole leads to a mass estimate of 8.2 solar mass. The spectral results by Miller et al., which suggest considerable black hole spin, would imply a higher mass.

  16. A high-field magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using an oven-controlled crystal oscillator as the local oscillator of its radio frequency transceiver.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Tang, Weinan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-09-01

    A home-made high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrometer with multiple receiving channels is described. The radio frequency (RF) transceiver of the spectrometer consists of digital intermediate frequency (IF) circuits and corresponding mixing circuits. A direct digital synthesis device is employed to generate the IF pulse; the IF signal from a down-conversion circuit is sampled and followed by digital quadrature detection. Both the IF generation and the IF sampling use a 50 MHz clock. An oven-controlled crystal oscillator, which has outstanding spectral purity and a compact circuit, is used as the local oscillator of the RF transceiver. A digital signal processor works as the pulse programmer of the spectrometer, as a result, 32 control lines can be generated simultaneously while an event is triggered. Field programmable gate array devices are utilized as the auxiliary controllers of the IF generation, IF receiving, and gradient control. High performance, including 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, 1 MHz receiving bandwidth, and 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, is achieved. High-quality images on a 1.5 T MRI system using the spectrometer are obtained. PMID:25273752

  17. A tunable dual frequency dye laser - dual frequency oscillator design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abury, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The pulsed dye laser offers a tunable oscillator, followed by three amplifiers. It is pumped by a dual frequency Nd:YAG laser. Tuning and spectral width are controlled by a holographic network connected to a high power telescope. The modified two wavelength dye laser allows for absorption lidar techniques for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Line switching is achieved by electrooptical commutation. A feasibility experiment was performed with the original oscillator. A model was then built, and tested with different dyes. After a few modifications were made to improve the conversion efficiency, this oscillator was inserted in the laser to check whether the amplifier stages were correctly adjusted.

  18. Studying X-Ray Binaries with High Energy Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.; West, Donald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to further our understanding of the dynamics of secreting neutron stars and black holes in the hope of using these systems as probes of the physics of strong gravitational fetus. The main focus of this work has been a multi-year program of simultaneous millisecond X-ray timing and spectral observations carried out with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) to perform the X-ray timing and one of the satellites Asca, BeppoSAX, or Chandra to perform X-ray spectral measurements. With the advent of Chandra, we have extended our work to incLude extragalactic X-ray binaries. We conducted a comprehensive study of the X-ray and radio behavior of the Black Hole Candidate (BHC) X-ray transient XTE J1550-564 using RXTE, Chandra, and the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We showed that strong radio emission is associated with major X-ray outbursts involving an X-ray state transition, while a compact radio jet is seen in the low/hard X-ray state found in the outburst decay. Interesting, the total energy required to produce the compact jet may be a substantial fraction of the total accretion energy of the system in that state. We also performed a detailed study of the spectral and timing properties of the decay. In joint RXTE/BeppoSAX observations of the neutron-star X-ray binary Cyg X-2, we discovered a correlation between the timing properties (the frequency of the horizontal branch oscillations) and the properties of a soft, thermal component of the X-ray spectrum. d e showed that more detoscillations in both the persistent emission and in the X-ray bursts.

  19. Playing the notes of DNA with light: extremely high frequency nanomechanical oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotnala, Abhay; Wheaton, Skyler; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    We use a double nanohole (DNH) optical tweezer with two trapping lasers beating to excite the vibrational modes of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fragments in the extremely high frequency range. We find the resonant vibration frequency of a 20 base ssDNA to be 40 GHz. We show that the change in the resonant frequency for different lengths of the DNA strand is in good agreement with one dimensional lattice vibration theory. Thus the DNH tweezer system could distinguish between different lengths of DNA strands with resolution down to a few bases. By varying the base sequence and length, it is possible to adjust the resonance frequency vibration spectrum. The technique shows the potential for use in sequencing applications if we can improve the resolution of the present system to detect changes in resonant frequency for a single base change in a given sequence. The technique is single-molecule and label-free as compared to the existing methods used for DNA characterization like gel electrophoresis.

  20. Network Mechanisms Generating Abnormal and Normal Hippocampal High-Frequency Oscillations: A Computational Analysis1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Gliske, Stephen; Catoni, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) are an intriguing potential biomarker for epilepsy, typically categorized according to peak frequency as either ripples (100–250 Hz) or fast ripples (>250 Hz). In the hippocampus, fast ripples were originally thought to be more specific to epileptic tissue, but it is still very difficult to distinguish which HFOs are caused by normal versus pathological brain activity. In this study, we use a computational model of hippocampus to investigate possible network mechanisms underpinning normal ripples, pathological ripples, and fast ripples. Our results unify several prior findings regarding HFO mechanisms, and also make several new predictions regarding abnormal HFOs. We show that HFOs are generic, emergent phenomena whose characteristics reflect a wide range of connectivity and network input. Although produced by different mechanisms, both normal and abnormal HFOs generate similar ripple frequencies, underscoring that peak frequency is unable to distinguish the two. Abnormal ripples are generic phenomena that arise when input to pyramidal cells overcomes network inhibition, resulting in high-frequency, uncoordinated firing. In addition, fast ripples transiently and sporadically arise from the precise conditions that produce abnormal ripples. Lastly, we show that such abnormal conditions do not require any specific network structure to produce coherent HFOs, as even completely asynchronous activity is capable of producing abnormal ripples and fast ripples in this manner. These results provide a generic, network-based explanation for the link between pathological ripples and fast ripples, and a unifying description for the entire spectrum from normal ripples to pathological fast ripples. PMID:26146658

  1. Inspiratory High Frequency Airway Oscillation Attenuates Resistive Loaded Dyspnea and Modulates Respiratory Function in Young Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Theresa; Sumners, David Paul; Green, David Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Direct chest-wall percussion can reduce breathlessness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and respiratory function may be improved, in health and disease, by respiratory muscle training (RMT). We tested whether high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO), a novel form of airflow oscillation generation can modulate induced dyspnoea and respiratory strength and/or patterns following 5 weeks of HFAO training (n = 20) compared to a SHAM-RMT (conventional flow-resistive RMT) device (n = 15) in healthy volunteers (13 males; aged 20–36 yrs). HFAO causes oscillations with peak-to-peak amplitude of 1 cm H2O, whereas the SHAM-RMT device was identical but created no pressure oscillation. Respiratory function, dyspnoea and ventilation during 3 minutes of spontaneous resting ventilation, 1 minute of maximal voluntary hyperventilation and 1 minute breathing against a moderate inspiratory resistance, were compared PRE and POST 5-weeks of training (2×30 breaths at 70% peak flow, 5 days a week). Training significantly reduced NRS dyspnoea scores during resistive loaded ventilation, both in the HFAO (p = 0.003) and SHAM-RMT (p = 0.005) groups. Maximum inspiratory static pressure (cm H2O) was significantly increased by HFAO training (vs. PRE; p<0.001). Maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure was increased by training in both the HFAO (vs. PRE; p<0.001) and SHAM-RMT (vs. PRE; p = 0.021) groups. Peak inspiratory flow rate (L.s−1) achieved during the maximum inspiratory dynamic pressure manoeuvre increased significantly POST (vs. PRE; p = 0.001) in the HFAO group only. HFAO reduced inspiratory resistive loading–induced dyspnoea and augments static and dynamic maximal respiratory manoeuvre performance in excess of flow-resistive IMT (SHAM-RMT) in healthy individuals without the respiratory discomfort associated with RMT. PMID:24651392

  2. Alterations in High-Frequency Neuronal Oscillations in a Cynomolgus Macaque Test of Sustained Attention Following NMDA Receptor Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Goonawardena, Anushka V; Heiss, Jaime; Glavis-Bloom, Courtney; Trube, Gerhard; Borroni, Edilio; Alberati, Daniela; Wallace, Tanya L

    2016-04-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency range (30-80 Hz) are disturbed in schizophrenic patients during cognitive processes and may represent an endophenotype of the disease. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been used experimentally to induce schizophrenia-like symptoms including cognitive deficits in animals and humans. Here we characterized neuronal oscillations and event-related potentials (ERPs) in Cynomolgus macaques fully trained to perform a continuous performance test (CPT) in the presence and absence of the NMDA antagonist phencyclidine (PCP). Macaques (n=8) were trained to touch 'target' stimuli and ignore 'distractor' stimuli presented randomly on a touchscreen. Subsequently, all subjects were implanted with epidural EEG electrodes over frontal (FC) and parietal cortices (PC) and later tested under vehicle (saline, i.m.) or acute PCP (0.1-0.3 mg/kg, i.m.) conditions. Compared with vehicle treatment, PCP produced a significant dose-dependent decrease in CPT performance accuracy and increased reaction times. Furthermore, PCP elevated the amplitudes of 'low' (30-50 Hz) and 'high' (51-80 Hz) gamma oscillations in FC and PC around target presentations for all correct responses. The CPT accuracy was inversely correlated with the gamma band amplitude in the presence of PCP. Additionally, PCP delayed the N100 peak latency in FC, and prolonged and suppressed the cognitively relevant P300 component of mean ERPs in FC and PC, respectively. The NMDA receptor antagonist-induced alteration in neuronal oscillations and ERPs may contribute to the observed cognitive deficits in macaques, and enhance our understanding of EEG recordings as a translatable biomarker. PMID:26354045

  3. DISCOVERY OF HIGH-FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE BLACK HOLE CANDIDATE IGR J17091-3624

    SciTech Connect

    Altamirano, D.; Belloni, T.

    2012-03-15

    We report the discovery of 8.5{sigma} high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) at 66 Hz in the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data of the black hole candidate IGR J17091-3624, a system whose X-ray properties are very similar to those of microquasar GRS 1915+105. The centroid frequency of the strongest peak is {approx}66 Hz, its quality factor above five, and its rms is between 4% and 10%. We found a possible additional peak at 164 Hz when selecting a subset of the data; however, at the 4.5{sigma} level we consider this detection marginal. These QPOs have hard spectrum and are stronger in observations performed between 2011 September and October, during which IGR J17091-3624 displayed for the first time light curves that resemble those of the {gamma} variability class in GRS 1915+105. We find that the 66 Hz QPO is also present in previous observations (4.5{sigma}), but only when averaging {approx}235 ks of relatively high count rate data. The fact that the HFQPOs frequency in IGR J17091-3624 matches surprisingly well with that seen in GRS 1915+105 raises questions on the mass scaling of QPOs frequency in these two systems. We discuss some possible interpretations; however, they all strongly depend on the distance and mass of IGR J17091-3624, both completely unconstrained today.

  4. Influences of Head Motion Regression on High-Frequency Oscillation Amplitudes of Resting-State fMRI Signals

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bin-Ke; Zang, Yu-Feng; Liu, Dong-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations (HFOs, >0.1 Hz) of resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) signals have received much attention in recent years. Denoising is critical for HFO studies. Previous work indicated that head motion (HM) has remarkable influences on a variety of rs-fMRI metrics, but its influences on rs-fMRI HFOs are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the impacts of HM regression (HMR) on HFO results using a fast sampling rs-fMRI dataset. We demonstrated that apparent high-frequency (∼0.2–0.4 Hz) components existed in the HM trajectories in almost all subjects. In addition, we found that individual-level HMR could robustly reveal more between-condition (eye-open vs. eye-closed) amplitude differences in high-frequency bands. Although regression of mean framewise displacement (FD) at the group level had little impact on the results, mean FD could significantly account for inter-subject variance of HFOs even after individual-level HMR. Our findings suggest that HM artifacts should not be ignored in HFO studies, and HMR is necessary for detecting HFO between-condition differences. PMID:27303280

  5. [The use of high-frequency chest wall oscillation for the combined treatment of the children presenting with mucoviscidosis].

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Lian, N A; Mikitchenko, N A

    2014-01-01

    Mucoviscidosis is a hereditary disease characterized by the severe clinical course which requires its continuous management by means of appropriate therapeutic and rehabilitative modalities. The objective of the present study was to develop the scientifically grounded rationale for the application of vibration and compression impacts with the use of The Vest clearance system for the clearance of the airways in 30 children at the age varying from 5 to 17 years presenting with mucoviscidosis. The results of the study suggest high effectiveness of high-frequency oscillation of the chest wall in such patients. Moreover, the new data have been obtained illustrating the beneficial influence of this therapeutic modality on the clinical symptoms of the disease, characteristics of the external respiration function, and results of pulseoxymetry. PMID:25087417

  6. High-frequency, correlated nuclear and electron oscillations in molecules in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Lu, Huizhong

    2013-03-01

    We have solved numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) describing dissociative-ionization of a H2 (and of a D2) molecule exposed to intense short-pulse laser light in one dimension. From the time dependent wave function we calculated the total average acceleration of the two electrons and the relative proton acceleration and the average of internuclear distance. We find that the general shape of the power spectra of electron and proton motion is very similar except that for the electrons the peaks occur at odd harmonics whereas for protons the peaks occur at even harmonics. We relate this to the appearance of higher order polarizabilities. The wavelet time-frequency analysis shows that, surprisingly, time profiles of electron and proton accelerations are nearly identical for high order harmonics. The wavelet time profiles confirm predictions of the three-step quasi-classical model of harmonic generation by identifying several (up to three) electron return times with high precision.

  7. Investigation of high frequency oscillations in the OV102 elevon actuation subsystems using continuous system modeling program simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, W. W., Sr.

    1979-01-01

    Two theories emerged as the cause of undesired oscillations at frequencies between 40 and 60 Hz in the Orbiter Vehicle inboard and outboard elevon actuation subsystems during hardware testing. Both the "hardover feedback" and "deadspace" theories were examined using continuous system modeling program simulation. Results did not support the "hardover feedback" theory but showed that deadspace in the torque feedback spring connections to the servospools must be considered to be a possible cause of the oscillations. Further investigation is recommended.

  8. Transient Schrödinger-Poisson simulations of a high-frequency resonant tunneling diode oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennemann, Jan-Frederik; Jüngel, Ansgar; Kosina, Hans

    2013-04-01

    Transient simulations of a resonant tunneling diode oscillator are presented. The semiconductor model for the diode consists of a set of time-dependent Schrödinger equations coupled to the Poisson equation for the electric potential. The one-dimensional Schrödinger equations are discretized by the finite-difference Crank-Nicolson scheme using memory-type transparent boundary conditions which model the injection of electrons from the reservoirs. This scheme is unconditionally stable and reflection-free at the boundary. An efficient recursive algorithm due to Arnold, Ehrhardt, and Sofronov is used to implement the transparent boundary conditions, enabling simulations which involve a very large number of time steps. Special care has been taken to provide a discretization of the boundary data which is completely compatible with the underlying finite-difference scheme. The transient regime between two stationary states and the self-oscillatory behavior of an oscillator circuit, containing a resonant tunneling diode, is simulated for the first time.

  9. Graphene mechanical oscillators with tunable frequency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changyao; Lee, Sunwoo; Deshpande, Vikram V; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Lekas, Michael; Shepard, Kenneth; Hone, James

    2013-12-01

    Oscillators, which produce continuous periodic signals from direct current power, are central to modern communications systems, with versatile applications including timing references and frequency modulators. However, conventional oscillators typically consist of macroscopic mechanical resonators such as quartz crystals, which require excessive off-chip space. Here, we report oscillators built on micrometre-size, atomically thin graphene nanomechanical resonators, whose frequencies can be electrostatically tuned by as much as 14%. Self-sustaining mechanical motion is generated and transduced at room temperature in these oscillators using simple electrical circuitry. The prototype graphene voltage-controlled oscillators exhibit frequency stability and a modulation bandwidth sufficient for the modulation of radiofrequency carrier signals. As a demonstration, we use a graphene oscillator as the active element for frequency-modulated signal generation and achieve efficient audio signal transmission. PMID:24240431

  10. Graphene mechanical oscillators with tunable frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changyao; Lee, Sunwoo; Deshpande, Vikram V.; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Lekas, Michael; Shepard, Kenneth; Hone, James

    2013-12-01

    Oscillators, which produce continuous periodic signals from direct current power, are central to modern communications systems, with versatile applications including timing references and frequency modulators. However, conventional oscillators typically consist of macroscopic mechanical resonators such as quartz crystals, which require excessive off-chip space. Here, we report oscillators built on micrometre-size, atomically thin graphene nanomechanical resonators, whose frequencies can be electrostatically tuned by as much as 14%. Self-sustaining mechanical motion is generated and transduced at room temperature in these oscillators using simple electrical circuitry. The prototype graphene voltage-controlled oscillators exhibit frequency stability and a modulation bandwidth sufficient for the modulation of radiofrequency carrier signals. As a demonstration, we use a graphene oscillator as the active element for frequency-modulated signal generation and achieve efficient audio signal transmission.

  11. High power coupled midinfrared free-electron-laser oscillator scheme as a driver for up-frequency conversion processes in the x-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecimer, M.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we present a high-gain free-electron-laser (FEL) oscillator scheme composed of two oscillators that are ideally coupled unidirectionally, with the coupled signal power flowing from the master to the amplifier oscillator. Electron bunches driving the oscillators are in perfect synchronization with the optical pulses building up within the respective cavities. The scheme is applied to a 100 MeV range superconducting energy recovery linac FEL. The computed mJ level, ultrashort pulse (<10cycles) output in the midinfrared region indicates the potential of the proposed FEL oscillator scheme in driving up-frequency conversion processes in the x-ray region, enabling tunable, high average brightness, attosecond scale coherent soft/hard x-ray sources.

  12. Low-frequency oscillations in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Li-Qiu; Han, Liang; Yu, Da-Ren; Guo, Ning

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we summarize the research development of low-frequency oscillations in the last few decades. The findings of physical mechanism, characteristics and stabilizing methods of low-frequency oscillations are discussed. It shows that it is unreasonable and incomplete to model an ionization region separately to analyze the physical mechanism of low-frequency oscillations. Electro-dynamics as well as the formation conditions of ionization distribution play an important role in characteristics and stabilizing of low-frequency oscillations. Understanding the physical mechanism and characteristics of low- frequency oscillations thoroughly and developing a feasible method stabilizing this instability are still important research subjects. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51477035), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. HIT.NSRIF 2015064), and the Open Research Fund Program of State Key Laboratory of Cryogenic Vacuum Technology and Physics, China (Grant No. ZDK201304).

  13. Automated Seizure Onset Zone Approximation Based on Nonharmonic High-Frequency Oscillations in Human Interictal Intracranial EEGs.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Evelien E; Visser, Gerhard H; Velis, Demetrios N; Claus, Steven P; Zijlmans, Maeike; Kalitzin, Stiliyan N

    2015-08-01

    A novel automated algorithm is proposed to approximate the seizure onset zone (SOZ), while providing reproducible output. The SOZ, a surrogate marker for the epileptogenic zone (EZ), was approximated from intracranial electroencephalograms (iEEG) of nine people with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), using three methods: (1) Total ripple length (TRL): Manually segmented high-frequency oscillations, (2) Rippleness (R): Area under the curve (AUC) of the autocorrelation functions envelope, and (3) Autoregressive model residual variation (ARR, novel algorithm): Time-variation of residuals from autoregressive models of iEEG windows. TRL, R, and ARR results were compared in terms of separability, using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, and performance, using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, to the gold standard for SOZ delineation: visual observation of ictal video-iEEGs. TRL, R, and ARR can distinguish signals from iEEG channels located within the SOZ from those outside it (p < 0.01). The ROC AUC was 0.82 for ARR, while it was 0.79 for TRL, and 0.64 for R. ARR outperforms TRL and R, and may be applied to identify channels in the SOZ automatically in interictal iEEGs of people with TLE. ARR, interpreted as evidence for nonharmonicity of high-frequency EEG components, could provide a new way to delineate the EZ, thus contributing to presurgical workup. PMID:25986751

  14. Low-frequency Intensity Variation of the South Asian High and its relationship to Boreal Summer Intraseasonal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Wei; Ren, Xuejuan

    2016-04-01

    The South Asian High (SAH) is an important member among the Asian summer monsoon circulations in the upper troposphere located over the Tibean Plateau and its surrounding areas during boreal summer. This research attempts to study the characteristics and mechanisms of low-frequency oscillation of SAH, using daily ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset and NECP/NCAR OLR data. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF)analysis is performed on 200hPa geopotential height low-frequency anomalies over the 20°-35°N, 35°-110°E for June, July and August from 1979 to 2013. The first EOF mode shows a monopole pattern capturing the strengthening or weakening of the SAH's body. The power spectrum analysis of the corresponding principal component (PC1) time series shows that the first mode has a period about 10-30 days. Positive anomalies appear in the 200hPa geopotential height and negative anomalies appear in their north side when SAH is in positive low-frequency phase. A band with negative outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) anomalies presents from the Arabian Sea, north of Indian Peninsula to Southeast China and Japan Island. Correspondingly, positive anomalous rainfall are contiguous in the north of Indian Peninsula, south of Tibetan Plateau, Southeast China and Japan Island. The lead-lag regression analysis demonstrates that from day -12 to day 0, negative OLR anomalies band move northward and northwest from the equatorial Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengals, the South China sea and Western North Pacific to the Arabian Sea, north of Indian Peninsula, south of Tibetan Plateau, Southeast China and Japan Island. Corresponding to OLR anomalies, positive rainfall anomalies band have the similar evolution. The spatial pattern of anomalies in integrated apparent heat source and integrated apparent moisture sink resemble that of rainfall and OLR, which correspond more anomalous condensation heat release. The lead-lag regression analysis also shows that the OLR band moving northward

  15. Disentangling High Frequency Climate Oscillations In A Volcanic Setting Laguna Lejia, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltzman, S. H.; Ukstins Peate, I.; Giralt, S.; Peate, D. W.; van Alderwerelt, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the tropics response to periods of rapid climate change such as CAPE I and the Younger Dryas is limited. Laguna Lejia (23°30'0" S 67°42'0" E ~4,300m asl), Chile is a small alkaline paleolake located in the central Altiplano. The volcanoes Lascar, Chiliques, Aguas Calientes and Acamarachi surround it. 1-3 mm laminations in calcareous clay sediments deposited on the southern terrace of Lejia record high-resolution chemical variability in the lake. Preliminary U-Th ages range from 19,567 +739/- 734 yr to 4208 +431/-429 yr, indicating that the Lejia terrace deposits span both CAPE I and the Younger Dryas, periods of rapid global climate change. Changes in the major and trace element composition, δ18O and δ13 C isotopic ratios, and the amount of Li, Mg, Ca, and Sr that can be readily leached from high magnesium smectite clays provide a direct proxy for hydrologic fluctuations. A climate signal can be detected through reoccurring trends in the chemical variability of these sediments; however, the detection of this signal is complicated by interaction with surrounding volcanic edifices. Statistical methods such as PCA analyses using R have been implemented to separate groupings of volcanic controlled elemental fluctuations (Fe, Zr, Nd, Ti, and Al) from ones under the influence of climate. Spectral analyses have been applied to high-resolution major element data collected on Lejia's paleoshores tufa deposits. Data was collected on Ca, Mg and As at .5 um intervals using a Jeol JXA- 8230 Electron Microprobe at the University of Iowa, Earth and Environmental Sciences. These analyses provided statistical evidence for cyclisity at intervals of 5-15 um and 75-150 um in the banding of the tufas. While previous literature attributes the larger bands to annual chemical cycles the origin of the smaller bands is currently under investigation.

  16. High Power and Frequency-Agile Optical Parametric Oscillators for Airborne DIAL Measurements of CH4 and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Shuman, T.; Chuang, T.; Hair, J. W.; Refaat, T. F.; Ismail, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Notari, A.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) has the second largest radiative forcing of the long-lived greenhouse gasses (GHG) after carbon dioxide. However, methane's much shorter atmospheric lifetime and much stronger warming potential make its radiative forcing equivalent to that for CO2 over a 20-year time horizon which makes CH4 a particularly attractive target for mitigation strategies. Similar to CH4, water vapor (H2O) is the most dominant of the short-lived GHG in the atmosphere and plays a key role in many atmospheric processes. Atmospheric H2O concentrations span over four orders of magnitude from the planetary boundary layer where high impact weather initiates to lower levels in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) where water vapor has significant and long term impacts on the Earth's radiation budget. NASA Langley has fostered the technology development with Fibertek, Inc. to develop frequency agile and high power (> 3 W) pulsed lasers using similar architectures in the 1645 nm and 935 nm spectral bands for DIAL measurements of CH4 and H2O, respectively. Both systems utilize high power 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency Nd:YAG lasers to generate high power laser emission at the desired wavelength via optical parametric oscillators (OPO). The CH4 OPO, currently in its final build stage in a SBIR Phase II program has demonstrated >2 W average power with injection seeding from a distributed feedback (DFB) laser during risk reduction experiments. The H2O OPO has demonstrated high power operation (>2 W) during the SBIR Phase I program while being injection seeded with a DFB laser, and is currently funded via an SBIR Phase II to build a robust system for future integration into an airborne water vapor DIAL system capable of profiling from the boundary layer up to the UTLS. Both systems have demonstrated operation with active OPO wavelength control to allow for optimization of the DIAL measurements for operation at different altitudes and geographic regions. An

  17. Stabilizing Microwave Frequency of a Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong

    2006-01-01

    A scheme for stabilizing the frequency of a microwave signal is proposed that exploits the operational characteristics of a coupled optoelectronic oscillator (COEO) and related optoelectronic equipment. An essential element in the scheme is a fiber mode-locked laser (MLL), the optical frequency of which is locked to an atomic transition. In this scheme, the optical frequency stability of the mode-locked laser is transferred to that of the microwave in the same device. Relative to prior schemes for using wideband optical frequency comb to stabilize microwave signals, this scheme is simpler and lends itself more readily to implementation in relatively compact, rugged equipment. The anticipated development of small, low-power, lightweight, highly stable microwave oscillators based on this scheme would afford great benefits in communication, navigation, metrology, and fundamental sciences. COEOs of various designs, at various stages of development, in some cases called by different names, have been described in a number of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. A COEO is an optoelectronic apparatus that generates both short (picosecond) optical pulses and a steady microwave signal having an ultrahigh degree of spectral purity. The term "coupled optoelectronic" in the full name of such an apparatus signifies that its optical and electronic oscillations are coupled to each other in a single device. The present frequency-stabilization scheme is best described indirectly by describing the laboratory apparatus used to demonstrate it. The apparatus (see figure) includes a COEO that generates a comb-like optical spectrum, the various frequency components of which interfere, producing short optical pulses. This spectrum is centered at a nominal wavelength of 1,560 nm. The spectrum separation of this comb is about 10 GHz, as determined primarily by the length of an optical loop and the bandpass filter in the microwave feedback loop. The optical loop serves as microwave resonator

  18. Experiments on Suppression of Thermocapillary Oscillations in Sodium Nitrate Floating Half-Zones by High-frequency End-wall Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anilkumar, A.; Grugel, R. N.; Bhowmick, J.; Wang, T.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments to suppress thermocapillary oscillations using high-frequency vibrations were carried out in sodium nitrate floating half-zones. Such a half-zone is formed by melting one end of a vertically held sodium nitrate crystal rod in contact with a hot surface at the top. Thermocapillary convection occurs in the melt because of the temperature gradient at the free surface of the melt. In the experiments, when thermocapillary oscillations occurred, the bottom end of the crystal rod was vibrated at a high frequency to generate a streaming flow in a direction opposite to that of the thermocapillary convection. It is observed that, by generating a sufficiently strong streaming flow, the thermocapillary flow can be offset enough such that the associated thermocapillary oscillations can be quenched.

  19. Damped Oscillator with Delta-Kicked Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1996-01-01

    Exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation for quantum damped oscillator subject to frequency delta-kick describing squeezed states are obtained. The cases of strong, intermediate, and weak damping are investigated.

  20. Two Seizure-Onset Types Reveal Specific Patterns of High-Frequency Oscillations in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Maxime; Salami, Pariya; Gotman, Jean; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations(HFOs; 80–500 Hz ) are thought to mirror the pathophysiological changes occurring in epileptic brains. However, the distribution of HFOs during seizures remains undefined. Here, we recorded from the hippocampal CA3 subfield, subiculum, entorhinal cortex, and dentate gyrus to quantify the occurrence of ripples (80–200 Hz) and fast ripples (250–500 Hz) during low-voltage fast-onset (LVF) and hypersynchronous-onset (HYP) seizures in the rat pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy. We discovered in LVF seizures that (1) progression from preictal to ictal activity was characterized in seizure-onset zones by an increase of ripple rates that were higher when compared with fast ripple rates and (2) ripple rates during the ictal period were higher compared with fast ripple rates in seizure-onset zones and later in regions of secondary spread. In contrast, we found in HYP seizures that (1) fast ripple rates increased during the preictal period and were higher compared with ripple rates in both seizure-onset zones and in regions of secondary spread and (2) they were still higher compared with ripple rates in both seizure-onset zones and regions of secondary spread during the ictal period. Our findings demonstrate that ripples and fast ripples show distinct time- and region-specific patterns during LVF and HYP seizures, thus suggesting that they play specific roles in ictogenesis. PMID:22993442

  1. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Casandra A; Palmer, Cassandra A; Ney, Arthur L; Becker, Brian; Schaffel, Steven D; Quickel, Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequently have chest tubes, drains, catheters, etc. which could become dislodged during HFCWO. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine if HFCWO treatment, as provided by The Vest™ Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Saint Paul, MN), was safe and well tolerated by these patients. Methods Twenty-five blunt thoracic trauma patients were entered into the study. These patients were consented. Each patient was prescribed 2, 15 minute HFCWO treatments per day using The Vest® Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Inc., St Paul, MN). The Vest® system was set to a frequency of 10–12 Hz and a pressure of 2–3 (arbitrary unit). Physiological parameters were measured before, during, and after treatment. Patients were free to refuse or terminate a treatment early for any reason. Results No chest tubes, lines, drains or catheters were dislodged as a result of treatment. One patient with flail chest had a chest tube placed after one treatment due to increasing serous effusion. No treatments were missed and continued without further incident. Post treatment survey showed 76% experienced mild or no pain and more productive cough. Thirty days after discharge there were no deaths or hospital re-admissions. Conclusion This study suggests that HFCWO treatment is safe for trauma patients with lung and chest wall injuries. These findings support further work to demonstrate the airway clearance benefits of HFCWO treatment. PMID:18837992

  2. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Daugey, Thomas; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-11-15

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10{sup −9} at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10{sup −11} τ{sup −1/2} up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance.

  3. Hemodynamic responses can modulate the brain oscillations in low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Feng-Mei; Wang, Yi-Feng; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have showed that the steady-state responses were able to be used as an effective index for modulating the neural oscillations in the high frequency ranges (> 1 Hz). However, the neural oscillations in low frequency ranges (<1 Hz) remain unknown. In this study, a series of fNIRS experimental tests were conducted to validate if the low frequency bands (0.1 Hz - 0.8 Hz) steady-state hemoglobin responses (SSHbRs) could be evoked and modulate the neural oscillation during a serial reaction time (SRT) task.

  4. He's Frequency Formulation for Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geng, Lei; Cai, Xu-Chu

    2007-01-01

    Based on an ancient Chinese algorithm, J H He suggested a simple but effective method to find the frequency of a nonlinear oscillator. In this paper, a modified version is suggested to improve the accuracy of the frequency; two examples are given, revealing that the obtained solutions are of remarkable accuracy and are valid for the whole solution…

  5. A comparison between automated detection methods of high-frequency oscillations (80–500 Hz) during seizures

    PubMed Central

    Salami, Pariya; Lévesque, Maxime; Gotman, Jean; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations (HFOs, ripples: 80–200 Hz, fast ripples: 250–500 Hz) recorded from the epileptic brain are thought to reflect abnormal network-driven activity. They are also better markers of seizure onset zones compared to interictal spikes. There is thus an increasing number of studies analysing HFOs in vitro, in vivo and in the EEG of human patients with refractory epilepsy. However, most of these studies have focused on HFOs during interictal events or at seizure onset, and few have analysed HFOs during seizures. In this study, we are comparing three different automated methods of HFO detection to two methods of visual analysis, during the pre-ictal, ictal and post-ictal periods on multiple channels using the rat pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy. The first method (method 1) detected HFOs using the average of the normalised period, the second (method 2) detected HFOs using the average of the normalised period in 1 s windows and the third (method 3) detected HFOs using the average of a reference period before seizure onset. Overall, methods 2 and 3 showed higher sensitivity compared to method 1. When dividing the analysed traces in pre-, ictal and post-ictal periods, method 3 showed the highest sensitivity during the ictal period compared to method 1, while method 2 was not significantly different from method 1. These findings suggest that method 3 could be used for automated and reliable detection of HFOs on large data sets containing multiple channels during the ictal period. PMID:22983173

  6. RIPPLELAB: A Comprehensive Application for the Detection, Analysis and Classification of High Frequency Oscillations in Electroencephalographic Signals.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Miguel; Alvarado-Rojas, Catalina; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Valderrama, Mario

    2016-01-01

    High Frequency Oscillations (HFOs) in the brain have been associated with different physiological and pathological processes. In epilepsy, HFOs might reflect a mechanism of epileptic phenomena, serving as a biomarker of epileptogenesis and epileptogenicity. Despite the valuable information provided by HFOs, their correct identification is a challenging task. A comprehensive application, RIPPLELAB, was developed to facilitate the analysis of HFOs. RIPPLELAB provides a wide range of tools for HFOs manual and automatic detection and visual validation; all of them are accessible from an intuitive graphical user interface. Four methods for automated detection-as well as several options for visualization and validation of detected events-were implemented and integrated in the application. Analysis of multiple files and channels is possible, and new options can be added by users. All features and capabilities implemented in RIPPLELAB for automatic detection were tested through the analysis of simulated signals and intracranial EEG recordings from epileptic patients (n = 16; 3,471 analyzed hours). Visual validation was also tested, and detected events were classified into different categories. Unlike other available software packages for EEG analysis, RIPPLELAB uniquely provides the appropriate graphical and algorithmic environment for HFOs detection (visual and automatic) and validation, in such a way that the power of elaborated detection methods are available to a wide range of users (experts and non-experts) through the use of this application. We believe that this open-source tool will facilitate and promote the collaboration between clinical and research centers working on the HFOs field. The tool is available under public license and is accessible through a dedicated web site. PMID:27341033

  7. RIPPLELAB: A Comprehensive Application for the Detection, Analysis and Classification of High Frequency Oscillations in Electroencephalographic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Rojas, Catalina; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Valderrama, Mario

    2016-01-01

    High Frequency Oscillations (HFOs) in the brain have been associated with different physiological and pathological processes. In epilepsy, HFOs might reflect a mechanism of epileptic phenomena, serving as a biomarker of epileptogenesis and epileptogenicity. Despite the valuable information provided by HFOs, their correct identification is a challenging task. A comprehensive application, RIPPLELAB, was developed to facilitate the analysis of HFOs. RIPPLELAB provides a wide range of tools for HFOs manual and automatic detection and visual validation; all of them are accessible from an intuitive graphical user interface. Four methods for automated detection—as well as several options for visualization and validation of detected events—were implemented and integrated in the application. Analysis of multiple files and channels is possible, and new options can be added by users. All features and capabilities implemented in RIPPLELAB for automatic detection were tested through the analysis of simulated signals and intracranial EEG recordings from epileptic patients (n = 16; 3,471 analyzed hours). Visual validation was also tested, and detected events were classified into different categories. Unlike other available software packages for EEG analysis, RIPPLELAB uniquely provides the appropriate graphical and algorithmic environment for HFOs detection (visual and automatic) and validation, in such a way that the power of elaborated detection methods are available to a wide range of users (experts and non-experts) through the use of this application. We believe that this open-source tool will facilitate and promote the collaboration between clinical and research centers working on the HFOs field. The tool is available under public license and is accessible through a dedicated web site. PMID:27341033

  8. Ictal onset patterns of local field potentials, high frequency oscillations, and unit activity in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Shennan Aibel; Alvarado-Rojas, Catalina; Bragin, Anatol; Behnke, Eric; Fields, Tony; Fried, Itzhak; Engel, Jerome; Staba, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To characterize local field potentials, high frequency oscillations, and single unit firing patterns in microelectrode recordings of human limbic onset seizures. Methods Wide bandwidth local field potential recordings were acquired from microelectrodes implanted in mesial temporal structures during spontaneous seizures from six patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Results In the seizure onset zone, distinct epileptiform discharges were evident in the local field potential prior to the time of seizure onset in the intracranial EEG. In all three seizures with hypersynchronous (HYP) seizure onset, fast ripples with incrementally increasing power accompanied epileptiform discharges during the transition to the ictal state (p < 0.01). In a single low voltage fast (LVF) onset seizure a triad of evolving HYP LFP discharges, increased single unit activity, and fast ripples of incrementally increasing power were identified ~20 s prior to seizure onset (p < 0.01). In addition, incrementally increasing fast ripples occurred after seizure onset just prior to the transition to LVF activity (p < 0.01). HYP onset was associated with an increase in fast ripple and ripple rate (p < 0.05) and commonly each HYP discharge had a superimposed ripple followed by a fast ripple. Putative excitatory and inhibitory single units could be distinguished during limbic seizure onset, and heterogeneous shifts in firing rate were observed during LVF activity. Significance Epileptiform activity is detected by microelectrodes before it is detected by depth macroelectrodes, and the one clinically identified LVF ictal onset was a HYP onset at the local level. Patterns of incrementally increasing fast ripple power are consistent with observations in rats with experimental hippocampal epilepsy, suggesting that limbic seizures arise when small clusters of synchronously bursting neurons increase in size, coalesce, and reach a critical mass for propagation. PMID:26611159

  9. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, Stephan P.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy.

  10. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, S.P.

    1998-11-24

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy. 14 figs.

  11. Multimode and multistate ladder oscillator and frequency recognition device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Herbert M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A ladder oscillator composed of capacitive and inductive impedances connected together to form a ladder network which has a chosen number N oscillation modes at N different frequencies. Each oscillation mode is characterized by a unique standing wave voltage pattern along the nodes of the ladder oscillator, with the mode in which the ladder oscillator is oscillating being determinable from the amplitudes or phase of the oscillations at the nodes. A logic circuit may be connected to the nodes of the oscillator to compare the phases of selected nodes and thereby determine which mode the oscillator is oscillating in. A ladder oscillator composed of passive capacitive and inductive impedances can be utilized as a frequency recognition device, since the passive ladder oscillator will display the characteristic standing wave patterns if an input signal impressed upon the ladder oscillator is close to one of the mode frequencies of the oscillator. A CL ladder oscillator having series capacitive impedances and shunt inductive impedances can exhibit sustained and autonomous oscillations if active nonlinear devices are connected in parallel with the shunt inductive impedances. The active CL ladder oscillator can be synchronized to input frequencies impressed upon the oscillator, and will continue to oscillate after the input signal has been removed at a mode frequency which is, in general, nearest to the input signal frequency. Autonomous oscillations may also be obtained as desired from the active CL ladder oscillator at the mode frequencies.

  12. A GENERAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF HIGH FREQUENCY QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN BLACK HOLE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Changsheng; Li Xiangdong E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.c

    2010-05-10

    We suggest a possible explanation for the high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in black hole (BH) low-mass X-ray binaries. By solving the perturbation general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations, we find two stable modes of the Alfven wave in the accretion disks with toroidal magnetic fields. We suggest that these two modes may lead to the double high frequency QPOs if they are produced in the transition region between the inner advection-dominated accretion flow and the outer thin disk. This model naturally accounts for the 3:2 relation for the upper and lower frequencies of the QPOs, and the relation between the BH mass and QPO frequency.

  13. Theoretical and experimental analysis of high-power frequency-stabilized semiconductor master oscillator power-amplifier system.

    PubMed

    Ji, Encai; Liu, Qiang; Nie, Mingming; Fu, Xing; Gong, Mali

    2016-04-10

    We present a compact high-power 780 nm frequency-stabilized diode laser with a power of as high as 2.825 W, corresponding to an estimated overall efficiency of 38.5%. The tapered amplifier (TPA) gain was about 24.5 dB, which was basically consistent with the simulation results. The beam quality factor was M2<1.72. The core feature of the system was stabilizing the frequency of the narrowband semiconductor TPA system with the matured saturated absorption spectrum technique. The laser frequency was stabilized against mode hops for a period of >4200  s with a frequency fluctuation around 6.7×10-10 within 1 s of the observation period, and the linewidth was no more than 0.95 MHz. The laser performance indicates that the current frequency-stabilized semiconductor laser has great potential in certain conditions that require several watts of output power. PMID:27139853

  14. Precise Frequency Measurements Using a Superconducting Cavity Stabilized Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Yeh, N.-C.; Jiang, W.; Anderson, V. L.; Asplund, N.

    1999-01-01

    Many physics experiments call on improved resolution to better define the experimental results, thus improving tests of theories. Modern microwave technology combined with high-Q resonators can achieve frequency readout and control with resolutions up to a part in 10(exp 18). When the physical quantity in question in the experiment can be converted to a frequency or a change in frequency, a high-stability microwave oscillator can be applied to obtain state-of-the-art precision. In this work we describe the overall physical concepts and the required experimental procedures for optimizing a high-resolution frequency measurement system that employs a high-Q superconducting microwave cavity and a low-noise frequency synthesizer. The basic approach is to resolve the resonant frequencies of a high-Q (Q > 10(exp 10)) cavity to extremely high precision (one part in 10(exp 17)- 10(exp 18)). Techniques for locking the synthesizer frequency to a resonant frequency of the superconducting cavity to form an ultra-stable oscillator are described. We have recently set up an ultra-high-vacuum high-temperature annealing system to process superconducting niobium cavities, and have been able to consistently achieve Q > 10(exp 9). We have integrated high-Q superconducting cavities with a low-noise microwave synthesizer in a phase-locked-loop to verify the frequency stability of the system. Effects that disturb the cavity resonant frequency (such as the temperature fluctuations and mechanical vibrations) and methods to mitigate those effects are also considered. Applicability of these techniques to experiments will be discussed, and our latest experimental progress in achieving high-resolution frequency measurements using the superconducting-cavity-stabilized-oscillator will be presented.

  15. The effects of high-frequency oscillations in hippocampal electrical activities on the classification of epileptiform events using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Alan W. L.; Jahromi, Shokrollah S.; Khosravani, Houman; Carlen, Peter L.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2006-03-01

    The existence of hippocampal high-frequency electrical activities (greater than 100 Hz) during the progression of seizure episodes in both human and animal experimental models of epilepsy has been well documented (Bragin A, Engel J, Wilson C L, Fried I and Buzsáki G 1999 Hippocampus 9 137-42 Khosravani H, Pinnegar C R, Mitchell J R, Bardakjian B L, Federico P and Carlen P L 2005 Epilepsia 46 1-10). However, this information has not been studied between successive seizure episodes or utilized in the application of seizure classification. In this study, we examine the dynamical changes of an in vitro low Mg2+ rat hippocampal slice model of epilepsy at different frequency bands using wavelet transforms and artificial neural networks. By dividing the time-frequency spectrum of each seizure-like event (SLE) into frequency bins, we can analyze their burst-to-burst variations within individual SLEs as well as between successive SLE episodes. Wavelet energy and wavelet entropy are estimated for intracellular and extracellular electrical recordings using sufficiently high sampling rates (10 kHz). We demonstrate that the activities of high-frequency oscillations in the 100-400 Hz range increase as the slice approaches SLE onsets and in later episodes of SLEs. Utilizing the time-dependent relationship between different frequency bands, we can achieve frequency-dependent state classification. We demonstrate that activities in the frequency range 100-400 Hz are critical for the accurate classification of the different states of electrographic seizure-like episodes (containing interictal, preictal and ictal states) in brain slices undergoing recurrent spontaneous SLEs. While preictal activities can be classified with an average accuracy of 77.4 ± 6.7% utilizing the frequency spectrum in the range 0-400 Hz, we can also achieve a similar level of accuracy by using a nonlinear relationship between 100-400 Hz and <4 Hz frequency bands only.

  16. Scaling of oscillation frequencies in rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda, D.; Deupree, R. G.

    2016-06-01

    Properties of stars undergoing pulsation such as the well-known root-mean-density scaling relation can be useful when trying to match the observed properties of a particular star. It is often assumed that this relation is valid for p-mode frequencies in rotating stars. To examine the change in frequency with rotation and mass, we have studied oscillation frequencies of two-dimensional uniformly rotating zero-age main-sequence stellar models in the δ Scuti mass range. We identified axisymmetric p and g modes for non-rotating models and then traced them as the rotational velocity was increased. We considered a rotation sequence of ten models for four different masses, with the largest rotation rate being about 200 km s-1. The models were required to have the same surface shape between all masses for a given rotation rate. We find that scaling relationships exist among the oscillation frequencies of the same mode for different masses when the models have the same shape. For p modes, this scaling closely follows the period-root-mean-density relation found in spherical stars. The g modes also scale between models of the same shape, with the scaling reflecting the change in properties outside the convective core as the stellar mass increases. These scaling relationships can be particularly useful in finding specific stellar models to match the oscillation frequencies of individual stars. We also find that the large separation scales approximately with the root mean density as the rotation rate increases, although the individual mode frequencies do not.

  17. Direct limits on the oscillation frequency.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-07-14

    We report results of a study of the B(s)(0) oscillation frequency using a large sample of B(s)(0) semileptonic decays corresponding to approximately 1 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in 2002-2006. The amplitude method gives a lower limit on the B(s)(0) oscillation frequency at 14.8 ps(-1) at the 95% C.L. At delta m(s) = 19 ps(-1), the amplitude deviates from the hypothesis A= 0(1) by 2.5 (1.6) standard deviations, corresponding to a two-sided C.L. of 1% (10%). A likelihood scan over the oscillation frequency, delta m(s), gives a most probable value of 19 ps(-1) and a range of 17 < delta m(s) < 21 ps(-1)at the 90% C.L., assuming Gaussian uncertainties. This is the first direct two-sided bound measured by a single experiment. If delta m(s) lies above 22 ps(-1), then the probability that it would produce a likelihood minimum similar to the one observed in the interval 16-22 ps(-1) is (5.0 +/- 0.3)%. PMID:16907434

  18. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, QI; Randall, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Although eastward propagation has long been considered one of the essential features of the Madden-Julian waves, recent observations have revealed a stationary or quasi-stationary component in the oscillations, particularly in measures of the diabatic heating rate. Wave-CISK theories of the low-frequency oscillations have struggled to explain the observed period and vertical structure of the waves. On the other hand, theoretical and numerical studies have shown that low-frequency waves strongly resembling the observed oscillations can be excited by specified low-frequency oscillations of the convective heating. A problem with the latter set of theories is that the cause of the oscillatory heating has not been satisfactorily explained. It is proposed here that the observed low-frequency wave motions are the response to forcing by an essentially stationary, self-excited oscillating heat source that is produced by nonlinear interactions among radiation, cumulus convection, and the surface fluxes of sensible heat and moisture. Feedback of the large-scale motions on the latent heating is not required. Results from two very different one-dimensional models are presented to support this hypothesis. The physical processes included in the models are essentially the same, that is, radiation, cumulus convection, and the surface fluxes of sensible heat and moisture; the first model is highly simplified, however, while the second includes relatively sophisticated parameterizations of all the relevant physical processes. Results from both models show low-frequency oscillations of the latent heating, temperature, and moisture. Experiments show that the oscillations are favored by a warm sea surface and weak surface wind speeds, consistent with the observed conditions over the Indian Ocean and the tropical western Pacific Ocean.

  19. Short-term variability in QT interval and ventricular arrhythmias induced by dofetilide are dependent on high-frequency autonomic oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Champeroux, P; Thireau, J; Judé, S; Laigot-Barbé, C; Maurin, A; Sola, M L; Fowler, J S L; Richard, S; Le Guennec, J Y

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The present study was undertaken to investigate an effect of dofetilide, a potent arrhythmic blocker of the voltage-gated K+ channel, hERG, on cardiac autonomic control. Combined with effects on ardiomyocytes, these properties could influence its arrhythmic potency. Experimental Approach The short-term variability of beat-to-beat QT interval (STVQT), induced by dofetilide is a strong surrogate of Torsades de pointes liability. Involvement of autonomic modulation in STVQT was investigated in healthy cynomolgus monkeys and beagle dogs by power spectral analysis under conditions of autonomic blockade with hexamethonium. Key Results Increase in STVQT induced by dofetilide in monkeys and dogs was closely associated with an enhancement of endogenous heart rate and QT interval high-frequency (HF) oscillations. These effects were fully suppressed under conditions of autonomic blockade with hexamethonium. Ventricular arrhythmias, including Torsades de pointes in monkeys, were prevented in both species when HF oscillations were suppressed by autonomic blockade. Similar enhancements of heart rate HF oscillations were found in dogs with other hERG blockers described as causing Torsades de pointes in humans. Conclusions and Implications These results demonstrate for the first time that beat-to-beat ventricular repolarization variability and ventricular arrhythmias induced by dofetilide are dependent on endogenous HF autonomic oscillations in heart rate. When combined with evidence of hERG-blocking properties, enhancement of endogenous HF oscillations in heart rate could constitute an earlier and more sensitive biomarker than STVQT for Torsades de pointes liability, applicable to preclinical regulatory studies conducted in healthy animals. PMID:25625756

  20. A model of the steep power-law spectra and high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in luminous black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason; Blaes, Omer

    2014-03-01

    We propose a new model of the steep power-law state of luminous black hole X-ray binaries. The model uses the fact that at high luminosities, the inner radii of radiation pressure dominated accretion discs are expected to (i) become effectively optically thin and (ii) produce significant luminosities. The gas temperature therefore rises sharply inwards, producing local saturated Compton spectra with rapidly increasing peak energies. These spectra sum together to form a steep power-law tail to the spectrum. A given photon energy on this tail corresponds to a narrow range in radius, so that local vertical oscillations of the disc naturally produce high-quality high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) in the hard X-ray band. The two lowest order modes have a robust frequency ratio of sqrt{7/3}˜eq 1.53. This model explains the appearance of steep power-law spectra and HFQPOs at high luminosity, the 3:2 HFQPO frequency ratios, and their association with the power-law spectral component. We predict an increase in QPO quality factor when the power spectrum is restricted to a narrower photon energy band, and an increase in HFQPO frequency at higher X-ray energies or lower luminosities. Future X-ray telescopes could detect additional HFQPOs from higher order modes. We demonstrate how this model could be used to measure black hole spin from HFQPOs, and qualitatively estimate the spin of GRO J1655-40 as a/M ˜ 0.4-0.7.

  1. Entrained neural oscillations in multiple frequency bands comodulate behavior

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Molly J.; Herrmann, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Our sensory environment is teeming with complex rhythmic structure, to which neural oscillations can become synchronized. Neural synchronization to environmental rhythms (entrainment) is hypothesized to shape human perception, as rhythmic structure acts to temporally organize cortical excitability. In the current human electroencephalography study, we investigated how behavior is influenced by neural oscillatory dynamics when the rhythmic fluctuations in the sensory environment take on a naturalistic degree of complexity. Listeners detected near-threshold gaps in auditory stimuli that were simultaneously modulated in frequency (frequency modulation, 3.1 Hz) and amplitude (amplitude modulation, 5.075 Hz); modulation rates and types were chosen to mimic the complex rhythmic structure of natural speech. Neural oscillations were entrained by both the frequency modulation and amplitude modulation in the stimulation. Critically, listeners’ target-detection accuracy depended on the specific phase–phase relationship between entrained neural oscillations in both the 3.1-Hz and 5.075-Hz frequency bands, with the best performance occurring when the respective troughs in both neural oscillations coincided. Neural-phase effects were specific to the frequency bands entrained by the rhythmic stimulation. Moreover, the degree of behavioral comodulation by neural phase in both frequency bands exceeded the degree of behavioral modulation by either frequency band alone. Our results elucidate how fluctuating excitability, within and across multiple entrained frequency bands, shapes the effective neural processing of environmental stimuli. More generally, the frequency-specific nature of behavioral comodulation effects suggests that environmental rhythms act to reduce the complexity of high-dimensional neural states. PMID:25267634

  2. Solar oscillation frequency and solar neutrino predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1990-07-05

    The light and velocity variations of the Sun and solar-like stars are unique among intrinsic variable stars. Unlike all other standard classes, such as Cepheids, B stars, and white dwarfs, the pulsation driving is caused by coupling with the acoustic noise in the upper convection zone. Each global pulsation mode is just another degree of freedom for the turbulent convection, and energy is shared equally between these g{sup {minus}}-modes and the solar oscillation modes. This driving and damping, together with the normal stellar pulsation mechanisms produce extremely low amplitude solar oscillations. Actually, the surface layer radiative damping is strong, and the varying oscillation mode amplitudes manifest the stochastic convection driving and the steady damping. Thus stability calculations for solar-like pulsations are difficult and mostly inconclusive, but calculations of pulsation periods are as straightforward as for all the other classes of intrinsic variable stars. The issue that is important for the Sun is its internal structure, because the mass, radius, and luminosity are extremely well known. Conventionally, we need the pulsation constants for each of millions of modes. Unknown parameters for constructing solar models are the composition and its material pressure, energy, and opacity, as well as the convection mixing length. We treat the nuclear energy and neutrino production formulas as sufficiently well known. The presence of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) orbiting the solar center affects the predicted oscillation frequencies so that they do not agree with observations as well as those for models without WIMPs. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Detection With Rhessi of High Frequency X-ray Oscillations in the Tail of the 2004 Hyperflare From SGR 1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Anna L.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2005-01-01

    The recent discovery of high frequency oscillations in giant flares from SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14 may be the first direct detection of vibrations in a neutron star crust. If this interpretation is correct it offers a novel means of testing the neutron star equation of state, crustal breaking strain, and magnetic field configuration. Using timing data from RHESSI, we have confirmed the detection of a 92.5 Hz Quasi-Periodic Oscillation (QPO) in the tail of the SGR 1806-20 giant flare. We also find another, stronger, QPO at higher energies, at 626.5 Hz. Both QPOs are visible only at particular (but different) rotational phases, implying an association with a specific area of the neutron star surface or magnetosphere. At lower frequencies we confirm the detection of an 18 Hz QPO, at the same rotational phase as the 92.5 Hz QPO, and report the additional presence of a broad 26 Hz QPO. We are however unable to make a robust confirmation of the presence of a 30 Hz QPO, despite higher count rates. We discuss our results in the light of neutron star vibration models.

  4. Frequency Tuning Feature of a Reditron Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Genshen; Li, Xiangsheng; Wang, Yong; Li, Chuanlu; Tan, Qimei; Li, Pingping

    1995-08-01

    We report some experimental results which confirm the theoretical analysis of the tuning feature of a reditron oscillator. Here, we produce high power microwave at 10 GHz, and the tuning range of the reditron is 8-13.32 GHz which is controlled by changing both the voltage and the anode-to-cathode separation. We also report a measurement method of the anode-to-cathode distance.

  5. Sustaining GHz oscillation of carbon nanotube based oscillators via a MHz frequency excitation.

    PubMed

    Motevalli, Benyamin; Taherifar, Neda; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-05-20

    There have been intensive studies to investigate the properties of gigahertz nano-oscillators based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Many of these studies, however, revealed that the unique telescopic translational oscillations in such devices would damp quickly due to various energy dissipation mechanisms. This challenge remains the primary obstacle against its practical applications. Herein, we propose a design concept in which a GHz oscillation could be re-excited by a MHz mechanical motion. This design involves a triple-walled CNT, in which sliding of the longer inner tube at a MHz frequency can re-excite and sustain a GHz oscillation of the shorter middle tube. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations prove this design concept at ∼10 nm scale. A mathematical model is developed to explore the feasibility at a larger size scale. As an example, in an oscillatory system with the CNT's length above 100 nm, the high oscillatory frequency range of 1.8-3.3 GHz could be excited by moving the inner tube at a much lower frequency of 53.4 MHz. This design concept together with the mechanical model could energize the development of GHz nano-oscillators in miniaturized electro-mechanical devices. PMID:27070404

  6. Sustaining GHz oscillation of carbon nanotube based oscillators via a MHz frequency excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, Benyamin; Taherifar, Neda; Zhe Liu, Jefferson

    2016-05-01

    There have been intensive studies to investigate the properties of gigahertz nano-oscillators based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Many of these studies, however, revealed that the unique telescopic translational oscillations in such devices would damp quickly due to various energy dissipation mechanisms. This challenge remains the primary obstacle against its practical applications. Herein, we propose a design concept in which a GHz oscillation could be re-excited by a MHz mechanical motion. This design involves a triple-walled CNT, in which sliding of the longer inner tube at a MHz frequency can re-excite and sustain a GHz oscillation of the shorter middle tube. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations prove this design concept at ∼10 nm scale. A mathematical model is developed to explore the feasibility at a larger size scale. As an example, in an oscillatory system with the CNT’s length above 100 nm, the high oscillatory frequency range of 1.8–3.3 GHz could be excited by moving the inner tube at a much lower frequency of 53.4 MHz. This design concept together with the mechanical model could energize the development of GHz nano-oscillators in miniaturized electro-mechanical devices.

  7. Gaseous bubble oscillations in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids under influence of high-frequency acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golykh, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    Progress of technology and medicine dictates the ever-increasing requirements (heat resistance, corrosion resistance, strength properties, impregnating ability, etc.) for non-Newtonian fluids and materials produced on their basis (epoxy resin, coating materials, liquid crystals, etc.). Materials with improved properties obtaining is possible by modification of their physicochemical structure. One of the most promising approaches to the restructuring of non-Newtonian fluids is cavitation generated by high-frequency acoustic vibrations. The efficiency of cavitation in non-Newtonian fluid is determined by dynamics of gaseous bubble. Today, bubble dynamics in isotropic non-Newtonian fluids, in which cavitation bubble shape remains spherical, is most full investigated, because the problem reduces to ordinary differential equation for spherical bubble radius. However, gaseous bubble in anisotropic fluids which are most wide kind of non-Newtonian fluids (due to orientation of macromolecules) deviates from spherical shape due to viscosity dependence on shear rate direction. Therefore, the paper presents the mathematical model of gaseous bubble dynamics in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids. The model is based on general equations for anisotropic non-Newtonian fluid flow. The equations are solved by asymptotic decomposition of fluid flow parameters. It allowed evaluating bubble size and shape evolution depending on rheological properties of liquid and acoustic field characteristics.

  8. Using ictal high-frequency oscillations (80-500Hz) to localize seizure onset zones in childhood absence epilepsy: a MEG study.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ailiang; Xiang, Jing; Tang, Lu; Ge, Huaiting; Liu, Hongxing; Wu, Ting; Chen, Qiqi; Hu, Zheng; Lu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xiaoshan

    2014-04-30

    This study aimed to use ictal high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) ranging from 80Hz to 500Hz to locate seizure onset zones in childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) using non-invasive magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ten drug-naïve children with CAE were studied using a 275-channel MEG system. MEG data were digitized at a sampling rate of 6000Hz. HFO spectral power in real-time spectrograms was assessed using Morlet continuous wavelet transform. Magnetic sources were volumetrically localized through dynamic magnetic source imaging with a slide window. HFOs were identified in all patients. The total time of fast ripples (250-500Hz) was greater than that of ripples (80-250Hz) during absence seizures. The rate of fast ripples was associated with seizure frequency. HFO duration was significantly longer when co-occurring with spikes than when occurring independently, and the maximum frequency of HFOs co-occurring with spikes was higher than that of HFOs occurring independently. HFOs were predominantly localized in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), whereas spikes were widespread to a variety of regions during the absence seizures. Compared with spikes, HFOs appeared to be more focal. The findings indicate that HFOs in the MPFC have a primary function in initializing epileptic activity in CAE. PMID:24582907

  9. Frequency-scanning marginal oscillator for ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Paul R.; Bowers, Michael T.

    1982-07-01

    A number of ion cyclotron resonance applications have arisen in the past few years which require a frequency-scanned detection system. Since the traditional marginal oscillator detector has always been a fixed-frequency detector, alternative detection techniques such as bridge circuit detectors have become widely used. In this paper we present an alternative to the bridge detector, namely, a frequency-scanning marginal oscillator. Requirements and modifications necessary to convert a marginal oscillator to frequency scanning operation are discussed in detail and the necessary circuit diagrams presented. Finally, a theoretical comparison is made between bridge circuit and marginal oscillator sensitivities.

  10. Frequency stabilization in nonlinear MEMS and NEMS oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Omar Daniel; Antonio, Dario

    2014-09-16

    An illustrative system includes an amplifier operably connected to a phase shifter. The amplifier is configured to amplify a voltage from an oscillator. The phase shifter is operably connected to a driving amplitude control, wherein the phase shifter is configured to phase shift the amplified voltage and is configured to set an amplitude of the phase shifted voltage. The oscillator is operably connected to the driving amplitude control. The phase shifted voltage drives the oscillator. The oscillator is at an internal resonance condition, based at least on the amplitude of the phase shifted voltage, that stabilizes frequency oscillations in the oscillator.

  11. LOW-FREQUENCY OSCILLATIONS IN XTE J1550-564

    SciTech Connect

    Rao Fengyun; Belloni, Tomaso; Stella, Luigi; Zhang Shuangnan; Li Tipei E-mail: tomaso.belloni@brera.inaf.i

    2010-05-10

    We present the results of a timing analysis of the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data of the black hole binary XTE J1550-564 during its 1998 outburst. The QPO frequency is observed to vary on timescales between {approx}100 s and days, correlated with the count rate contribution from the optically thick accretion disk: we studied this correlation and discuss its influence on the QPO width. In all observations, the quality factors ({nu}{sub 0}/FWHM) of the fundamental and second harmonic peaks were observed to be consistent, suggesting that the quasi-periodic nature of the oscillation is due to frequency modulation. In addition to the QPO and its harmonic peaks, a new 1.5{nu} component was detected in the power spectra. This component is broad, with a quality factor of {approx}0.6. From this, we argue that the peak observed at half the QPO frequency, usually referred to as 'sub-harmonic', could be the fundamental frequency, leading to the sequence 1:2:3:4. We also studied the energy dependence of the timing features and conclude that the two continuum components observed in the power spectrum, although both more intense at high energies, show a different dependence on energy. At low energies, the lowest-frequency component dominates, while at high energies the higher-frequency one has a higher fractional rms. An interplay between these two components was also observed as a function of their characteristic frequency. In this source, the transition between the low/hard state and the hard-intermediate state appears to be a smooth process.

  12. Frequency-locked chaotic opto-RF oscillator.

    PubMed

    Thorette, Aurélien; Romanelli, Marco; Brunel, Marc; Vallet, Marc

    2016-06-15

    A driven opto-RF oscillator, consisting of a dual-frequency laser (DFL) submitted to frequency-shifted feedback, is experimentally and numerically studied in a chaotic regime. Precise control of the reinjection strength and detuning permits isolation of a parameter region of bounded-phase chaos, where the opto-RF oscillator is frequency-locked to the master oscillator, in spite of chaotic phase and intensity oscillations. Robust experimental evidence of this synchronization regime is found, and phase noise spectra allow us to compare phase-locking and bounded-phase chaos regimes. In particular, it is found that the long-term phase stability of the master oscillator is well transferred to the opto-RF oscillator, even in the chaotic regime. PMID:27304302

  13. Resection of ictal high frequency oscillations is associated with favorable surgical outcome in pediatric drug resistant epilepsy secondary to tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hisako; Leach, James L; Greiner, Hansel M; Holland-Bouley, Katherine D; Rose, Douglas F; Arthur, Todd; Mangano, Francesco T

    2016-10-01

    Resective epilepsy surgery can improve seizures when the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is limited to a well-defined region. High frequency oscillations (HFO) have been recognized as having a high association with the seizure onset zone. Therefore, we retrospectively identified ictal HFOs and determined their relationship to specific intracranial features of cortical tubers in children with TSC who underwent resective surgery. We identified 14 patients with drug resistant epilepsy secondary to TSC who underwent subdural grid and strip implantation for presurgical evaluation and subsequent resection with adequate post-surgical follow-up. We aimed to determine the relationship between ictal HFOs, post-resection outcome and neuroimaging features in this population. The largest tuber was identified in all 14 patients (100%). Four patients (29%) had unusual tubers. HFOs were observed at ictal onset in all 14 patients. Seven of 10 patients with complete resection of HFOs were seizure free. The better seizure outcome (ILAE=1-3) was achieved with complete HFO resection regardless of the unique TSC structural features (p=0.0140). Our study demonstrates the presence of ripple and fast ripple range HFOs at ictal onset in children with TSC. Our study showed that complete HFO resection led to the better surgical outcome, independent of MR imaging findings. PMID:27450371

  14. Frequency jumps in single chip microwave LC oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Gualco, Gabriele; Grisi, Marco; Boero, Giovanni

    2014-12-15

    We report on the experimental observation of oscillation frequency jumps in microwave LC oscillators fabricated using standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technologies. The LC oscillators, operating at a frequency of about 20 GHz, consist of a single turn planar coil, a metal-oxide-metal capacitor, and two cross-coupled metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors used as negative resistance network. At 300 K as well as at 77 K, the oscillation frequency is a continuous function of the oscillator bias voltage. At 4 K, frequency jumps as large as 30 MHz are experimentally observed. This behavior is tentatively attributed to the emission and capture of single electrons from defects and dopant atoms.

  15. Frequency jumps in single chip microwave LC oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualco, Gabriele; Grisi, Marco; Boero, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    We report on the experimental observation of oscillation frequency jumps in microwave LC oscillators fabricated using standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technologies. The LC oscillators, operating at a frequency of about 20 GHz, consist of a single turn planar coil, a metal-oxide-metal capacitor, and two cross-coupled metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors used as negative resistance network. At 300 K as well as at 77 K, the oscillation frequency is a continuous function of the oscillator bias voltage. At 4 K, frequency jumps as large as 30 MHz are experimentally observed. This behavior is tentatively attributed to the emission and capture of single electrons from defects and dopant atoms.

  16. Gap Junctions as Common Cause of High-Frequency Oscillations and Epileptic Seizures in a Computational Cascade of Neuronal Mass and Compartmental Modeling.

    PubMed

    Helling, Robert M; Koppert, Marc M J; Visser, Gerhard H; Kalitzin, Stiliyan N

    2015-09-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFO) appear to be a promising marker for delineating the seizure onset zone (SOZ) in patients with localization related epilepsy. It remains, however, a purely observational phenomenon and no common mechanism has been proposed to relate HFOs and seizure generation. In this work we show that a cascade of two computational models, one on detailed compartmental scale and a second one on neural mass scale can explain both the autonomous generation of HFOs and the presence of epileptic seizures as emergent properties. To this end we introduce axonal-axonal gap junctions on a microscopic level and explore their impact on the higher level neural mass model (NMM). We show that the addition of gap junctions can generate HFOs and simultaneously shift the operational point of the NMM from a steady state network into bistable behavior that can autonomously generate epileptic seizures. The epileptic properties of the system, or the probability to generate epileptic type of activity, increases gradually with the increase of the density of axonal-axonal gap junctions. We further demonstrate that ad hoc HFO detectors used in previous studies are applicable to our simulated data. PMID:26058401

  17. Ketamine Dysregulates the Amplitude and Connectivity of High-Frequency Oscillations in Cortical-Subcortical Networks in Humans: Evidence From Resting-State Magnetoencephalography-Recordings.

    PubMed

    Rivolta, Davide; Heidegger, Tonio; Scheller, Bertram; Sauer, Andreas; Schaum, Michael; Birkner, Katharina; Singer, Wolf; Wibral, Michael; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Hypofunctioning of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) has been prominently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (ScZ). The current study tested the effects of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic and NMDA-R antagonist, on resting-state activity recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy volunteers. In a single-blind cross-over design, each participant (n = 12) received, on 2 different sessions, a subanesthetic dose of S-ketamine (0.006 mg/Kg) and saline injection. MEG-data were analyzed at sensor- and source-level in the beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (30-90 Hz) frequency ranges. In addition, connectivity analysis at source-level was performed using transfer entropy (TE). Ketamine increased gamma-power while beta-band activity was decreased. Specifically, elevated 30-90 Hz activity was pronounced in subcortical (thalamus and hippocampus) and cortical (frontal and temporal cortex) regions, whilst reductions in beta-band power were localized to the precuneus, cerebellum, anterior cingulate, temporal and visual cortex. TE analysis demonstrated increased information transfer in a thalamo-cortical network after ketamine administration. The findings are consistent with the pronounced dysregulation of high-frequency oscillations following the inhibition of NMDA-R in animal models of ScZ as well as with evidence from electroencephalogram-data in ScZ-patients and increased functional connectivity during early illness stages. Moreover, our data highlight the potential contribution of thalamo-cortical connectivity patterns towards ketamine-induced neuronal dysregulation, which may be relevant for the understanding of ScZ as a disorder of disinhibition of neural circuits. PMID:25987642

  18. Self-excited nonlinear plasma series resonance oscillations in geometrically symmetric capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Donko, Z.; Schulze, J.; Czarnetzki, U.; Luggenhoelscher, D.

    2009-03-30

    At low pressures, nonlinear self-excited plasma series resonance (PSR) oscillations are known to drastically enhance electron heating in geometrically asymmetric capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges by nonlinear electron resonance heating (NERH). Here we demonstrate via particle-in-cell simulations that high-frequency PSR oscillations can also be excited in geometrically symmetric discharges if the driving voltage waveform makes the discharge electrically asymmetric. This can be achieved by a dual-frequency (f+2f) excitation, when PSR oscillations and NERH are turned on and off depending on the electrical discharge asymmetry, controlled by the phase difference of the driving frequencies.

  19. High power radial klystron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Arman, M.J.

    1995-11-01

    The advantages of the radial klystron amplifier over the conventional klystron amplifier have been reported by Arman et al. Briefly, the radial structure of this design allows for much smaller impedances and thus higher power, the beam-cavity coupling is stronger because the beam travels inside the cavity, and the source is much more compact because there is no need for external magnetic fields. Here the author reports on possible advantages of the radial klystron oscillator over the radial klystron amplifier. The amplifying nature of certain HPM sources is often mandated by the requirement for synchronization and phase-locking of a number of sources in specific applications. In situations where amplification is solely adhered to for the purpose of achieving higher powers, the oscillator will be a better choice if a mechanism can be found to grow the desired mode at the required frequency. By switching to the oscillator mode there will be no need for priming the cavity or maintaining the phase. This simplifies the design and reduces the operational and maintenance cost of the source. Here he reports that an oscillator version of the radial klystron is possible and in fact more suitable for many applications. The mechanism for exciting and growing the mode will be transit-time effects thus providing all the beneficial features of the transit-time oscillators. The complications due to the presence of thin foils in the radial design still persist and will be dealt with in subsequent works. Numerical simulations using the PIC codes MAGIC and SOS indicate the radial klystron oscillator is a viable and efficient means of rf generation.

  20. Self-oscillating optical frequency comb generator based on an optoelectronic oscillator employing cascaded modulators.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian; Xu, Xingyuan; Wu, Zhongle; Dai, Yitang; Yin, Feifei; Zhou, Yue; Li, Jianqiang; Xu, Kun

    2015-11-16

    An ultraflat self-oscillating optical frequency comb generator based on an optoelectronic oscillator employing cascaded modulators was proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By incorporating the optoelectronic oscillation loop with cascaded modulators into the optical frequency comb generator, 11 ultraflat comb lines would be generated, and the frequency spacing is equal to the oscillation frequency of the OEO. 10 and 12GHz optical frequency combs are demonstrated with the spectral power variation below 0.82dB and 0.93dB respectively. The corresponding spectral pure microwave source are also generated and evaluated. The corresponding single-sideband phase noise are as low as -122dBc/Hz and -115 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset frequency. PMID:26698482

  1. Cascade frequency generation regime in an optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, D B; Dmitriev, Aleksandr K; Gorelik, P; Vong, Franko; Zondy, J J

    2009-05-31

    In a parametric oscillator of a special two-sectional design based on a lithium niobate periodic structure, a cascade frequency generation regime was observed in which a signal wave pumped a secondary parametric oscillator, producing secondary signal and idler waves. The secondary parametric oscillator can be tuned in a broad range of {approx}200 nm with respect to a fixed wavelength of the primary idler wave. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  2. Deterministic coherence resonance in coupled chaotic oscillators with frequency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarchik, A. N.; Jaimes-Reátegui, R.

    2015-11-01

    A small mismatch between natural frequencies of unidirectionally coupled chaotic oscillators can induce coherence resonance in the slave oscillator for a certain coupling strength. This surprising phenomenon resembles "stabilization of chaos by chaos," i.e., the chaotic driving applied to the chaotic system makes its dynamics more regular when the natural frequency of the slave oscillator is a little different than the natural frequency of the master oscillator. The coherence is characterized with the dominant component in the power spectrum of the slave oscillator, normalized standard deviations of both the peak amplitude and the interpeak interval, and Lyapunov exponents. The enhanced coherence is associated with increasing negative both the third and the fourth Lyapunov exponents, while the first and second exponents are always positive and zero, respectively.

  3. Deterministic coherence resonance in coupled chaotic oscillators with frequency mismatch.

    PubMed

    Pisarchik, A N; Jaimes-Reátegui, R

    2015-11-01

    A small mismatch between natural frequencies of unidirectionally coupled chaotic oscillators can induce coherence resonance in the slave oscillator for a certain coupling strength. This surprising phenomenon resembles "stabilization of chaos by chaos," i.e., the chaotic driving applied to the chaotic system makes its dynamics more regular when the natural frequency of the slave oscillator is a little different than the natural frequency of the master oscillator. The coherence is characterized with the dominant component in the power spectrum of the slave oscillator, normalized standard deviations of both the peak amplitude and the interpeak interval, and Lyapunov exponents. The enhanced coherence is associated with increasing negative both the third and the fourth Lyapunov exponents, while the first and second exponents are always positive and zero, respectively. PMID:26651632

  4. Role of low- and high-frequency oscillations in the human hippocampus for encoding environmental novelty during a spatial navigation task.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinsick; Lee, Hojong; Kim, Taekyung; Park, Ga Young; Lee, Eun Mi; Baek, Seunghee; Ku, Jeonghun; Kim, In Young; Kim, Sun I; Jang, Dong Pyo; Kang, Joong Koo

    2014-11-01

    The hippocampus plays a key role in the encoding and retrieval of information related to novel environments during spatial navigation. However, the neural basis for these processes in the human hippocampus remains unknown because it is difficult to directly measure neural signals in the human hippocampus. This study investigated hippocampal neural oscillations involved in encoding novel environments during spatial navigation in a virtual environment. Seven epileptic patients with implanted intracranial hippocampal depth electrodes performed three sessions of virtual environment navigation. Each session consisted of a navigation task and a location-recall task. The navigation task consisted of eight blocks, and in each block, the participant navigated to the location of four different objects and was instructed to remember the location of the objects. After the eight blocks were completed, a location-recall task was performed for each of the four objects. Intracranial electroencephalography data were monitored during the navigation tasks. Theta (5-8 Hz) and delta (1-4 Hz) oscillations were lower in the first block (novel environment) than in the eighth block (familiar environment) of the navigation task, and significantly increased from block one to block eight. By contrast, low-gamma (31-50 Hz) oscillations were higher in the first block than in the eighth block of the navigation task, and significantly decreased from block one to block eight. Comparison of sessions with high recall performance (low error between identified and actual object location) and low recall performance revealed that high-gamma (51-100 Hz) oscillations significantly decreased from block one to block eight only in sessions with high recall performance. These findings suggest that delta, theta, and low-gamma oscillations were associated with encoding of environmental novelty and high-gamma oscillations were important for the successful encoding of environmental novelty. PMID:24910318

  5. Frequency Stability of 1X10(sup -13) in a Compensated Sapphire Oscillator Operating Above 77 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, D. G.; Dick, G. J.; Wang, R. T.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a frequency-stable temperature compensated sapphire oscillator (CSO) at temperatures above 77 K. Previously, high stability in sapphire oscillators had only been obtained with liquid helium cooling.

  6. Endogenous modulation of low frequency oscillations by temporal expectations

    PubMed Central

    Cravo, Andre M.; Rohenkohl, Gustavo; Wyart, Valentin

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have associated increasing temporal expectations with synchronization of higher frequency oscillations and suppression of lower frequencies. In this experiment, we explore a proposal that low-frequency oscillations provide a mechanism for regulating temporal expectations. We used a speeded Go/No-go task and manipulated temporal expectations by changing the probability of target presentation after certain intervals. Across two conditions, the temporal conditional probability of target events differed substantially at the first of three possible intervals. We found that reactions times differed significantly at this first interval across conditions, decreasing with higher temporal expectations. Interestingly, the power of theta activity (4–8 Hz), distributed over central midline sites, also differed significantly across conditions at this first interval. Furthermore, we found a transient coupling between theta phase and beta power after the first interval in the condition with high temporal expectation for targets at this time point. Our results suggest that the adjustments in theta power and the phase-power coupling between theta and beta contribute to a central mechanism for controlling neural excitability according to temporal expectations. PMID:21900508

  7. Stochastic regimes in very-low-frequency fluidic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesař, Václav

    2016-03-01

    Paper discusses interesting unexpected stochastic regimes discovered in a fluidic oscillator designed for operation at very low oscillation frequencies - without the inconvenience of the long feedback loops needed in standard low-frequency oscillator designs. The new oscillator contains a pair of bistable turn-down active valves operating in anti-parallel — essentially analogous to Abraham & Bloch electric "multibrateur" invented in 1919. Three different self-excited oscillation regimes were found. In the order of increasing supplied flow rate, these regimes are characterised by: (A) generation of stochastic-duration multi-pulse packs, (B) generation of individual pulses with a degree of periodicity, and (C) regime with randomly appearing flow pulses separated by intervals of the order of seconds.

  8. Mode-locked Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator with 41 µJ pulse energy at 145 W average infrared power and high power frequency conversion.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Dominik; Zawischa, Ivo; Sutter, Dirk H; Killi, Alexander; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2012-04-23

    We demonstrate the generation of 1.1 ps pulses containing more than 41 µJ of energy directly out of an Yb:YAG thin-disk without any additional amplification stages. The laser oscillator operates in ambient atmosphere with a 3.5 MHz repetition rate and 145 W of average output power at a fundamental wavelength of 1030 nm. An average output power of 91.5 W at 515 nm was obtained by frequency doubling with a conversion efficiency exceeding 65%. Third harmonic generation resulted in 34 W at 343 nm at 34% efficiency. PMID:22535061

  9. Yb-fiber laser pumped high-power, broadly tunable, single-frequency red source based on a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Mukesh Kumar; Maji, Partha Sona; Das, Ritwick

    2016-07-01

    We present an efficient and tunable source generating multi-watt single-frequency red radiation by intra-cavity frequency doubling of the signal in a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 (MgO:PPLN)-based singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO). By optimally designing the SRO cavity in a six-mirror configuration, we generate ≈276  nm tunable idler radiation in mid-infrared with a maximum power of Pi=2.05  W at a pump power of Pp=14.0  W. The resonant signal is frequency doubled using a 10 mm-long BiB3O6 (BiBO) crystal which resulted in tunability of a red beam from ≈753 to 780 nm band with maximum power Pr≈4.0  W recorded at λr≈756  nm. The deployment of a six-mirror SRO ensures single-frequency generation of red across the entire tuning range by inducing additional losses to Raman modes of LiNbO3 and, thus, inhibiting their oscillation. Using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI), nominal linewidth of the red beam is measured to ≈3  MHz which changes marginally over the entire tuning range. Long-term (over 1 h) peak-to-peak frequency fluctuation of the generated red beam is estimated to be about 3.3 GHz under free-running conditions at Pp=14.0  W. The generated red beam is delivered in a TEM00 mode profile with M2≤1.32 at maximum power in a red beam. PMID:27367094

  10. The anti-ictogenic effects of levetiracetam are mirrored by interictal spiking and high-frequency oscillation changes in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Maxime; Behr, Charles; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most prevalent type of partial epileptic disorders. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of levetiracetam (LEV) in the pilocarpine model of MTLE. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 19) were injected with pilocarpine (380 mg/kg, i.p.) to induce a status epilepticus. Twelve animals were used as controls and seven were treated with LEV. They were implanted with bipolar electrodes in the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex (EC), dentate gyrus (DG) and subiculum and EEG-video monitored continuously from day 4 to day 14 after SE. Results Only 29% of LEV-treated animals had seizures compared to all controls following a latent period that was similar in duration. Seizure rates were lower in LEV-treated animals. In LEV-treated animals without seizures, lower interictal spike rates were found in all regions compared to controls. Analysis of interictal high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) revealed that LEV-treated animals without seizures had lower rates of interictal spikes with ripples (80–200 Hz) in CA3, EC and subiculum (p < 0.01), whereas rates of interictal spikes with fast ripples (250–500 Hz) were significantly lower in CA3 and subiculum, compared to controls. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the anti-ictogenic properties of LEV are mirrored by decreases of interictal spike rate in temporal lobe regions, and are accompanied by subregion-specific decreases of HFO occurrence in CA3 and subiculum. Overall, this evidence suggest that LEV may inhibit neural network activity in regions that are known to play important roles in MTLE. PMID:25645630

  11. El Niño-Southern Oscillation frequency cascade.

    PubMed

    Stuecker, Malte F; Jin, Fei-Fei; Timmermann, Axel

    2015-11-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon, the most pronounced feature of internally generated climate variability, occurs on interannual timescales and impacts the global climate system through an interaction with the annual cycle. The tight coupling between ENSO and the annual cycle is particularly pronounced over the tropical Western Pacific. Here we show that this nonlinear interaction results in a frequency cascade in the atmospheric circulation, which is characterized by deterministic high-frequency variability on near-annual and subannual timescales. Through climate model experiments and observational analysis, it is documented that a substantial fraction of the anomalous Northwest Pacific anticyclone variability, which is the main atmospheric link between ENSO and the East Asian Monsoon system, can be explained by these interactions and is thus deterministic and potentially predictable. PMID:26483455

  12. Controlled oscillator system with a time dependent output frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelstein, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A controlled oscillator system is presented for providing an output with a frequency which changes with respect to time and with a phase which is within established phase error limits. The system includes a frequency synthesizer with a symmetrical search oscillator, capable of tuning the output with a range of + or - 100 Hz about any fixed frequency to which the synthesizer is set. For a tuning range of 200 Hz (+ or - 100 Hz) an expanded search oscillator output of a frequency range of 4 MHz (from 1 MHz to 5 MHz) is provided. A counter counts continuously the expanded output cycles and at each of fixed sampling intervals, for every 0.1 second, the count or number accumulated in the counter is read out. The sample number is compared with a theoretical number which should be present in the counter at the particular sampling instant for proper synthesizer's output frequency and phase.

  13. Frequency transitions in odor-evoked neural oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Iori; Bazhenov, Maxim; Ong, Rose Chik-ying; Raman, Baranidharan; Stopfer, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Summary In many species sensory stimuli elicit the oscillatory synchronization of groups of neurons. What determines the properties of these oscillations? In the olfactory system of the moth we found that odors elicited oscillatory synchronization through a neural mechanism like that described in locust and Drosophila. During responses to long odor pulses, oscillations suddenly slowed as net olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) output decreased; thus, stimulus intensity appeared to determine oscillation frequency. However, changing the concentration of the odor had little effect upon oscillatory frequency. Our recordings in vivo and computational models based on these results suggested the main effect of increasing odor concentration was to recruit additional, less well-tuned ORNs whose firing rates were tightly constrained by adaptation and saturation. Thus, in the periphery, concentration is encoded mainly by the size of the responsive ORN population, and oscillation frequency is set by the adaptation and saturation of this response. PMID:20005825

  14. Semilinear coherent optical oscillator with frequency shifted feedback.

    PubMed

    Rebhi, Riadh; Mathey, Pierre; Jauslin, Hans Rudolf; Odoulov, Serguey

    2007-12-10

    It is shown that the saw-tooth variation of the cavity length in a photorefractive semilinear coherent oscillator can suppress the instability in the frequency domain and prevent a bifurcation in the oscillation spectrum. To achieve such a suppression the frequency of the cavity length modulation should be chosen appropriately. It depends on the photorefractive crystal parameters (electrooptic properties, photoconductivity, dimensions) and on the experimental conditions (pump intensity ratio, orientation of the pump and oscillation waves with respect to the crystallographic axes, polarization of the pump waves, etc. ). It depends also strongly on a possible misalignment of the two pump waves. On the other hand, within a certain range of the experimental parameters the mirror vibration may lead to a further frequency splitting in the already existing two-mode oscillation spectrum. PMID:19551007

  15. Detectability of the somatosensory evoked high frequency oscillation (HFO) co-recorded by scalp EEG and ECoG under propofol

    PubMed Central

    Burnos, Sergey; Fedele, Tommaso; Schmid, Olivier; Krayenbühl, Niklaus; Sarnthein, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Objective The somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) elicited by median nerve stimulation consists of the N20 peak together with the concurrent high frequency oscillation (HFO, > 500 Hz). We describe the conditions for HFO detection in ECoG and scalp EEG in intraoperative recordings. Methods During neurosurgical interventions in six patients under propofol anesthesia, the SEP was recorded from subdural electrode strips (15 recordings) and from scalp electrodes (10/15 recordings). We quantified the spatial attenuation of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of N20 and HFO along the contacts of the electrode strip. We then compared the SNR of ECoG and simultaneous scalp EEG in a biophysical framework. Results HFO detection under propofol anesthesia was demonstrated. Visual inspection of strip cortical recordings revealed phase reversal for N20 in 14/15 recordings and for HFO in 10/15 recordings. N20 had higher maximal SNR (median 33.5 dB) than HFO (median 23 dB). The SNR of N20 attenuated with a larger spatial extent (median 7.2 dB/cm) than the SNR of HFO (median 12.3 dB/cm). We found significant correlations between the maximum SNR (rho = 0.58, p = 0.025) and the spatial attenuation (rho = 0.86, p < 0.001) of N20 and HFO. In 3/10 recordings we found HFO in scalp EEG. Based on the spatial attenuation and SNR in the ECoG, we estimated the scalp EEG amplitude ratio N20/HFO and found significant correlation with recorded values (rho = 0.65, p = 0.049). Conclusions We proved possible the intraoperative SEP HFO detection under propofol anesthesia. The spatial attenuation along ECoG contacts represents a good estimator of the area contributing to scalp EEG. The SNR and the spatial attenuation in ECoG recordings provide further insights for the prediction of HFO detectability in scalp EEG. The results obtained in this context may not be limited to SEP HFO, but could be generalized to biological signatures lying in the same SNR and frequency range. PMID:26900572

  16. Convergence of oscillator spectral estimators for counted-frequency measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A common intermediary connecting frequency-noise calibration or testing of an oscillator to useful applications is the spectral density of the frequency-deviating process. In attempting to turn test data into predicts of performance characteristics, one is naturally led to estimation of statistical values by sample-mean and sample-variance techniques. However, sample means and sample variances themselves are statistical quantities that do not necessarily converge (in the mean-square sense) to actual ensemble-average means and variances, except perhaps for excessively large sample sizes. This is especially true for the flicker noise component of oscillators. This article shows, for the various types of noises found in oscillators, how sample averages converge (or do not converge) to their statistical counterparts. The convergence rate is shown to be the same for all oscillators of a given spectral type.

  17. Low-frequency calcium oscillations accompany deoxyhemoglobin oscillations in rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Du, Congwu; Volkow, Nora D; Koretsky, Alan P; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-10-28

    Spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals are used to map brain functional connectivity with functional MRI, but their source is not well understood. Here we used optical imaging to assess whether LFOs from vascular signals covary with oscillatory intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)i) and with local field potentials in the rat's somatosensory cortex. We observed that the frequency of Ca(2+)i oscillations in tissue (∼0.07 Hz) was similar to the LFOs of deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) and oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) in both large blood vessels and capillaries. The HbR and HbO2 fluctuations within tissue correlated with Ca(2+)i oscillations with a lag time of ∼5-6 s. The Ca(2+)i and hemoglobin oscillations were insensitive to hypercapnia. In contrast, cerebral-blood-flow velocity (CBFv) in arteries and veins fluctuated at a higher frequency (∼0.12 Hz) and was sensitive to hypercapnia. However, in parenchymal tissue, CBFv oscillated with peaks at both ∼0.06 Hz and ∼0.12 Hz. Although the higher-frequency CBFv oscillation (∼0.12 Hz) was decreased by hypercapnia, its lower-frequency component (∼0.06 Hz) was not. The sensitivity of the higher CBFV oscillations to hypercapnia, which triggers blood vessel vasodilation, suggests its dependence on vascular effects that are distinct from the LFOs detected in HbR, HbO2, Ca(2+)i, and the lower-frequency tissue CBFv, which were insensitive to hypercapnia. Hemodynamic LFOs correlated both with Ca(2+)i and neuronal firing (local field potentials), indicating that they directly reflect neuronal activity (perhaps also glial). These findings show that HbR fluctuations (basis of BOLD oscillations) are linked to oscillatory cellular activity and detectable throughout the vascular tree (arteries, capillaries, and veins). PMID:25313035

  18. Low-frequency calcium oscillations accompany deoxyhemoglobin oscillations in rat somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Du, Congwu; Volkow, Nora D.; Koretsky, Alan P.; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals are used to map brain functional connectivity with functional MRI, but their source is not well understood. Here we used optical imaging to assess whether LFOs from vascular signals covary with oscillatory intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) and with local field potentials in the rat’s somatosensory cortex. We observed that the frequency of Ca2+i oscillations in tissue (∼0.07 Hz) was similar to the LFOs of deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) and oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) in both large blood vessels and capillaries. The HbR and HbO2 fluctuations within tissue correlated with Ca2+i oscillations with a lag time of ∼5–6 s. The Ca2+i and hemoglobin oscillations were insensitive to hypercapnia. In contrast, cerebral-blood-flow velocity (CBFv) in arteries and veins fluctuated at a higher frequency (∼0.12 Hz) and was sensitive to hypercapnia. However, in parenchymal tissue, CBFv oscillated with peaks at both ∼0.06 Hz and ∼0.12 Hz. Although the higher-frequency CBFv oscillation (∼0.12 Hz) was decreased by hypercapnia, its lower-frequency component (∼0.06 Hz) was not. The sensitivity of the higher CBFV oscillations to hypercapnia, which triggers blood vessel vasodilation, suggests its dependence on vascular effects that are distinct from the LFOs detected in HbR, HbO2, Ca2+i, and the lower-frequency tissue CBFv, which were insensitive to hypercapnia. Hemodynamic LFOs correlated both with Ca2+i and neuronal firing (local field potentials), indicating that they directly reflect neuronal activity (perhaps also glial). These findings show that HbR fluctuations (basis of BOLD oscillations) are linked to oscillatory cellular activity and detectable throughout the vascular tree (arteries, capillaries, and veins). PMID:25313035

  19. Discomfort of seated persons exposed to low frequency lateral and roll oscillation: Effect of backrest height.

    PubMed

    Beard, George F; Griffin, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Backrests influence the comfort of seated people. With 21 subjects sitting with three backrest heights (no backrest, short backrest, high backrest) discomfort caused by lateral, roll, and fully roll-compensated lateral oscillation was investigated at frequencies between 0.25 and 1.0 Hz. With lateral oscillation, the short backrest reduced discomfort at frequencies less than 0.63 Hz and the high backrest reduced discomfort at frequencies less than 1.0 Hz. With roll oscillation, the high backrest reduced discomfort at frequencies less than 0.63 Hz, but increased discomfort at 1.0 Hz. With fully roll-compensated lateral oscillation, the short backrest reduced discomfort at 0.4 Hz and the high backrest reduced discomfort at 0.5 and 0.63 Hz. As predicted by current standards, a backrest can increase discomfort caused by high frequencies of vibration. However, a backrest can reduce discomfort caused by low frequencies, with the benefit depending on the frequency and direction of oscillation and backrest height. PMID:26851464

  20. Solar activity and oscillation frequency splittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, M. F.; Libbrecht, K. G.

    1993-01-01

    Solar p-mode frequency splittings, parameterized by the coefficients through order N = 12 of a Legendre polynomial expansion of the mode frequencies as a function of m/L, were obtained from an analysis of helioseismology data taken at Big Bear Solar Observatory during the 4 years 1986 and 1988-1990 (approximately solar minimum to maximum). Inversion of the even-index splitting coefficients confirms that there is a significant contribution to the frequency splittings originating near the solar poles. The strength of the polar contribution is anti correlated with the overall level or solar activity in the active latitudes, suggesting a relation to polar faculae. From an analysis of the odd-index splitting coefficients we infer an uppor limit to changes in the solar equatorial near-surface rotatinal velocity of less than 1.9 m/s (3 sigma limit) between solar minimum and maximum.

  1. Fluidic Oscillator Having Decoupled Frequency and Amplitude Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A fluidic oscillator having independent frequency and amplitude control includes a fluidic-oscillator main flow channel having a main flow inlet, a main flow outlet, and first and second control ports disposed at opposing sides thereof. A fluidic-oscillator controller has an inlet and outlet. A volume defined by the main flow channel is greater than the volume defined by the controller. A flow diverter coupled to the outlet of the controller defines a first fluid flow path from the controller's outlet to the first control port and defines a second fluid flow path from the controller's outlet to the second control port.

  2. Resonator power to frequency conversion in a cryogenic sapphire oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nand, Nitin R.; Parker, Stephen R.; Ivanov, Eugene N.; le Floch, Jean-Michel; Hartnett, John G.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2013-07-01

    We report on the measurement and characterization of power to frequency conversion in the resonant mode of a cryogenic sapphire loaded cavity resonator, which is used as the frequency discriminating element of a loop oscillator circuit. Fluctuations of power incident on the resonator lead to changes in radiation pressure and temperature in the sapphire dielectric, both of which contribute to a shift in the resonance frequency. We measure a modulation and temperature independent radiation pressure induced power to frequency sensitivity of -0.15 Hz/mW and find that this is the primary factor limiting the stability of the resonator frequency.

  3. Frequency, phase, and amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, Claude; Diener, William A.

    1992-01-01

    The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation, which are induced by the modulation of the cavity resonant frequency, are considered. The results obtained apply specifically to one of the H-maser cavity autotuning methods which is actually implemented, namely the cavity frequency-switching method. The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes are analyzed theoretically. The phase and the amplitude variations are measured experimentally. It is shown, in particular, that the phase of oscillation is subjected to abrupt jumps at the times of the cavity frequency switching, whose magnitude is specified. The results given can be used for the design of a phase-locked loop (PLL) aimed at minimizing the transfer of the phase modulation to the slaved VCXO.

  4. Wideband signal upconversion and phase shifting based on a frequency tunable optoelectronic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shifeng; Zhu, Dan; Pan, Shilong

    2014-03-01

    A wideband signal upconversion and phase shifting scheme based on a frequency tunable optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) are proposed and demonstrated. The OEO performs simultaneously tunable high-quality local oscillator (LO) signal generation, wideband frequency upconversion, and phase shifting within the whole 2π range. With the generated LO tuning from 9.549 to 11.655 GHz, wideband square signals are successfully upconverted to the X band. The phase of the upconverted signal is tuned from 0 to 360 deg. The phase noise of the oscillation signal is about -104 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset with or without the injected baseband signal.

  5. Improvement of the low frequency oscillation model for Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunsheng; Wang, Huashan

    2016-08-01

    The low frequency oscillation of the discharge current in Hall thrusters is a major aspect of these devices that requires further study. While the existing model captures the ionization mechanism of the low frequency oscillation, it unfortunately fails to express the dynamic characteristics of the ion acceleration. The analysis in this paper shows this is because of the simplification of the electron equation, which affects both the electric field distribution and the ion acceleration process. Additionally, the electron density equation is revised and a new model that is based on the physical properties of ion movement is proposed.

  6. Frequency Response and Gap Tuning for Nonlinear Electrical Oscillator Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Harish S.; Vaz, Garnet J.

    2013-01-01

    We study nonlinear electrical oscillator networks, the smallest example of which consists of a voltage-dependent capacitor, an inductor, and a resistor driven by a pure tone source. By allowing the network topology to be that of any connected graph, such circuits generalize spatially discrete nonlinear transmission lines/lattices that have proven useful in high-frequency analog devices. For such networks, we develop two algorithms to compute the steady-state response when a subset of nodes are driven at the same fixed frequency. The algorithms we devise are orders of magnitude more accurate and efficient than stepping towards the steady-state using a standard numerical integrator. We seek to enhance a given network's nonlinear behavior by altering the eigenvalues of the graph Laplacian, i.e., the resonances of the linearized system. We develop a Newton-type method that solves for the network inductances such that the graph Laplacian achieves a desired set of eigenvalues; this method enables one to move the eigenvalues while keeping the network topology fixed. Running numerical experiments using three different random graph models, we show that shrinking the gap between the graph Laplacian's first two eigenvalues dramatically improves a network's ability to (i) transfer energy to higher harmonics, and (ii) generate large-amplitude signals. Our results shed light on the relationship between a network's structure, encoded by the graph Laplacian, and its function, defined in this case by the presence of strongly nonlinear effects in the frequency response. PMID:24223751

  7. Frequency drifts of 3-min oscillations in microwave and EUV emission above sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, R.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Shibasaki, K.; Yan, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: We analysed 3-min oscillations of microwave and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission generated at different heights of a sunspot atmosphere, studied the amplitude and frequency modulation of the oscillations, and its relationship with the variation of the spatial structure of the oscillations. Methods: High-resolution data obtained with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, TRACE and SDO/AIA were analysed with pixelised wavelet filtering (PWF) and wavelet skeleton techniques. Results: Three-minute oscillations in sunspots appear in the form of recurring trains of 8-20 min duration (13 min in average). The typical interval between the trains is 30-50 min. The oscillation trains are transient in frequency and power. The relative amplitude of 3-min oscillations was about 3-8% and sometimes reached 17%. Recurring frequency drifts of 3-min oscillations were detected during the development of individual trains, with the period varying in the range 90-240 s. A wavelet analysis showed that there are three types of oscillation trains: with positive drifts (to high frequencies), negative drifts, and without a drift. Negative drifts, i.e., when the 3-min oscillation period gradually increases, were found to occur more often. The start and end of the drifts coincides with the start time and end of the train. Sometimes two drifts co-exist, i.e. during the end of the previous drift, a new drift appears near 160 s, when the frequency is in the low-frequency part of the 3-min spectrum, near 200 s. This behaviour is seen at all levels of the sunspot atmosphere. The speed of the drift is 4-5 mHz/h in the photosphere, 5-8 mHz/h in the chromosphere, and 11-13 mHz/h in the corona. There were also low-frequency peaks in the spectrum, corresponding to the periods of 10-20 min, and 30-60 min. The comparative study of the spatial structure of 3-min oscillations in microwave and EUV shows the appearance of new sources of the sunspot oscillations during the development of the trains. Conclusions

  8. Running speed alters the frequency of hippocampal gamma oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Omar J.; Mehta, Mayank R.

    2012-01-01

    Successful spatial navigation is thought to employ a combination of at least two strategies: the following of landmark cues and path integration. Path integration requires that the brain use the speed and direction of movement in a meaningful way to continuously compute the position of the animal. Indeed, the running speed of rats modulates both the firing rate of neurons and the spectral properties of low frequency, theta oscillations seen in the local field potential (LFP) of the hippocampus, a region important for spatial memory formation. Higher frequency, gamma-band LFP oscillations are usually associated with decision-making, increased attention and improved reaction times. Here, we show that increased running speed is accompanied by large, systematic increases in the frequency of hippocampal CA1 network oscillations spanning the entire gamma range (30–120 Hz) and beyond. These speed-dependent changes in frequency are seen on both linear tracks and two-dimensional platforms, and are thus independent of the behavioral task. Synchrony between anatomically distant CA1 regions also shifts to higher gamma frequencies as running speed increases. The changes in frequency are strongly correlated with changes in the firing rates of individual interneurons, consistent with models of gamma generation. Our results suggest that as a rat runs faster, there are faster gamma frequency transitions between sequential place cell-assemblies. This may help to preserve the spatial specificity of place cells and spatial memories at vastly different running speeds. PMID:22623683

  9. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency ``Madden-Julian oscillation`` observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  10. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency Madden-Julian oscillation'' observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  11. Seismology and geodesy of the sun: low-frequency oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Dicke, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    The hourly averages of the solar ellipticity measured from June 13 to September 17, 1966, are analyzed for indications of solar oscillations with periods in excess of 2 h ..nu.. < 0.5 h/sup -1/. Nothing significant is found for frequencies ..nu.. > 0.1 hr/sup -1/ but for lower frequencies the power spectrum shows a very complex structure containing about 20 strong narrow peaks. The complexity is illusionary. The signal apparently consists of only two frequencies. The complexity is due to aliasing by the window function with its basic 24-h period, with many observational days missing, and with different numbers of hourly averages for the various observational days. Both signal frequencies are apparently due to odd-degree spherical harmonic oscillations of the sun.

  12. Frequency stabilization of spin-torque-driven oscillations by coupling with a magnetic nonlinear resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Kiwamu Suto, Hirofumi; Nagasawa, Tazumi; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2014-10-28

    The fundamental function of any oscillator is to produce a waveform with a stable frequency. Here, we show a method of frequency stabilization for spin-torque nano-oscillators (STNOs) that relies on coupling with an adjacent nanomagnet through the magnetic dipole–dipole interaction. It is numerically demonstrated that highly stable oscillations occur as a result of mutual feedback between an STNO and a nanomagnet. The nanomagnet acts as a nonlinear resonator for the STNO. This method is based on the nonlinear behavior of the resonator and can be considered as a magnetic analogue of an optimization scheme in nanoelectromechanical systems. The oscillation frequency is most stabilized when the nanomagnet is driven at a special feedback point at which the feedback noise between the STNO and resonator is completely eliminated.

  13. A preliminary analysis of low frequency pressure oscillations in hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1994-10-01

    Past research with hybrid rockets has suggested that certain motor operating conditions are conducive to the formation of pressure oscillations, or flow instabilities, within the motor combustion chamber. These combustion-related vibrations or pressure oscillations may be encountered in virtually any type of rocket motor and typically fall into three frequency ranges: low frequency oscillations (0-300 Hz); intermediate frequency oscillations (400-1000 Hz); and high frequency oscillations (greater than 1000 Hz). In general, combustion instability is characterized by organized pressure oscillations occurring at well-defined intervals with pressure peaks that may maintain themselves, grow, or die out. Usually, such peaks exceed +/- 5% of the mean chamber pressure. For hybrid motors, these oscillations have been observed to grow to a limiting amplitude which may be dependent on factors such as fuel characteristics, oxidizer injector characteristics, average chamber pressure, oxidizer mass flux, combustion chamber length, and grain geometry. The approach taken in the present analysis is to develop a modified chamber length, L, instability theory which accounts for the relationship between pressure and oxidizer to fuel concentration ratio in the motor.

  14. A preliminary analysis of low frequency pressure oscillations in hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1994-01-01

    Past research with hybrid rockets has suggested that certain motor operating conditions are conducive to the formation of pressure oscillations, or flow instabilities, within the motor combustion chamber. These combustion-related vibrations or pressure oscillations may be encountered in virtually any type of rocket motor and typically fall into three frequency ranges: low frequency oscillations (0-300 Hz); intermediate frequency oscillations (400-1000 Hz); and high frequency oscillations (greater than 1000 Hz). In general, combustion instability is characterized by organized pressure oscillations occurring at well-defined intervals with pressure peaks that may maintain themselves, grow, or die out. Usually, such peaks exceed +/- 5% of the mean chamber pressure. For hybrid motors, these oscillations have been observed to grow to a limiting amplitude which may be dependent on factors such as fuel characteristics, oxidizer injector characteristics, average chamber pressure, oxidizer mass flux, combustion chamber length, and grain geometry. The approach taken in the present analysis is to develop a modified chamber length, L, instability theory which accounts for the relationship between pressure and oxidizer to fuel concentration ratio in the motor.

  15. Hybrid radio-intermediate-frequency oscillator with photonic-delay-matched frequency conversion pair.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yitang; Wang, Ruixin; Yin, Feifei; Dai, Jian; Zhou, Yue; Li, Jianqiang; Xu, Kun

    2015-06-15

    A low-phase-noise, single-loop radio-frequency (RF) oscillator is proposed and experimentally demonstrated where part of the oscillation is in intermediate-frequency (IF) domain by a pair of frequency conversions. Single-mode operation is achieved by IF filtering. The key design is the matched photonic delay between the two conversions, by which the large phase noise of the common external RF local oscillation (LO) shows no impact on the RF carrier passing through the conversion pair and the low-phase-noise oscillation is guaranteed. The phase-noise performance of the delay-matched conversion pair plus IF filtering is theoretically and experimentally studied. With the proposed scheme, we achieve 120 dBc/Hz phase noise at 10-kHz offset from 10-GHz carrier frequency through a 1-μs loop cavity. PMID:26076289

  16. Reviving oscillation with optimal spatial period of frequency distribution in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tongfa; Liu, Weiqing; Zhu, Yun; Xiao, Jinghua; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The spatial distributions of system's frequencies have significant influences on the critical coupling strengths for amplitude death (AD) in coupled oscillators. We find that the left and right critical coupling strengths for AD have quite different relations to the increasing spatial period m of the frequency distribution in coupled oscillators. The left one has a negative linear relationship with m in log-log axis for small initial frequency mismatches while remains constant for large initial frequency mismatches. The right one is in quadratic function relation with spatial period m of the frequency distribution in log-log axis. There is an optimal spatial period m0 of frequency distribution with which the coupled system has a minimal critical strength to transit from an AD regime to reviving oscillation. Moreover, the optimal spatial period m0 of the frequency distribution is found to be related to the system size √{ N } . Numerical examples are explored to reveal the inner regimes of effects of the spatial frequency distribution on AD.

  17. Low-frequency combustion oscillations in a model afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Macquisten, M.A.; Dowling, A.P. )

    1993-08-01

    Low-frequency combustion oscillations, involving the interaction between longitudinal acoustic waves and unsteady combustion, are investigated for a model afterburner. An experimental rig, in which a confined flame is stabilized in the wake of a conical gutter, is run with inlet conditions representative of an engine afterburner. Results are presented for inlet Mach numbers in the range of 0.15--0.27, with inlet temperatures up to 630 K. Comparison is made between theory and experiment. Although the theory was developed from low Mach number data, it is found to apply equally well at these faster flow rates. The theory is able to predict the frequency of the instability and the mode shape, accurately reproducing the changes due to variations in the inlet Mach number and temperature. The effect of altering the downstream boundary condition by replacing the open end by a choked nozzle is also investigated. Such a change is found to be highly destabilizing, both experimentally and theoretically. Again, predictions from the theory are in good agreement with the observations.

  18. Low-cost precise measurement of oscillator frequency instability based on GNSS carrier observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Yanhong; Jiao, Yue; Xu, Dongyang; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ya; Li, Xiaohui

    2013-03-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers can be used in time and frequency metrology by exploiting stable GNSS time scales. This paper proposes a low-cost method for precise measurement of oscillator frequency instability using a single-frequency software GNSS receiver. The only required hardware is a common radio frequency (RF) data collection device driven by the oscillator under test (OUT). The receiver solves the oscillator frequency error in high time resolution using the carrier Doppler observation and the broadcast ephemeris from one of the available satellites employing the onboard reference atomic frequency standard that is more stable than the OUT. Considering the non-stable and non-Gaussian properties of the frequency error measurement, an unbiased finite impulse response (FIR) filter is employed to obtain robust estimation and filter out measurement noise. The effects of different filter orders and convolution lengths are further discussed. The frequency error of an oven controlled oscillator (OCXO) is measured using live Beidou-2/Compass signals. The results are compared with the synchronous measurement using a specialized phase comparator with the standard coordinated universal time (UTC) signal from the master clock H226 in the national time service center (NTSC) of China as its reference. The Allan deviation (ADEV) estimates using the two methods have a 99.9% correlation coefficient and a 0.6% mean relative difference over 1-1000 s intervals. The experiment demonstrates the effectiveness and high precision of the software receiver method.

  19. Identifying Robust and Sensitive Frequency Bands for Interrogating Neural Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Shackman, Alexander J.; McMenamin, Brenton W.; Maxwell, Jeffrey S.; Greischar, Lawrence L.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in using neural oscillations to characterize the mechanisms supporting cognition and emotion. Oftentimes, oscillatory activity is indexed by mean power density in predefined frequency bands. Some investigators use broad bands originally defined by prominent surface features of the spectrum. Others rely on narrower bands originally defined by spectral factor analysis (SFA). Presently, the robustness and sensitivity of these competing band definitions remains unclear. Here, a Monte Carlo-based SFA strategy was used to decompose the tonic (“resting” or “spontaneous”) electroencephalogram (EEG) into five bands: delta (1–5Hz), alpha-low (6–9Hz), alpha-high (10–11Hz), beta (12–19Hz), and gamma (>21Hz). This pattern was consistent across SFA methods, artifact correction/rejection procedures, scalp regions, and samples. Subsequent analyses revealed that SFA failed to deliver enhanced sensitivity; narrow alpha sub-bands proved no more sensitive than the classical broadband to individual differences in temperament or mean differences in task-induced activation. Other analyses suggested that residual ocular and muscular artifact was the dominant source of activity during quiescence in the delta and gamma bands. This was observed following threshold-based artifact rejection or independent component analysis (ICA)-based artifact correction, indicating that such procedures do not necessarily confer adequate protection. Collectively, these findings highlight the limitations of several commonly used EEG procedures and underscore the necessity of routinely performing exploratory data analyses, particularly data visualization, prior to hypothesis testing. They also suggest the potential benefits of using techniques other than SFA for interrogating high-dimensional EEG datasets in the frequency or time-frequency (event-related spectral perturbation, event-related synchronization / desynchronization) domains. PMID

  20. Resonant oscillations of intermediate frequency in a stratified atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, O. E.

    1973-01-01

    A class of solutions to a model of forced oscillations in a rotating stratified atmospheric layer is derived and analyzed. The basic model is found to reduce to a boundary value problem with a second-order linear partial differential equation of the hyperbolic type for this range of forcing frequencies. The forced solutions are shown to exhibit resonances with the normal modes of oscillation of the layer. The characteristics of the resonant modes are analyzed in terms of mean tropospheric values of temperature, temperature lapse, wind speed, horizontal and vertical wind shears, latitude, and the frequency and horizontal wavelength of the forcing mechanism. These solutions are compared with solutions to the model for a different (subinertial) range of forcing frequencies. This comparison leads to an elliptic boundary value problem. The solutions in that case do not exhibit the same type of resonance and generally decay away from the region of forcing.

  1. Composite oscillator systems for meeting user needs for time and frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, S. R.; Walls, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    Frequency standards are used in most navigation and telecommunications systems to provide a long term memory of either frequency, phase, or time epoch. From a systems point of view, the performance aspects of the frequency standard are weighed against other systems characteristics, such as overall performance, cost, size, and accessibility; a number of examples are very briefly reviewed. The theory of phase lock and frequency lock systems is outlined in sufficient detail that total oscillator system performance can be predicted from measurements on the individual components. As an example, details of the performance of a high spectral purity oscillator phase locked to a long term stable oscillator are given. Results for several systems, including the best system stability that can be obtained from present commercially available 5-MHz sources, are shown.

  2. Frequency multiplying optoelectronic oscillator based on nonlinearly-coupled double loops.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Jin, Tao; Chi, Hao

    2013-12-30

    We propose and demonstrate a frequency multiplying optoelectronic oscillator with nonlinearly-coupled double loops based on two cascaded Mach-Zehnder modulators, to generate high frequency microwave signals using only low-frequency devices. We find the final oscillation modes are only determined by the length of the master oscillation loop. Frequency multiplying signals are generated via nonlinearly-coupled double loops, the output of one loop being used to modulate the other. In the experiments, microwave signals at 10 GHz with -121 dBc/Hz phase noise at 10 kHz offset and 20 GHz with -112.8 dBc/Hz phase noise at 10 kHz offset are generated. Meanwhile, their side-mode suppression ratios are also evaluated and the maximum ratio of 70 dB is obtained. PMID:24514845

  3. Steady-state BOLD Response to Higher-order Cognition Modulates Low-Frequency Neural Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Dai, Gang-Shu; Liu, Feng; Long, Zhi-Liang; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2015-12-01

    Steady-state responses (SSRs) reflect the synchronous neural oscillations evoked by noninvasive and consistently repeated stimuli at the fundamental or harmonic frequencies. The steady-state evoked potentials (SSEPs; the representative form of the SSRs) have been widely used in the cognitive and clinical neurosciences and brain-computer interface research. However, the steady-state evoked potentials have limitations in examining high-frequency neural oscillations and basic cognition. In addition, synchronous neural oscillations in the low frequency range (<1 Hz) and in higher-order cognition have received a little attention. Therefore, we examined the SSRs in the low frequency range using a new index, the steady-state BOLD responses (SSBRs) evoked by semantic stimuli. Our results revealed that the significant SSBRs were induced at the fundamental frequency of stimuli and the first harmonic in task-related regions, suggesting the enhanced variability of neural oscillations entrained by exogenous stimuli. The SSBRs were independent of neurovascular coupling and characterized by sensorimotor bias, an indication of regional-dependent neuroplasticity. Furthermore, the amplitude of SSBRs may predict behavioral performance and show the psychophysiological relevance. Our findings provide valuable insights into the understanding of the SSRs evoked by higher-order cognition and how the SSRs modulate low-frequency neural oscillations. PMID:26284992

  4. Trapped ion oscillation frequencies as sensors for spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Manuel; Quint, Wolfgang; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried

    2010-01-01

    The oscillation frequencies of charged particles in a Penning trap can serve as sensors for spectroscopy when additional field components are introduced to the magnetic and electric fields used for confinement. The presence of so-called "magnetic bottles" and specific electric anharmonicities creates calculable energy-dependences of the oscillation frequencies in the radiofrequency domain which may be used to detect the absorption or emission of photons both in the microwave and optical frequency domains. The precise electronic measurement of these oscillation frequencies therefore represents an optical sensor for spectroscopy. We discuss possible applications for precision laser and microwave spectroscopy and their role in the determination of magnetic moments and excited state life-times. Also, the trap-assisted measurement of radiative nuclear de-excitations in the X-ray domain is discussed. This way, the different applications range over more than 12 orders of magnitude in the detectable photon energies, from below μeV in the microwave domain to beyond MeV in the X-ray domain. PMID:22294921

  5. Trapped Ion Oscillation Frequencies as Sensors for Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Manuel; Quint, Wolfgang; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried

    2010-01-01

    The oscillation frequencies of charged particles in a Penning trap can serve as sensors for spectroscopy when additional field components are introduced to the magnetic and electric fields used for confinement. The presence of so-called “magnetic bottles” and specific electric anharmonicities creates calculable energy-dependences of the oscillation frequencies in the radiofrequency domain which may be used to detect the absorption or emission of photons both in the microwave and optical frequency domains. The precise electronic measurement of these oscillation frequencies therefore represents an optical sensor for spectroscopy. We discuss possible applications for precision laser and microwave spectroscopy and their role in the determination of magnetic moments and excited state life-times. Also, the trap-assisted measurement of radiative nuclear de-excitations in the X-ray domain is discussed. This way, the different applications range over more than 12 orders of magnitude in the detectable photon energies, from below μeV in the microwave domain to beyond MeV in the X-ray domain. PMID:22294921

  6. Ultra-High-Frequency Capacitive Displacement Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.

    1994-01-01

    Improved class of compact, high-resolution capacitive displacement sensors operates at excitation frequency of 915 MHz and measures about 7.5 by 4 by 2 centimeters. Contains commercially available 915-MHz oscillator and transmission-line resonator. Resonator contains stripline inductor in addition to variable capacitor. Ultrahigh excitation frequency offers advantages of resolution and frequency response. Not deleteriously affected by mechanical overdriving, or contact between electrodes.

  7. Frequency modulated self-oscillation and phase inertia in a synchronized nanowire mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barois, T.; Perisanu, S.; Vincent, P.; Purcell, S. T.; Ayari, A.

    2014-08-01

    Synchronization has been reported for a wide range of self-oscillating systems. However, even though it has been predicted theoretically for several decades, the experimental realization of phase self-oscillation, sometimes called phase trapping, in the high driving regime has been studied only recently. We explored in detail the phase dynamics in a synchronized field emission SiC nanoelectromechanical system with intrinsic feedback. A richer variety of phase behavior has been unambiguously identified, implying phase modulation and inertia. This synchronization regime is expected to have implications for the comprehension of the dynamics of interacting self-oscillating networks and for the generation of frequency modulated signals at the nanoscale.

  8. Hydrodynamic Force on a Cylinder Oscillating at Low Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Yao, Minwu; Panzarella, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    The hydrodynamic force on a cylinder oscillating transversely to its axis is a nonlinear function of the displacement amplitude x0. We report measurements and numerical calculations of the force at frequencies low enough that delta > R, where delta is the viscous penetration length and R is the cylinder radius. For small amplitudes, the numerically calculated Fourier transform of the force per unit length, F(sub small), agrees with Stokes' analytical calculation. For larger amplitudes, the force per unit length found by both calculation and measurement is F = F(sub small)C (x(sub 0)/delta,R/delta). The complex function C depends only weakly on R/delta, indicating that x0/delta is more appropriate as a scaling variable than the Keulegan-Carpenter number KC = pi*x(sub 0)/R. The measurements used a torsion oscillator driven at frequencies from 1 to 12 Hz while immersed in dense xenon. The oscillator comprised cylinders with an effective radius of R = 13.4 micron and oscillation amplitudes as large as x(sub 0)/delta = 4 (corresponding to KC as large as 71). The calculations used similar conditions except that the amplitudes were as large as x0/delta = 28.

  9. Recent advances in ultrafast optical parametric oscillator frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Richard A.; Zhang, Zhaowei; Reid, Derryck T.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss recent advances in the stabilization and application of femtosecond frequency combs based on optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) pumped by femtosecond lasers at 800 and 1060 nm. A method for locking to zero the carrier-envelope-offset of a Ti:sapphire-pumped OPO comb is described. The application of Yb:KYW-laser-pumped dual-combs for mid-infrared spectroscopy is detailed, specifically methane spectroscopy at approximately a 0.7% concentration at 1 atm.

  10. Dependence of the colored frequency noise in spin torque oscillators on current and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, Anders Sani, Sohrab R.; Chung, Sunjae; Amir Hossein Banuazizi, S.; Östling, Mikael; Gunnar Malm, B.; Bonetti, Stefano; Majid Mohseni, S.; Persson, Johan; Iacocca, Ezio; Åkerman, Johan

    2014-03-03

    The nano-scale spin torque oscillator (STO) is a compelling device for on-chip, highly tunable microwave frequency signal generation. Currently, one of the most important challenges for the STO is to increase its longer-time frequency stability by decreasing the 1/f frequency noise, but its high level makes even its measurement impossible using the phase noise mode of spectrum analyzers. Here, we present a custom made time-domain measurement system with 150 MHz measurement bandwidth making possible the investigation of the variation of the 1/f as well as the white frequency noise in a STO over a large set of operating points covering 18–25 GHz. The 1/f level is found to be highly dependent on the oscillation amplitude-frequency non-linearity and the vicinity of unexcited oscillation modes. These findings elucidate the need for a quantitative theoretical treatment of the low-frequency, colored frequency noise in STOs. Based on the results, we suggest that the 1/f frequency noise possibly can be decreased by improving the microstructural quality of the metallic thin films.

  11. High power, high frequency helix TWT's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloley, H. J.; Willard, J.; Paatz, S. R.; Keat, M. J.

    The design and performance characteristics of a 34-GHz pulse tube capable of 75 W peak power output at 30 percent duty cycle and a broadband CW tube are presented. Particular attention is given to the engineering problems encountered during the development of the tubes, including the suppression of backward wave oscillation, the design of electron guns for small-diameter high-current beams, and the thermal capability of small helix structures. The discussion also covers the effects of various design parameters and choice of engineering materials on the ultimate practical limit of power and gain at the operating frequencies. Measurements are presented for advanced experimental tubes.

  12. Frequency-doubling optoelectronic oscillator based on destructive interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Chen, Fushen; Fan, Mengqiu; Li, Chengxin; Dong, Qimeng

    2015-12-01

    A frequency-doubling optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) using two cascaded modulators based on destructive interference is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed system, we utilize a cascaded modulator including a phase modulator and an intensity modulator, which implements a carrier-suppressed double-sideband modulation based on destructive interference to generate a frequency-doubled microwave signal. Meanwhile, the phase modulator is connected by a chirp fiber Bragg grating in the loop, which forms a microwave photonic filter to select the fundamental frequency signal in the OEO loop. As a result, a frequency-doubled microwave signal at 17.9 and 20.5 GHz is generated, respectively. The phase noises and the long-term stability of the generated microwave signals are also investigated.

  13. Frequency stability of an RF oscillator with an MEMS-based encapsulated resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohua, Peng; Wei, Luo; Jicong, Zhao; Quan, Yuan; Jinling, Yang; Fuhua, Yang

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a high-Q RF MEMS oscillator consisting of a micro-disk resonator and low noise feedback circuits. The oscillator has high frequency stability and low phase noise. The two-port resonator was hermetically encapsulated using low-cost Sn-rich Au-Sn solder bonding, which significantly improves the frequency stability. A low noise oscillator circuit was designed with a two-stage amplifying architecture which effectively improves both the frequency stability and phase noise performance. The measured phase noise is -96 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -128 dBc/Hz at far-from-carrier offsets. Moreover, the medium-term frequency stability and Allan deviation of the oscillator are ±4 ppm and 10 ppb, respectively. The oscillator is a promising component in future wireless communication application. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61234007, 61404136) and the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Nos. 2011CB933102, 2013YQ16055103).

  14. Synchronization of low-frequency oscillations in the cardiovascular system: Application to medical diagnostics and treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarenko, V. I.; Prokhorov, M. D.; Karavaev, A. S.; Kiselev, A. R.; Gridnev, V. I.; Bezruchko, B. P.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate synchronization between the low-frequency oscillations of heart rate and blood pressure having in humans a basic frequency close to 0.1 Hz. A quantitative estimation of this synchronization based on calculation of relative time of phase synchronization of oscillations is proposed. We show that assessment of synchronization between the considered oscillations can be useful for selecting an optimal dose of beta-blocker treatment in patients after acute myocardial infarction. It is found out that low value of synchronization between the low-frequency rhythms in heart rate and blood pressure at the first week after acute myocardial infarction is a sensitive marker of high risk of mortality during the subsequent 5 years.

  15. Synthesis of Optical Frequencies and Ultrastable Femtosecond Pulse Trains from an Optical Reference Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, A.; Ramond, T. M.; Diddams, S. A.; Hollberg, L.

    Recently, atomic clocks based on optical frequency standards have been demonstrated [1,2]. A key element in these clocks is a femtosecond laser that downconverts the petahertz oscillation rate into countable ticks at 1 GHz. When compared to current microwave standards, these new optical clocks are expected to yield an improvement in stability and accuracy by roughly a factor of 1000. Furthermore, it is possible that the lowest noise microwave sources will soon be based on atomically-stabilized optical oscillators that have their frequency converted to the microwave domain via a femtosecond laser. Here, we present tests of the ability of femtosecond lasers to transfer stability from an optical oscillator to their repetition rates as well as to the associated broadband frequency comb. In a first experiment, we phase-lock two lasers to a stabilized laser diode and find that the relative timing jitter in their pulse trains can be on the order of 1 femtosecond in a 100 kHz bandwidth. It is important to distinguish this technique from previous work where a femtosecond laser has been stabilized to a microwave standard [3,4] or another femtosecond laser [5]. Furthermore, we extract highly stable microwave signals with a fractional frequency instability of 2×10-14 in 1 s by photodetection of the laser pulse trains. In a second experiment, we similarly phase-lock the femtosecond laser to an optical oscillator with linewidth less than 1 Hz [6]. The precision with which we can make the femtosecond frequency comb track this reference oscillator is then tested by a heterodyne measurement between a second stable optical oscillator and a mode of the frequency comb that is displaced 76 THz from the 1 Hz-wide reference. From this heterodyne signal we place an upper limit of 150 Hz on the linewidth of the elements of the frequency comb, limited by the noise in the measurement itself.

  16. Oscillator circuit for use with high loss quartz resonator sensors

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Otto

    1995-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a Lever oscillator for use in high resistance resonator applications, especially for use with quartz resonator sensors. The oscillator is designed to operate over a wide dynamic range of resonator resistance due to damping of the resonator in mediums such as liquids. An oscillator design is presented that allows both frequency and loss (R.sub.m) of the resonator to be determined over a wide dynamic range of resonator loss. The Lever oscillator uses negative feedback in a differential amplifier configuration to actively and variably divide (or leverage) the resonator impedance such that the oscillator can maintain the phase and gain of the loop over a wide range of resonator resistance.

  17. Experimental Hingeless Rotor Characteristics at Full Scale First Flap Mode Frequencies (including Rotor Frequency Response to Shaft Oscillations), Phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczynski, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    The completion of the High Advance Ratio Research Program is reported. The primary objectives of the program were to experimentally determine the rotor frequency response to shaft pitching and rolling oscillations and to acquire steady response and frequency response data at high advance ratios for hingeless rotors with typical, full-scale, first flap mode natural frequencies. Secondary objectives of the program included the further evaluation of both the hub moment feedback control system and the simplified rigid blade flapping theory with respect to shaft oscillations. The bulk of the text is devoted to the presentation and examination of representative experimental results. All the analyzed test data are documented in tabular and/or graphical formats.

  18. The effect of near-surface convection on oscillation frequencies of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modelled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the “surface term”. The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modelling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelength (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary 3-D flows, can be reduced to an effective “quiet-Sun” wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt-Väisäla frequency and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified wave equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of three dimensional flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from three dimensional numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies, and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  19. Measurements of High-Degree Solar Oscillation Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, K. T.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.; Hill, F.

    1994-12-01

    We present results obtained from full-disk, 1000times 1024 pixel, Ca II intensity images of the Sun collected with the High-L Helioseismometer (HLH). Our measurement of p- and f-mode oscillation frequencies over the frequency range 1.8<=nu <=5.0 mHz and the spherical harmonic degree range 100<=l<=1200 from 22-25 June 1993 data represents an improvement over previous measurements. We are able to differentiate among the predictions of several solar models, thus constraining physical models of the solar convection zone. We also include recent splitting and frequency results from data collected during the entire month of June 1994. The purpose of the HLH research program is to measure high-degree solar oscillation parameters for the remainder of this decade in support of the Solar Oscillations Investigation - Michelson Doppler Imager collaboration, which is part of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, a joint ESA-NASA satellite mission.

  20. Hemodynamic low-frequency oscillation reflects resting-state neuronal activity in rodent brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Peng; Li, James; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2015-03-01

    Brain functional connectivity is mapped using spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) in blood-oxygen-leveldependent (BOLD) signals using fMRI. However, the origin of spontaneous BOLD oscillations remains elusive. Specifically, the coupling of regional hemodynamic LFOs to neuronal activity in a resting brain is rarely examined directly. Here we present a method based on instantaneous-frequency (IF) analysis to detect regional LFOs of cerebral blood flow (CBF) along with local-field potential (LFP) changes of neurons in resting state to study neurovascular coupling. CBF and LFP were simultaneously acquired using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and electroencephalography in the rat's somatosensory cortex with high temporal resolution (i.e., 20Hz for CBF and 2kHz for LDF, respectively). Instead of fast Fourier transform analysis, a peak-detection algorithm was used to define the LFP activities and CBF spontaneous oscillations in the time domain and the time lapses were used to calculate the IFs of hemodynamic (i.e., CBF) oscillations and neuronal (i.e., LFP) activities. Our results showed that the CBF mostly oscillated at ~0.1Hz with a full-half-bandwidth of [0.08Hz, 0.15Hz]. In addition, the maximal frequency of LFP firings was also approximately at 0.1Hz, which collaborated with to the frequency of CBF oscillations. Interestingly, CBF increased linearly with the LFP activity up to 0.15Hz (r=0.93), and both signals then decreased rapidly as a function of activity frequency. This indicates the spontaneous hemodynamic LFOs were associated with neuronal activities, thus confirming the neuronal origin of the hemodynamic oscillations.

  1. High efficiency UHF oscillator for portable battery-powered applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessendorf, K. O.

    There is a growing demand for high-frequency circuit designs which are capable of being used in portable battery-powered applications. This type of environment typically requires circuits designed for small size and minimum dc current draw. A transponder design at Sandia National Laboratories required a 430 MHz oscillator (crystal controlled) which could run off a 3 V lithium battery and have an output power of approximately 0 dbm and draw the least possible dc current (less than 4 mA was desired). Physically the oscillator height has to be less than 0.1 sq in. and occupy less than 1 sq in. surface area. Another requirement, for the first engineering prototype, was that the oscillator be made out of inexpensive, standard parts. The design was integrated onto a circuit board with the associated transponder circuitry. This paper describes a technique to make a high-efficiency 430 MHz oscillator which demonstrates efficiencies in the 10 to 12 percent range for an output of approximately 0 dbm. Data will show the frequency spectrum of the oscillator waveform and the performance of the oscillator over temperature and power supply voltage. To meet the requirements and make the design as simple as possible a 107.5 MHz (R(sub m) less than 70 ohms) Statek AT-Strip resonator was chosen. This resonator was chosen because of its small size, surface mountability, and good electrical performance. This resonator was used at series resonance in an oscillator multiplier circuit which would provide a (4X) multiplication in an efficient manner. The oscillator (first stage) is a Butler Oscillator-Multiplier (2X) which is direct coupled to a buffer transistor (second stage) and harmonic generating (2X) transistor which share bias current. The final design delivers 1 dbm at 3 V with 3.33 mA current draw. All harmonics and subharmonics are greater than 20 db down from the desired frequency.

  2. Abnormality of low frequency cerebral hemodynamics oscillations in TBI population.

    PubMed

    Chernomordik, Victor; Amyot, Franck; Kenney, Kimbra; Wassermann, Eric; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2016-05-15

    Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) can non-invasively capture dynamic cognitive activation and underlying physiological processes by measuring changes in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin levels, correlated to brain activation. It is a portable, inexpensive and user-friendly device which is easily adapted to the outpatient setting for the assessment of cognitive functions after Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Low frequency oscillations in hemodynamic signal, attributed in the literature to cerebral autoregulation, were assessed using recently introduced metrics, Oxygenation Variability (OV Index), obtained from oxy/deoxy-hemoglobin variations in response to mental tasks for a group of healthy control (HC, n=14) and TBI (n=29). Participants responded to an action complexity judgment task (evaluating the complexity of daily life activities by classifying the number of steps as "few" or "many") with a varying degree of cognitive load to produce brain activation. During the task, we measured blood variations with fNIRS and analyzed OV Index changes. Mean OV indices, corresponding to high complexity tasks, are higher than that of low complexity tasks in the HC group, revealing strong parametric effect (0.039±0.017 for low, 0.057±0.036 for high, p-value=0.069). However, no significant difference has been recorded for the OV indexes for two different loads in the TBI group (0.055±0.033 for low, 0.054±0.035 for high, p=0.9). OV index metrics proves to be sensitive to chronic TBI and can potentially be used to separate subpopulations TBI vs. HC. Noticeable differences in OV index spatial distributions between subpopulations have been observed. PMID:26996413

  3. Low and then high frequency oscillations of distinct right cortical networks are progressively enhanced by medium and long term Satyananda Yoga meditation practice

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John; Jamieson, Graham; Cohen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Meditation proficiency is related to trait-like (learned) effects on brain function, developed over time. Previous studies show increases in EEG power in lower frequency bands (theta, alpha) in experienced meditators in both meditation states and baseline conditions. Higher gamma band power has been found in advanced Buddhist meditators, yet it is not known if this occurs in Yoga meditation practices. This study used eLORETA to compare differences in cortical source activity underlying scalp EEG from intermediate (mean experience 4 years) and advanced (mean experience 30 years) Australian meditators from the Satyananda Yoga tradition during a body-steadiness meditation, mantra meditation, and non-meditation mental calculation condition. Intermediate Yoga meditators showed greater source activity in low frequencies (particularly theta and alpha1) during mental calculation, body-steadiness and mantra meditation. A similar spatial pattern of significant differences was found in all conditions but the number of significant voxels was double during body-steadiness and mantra meditation than in the non-meditation (calculation) condition. These differences were greatest in right (R) superior frontal and R precentral gyri and extended back to include the R parietal and occipital lobes. Advanced Yoga meditators showed greater activity in high frequencies (beta and especially gamma) in all conditions but greatly expanded during meditation practice. Across all conditions (meditation and non-meditation) differences were greatest in the same regions: R insula, R inferior frontal gyrus and R anterior temporal lobe. Distinct R core networks were identified in alpha1 (8–10 Hz) and gamma (25–42 Hz) bands, respectively. The voxels recruited to these networks greatly expanded during meditation practice to include homologous regions of the left hemisphere. Functional interpretation parallels traditionally described stages of development in Yoga proficiency. PMID:24959124

  4. Torsional oscillations of neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime

    2015-11-01

    To determine the frequencies of magnetic oscillations in neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields, we derive the perturbation equations. We assume that the field strength of the global magnetic structure is so small that such fields are negligible compared with tangled fields, which may still be far from a realistic configuration. Then, we systematically examine the spectra of the magnetic oscillations, as varying the magnetic field strength and stellar mass. The frequencies without crust elasticity are completely proportional to the strength of the magnetic field, whose proportionality constant depends strongly on the stellar mass. On the other hand, the oscillation spectra with crust elasticity become more complicated, where the frequencies even for weak magnetic fields are different from the crustal torsional oscillations without magnetic fields. For discussing spectra, the critical field strength can play an important role, and it is determined in such a way that the shear velocity is equivalent to the Alfvén velocity at the crust basis. Additionally, we find that the effect of the crust elasticity can be seen strongly in the fundamental oscillations with a lower harmonic index, ℓ. Unlike the stellar models with a pure dipole magnetic field, we also find that the spectra with highly tangled magnetic fields become discrete, where one can expect many of the eigenfrequencies. Maybe these frequencies could be detected after the violent phenomena breaking the global magnetic field structure.

  5. Single-resonator dual-frequency AIN-on-Si MEMS oscillators.

    PubMed

    Lavasani, Hossein Miri; Abdolvand, Reza; Ayazi, Farrokh

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports on the design, implementation, and phase-noise optimization of low-power interface IC for dual-frequency oscillators that utilize two high quality factor (Q) width-extensional bulk acoustic modes of the same AlN-on-silicon resonator. Two 0.5-μm CMOS transimpedance amplifiers (TIA) have been designed, characterized, and interfaced with two dual-mode resonators operating at 35.5/105.7 MHz (first/third order modes) and 35.5/174.9 MHz (first/ fifth order modes). One TIA uses open-loop regulated cascode (RGC) topology in the first stage to enable low power operation, whereas the second one uses an inverter with shunt-shunt feedback to deliver higher gain with lower phase noise. An on-chip switching network is incorporated into each TIA to change the oscillation frequency based on the different phase shift. The effect of TIA on the phase-noise performance of oscillators is studied and compared for both topologies. The measured phase noise of low- and high-frequency modes at 1 kHz offset from carrier are -114 and -108 dBc/Hz for the 35/105 MHz oscillator, and -108 and -105 dBc/Hz for the 35/175 MHz oscillator, respectively, whereas the far-from-carrier reaches below -140 dBc/Hz in all cases. PMID:25965675

  6. Frequency tuning of polarization oscillations in spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann, Markus; Pusch, Tobias; Michalzik, Rainer; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the coupled spin-photon dynamics in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) is an attractive opportunity to overcome the limitations of conventional, purely charge based semiconductor lasers. Such spin-controlled VCSELs (spin-VCSELs) offer several advantages, like reduced threshold, spin amplification and polarization control. Furthermore the coupling between carrier spin and light polarization bears the potential for ultrafast polarization dynamics. By injecting spin-polarized carriers, the complex polarization dynamics can be controlled and utilized for high-speed applications. Polarization oscillations as resonance oscillations of the coupled spin- photon system can be generated using pulsed spin injection, which can be much faster than the intensity dynamics in conventional devices. We already demonstrated that the oscillations can be switched in a controlled manner. These controllable polarization dynamics can be used for ultrafast polarization-based optical data communication. The polarization oscillation frequency and therefore the possible data transmission rate is assumed to be mainly determined by the birefringence-induced mode-splitting. This provides a direct tool to increase the polarization dynamics toward higher frequencies by adding a high amount of birefringence to the VCSEL structure. Using this technique, we could recently demonstrate experimentally a birefringence splitting of more than 250 GHz using mechanical strain. Here, we employ the well-known spin-flip model to investigate the tuning of the polarization oscillation frequency. The changing mechanical strain is represented by a linear birefringence sweep to values up to 80πGHz. The wide tuning range presented enables us to generate polarization oscillation frequencies exceeding the conventional intensity modulation frequency in the simulated device by far, mainly dependent on the birefringence in the cavity only.

  7. Intrinsic frequency doubling in an MgO-based spin torque oscillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Muduli, P. K.; Heinonen, O. G.; Akerman, J.

    2011-01-01

    We show that the frequency of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ)-based spin torque oscillator (STO) can be doubled and the first harmonic entirely suppressed by orienting the free and fixed layer magnetizations in an antiparallel (AP) state. The angular dependence of the harmonics allows us to extract the free layer precession angle, which follows a parabolic decrease from a maximum of 20{sup o} in the AP state to about 10{sup o} at 25{sup o} of misalignment. Frequency-doubling provides both a promising way for increasing the frequency of MTJ-STOs and a means for high-rate frequency shift keying using only a small magnetic field.

  8. Peak luminosity correlated low-frequency oscillations in black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Gao, H. Q.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Qu, J. L.; Zhang, C. M.; Song, L. M.

    2014-05-01

    Based on Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observational data, we study the timing and spectral properties of some peculiar low-frequency (LF) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), which have been found at the peak luminosity of the outburst of some transient black hole (BH) binaries: the 2005 outburst of GRO J1655-40, the 2003 outburst of H1743-322 and the 1998 outburst of XTE J1550-564. Appearing in the ultraluminous state, these QPOs from different sources show some common properties. The amplitude is very weak (less than 1 per cent) and the quality factor is larger than 6. Moreover, these QPOs (about several Hz) sometimes show up simultaneously with another QPO (about 10 Hz), but their frequencies are not harmonically related. We also find that the frequencies of these QPOs are inversely correlated with the mass of the BH, which implies that these QPOs might be correlated with the innermost stable circular orbit. The QPO frequency is also negative correlated with the inner disc radius among BHs. However, its frequency is too low to ascribe it to the Keperlian orbit frequency. Moreover, we discuss the physical origin of these QPOs and we suggest that they are not produced by the viscous variability of the inner disc either.

  9. Early solar mass loss, element diffusion, and solar oscillation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.; Cox, A.N.

    1994-07-01

    Swenson and Faulkner, and Boothroyd et al. investigated the possibility that early main-sequence mass loss via a stronger early solar wind could be responsible for the observed solar lithium and beryllium depiction. This depletion requires a total mass loss of {approximately}0.1 M{circle_dot}, nearly independent of the mass loss timescale. We have calculated the evolution and oscillation frequencies of solar models including helium and element diffusion, and such early solar mass loss. We show that extreme mass loss of 1 M{circle_dot} is easily ruled out by the low-degree p-modes that probe the solar center and sense the steeper molecular weight gradient produced by the early phase of more rapid hydrogen burning. The effects on central structure are much smaller for models with an initial mass of 1.1 M{circle_dot} and exponentially-decreasing mass loss irate with e-folding timescale 0.45 Gyr. While such mass loss slightly worsens the agreement between observed and calculated low-degree modes, the observational uncertainties of several tenths of a microhertz weaken this conclusion. Surprisingly, the intermediate-degree modes with much smaller observational uncertainties that probe the convection zone bottom prove to be the key to discriminating between models: The early mass loss phase decreases the total amount of helium and heavier elements diffused from the convection zone, and the extent of the diffusion produced composition gradient just below the convection zone, deteriorating the agreement with observed frequencies for these modes. Thus it appears that oscillations can also rule out this smaller amount of gradual early main-sequence mass loss in the young Sun. The mass loss phase must be confined to substantially under a billion years, probably 0.5 Gyr or less, to simultaneously solve the solar Li/Be problem and avoid discrepancies with solar oscillation frequencies.

  10. Frequency comb metrology with an optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Balskus, K; Schilt, S; Wittwer, V J; Brochard, P; Ploetzing, T; Jornod, N; McCracken, R A; Zhang, Z; Bartels, A; Reid, D T; Südmeyer, T

    2016-04-18

    We report on the first demonstration of absolute frequency comb metrology with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) frequency comb. The synchronously-pumped OPO operated in the 1.5-µm spectral region and was referenced to an H-maser atomic clock. Using different techniques, we thoroughly characterized the frequency noise power spectral density (PSD) of the repetition rate frep, of the carrier-envelope offset frequency fCEO, and of an optical comb line νN. The comb mode optical linewidth at 1557 nm was determined to be ~70 kHz for an observation time of 1 s from the measured frequency noise PSD, and was limited by the stability of the microwave frequency standard available for the stabilization of the comb repetition rate. We achieved a tight lock of the carrier envelope offset frequency with only ~300 mrad residual integrated phase noise, which makes its contribution to the optical linewidth negligible. The OPO comb was used to measure the absolute optical frequency of a near-infrared laser whose second-harmonic component was locked to the F = 2→3 transition of the 87Rb D2 line at 780 nm, leading to a measured transition frequency of νRb = 384,228,115,346 ± 16 kHz. We performed the same measurement with a commercial fiber-laser comb operating in the 1.5-µm region. Both the OPO comb and the commercial fiber comb achieved similar performance. The measurement accuracy was limited by interferometric noise in the fibered setup of the Rb-stabilized laser. PMID:27137274

  11. The frequency of calcium oscillations in mouse eggs at fertilization is modulated by the number of fused sperm.

    PubMed

    Faure, J E; Myles, D G; Primakoff, P

    1999-09-15

    In a variety of calcium signaling systems, the frequency of intracellular calcium oscillations is physiologically important. Probably multiple factors control the frequency of calcium oscillations in the egg after fertilization and many of these remain to be identified. In this study, we present the first rigorous set of data showing that monospermic fertilization is important for setting the physiological calcium oscillation frequency. Recordings in 152 zona-free eggs show that the general pattern of the calcium oscillations is identical in monospermic and polyspermic eggs; however, the oscillation frequency is higher in polyspermic eggs (P < 10(-6)). The frequency of the late oscillations increases with the number of sperm heads incorporated: 5.2 +/- 0.3 spikes per hour (mean +/- SEM; n = 55) in monospermic eggs, 6.6 +/- 0.3 (n = 62) in dispermic eggs, 8.7 +/- 0.7 (n = 23) in trispermic eggs, and 8.9 +/- 0.9 (n = 12) in eggs with four or more sperm heads. The frequency of the early oscillations is also increased in polyspermic eggs. Seventy-eight additional eggs were divided into two groups and inseminated with two different sperm concentrations ("low" and "high") to obtain one group mainly monospermic and the other mainly polyspermic. The two groups of eggs oscillated at different frequencies (P < 10(-5)). These data rule out the possibility of an egg effect in which some eggs would have the dual properties of oscillating faster and of being able to fuse with several sperm cells. These data instead suggest that the sperm modulates the frequency of the oscillations in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:10479454

  12. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  13. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  14. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  15. Synchronization of phase oscillators with frequency-weighted coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Can; Sun, Yuting; Gao, Jian; Qiu, Tian; Zheng, Zhigang; Guan, Shuguang

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the first-order synchronization transition has been studied in systems of coupled phase oscillators. In this paper, we propose a framework to investigate the synchronization in the frequency-weighted Kuramoto model with all-to-all couplings. A rigorous mean-field analysis is implemented to predict the possible steady states. Furthermore, a detailed linear stability analysis proves that the incoherent state is only neutrally stable below the synchronization threshold. Nevertheless, interestingly, the amplitude of the order parameter decays exponentially (at least for short time) in this regime, resembling the Landau damping effect in plasma physics. Moreover, the explicit expression for the critical coupling strength is determined by both the mean-field method and linear operator theory. The mechanism of bifurcation for the incoherent state near the critical point is further revealed by the amplitude expansion theory, which shows that the oscillating standing wave state could also occur in this model for certain frequency distributions. Our theoretical analysis and numerical results are consistent with each other, which can help us understand the synchronization transition in general networks with heterogenous couplings.

  16. Synchronization of phase oscillators with frequency-weighted coupling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Can; Sun, Yuting; Gao, Jian; Qiu, Tian; Zheng, Zhigang; Guan, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the first-order synchronization transition has been studied in systems of coupled phase oscillators. In this paper, we propose a framework to investigate the synchronization in the frequency-weighted Kuramoto model with all-to-all couplings. A rigorous mean-field analysis is implemented to predict the possible steady states. Furthermore, a detailed linear stability analysis proves that the incoherent state is only neutrally stable below the synchronization threshold. Nevertheless, interestingly, the amplitude of the order parameter decays exponentially (at least for short time) in this regime, resembling the Landau damping effect in plasma physics. Moreover, the explicit expression for the critical coupling strength is determined by both the mean-field method and linear operator theory. The mechanism of bifurcation for the incoherent state near the critical point is further revealed by the amplitude expansion theory, which shows that the oscillating standing wave state could also occur in this model for certain frequency distributions. Our theoretical analysis and numerical results are consistent with each other, which can help us understand the synchronization transition in general networks with heterogeneous couplings. PMID:26903110

  17. Synchronization of phase oscillators with frequency-weighted coupling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Can; Sun, Yuting; Gao, Jian; Qiu, Tian; Zheng, Zhigang; Guan, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the first-order synchronization transition has been studied in systems of coupled phase oscillators. In this paper, we propose a framework to investigate the synchronization in the frequency-weighted Kuramoto model with all-to-all couplings. A rigorous mean-field analysis is implemented to predict the possible steady states. Furthermore, a detailed linear stability analysis proves that the incoherent state is only neutrally stable below the synchronization threshold. Nevertheless, interestingly, the amplitude of the order parameter decays exponentially (at least for short time) in this regime, resembling the Landau damping effect in plasma physics. Moreover, the explicit expression for the critical coupling strength is determined by both the mean-field method and linear operator theory. The mechanism of bifurcation for the incoherent state near the critical point is further revealed by the amplitude expansion theory, which shows that the oscillating standing wave state could also occur in this model for certain frequency distributions. Our theoretical analysis and numerical results are consistent with each other, which can help us understand the synchronization transition in general networks with heterogenous couplings. PMID:26903110

  18. Frequency and amplitude control of cortical oscillations by phosphoinositide waves.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ding; Xiao, Shengping; Guo, Su; Lin, Qingsong; Nakatsu, Fubito; Wu, Min

    2016-03-01

    Rhythmicity is prevalent in the cortical dynamics of diverse single and multicellular systems. Current models of cortical oscillations focus primarily on cytoskeleton-based feedbacks, but information on signals upstream of the actin cytoskeleton is limited. In addition, inhibitory mechanisms--especially local inhibitory mechanisms, which ensure proper spatial and kinetic controls of activation--are not well understood. Here, we identified two phosphoinositide phosphatases, synaptojanin 2 and SHIP1, that function in periodic traveling waves of rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) mast cells. The local, phase-shifted activation of lipid phosphatases generates sequential waves of phosphoinositides. By acutely perturbing phosphoinositide composition using optogenetic methods, we showed that pulses of PtdIns(4,5)P2 regulate the amplitude of cyclic membrane waves while PtdIns(3,4)P2 sets the frequency. Collectively, these data suggest that the spatiotemporal dynamics of lipid metabolism have a key role in governing cortical oscillations and reveal how phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K) activity could be frequency-encoded by a phosphatase-dependent inhibitory reaction. PMID:26751515

  19. Nonlinear spacing and frequency effects of an oscillating cylinder in the wake of a stationary cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhongquan Charlie

    2010-04-01

    Nonlinear responses to a transversely oscillating cylinder in the wake of a stationary upstream cylinder are studied theoretically by using an immersed-boundary method at Re=100. Response states are investigated in the three flow regimes for a tandem-cylinder system: the "vortex suppression" regime, the critical spacing regime, and the "vortex formation" regime. When the downstream cylinder is forced to oscillate at a fixed frequency and amplitude, the response state of flow around the two cylinders varies with different spacing between the two cylinders, while in the same flow regime, the response state can change with the oscillating frequency and amplitude of the downstream cylinder. Based on velocity phase portraits, each of the nonlinear response states can be categorized into one of the three states in the order of increasing chaotic levels: lock-in, transitional, or quasiperiodic. These states can also be correlated with velocity spectral behaviors. The discussions are conducted using near-wake velocity phase portraits, spectral analyses, and related vorticity fields. A general trend in the bifurcation diagrams of frequency spacing shows the smaller the spacing, frequency, or amplitude, the less chaotic the response state of the system and more likely the downstream and upstream wakes are in the same response state. The system is not locked-in in any case when the spacing between the cylinders is larger than the critical spacing. The near-wake velocity spectral behaviors correspond to the nonlinear response states, with narrow-banded peaks shown at the oscillation frequency and its harmonics in the lock-in cases. High frequency harmonic peaks, caused by interactions between the upstream wake and the downstream oscillating cylinder, are reduced in the near-wake velocity spectra of the upstream cylinder when the spacing increases.

  20. Studies of the Origin of High-frequency Quasi-periodic Oscillations of Mass-accreting Black Holes in X-Ray Binaries with Next-generation X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshtipour, Banafsheh; Hoormann, Janie K.; Krawczynski, Henric

    2016-08-01

    Observations with RXTE (Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer) revealed the presence of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) of the X-ray flux from several accreting stellar-mass black holes. HFQPOs (and their counterparts at lower frequencies) may allow us to study general relativity in the regime of strong gravity. However, the observational evidence today does not yet allow us to distinguish between different HFQPO models. In this paper we use a general-relativistic ray-tracing code to investigate X-ray timing spectroscopy and polarization properties of HFQPOs in the orbiting Hotspot model. We study observational signatures for the particular case of the 166 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the galactic binary GRS 1915+105. We conclude with a discussion of the observability of spectral signatures with a timing-spectroscopy experiment such as the LOFT (Large Observatory for X-ray Timing) and polarization signatures with space-borne X-ray polarimeters such as IXPE (Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer), PolSTAR (Polarization Spectroscopic Telescope Array), PRAXyS(Polarimetry of Relativistic X-ray Sources), or XIPE (X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer). A mission with high count rate such as LOFT would make it possible to get a QPO phase for each photon, enabling the study of the QPO-phase-resolved spectral shape and the correlation between this and the flux level. Owing to the short periods of the HFQPOs, first-generation X-ray polarimeters would not be able to assign a QPO phase to each photon. The study of QPO-phase-resolved polarization energy spectra would thus require simultaneous observations with a first-generation X-ray polarimeter and a LOFT-type mission.

  1. Avalanche-diode oscillator circuit with tuning at multiple frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D.; Ablow, C. M.; Lee, R. E.; Karp, A.; Chambers, D. R.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed theoretical analysis of three different modes or types of high efficiency oscillation in a PIN diode are presented. For the TRAPATT mode in a PIN diode, it is shown that a traveling avalanche zone is not necessary to generate a dense trapped plasma. An economical computer program for TRAPATT oscillations in a PIN diode is described. Typical results of diode power, dc-to-RF conversion efficiency, and required circuit impedances are presented for several different current waveforms. A semianalytical solution for a second type of high efficiency mode in a PIN diode is derived assuming a rectangular current waveform. A quasi-static approximation is employed to derive a semianalytical solution for the voltage across a PIN diode in a third mode, where avalanching occurs during a major portion of a half cycle. Calculations for this mode indicate that the power increases proportionally to the magnitude of the drive current with a small decrease in efficiency relative to the ordinary TRAPATT mode. An analytical solution is also given for a PIN diode, where it is assumed that the ionization coefficient is a step function. It is shown that the step-ionization approximation permits one to draw possible patterns of avalanche region in the depletion layer as a function of time. A rule governing admissible patterns is derived and an example solution given for one admissible pattern. Preliminary experimental results on the high-efficiency oscillations are presented and discussed. Two different experimental circuits, which used channel-dropping filters to provide independent harmonic tuning, are described. Simpler circuits used to produce high-efficiency oscillations are discussed. Results of experiments using inexpensive Fairchild FD300 diodes are given.

  2. Optical parametric oscillator of quasi-phasematched LiNbO 3 pumped by a compact high repetition rate single-frequency passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäder, U.; Bartschke, J.; Klimov, I.; Borsutzky, A.; Wallenstein, R.

    1998-02-01

    We report on an efficient diode pumped compact source of pulsed tunable infrared radiation based on a high repetition rate single frequency passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) of quasi-phase matched LiNbO 3. When pumped by 5.4 W of 810 nm cw diode laser radiation the Nd:YAG laser (which is passively Q-switched by a Cr 4+:GSGG saturable absorber) oscillates on a single-longitudinal mode and emits in a diffraction limited beam light pulses with duration of 2 ns, pulse energy of 100 μJ, repetition rate of 1.1 kHz and average power of 110 mW. This radiation excites an OPO of quasi-phase matched LiNbO 3. The OPO generates signal and idler radiation which is tunable in the range of 1.46-1.61 μm and 3.13-3.92 μm, respectively. Tuning is achieved by using 8 different poling periods ( Λ=28.5-29.9 μm) and by changing the crystal's temperature in the range of 80-160°C. The measured signal pulse energy is ES =22 μJ, the average signal output power PS =24 mW, the measured idler power PI =2.5 mW and the pump depletion 33%.

  3. Frequency tunable optoelectronic oscillator based on a directly modulated DFB semiconductor laser under optical injection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Xiong, Jintian; Zhang, Tingting; Chen, Dalei; Xiang, Peng; Zheng, Jilin; Zhang, Yunshan; Li, Ruoming; Huang, Long; Pu, Tao; Chen, Xiangfei

    2015-08-10

    A frequency tunable optoelectronic oscillator based on a directly modulated distributed-feedback (DFB) semiconductor laser under optical injection is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Through optical injection, the relaxation oscillation frequency of the DFB laser is enhanced and its high modulation efficiency can enable the loop oscillation with a RF threshold gain of less than 20 dB. The DFB laser is a commercial semiconductor laser with a package of 10 GHz, and its packaging limitation can be overcome by optical injection. In our scheme, neither a high-speed external modulator nor an electrical bandpass filter is required, making the system simple and low-cost. Microwave signals with a frequency tuning range from 5.98 to 15.22 GHz are generated by adjusting the injection ratio and frequency detuning between the master and slave lasers. The phase noise of the generated 9.75 GHz microwave signal is measured to be -104.8 dBc/Hz @ 10 kHz frequency offset. PMID:26367899

  4. Time domain characterization of oscillating sensors: Application of frequency counting to resonance frequency determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Kefeng; Ong, Keat G.; Mungle, Casey; Grimes, Craig A.

    2002-12-01

    A frequency counting technique is described for determining the resonance frequency of a transiently excited sensor; the technique is applicable to any sensor platform where the characteristic resonance frequency is the parameter of interest. The sensor is interrogated by a pulse-like excitation signal, and the resonance frequency of the sensor subsequently determined by counting the number of oscillations per time during sensor ring-down. A repetitive time domain interrogation technique is implemented to overcome the effects of sensor damping, such as that associated with mass loading, which reduces the duration of the sensor ring-down and hence the measurement resolution. The microcontroller based, transient frequency counting technique is detailed with application to the monitoring of magnetoelastic sensors [C. A. Grimes, D. Kouzoudis, and C. Mungle, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 3822 (2000)], with a measurement resolution of 0.001% achieved in approximately 40 ms.

  5. Information coding with frequency of oscillations in Belousov-Zhabotinsky encapsulated disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorecki, J.; Gorecka, J. N.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Information processing with an excitable chemical medium, like the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, is typically based on information coding in the presence or absence of excitation pulses. Here we present a new concept of Boolean coding that can be applied to an oscillatory medium. A medium represents the logical TRUE state if a selected region oscillates with a high frequency. If the frequency fails below a specified value, it represents the logical FALSE state. We consider a medium composed of disks encapsulating an oscillatory mixture of reagents, as related to our recent experiments with lipid-coated BZ droplets. We demonstrate that by using specific geometrical arrangements of disks containing the oscillatory medium one can perform logical operations on variables coded in oscillation frequency. Realizations of a chemical signal diode and of a single-bit memory with oscillatory disks are also discussed.

  6. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  7. High-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M R

    1986-08-01

    Over the last six years high-frequency ventilation has been extensively evaluated both in the clinical and laboratory settings. It is now no longer the great mystery it once was, and it is now no longer believed (as many had hoped), that it will solve all the problems associated with mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Although the technique is safe and appears to cause no harm even in the long term, it has not yet been shown to offer any major advantages over conventional mechanical ventilation. PMID:3530042

  8. Low-noise and broadband optical frequency comb generation based on an optoelectronic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaopeng; Sun, Tao; Peng, Huanfa; Zhang, Cheng; Guo, Peng; Zhu, Lixin; Hu, Weiwei; Chen, Zhangyuan

    2014-02-15

    A novel scheme to generate broadband high-repetition-rate optical frequency combs and low phase noise microwave signals simultaneously is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By incorporating an optical frequency comb generator in an optoelectronic oscillator loop, more than 200 lines are generated for a 25 GHz optical frequency comb, and the single-sideband phase noise is as low as -122  dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset for the 25 GHz microwave signal. 10 and 20 GHz optical frequency combs and microwave signals are also generated. Unlike the microwave frequency synthesizer, the phase noise of the microwave signals generated by this new scheme is frequency independent. PMID:24562206

  9. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  10. Analysis of Low Frequency Oscillations in Magnetron Injection Guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Youlei; Luo, Yong; Yan, Ran; Liu, Guo; Jiang, Wei

    2012-02-01

    In our gyro-TWT experiments, low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) had been observed. LFOs is a physical phenomenon usually caused by the electrons trapped between the magnetron injection guns (MIGs) and the interaction region. In this paper, the formation procedure and physical mechanism of LFOs are reported. Available methods including optimizing the magnetic field distribution in the beam compression region and loading bevel cuts on the second anode are involved to capture the trapped electrons, suppress the LFOs and improve the helical electron beam quality. Simulations and experimental results are in good agreement with each other and also reveal the reasonableness of this means. Finally, the influence of current capture ratio on LFOs and the beam quality are studied. With the current capture ratio increasing, the amplitude of LFOs decreases, the pitch factor maintains a constant about 1.2 and we also demonstrate a low transverse velocity spread about 3%.

  11. Low-frequency oscillations of the level of enclosed sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotaev, G. K.

    2015-07-01

    This work studies the variable surface level of a small enclosed basin that is related to the problem of interpreting satellite altimetric data, which assist in observations only of a deviation of a marine basin from unknown average condition needed to be calculated for the reconstruction of the sea-level topography. The reconstruction of unknown average condition becomes especially uncertain for the enclosed basins with significant level oscillations due to a variable water balance and requires the attraction of a priori physical concepts. This work reveals the general principles of response of the sea level to the low-frequency changes of the water exchange through the boundary of the basin with a rather arbitrary morphology.

  12. A precise measurement of the B^0 meson oscillation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; C. Forshaw, D.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; K. Kuonen, A.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; W. Ronayne, J.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    The oscillation frequency, Δ m_d, of B^0 mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a D^- or D^{*-} meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 3.0fb^{-1} of pp collisions, collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies √{s} = 7 and 8 TeV. A combination of the two decay modes gives Δ m_d = (505.0 ± 2.1 ± 1.0) ns^{-1}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is consistent with the current world average and has similar precision.

  13. Floquet topological system based on frequency-modulated classical coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Grazia; Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically propose how to observe topological effects in a generic classical system of coupled harmonic oscillators, such as classical pendula or lumped-element electric circuits, whose oscillation frequency is modulated fast in time. Making use of Floquet theory in the high-frequency limit, we identify a regime in which the system is accurately described by a Harper-Hofstadter model where the synthetic magnetic field can be externally tuned via the phase of the frequency modulation of the different oscillators. We illustrate how the topologically protected chiral edge states, as well as the Hofstadter butterfly of bulk bands, can be observed in the driven-dissipative steady state under a monochromatic drive. In analogy with the integer quantum Hall effect, we show how the topological Chern numbers of the bands can be extracted from the mean transverse shift of the steady-state oscillation amplitude distribution. Finally, we discuss the regime where the analogy with the Harper-Hofstadter model breaks down.

  14. Effect of preionization in Aton-type Hall thruster on low frequency oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Daren; Wei Liqiu; Zhao Zuoyang; Han Ke; Yan Guojun

    2008-04-15

    It was found through the experiments made with an Aton-type Hall thruster that some of the propellant was ionized in the buffer chamber by 'quick electrons'. This ionization is called 'preionization' to discriminate it from the ionization in the discharge channel. The effect of preionization on low frequency oscillation was experimentally studied by changing the electric field intensity in the buffer chamber. The relationship between low frequency oscillation and preionization ratio was investigated through numerical simulation using a one-dimensional quasineutrality hydrodynamic model. The results obtained indicate that the amplitude of low frequency oscillation decreases as the preionization ratio increases. It was found through the analysis and numerical simulation of the physical process of low frequency oscillation that the positive feedback of electron density was the main cause of low frequency oscillation. The increase of preionization ratio decreases the amplitude of the feedback variation thereby reducing the amplitude of low frequency oscillation.

  15. Single-frequency fiber oscillator with watt-level output power using photonic crystal phosphate glass fiber.

    PubMed

    Schülzgen, A; Li, L; Temyanko, V L; Suzuki, S; Moloney, J V; Peyghambarian, N

    2006-08-01

    Utilizing phosphate glass fiber with photonic crystal cladding and highly doped, large area core a cladding-pumped, single-frequency fiber oscillator is demonstrated. The fiber oscillator contains only 3.8 cm of active fiber in a linear cavity and operates in the 1.5 micron region. Spectrally broad, multimode pump light from semiconductor laser diodes is converted into a single-mode, single-frequency light beam with an efficiency of about 12% and the oscillator output power reached 2.3 W. PMID:19529079

  16. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  17. On the Question of the Existence of High-Frequency Oscillations in the Power Supply Circuits of a Copper Vapor Laser and Their Influence on the Lasing Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhan, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    The statement of the problem and conclusions in the publication by N. A. Yudin, M. R. Tret'yakova, and N. N. Yudin "Influence of electrophysical processes in the discharge circuit on the energy characteristics of a copper vapor laser" (Russ. Phys. J., 55, No. 9, 1080 - 1090 (2013)) is considered. It is shown that the main positions of the publication touching on relaxation of the populations of metastable states in the afterglow and their influence on the frequency-energy characteristics of lasers are mistaken.

  18. Frequency- and phase-tunable optoelectronic oscillator based on a DPMZM and SBS effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Beilei; Wang, Muguang; Sun, Jian; Yin, Bin; Chen, Hongyao; Li, Tangjun; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach to the optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) for the generation of a microwave signal with simultaneously frequency and phase tunability is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed OEO, a carrier phase-shifted double-sideband modulated optical signal generated using a dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPMZM) is split into two parts. For one part, the signal is injected into a photodetector (PD) after passing through a section of high nonlinear fiber and then fed back into the DPMZM to form an OEO loop. The stimulated Brillouin scattering effect is used to select the oscillation frequency which equals to the Brillouin frequency shift. For the other part, a carrier phase-shifted single-sideband modulated signal is achieved by a tunable filter, and then converts to a microwave signal by a second PD. The tunable phase of the generated microwave signal is achieved by controlling the bias voltage of the DPMZM to change the phase difference between the optical carrier and the sideband. Thanks to the wavelength-dependent effect of the Brillouin frequency shift, the tunable frequency is realized by tuning the frequency of the laser source. Microwave signals with a tunable frequency from 8.950 to 9.351 GHz and a tunable phase from 0° to 360° are experimentally generated.

  19. Low noise frequency synthesizer with self-calibrated voltage controlled oscillator and accurate AFC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qin; Jinbo, Li; Jian, Kang; Xiaoyong, Li; Jianjun, Zhou

    2014-09-01

    A low noise phase locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology is introduced. A VCO noise reduction method suited for short channel design is proposed to minimize PLL output phase noise. A self-calibrated voltage controlled oscillator is proposed in cooperation with the automatic frequency calibration circuit, whose accurate binary search algorithm helps reduce the VCO tuning curve coverage, which reduces the VCO noise contribution at PLL output phase noise. A low noise, charge pump is also introduced to extend the tuning voltage range of the proposed VCO, which further reduces its phase noise contribution. The frequency synthesizer generates 9.75-11.5 GHz high frequency wide band local oscillator (LO) carriers. Tested 11.5 GHz LO bears a phase noise of-104 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz frequency offset. The total power dissipation of the proposed frequency synthesizer is 48 mW. The area of the proposed frequency synthesizer is 0.3 mm2, including bias circuits and buffers.

  20. Low Frequency Plasma Oscillations in a 6-kW Magnetically Shielded Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Hofery, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The oscillations from 0-100 kHz in a 6-kW magnetically shielded thruster are experimen- tally characterized. Changes in plasma parameters that result from the magnetic shielding of Hall thrusters have the potential to significantly alter thruster transients. A detailed investigation of the resulting oscillations is necessary both for the purpose of determin- ing the underlying physical processes governing time-dependent behavior in magnetically shielded thrusters as well as for improving thruster models. In this investigation, a high speed camera and a translating ion saturation probe are employed to examine the spatial extent and nature of oscillations from 0-100 kHz in the H6MS thruster. Two modes are identified at 8 kHz and 75-90 kHz. The low frequency mode is azimuthally uniform across the thruster face while the high frequency oscillation is concentrated close to the thruster centerline with an m = 1 azimuthal dependence. These experimental results are discussed in the context of wave theory as well as published observations from an unshielded variant of the H6MS thruster.

  1. Fast optical frequency sweeping using voltage controlled oscillator driven single sideband modulation combined with injection locking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Dijun; Cai, Haiwen; Wei, Fang; Qu, Ronghui

    2015-03-23

    An ultrafast optical frequency sweeping technique for narrow linewidth lasers is reported. This technique exploits the large frequency modulation bandwidth of a wideband voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) and a high speed electro-optic dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPMZM) which works on the state of carrier suppressed single sideband modulation(CS-SSB). Optical frequency sweeping of a narrow linewidth fiber laser with 3.85 GHz sweeping range and 80 GHz/μs tuning speed is demonstrated, which is an extremely high tuning speed for frequency sweeping of narrow linewidth lasers. In addition, injection locking technique is adopted to improve the sweeper's low optical power output and small side-mode suppression ratio (SMSR). PMID:25837048

  2. Real-Time Distributed Embedded Oscillator Operating Frequency Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, Julie; Oliver, Brett; Brickner, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses the utilization of embedded clocks inside of operating network data links as an auxiliary clock source to satisfy local oscillator monitoring requirements. Modem network interfaces, typically serial network links, often contain embedded clocking information of very tight precision to recover data from the link. This embedded clocking data can be utilized by the receiving device to monitor the local oscillator for tolerance to required specifications, often important in high-integrity fault-tolerant applications. A device can utilize a received embedded clock to determine if the local or the remote device is out of tolerance by using a single link. The local device can determine if it is failing, assuming a single fault model, with two or more active links. Network fabric components, containing many operational links, can potentially determine faulty remote or local devices in the presence of multiple faults. Two methods of implementation are described. In one method, a recovered clock can be directly used to monitor the local clock as a direct replacement of an external local oscillator. This scheme is consistent with a general clock monitoring function whereby clock sources are clocking two counters and compared over a fixed interval of time. In another method, overflow/underflow conditions can be used to detect clock relationships for monitoring. These network interfaces often provide clock compensation circuitry to allow data to be transferred from the received (network) clock domain to the internal clock domain. This circuit could be modified to detect overflow/underflow conditions of the buffering required and report a fast or slow receive clock, respectively.

  3. Direct measurement of density oscillation induced by a radio-frequency wave.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Ejiri, A; Shimada, Y; Oosako, T; Tsujimura, J; Takase, Y; Kasahara, H

    2007-08-01

    An O-mode reflectometer at a frequency of 25.85 GHz was applied to plasmas heated by the high harmonic fast wave (21 MHz) in the TST-2 spherical tokamak. An oscillation in the phase of the reflected microwave in the rf range was observed directly for the first time. In TST-2, the rf (250 kW) induced density oscillation depends mainly on the poloidal rf electric field, which is estimated to be about 0.2 kV/m rms by the reflectometer measurement. Sideband peaks separated in frequency by ion cyclotron harmonics from 21 MHz, and peaks at ion cyclotron harmonics which are suggested to be quasimodes generated by parametric decay, were detected. PMID:17764321

  4. Characterization of a 10-MHz quadrant APD for measuring frequency oscillations and tip displacements of microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Brian G.; LaVan, David A.

    2012-10-01

    The room-temperature response of a 10-MHz quadrant avalanche photodiode (APD) is investigated for detection of high frequency oscillations and tip displacements of fabricated microcantilevers. Currently, no quadrant detectors with a response bandwidth in the megahertz range are available, and oscillations on the order of a few microseconds cannot be resolved. A comparison is made between optical and opto-mechanical measurements to characterize this detector by investigating the frequency response and signal-to-noise (SNR) of pulsed laser signals up to 10 MHz and reflected laser signals from freely vibrating microcantilevers up to 1.64 MHz. The power level of the minimum detectable signal incident on the APD is found to be 28.2 ± 5.0 nW for optical measurements and 1.0 μW ± 5.0 nW for opto-mechanical measurements.

  5. The Forgotten Role of Central Volume in Low Frequency Oscillations of Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Manuela; Moissl, Ulrich; Garzotto, Francesco; Cruz, Dinna N.; Tetta, Ciro; Signorini, Maria G.; Ronco, Claudio; Grassmann, Aileen; Cerutti, Sergio; Guzzetti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that central volume plays a key role in the source of low frequency (LF) oscillations of heart rate variability (HRV) was tested in a population of end stage renal disease patients undergoing conventional hemodialysis (HD) treatment, and thus subject to large fluid shifts and sympathetic activation. Fluid overload (FO) in 58 chronic HD patients was assessed by whole body bioimpedance measurements before the midweek HD session. Heart Rate Variability (HRV) was measured using 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram recordings starting before the same HD treatment. Time domain and frequency domain analyses were performed on HRV signals. Patients were retrospectively classified in three groups according to tertiles of FO normalized to the extracellular water (FO/ECW%). These groups were also compared after stratification by diabetes mellitus. Patients with the low to medium hydration status before the treatment (i.e. 1st and 2nd FO/ECW% tertiles) showed a significant increase in LF power during last 30 min of HD compared to dialysis begin, while no significant change in LF power was seen in the third group (i.e. those with high pre-treatment hydration values). In conclusion, several mechanisms can generate LF oscillations in the cardiovascular system, including baroreflex feedback loops and central oscillators. However, the current results emphasize the role played by the central volume in determining the power of LF oscillations. PMID:25793464

  6. Analytical theory of low-frequency space charge oscillations in gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Ran; Antonsen, T. M. Jr.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2008-10-15

    Low-frequency oscillations attributed to reflected electrons bouncing adiabatically between the electron gun and the interaction space have been observed in many gyrotrons. An analytical model is considered which allows one to apply space-charge wave theory to the analysis of these oscillations. In the framework of the small-signal theory, the regions of low-frequency oscillations, the oscillation frequency and the temporal and spatial growth rates of low-frequency oscillations are determined in the relevant parameter space. The mode frequency is determined not only by the particle travel time, but by the travel time of charge waves on the reflected electron beam. This explains the existence of modes with noncommensurate frequencies.

  7. Discomfort of seated persons exposed to low frequency lateral and roll oscillation: effect of seat cushion.

    PubMed

    Beard, George F; Griffin, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The discomfort caused by lateral oscillation, roll oscillation, and fully roll-compensated lateral oscillation has been investigated at frequencies between 0.25 and 1.0 Hz when sitting on a rigid seat and when sitting on a compliant cushion, both without a backrest. Judgements of vibration discomfort and the transmission of lateral and roll oscillation through the seat cushion were obtained with 20 subjects. Relative to the rigid seat, the cushion increased lateral acceleration and roll oscillation at the lower frequencies and also increased discomfort during lateral oscillation (at frequencies less than 0.63 Hz), roll oscillation (at frequencies less than 0.4 Hz), and fully roll-compensated lateral oscillation (at frequencies between 0.315 and 0.5 Hz). The root-sums-of-squares of the frequency-weighted lateral and roll acceleration at the seat surface predicted the greater vibration discomfort when sitting on the cushion. The frequency-dependence of the predicted discomfort may be improved by adjusting the frequency weighting for roll acceleration at frequencies between 0.25 and 1.0 Hz. PMID:24947003

  8. Synchronization of low-frequency oscillations in the human cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavaev, A. S.; Prokhorov, M. D.; Ponomarenko, V. I.; Kiselev, A. R.; Gridnev, V. I.; Ruban, E. I.; Bezruchko, B. P.

    2009-09-01

    We investigate synchronization between the low-frequency oscillations of heart rate and blood pressure having in humans a basic frequency close to 0.1 Hz. A method is proposed for quantitative estimation of synchronization between these oscillating processes based on calculation of relative time of phase synchronization of oscillations. It is shown that healthy subjects exhibit on average substantially longer epochs of internal synchronization between the low-frequency oscillations in heart rate and blood pressure than patients after acute myocardial infarction.

  9. Force Control Is Related to Low-Frequency Oscillations in Force and Surface EMG

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hwasil; Kim, Changki; Kwon, Minhyuk; Chen, Yen Ting; Onushko, Tanya; Lodha, Neha; Christou, Evangelos A.

    2014-01-01

    Force variability during constant force tasks is directly related to oscillations below 0.5 Hz in force. However, it is unknown whether such oscillations exist in muscle activity. The purpose of this paper, therefore, was to determine whether oscillations below 0.5 Hz in force are evident in the activation of muscle. Fourteen young adults (21.07±2.76 years, 7 women) performed constant isometric force tasks at 5% and 30% MVC by abducting the left index finger. We recorded the force output from the index finger and surface EMG from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle and quantified the following outcomes: 1) variability of force using the SD of force; 2) power spectrum of force below 2 Hz; 3) EMG bursts; 4) power spectrum of EMG bursts below 2 Hz; and 5) power spectrum of the interference EMG from 10–300 Hz. The SD of force increased significantly from 5 to 30% MVC and this increase was significantly related to the increase in force oscillations below 0.5 Hz (R2 = 0.82). For both force levels, the power spectrum for force and EMG burst was similar and contained most of the power from 0–0.5 Hz. Force and EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz were highly coherent (coherence = 0.68). The increase in force oscillations below 0.5 Hz from 5 to 30% MVC was related to an increase in EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz (R2 = 0.51). Finally, there was a strong association between the increase in EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz and the interference EMG from 35–60 Hz (R2 = 0.95). In conclusion, this finding demonstrates that bursting of the EMG signal contains low-frequency oscillations below 0.5 Hz, which are associated with oscillations in force below 0.5 Hz. PMID:25372038

  10. Pressurized high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas D.

    Acoustic heat engines show much promise for converting waste heat to electricity. Since most applications require high power levels, high frequency thermoacoustic engines can reach such performance by operating with a pressurized working gas. Results on a 3 kHz prime mover, consisting of a quarter-wave resonator and a random stack material between two heat exchangers, show that the acoustic power from such a device is raised substantially as the working gas is pressurized. At pressures up to approximately 10 bar, the increase in acoustic power is approximately linear to the increase in pressure, and thus is an effective way to increase the power output of thermoacoustic engines. Since the heat input was not changed during the experiments, the increases in acoustic power translate directly to increases in engine efficiency which is calculated as the output acoustic power divided by the input heat power. In most experiments run in this study, the engine efficiency increased by a factor of at least 4 as the pressure was increased from 2 bar up to about 10 bar. Further increases in pressure lead to acoustic power saturation and eventual attenuation. This is most likely due to a combination of several factors including the shrinking thermal penetration depth, and the fact that the losses increase faster with pressure in a random stack material than in traditional parallel plates. Pressurization also leads to a lower DeltaT for onset of oscillations in the range of 10 bar of mean pressure, potentially opening up even more heat sources that can power a thermoacoustic engine. Results from another 3 kHz engine, one that was pressurized itself as opposed to being placed in a pressurized chamber, are also presented. The configuration of this engine solves the problem of how to simultaneously pressurize the engine and inject heat into the hot heat exchanger. It was also noted that the geometry of the resonator cavity in the quarter wavelength pressurized engine plays an

  11. Clustering of cochlear oscillations in frequency plateaus as a tool to investigate SOAE generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, Bastian; Wit, Hero; van Dijk, Pim

    2015-12-01

    Spontonaeous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE) reflect the net effect of self-sustained activity in the cochlea, but do not directly provide information about the underlying mechanism and place of origin within the cochlea. The present study investigates if frequency plateaus as found in a linear array of coupled oscillators (OAM) [7] are also found in a transmission line model (TLM) which is able to generate realistic SOAEs [2] and if these frequency plateaus can be used to explain the formation of SOAEs. The simulations showed a clustering of oscillators along the simulated basilar membrane Both, the OAM and the TLM show traveling-wave like behavior along the oscillators coupled into one frequency plateau. While in the TLM roughness is required in order to produce SOAEs, no roughness is required to trigger frequency plateaus in the linear array of oscillators. The formation of frequency plateaus as a consequence of coupling between neighbored active oscillators might be the mechanism underlying SOAEs.

  12. Observation of multi-scale oscillation of laminar lifted flames with low-frequency AC electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, S.K.; Kim, Y.K.; Kim, M.K.; Won, S.H.; Chung, S.H.

    2010-01-15

    The oscillation behavior of laminar lifted flames under the influence of low-frequency AC has been investigated experimentally in coflow jets. Various oscillation modes were existed depending on jet velocity and the voltage and frequency of AC, especially when the AC frequency was typically smaller than 30 Hz. Three different oscillation modes were observed: (1) large-scale oscillation with the oscillation frequency of about 0.1 Hz, which was independent of the applied AC frequency, (2) small-scale oscillation synchronized to the applied AC frequency, and (3) doubly-periodic oscillation with small-scale oscillation embedded in large-scale oscillation. As the AC frequency decreased from 30 Hz, the oscillation modes were in the order of the large-scale oscillation, doubly-periodic oscillation, and small-scale oscillation. The onset of the oscillation for the AC frequency smaller than 30 Hz was in close agreement with the delay time scale for the ionic wind effect to occur, that is, the collision response time. Frequency-doubling behavior for the small-scale oscillation has also been observed. Possible mechanisms for the large-scale oscillation and the frequency-doubling behavior have been discussed, although the detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms will be a future study. (author)

  13. The High Frequency Stabilization of a Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirdyashev, K.

    2004-10-01

    Experimental data on the high-frequency stabilization of the MPD thruster and the suppression of low-frequency oscillations in the frequency range from 20 to 100 kHz are presented. Conditions for the stabilizing effect of a high-frequency magnetic field at the frequency of 40 MHz on the plasma jet produced by the thruster are determined, and the efficiency of this action is evaluated. The action of high frequency field on the MPD thruster consists in the contention of two processes - the stabilization of the plasma drift instability by the magnetic component of high frequency field and the energy conversion of natural plasma oscillations excited by the external field to the ion-sound wave energy.

  14. Electromagnetic inhibition of high frequency thermal bonding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong; Zhang, Qing-qing; Li, Hang; Zhang, Da-jian; Hou, Ming-feng; Zhu, Xian-wei

    2011-12-01

    The traditional high frequency thermal bonding machine had serious radiation problems at dominant frequency, two times frequency and three times frequency. Combining with its working principle, the problems of electromagnetic compatibility were studied, three following measures were adopted: 1.At the head part of the high frequency thermal bonding machine, resonant circuit attenuator was designed. The notch groove and reaction field can make the radiation being undermined or absorbed; 2.The electromagnetic radiation shielding was made for the high frequency copper power feeder; 3.Redesigned the high-frequency oscillator circuit to reduce the output of harmonic oscillator. The test results showed that these measures can make the output according with the national standard of electromagnetic compatibility (GB4824-2004-2A), the problems of electromagnetic radiation leakage can be solved, and good social, environmental and economic benefits would be brought.

  15. Cross-frequency coupling of brain oscillations in studying motivation and emotion.

    PubMed

    Schutter, Dennis J L G; Knyazev, Gennady G

    2012-03-01

    Research has shown that brain functions are realized by simultaneous oscillations in various frequency bands. In addition to examining oscillations in pre-specified bands, interactions and relations between the different frequency bandwidths is another important aspect that needs to be considered in unraveling the workings of the human brain and its functions. In this review we provide evidence that studying interdependencies between brain oscillations may be a valuable approach to study the electrophysiological processes associated with motivation and emotional states. Studies will be presented showing that amplitude-amplitude coupling between delta-alpha and delta-beta oscillations varies as a function of state anxiety and approach-avoidance-related motivation, and that changes in the association between delta-beta oscillations can be observed following successful psychotherapy. Together these studies suggest that cross-frequency coupling of brain oscillations may contribute to expanding our understanding of the neural processes underlying motivation and emotion. PMID:22448078

  16. Mid-infrared optical parametric oscillators and frequency combs for molecular spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vainio, M; Halonen, L

    2016-02-14

    Nonlinear optical frequency conversion is one of the most versatile methods to generate wavelength-tunable laser light in the mid-infrared region. This spectral region is particularly important for trace gas detection and other applications of molecular spectroscopy, because it accommodates the fundamental vibrational bands of several interesting molecules. In this article, we review the progress of the most significant nonlinear optics instruments for widely tunable, high-resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy: continuous-wave optical parametric oscillators and difference frequency generators. We extend our discussion to mid-infrared optical frequency combs, which are becoming increasingly important spectroscopic tools, owing to their capability of highly sensitive and selective parallel detection of several molecular species. To illustrate the potential and limitations of mid-infrared sources based on nonlinear optics, we also review typical uses of these instruments in both applied and fundamental spectroscopy. PMID:26804321

  17. Frequency of gamma oscillations in humans is modulated by velocity of visual motion

    PubMed Central

    Butorina, Anna V.; Sysoeva, Olga V.; Prokofyev, Andrey O.; Nikolaeva, Anastasia Yu.; Stroganova, Tatiana A.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are generated in networks of inhibitory fast-spiking (FS) parvalbumin-positive (PV) interneurons and pyramidal cells. In animals, gamma frequency is modulated by the velocity of visual motion; the effect of velocity has not been evaluated in humans. In this work, we have studied velocity-related modulations of gamma frequency in children using MEG/EEG. We also investigated whether such modulations predict the prominence of the “spatial suppression” effect (Tadin D, Lappin JS, Gilroy LA, Blake R. Nature 424: 312-315, 2003) that is thought to depend on cortical center-surround inhibitory mechanisms. MEG/EEG was recorded in 27 normal boys aged 8–15 yr while they watched high-contrast black-and-white annular gratings drifting with velocities of 1.2, 3.6, and 6.0°/s and performed a simple detection task. The spatial suppression effect was assessed in a separate psychophysical experiment. MEG gamma oscillation frequency increased while power decreased with increasing velocity of visual motion. In EEG, the effects were less reliable. The frequencies of the velocity-specific gamma peaks were 64.9, 74.8, and 87.1 Hz for the slow, medium, and fast motions, respectively. The frequency of the gamma response elicited during slow and medium velocity of visual motion decreased with subject age, whereas the range of gamma frequency modulation by velocity increased with age. The frequency modulation range predicted spatial suppression even after controlling for the effect of age. We suggest that the modulation of the MEG gamma frequency by velocity of visual motion reflects excitability of cortical inhibitory circuits and can be used to investigate their normal and pathological development in the human brain. PMID:25925324

  18. Efficiency enhancement in high power backward-wave oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, D.M.; Feicht, J.R. Adler, E.A. ); Ponti, E.S. ); Eisenhart, R.L. ); Lemke, R.W. )

    1999-06-01

    High power microwave (HPM) sources based on the backward-wave oscillator (BWO) have been investigated for the past two decades primarily because of their potential for very high efficiency (15 to 40%) operation. Several different effects have been proposed to explain this high efficiency compared to conventional BWO's. One of the major contributors to the high efficiency of the plasma-filled Pasotron HPM BWO source is the presence of optimally phased end reflections. The Pasotron uses a long pulse ([ge]100 [micro]s) plasma-cathode electron-gun and plasma-filled slow-wave structure to produce microwave pulses in the range of 1 to 10 MW without the use of externally produced magnetic fields. The efficiency of the Pasotron can be enhanced by up to a factor of two when the device is configured as a standing-wave oscillator in which properly phased reflections from the downstream collector end of the finite length SWS constructively interfere with the fundamental backward-wave modes and improve the coupling of the beam to the circuit. Operation in this configuration increases the efficiency up to 30% but causes the frequency to vary in discrete steps and the output power to change strongly with beam parameters and oscillation frequency.

  19. High-frequency Probing Diagnostic for Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Litvak; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-25

    High-frequency oscillations (1-100 MHz) in Hall thrusters have apparently eluded significant experimental scrutiny. A diagnostic setup, consisting of a single Langmuir probe, a special shielded probe connector-positioner, and an electronic impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been identified and characterized for various thruster operating conditions.

  20. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, E.S.; Campbell, D.V.

    1997-04-29

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer. 22 figs.

  1. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Eric S.; Campbell, David V.

    1997-01-01

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer.

  2. Nontrivial Bloch oscillation and Zener tunneling frequencies in helicoidal molecules due to spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, R. A.

    2014-05-01

    Bloch oscillation and Zener tunneling are investigated in helicoidal molecules, with DNA as the representative example, in the presence of spin-orbit coupling induced by electrical charges accumulated along the structure of the molecule. We show that the presence of the spin-orbit coupling does not destroy the Bloch oscillations and, further, it induces the appearance of nontrivial Bloch oscillation frequencies associated with resonances among Wannier-Stark states. The Zener tunneling between the spin states is also studied here by looking at the time evolution of the polarization of the wave packet. The results show that the polarization also oscillates with nontrivial well-determined frequencies.

  3. Broadband electromagnetic power harvester from vibrations via frequency conversion by impact oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Yuksek, N. S.; Almasri, M.; Feng, Z. C.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we propose an electromagnetic power harvester that uses a transformative multi-impact approach to achieve a wide bandwidth response from low frequency vibration sources through frequency-up conversion. The device consists of a pick-up coil, fixed at the free edge of a cantilever beam with high resonant frequency, and two cantilever beams with low excitation frequencies, each with an impact mass attached at its free edge. One of the two cantilevers is designed to resonate at 25 Hz, while the other resonates at 50 Hz within the range of ambient vibration frequency. When the device is subjected to a low frequency vibration, the two low-frequency cantilevers responded by vibrating at low frequencies, and thus their thick metallic masses made impacts with the high resonance frequency cantilever repeatedly at two locations. This has caused it along with the pick-up coil to oscillate, relative to the permanent magnet, with decaying amplitude at its resonance frequency, and results in a wide bandwidth response from 10 to 63 Hz at 2 g. A wide bandwidth response between 10–51 Hz and 10–58 Hz at acceleration values of 0.5 g and 2 g, respectively, were achieved by adjusting the impact cantilever frequencies closer to each other (25 Hz and 45 Hz). A maximum output power of 85 μW was achieved at 5 g at 30 Hz across a load resistor, 2.68 Ω.

  4. Measuring Instantaneous Frequency of Local Field Potential Oscillations using the Kalman Smoother

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, David P.; Wilson, Matthew A.; Brown, Emery N.; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Rhythmic local field potentials (LFP) arise from coordinated neural activity. Inference of neural function based on the properties of brain rhythms remains a challenging data analysis problem. Algorithms that characterize non-stationary rhythms with high temporal and spectral resolution may be useful for interpreting LFP activity on the timescales in which they are generated. We propose a Kalman smoother based dynamic autoregressive model for tracking the instantaneous frequency (iFreq) and frequency modulation (FM) of noisy and non-stationary sinusoids such as those found in LFP data. We verify the performance of our algorithm using simulated data with broad spectral content, and demonstrate its application using real data recorded from behavioral learning experiments. In analyses of ripple oscillations (100-250 Hz) recorded from the rodent hippocampus, our algorithm identified novel repetitive, short timescale frequency dynamics. Our results suggest that iFreq and FM may be useful measures for the quantification of small timescale LFP dynamics. PMID:19699763

  5. Coupled frequency-doubling optoelectronic oscillator based on polarization modulation and polarization multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuhong; Pan, Shilong; Zhu, Dan; Tang, Zhenzhou; Zhou, Pei; Chen, Xiangfei

    2012-03-01

    A coupled frequency-doubling optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated, which is constructed based on the perfect combination of polarization modulation and polarization multiplexing. A fundamental microwave signal at 9.95 GHz or a frequency-doubled microwave signal at 19.9 GHz is generated with a wavelength-independent sidemode-suppression ratio (SMSR) as high as 78 dB obtained. The phase noise of the generated 19.9-GHz signal is - 103.45 dBc/Hz at 10-kHz frequency offset, indicating a good short-term stability. The proposed scheme is simple and flexible, which can find applications in radars and wireless communications.

  6. Study on Low-Frequency Oscillations in a Gyrotron Using a 3D CFDTD PIC Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Smithe, D. N.

    2010-11-01

    Low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) have been observed in a high average power gyrotron and the trapped electron population contributing to the oscillation has been measured. As high average power gyrotrons are the most promising millimeter wave source for thermonuclear fusion research, it is important to get a better understanding of this parasitic phenomenon to avoid any deterioration of the electron beam quality thus reducing the gyrotron efficiency. 2D Particle-in-cell simulations quasi-statically model the development of oscillations of the space charge in the adiabatic trap, but the physics of the electron dynamics in the adiabatic trap is only partially understood. Therefore, understanding of the LFOs remains incomplete and a full picture of this parasitic phenomenon has not been seen yet. In this work, we use a 3D conformal finite-difference time-domain (CFDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) method to accurately and efficiently study the LFOs in a high average power gyrotron. As the CFDTD method exhibits a second order accuracy, complicated structures, such as a magnetron injection gun, can be well described. Employing a highly parallelized computation, the model can be simulated in time domain more realistically.

  7. Resonant oscillation modes of sympathetically cooled ions in a radio-frequency trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro; Shimizu, Tadao

    2002-12-01

    Sympathetic cooling of Ca{sup +}, Zn{sup +}, Sr{sup +}, Ba{sup +}, and Yb{sup +} as guest ions with laser-cooled {sup 24}Mg{sup +} as host ions in a rf ion trap is carried out, and resonant frequencies of their motion in the trap potential are measured. Various oscillation modes of the sympathetically cooled ions are observed. The resonant frequency of the oscillation mode is different from the frequency of either the collective oscillation frequency of the trapped ions or the oscillation frequency of each ion without host ions. This difference is well explained by a theoretical model in which coupled equations of motion of the host ion cloud with a single guest ion are considered.

  8. Wind/PV Generation for Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping in the Eastern Interconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Gracia, Jose R; Hadley, Stanton W; Liu, Yilu

    2013-12-01

    This report presents the control of renewable energy sources, including the variable-speed wind generators and solar photovoltaic (PV) generators, for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI). In this report, based on the user-defined wind/PV generator electrical control model and the 16,000-bus Eastern Interconnection dynamic model, the additional controllers for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are developed and incorporated and the potential contributions of renewable energy sources to the EI system frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are evaluated.

  9. Simple Laser-Ultrasonic System Using a Single-Frequency Pulsed Laser Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blouin, A.; Carrion, L.; Padioleau, C.; Bouchard, P.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2005-04-01

    We present a new pulsed laser oscillator and system for the optical detection of ultrasound in materials using a flashlamp-pumped dual Nd:YAG rod configuration. A single-frequency laser oscillator based on one rod inside a ring cavity is proposed. The second rod can be used as an amplifier for the oscillator or as a generation laser. Performance of the system is investigated with a two-wave mixing phase demodulator. Tests on metallic samples are presented.

  10. Fully efficient adiabatic frequency conversion of broadband Ti:sapphire oscillator pulses.

    PubMed

    Moses, Jeffrey; Suchowski, Haim; Kärtner, Franz X

    2012-05-01

    By adiabatic difference-frequency generation in an aperiodically poled nonlinear crystal-a nonlinear optical analog of rapid adiabatic passage in a two-level atomic system-we demonstrate the conversion of a 110 nm band from an octave-spanning Ti:sapphire oscillator to the infrared, spanning 1550 to 2450 nm, with near-100% internal conversion efficiency. The experiment proves the principle of complete Landau-Zener adiabatic transfer in nonlinear optical wave mixing. Our implementation is a practical approach to the seeding of high-energy ultrabroadband optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers. PMID:22555747

  11. On the self-excitation mechanisms of plasma series resonance oscillations in single- and multi-frequency capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schüngel, Edmund; Brandt, Steven; Schulze, Julian; Korolov, Ihor; Derzsi, Aranka; Donkó, Zoltán

    2015-04-15

    The self-excitation of plasma series resonance (PSR) oscillations is a prominent feature in the current of low pressure capacitive radio frequency discharges. This resonance leads to high frequency oscillations of the charge in the sheaths and enhances electron heating. Up to now, the phenomenon has only been observed in asymmetric discharges. There, the nonlinearity in the voltage balance, which is necessary for the self-excitation of resonance oscillations with frequencies above the applied frequencies, is caused predominantly by the quadratic contribution to the charge-voltage relation of the plasma sheaths. Using Particle In Cell/Monte Carlo collision simulations of single- and multi-frequency capacitive discharges and an equivalent circuit model, we demonstrate that other mechanisms, such as a cubic contribution to the charge-voltage relation of the plasma sheaths and the time dependent bulk electron plasma frequency, can cause the self-excitation of PSR oscillations, as well. These mechanisms have been neglected in previous models, but are important for the theoretical description of the current in symmetric or weakly asymmetric discharges.

  12. Spontaneous low-frequency voltage oscillations in frog saccular hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Fioretti, Bernard; Perin, Paola; Franciolini, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous membrane voltage oscillations were found in 27 of 130 isolated frog saccular hair cells. Voltage oscillations had a mean peak-to-peak amplitude of 23 mV and a mean oscillatory frequency of 4.6 Hz. When compared with non-oscillatory cells, oscillatory cells had significantly greater hyperpolarization-activated and lower depolarization-activated current densities. Two components, the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, Ih, and the K+-selective inward-rectifier current, IK1, contributed to the hyperpolarization-activated current, as assessed by the use of the IK1-selective inhibitor Ba2+ and the Ih-selective inhibitor ZD-7288. Five depolarization-activated currents were present in these cells (transient IBK, sustained IBK, IDRK, IA, and ICa), and all were found to have significantly lower densities in oscillatory cells than in non-oscillatory cells (revealed by using TEA to block IBK, 4-AP to block IDRK, and prepulses at different voltages to isolate IA). Bath application of either Ba2+ or ZD-7288 suppressed spontaneous voltage oscillations, indicating that Ih and IK1 are required for generating this activity. On the contrary, TEA or Cd2+ did not inhibit this activity, suggesting that IBK and ICa do not contribute. A mathematical model has been developed to test the interpretation derived from the pharmacological and biophysical data. This model indicates that spontaneous voltage oscillations can be generated when the electrophysiological features of oscillatory cells are used. The oscillatory behaviour is principally driven by the activity of IK1 and Ih, with IA playing a modulatory role. In addition, the model indicates that the high densities of depolarization-activated currents expressed by non-oscillatory cells help to stabilize the resting membrane potential, thus preventing the spontaneous oscillations. PMID:15489251

  13. High-performance fiber parametric oscillator for coherent Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Erin S.; Lefrancois, Simon; Ji, Minbiao; Wadsworth, William J.; Xie, X. Sunney; Wise, Frank W.

    2014-02-01

    A compact, alignment-free, and inexpensive fiber source for coherent Raman spectroscopy would benefit the field considerably. We present a fiber optical parametric oscillator offering the best performance from a fiber-source to date. Pumping the oscillator with amplified pulses from a 1 μm fiber laser, we achieve widely spaced, narrowband pulses suitable for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. The nearly transform limited, 2 ps signal pulses are generated through the use of normal dispersion four wave mixing in photonic crystal fiber, and can be tuned from 779-808 nm, limited by the tuning range of the seed laser. The average signal power can reach 180 mW (pulse energies up to 4 nJ). The long-wavelength idler field is resonant in the oscillator, and the use of a narrow bandpass filter in the feedback loop is critical for stable operation, as seen in both simulation and experiment. Due to the self-consistent nature of the oscillator, this source provides lower relative intensity noise on its output pulses than parametric amplifiers based on the same frequency conversion process. We present high quality images of mouse tissues taken with this source that exhibit an outstanding signal to noise ratio at top imaging speeds.

  14. Stable, high efficiency gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, C. T.; Chang, T. H.; Pao, K. F.; Chu, K. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2007-09-15

    Stability issues have been a major concern for the realization of broadband tunability of the gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO). Multimode, time-dependent simulations are employed to examine the stability properties of the gyro-BWO. It is shown that the gyro-BWO is susceptible to both nonstationary oscillations and axial mode competition in the course of frequency tuning. Regions of nonstationary oscillations and axial mode competition are displayed in the form of stability maps over wide-ranging parameter spaces. These maps serve as a guide for the identification and optimization of stable windows for broadband tuning. Results indicate that a shorter interaction length provides greater stability without efficiency degradation. These theoretical predictions have been verified in a Ka-band gyro-BWO experiment using both short and long interaction lengths. In the case of a short interaction length, continuous and smooth tunability, in magnetic field and in beam voltage, was demonstrated with the high interaction efficiency reported so far. A maximum 3-dB tuning range of 1.3 GHz with a peak power of 149 kW at 29.8% efficiency was achieved. In a comparative experiment with a longer interaction length, the experimental data are characterized by piecewise-stable tuning curves separated by region(s) of nonstationary oscillations, as predicted by theory.

  15. Changes in Frequency of Spontaneous Oscillations in Procerebrum Correlate to Behavioural Choice in Terrestrial Snails

    PubMed Central

    Samarova, Elena; Balaban, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to understand functional significance of spontaneous oscillations of local field potential in the olfactory brain lobe of terrestrial snail, the procerebrum (PC). We compared changes in frequency of oscillations in semi-intact preparations from snails trained to percept the same conditioned odor as positive (associated with food reinforcement) or negative (associated with noxious reinforcement). In vivo recordings in freely behaving naïve snails showed a significant decrease of spontaneous PC oscillations frequency during a stage of tentacle withdrawal to odor presentation. In in vitro preparations from naïve snails, a similar decrease in frequency of the PC oscillations to odor presentation was observed. Changes in frequency of the oscillations to cineole presentations in the “aversive” group of snails (demonstrating withdrawal) were much more pronounced than in naïve snails. No significant difference in responses to 5% and 20% cineole was noted. Changes in the spontaneous oscillations frequency in the snails trained to respond with positive reaction (approach) to cineole depended on the concentration of the applied odor, and these responses were qualitatively similar to responses of other groups during the first 10 s of responses to odor, but significantly different (increase in PC oscillations frequency) from the responses of the aversively trained and naïve snails in the interval 11–30 s, which corresponds to the end of the tentacle withdrawal and timing of decision making (approach or escape) in the free behaving snails. Obtained results suggest that frequency of the PC lobe spontaneous oscillations correlate to the choice of behavior in snails: withdrawal (decrease in frequency) or approach (increase in frequency) to the source of odor. PMID:19753329

  16. Hippocampal gamma-frequency oscillations: from interneurones to pyramidal cells, and back.

    PubMed

    Mann, Edward O; Radcliffe, Catrin A; Paulsen, Ole

    2005-01-01

    GABAergic interneurones are necessary for the emergence of hippocampal gamma-frequency network oscillations, during which they play a key role in the synchronization of pyramidal cell firing. However, it remains to be resolved how distinct interneurone subtypes contribute to gamma-frequency oscillations, in what way the spatiotemporal pattern of interneuronal input affects principal cell activity, and by which mechanisms the interneurones themselves are synchronized. Here we summarize recent evidence from cholinergically induced gamma-frequency network oscillations in vitro, showing that perisomatic-targeting GABAergic interneurones provide prominent rhythmic inhibition in pyramidal cells, and that these interneurones are synchronized by recurrent excitation. We conclude by presenting a minimal integrate-and-fire network model which demonstrates that this excitatory-inhibitory feedback loop is sufficient to explain the generation of intrahippocampal gamma-frequency oscillations. PMID:15539391

  17. ON THE RELATIVISTIC PRECESSION AND OSCILLATION FREQUENCIES OF TEST PARTICLES AROUND RAPIDLY ROTATING COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Pachon, Leonardo A.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Valenzuela-Toledo, Cesar A. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2012-09-01

    Whether or not analytic exact vacuum (electrovacuum) solutions of the Einstein (Einstein-Maxwell) field equations can accurately describe the exterior space-time of compact stars still remains an interesting open question in relativistic astrophysics. As an attempt to establish their level of accuracy, the radii of the innermost stable circular orbits (ISCOs) of test particles given by analytic exterior space-time geometries have been compared with those given by numerical solutions for neutron stars (NSs) obeying a realistic equation of state (EOS). It has been so shown that the six-parametric solution of Pachon et al. (PRS) more accurately describes the NS ISCO radii than other analytic models do. We propose here an additional test of accuracy for analytic exterior geometries based on the comparison of orbital frequencies of neutral test particles. We compute the Keplerian, frame-dragging, and precession and oscillation frequencies of the radial and vertical motions of neutral test particles for the Kerr and PRS geometries and then compare them with the numerical values obtained by Morsink and Stella for realistic NSs. We identify the role of high-order multipole moments such as the mass quadrupole and current octupole in the determination of the orbital frequencies, especially in the rapid rotation regime. The results of this work are relevant to cast a separatrix between black hole and NS signatures and to probe the nuclear-matter EOS and NS parameters from the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in low-mass X-ray binaries.

  18. External high-frequency control of combustion instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Mitrofanov, G. A.; Kozar, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of combustion instability in the pulse combustor. Propane-air mixture is burned in the chamber with the flame holder. It was experimentally found that feeding high-frequency sound vibrations into the combustion chamber causes the suppression of pulsating combustion. The oscillation frequency ranges in 870 to 1400 Hz. This corresponds to 9-12 resonance frequencies of oscillations in the combustor. The physical mechanism of the observed phenomenon consists in changing the conditions of formation and destruction of fuel jets in the vortex zone behind the flame holder.

  19. Oscillation frequencies for 35 Kepler solar-type planet-hosting stars using Bayesian techniques and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G. R.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Bedding, T. R.; Handberg, R.; Lund, M. N.; Chaplin, W. J.; Huber, D.; White, T. R.; Benomar, O.; Hekker, S.; Basu, S.; Campante, T. L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Elsworth, Y.; Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M. S.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Stello, D.

    2016-02-01

    Kepler has revolutionized our understanding of both exoplanets and their host stars. Asteroseismology is a valuable tool in the characterization of stars and Kepler is an excellent observing facility to perform asteroseismology. Here we select a sample of 35 Kepler solar-type stars which host transiting exoplanets (or planet candidates) with detected solar-like oscillations. Using available Kepler short cadence data up to Quarter 16 we create power spectra optimized for asteroseismology of solar-type stars. We identify modes of oscillation and estimate mode frequencies by `peak bagging' using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo framework. In addition, we expand the methodology of quality assurance using a Bayesian unsupervised machine learning approach. We report the measured frequencies of the modes of oscillation for all 35 stars and frequency ratios commonly used in detailed asteroseismic modelling. Due to the high correlations associated with frequency ratios we report the covariance matrix of all frequencies measured and frequency ratios calculated. These frequencies, frequency ratios, and covariance matrices can be used to obtain tight constraint on the fundamental parameters of these planet-hosting stars.

  20. Real Time Distributed Embedded Oscillator Operating Frequency Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, Julie (Inventor); Oliver, Brett D. (Inventor); Brickner, Christopher (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for clock monitoring in a network is provided. The method comprises receiving a first network clock signal at a network device and comparing the first network clock signal to a local clock signal from a primary oscillator coupled to the network device.

  1. High Temperature Superconducting RF Resonators for Resonator Stabilized Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettee, Jeffrey David

    Electromagnetic resonators made of superconducting materials show unusually sharp resonances because resistive losses are minimized. The availability of high quality thin films of YB_2CU_3 O_{7-delta} (YBCO) with superconducting transitions at 92K has aroused interest in thin film resonators at microwave frequencies for use in filters and oscillators in communication and radar systems. I have investigated the design and radio frequency (rf) properties of superconducting resonators in microstrip geometries (in which the resonant element and a single ground plane are on opposite faces of the LaAlO_3 substrates). This monolithic approach minimizes vibration sensitivity, but exposes the resonators to interactions with the packaging structure. I used niobium (Nb) superconducting 2 GHz resonators at 4.2K to investigate the geometry dependence of the quality factor Q and the high frequency phase noise S_ {y}(f). Q's in excess of 250,000 and S_{y}(1 Hz) = -227 were achieved. Desirable geometries were then fabricated in YBCO thin films produced by coevaporation or sputtering. They typically showed Q's that are a factor of four lower than the comparable Nb resonator, but retained their usefulness to substantially higher temperatures ( ~60K). One of these YBCO resonators was successfully operated to stabilize an oscillator operating at 2 GHz with overall single-sideband phase noise }(1 Hz) = -30 dBc/Hz comparable to the best available competing technologies.

  2. Deep level domain spectroscopy of low frequency oscillations in semi-insulating InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhouse, C.; Young, L.

    1992-11-01

    It is known that low frequency current oscillations occur in semi-insulating GaAs due to the formation and transit of high field domains caused by enhanced trapping of hot electrons by deep levels and that power density spectra of the current show peaks whose temperature dependence gives information on deep levels. In the present work Fe-compensated InP was investigated. The peaks rose from an approximately {1}/{f}{3}/{2} background and by estimating and removing this and by averaging many spectra, no less than 14 frequency peaks were resolved which gave straight lines on an Arrhenius plot of log( {T 2}/{2f}) vs{1}/{T}. Although the amplitude of the current oscillations is not so large as to preclude multiple domain propagation, it seems more likely that the domains are caused by hot electron trapping by one level only, rather than that several traps should have the necessary characteristics to launch domains. The multiplicity of peaks could be partly due to harmonics of the basic high field domain oscillation and partly due to conductivity modulation by other levels whose occupancies are changed by the passage of the domains: the task, if so, is to determine which peaks are which. The activation energies from the Arrhenius plots fell into groups close to 0.30, 0.39, 0.41, 0.44 and 0.49 eV. The 14 peaks thus are believed to arise from 5 deep levels. Evidence was found that the 0.49 eV level is iron-related and is responsible for producing the high field domains and for drain current drift in InP metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  3. The Lever oscillator for use in high resistance resonator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, K.O.

    1993-07-01

    The Lever oscillator has been specifically designed for use with quartz resonator sensors. The use of quartz resonators as sensors is of particular interest and depending on the sensing environment, e.g., liquid, the oscillator design is both critical and difficult due to the wide dynamic range of resonator resistance possible due to damping of the resonator. Standard oscillator designs do not work well as sensor oscillators. An oscillator design will be presented that allows both frequency and loss (R{sub m}) of the resonator to be determined over a wide dynamic range of resonator loss. The Lever oscillator uses negative feedback in a differential amplifier configuration to actively and variably divide (or leverage) the resonator impedance such that the oscillator can maintain the phase and gain of the loop over a wide range of resonator resistance.

  4. Abnormal Excitability and Episodic Low-Frequency Oscillations in the Cerebral Cortex of the tottering Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Samuel W.; Popa, Laurentiu S.; Carter, Russell E.; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The Ca2+ channelopathies caused by mutations of the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of the human Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channel include episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2). Although, in EA2 the emphasis has been on cerebellar dysfunction, patients also exhibit episodic, nonmotoric abnormalities involving the cerebral cortex. This study demonstrates episodic, low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) throughout the cerebral cortex of tottering (tg/tg) mice, a widely used model of EA2. Ranging between 0.035 and 0.11 Hz, the LFOs in tg/tg mice can spontaneously develop very high power, referred to as a high-power state. The LFOs in tg/tg mice are mediated in part by neuronal activity as tetrodotoxin decreases the oscillations and cortical neuron discharge contain the same low frequencies. The high-power state involves compensatory mechanisms because acutely decreasing P/Q-type Ca2+ channel function in either wild-type (WT) or tg/tg mice does not induce the high-power state. In contrast, blocking l-type Ca2+ channels, known to be upregulated in tg/tg mice, reduces the high-power state. Intriguingly, basal excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission constrains the high-power state because blocking ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptors results in high-power LFOs in tg/tg but not WT mice. The high-power LFOs are decreased markedly by acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine, the primary treatments for EA2, suggesting disease relevance. Together, these results demonstrate that the high-power LFOs in the tg/tg cerebral cortex represent a highly abnormal excitability state that may underlie noncerebellar symptoms that characterize CACNA1A mutations. PMID:25855180

  5. Abnormal excitability and episodic low-frequency oscillations in the cerebral cortex of the tottering mouse.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Samuel W; Popa, Laurentiu S; Carter, Russell E; Chen, Gang; Ebner, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    The Ca(2+) channelopathies caused by mutations of the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of the human Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel include episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2). Although, in EA2 the emphasis has been on cerebellar dysfunction, patients also exhibit episodic, nonmotoric abnormalities involving the cerebral cortex. This study demonstrates episodic, low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) throughout the cerebral cortex of tottering (tg/tg) mice, a widely used model of EA2. Ranging between 0.035 and 0.11 Hz, the LFOs in tg/tg mice can spontaneously develop very high power, referred to as a high-power state. The LFOs in tg/tg mice are mediated in part by neuronal activity as tetrodotoxin decreases the oscillations and cortical neuron discharge contain the same low frequencies. The high-power state involves compensatory mechanisms because acutely decreasing P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel function in either wild-type (WT) or tg/tg mice does not induce the high-power state. In contrast, blocking l-type Ca(2+) channels, known to be upregulated in tg/tg mice, reduces the high-power state. Intriguingly, basal excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission constrains the high-power state because blocking ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptors results in high-power LFOs in tg/tg but not WT mice. The high-power LFOs are decreased markedly by acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine, the primary treatments for EA2, suggesting disease relevance. Together, these results demonstrate that the high-power LFOs in the tg/tg cerebral cortex represent a highly abnormal excitability state that may underlie noncerebellar symptoms that characterize CACNA1A mutations. PMID:25855180

  6. Downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in transonic diffuser flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, T.; Coakley, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in two-dimensional, separated transonic diffuser flows has been conducted numerically by solving the compressible, Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equation with a two-equation turbulence model. It was found that the unsteady diffuser flowfields are very sensitive to the location of the downstream boundary. Extension of the diffuser downstream boundary significantly reduces the frequency and amplitude of oscillations for pressure, velocity and shock. Computational results suggest that the mechanism causing the self-excited oscillation changes from viscous convective wave dominated oscillations to inviscid acoustic wave dominated oscillations when the location of downstream boundary varies from 8.66 to 134.7 throat height. The existence of a suction slot in the experimental setup obscures the physical downstream boundary and, therefore, presents a difficulty for quantitative comparisons between computation and experiment.

  7. A beta2-frequency (20–30 Hz) oscillation in nonsynaptic networks of somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roopun, Anita K.; Middleton, Steven J.; Cunningham, Mark O.; LeBeau, Fiona E. N.; Bibbig, Andrea; Whittington, Miles A.; Traub, Roger D.

    2006-01-01

    Beta2 frequency (20–30 Hz) oscillations appear over somatosensory and motor cortices in vivo during motor preparation and can be coherent with muscle electrical activity. We describe a beta2 frequency oscillation occurring in vitro in networks of layer V pyramidal cells, the cells of origin of the corticospinal tract. This beta2 oscillation depends on gap junctional coupling, but it survives a cut through layer 4 and, hence, does not depend on apical dendritic electrogenesis. It also survives a blockade of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors or a blockade of GABAA receptors that is sufficient to suppress gamma (30–70 Hz) oscillations in superficial cortical layers. The oscillation period is determined by the M type of K+ current. PMID:17030821

  8. Frequency control of a spin-torque oscillator using magnetostrictive anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Gyu Albert; Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Park, Byong-Guk; Lee, Seok-Hee

    2016-01-01

    We report the working principle of a spin-torque oscillator, of which the frequency is efficiently controlled by manipulating the magnetostrictive anisotropy. To justify the scheme, we simulate a conventional magnetic-tunnel junction-based oscillator which is fabricated on a piezoelectric material. By applying mechanical stress to a free layer using a piezoelectric material, the oscillation frequency can be controlled to ensure a broad tuning range without a significant reduction of the dynamic resistance variation. Such controllability, which appears in the absence of an external magnetic field, will not only enable the integration of spin-torque oscillators and conventional complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor technology but will also broaden the applicability of spin-torque oscillators.

  9. Completely monolithic linearly polarized high-power fiber laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belke, Steffen; Becker, Frank; Neumann, Benjamin; Ruppik, Stefan; Hefter, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated a linearly polarized cw all-in-fiber oscillator providing 1 kW of output power and a polarization extinction ratio (PER) of up to 21.7 dB. The design of the laser oscillator is simple and consists of an Ytterbium-doped polarization maintaining large mode area (PLMA) fiber and suitable fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) in matching PLMA fibers. The oscillator has nearly diffraction-limited beam quality (M² < 1.2). Pump power is delivered via a high power 6+1:1 pump coupler. The slope efficiency of the laser is 75 %. The electro/optical efficiency of the complete laser system is ~30 % and hence in the range of Rofin's cw non-polarized fiber lasers. Choosing an adequate bending diameter for the Yb-doped PLMA fiber, one polarization mode as well as higher order modes are sufficiently supressed1. Resulting in a compact and robust linearly polarized high power single mode laser without external polarizing components. Linearly polarized lasers are well established for one dimensional cutting or welding applications. Using beam shaping optics radially polarized laser light can be generated to be independent from the angle of incident to the processing surface. Furthermore, high power linearly polarized laser light is fundamental for nonlinear frequency conversion of nonlinear materials.

  10. High Power Local Oscillator Sources for 1-2 THz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Thomas, Bertrand; Lin, Robert; Maestrini, Alain; Ward, John; Schlecht, Erich; Gill, John; Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Maiwald, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Recent results from the Heterodyne Instrument for Far-Infrared (HIFI) on the Herschel Space Telescope have confirmed the usefulness of high resolution spectroscopic data for a better understanding of our Universe. This paper will explore the current status of tunable local oscillator sources beyond HIFI and provide demonstration of how power combining of GaAs Schottky diodes can be used to increase both power and upper operating frequency for heterodyne receivers. Availability of power levels greater than 1 watt in the W-band now makes it possible to design a 1900 GHz source with more than 100 microwatts of expected output power.

  11. Intrinsic Cornu Ammonis Area 1 Theta-Nested Gamma Oscillations Induced by Optogenetic Theta Frequency Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James L.; Mendonça, Philipe R. F.; Robinson, Hugh P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma oscillations (30–120 Hz) are thought to be important for various cognitive functions, including perception and working memory, and disruption of these oscillations has been implicated in brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. The cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) of the hippocampus receives gamma frequency inputs from upstream regions (cornu ammonis area 3 and medial entorhinal cortex) and generates itself a faster gamma oscillation. The exact nature and origin of the intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillation is still under debate. Here, we expressed channelrhodopsin-2 under the CaMKIIα promoter in mice and prepared hippocampal slices to produce a model of intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillations. Sinusoidal optical stimulation of CA1 at theta frequency was found to induce robust theta-nested gamma oscillations with a temporal and spatial profile similar to CA1 gamma in vivo. The results suggest the presence of a single gamma rhythm generator with a frequency range of 65–75 Hz at 32°C. Pharmacological analysis found that the oscillations depended on both AMPA and GABAA receptors. Cell-attached and whole-cell recordings revealed that excitatory neuron firing slightly preceded interneuron firing within each gamma cycle, suggesting that this intrinsic CA1 gamma oscillation is generated with a pyramidal–interneuron circuit mechanism. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study demonstrates that the cornu ammonis area 1 (CA1) is capable of generating intrinsic gamma oscillations in response to theta input. This gamma generator is independent of activity in the upstream regions, highlighting that CA1 can produce its own gamma oscillation in addition to inheriting activity from the upstream regions. This supports the theory that gamma oscillations predominantly function to achieve local synchrony, and that a local gamma generated in each area conducts the signal to the downstream region. PMID:27076416

  12. Effect of turbulent pressure on solar oscillation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antia, H. M.; Basu, S.

    1997-12-01

    We use observed frequencies of solar $p$-modes to test different formulations for calculating the convective flux. In particular, models using the usual mixing length theory and the formulation of Canuto and Mazzitelli for calculating the convective flux are compared to find that the latter yields frequencies that are closer to observed values. Inclusion of turbulent pressure is also found to improve the agreement with observed frequencies, but the magnitude of the difference is much smaller.

  13. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  14. 3D CFDTD PIC Simulation Study on Low-Frequency Oscillations in a Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Smithe, D. N.

    2011-10-01

    Low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) have been observed in a high average power gyrotron and the trapped electron population contributing to the oscillation has been measured. As high average power gyrotrons are the most promising millimeter wave source for thermonuclear fusion research, it is important to get a better understanding of this parasitic phenomenon to avoid any deterioration of the electron beam quality thus reducing the gyrotron efficiency. However, understanding of the LFOs remains incomplete and a full picture of this parasitic phenomenon has not been seen yet. In this work, we use a 3D conformal finite-difference time-domain (CFDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) method to accurately and efficiently study the LFOs in a magnetron injection gun (MIG) of a high average power gyrotron. Employing a highly parallelized computation, the model can be simulated in time domain more realistically. LFOs have been obtained in a 3D time domain simulation for the first time. From our preliminary simulation studies, it is found that not only magnetic compression profile but initial velocity or velocity ratio play an important role in the operation of a MIG electron gun. In addition, the secondary emission effects on the LFOs are also studied. Detailed results will be presented. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0004436.

  15. The high-overtone p-mode spectrum of the rapidly oscillating Ap star HR 1217 (HD 24712) - Results of a frequency analysis of 324 hr of multi-site photometric observations obtained during a 46-d time-span in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, D. W.; Martinez, P.; Seeman, J.; Matthews, J. M.; Cropper, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The present high-speed photometry for the rapidly oscillating Ap star HR 1217 indicates that the 6-min light variations are amplitude-modulated, in phase with the magnetic variations. Amplitude and magnetic maxima coincide, while the mean light minimum occurs at a perhaps significantly different time. It is established that HR 1217 is an oblique rotator with a centered dipole magnetic field, as well as an oblique pulsator whose pulsation and magnetic axes are aligned. There are six principal frequencies of pulsation; the secondary frequencies indicate that the principal ones are amplitude-modulated on a time-scale of months.

  16. Frequencies of gas oscillations in a pipe with a concentrated heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovleva, O. V.; Larionov, V. M.; Semenova, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the location of the heat source significantly affects the frequency of acoustic oscillations in the channels. The case of a step change in the sound speed is investigated. In this article, linear distribution of sound speed in hot gas is considered. The well-known equations are used to calculate frequencies of the gas oscillations. The analysis shows that the movement of the flame from the down up in an open tube causes a nonmonotonic change in the resonant frequency. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Characterizing low-frequency oscillation of Hall thrusters by dielectric wall temperature variation

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, Guo; Liqiu, Wei E-mail: weiliqiu@hit.edu.cn; Yongjie, Ding

    2014-05-15

    The low-frequency oscillation characteristics of a Hall thruster were investigated by varying the dielectric wall temperature. Experimental results indicate that increasing the dielectric wall temperature can result in an increase in the amplitude of low-frequency oscillation and a slight decrease in its frequency. Physical analysis revealed that this change is related to the secondary electron emissions at different dielectric wall temperatures. The evidence suggests that this technique can serve as an effective way for future studies to examine how secondary electron emissions affect a discharging thruster.

  18. Evading surface and detector frequency noise in harmonic oscillator measurements of force gradients

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Eric W.; Lee, SangGap; Hickman, Steven A.; Harrell, Lee E.; Marohn, John A.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce and demonstrate a method of measuring small force gradients acting on a harmonic oscillator in which the force-gradient signal of interest is used to parametrically up-convert a forced oscillation below resonance into an amplitude signal at the oscillator’s resonance frequency. The approach, which we demonstrate in a mechanically detected electron spin resonance experiment, allows the force-gradient signal to evade detector frequency noise by converting a slowly modulated frequency signal into an amplitude signal. PMID:20733934

  19. Spells of Low-Frequency Oscillations and Weather Regimes in the Northern Hemisphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, Guy; Vautard, Robert

    1994-01-01

    The low-frequency variability in the midlatitudes is described through an analysis of the oscillatory phenomena. In order to isolate nearly periodic components of the atmospheric flow, the multichannel version of the singular spectrum analysis (M-SSA) is developed and applied to an NMC 32-year long set of 700-hPa geopotential heights. In the same way that principal component analysis identifies the spatial patterns dominating the variability, M-SSA identifies dynamically relevant space-time patterns and provides an adaptive filtering technique.Three major low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) are found, with periods of 70 days, 40-45 days, and 30-35 days. The 70-day oscillation consists of fluctuations in both position and amplitude of the Atlantic jet, with a poleward-propagating anomaly pattern. The 40-45-day oscillation is specific to the Pacific sector and has a pronounced Pacific/North American (PNA) structure in its high-amplitude phase. The 30-35-day mode is confined over the Atlantic region, and consists of the retrogression of a dipole pattern. All these oscillations are shown to be intermittently excited, and M-SSA allows the localization of their spells. The two Atlantic oscillations turn out to be frequently phase locked, so that the 30-35-day mode is likely to be a harmonic of the 70-day mode. The phase locking of the Pacific 40-45-day with the Atlantic 30-35-day oscillations is also studied.Next, the relationships between LFOs and weather regimes are studied. It is shown in particular that the occurrence of the Euro-Atlantic blocking regime is strongly favored, although not systematically caused, by particular phases of the 30-35-day mode. The LFOs themselves are able to produce high-amplitude persistent anomalies by interfering with each other.The transition from a zonal regime to a blocking regime is also shown to be highly connected to the life cycle of the 30-35-day mode, indicating that regime transitions do not result only from the random occurrence

  20. Why high-frequency pulse tubes can be tipped

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Gregory W092710; Backhaus, Scott N

    2010-01-01

    The typical low-frequency pulse-tube refrigerator loses significant cooling power when it is tipped with the pulse tube's cold end above its hot end, because natural convection in the pulse tube loads the cold heat exchanger. Yet most high-frequency pulse-tube refrigerators work well in any orientation with respect to gravity. In such a refrigerator, natural convection is suppressed by sufficiently fast velocity oscil1ations, via a nonlinear hydrodynamic effect that tends to align the density gradients in the pulse tube parallel to the oscillation direction. Since gravity's tendency to cause convection is only linear in the pulse tube's end-to-end temperature difference while the oscillation's tendency to align density gradients with oscillating velocity is nonlinear, it is easiest to suppress convection when the end-to-end temperature difference is largest. Simple experiments demonstrate this temperature dependence, the strong dependence on the oscillating velocity, and little dependence on the magnitude or phase of the oscillating pressure. In some circumstances in this apparatus, the suppression of convection is a hysteretic function of oscillating velocity. In some other circumstances, a time-dependent convective state seems more difficult to suppress.

  1. Low-Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations and Iron Line Variability of Discoseismic Corrugation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsky, Iryna; Tsang, D.

    2013-01-01

    Using a fast semi-analytic raytracing code, we study the variability of iron lines due to discoseismic oscillations concentrated in the inner-most regions of accretion discs around black holes. The dependence of the relativistically broadened line profile on the oscillation-phase is studied for discoseismic corrugation modes. The corrugation mode, or c-mode, is of particular interest as their natural frequency corresponds well to the 0.1-10 Hz range observed for low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (LFQPOs) in X-ray binaries. Comparison of the oscillation phase dependent variability and QPO-phase stacked Fe-Kalpha line observations will allow such discoseismic models to be confirmed or ruled out as a source of LFQPOs.

  2. System for adjusting frequency of electrical output pulses derived from an oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bartholomew, David B.

    2006-11-14

    A system for setting and adjusting a frequency of electrical output pulses derived from an oscillator in a network is disclosed. The system comprises an accumulator module configured to receive pulses from an oscillator and to output an accumulated value. An adjustor module is configured to store an adjustor value used to correct local oscillator drift. A digital adder adds values from the accumulator module to values stored in the adjustor module and outputs their sums to the accumulator module, where they are stored. The digital adder also outputs an electrical pulse to a logic module. The logic module is in electrical communication with the adjustor module and the network. The logic module may change the value stored in the adjustor module to compensate for local oscillator drift or change the frequency of output pulses. The logic module may also keep time and calculate drift.

  3. A solid-mounted resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency synthesis.

    PubMed

    Boudot, R; Li, M D; Giordano, V; Rolland, N; Rolland, P A; Vincent, P

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a 4.596 GHz frequency synthesis based on a 2.1 GHz solid mounted resonator (SMR) voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO). The SMR oscillator presents a chip size lower than 2 mm(2), a power consumption of 18.2 mW, and exhibits a phase noise of -89 dBc/Hz and -131 dBc/Hz at 2 kHz and 100 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The VCO temperature-frequency dependence is measured to be -14 ppm∕°C over a range of -20°C to 60°C. From this source, a low noise frequency synthesizer is developed to generate a 4.596 GHz signal (half of the Cs atom hyperfine transition frequency) with a phase noise of -81 dBc/Hz and -120 dBc/Hz at 2 kHz and 100 kHz from the carrier. The frequency synthesis output is used as a local oscillator in a Cs vapor microcell-based compact atomic clock. Preliminary results are reported and discussed. To the authors knowledge, this is the first development of a SMR-oscillator-based frequency synthesizer for miniature atomic clocks applications. PMID:21456775

  4. Vocal fold vibrations at high soprano fundamental frequencies.

    PubMed

    Echternach, Matthias; Döllinger, Michael; Sundberg, Johan; Traser, Louisa; Richter, Bernhard

    2013-02-01

    Human voice production at very high fundamental frequencies is not yet understood in detail. It was hypothesized that these frequencies are produced by turbulences, vocal tract/vocal fold interactions, or vocal fold oscillations without closure. Hitherto it has been impossible to visually analyze the vocal mechanism due to technical limitations. Latest high-speed technology, which captures 20,000 frames/s, using transnasal endoscopy was applied. Up to 1568 Hz human vocal folds do exhibit oscillations with complete closure. Therefore, the recent results suggest that human voice production at very high F0s up to 1568 Hz is not caused by turbulence, but rather by airflow modulation from vocal fold oscillations. PMID:23363198

  5. Mobile high frequency vibrator system

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, D.W.; Buller, P.L.

    1985-01-08

    A carrier mounted seismic vibrator system that is primarily adapted for generation of high force, high frequency seismic energy into an earth medium. The apparatus includes first and second vibrators as supported by first and second lift systems disposed in tandem juxtaposition generally centrally in said vehicle, and the lift systems are designed to maintain equal hold-down force on the vibrator coupling baseplates without exceeding the weight of the carrier vehicle. The juxtaposed vibrators are then energized in synchronized relationship to propagate increased amounts of higher frequency seismic energy into an earth medium.

  6. Low-cost and wideband frequency tunable optoelectronic oscillator based on a directly modulated distributed feedback semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jintian; Wang, Rong; Fang, Tao; Pu, Tao; Chen, Dalei; Lu, Lin; Xiang, Peng; Zheng, Jilin; Zhao, Jiyong

    2013-10-15

    A novel scheme to realize a low-cost and wideband frequency tunable optoelectronic oscillator based on a directly modulated distributed feedback (DFB) semiconductor laser is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed scheme, neither an external modulator nor an electrical filter is used, and no more than 25 dB of the electrical loop gain is required due to the high modulation efficiency of the relaxation oscillation frequency of the DFB laser. Microwave signals with frequency coarsely tuned from 3.77 to 8.75 GHz are generated by changing the bias current and operation temperature of the DFB laser. The single sideband phase noise of the generated 6.97 GHz microwave signal is measured to be -103.6 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset. PMID:24321940

  7. High-power Čerenkov microwave oscillators utilizing High-Current nanosecond Electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, S. D.; Polevin, S. D.; Rostov, V. V.

    1996-12-01

    A short review is given of results obtained at the Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences on generating high-power microwave radiation. Most of the research was devoted to a study of stimulated Čerenkov radiation from relativistic electron beams. It is shown that the efficiency of a relativistic 3-cm backward wave tube with a nonuniform coupling resistance can reach 35%. High-frequency radiation was discovered in the emission spectrum of the Čerenkov oscillators and it was shown that the nature of the radiation was associated with the stimulated scattering of low-frequency radiation by the relativistic electrons. Radiation with a power of 500 MW was obtained in the 8-mm wavelength range using a two-beam Čerenkov oscillator. High-current pulse-periodic nanosecond accelerators with a charging device utilizing a Tesla transformer were used in the experiments. The possibility was demonstrated of generating high-power microwave radiation with a pulse-repetition frequency of up to 100 Hz. An average power of ˜500 W was achieved from the relativistic oscillators. A relativistic backward wave tube with a high-current electron beam was used to make a prototype nanosecond radar device. Some of the results presented were obtained jointly with the Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Applied Physics. Questions concerning multiwave Čerenkov interaction are not considered in this paper.

  8. Experimental Determination of Effects of Frequency and Amplitude on the Lateral Stability Derivatives for a Delta, a Swept, and Unswept Wing Oscillating in Yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lewis R

    1958-01-01

    Three wing models were oscillated in yaw about their vertical axes to determine the effects of systematic variations of frequency and amplitude of oscillation on the in-phase and out-of-phase combination lateral stability derivatives resulting from this motion. The tests were made at low speeds for a 60 degree delta wing, a 45 degree swept wing, and an unswept wing; the swept and unswept wings had aspect ratios of 4. The results indicate that large changes in the magnitude of the stability derivatives due to the variation of frequency occur at high angles of attack, particularly for the delta wing. The greatest variations of the derivatives with frequency take place for the lowest frequencies of oscillation; at the higher frequencies, the effects of frequency are smaller and the derivatives become more linear with angle of attack. Effects of amplitude of oscillation on the stability derivatives for delta wings were evident for certain high angles of attack and for the lowest frequencies of oscillation. As the frequency became high, the amplitude effects tended to disappear.

  9. Radio Frequency Transistors Using Aligned Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes with Current-Gain Cutoff Frequency and Maximum Oscillation Frequency Simultaneously Greater than 70 GHz.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Brady, Gerald J; Gui, Hui; Rutherglen, Chris; Arnold, Michael S; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-07-26

    In this paper, we report record radio frequency (RF) performance of carbon nanotube transistors based on combined use of a self-aligned T-shape gate structure, and well-aligned, high-semiconducting-purity, high-density polyfluorene-sorted semiconducting carbon nanotubes, which were deposited using dose-controlled, floating evaporative self-assembly method. These transistors show outstanding direct current (DC) performance with on-current density of 350 μA/μm, transconductance as high as 310 μS/μm, and superior current saturation with normalized output resistance greater than 100 kΩ·μm. These transistors create a record as carbon nanotube RF transistors that demonstrate both the current-gain cutoff frequency (ft) and the maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) greater than 70 GHz. Furthermore, these transistors exhibit good linearity performance with 1 dB gain compression point (P1dB) of 14 dBm and input third-order intercept point (IIP3) of 22 dBm. Our study advances state-of-the-art of carbon nanotube RF electronics, which have the potential to be made flexible and may find broad applications for signal amplification, wireless communication, and wearable/flexible electronics. PMID:27327074

  10. High frequency integrated MOS filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques exist for implementing integrated MOS filters. These techniques fit into the general categories of sampled and tuned continuous-time filters. Advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. This paper focuses primarily on the high frequency capabilities of MOS integrated filters.

  11. On The Low Frequency Quasi Periodic Oscillations Of X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. M.

    2005-09-01

    Based on the interpretation of the twin kilohertz Quasi Periodic Oscillations (kHz QPOs) of X-ray spectra of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries (LMXBs) ascribed to the Keplerian and the periastron precession frequencies at the inner disk respectively, we ascribe the low frequency (0.1 10 Hz) Quasi Periodic Oscillations (LFQPO) and HBO (15 60 Hz QPO for Z sources or Atoll sources) to the periastron precession at some outer disk radius. It is assumed that both radii are correlated by a scaling factor of 0.4. The conclusions obtained include: All QPO frequencies increase with increasing accretion rate. The theoretical relations between HBO (LFQPO) frequency and the kHz QPO frequencies are similar to the measured empirical formula.

  12. Low frequency driven oscillations of cantilevers in viscous fluids at very low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranch, G. A.; Lane, J. E.; Miller, G. A.; Lou, J. W.

    2013-05-01

    The motion of submerged cantilevers driven by viscous fluids is experimentally investigated and a previously published theoretical model is verified over a broad range of Reynolds number covering 4×10-3≤Re≤2000 at frequencies up to 1 kHz. Both planar and cylindrical cantilevers are implemented using short length (few centimeters) fiber lasers, which are also used to measure the deflections. The driving forces are analyzed in detail illustrating how the dominant force transitions from a pressure related force to a viscous force depending on the Reynolds number of the fluid flow around the cantilever. Simplified, approximate expressions for the tip displacement of cantilevers oscillating in the highly viscous regime are also presented. These results will enable accurate, a priori, calculation of the motion of driven cantilevers over a range of dimensions, geometries, and fluid properties.

  13. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, T. R.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densam, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J. J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L. J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J. S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-01

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ+ and μ- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular He6 and Ne18, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  14. Distribution of frequencies of spontaneous oscillations in hair cells of the bullfrog sacculus.

    PubMed

    Ramunno-Johnson, D; Strimbu, C E; Fredrickson, L; Arisaka, K; Bozovic, D

    2009-02-01

    Under in vitro conditions, free-standing hair bundles of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) sacculus have exhibited spontaneous oscillations. We used a high-speed complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera to track the active movements of multiple hair cells in a single field of view. Our techniques enabled us to probe for correlations between pairs of cells, and to acquire records on over 100 actively oscillating bundles per epithelium. We measured the statistical distribution of oscillation periods of cells from different areas within the sacculus, and on different epithelia. Spontaneous oscillations exhibited a peak period of 33 ms (+29 ms, -14 ms) and uniform spatial distribution across the sacculus. PMID:19186151

  15. Respiratory calcium fluctuations in low-frequency oscillating astrocytes in the pre-Bötzinger complex.

    PubMed

    Oku, Yoshitaka; Fresemann, Jens; Miwakeichi, Fumikazu; Hülsmann, Swen

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes have been found to modulate neuronal activity through calcium-dependent signaling in various brain regions. However, whether astrocytes of the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC) exhibit respiratory rhythmic fluctuations is still controversial. Here we evaluated calcium-imaging experiments within preBötC in rhythmically active medullary slices from TgN(hGFAP-EGFP) mice using advanced analyses. 13.8% of EGFP-negative cells, putative neurons, showed rhythmic fluorescent changes that were highly correlated to the respiratory rhythmic fluctuation (cross-correlation coefficient>0.5 and dF/F>0.2%). In contrast, a considerable number of astrocyte somata exhibited synchronized low-frequency (<0.03Hz) calcium oscillations. After band-pass filtering, signals that irregularly preceded the calcium signal of EGFP-negative cells were observed in 10.2% of astrocytes, indicating a functional coupling between astrocytes and neurons in preBötC. A model simulation confirmed that such preinspiratory astrocytic signals can arise from coupled neuronal and astrocytic oscillators, supporting a concept that slow oscillatory changes of astrocytic functions modulate neighboring neuronal activity to add variability in respiratory rhythm. PMID:25747384

  16. A systems approach to high performance oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, S. R.; Manney, C. M., Jr.; Walls, F. L.; Gray, J. E.; Besson, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how systems composed of multiple oscillators and resonators can achieve superior performance compared to a single oscillator. Experimental results are presented for two systems based on quartz crystals which provide state-of-the-art stability over a much wider range of averaging times than has been previously achieved. One system has achieved a factor of five improvement in noise floor compared to all previously reported results.

  17. Low-frequency EEG oscillations associated with information processing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bates, Alan T; Kiehl, Kent A; Laurens, Kristin R; Liddle, Peter F

    2009-12-01

    Numerous studies have described attenuated event-related potential (ERP) component amplitudes in schizophrenia (e.g., P300, Mismatch Negativity (MMN), Error Negativity/Error-Related Negativity (Ne/ERN)). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have typically shown decreased recruitment of diverse brain areas during performance of tasks that elicit the above ERP components. Recent research suggests that phase-resetting of slow-oscillations (e.g., in the delta and theta bands) underlies the potentials observed in ERP averages. Several studies have reported that slow-oscillations are increased in amplitude in people with schizophrenia at rest. Few studies have examined event-related low-frequency oscillations in schizophrenia. We examined event-related evoked and induced delta and theta activity in 17 people with schizophrenia and 17 healthy controls in two go/no-go task variants. We analyzed stimulus-related and response-related oscillations associated with correct-hits, correct-rejects and false-alarms. Our results reveal a pattern of reduced delta and theta activity for task-relevant events in schizophrenia. The findings indicate that while low-frequency oscillations are increased in amplitude at rest, they are not coordinated effectively in schizophrenia during various information processing tasks including target-detection, response-inhibition and error-detection. This slow-oscillation coordination abnormality may help explain the decreased recruitment of brain areas seen in fMRI studies. PMID:19850450

  18. Spatial synchronization of visual stimulus-evoked gamma frequency oscillations in the rat superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskis, Gytis; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2016-02-10

    In the superior colliculus, visual stimuli can induce gamma frequency oscillations of neuronal activity. It has been shown that in cats, these oscillations are synchronized over distances of greater than 300 μm that may contribute toward visual information processing. We investigated the spatial properties of such oscillations in a rodent because the availability of molecular tools could enable future studies on the role of these oscillations in visual information processing. Using extracellular electrode array recordings in anesthetized rats, we found that visual stimuli-induced gamma and eta frequency (30-115 Hz) oscillations of the local field potential that were synchronized over distances of ∼ 600 μm. Multiple-unit events were phase locked to the local field potential signal and showed prominent oscillations during OFF responses. The rate of lower than 5 ms cross-electrode coincidences was in line with the response-corrected predictions for each electrode. These data suggest that the synchronized superior colliculus neuronal activity is largely network driven, whereas common synaptic inputs play a minor role. PMID:26735701

  19. 30 Hz-linewidth, diode-laser-pumped, Nd:GGG nonplanar ring oscillators by active frequency stabilisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, T.; Nilsson, A. C.; Fejer, M. M.; Farinas, A. D.; Gustafson, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne linewidth of less than 30 Hz for the beatnote between the outputs of two 282 THz Nd:GGG nonplanar ring oscillators (NPROs) is reported. The lasers were independently locked to adjacent axial modes of a high-finesse interferometer. The remnant frequency noise appears to be dominated by free spectral range fluctuations in the reference interferometer rather than by residual laser noise.

  20. The Autonomous Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator: A Reference for Frequency Stability and Phase Noise Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, V.; Grop, S.; Fluhr, C.; Dubois, B.; Kersalé, Y.; Rubiola, E.

    2016-06-01

    The Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillator (CSO) is the microwave oscillator which feature the highest short-term stability. Our best units exhibit Allan deviation σy (τ) of 4.5x10-16 at 1s, ≈ 1.5x10-16 at 100 s ≤ t ≤ 5,000 s (floor), and ≤ 5x10-15 at one day. The use of a Pulse-Tube cryocooler enables full two year operation with virtually no maintenance. Starting with a short history of the CSO in our lab, we go through the architecture and we provide more details about the resonator, the cryostat, the oscillator loop, and the servo electronics. We implemented three similar oscillators, which enable the evaluation of each with the three- cornered hat method, and provide the potential for Allan deviation measurements at parts of 10-17 level. One of our CSOs (ULISS) is transportable, and goes with a small customized truck. The unique feature of ULISS is that its σy (τ) can be validated at destination by measuring before and after the roundtrip. To this extent, ULISS can be regarded as a traveling standard of frequency stability. The CSOs are a part of the Oscillator IMP project, a platform dedicated to the measurement of noise and short-term stability of oscillators and devices in the whole radio spectrum (from MHz to THz), including microwave photonics. The scope spans from routine measurements to the research on new oscillators, components, and measurement methods.

  1. High resolution coherence analysis between planetary and climate oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the existence of a multi-frequency spectral coherence between planetary and global surface temperature oscillations by using advanced techniques of coherence analysis and statistical significance tests. The performance of the standard Matlab mscohere algorithms is compared versus high resolution coherence analysis methodologies such as the canonical correlation analysis. The Matlab mscohere function highlights large coherence peaks at 20 and 60-year periods although, due to the shortness of the global surface temperature record (1850-2014), the statistical significance of the result depends on the specific window function adopted for pre-processing the data. In fact, window functions disrupt the low frequency component of the spectrum. On the contrary, using the canonical correlation analysis at least five coherent frequencies at the 95% significance level are found at the following periods: 6.6, 7.4, 14, 20 and 60 years. Thus, high resolution coherence analysis confirms that the climate system can be partially modulated by astronomical forces of gravitational, electromagnetic and solar origin. A possible chain of the physical causes explaining this coherence is briefly discussed.

  2. Graphene nanoelectromechanical systems as stochastic-frequency oscillators.

    PubMed

    Miao, Tengfei; Yeom, Sinchul; Wang, Peng; Standley, Brian; Bockrath, Marc

    2014-06-11

    We measure the quality factor Q of electrically driven few-layer graphene drumhead resonators, providing an experimental demonstration that Q ∼ 1/T, where T is the temperature. We develop a model that includes intermodal coupling and tensioned graphene resonators. Because the resonators are atomically thin, out-of-plane fluctuations are large. As a result, Q is mainly determined by stochastic frequency broadening rather than frictional damping, in analogy to nuclear magnetic resonance. This model is in good agreement with experiment. Additionally, at larger drives the resonance line width is enhanced by nonlinear damping, in qualitative agreement with recent theory of damping by radiation of in-plane phonons. Parametric amplification produced by periodic thermal expansion from the ac drive voltage yields an anomalously large line width at the largest drives. Our results contribute toward a general framework for understanding the mechanisms of dissipation and spectral line broadening in atomically thin membrane resonators. PMID:24742005

  3. Cs-based optical frequency measurement using cross-linked optical and microwave oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamm, Chr.; Huntemann, N.; Lipphardt, B.; Gerginov, V.; Nemitz, N.; Kazda, M.; Weyers, S.; Peik, E.

    2014-02-01

    We describe a measurement of the frequency of the 2S1/2(F=0)-2D3/2(F'=2) transition of 171Yb+ at the wavelength 436 nm (frequency 688 THz), using a single Yb+ ion confined in a Paul trap and two cesium fountains as references. In one of the fountains, the frequency of the microwave oscillator that interrogates the cesium atoms is stabilized by the laser that excites the Yb+ reference transition with a linewidth in the hertz range. The stability is transferred to the microwave oscillator with the use of a fiber laser-based optical frequency comb generator that also provides the frequency conversion for the absolute frequency measurement. The frequency comb generator is configured as a transfer oscillator so that fluctuations of the pulse repetition rate and of the carrier offset frequency do not degrade the stability of the frequency conversion. The phase noise level of the generated ultrastable microwave signal is comparable to that of a cryogenic sapphire oscillator. For fountain operation with optical molasses loaded from a laser-cooled atomic beam source, we obtain a stability corresponding to a fractional Allan deviation of 4.1 × 10-14 (τ /s)-1/2. With the molasses loaded from thermal vapor and an averaging time of 65 h, we measure the frequency of the Yb+ transition with a relative statistical uncertainty of 2.8 × 10-16 and a systematic uncertainty of 5.9 × 10-16. The frequency was also simultaneously measured with the second fountain that uses a quartz-based interrogation oscillator. The unperturbed frequency of the Yb+ transition is realized with an uncertainty of 1.1 × 10-16 that mainly results from the uncertainty of the blackbody shift at the operating temperature near 300 K. The transition frequency of 688 358 979 309 307.82(36) Hz, measured with the two fountains, is in good agreement with previous results.

  4. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  5. Phase speed and frequency-dependent damping of longitudinal intensity oscillations in coronal loop structures observed with AIA/SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedini, A.

    2016-04-01

    Longitudinal intensity oscillations along coronal loops that are interpreted as signatures of magneto-acoustic waves are observed frequently in different coronal structures. The aim of this paper is to estimate the physical parameters of the slow waves and the quantitative dependence of these parameters on their frequencies in the solar corona loops that are situated above active regions with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The observed data on 2012-Feb-12, consisting of 300 images with an interval of 24 seconds in the 171 Å and 193 Å passbands is analyzed for evidence of propagating features as slow waves along the loop structures. Signatures of longitudinal intensity oscillations that are damped rapidly as they travel along the loop structures were found, with periods in the range of a few minutes to few tens of minutes. Also, the projected (apparent) phase speeds, projected damping lengths, damping times and damping qualities of filtered intensities centred on the dominant frequencies are measured in the range of Cs ≃38-79 km s^{-1}, Ld≃ 23-68 Mm, τd≃7-21 min and τ_{d/P}≃0.34-0.77, respectively. The theoretical and observational results of this study indicate that the damping times and damping lengths increase with increasing the oscillation periods, and are highly sensitive function of oscillation period, but the projected speeds and the damping qualities are not very sensitive to the oscillation periods. Furthermore, the magnitude values of physical parameters are in good agreement with the prediction of the theoretical dispersion relations of high-frequency MHD waves (>1.1 mHz) in a coronal plasma with electron number density in the range of ne≃107-10^{12} cm^{-3}.

  6. Low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in black hole and neutron star LMXBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are routinely seen in the X-ray flux of accreting black holes and neutron stars. Since the QPO frequency correlates with the low frequency power spectral break in the same manner for both object classes, it is reasonable to believe that these oscillations have the same physical origin in neutron stars as they do in black holes. However, recent successes in modelling black hole low frequency QPOs as Lense-Thirring precession contrast sharply with failures of the same model in neutron stars. This could be attributable to the significant extra complexity, both in the physics and in the observed power spectra, of accreting neutron stars when compared with black holes. Alternatively, the QPO mechanism really is the same for the two object classes, but in that case, why does the Lense-Thirring model work so well for black holes? I will review the current state of this field.

  7. Resonance Assisted Synchronization of Coupled Oscillators: Frequency Locking without Phase Locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thévenin, J.; Romanelli, M.; Vallet, M.; Brunel, M.; Erneux, T.

    2011-09-01

    Frequency locking without phase locking of two coupled nonlinear oscillators is experimentally demonstrated. This synchronization regime is found for two coupled laser modes, beyond the phase-locking range fixed by Adler’s equation, because of a resonance mechanism. Specifically, we show that the amplitudes of the two modes exhibit strong fluctuations that produce average frequency synchronization, even if the instantaneous phases are unlocked. The experimental results are in good agreement with a theoretical model.

  8. Radio Frequency Tunable Oscillator Device Based on a SmB6 Microcrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alex; Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Galitski, Victor; Fisk, Zachary; Xia, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Radio frequency tunable oscillators are vital electronic components for signal generation, characterization, and processing. They are often constructed with a resonant circuit and a "negative" resistor, such as a Gunn diode, involving complex structure and large footprints. Here we report that a piece of SmB6 , 100 μ m in size, works as a current-controlled oscillator in the 30 MHz frequency range. SmB6 is a strongly correlated Kondo insulator that was recently found to have a robust surface state likely to be protected by the topology of its electronics structure. We exploit its nonlinear dynamics, and demonstrate large ac voltage outputs with frequencies from 20 Hz to 30 MHz by adjusting a small dc bias current. The behaviors of these oscillators agree well with a theoretical model describing the thermal and electronic dynamics of coupled surface and bulk states. With reduced crystal size we anticipate the device to work at higher frequencies, even in the THz regime. This type of oscillator might be realized in other materials with a metallic surface and a semiconducting bulk.

  9. Pump wavelength tuning of optical parametric oscillations and frequency mixing in KTiOAsO4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Mahendra G.; Murray, James T.; Petrin, Roger R.; Powell, Richard C.; Loiacono, D. N.; Loiacono, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of alexandrite laser-pumped optical parametric oscillators are reported for potassium titanyl arsenate. Near-infrared tuning curves and slope efficiencies were measured as functions of pump wavelength and pump power. In addition, sum frequency mixing of red and infrared wavelengths to produce green emission is also reported.

  10. Radio Frequency Tunable Oscillator Device Based on a SmB_{6} Microcrystal.

    PubMed

    Stern, Alex; Efimkin, Dmitry K; Galitski, Victor; Fisk, Zachary; Xia, Jing

    2016-04-22

    Radio frequency tunable oscillators are vital electronic components for signal generation, characterization, and processing. They are often constructed with a resonant circuit and a "negative" resistor, such as a Gunn diode, involving complex structure and large footprints. Here we report that a piece of SmB_{6}, 100  μm in size, works as a current-controlled oscillator in the 30 MHz frequency range. SmB_{6} is a strongly correlated Kondo insulator that was recently found to have a robust surface state likely to be protected by the topology of its electronics structure. We exploit its nonlinear dynamics, and demonstrate large ac voltage outputs with frequencies from 20 Hz to 30 MHz by adjusting a small dc bias current. The behaviors of these oscillators agree well with a theoretical model describing the thermal and electronic dynamics of coupled surface and bulk states. With reduced crystal size we anticipate the device to work at higher frequencies, even in the THz regime. This type of oscillator might be realized in other materials with a metallic surface and a semiconducting bulk. PMID:27152816

  11. Metastability and inter-band frequency modulation in networks of oscillating spiking neuron populations.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, David; Shanahan, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Groups of neurons firing synchronously are hypothesized to underlie many cognitive functions such as attention, associative learning, memory, and sensory selection. Recent theories suggest that transient periods of synchronization and desynchronization provide a mechanism for dynamically integrating and forming coalitions of functionally related neural areas, and that at these times conditions are optimal for information transfer. Oscillating neural populations display a great amount of spectral complexity, with several rhythms temporally coexisting in different structures and interacting with each other. This paper explores inter-band frequency modulation between neural oscillators using models of quadratic integrate-and-fire neurons and Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. We vary the structural connectivity in a network of neural oscillators, assess the spectral complexity, and correlate the inter-band frequency modulation. We contrast this correlation against measures of metastable coalition entropy and synchrony. Our results show that oscillations in different neural populations modulate each other so as to change frequency, and that the interaction of these fluctuating frequencies in the network as a whole is able to drive different neural populations towards episodes of synchrony. Further to this, we locate an area in the connectivity space in which the system directs itself in this way so as to explore a large repertoire of synchronous coalitions. We suggest that such dynamics facilitate versatile exploration, integration, and communication between functionally related neural areas, and thereby supports sophisticated cognitive processing in the brain. PMID:23614040

  12. Input-Dependent Frequency Modulation of Cortical Gamma Oscillations Shapes Spatial Synchronization and Enables Phase Coding

    PubMed Central

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25–80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping (‘binding’) and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency

  13. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  14. Single-frequency and tunable operation of a continuous intracavity-frequency-doubled singly resonant optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    My, Thu-Hien; Drag, Cyril; Bretenaker, Fabien

    2008-07-01

    A widely tunable continuous intracavity-frequency-doubled singly resonant optical parametric oscillator based on MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate crystal is described. The idler radiation resonating in the cavity is frequency doubled by an intracavity BBO crystal. Pumped in the green, this system can provide up to 485 mW of single-frequency orange radiation. The system is continuously temperature tunable between 1170 and 1355 nm for the idler, 876 and 975 nm for the signal, and between 585 and 678 nm for the doubled idler. The free-running power and frequency stability of the system have been observed to be better than those for a single-mode dye laser. PMID:18594663

  15. Mechanisms of high-frequency song generation in brachypterous crickets and the role of ghost frequencies.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Tony; Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Grandcolas, Philippe; Robert, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Sound production in crickets relies on stridulation, the well-understood rubbing together of a pair of specialised wings. As the file of one wing slides over the scraper of the other, a series of rhythmic impacts causes harmonic oscillations, usually resulting in the radiation of pure tones delivered at low frequencies (2-8 kHz). In the short-winged crickets of the Lebinthini tribe, acoustic communication relies on signals with remarkably high frequencies (>8 kHz) and rich harmonic content. Using several species of the subfamily Eneopterinae, we characterised the morphological and mechanical specialisations supporting the production of high frequencies, and demonstrated that higher harmonics are exploited as dominant frequencies. These specialisations affect the structure of the stridulatory file, the motor control of stridulation and the resonance of the sound radiator. We placed these specialisations in a phylogenetic framework and show that they serve to exploit high-frequency vibrational modes pre-existing in the phylogenetic ancestor. In Eneopterinae, the lower frequency components are harmonically related to the dominant peak, suggesting they are relicts of ancestral carrier frequencies. Yet, such ghost frequencies still occur in the wings' free resonances, highlighting the fundamental mechanical constraints of sound radiation. These results support the hypothesis that such high-frequency songs evolved stepwise, by a form of punctuated evolution that could be related to functional constraints, rather than by only the progressive increase of the ancestral fundamental frequency. PMID:23430987

  16. Frequency stabilization of single layer graphene oscillators through optical injection locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houri, Samer; Cartamil Bueno, Santiago; Venstra, Warner

    Single layer graphene (SLG) drum resonators offer exciting prospects as experimental testbeds for nonlinear dynamics. Recently, photo-thermal induced feedback effects leading to self-oscillations in graphene have been demonstrated. In this paper we examine the phase jitter of self-oscillating SLG, and the means to improve the frequency stability through optical injection locking. The resonator consists of an SLG on top of a 10 micron diameter circular cavity with a cavity depth of 750 nm. By shining a 10 mW He-Ne laser the drum enters a regime of photo-thermally induced self-oscillation. The oscillating SLG suffers from a significant phase noise that can be directly observed in the time domain as random walk of the oscillation period. By applying a lock tone to the oscillator through the application of a modulated blue laser (405 nm), the SLG motion is then phase locked to the applied tone with more than an order of magnitude improvement in its coherence time. The injection locking is also studied as a function of lock signal detuning and power. Presenting author.

  17. Wavelet transform analysis to assess oscillations in pial artery pulsation at the human cardiac frequency.

    PubMed

    Winklewski, P J; Gruszecki, M; Wolf, J; Swierblewska, E; Kunicka, K; Wszedybyl-Winklewska, M; Guminski, W; Zabulewicz, J; Frydrychowski, A F; Bieniaszewski, L; Narkiewicz, K

    2015-05-01

    Pial artery adjustments to changes in blood pressure (BP) may last only seconds in humans. Using a novel method called near-infrared transillumination backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS) that allows for the non-invasive measurement of pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) in humans, we aimed to assess the relationship between spontaneous oscillations in BP and cc-TQ at frequencies between 0.5 Hz and 5 Hz. We hypothesized that analysis of very short data segments would enable the estimation of changes in the cardiac contribution to the BP vs. cc-TQ relationship during very rapid pial artery adjustments to external stimuli. BP and pial artery oscillations during baseline (70s and 10s signals) and the response to maximal breath-hold apnea were studied in eighteen healthy subjects. The cc-TQ was measured using NIR-T/BSS; cerebral blood flow velocity, the pulsatility index and the resistive index were measured using Doppler ultrasound of the left internal carotid artery; heart rate and beat-to-beat systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded using a Finometer; end-tidal CO2 was measured using a medical gas analyzer. Wavelet transform analysis was used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations. The recordings lasting 10s and representing 10 cycles with a frequency of ~1 Hz provided sufficient accuracy with respect to wavelet coherence and wavelet phase coherence values and yielded similar results to those obtained from approximately 70cycles (70s). A slight but significant decrease in wavelet coherence between augmented BP and cc-TQ oscillations was observed by the end of apnea. Wavelet transform analysis can be used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations at cardiac frequency using signals intervals as short as 10s. Apnea slightly decreases the contribution of cardiac activity to BP and cc-TQ oscillations. PMID:25804326

  18. Catalog of low frequency oscillations of the earth's magnetic field as observed at ATS-1 during January 1968

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, W. D.; Lyons, D.

    1974-01-01

    A catalog of ATS-1 observed magnetic field oscillations is presented. The catalog holds only those events with a duration of at least ten minutes and with a frequency that remains roughly constant. Events are distinguished on the basis of the frequency of oscillations. A comparison was made between ATS-1 data and other ground and satellite magnetometer data.

  19. Phase and frequency structure of superradiance pulses generated by relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Elchaninov, A. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    Phase and frequency stability of electromagnetic oscillations in sub-gigawatt superradiance (SR) pulses generated by an extensive slow-wave structure of a relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator were experimentally investigated. Data on the frequency tuning and radiation phase stability of SR pulses with a variation of the energy and current of electron beam were obtained.

  20. A dual-band quadrature VCO with gain proportional to oscillation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenrui, Zhu; Haigang, Yang; Tongqiang, Gao; Hui, Zhang

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a novel dual-band quadrature voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) with the gain proportional to the oscillation frequency. Frequency synthesizers with this VCO can reduce the bandwidth fluctuation over all the frequency ranges without compensation or calibration. Besides the original switched capacitor array, an extra switched varactor array is adopted for the implementation of the proposed VCO. The tuning technique of changing the values of the capacitor and varactor at the same ratio is also derived. For verification purposes, a 2.5 G/3.5 G dual-band quadrature VCO is fabricated in a 0.13 μm CMOS process for WiMAX applications. Measurement results show that the VCO gain is closely proportional to the oscillation frequency with ±16% variation over the entire frequency range. The phase noise is -138.15 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz from the 2.5 GHz carrier and -137.44 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz from the 3.5 GHz carrier.

  1. Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Rekha

    1995-01-01

    Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes during the solar cycle are calculated for a non-magnetic polytrope convection zone model. An isothermal chromospheric atmosphere threaded by a uniform horizontal magnetic field is correlated to this model. The relevant observations of such frequency changes are discussed. The calculated simultaneous changes in the field strength and chromospheric temperature result in the frequency shifts that are similar to those of the observations.

  2. Nonlinear spacing and frequency effects of an oscillating cylinder in the wake of a stationary cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z.; Yang, Xiaofan

    2008-11-01

    Nonlinear responses to a transversely oscillating cylinder in the wake of a stationary upstream cylinder are studied theoretically by using an immersed-boundary method. It is found that flow around the two cylinders varies with different spacing between the two cylinders and the oscillation frequency of the downstream cylinder. As known in a stationary tandem-cylinder system, there exist the ``vortex suppression regime'' (VS) and the ``vortex formation regime'' (VF). These two regimes are divided by a critical spacing. When the downstream cylinder is forced to oscillate at a fixed amplitude but different frequency, different flow patterns appear in each of the regime. On the other hand, at the same oscillating frequency but different spacing, the response state (lock-in, transient or non-lock-in) changes. While each state has periodic or quasi-periodic behaviors, nonlinear responses appear. All of the analyses are based on vorticity contours, time histories of the velocities in the near wake regions, spectral analyses, and related phase portraits.

  3. Frequency shift of spin waves in tunnel-junction spin-transfer nano-oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Matos-Abiague, A.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2010-10-01

    The excitations of microwave spin waves in magnetic tunnel junctions are theoretically investigated. An analytical approach which describes the dependence of the microwave precession frequency on the applied voltage is developed. It is shown that the spin-wave frequency is directly related to both the in-plane and perpendicular spin-transfer torques. In the low field regime the perpendicular torque can induce changes in the slope of the oscillation frequency versus applied voltage (df/dv) from negative (redshift) to positive (blueshift) values.

  4. Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping Contributions of Variable-Speed Wind Generators in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yong; Gracia, Jose R,; King, Jr, Thomas J.; Liu, Yilu

    2014-05-16

    The U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI) is one of the largest electric power grids in the world and is expected to have difficulties in dealing with frequency regulation and oscillation damping issues caused by the increasing wind power. On the other side, variable-speed wind generators can actively engage in frequency regulation or oscillation damping with supplementary control loops. This paper creates a 5% wind power penetration simulation scenario based on the 16 000-bus EI system dynamic model and developed the user-defined wind electrical control model in PSS (R) E that incorporates additional frequency regulation and oscillation damping control loops. We evaluated the potential contributions of variable-speed wind generations to the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping, and simulation results demonstrate that current and future penetrations of wind power are promising in the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping.

  5. Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping Contributions of Variable-Speed Wind Generators in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Yong; Gracia, Jose R,; King, Jr, Thomas J.; Liu, Yilu

    2014-05-16

    The U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI) is one of the largest electric power grids in the world and is expected to have difficulties in dealing with frequency regulation and oscillation damping issues caused by the increasing wind power. On the other side, variable-speed wind generators can actively engage in frequency regulation or oscillation damping with supplementary control loops. This paper creates a 5% wind power penetration simulation scenario based on the 16 000-bus EI system dynamic model and developed the user-defined wind electrical control model in PSS (R) E that incorporates additional frequency regulation and oscillation damping control loops. We evaluatedmore » the potential contributions of variable-speed wind generations to the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping, and simulation results demonstrate that current and future penetrations of wind power are promising in the EI system frequency regulation and oscillation damping.« less

  6. High frequency dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K; Swager, Timothy M; Temkin, Richard J; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-09-17

    During the three decades 1980-2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical, and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = 1/2 species (13)C or (15)N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, such as (17)O or (27)Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime, roughly 150-660 GHz, and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades, scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  7. High Frequency Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Swager, Timothy M.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus During the three decades 1980–2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = ½ species 13C or 15N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, like 17O or 27Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime — roughly 150–660 GHz — and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  8. Abnormal functional integration of thalamic low frequency oscillation in the BOLD signal after acute heroin treatment.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Schmidt, André; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Huber, Christian G; Lang, Undine E; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Heroin addiction is a severe relapsing brain disorder associated with impaired cognitive control, including deficits in attention allocation. The thalamus has a high density of opiate receptors and is critically involved in orchestrating cortical activity during cognitive control. However, there have been no studies on how acute heroin treatment modulates thalamic activity. In a cross-over, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study, 29 heroin-maintained outpatients were studied after heroin and placebo administration, while 20 healthy controls were included for the placebo condition only. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to analyze functional integration of the thalamus by three different resting state analysis techniques. Thalamocortical functional connectivity (FC) was analyzed by seed-based correlation, while intrinsic thalamic oscillation was assessed by analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) and the fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF). Relative to the placebo treatment and healthy controls, acute heroin administration reduced thalamocortical FC to cortical regions, including the frontal cortex, while the reductions in FC to the mediofrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and frontal pole were positively correlated with the plasma level of morphine, the main psychoactive metabolite of heroin. Furthermore, heroin treatment was associated with increased thalamic ReHo and fALFF values, whereas fALFF following heroin exposure correlated negatively with scores of attentional control. The heroin-associated increase in fALFF was mainly dominated by slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) oscillations. Our findings show that there are acute effects of heroin within the thalamocortical system and may shed new light on the role of the thalamus in cognitive control in heroin addiction. Future research is needed to determine the underlying physiological mechanisms and their role in heroin addiction. PMID:26441146

  9. A study and classification of non-linear high frequency ionospheric instabilities by coupled mode theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, K. J.

    1972-01-01

    Two basic high-frequency ionospheric instabilities are discussed - i.e., the three-wave parametric interaction, and the oscillating two-stream instability. In the parametric instability, the ion-acoustic wave has a complex frequency, whereas in the oscillating two-stream instability the ion-acoustic frequency is purely imaginary. The parametric instability is shown to be the only one whose threshold depends on the ion collision frequency. A coupled-mode theory is proposed which permits study and classification of high-frequency instabilities on a unified basis.

  10. High efficiency coaxial klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator with a premodulation cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Renzhen; Teng Yan; Chen Changhua; Sun Jun

    2011-11-15

    The klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) combines the transition radiation with Cerenkov radiation and has demonstrated microwave output of high power and high efficiency. The coaxial slow wave structure device can produce microwave with a lower frequency in a smaller cross section. For the purpose of high efficiency, low frequency, and miniaturization, a coaxial klystron-like RBWO with a premodulation cavity is presented. Particle-in-cell simulations show that a microwave with power of 1.15 GW and frequency of 2.1 GHz is generated with conversion efficiency of 48%, whereas for the device with a reflector, the efficiency is 38%.

  11. Exoskeleton control for lower-extremity assistance based on adaptive frequency oscillators: adaptation of muscle activation and movement frequency.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Ollinger, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we analyze a novel strategy for assisting the lower extremities based on adaptive frequency oscillators. Our aim is to use the control algorithm presented here as a building block for the control of powered lower-limb exoskeletons. The algorithm assists cyclic movements of the human extremities by synchronizing actuator torques with the estimated net torque exerted by the muscles. Synchronization is produced by a nonlinear dynamical system combining an adaptive frequency oscillator with a form of adaptive Fourier analysis. The system extracts, in real time, the fundamental frequency component of the net muscle torque acting on a specific joint. Said component, nearly sinusoidal in shape, is the basis for the assistive torque waveform delivered by the exoskeleton. The action of the exoskeleton can be interpreted as a virtual reduction in the mechanical impedance of the leg. We studied the ability of human subjects to adapt their muscle activation to the assistive torque. Ten subjects swung their extended leg while coupled to a stationary hip joint exoskeleton. The experiment yielded a significant decrease, with respect to unassisted movement, of the activation levels of an agonist/antagonist pair of muscles controlling the hip joint's motion, which suggests the exoskeleton control has potential for assisting human gait. A moderate increase in swing frequency was observed as well. We theorize that the increase in frequency can be explained by the impedance model of the assisted leg. Per this model, subjects adjust their swing frequency in order to control the amount of reduction in net muscle torque. PMID:25655955

  12. High-Frequency Inductor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, L. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Finemet-type nanocrystalline alloy represents an advanced soft-magnetic metal-metal-type nanocomposite with an eddy-current-determined high- frequency limit. A survey of different heat treatments under tensile stress is presented to tailor the hysteresis loop by induced transversal anisotropy. The flattened loop having reduced effective permeability enhances the eddy- current limit in the MHz region; For example, continuous stress annealing in a tubular furnace of 1 m length at 650°C, pulling the ribbon with a velocity of 4 m/min under a tensile stress of 200 MPa, results in a wound core having a permeability of 120 and a frequency limit of 10 MHz. Careful annealing preserves the static coercivity below 10 A/m. The power loss at 0.1 T and 100 kHz is only 82 mW/cm3, which is an order of magnitude lower then the values obtained for Sendust™ cores in similar conditions.

  13. Low frequency electromagnetic oscillations in dense degenerate electron-positron pair plasma, with and without ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.; Ayub, M. K.; Ahmad, Ali

    2012-10-01

    Quantum plasma oscillations are studied in a strongly magnetized, ultra-dense plasma with degenerate electrons and positrons. The dispersive role of electron and positron quantum effects on low frequency (in comparison to electron cyclotron frequency) shear electromagnetic wave is investigated by employing hydrodynamic formulation. In the presence of ions, the density balance changes, and the electromagnetic wave (with frequency lower than the ion cyclotron frequency) is shown to couple with electrostatic ion mode under certain conditions. For such low frequency waves, it is also seen that the contribution of electron and positron degeneracy pressure is dominant as compared to their diffraction effects. The results are analyzed numerically for illustrative purpose pointing out their relevance to the dense laboratory (e.g., super-intense laser-dense matter interactions) and astrophysical plasmas.

  14. Low frequency electromagnetic oscillations in dense degenerate electron-positron pair plasma, with and without ions

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S. A.; Ayub, M. K.; Ahmad, Ali

    2012-10-15

    Quantum plasma oscillations are studied in a strongly magnetized, ultra-dense plasma with degenerate electrons and positrons. The dispersive role of electron and positron quantum effects on low frequency (in comparison to electron cyclotron frequency) shear electromagnetic wave is investigated by employing hydrodynamic formulation. In the presence of ions, the density balance changes, and the electromagnetic wave (with frequency lower than the ion cyclotron frequency) is shown to couple with electrostatic ion mode under certain conditions. For such low frequency waves, it is also seen that the contribution of electron and positron degeneracy pressure is dominant as compared to their diffraction effects. The results are analyzed numerically for illustrative purpose pointing out their relevance to the dense laboratory (e.g., super-intense laser-dense matter interactions) and astrophysical plasmas.

  15. Frequency Modulated Translocational Oscillations of Nrf2 Mediate the Antioxidant Response Element Cytoprotective Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mingzhan; Momiji, Hiroshi; Rabbani, Naila; Barker, Guy; Bretschneider, Till; Shmygol, Anatoly; Rand, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Stress responsive signaling coordinated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) provides an adaptive response for protection of cells against toxic insults, oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction. Nrf2 regulates a battery of protective genes by binding to regulatory antioxidant response elements (AREs). The aim of this study was to examine how Nrf2 signals cell stress status and regulates transcription to maintain homeostasis. Results: In live cell microscopy we observed that Nrf2 undergoes autonomous translocational frequency-modulated oscillations between cytoplasm and nucleus. Oscillations occurred in quiescence and when cells were stimulated at physiological levels of activators, they decrease in period and amplitude and then evoke a cytoprotective transcriptional response. We propose a mechanism whereby oscillations are produced by negative feedback involving successive de-phosphorylation and phosphorylation steps. Nrf2 was inactivated in the nucleus and reactivated on return to the cytoplasm. Increased frequency of Nrf2 on return to the cytoplasm with increased reactivation or refresh-rate under stress conditions activated the transcriptional response mediating cytoprotective effects. The serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5, member of the Nrf2 interactome, was a key regulatory component. Innovation: We found that Nrf2 is activated in cells without change in total cellular Nrf2 protein concentration. Regulation of ARE-linked protective gene transcription occurs rather through translocational oscillations of Nrf2. We discovered cytoplasmic refresh rate of Nrf2 is important in maintaining and regulating the transcriptional response and links stress challenge to increased cytoplasmic surveillance. We found silencing and inhibition of PGAM5 provides potent activation of Nrf2. Conclusion: Frequency modulated translocational oscillations of Nrf2 mediate the ARE-linked cytoprotective transcriptional response. Antioxid. Redox

  16. Inverse Bloch-oscillator: Strong Thz-photocurrent resonances at the Bloch frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Unterrainer, K.; Keay, B.J.; Wanke, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    We have observed resonant changes in the current-voltage characteristics of miniband semiconductor superlattices when the Bloch frequency is resonant with a terahertz field and its harmonics: the inverse Bloch oscillator effect. The resonant feature consists of a peak in the current which grows with increasing laser intensity accompanied by a decrease of the current at the low bias side. The peak position moves linearly with the laser frequency. When the intensity is increased further the first peak starts to decrease and a second peak at about twice the voltage of the first peak is observed due to a two photon resonance. At the highest intensities we observe up to a four photon resonance. A superlattice is expected to show negative differential conductance due to the strong nonparabolicity of the miniband. In this situation the carriers should undergo Bloch oscillations with a frequency {omega}{sub B} = eEd/h. Transient Bloch oscillations of photo excited carriers have been observed in time resolved Thz emission measurements. However, the possibility of Thz generation form a DC voltage biased superlattice is still under discussion. We have approached this problem by exploring the inverse Bloch oscillator effect in a superlattice excited by the Thz radiation form the UCSB FEL. The superlattice consists of 40 periods of 80{angstrom} GaAs wells and 20{angstrom} Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As barriers. To couple the electric field of the Terahertz radiation parallel to the growth direction a coplanar bowtie antenna has been employed. Our results show clearly that the external radiation couples to Bloch oscillations in contrary to theoretical suggestions that Thz radiation would not couple to a uniform Wannier Stark ladder. We conclude that this result is intimately related to dissipation and line broadening of the otherwise identical states in the ladder: absorption appears above the Wannier Stark splitting ({omega}{sub B}<{omega}) and gain below ({omega}{sub B}>{omega}).

  17. Design and implementation of a high power rf oscillator on a printed circuit board for multipole ion guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Raman; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2006-11-01

    Radio frequency (rf) oscillators are commonly used to drive electrodes of ion guides. In this article a rf oscillator circuit design and its implementation is presented. The printed circuit board for the rf oscillator is designed and fabricated. The performance of the circuit was tested to transfer ions through a hexapole in a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometer. A comprehensive discussion of several aspects of printed circuit board design for high power and high frequency circuits is presented.

  18. A Daily Oscillation in the Fundamental Frequency and Amplitude of Harmonic Syllables of Zebra Finch Song

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William E.; Osseward, Peter J.; Roseberry, Thomas K.; Perkel, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Complex motor skills are more difficult to perform at certain points in the day (for example, shortly after waking), but the daily trajectory of motor-skill error is more difficult to predict. By undertaking a quantitative analysis of the fundamental frequency (FF) and amplitude of hundreds of zebra finch syllables per animal per day, we find that zebra finch song follows a previously undescribed daily oscillation. The FF and amplitude of harmonic syllables rises across the morning, reaching a peak near mid-day, and then falls again in the late afternoon until sleep. This oscillation, although somewhat variable, is consistent across days and across animals and does not require serotonin, as animals with serotonergic lesions maintained daily oscillations. We hypothesize that this oscillation is driven by underlying physiological factors which could be shared with other taxa. Song production in zebra finches is a model system for studying complex learned behavior because of the ease of gathering comprehensive behavioral data and the tractability of the underlying neural circuitry. The daily oscillation that we describe promises to reveal new insights into how time of day affects the ability to accomplish a variety of complex learned motor skills. PMID:24312654

  19. Development of Sensory Gamma Oscillations and Cross-Frequency Coupling from Childhood to Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Raymond Y.; Walker, Christopher P.; Polizzotto, Nicola R.; Wozny, Thomas A.; Fissell, Catherine; Chen, Chi-Ming A.; Lewis, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of gamma oscillations in normal and disturbed cognition, there has been growing interest in their developmental trajectory. In the current study, age-related changes in sensory cortical gamma were studied using the auditory steady-state response (ASSR), indexing cortical activity entrained to a periodic auditory stimulus. A large sample (n = 188) aged 8–22 years had electroencephalography recording of ASSR during 20-, 30-, and 40-Hz click trains, analyzed for evoked amplitude, phase-locking factor (PLF) and cross-frequency coupling (CFC) with lower frequency oscillations. Both 40-Hz evoked power and PLF increased monotonically from 8 through 16 years, and subsequently decreased toward ages 20–22 years. CFC followed a similar pattern, with strongest age-related modulation of 40-Hz amplitude by the phase of delta oscillations. In contrast, the evoked power, PLF and CFC for the 20- and 30-Hz stimulation were distinct from the 40-Hz condition, with flat or decreasing profiles from childhood to early adulthood. The inverted U-shaped developmental trajectory of gamma oscillations may be consistent with interacting maturational processes—such as increasing fast GABA inhibition that enhances gamma activity and synaptic pruning that decreases gamma activity—that may continue from childhood through to adulthood. PMID:24334917

  20. Exploration of solid helium 4 at multiple frequencies using a compound torsional oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiderling, Michael C.

    Apparent but controversial evidence of supersolidity, a coexistence of crystalline and superfluid states, was observed in 2004. Samples of solid 4He were grown, in a chamber, inside a torsion oscillator (TO). The samples showed evidence of apparent decoupling from their container in the form of a resonant frequency increase of the TO as the temperature was lowered. We have developed a Compound torsion oscillator (CTO), with two resonant modes, that allows us to observe a single solid helium sample at two frequencies simultaneously. This thesis will cover the first comprehensive study on the frequency dependence of the apparent supersolid effect. This includes a study of the effect of varying 3He concentrations (x3) on the frequency dependence. Additionally a study on how changes in x3 affect the dissipation, which previous studies of x3 dependence have not explored. Also studied is how varying x3 affected the hysteresis first observed by Aoki et al. The CTO has allowed the exploration of the amplitude dependent effects in new ways. By exciting the sample at both frequencies simultaneously and varying the driving amplitude of one mode one can see how excitations at one mode affect what is observed at the other. The studies of the effects of varying x3 show results that are consistent with the dislocation movement model proposed by Iwasa. The collected data was not consistent with the simple supersolid model initially proposed. The studies of hysteresis show that the onset of hysteresis was dependent on x3 but was not frequency dependent. This lends credit to the hysteresis being due to the pinning and unpinning of 3He impurities. The studies of the effect of amplitude dependent effects show an asymmetry between the two frequencies. The higher frequency has a larger effect on the lower frequency than the lower frequency has on the higher. This is also inconsistent with the initial simple supersolid model.

  1. Spike-Mode Oscillation of a Single Frequency, Neodymium: YAG Ring Laser with Intracavity Second Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, George Jefferies

    Spike-mode oscillation of a single-frequency, internally-doubled Nd:YAG laser under conditions of square -wave pump modulation is a potentially interesting technique for increasing the average harmonic conversion efficiency. To investigate this mode of operation, we have designed and built a unidirectional, Nd:YAG ring laser prototype which is capable of single-longitudinal mode oscillation at pump powers which are substantially above threshold. Initial study of this laser with diode-laser-array pumping yielded a maximum continuous-wave (cw) 1064-nm output power of 72 mW at an optical conversion efficiency exceeding 14%. Intracavity second harmonic generation was studied by inserting a crystal of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) inside the resonator and replacing the infrared output coupler with a mirror which was highly reflecting at 1064 nm and had high transmission at the 532-nm second harmonic. A maximum cw harmonic output power of 12 mW was observed from the laser at a pump power of 473 mW. Spike-mode oscillation could be achieved in the intracavity-doubled laser through square wave current modulation of the diode laser pump. Under optimal conditions, the average harmonic conversion efficiency was increased by over 100% under spiked conditions. Spike-mode oscillation with significant intracavity nonlinear coupling was observed to differ substantially from that of laser without the nonlinear crystal. The power-dependent harmonic output coupling had the effect of damping out relaxation oscillations and substantially limiting the peak spiked power. It was also observed to increase the amplitude and temporal stability of the spike pulse train and significantly increase the frequency range over which spiked oscillation would occur. A set of coupled rate equations relating the single -mode intracavity field to the gain in the laser medium was used to model the spike-mode oscillations of the intracavity -doubled ring. Numerical methods were used to obtain solutions

  2. Distribution of Frequencies of Spontaneous Oscillations in Hair Cells of the Bullfrog Sacculus

    PubMed Central

    Ramunno-Johnson, D.; Strimbu, C.E.; Fredrickson, L.; Arisaka, K.; Bozovic, D.

    2009-01-01

    Under in vitro conditions, free-standing hair bundles of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) sacculus have exhibited spontaneous oscillations. We used a high-speed complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera to track the active movements of multiple hair cells in a single field of view. Our techniques enabled us to probe for correlations between pairs of cells, and to acquire records on over 100 actively oscillating bundles per epithelium. We measured the statistical distribution of oscillation periods of cells from different areas within the sacculus, and on different epithelia. Spontaneous oscillations exhibited a peak period of 33 ms (+29 ms, −14 ms) and uniform spatial distribution across the sacculus. PMID:19186151

  3. Fluidic low-frequency oscillator consisting of load-switched diverter and a pair of vortex chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesař, Václav; Peszynski, Kazimierz; Smyk, Emil

    2016-03-01

    Paper discusses a new configuration of fluidic oscillators, a subject of recent Patent application. There is some similarity with the standard Warren oscillator with its bistable jet-deflection diverter and two feedbacks - which is not suitable for situations demanding very low oscillation frequency. For these conditions the new design replaces jet-deflection switching in the diverter by load-switching effects, with the gradually increased loading by spin-up of fluid in the vortex chambers. The spin-up time also provides the needed time delays. Behaviour is characterised by the oscillation frequency increasing with increasing fluid flow rate - for which was derived a surprisingly simple theoretical solution.

  4. Dynamics of two populations of phase oscillators with different frequency distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Yu; Aoyagi, Toshio

    2016-07-01

    A large variety of rhythms are observed in nature. Rhythms such as electroencephalogram signals in the brain can often be regarded as interacting. In this study, we investigate the dynamical properties of rhythmic systems in two populations of phase oscillators with different frequency distributions. We assume that the average frequency ratio between two populations closely approximates some small integer. Most importantly, we adopt a specific coupling function derived from phase reduction theory. Under some additional assumptions, the system of two populations of coupled phase oscillators reduces to a low-dimensional system in the continuum limit. Consequently, we find chimera states in which clustering and incoherent states coexist. Finally, we confirm consistent behaviors of the derived low-dimensional model and the original model.

  5. Frequency multiplying oscillator with an electron beam accelerated in a drift space

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Kyu-Ha; Lee, Kitae; Hee Park, Seong; Uk Jeong, Young; Miginsky, S.

    2012-07-02

    In a uniform acceleration region, the behavior of a velocity-modulated electron beam has been analyzed using a particle-in-cell code. By making use of one of the accelerated harmonic components of the velocity-modulated electron beam, we demonstrate a frequency multiplying oscillator for a compact THz emitter, which employs multiple electron beams and a higher order mode resonator to modulate the electron beam without an additional driving source.

  6. High-frequency filtering of strong-motion records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas, J.; Boore, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of noise in strong-motion records is most problematic at low and high frequencies where the signal to noise ratio is commonly low compared to that in the mid-spectrum. The impact of low-frequency noise (5 Hz) on computed pseudo-absolute response spectral accelerations (PSAs). In contrast to the case of low-frequency noise our analysis shows that filtering to remove high-frequency noise is only necessary in certain situations and that PSAs can often be used up to 100 Hz even if much lower high-cut corner frequencies are required to remove the noise. This apparent contradiction can be explained by the fact that PSAs are often controlled by ground accelerations associated with much lower frequencies than the natural frequency of the oscillator because path and site attenuation (often modelled by Q and κ, respectively) have removed the highest frequencies. We demonstrate that if high-cut filters are to be used, then their corner frequencies should be selected on an individual basis, as has been done in a few recent studies.

  7. Membrane properties and the balance between excitation and inhibition control gamma-frequency oscillations arising from feedback inhibition.

    PubMed

    Economo, Michael N; White, John A

    2012-01-01

    Computational studies as well as in vivo and in vitro results have shown that many cortical neurons fire in a highly irregular manner and at low average firing rates. These patterns seem to persist even when highly rhythmic signals are recorded by local field potential electrodes or other methods that quantify the summed behavior of a local population. Models of the 30-80 Hz gamma rhythm in which network oscillations arise through 'stochastic synchrony' capture the variability observed in the spike output of single cells while preserving network-level organization. We extend upon these results by constructing model networks constrained by experimental measurements and using them to probe the effect of biophysical parameters on network-level activity. We find in simulations that gamma-frequency oscillations are enabled by a high level of incoherent synaptic conductance input, similar to the barrage of noisy synaptic input that cortical neurons have been shown to receive in vivo. This incoherent synaptic input increases the emergent network frequency by shortening the time scale of the membrane in excitatory neurons and by reducing the temporal separation between excitation and inhibition due to decreased spike latency in inhibitory neurons. These mechanisms are demonstrated in simulations and in vitro current-clamp and dynamic-clamp experiments. Simulation results further indicate that the membrane potential noise amplitude has a large impact on network frequency and that the balance between excitatory and inhibitory currents controls network stability and sensitivity to external inputs. PMID:22275859

  8. Characterization technique of optical whispering gallery mode resonators in the microwave frequency domain for optoelectronic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Merrer, Pierre-Henri; Saleh, Khaldoun; Llopis, Olivier; Berneschi, Simone; Cosi, Franco; Conti, Gualtiero Nunzi

    2012-07-10

    Optical Q factor measurements are performed on a whispering gallery mode (WGM) disk resonator using a microwave frequency domain approach instead of using an optical domain approach. An absence of hysteretic behavior and a better linearity are obtained when performing linewidth measurements by using a microwave modulation for scanning the resonances instead of the piezoelectric-based frequency tuning capability of the laser. The WGM resonator is then used to stabilize a microwave optoelectronic oscillator. The microwave output of this system generates a 12.48 GHz signal with -94 dBc/Hz phase noise at 10 kHz offset. PMID:22781250

  9. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  10. Special Aspects in Designing High - Frequency Betatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, A. A.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to designing the high - frequency betatron. In high - frequency betatron most important problem is overheating of the elements of the body radiator unit. In an article some directions of solving this problem are shown.

  11. High-precision buffer circuit for suppression of regenerative oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S.; Hare, David A.; Tcheng, Ping

    1995-01-01

    Precision analog signal conditioning electronics have been developed for wind tunnel model attitude inertial sensors. This application requires low-noise, stable, microvolt-level DC performance and a high-precision buffered output. Capacitive loading of the operational amplifier output stages due to the wind tunnel analog signal distribution facilities caused regenerative oscillation and consequent rectification bias errors. Oscillation suppression techniques commonly used in audio applications were inadequate to maintain the performance requirements for the measurement of attitude for wind tunnel models. Feedback control theory is applied to develop a suppression technique based on a known compensation (snubber) circuit, which provides superior oscillation suppression with high output isolation and preserves the low-noise low-offset performance of the signal conditioning electronics. A practical design technique is developed to select the parameters for the compensation circuit to suppress regenerative oscillation occurring when typical shielded cable loads are driven.

  12. High Precision Noise Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Eugene; Tobar, Michael

    2009-04-23

    We describe microwave noise measurement system capable of detecting the phase fluctuations of rms amplitude of 2{center_dot}10{sup -11} rad/{radical}(Hz). Such resolution allows the study of intrinsic fluctuations in various microwave components and materials, as well as precise tests of fundamental physics. Employing this system we discovered a previously unknown phenomenon of down-conversion of pump oscillator phase noise into the low-frequency voltage fluctuations.

  13. Realization of Ultra-High Spectral Purity with the Opto-Electronic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Steve; Maleki, Lute; Ji, Yu; Dick, John

    2000-01-01

    Recent results with the Opto-Electronic Oscillator (OEO) have led to the realization of very high spectral purity. Experimental results have produced a performance characterized by a noise as low as by -50 dBc/Hz at 10 Hz for a 10 GHz OEO. The unit was built in a compact package containing an integrated DFB laser and the modulator. This performance is significant because the oscillator is free running, and since the noise in an OEO is independent of the oscillation frequency, the same result can also be obtained at higher frequencies. The result also demonstrates that high frequency, high performance, low cost, and miniature OEO can be realized with the integrated photonic technology. We have also developed a novel carrier suppression technique to reduce the 1/f phase noise of the oscillator even further. The technique is based on the use of a long fiber delay, in place of the high Q cavity, to implement carrier suppression. Our preliminary experimental results indicate an extra 10 to 20 dB phase noise reduction of the OEO with this novel technique. Further noise reduction beyond this value is expected with improved circuit design and longer reference fiber.

  14. Submillimeter sources for radiometry using high power Indium Phosphide Gunn diode oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Naresh C.

    1990-01-01

    A study aimed at developing high frequency millimeter wave and submillimeter wave local oscillator sources in the 60-600 GHz range was conducted. Sources involved both fundamental and harmonic-extraction type Indium Phosphide Gunn diode oscillators as well as varactor multipliers. In particular, a high power balanced-doubler using varactor diodes was developed for 166 GHz. It is capable of handling 100 mW input power, and typically produced 25 mW output power. A high frequency tripler operating at 500 GHz output frequency was also developed and cascaded with the balanced-doubler. A dual-diode InP Gunn diode combiner was used to pump this cascaded multiplier to produce on the order of 0.5 mW at 500 GHz. In addition, considerable development and characterization work on InP Gunn diode oscillators was carried out. Design data and operating characteristics were documented for a very wide range of oscillators. The reliability of InP devices was examined, and packaging techniques to enhance the performance were analyzed. A theoretical study of a new class of high power multipliers was conducted for future applications. The sources developed here find many commercial applications for radio astronomy and remote sensing.

  15. Short-term changes in solar oscillation frequencies and solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, M. F.; Libbrecht, K. G.; Kuhn, J. R.; Murray, N.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the frequencies of solar rho-mode oscillations change significantly over periods as short as one month. These changes correlate significantly with variations in the strength of surface solar activity as measured by the average, over the sun's visible surface, of the magnitude of the line-of-sight magnetic field component from magnetograms. The frequency and mean magnetic variations are found to obey a linear relationship. It is seen that the mean frequency shift at any time depends on the history of solar activity over an interval of, at most, several months prior to the measurement and conclude that the dominant mechanism of the frequency shift is correlated with surface magnetic activity.

  16. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  17. High-frequency instability of the sheath-plasma resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    Coherent high frequency oscillations near the electron plasma frequency (omega approx. less than omega sub p) are generated by electrodes with positive dc bias immersed in a uniform Maxwellian afterglow plasma. The instability occurs at the sheath-plasma resonance and is driven by a negative RF sheath resistance associated with the electron inertia in the diode-like electron-rich sheath. With increasing dc bias, i.e., electron transit time, the instability exhibits a hard threshold, downward frequency pulling, line broadening and copious harmonics. The fundamental instability is a bounded oscillation due to wave evanescence, but the harmonics are radiated as electromagnetic waves from the electrodes acting like antennas. Wavelength and polarization measurements confirm the emission process. Electromagnetic waves are excited by electrodes of various geometries (planes, cylinders, spheres) which excludes other radiation mechanisms such as orbitrons or beam-plasma instabilities. The line broadening mechanism was identified as a frequency modulation via the electron transit time by dynamic ions. Ion oscillations at the sheath edge give rise to burst-like RF emissions. These laboratory observations of a new instability are important for antennas in space plasmas, generation of coherent beams with diodes, and plasma diagnostics.

  18. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  19. Correlations between Kilohertz Quasi-periodic Oscillations and Low-Frequency Features Attributed to Radial Oscillations and Diffusive Propagation in the Viscous Boundary Layer around a Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Osherovich, Vladimir

    1999-06-01

    We present a dimensional analysis of two characteristic timescales in the boundary layer where the disk adjusts to the rotating neutron star (NS). The boundary layer is treated as a transition region between the NS surface and the first Keplerian orbit. The radial transport of the angular momentum in this layer is controlled by a viscous force defined by the Reynolds number, which in turn is related to the mass accretion rate. We show that the observed low-Lorentzian frequency is associated with radial oscillations in the boundary layer, where the observed break frequency is determined by the characteristic diffusion time of the inward motion of the matter in the accretion flow. Predictions of our model regarding relations between those two frequencies and the frequencies of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) compare favorably with recent observations of the source 4U 1728-34. This Letter contains a theoretical classification of kHz QPOs in NS binaries and the related low-frequency features. Thus, results concerning the relationship between the low-Lorentzian frequency of viscous oscillations and the break frequency are presented in the framework of our model of kHz QPOs viewed as Keplerian oscillations in a rotating frame of reference.

  20. A Voltage Controlled Oscillator for a Phase-Locked Loop Frequency Synthesizer in a Silicon-on-Sapphire Process

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, Sean

    2009-05-21

    Engineers from a government-owned engineering and manufacturing facility were contracted by government-owned research laboratory to design and build an S-band telemetry transmitter using Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit (RFIC) technology packaged in a Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) Multi-Chip Module. The integrated circuit technology chosen for the Phase-Locked Loop Frequency Synthesizer portion of the telemetry transmitter was a 0.25 um CMOS process that utilizes a sapphire substrate and is fabricated by Peregrine Semiconductor corporation. This thesis work details the design of the Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) portion of the PLL frequency synthesizer and constitutes an fully integrated VCO core circuit and a high-isolation buffer amplifier. The high-isolation buffer amplifier was designed to provide 16 dB of gain for 2200-3495 MHz as well as 60 dB of isolation for the oscillator core to provide immunity to frequency pulling due to RF load mismatch. Actual measurements of the amplifier gain and isolation showed the gain was approximately 5 dB lower than the simulated gain when all bond-wire and test substrate parasitics were taken into account. The isolation measurements were shown to be 28 dB at the high end of the frequency band but the measurement was more than likely compromised due to the aforementioned bond-wire and test substrate parasitics. The S-band oscillator discussed in this work was designed to operate over a frequency range of 2200 to 2300 MHz with a minimum output power of 0 dBm with a phase-noise of -92 dBc/Hz at a 100 kHz offset from the carrier. The tuning range was measured to be from 2215 MHz to 2330 MHz with a minimum output power of -7 dBm over the measured frequency range. A phase-noise of -90 dBc was measured at a 100 kHz offset from the carrier.

  1. The 2.2 GHz Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) oscillator development Ku-band frequency source development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Two 2.2 GHz SAW oscillators using aluminum nitride on sapphire (AlN/Al2O3) delay lines were fabricated. The oscillators were electronically temperature compensated and characterized. One of the oscillators was used as the frequency reference for the Ku band source; the second oscillator is available for continued evaluation. A 15 GHz frequency source was designed and fabricated. The 15 GHz source consists of a Ku band FET oscillator which is phase locked to the frequency multiplied (X7) output of the 2.2 GHz SAW reference source. The Ku band source was built using microstrip circuit designs, which are hybrid compatible. Two wafer runs of 2.2 GHz TED devices were fabricated and evaluated. The devices were mounted on microstrip test substrates and evaluated as 15 GHz divide by 7 circuits. The device evaluation indicated that in their present form the TED is not a practical circuit element.

  2. Low-Frequency Flow Oscillations on Stalled Wings Exhibiting Cellular Separation Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disotell, Kevin James

    One of the most pervasive threats to aircraft controllability is wing stall, a condition associated with loss of lift due to separation of air flow from the wing surface at high angles of attack. A recognized need for improved upset recovery training in extended-envelope flight simulators is a physical understanding of the post-stall aerodynamic environment, particularly key flow phenomena which influence the vehicle trajectory. Large-scale flow structures known as stall cells, which scale with the wing chord and are spatially-periodic along the span, have been previously observed on post-stall airfoils with trailing-edge separation present. Despite extensive documentation of stall cells in the literature, the physical mechanisms behind their formation and evolution have proven to be elusive. The undertaken study has sought to characterize the inherently turbulent separated flow existing above the wing surface with cell formation present. In particular, the question of how the unsteady separated flow may interact with the wing to produce time-averaged cellular surface patterns is considered. Time-resolved, two-component particle image velocimetry measurements were acquired at the plane of symmetry of a single stall cell formed on an extruded NACA 0015 airfoil model at chord Reynolds number of 560,000 to obtain insight into the time-dependent flow structure. The evolution of flow unsteadiness was analyzed over a static angle-of-attack range covering the narrow post-stall regime in which stall cells have been observed. Spectral analysis of velocity fields acquired near the stall angle confirmed a low-frequency flow oscillation previously detected in pointwise surface measurements by Yon and Katz (1998), corresponding to a Strouhal number of 0.042 based on frontal projected chord height. Probability density functions of the streamwise velocity component were used to estimate the convective speed of this mode at approximately half the free-stream velocity, in agreement

  3. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz. PMID:12071247

  4. High-frequency multi-wavelength acoustic power maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Frank; Ladenkov, Oleg; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic power maps have been constructed using SOHO/MDI velocity and intensity data in Ni I 6768; NSO High-L Helioseismometer (HLH) Ca K intensity; and Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON) intensity in Ca K. The HLH data provides maps up to a frequency of 11.9 mHz, substantially higher than the usual 8.33 mHz. The Ca K observations show a surprising strong enhancement of power within a sunspot at all temporal frequencies, while the Ni I data show the well-known suppression of power. Tests suggest that this apparent acoustic enhancement is the result of strong intensity gradients observed through terrestrial seeing.

  5. Soliton of Bose-Einstein condensate in a trap with rapidly oscillating walls: II. Analysis of the soliton behavior upon a decrease in the wall oscillation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veretenov, N. A.; Vysotina, N. V.; Nesterov, L. A.; Rosanov, N. N.

    2016-01-01

    This work is a continuation of our study [1], in which a two-scale analytical approach to the investigation of a soliton oscillon in a trap with rapidly oscillating walls has been developed. In terms of this approach, the solution to the equation of motion of the soliton center is sought as a series expansion in powers of a small parameter, which is a ratio of the intrinsic frequency of slow soliton oscillations to the frequency of fast trap wall oscillations. In [1], we have examined the case ɛ ≪ 1, in which, to describe the motion of the soliton, it is sufficient to restrict the consideration to the zero approximation of the sought solution. However, when the frequency of wall oscillations begins to decrease, while the parameter begins to increase, it is necessary to take into account corrections to the zero approximation. In this work, we have calculated corrections of the first and second orders in to this approximation. We have shown that, with an increase in, the role played by the corrections related to fast oscillations of the trap walls increases, which results in a complex shape of the envelope of oscillations of the soliton center. It follows from our calculations that, if the difference between the amplitudes of wall oscillations is not too large, the analytical solution of the equation of motion of the soliton center will coincide very well with the numerical solution. However, with an increase in this difference, as well as with a decrease in the wall oscillation frequency, the discrepancy between the numerical and analytical solutions generally begins to increase. Regimes of irregular oscillations of the soliton center arise. With a decrease in the frequency of wall oscillations, the instability boundary shows a tendency toward a smaller difference between the wall oscillation amplitudes. In general, this leads to enlargement of the range of irregular regimes. However, at the same time, stability windows can arise in this range in which the

  6. MEG sensor and source measures of visually induced gamma-band oscillations are highly reliable.

    PubMed

    Tan, H-R M; Gross, J; Uhlhaas, P J

    2016-08-15

    High frequency brain oscillations are associated with numerous cognitive and behavioral processes. Non-invasive measurements using electro-/magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG) have revealed that high frequency neural signals are heritable and manifest changes with age as well as in neuropsychiatric illnesses. Despite the extensive use of EEG/MEG-measured neural oscillations in basic and clinical research, studies demonstrating test-retest reliability of power and frequency measures of neural signals remain scarce. Here, we evaluated the test-retest reliability of visually induced gamma (30-100Hz) oscillations derived from sensor and source signals acquired over two MEG sessions. The study required participants (N=13) to detect the randomly occurring stimulus acceleration while viewing a moving concentric grating. Sensor and source MEG measures of gamma-band activity yielded comparably strong reliability (average intraclass correlation, ICC=0.861). Peak stimulus-induced gamma frequency (53-72Hz) yielded the highest measures of stability (ICCsensor=0.940; ICCsource=0.966) followed by spectral signal change (ICCsensor=0.890; ICCsource=0.893) and peak frequency bandwidth (ICCsensor=0.856; ICCsource=0.622). Furthermore, source-reconstruction significantly improved signal-to-noise for spectral amplitude of gamma activity compared to sensor estimates. Our assessments highlight that both sensor and source derived estimates of visually induced gamma-band oscillations from MEG signals are characterized by high test-retest reliability, with source derived oscillatory measures conferring an improvement in the stability of peak-frequency estimates. Importantly, our finding of high test-retest reliability supports the feasibility of pharma-MEG studies and longitudinal aging or clinical studies. PMID:27153980

  7. Recent Developments in the Analysis of Couple Oscillator Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation considers linear arrays of coupled oscillators. Our purpose in coupling oscillators together is to achieve high radiated power through the spatial power combining which results when the oscillators are injection locked to each other. York, et. al. have shown that, left to themselves, the ensemble of injection locked oscillators oscillate at the average of the tuning frequencies of all the oscillators. Coupling these arrays achieves high radiated power through coherent spatial power combining. The coupled oscillators are usually designed to produce constant aperture phase. Oscillators are injection locked to each other or to a master oscillator to produce coherent radiation. Oscillators do not necessarily oscillate at their tuning frequency.

  8. LOW-FREQUENCY OSCILLATIONS IN GLOBAL SIMULATIONS OF BLACK HOLE ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, Sean M.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Coleman Miller, M.; Sorathia, Kareem A.

    2011-08-01

    We have identified the presence of large-scale, low-frequency dynamo cycles in a long-duration, global, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of black hole accretion. Such cycles have previously been seen in local shearing box simulations, but we discuss their evolution over 1500 inner disk orbits of a global {pi}/4 disk wedge spanning two orders of magnitude in radius and seven scale heights in elevation above/below the disk midplane. The observed cycles manifest themselves as oscillations in azimuthal magnetic field occupying a region that extends into a low-density corona several scale heights above the disk. The cycle frequencies are 10-20 times lower than the local orbital frequency, making them potentially interesting sources of low-frequency variability when scaled to real astrophysical systems. Furthermore, power spectra derived from the full time series reveal that the cycles manifest themselves at discrete, narrowband frequencies that often share power across broad radial ranges. We explore possible connections between these simulated cycles and observed low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (LFQPOs) in galactic black hole binary systems, finding that dynamo cycles have the appropriate frequencies and are located in a spatial region associated with X-ray emission in real systems. Derived observational proxies, however, fail to feature peaks with rms amplitudes comparable to LFQPO observations, suggesting that further theoretical work and more sophisticated simulations will be required to form a complete theory of dynamo-driven LFQPOs. Nonetheless, this work clearly illustrates that global MHD dynamos exhibit quasi-periodic behavior on timescales much longer than those derived from test particle considerations.

  9. Measurement of acoustic glitches in solar-type stars from oscillation frequencies observed by Kepler

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumdar, A.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Cunha, M. S.; Ballot, J.; Antia, H. M.; Basu, S.; Houdek, G.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Verner, G. A.; Chaplin, W. J.; Sanderfer, D. T.; Seader, S. E.; Smith, J. C.

    2014-02-10

    For the very best and brightest asteroseismic solar-type targets observed by Kepler, the frequency precision is sufficient to determine the acoustic depths of the surface convective layer and the helium ionization zone. Such sharp features inside the acoustic cavity of the star, which we call acoustic glitches, create small oscillatory deviations from the uniform spacing of frequencies in a sequence of oscillation modes with the same spherical harmonic degree. We use these oscillatory signals to determine the acoustic locations of such features in 19 solar-type stars observed by the Kepler mission. Four independent groups of researchers utilized the oscillation frequencies themselves, the second differences of the frequencies and the ratio of the small and large separation to locate the base of the convection zone and the second helium ionization zone. Despite the significantly different methods of analysis, good agreement was found between the results of these four groups, barring a few cases. These results also agree reasonably well with the locations of these layers in representative models of the stars. These results firmly establish the presence of the oscillatory signals in the asteroseismic data and the viability of several techniques to determine the location of acoustic glitches inside stars.

  10. Low-frequency oscillations in precipitation, temperature, and runoff on a west facing mountain front: A hydrogeologic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shun, Tongying; Duffy, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the space-time patterns of annual, interannual, and decadal components of precipitation, temperature, and runoff (P-T-R) using long-record time series across the steep topographic gradient of the Wasatch Front in northern Utah. This region forms the major drainage area to the Great Salt Lake. The approach is to use multichannel singular spectrum analysis as a means of detecting dominant oscillations and spatial patterns in the data and to discuss the relation to the unique mountain and basin hydrologic setting. Results of the analysis show that high-elevation runoff is dominated by the annual and seasonal harmonics, while low-elevation runoff exhibits strong interannual and decadal oscillations. For precipitation and temperature, only the annual/seasonal spectral peaks were found to be significantly different from the underlying noise floor, and these components increase with altitude similar to the mean orographic pattern. Spectral peaks in runoff show a more complex pattern with altitude, with increasing low-frequency components at intermediate and lower elevation. This pattern is then discussed in terms of basin storage effects and groundwater-stream interaction. A conceptual hydrogeologic model for the mountain and basin system proposes how losing streams and deep upwelling groundwater in the alluvial aquifer could explain the strong low-frequency component in streams entering the Great Salt Lake. The phase-plane trajectories of the dominant components for P-T-R are reconstructed as a function of altitude showing the relation of hydrogeologic conditions to the strongest oscillations in mountain runoff and discharge to the Great Salt Lake. The paper shows that weak interannual and decadal oscillations in the climate signal are strengthened where groundwater discharge dominates streamflow.

  11. Frequency spectrum of transepithelial potential difference reveals transport-related oscillations.

    PubMed

    Montalbetti, Nicolás; Fischbarg, Jorge

    2009-09-16

    How epithelia transport fluid is a fundamental issue that is unresolved. Explanations offered include molecular engines, local transcellular osmosis, local paracellular osmosis, and paracellular fluid transport. On the basis of experimental and theoretical work done on corneal endothelium, a fluid transporting epithelium, we suggest electroosmotic coupling at the level of the intercellular junctions driven by the transendothelial electrical potential difference as an explanation of paracellular fluid transport. We collect frequency spectra of that potential difference in real-time. For what we believe is the first time for any epithelium, we report that, unexpectedly, the potential difference displays oscillations at many characteristic frequencies. We also show that on both stimulating cell activity and inhibiting ion transport mechanisms, there are corresponding changes in the oscillations amplitudes that mirror changes known previously in rates of fluid transport. We believe these findings provide a novel tool to study the kinetics of electrogenic elements such as channels and transporters, which from this evidence would give rise to current oscillations with characteristic periods going from 150 ms to 8 s. PMID:19751657

  12. Temporal expectation enhances contrast sensitivity by phase entrainment of low-frequency oscillations in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    CRAVO, André M.; ROHENKOHL, Gustavo; WYART, Valentin; NOBRE, Anna C.

    2013-01-01

    Although it is increasingly accepted that temporal expectation can modulate early perceptual processing, the underlying neural computations remain unknown. In the present study, we combined a psychophysical paradigm with electrophysiological recordings to investigate the putative contribution of low-frequency oscillatory activity in mediating the modulation of visual perception by temporal expectation. Human participants judged the orientation of brief targets (visual Gabor patterns tilted clockwise or counter-clockwise) embedded within temporally regular or irregular streams of noise-patches used as temporal cues. Psychophysical results indicated that temporal expectation enhanced the contrast sensitivity of visual targets. A diffusion model indicated that rhythmic temporal expectation modulated the signal-to-noise gain of visual processing. The concurrent electrophysiological data revealed that the phase of delta oscillations overlying human visual cortex (1 to 4 Hz) was predictive of the quality of target processing only in regular streams of events. Moreover, in the regular condition, the optimum phase of these perception-predictive oscillations occurred in anticipation of the expected events. Together, these results show a strong correspondence between psychophysical and neurophysiological data, suggesting that the phase entrainment of low-frequency oscillations to external sensory cues can serve as an important and flexible mechanism for enhancing sensory processing. PMID:23447609

  13. Slime mould logic gates based on frequency changes of electrical potential oscillation.

    PubMed

    Whiting, James G H; de Lacy Costello, Ben P J; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Physarum polycephalum is a large single amoeba cell, which in its plasmodial phase, forages and connects nearby food sources with protoplasmic tubes. The organism forages for food by growing these tubes towards detected foodstuff, this foraging behaviour is governed by simple rules of photoavoidance and chemotaxis. The electrical activity of the tubes oscillates, creating a peristaltic like action within the tubes, forcing cytoplasm along the lumen; the frequency of this oscillation controls the speed and direction of growth. External stimuli such as light and food cause changes in the oscillation frequency. We demonstrate that using these stimuli as logical inputs we can approximate logic gates using these tubes and derive combinational logic circuits by cascading the gates, with software analysis providing the output of each gate and determining the input of the following gate. Basic gates OR, AND and NOT were correct 90%, 77.8% and 91.7% of the time respectively. Derived logic circuits XOR, half adder and full adder were 70.8%, 65% and 58.8% accurate respectively. Accuracy of the combinational logic decreases as the number of gates is increased, however they are at least as accurate as previous logic approximations using spatial growth of P. polycephalum and up to 30 times as fast at computing the logical output. The results shown here demonstrate a significant advancement in organism-based computing, providing a solid basis for hybrid computers of the future. PMID:25102081

  14. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  15. Mechanisms underlying very-low-frequency RR-interval oscillations in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Carr, D. L.; Myers, C. W.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival of post-myocardial infarction patients is related inversely to their levels of very-low-frequency (0.003 to 0.03 Hz) RR-interval variability. The physiological basis for such oscillations is unclear. In our study, we used blocking drugs to evaluate potential contributions of sympathetic and vagal mechanisms and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system to very-low-frequency RR-interval variability in 10 young healthy subjects. METHODS AND RESULTS: We recorded RR intervals and arterial pressures during three separate sessions, with the patient in supine and 40 degree upright tilt positions, during 20-minute frequency (0.25 Hz) and tidal volume-controlled breathing after intravenous injections: saline (control), atenolol (0.2 mg/kg, beta-adrenergic blockade), atropine sulfate (0.04 mg/kg, parasympathetic blockade), atenolol and atropine (complete autonomic blockade), and enalaprilat (0.02 mg/kg, ACE blockade). We integrated fast Fourier transform RR-interval spectral power at very low (0.003 to 0.03 Hz), low (0.05 to 0. 15 Hz), and respiratory (0.2 to 0.3 Hz) frequencies. Beta-adrenergic blockade had no significant effect on very-low- or low-frequency RR-interval power but increased respiratory frequency power 2-fold. ACE blockade had no significant effect on low or respiratory frequency RR-interval power but modestly (approximately 21%) increased very-low-frequency power in the supine (but not upright tilt) position (P<0.05). The most profound effects were exerted by parasympathetic blockade: Atropine, given alone or with atenolol, abolished nearly all RR-interval variability and decreased very-low-frequency variability by 92%. CONCLUSIONS: Although very-low-frequency heart period rhythms are influenced by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, as low and respiratory frequency RR-interval rhythms, they depend primarily on the presence of parasympathetic outflow. Therefore the prognostic value of very-low-frequency heart period oscillations may

  16. Spontaneous and forced oscillations of cell membrane of normal human erythrocytes: absence of resonance frequencies in a range of 0.03-500 Hz.

    PubMed

    Kononenko, V L; Shimkus, J K

    2000-01-01

    The spectra of natural oscillations of human erythrocyte cell membranes were studied experimentally and theoretically. The measurements were carried out at room temperature for both single normal cells and erythrocyte rouleaux in a range of 0.03-500 Hz. The spectra were measured at a resolution better than 1% using two techniques: registration of spontaneous membrane oscillations induced by thermal agitation in the surrounding medium and registration of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the forced oscillations of erythrocyte elongation induced by a high-frequency electric field with the amplitude harmonic modulation. The spectra measured by both techniques had no resonance frequencies and decreased monotonically with the frequency increase. These results are confirmed by the theory developed for the extracellular excitation mechanisms of membrane oscillations. The spectra of active oscillatory biomechanical processes were measured for comparison. These processes are ciliary beating of human bronchial epithelium and ciliary beating and artificial periodic contractions of the cytoplasm of the ciliate Spirostomum ambiguum. The quality of the resonance lines of the order of 10-20 registered may serve as estimates for the line width in search of the resonance oscillations in erythrocytes induced by active cell processes. PMID:11368497

  17. A study on the high-order mode oscillation in a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying-Hui; Niu, Xin-Jian; Jia, Nan; Li, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Hui; Cheng, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Chuan; Duan, Yaoyong

    2016-07-01

    The high-order mode oscillation is studied in designing a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier. The reason for the oscillation caused by high-order modes and a method to suppress these kinds of spurious modes are found through theoretical analyses and the study on the influence of major parameters of a high frequency structure (such as the oscillation frequency of cavities, the cavity Q value, the length of drift tube section, and the characteristic impedance). Based on much simulation, a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier with a superior performance has been designed, built, and tested. An output power of 2.22 GW corresponding to 27.4% efficiency and 61 dB gain has been obtained. Moreover, the high-order mode oscillation is suppressed effectively, and an output power of 1.95 GW corresponding to 26% efficiency and 62 dB gain has been obtained in our laboratory.

  18. Space applications of superconductivity - Resonators for high stability oscillators and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    The potential applications of superconductivity in space are examined. It is shown that superconducting oscillators have achieved better frequency stability that any other device for averaging times of 10 s to 1000 s. Such a high stability results from the use of solid niobium resonators having Q factors greater that 10 to the 10th. Oscillators of this type have direct applications as clocks and spectrally pure sources. In addition, they may also be used for accurate measurements of many physical quantities and to perform a variety of experiments on fundamental constants, relativity, and gravity waves.

  19. Theory and simulation of high-power microwave generation in a magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Raymond W.; Clark, Collins M.

    1987-10-01

    The magnetically insulated transmission line (MITE-LINE) oscillator is an electron beam diode comprised of a field emitting cathode and a corrugated anode. The device is similar to a linear magnetron except that the insulating magnetic field is self-generated. The self-insulating property makes this device a robust high-power microwave tube. Using the thin-beam approximation a dispersion relation for a cylindrical MITE-LINE oscillator is derived. The dispersion relation is used to predict frequency and growth rate of the microwave generating instability. Analytical results are compared with CCUBE particle simulations.

  20. Theory and simulation of high-power microwave generation in a magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, R.W.; Collins Clark, M.

    1987-10-15

    The magnetically insulated transmission line (MITE-LINE) oscillator is an electron beam diode comprised of a field emitting cathode and a corrugated anode. The device is similar to a linear magnetron except that the insulating magnetic field is self-generated. The self-insulating property makes this device a robust high-power microwave tube. Using the thin-beam approximation we have derived a dispersion relation for a cylindrical MITE-LINE oscillator. The dispersion relation is used to predict frequency and growth rate of the microwave generating instability. Analytical results are compared with c-smcapsc-smcapsu-smcapsb-smcapse-smcaps particle simulations.

  1. Frequency modulated translocational oscillations of Nrf2, a transcription factor functioning like a wireless sensor.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mingzhan; Momiji, Hiroshi; Rabbani, Naila; Bretschneider, Till; Rand, David A; Thornalley, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    The discovery that nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) undergoes translocational oscillations from cytoplasm to nucleus in human cells with frequency modulation linked to activation of a stress-stimulated cytoprotective response raises the prospect that the Nrf2 works mechanistically analogous to a wireless sensor. Herein, we consider how this new model of Nrf2 oscillation resolves previous inexplicable experimental findings on Nrf2 regulation and why it is fit-for-purpose. Further investigation is required to assess how generally applicable the oscillatory mechanism is and if characteristics of this regulatory control can be found in vivo. It suggests there are multiple, potentially re-enforcing receptors for Nrf2 activation, indicating that potent Nrf2 activation for improved health and treatment of disease may be achieved through combination of Nrf2 system stimulants. PMID:26551710

  2. Tunable femtosecond laser in the visible range with an intracavity frequency-doubled optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang-Feng; Xu, Liang; Lin, Qing-Feng; Zhong, Xin; Han, Hai-Nian; Wei, Zhi-Yi

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrated experimentally a synchronously pumped intracavity frequency-doubled femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) using a periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN) as the nonlinear material in combination with a lithium triborate (LBO) as the doubling crystal. A Kerr-lens-mode-locked (KLM) Ti:sapphire oscillator at the wavelength of 790 nm was used as the pump source, which was capable of generating pulses with a duration as short as 117 fs. A tunable femtosecond laser covering the 624-672 nm range was realized by conveniently adjusting the OPO cavity length. A maximum average output power of 260 mW in the visible range was obtained at the pump power of 2.2 W, with a typical pulse duration of 205 fs assuming a sech2 pulse profile.

  3. Determination of delayed neutrons source in the frequency domain based on in-pile oscillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yedvab, Y.; Reiss, I.; Bettan, M.; Harari, R.; Grober, A.; Ettedgui, H.; Caspi, E. N.

    2006-07-01

    A method for determining delayed neutrons source in the frequency domain based on measuring power oscillations in a non-critical reactor is presented. This method is unique in the sense that the delayed neutrons source is derived from the dynamic behavior of the reactor, which serves as the measurement system. An algorithm for analyzing power oscillation measurements was formulated, which avoids the need for a multi-parameter non-linear fit process used by other methods. Using this algorithm results of two sets of measurements performed in IRR-I and IRR-II (Israeli Research Reactors I and II) are presented. The agreement between measured values from both reactors and calculated values based on Keepin (and JENDL-3.3) group parameters is very good. (authors)

  4. Widely tunable opto-electronic oscillator based on a dual frequency laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxin, J.; Saleh, K.; Pillet, G.; Morvan, L.; Llopis, O.; Dolfi, D.

    2013-03-01

    We present the stabilization of the beatnote of an Er,Yb:glass Dual Frequency Laser at 1.53 μm with optical fiber delay lines. Instead of standard optoelectronics oscillators, this architecture does not need RF filter and offers a wide tunability from 2.5 to 5.5 GHz. Thank to a fine analysis of the laser RIN to phase noise conversion in the photodiodes, the expected RF-amplifiers noise limit is reached with a phase noise power spectral density of -25 dBc/Hz at 10 Hz (respectively -110 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz) from the carrier over the whole tuning range. Implementation of a double fiber coil architecture improves the oscillator spectral purity: the phase noise reaches a level of -35 dBc/Hz at 10 Hz (respectively -112 dBc/Hz respectively 10 kHz) from the carrier.

  5. Solar-stellar connection: the frequency of maximum oscillation power from solar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barban, C.; Beuret, M.; Baudin, F.; Belkacem, K.; Goupil, M. J.; Samadi, R.

    2013-06-01

    Stellar oscillations provide powerful tools to derive stellar fundamental parameters such as the mass and radius. These global quantities are derived from scaling relations linking seismic quantities [νmax and Δν to global stellar parameters. These relations use the Sun as a reference. In this work, we used VIRGO and GOLF data to study how the solar frequency at the maximum oscillation power (νmax) varies with time along the solar cycle. We show that these variations imply differences of about 4% in radius and 12% in mass. We showed also that the observational method based on intensity or velocity data has also an impact, implying differences in mass of about 22% and 7% in radius.

  6. Frequency-agile terahertz-wave parametric oscillator in a ring-cavity configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamide, Hiroaki; Ikari, Tomofumi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2009-12-01

    We demonstrate a frequency-agile terahertz wave parametric oscillator (TPO) in a ring-cavity configuration (ring-TPO). The TPO consists of three mirrors and a MgO:LiNbO3 crystal under noncollinear phase-matching conditions. A novel, fast frequency-tuning method was realized by controlling a mirror of the three-mirror ring cavity. The wide tuning range between 0.93 and 2.7 THz was accomplished. For first demonstration using the ring-TPO, terahertz spectroscopy was performed as the verification of the frequency-agile performance, measuring the transmission spectrum of the monosaccharide glucose. The spectrum was obtained within about 8 s in good comparison to those of Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

  7. Beam-loaded frequency shift study in an over-sized backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhenghong; Zhou, Zhigang; Qiu, Rong

    2014-10-15

    The oversized backward wave oscillator (BWO) can significantly decreases the internal rf electric field in the device. The beam-loaded effect is obvious in such devices and its performance is also significantly affected. Based on the characteristics of the oversized BWO, a self-consistent equation is developed to study its beam-loaded frequency shift together with particle in cell (PIC) simulations. The mechanism whereby the output rf frequency is affected by the beam's parameters and the device's structure is theoretically studied. The frequency's dependence on the drift tube length between the reflector and SWS (slow wave structures) in the device is deduced in the paper and the theoretical results agree with those obtained in PIC simulations.

  8. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-01-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology. PMID:26976199

  9. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2016-03-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology.

  10. Frequency and amplitude modulation of ultra-compact terahertz quantum cascade lasers using an integrated avalanche diode oscillator.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2016-01-01

    Mode-locked comb sources operating at optical frequencies underpin applications ranging from spectroscopy and ultrafast physics, through to absolute frequency measurements and atomic clocks. Extending their operation into the terahertz frequency range would greatly benefit from the availability of compact semiconductor-based sources. However, the development of any compact mode-locked THz laser, which itself is inherently a frequency comb, has yet to be achieved without the use of an external stimulus. High-power, electrically pumped quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have recently emerged as a promising solution, owing to their octave spanning bandwidths, the ability to achieve group-velocity dispersion compensation and the possibility of obtaining active mode-locking. Here, we propose an unprecedented compact architecture to induce both frequency and amplitude self-modulation in a THz QCL. By engineering a microwave avalanche oscillator into the laser cavity, which provides a 10 GHz self-modulation of the bias current and output power, we demonstrate multimode laser emission centered around 3 THz, with distinct multiple sidebands. The resulting microwave amplitude and frequency self-modulation of THz QCLs opens up intriguing perspectives, for engineering integrated self-mode-locked THz lasers, with impact in fields such as nano- and ultrafast photonics and optical metrology. PMID:26976199

  11. On the lack of correlation between X-ray flux and kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catmabacak, Onur; Hakan Erkut, M.

    2016-07-01

    We study the so-called "parallel tracks" phenomenon, which arises from the observation that kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies correlate with X-ray flux on short time scales (less than a day) while there seems to be no correlation at all on longer time scales (more than a day). The oscillatory modes with frequency bands determined by the radial epicyclic frequency in the magnetic boundary region between the disk and the neutron star magnetosphere are likely to be the origin of these high frequency QPOs. Within the boundary region model, we provide a possible explanation for the parallel track phenomenon taking into account the variation of the model parameters such as the rotation frequency of the innermost disk matter and the radial extension of the boundary region. In addition to the mass, radius, and magnetic field of the neutron star, the frequency bands of oscillatory modes depend on mass accretion rate through these model parameters as well. Using the aspect ratio of the disk, which actually depends on mass accretion rate, we estimate the radial width of the boundary region and its variation on long and short time scales to reproduce the parallel tracks in accordance with observations. We repeat the analysis for a wide range of neutron star masses, radii, and magnetic field strengths in order to understand the effects of these parameters on our results.

  12. Terahertz imaging system using high-Tc superconducting oscillation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, M.; Minami, H.; Delfanazari, K.; Sawamura, M.; Nakayama, R.; Kitamura, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Kashiwagi, T.; Hattori, T.; Kadowaki, K.

    2012-06-01

    Microwatt power oscillation devices at sub-terahertz frequency region between 0.3 and 1.0 terahertz (THz) were fabricated from high-Tc superconducting single crystalline Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and used as a source of the transmission terahertz imaging system. As test examples, terahertz images of coins and a razor blade placed inside the brownish paper envelopes with the spatial resolution of 1 mm are presented. The signal-to-noise ratio exceeds 130 in these images. Using a simple wedge-shaped interferometer and analysing the interference fringe pattern, the wavelength of the terahertz wave is calibrated within 0.1% accuracy. This interferometer also provides a simple method to measure the absorption coefficient of the liquid sample. Two test measurements for distilled water and ethanol are demonstrated and their absorption coefficients are obtained with 99.2% accuracy. This suggests that our terahertz imaging system can be applied to many practical applications, such as biological and biomedical imaging, environmental monitoring, microanalysis of impurities, structure and dynamical analyses of large molecules and ions in solution.

  13. Characterization of the Individual Short-Term Frequency Stability of Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillators at the 10(-16) Level.

    PubMed

    Fluhr, Christophe; Grop, Serge; Dubois, Benoit; Kersale, Yann; Rubiola, Enrico; Giordano, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    We present the characterization of three cryogenic sapphire oscillators (CSOs) using the three-cornered-hat method. Easily implemented with commercial components and instruments, this method reveals itself very useful to analyze the fractional frequency stability limitations of these state-of-the-art ultrastable oscillators. The best unit presents a fractional frequency stability better than 5 ×10(-16) at 1 s and below 2 ×10(-16) for [Formula: see text]. PMID:27076408

  14. High-energy terahertz wave parametric oscillator with a surface-emitted ring-cavity configuration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Xu, Wentao; Duan, Pan; Yan, Chao; Tang, Longhuang; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-05-15

    A surface-emitted ring-cavity terahertz (THz) wave parametric oscillator has been demonstrated for high-energy THz output and fast frequency tuning in a wide frequency range. Through the special optical design with a galvano-optical scanner and four-mirror ring-cavity structure, the maximum THz wave output energy of 12.9 μJ/pulse is achieved at 1.359 THz under the pump energy of 172.8 mJ. The fast THz frequency tuning in the range of 0.7-2.8 THz can be accessed with the step response of 600 μs. Moreover, the maximum THz wave output energy from this configuration is 3.29 times as large as that obtained from the conventional surface-emitted THz wave parametric oscillator with the same experimental conditions. PMID:27176978

  15. High frequency gyrokinetic particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, R. A.; Lee, W. W.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.

    2007-07-15

    The gyrokinetic approach for arbitrary frequency dynamics in magnetized plasmas is explored, using the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory. Contrary to low-frequency gyrokinetics, which views each particle as a rigid charged ring, arbitrary frequency response of a particle is described by a quickly changing Kruskal ring. This approach allows the separation of gyrocenter and gyrophase responses and thus allows for, in many situations, larger time steps for the gyrocenter push than for the gyrophase push. The gyrophase response which determines the shape of Kruskal rings can be described by a Fourier series in gyrophase for some problems, thus allowing control over the cyclotron harmonics at which the plasma responds. A computational algorithm for particle-in-cell simulation based on this concept has been developed. An example of the ion Bernstein wave is used to illustrate its numerical properties, and comparison with a direct Lorentz-force approach is presented.

  16. Frequency Stability of 1X10(sup -13) in a compensated Saphirre Oscillator Operating Above 77K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Santiago, David G.; Wang, Rabi T.

    1996-01-01

    We report on tests of a compensated saphirre oscillator (CS) which shows frequency-stable operation at temperatures above 77k.The frequency stability for this oscillator shows an apparent flicker floor of 7.5X10(sup -14) for measuring times between 3 and 10 seconds, and stability is better than 2X10(sup -13) for all measuring times between 10 and 100 seconds... Frequency sensitivities os the microwave sapphire resonator to temperature and temperature rate have been characterized, and a careful analysis of several aspects of the ac frequency-lock.

  17. Measurement of the Fundamental Thermal Noise Limit in a Cryogenic Sapphire Frequency Standard Using Bimodal Maser Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Benmessai, Karim; Kersale, Yann; Giordano, Vincent; Creedon, Daniel Lloyd; Tobar, Michael Edmund; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves

    2008-06-13

    We report observations of the Schawlow-Townes noise limit in a cryogenic sapphire secondary frequency standard. The effect causes a fundamental limit to the frequency stability, and was measured through the novel excitation of a bimodal maser oscillation of a Whispering Gallery doublet at 12.04 GHz. The beat frequency of 10 kHz between the oscillations enabled a sensitive probe for this measurement of fractional frequency instability of 10{sup -14}{tau}{sup -1/2} with only 0.5 pW of output power.

  18. The importance of individual frequencies of endogenous brain oscillations for auditory cognition - A short review.

    PubMed

    Baltus, Alina; Herrmann, Christoph Siegfried

    2016-06-01

    Oscillatory EEG activity in the human brain with frequencies in the gamma range (approx. 30-80Hz) is known to be relevant for a large number of cognitive processes. Interestingly, each subject reveals an individual frequency of the auditory gamma-band response (GBR) that coincides with the peak in the auditory steady state response (ASSR). A common resonance frequency of auditory cortex seems to underlie both the individual frequency of the GBR and the peak of the ASSR. This review sheds light on the functional role of oscillatory gamma activity for auditory processing. For successful processing, the auditory system has to track changes in auditory input over time and store information about past events in memory which allows the construction of auditory objects. Recent findings support the idea of gamma oscillations being involved in the partitioning of auditory input into discrete samples to facilitate higher order processing. We review experiments that seem to suggest that inter-individual differences in the resonance frequency are behaviorally relevant for gap detection and speech processing. A possible application of these resonance frequencies for brain computer interfaces is illustrated with regard to optimized individual presentation rates for auditory input to correspond with endogenous oscillatory activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. PMID:26453287

  19. Transit-time devices as local oscillators for frequencies above 100 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, H.; Kidner, C.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    Very promising preliminary experimental results have been obtained from GaAs IMPATT diodes at F-band frequencies (75 mW, 3.5 percent at 111.1 GHz and 20 mW, 1.4 percent at 120.6 GHz) and from GaAs TUNNETT diodes at W-band frequencies (26 mW, 1.6 percent at 87.2 GHz and 32 mW, 2.6 percent at 93.5 GHz). These results indicate that IMPATT, MITATT and TUNNETT diodes have the highest potential of delivering significant amounts of power at Terahertz frequencies. As shown recently, the noise performance of GaAs W-band IMPATT diodes can compete with that of Gunn devices. Since TUNNETT diodes take advantage of the quieter tunnel injection, they are expected to be especially suited for low-noise local oscillators. This paper will focus on the two different design principles for IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes, the material parameters involved in the design and some aspects of the present device technology. Single-drift flat-profile GaAs D-band IMPATT diodes had oscillations up to 129 GHz with 9 mW, 0.9 percent at 128.4 GHz. Single-drift GaAs TUNNETT diodes had oscillations up to 112.5 GHz with 16 mW and output power levels up to 33 mW and efficiencies up to 3.4 percent around 102 GHz. These results are the best reported so far from GaAs IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes.

  20. Tracking high amplitude auto-oscillations with digital Fresnel holograms.

    PubMed

    Picart, Pascal; Leval, Julien; Piquet, Francis; Boileau, Jean P; Guimezanes, Thomas; Dalmont, Jean-Pierre

    2007-06-25

    Method for tracking vibrations with high amplitude of several hundreds of micrometers is presented. It is demonstrated that it is possible to reconstruct a synthetic high amplitude deformation of auto-oscillations encoded with digital Fresnel holograms. The setup is applied to the auto-oscillation of a clarinet reed in a synthetic mouth. Tracking of the vibration is performed by using the pressure signal delivered by the mouth. Experimental results show the four steps of the reed movement and especially emphasize the shocks of the reed on the mouthpiece. PMID:19547155

  1. Tracking high amplitude auto-oscillations with digital Fresnel holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picart, Pascal; Leval, Julien; Piquet, Francis; Boileau, Jean P.; Guimezanes, Thomas; Dalmont, Jean-Pierre

    2007-06-01

    Method for tracking vibrations with high amplitude of several hundreds of micrometers is presented. It is demonstrated that it is possible to reconstruct a synthetic high amplitude deformation of auto-oscillations encoded with digital Fresnel holograms. The setup is applied to the auto-oscillation of a clarinet reed in a synthetic mouth. Tracking of the vibration is performed by using the pressure signal delivered by the mouth. Experimental results show the four steps of the reed movement and especially emphasize the shocks of the reed on the mouthpiece.

  2. Thermal resistance at a liquid-solid interface dependent on the ratio of thermal oscillation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, BoHung

    2012-12-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of atomic-scale thermal resistance at a solid-liquid interface are theoretically investigated with a simple modal analysis of a one-dimensional lattice system. In the modal analysis, the solid-liquid intermolecular interaction strength between is taken into account as the stiffness constant between the solid and liquid molecular masses, and plays a key role in understanding the interfacial thermal resistance. The results show that the interfacial thermal resistance is proportional to the 4th power of the ratio of the thermal oscillation frequencies for the solid and liquid molecules, which provides a better physical description for the interfacial thermal resistance.

  3. Measurements of the Plasma Parameters and Low Frequency Oscillations in the Fisk Plasma Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Edward, Jr.; Wallace, Kent; Lampkin, Gregory; Watson, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A new plasma device, the Fisk Plasma Source (FPS), has been developed at Fisk University. This plasma device is used to study the physics of low temperature plasmas and plasma-material interactions. The FPS device is a stainless steel vacuum 6-way cross vacuum vessel with at 10-inch inner diameter. Low temperature argon plasmas are generated using DC glow discharge and thermionic filament techniques. Spatial profiles of the plasma density, plasma potential, and electron temperature are measured using Langmuir probes. We present initial experimental measurements of density and temperature profiles in the FPS device. Experimental and theoretical studies of low frequency oscillations observed in the FPS device are also presented.

  4. Measurement of the B0-B-0 oscillation frequency with inclusive dilepton events.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Oddone, P J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; Foster, B; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, Sh; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P-A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; Laplace, S; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Van Bibber, K; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Bellodi, G; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J L; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Nief, J Y; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R G; Gabriel, T A; Brau, J; Frey, R; Grauges, E; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Campagna, E; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J S; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Lamanna, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Aston, D; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Calderini, G; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Haas, T; Himel, T; Hryn'ova, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; Von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Kordich, T M B; Neal, H

    2002-06-01

    The B0-B-0 oscillation frequency has been measured with a sample of 23 x 10(6) BB- pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. In this sample, we select events in which both B mesons decay semileptonically and use the charge of the leptons to identify the flavor of each B meson. A simultaneous fit to the decay time difference distributions for opposite- and same-sign dilepton events gives deltamd = 0.493+/-0.012(stat)+/-0.009(syst) ps-1. PMID:12059415

  5. Quasipatterns in a Model for Chemical Oscillations Forced at Multiple Resonance Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Jessica M.; Riecke, Hermann

    2007-11-23

    Multifrequency forcing of systems undergoing a Hopf bifurcation to spatially homogeneous oscillations is investigated. For weak forcing composed of frequencies near the 1 ratio 1, 1 ratio 2, and 1 ratio 3 resonances, such systems can be described systematically by a suitably extended complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. Weakly nonlinear analysis shows that, generically, the forcing function can be tuned such that resonant triad interactions with weakly damped modes stabilize subharmonic 4- and 5-mode quasipatterns. In simulations starting from random initial conditions, domains of these quasipatterns compete and yield complex, slowly ordering patterns.

  6. Reliable and integrated technique for determining resonant frequency in radio frequency resonators. Application to a high-precision resonant cavity-based displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Rigoberto; Asua, Estibaliz; Portilla, Joaquin; Etxebarria, Victor

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a reliable and integrated technique for determining the resonant frequency of radio frequency resonators, which can be of interest for different purposes. The approach uses a heterodyne scheme as phase detector coupled to a voltage-controlled oscillator. The system seeks the oscillator frequency that produces a phase null in the resonator, which corresponds to the resonant frequency. A complete explanation of the technique to determine the resonant frequency is presented and experimentally tested. The method has been applied to a high-precision displacement sensor based on resonant cavity, obtaining a theoretical nanometric precision.

  7. Clustered Desynchronization from High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    While high-frequency deep brain stimulation is a well established treatment for Parkinson’s disease, its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that two competing hypotheses, desynchronization and entrainment in a population of model neurons, may not be mutually exclusive. We find that in a noisy group of phase oscillators, high frequency perturbations can separate the population into multiple clusters, each with a nearly identical proportion of the overall population. This phenomenon can be understood by studying maps of the underlying deterministic system and is guaranteed to be observed for small noise strengths. When we apply this framework to populations of Type I and Type II neurons, we observe clustered desynchronization at many pulsing frequencies. PMID:26713619

  8. Clustered Desynchronization from High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-12-01

    While high-frequency deep brain stimulation is a well established treatment for Parkinson's disease, its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that two competing hypotheses, desynchronization and entrainment in a population of model neurons, may not be mutually exclusive. We find that in a noisy group of phase oscillators, high frequency perturbations can separate the population into multiple clusters, each with a nearly identical proportion of the overall population. This phenomenon can be understood by studying maps of the underlying deterministic system and is guaranteed to be observed for small noise strengths. When we apply this framework to populations of Type I and Type II neurons, we observe clustered desynchronization at many pulsing frequencies. PMID:26713619

  9. Transponder System for High-Frequency Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, C. L.; Shores, P. W.; Kobayashi, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transponder system uses phase difference between transmitted and reflected high-frequency radio waves to measure distance to target. To suppress spurious measurements of reflections from objects near target at transmitted frequency and its harmonics, transponder at target generates return signal at half transmitted frequency. System useful in such applications as surveying, docking of ships, and short-range navigation.

  10. Mechanical oscillator with optical cavity read-out for high sensitivity force detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Thomas; Miao, Houxun; Srinivasan, Kartik; Zou, Jie; Rangelow, Ivo W.; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    Incorporating cavity optomechanics into micro and nano-scale electro mechanical systems (MEMS, NEMS) is a topic of high interest since it enables measurement of mechanical motion near the fundamental limits of precision imposed by quantum mechanics. We have developed an on-chip cavity optomechanical transducer platform that combines high bandwidth and sensitivity near the standard quantum limit with compactness, robustness, small size, and potential for low cost batch fabrication inherent in MEMS. We present a novel MEMS transducer with a fiber pigtailed on-chip Si microdisk optical cavity used to readout the motion of a mechanical oscillator probe. The SiN torsional oscillator can be excited by an electrical signal supplied to an integrated thermal actuator. The oscillator is evanescently coupled to a high-Q whispering gallery mode of the optical cavity and the motion is detected by measuring the resonance frequency shift of the mode. One side of the oscillator probe overhangs the edge of the chip, where it can be easily coupled to a variety of off-chip samples and physical systems of interest. A 10 um long probe is currently designed to have a stiffness of 1 N/m to 3 N/m and a resonance frequency of 100 kHz to 500 kHz, while the design can be easily and broadly tailored for specific sensing applications.

  11. Measurement of the B0(s) - anti-B0(s) Oscillation Frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-06-01

    The authors present the first measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub s}. They use 1 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The sample contains signals of 3600 fully reconstructed hadronic B{sub s} decays and 37,000 partially reconstructed semileptonic B{sub s} decays. They measure the probability as a function of proper decay time that the B{sub s} decays with the same, or opposite, flavor as the flavor at production and they find a signal consistent with B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations. The probability that random fluctuations could produce a comparable signal is 0.2%. Under the hypothesis that the signal is due to B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, they measure {Delta}m{sub s} = 17.31{sub -0.18}{sup +0.33}(stat.) {+-} 0.07(syst.) ps{sup -1} and determine |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}| = 0.208{sub -0.002}{sup +0.001}(exp.){sub -0.006}{sup +0.008}(theo.).

  12. Oscillations Go the Distance: Low-Frequency Human Hippocampal Oscillations Code Spatial Distance in the Absence of Sensory Cues during Teleportation.

    PubMed

    Vass, Lindsay K; Copara, Milagros S; Seyal, Masud; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Farias, Sarah Tomaszewski; Shen, Peter Y; Ekstrom, Arne D

    2016-03-16

    Low-frequency (delta/theta band) hippocampal neural oscillations play prominent roles in computational models of spatial navigation, but their exact function remains unknown. Some theories propose they are primarily generated in response to sensorimotor processing, while others suggest a role in memory-related processing. We directly recorded hippocampal EEG activity in patients undergoing seizure monitoring while they explored a virtual environment containing teleporters. Critically, this manipulation allowed patients to experience movement through space in the absence of visual and self-motion cues. The prevalence and duration of low-frequency hippocampal oscillations were unchanged by this manipulation, indicating that sensorimotor processing was not required to elicit them during navigation. Furthermore, the frequency-wise pattern of oscillation prevalence during teleportation contained spatial information capable of classifying the distance teleported. These results demonstrate that movement-related sensory information is not required to drive spatially informative low-frequency hippocampal oscillations during navigation and suggest a specific function in memory-related spatial updating. PMID:26924436

  13. A randomised controlled trial and cost-effectiveness analysis of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation against conventional artificial ventilation for adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome. The OSCAR (OSCillation in ARDS) study.

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Ranjit; Hamilton, Patrick; Young, Duncan; Hulme, Claire; Hall, Peter; Shah, Sanjoy; MacKenzie, Iain; Tunnicliffe, William; Rowan, Kathy; Cuthbertson, Brian; McCabe, Chris; Lamb, Sallie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) require artificial ventilation but this treatment may produce secondary lung damage. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may reduce this damage. OBJECTIVES To determine the clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness of HFOV in patients with ARDS compared with standard mechanical ventilation. DESIGN A parallel, randomised, unblinded clinical trial. SETTING UK intensive care units. PARTICIPANTS Mechanically ventilated patients with a partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood/fractional concentration of inspired oxygen (P : F) ratio of 26.7 kPa (200 mmHg) or less and an expected duration of ventilation of at least 2 days at recruitment. INTERVENTIONS Treatment arm HFOV using a Novalung R100(®) ventilator (Metran Co. Ltd, Saitama, Japan) ventilator until the start of weaning. Control arm Conventional mechanical ventilation using the devices available in the participating centres. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary clinical outcome was all-cause mortality at 30 days after randomisation. The primary health economic outcome was the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. RESULTS One hundred and sixty-six of 398 patients (41.7%) randomised to the HFOV group and 163 of 397 patients (41.1%) randomised to the conventional mechanical ventilation group died within 30 days of randomisation (p = 0.85), for an absolute difference of 0.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) -6.1% to 7.5%]. After adjustment for study centre, sex, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, and the initial P : F ratio, the odds ratio for survival in the conventional ventilation group was 1.03 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.40; p = 0.87 logistic regression). Survival analysis showed no difference in the probability of survival up to 12 months after randomisation. The average QALY at 1 year in the HFOV group was 0.302 compared to 0.246. This gives an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for the cost to

  14. Absolute frequency stabilization of an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Plusquellic, D.F.; Votava, O.; Nesbitt, D.J.

    1996-03-01

    A method is described that provides absolute frequency stabilization and calibration of the signal and idler waves generated by an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The method makes use of a He{endash}Ne stabilized transfer cavity (TC) to control the frequencies of the cw sources used to seed both the pump laser and OPO cavity. The TC serves as a stable calibration source for the signal and idler waves by providing marker fringes as the seed laser is scanned. Additionally, an acoustic-optic modulator (AOM) is used to shift the OPO seed laser{close_quote}s frequency before locking it onto the TC. The sidebands of the AOM are tunable over more than one free spectral range of the TC, thereby permitting stabilization of the signal and idler waves at any frequency. A {plus_minus}25-MHz residual error in the absolute frequency stabilities of the pump, signal, and idler waves is experimentally demonstrated, which is roughly 30{percent} of the 160-MHz near-transform-limited linewidths of the signal and idler pulses. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  15. Frequency quadrupling optoelectronic oscillator using a single polarization modulator in a Sagnac loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen Ting; Li, Wei; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2014-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel and cost efficient method to generating a frequency quadrupling optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) using a single polarization modulator (PolM) in a Sagnac loop. The OEO loop and the Sagnac loop share the same PolM. In the OEO loop, the PolM is used to generate the fundamental microwave signal. In the Sagnac loop, the joint use of the PolM, a polarization controller (PC), and a polarization beam splitter (PBS) is equivalent to an intensity modulator. The odd order sidebands of the modulated signal are suppressed by biasing the equivalent intensity modulator at the maximum transmission point. Moreover, the undesired optical carrier is also eliminated by bidirectional use of the PolM. As a result, only the two second order sidebands are left. The beating between the two second order sidebands in a photodetector (PD) generates a microwave signal at the frequency corresponding to four times of the fundamental tone. A frequency quadrupling microwave signal at the frequency of 39.74 GHz with a phase noise of -100.14 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz frequency offset was experimentally generated.

  16. A new correction of stellar oscillation frequencies for near-surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. H.; Gizon, L.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Space-based observations of solar-like oscillations present an opportunity to constrain stellar models using individual mode frequencies. However, current stellar models are inaccurate near the surface, which introduces a systematic difference that must be corrected. Aims: We introduce and evaluate two parametrizations of the surface corrections based on formulae given by Gough (1990, LNP, 367, 283). The first we call a cubic term proportional to ν3/ ℐ and the second has an additional inverse term proportional to ν-1/ ℐ, where ν and ℐ are the frequency and inertia of an oscillation mode. Methods: We first show that these formulae accurately correct model frequencies of two different solar models (Model S and a calibrated MESA model) when compared to observed BiSON frequencies. In particular, even the cubic form alone fits significantly better than a power law. We then incorporate the parametrizations into a modelling pipeline that simultaneously fits the surface effects and the underlying stellar model parameters. We apply this pipeline to synthetic observations of a Sun-like stellar model, solar observations degraded to typical asteroseismic uncertainties, and observations of the well-studied CoRoT target HD 52265. For comparison, we also run the pipeline with the scaled power-law correction proposed by Kjeldsen et al. (2008, ApJ, 683, L175). Results: The fits to synthetic and degraded solar data show that the method is unbiased and produces best-fit parameters that are consistent with the input models and known parameters of the Sun. Our results for HD 52265 are consistent with previous modelling efforts and the magnitude of the surface correction is similar to that of the Sun. The fit using a scaled power-law correction is significantly worse but yields consistent parameters, suggesting that HD 52265 is sufficiently Sun-like for the same power-law to be applicable. Conclusions: We find that the cubic term alone is suitable for asteroseismic

  17. A generator with nonlinear spring oscillator to provide vibrations of multi-frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Liu, Jingquan; Tang, Gang; Luo, Jiangbo; Yang, Chunsheng; Li, Yigui

    2011-11-01

    A piezoelectric generator with nonlinear spring oscillator is proposed to provide multiple resonant modes for operation and improve conversion efficiency. In order to scavenge the vibration energy of multiple frequencies from a certain vibration source, two types of nonlinear springs have been employed and tested. The maximum output power of 5, 17.83, and 23.39 μW for the nonlinear spring of 8.3 N/m with 1 g acceleration has been obtained under the resonant frequency of 89, 104, and 130 Hz, respectively. Its total output power of 46.22 μW is obviously larger than the one of 28.35 μW for traditional second-order spring-mass linear system.

  18. A time/frequency quantum analysis of the light generated by synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shifeng; Treps, Nicolas; Fabre, Claude

    2012-04-01

    We present in this paper a general model for determining the quantum properties of the light generated by a synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillator (SPOPO) operating below threshold. This model considers time and frequency on an equal footing, which allows us to find new quantum properties, related for example to the carrier envelope offset (CEO) phase, and to consider situations that are close to real experiments. We show that, in addition to multimode squeezing in the so-called ‘supermodes’, the system exhibits quadrature entanglement between frequency combs of opposite CEO phases. We have also determined the quantum properties of the individual pulses and their quantum correlations with the neighboring pulses. Finally, we determine the quantum Cramer-Rao limit for an ultra-short time delay measurement using a given number of pulses generated by the SPOPO.

  19. Tunability over three frequency bands induced by mode transition in relativistic backward wave oscillator with strong end reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun; Fan, Juping; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Sun, Jun

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents an efficient approach to realizing the frequency tunability of a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) over three frequency bands by mode transition without changing the slow wave structure (SWS). It is figured out that the transition of the operation mode in the RBWO can be efficiently achieved by using the strong end reflection of the SWS. This mode transition results in the tunability of the RBWO over three frequency bands at high power and high efficiency without changing the SWS. In numerical simulation, the output frequency of the RBWO can jump over 7.9 GHz in C-band, 9.9 GHz in X-band, and 12.4 GHz in Ku-band with output power exceeding 3.0 GW and conversion efficiency higher than 35% by just reasonably transforming the structures of the front and post resonant reflectors which provide the strong end reflection for the SWS.

  20. Asymptotic theory of intermediate- and high-degree solar acoustic oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodsky, M.; Vorontsov, S. V.

    1993-01-01

    A second-order asymptotic approximation is developed for adiabatic nonradial p-modes of a spherically symmetric star. The exact solutions of adiabatic oscillations are assumed in the outermost layers, where the asymptotic description becomes invalid, which results in a eigenfrequency equation with model-dependent surface phase shift. For lower degree modes, the phase shift is a function of frequency alone; for high-degree modes, its dependence on the degree is explicitly taken into account.

  1. Fermi pockets and quantum oscillations of the Hall coefficient in high-temperature superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Sudip; Kee, Hae-Young

    2008-01-01

    Recent quantum oscillation measurements in high-temperature superconductors in high magnetic fields and low temperatures have ushered in a new era. These experiments explore the normal state from which superconductivity arises and provide evidence of a reconstructed Fermi surface consisting of electron and hole pockets in a regime in which such a possibility was previously considered to be remote. More specifically, the Hall coefficient has been found to oscillate according to the Onsager quantization condition, involving only fundamental constants and the areas of the pockets, but with a sign that is negative. Here, we explain the observations with the theory that the alleged normal state exhibits a hidden order, the d-density wave, which breaks symmetries signifying time reversal, translation by a lattice spacing, and a rotation by an angle π/2, while the product of any two symmetry operations is preserved. The success of our analysis underscores the importance of spontaneous breaking of symmetries, Fermi surface reconstruction, and conventional quasiparticles. We primarily focus on the version of the order that is commensurate with the underlying crystalline lattice, but we also touch on the consequences if the order were to incommensurate. It is shown that whereas commensurate order results in two independent oscillation frequencies as a function of the inverse of the applied magnetic field, incommensurate order leads to three independent frequencies. The oscillation amplitudes, however, are determined by the mobilities of the charge carriers comprising the Fermi pockets. PMID:18577585

  2. An Attempt to Describe Frequency Correlations among kHz QPOs and HBOs by Two-Armed Nearly Vertical Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shoji

    2012-06-01

    We examine whether the two-armed (m = 2) vertical p-mode oscillations trapped in the innermost region of magnetized accretion disks with finite disk thickness can describe kHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and horizontal branch oscillations (HBOs) in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). First, we derive the frequency-frequency correlation of the two basic oscillations (both are fundamental modes in the vertical direction, but one is the fundamental and the other the first overtone in the radial direction), and compare it with the observed frequency correlation of twin kHz QPOs. Results show that the calculated frequency correlation can well describe the observed frequency one with reasonable values of the parameters. Second, we examine whether the observed frequency correlation between kHz QPOs and HBO can be described by regarding HBO as the first overtone oscillation in the vertical direction (and the fundamental in the radial direction). The results suggest that (i) the innermost parts of disks on the horizontal branch are strongly diminished in their vertical thickness (presumably by hot coronae) and (ii) the branch is roughly a sequence of variations of magnetic fields or disk temperature.

  3. Cryogenic Behavior of the High Temperature Crystal Oscillator PX-570

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Scherer, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Microprocessors, data-acquisition systems, and electronic controllers usually require timing signals for proper and accurate operation. These signals are, in most cases, provided by circuits that utilize crystal oscillators due to availability, cost, ease of operation, and accuracy. Stability of these oscillators, i.e. crystal characteristics, is usually governed, amongst other things, by the ambient temperature. Operation of these devices under extreme temperatures requires, therefore, the implementation of some temperature-compensation mechanism either through the manufacturing process of the oscillator part or in the design of the circuit to maintain stability as well as accuracy. NASA future missions into deep space and planetary exploration necessitate operation of electronic instruments and systems in environments where extreme temperatures along with wide-range thermal swings are countered. Most of the commercial devices are very limited in terms of their specified operational temperature while very few custom-made and military-grade parts have the ability to operate in a slightly wider range of temperature. Thus, it is becomes mandatory to design and develop circuits that are capable of operation efficiently and reliably under the space harsh conditions. This report presents the results obtained on the evaluation of a new (COTS) commercial-off-the-shelf crystal oscillator under extreme temperatures. The device selected for evaluation comprised of a 10 MHz, PX-570-series crystal oscillator. This type of device was recently introduced by Vectron International and is designed as high temperature oscillator [1]. These parts are fabricated using proprietary manufacturing processes designed specifically for high temperature and harsh environment applications [1]. The oscillators have a wide continuous operating temperature range; making them ideal for use in military and aerospace industry, industrial process control, geophysical fields, avionics, and engine

  4. Lightweight, high-frequency transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The 25-kVA space transformer was developed under contract by Thermal Technology Laboratory, Buffalo, N. Y. The NASA Lewis transformer technology program attempted to develop the baseline technology. For the 25-kVA transformer the input voltage was chosen as 200 V, the output voltage as 1500 V, the input voltage waveform as square wave, the duty cycle as continuous, the frequency range (within certain constraints) as 10 to 40 kHz, the operating temperatures as 85 deg. and 130 C, the baseplate temperature as 50 C, the equivalent leakage inductance as less than 10 micro-h, the operating environment as space, and the life expectancy as 10 years. Such a transformer can also be used for aircraft, ship and terrestrial applications.

  5. An Optimal Frequency in Ca2+ Oscillations for Stomatal Closure Is an Emergent Property of Ion Transport in Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    Minguet-Parramona, Carla; Wang, Yizhou; Hills, Adrian; Vialet-Chabrand, Silvere; Griffiths, Howard; Rogers, Simon; Lawson, Tracy; Lew, Virgilio L; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations in cytosolic-free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) have been proposed to encode information that controls stomatal closure. [Ca(2+)]i oscillations with a period near 10 min were previously shown to be optimal for stomatal closure in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), but the studies offered no insight into their origins or mechanisms of encoding to validate a role in signaling. We have used a proven systems modeling platform to investigate these [Ca(2+)]i oscillations and analyze their origins in guard cell homeostasis and membrane transport. The model faithfully reproduced differences in stomatal closure as a function of oscillation frequency with an optimum period near 10 min under standard conditions. Analysis showed that this optimum was one of a range of frequencies that accelerated closure, each arising from a balance of transport and the prevailing ion gradients across the plasma membrane and tonoplast. These interactions emerge from the experimentally derived kinetics encoded in the model for each of the relevant transporters, without the need of any additional signaling component. The resulting frequencies are of sufficient duration to permit substantial changes in [Ca(2+)]i and, with the accompanying oscillations in voltage, drive the K(+) and anion efflux for stomatal closure. Thus, the frequency optima arise from emergent interactions of transport across the membrane system of the guard cell. Rather than encoding information for ion flux, these oscillations are a by-product of the transport activities that determine stomatal aperture. PMID:26628748

  6. A high-performance Hg(+) trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    A high-performance frequency standard based on (199)Hg(+) ions confined in a hybrid radio frequency (RF)/dc linear ion trap is demonstrated. This trap permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. A 160-mHz-wide atomic resonance line for the 40.5-GHz clock transition is used to steer the output of a 5-mHz crystal oscillator to obtain a stability of 2 x 10(exp -15) for 24,000-second averaging times. Measurements with a 37-mHz line width for the Hg(+) clock transition demonstrate that the inherent stability for this frequency standard is better than 1 x 10(exp -15) at 10,000-second averaging times.

  7. The internal clock: evidence for a temporal oscillator underlying time perception with some estimates of its characteristic frequency.

    PubMed

    Treisman, M; Faulkner, A; Naish, P L; Brogan, D

    1990-01-01

    Evidence for the proposition that human time perception is determined by an internal clock is largely indirect. It would strengthen the case for this hypothesis if a model for the internal clock were available from which predictions could be derived and tested, and if the basic parameter of such a model, the frequency at which the clock runs, could be estimated. A model for an internal temporal pacemaker is briefly described and its properties are explored by computer simulation. Results are obtained that provide a basis for predicting that, under appropriate conditions, interference between an imposed rhythm and the frequency of a temporal oscillator may cause perturbations in temporal judgment which are related to the characteristic frequency of that oscillator. Experimental data are reported which appear to demonstrate such an interference pattern. These results allow some estimates of the characteristic frequency of the temporal oscillator to be obtained. PMID:2130371

  8. The effect of low-frequency oscillations on cardio-respiratory synchronization. Observations during rest and exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenwright, D. A.; Bahraminasab, A.; Stefanovska, A.; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2008-10-01

    We show that the transitions which occur between close orders of synchronization in the cardiorespiratory system are mainly due to modulation of the cardiac and respiratory processes by low-frequency components. The experimental evidence is derived from recordings on healthy subjects at rest and during exercise. Exercise acts as a perturbation of the system that alters the mean cardiac and respiratory frequencies and changes the amount of their modulation by low-frequency oscillations. The conclusion is supported by numerical evidence based on a model of phase-coupled oscillators, with white noise and lowfrequency noise. Both the experimental and numerical approaches confirm that low-frequency oscillations play a significant role in the transitional behavior between close orders of synchronization.

  9. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  10. A 300 mV sub-threshold region 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator and frequency divider with transformer technique for ultralow power RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yasunori; Ishikawa, Keisuke; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    2014-01-01

    A new ultralow voltage 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) and a divide-by-2 frequency divider circuits operating in a CMOS sub-threshold region using a transformer technique have been developed. In the sub-threshold region, the CMOS transistor high frequency performances are decreased to the point where oscillation and frequency division are challenging to achieve. The new proposed VCO uses the transformer feedback complementary VCO technique to improves VCO negative feedback gain. The circuits have been fabricated in a 65 nm standard CMOS process. The oscillation frequency is designed at 2.4 GHz under a 300 mV supply voltage. The total power consumption is 202 µW with noise performance of -96 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. The new proposed frequency divider circuit consists of two stages master-slave D-type flip-flop (DFF). The DFF differential input is coupled to a transformer circuit instead of transistors to reduce the number of stacks. The minimum operating supply voltage is 300 mV with power consumption of 34 µW with a free-run frequency of 1.085 GHz.

  11. Self-Oscillation-Based Frequency Tracking for the Drive and Detection of Resonance Magnetometers.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zheng; Ren, Dahai; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a drive and detection method for Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS)-based Lorentz-force resonance magnetometers. Based on the proposed MEMS magnetometer, a drive and detection method was developed by using self-oscillation to adjust the mismatch between the mechanical resonance frequency and the coil drive frequency as affected by temperature fluctuations and vibration amplitude changes. Not only was the signal-to-noise ratio enhanced by the proposed method compared to the traditional method, but the test system automatically reached resonance frequency very rapidly when powered on. Moreover, the linearity and the measurement range were improved by the magnetic feedback generated by the coil. Test results indicated that the sensitivity of the proposed magnetometer is 59.6 mV/μT and its noise level is 0.25 μT. When operating in ±65 μT, its nonlinearity is 2.5‰-only one-tenth of the former prototype. Its power consumption is only about 250 mW and its size is only 28 mm × 28 mm × 10 mm, or about one-eighth of the original sensor; further, unlike the former device, it can distinguish both positive and negative magnetic fields. The proposed method can also be applied in other MEMS sensors such as gyroscopes and micromirrors to enhance their frequency tracking ability. PMID:27213401

  12. On the modulation of low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in black hole transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Devraj D.; Motta, Sara; Shanthi, K.; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Belloni, Tomaso

    2015-04-01

    We studied the properties of the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations detected in a sample of six black hole candidates (XTE J1550-564, H 1743-322, XTE J1859+226, 4U 1630-47, GX 339-4, XTE J1650-500) observed by the Rossi XTE satellite. We analysed the relation between the full width at half-maximum and the frequency of all the narrow peaks detected in power density spectra where a type-C QPO is observed. Our goal was to understand the nature of the modulation of the signal by comparing the properties of different harmonic peaks in the power density spectrum. We find that for the sources in our sample the width of the fundamental and of the first harmonic are compatible with a frequency modulation, while that of the sub-harmonic is independent of frequency, possibly indicating the presence of an additional modulation in amplitude. We compare our results with those obtained earlier from GRS 1915+105 and XTE J1550-564.

  13. Self-Oscillation-Based Frequency Tracking for the Drive and Detection of Resonance Magnetometers

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zheng; Ren, Dahai; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a drive and detection method for Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS)-based Lorentz-force resonance magnetometers. Based on the proposed MEMS magnetometer, a drive and detection method was developed by using self-oscillation to adjust the mismatch between the mechanical resonance frequency and the coil drive frequency as affected by temperature fluctuations and vibration amplitude changes. Not only was the signal-to-noise ratio enhanced by the proposed method compared to the traditional method, but the test system automatically reached resonance frequency very rapidly when powered on. Moreover, the linearity and the measurement range were improved by the magnetic feedback generated by the coil. Test results indicated that the sensitivity of the proposed magnetometer is 59.6 mV/μT and its noise level is 0.25 μT. When operating in ±65 μT, its nonlinearity is 2.5‰—only one-tenth of the former prototype. Its power consumption is only about 250 mW and its size is only 28 mm × 28 mm × 10 mm, or about one-eighth of the original sensor; further, unlike the former device, it can distinguish both positive and negative magnetic fields. The proposed method can also be applied in other MEMS sensors such as gyroscopes and micromirrors to enhance their frequency tracking ability. PMID:27213401

  14. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  15. High Power Coaxial Ubitron Oscillator: Theory and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkcum, A. J.; McDermott Luhmann, D. B., Jr.; Phillips, R. M.

    1997-11-01

    The coaxial ubitron is ideally suited for producing high power microwaves. It utilizes an annular beam of electrons which interact with the rf breakdown resistant TE_01 mode in a coaxial circuit. Because the periodic permanent magnetic (PPM) focusing of the device is capable of propagating extremely high currents without an axial guide field, high power operation with high overall efficiency can be achieved. The PPM rings also produce the quiver velocity for the ubitron. The linear theory for the ubitron oscillator and a simple fast timescale particle tracing nonlinear simulation code are presented. These have been used to develop a design for an S-band coaxial cavity oscillator capable of producing 1 GW of power with 21% efficiency. Verification of the design has been achieved using MAGIC, a 2-1/2 dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code.

  16. Analysis of frequency noise in ultra-stable optical oscillators with active control of residual amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liufeng; Shen, Hui; Bi, Jin; Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Chen, Lisheng

    2014-12-01

    Two 1,064-nm Nd:YAG lasers frequency stabilized by high-finesse optical cavities are developed to investigate various noise mechanisms in ultra-stable optical oscillators. Active control of residual amplitude modulation using a separate sensing path is implemented and its effectiveness in the presence of a resonant optical cavity is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified by measuring the rejection ratios in optical heterodyne beat between a perturbed laser and a stable reference. Laser frequency noises originated from vibration, residual amplitude modulation, quantum-limited shot noise, and electronic noise are experimentally analyzed. With active control, residual amplitude modulation is suppressed to below 1 × 10-6 at 0.02-1,000 s, reaching a minimum of 2 × 10-7 at ~2 s. A frequency stability of 2 × 10-15 is obtained from 0.1 to 10 s, and the optical heterodyne beat of the two Nd:YAG lasers shows 1-Hz linewidth with a measurement time of 4.096 s. In addition, the experimentally determined linewidths agree well with the calculation according to a simplified relationship between the linewidth and the underlying flicker noise that modulates the laser frequency.

  17. Analysis of frequency noise in ultra-stable optical oscillators with active control of residual amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liufeng; Shen, Hui; Bi, Jin; Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Chen, Lisheng

    2014-09-01

    Two 1,064-nm Nd:YAG lasers frequency stabilized by high-finesse optical cavities are developed to investigate various noise mechanisms in ultra-stable optical oscillators. Active control of residual amplitude modulation using a separate sensing path is implemented and its effectiveness in the presence of a resonant optical cavity is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified by measuring the rejection ratios in optical heterodyne beat between a perturbed laser and a stable reference. Laser frequency noises originated from vibration, residual amplitude modulation, quantum-limited shot noise, and electronic noise are experimentally analyzed. With active control, residual amplitude modulation is suppressed to below 1 × 10-6 at 0.02-1,000 s, reaching a minimum of 2 × 10-7 at ~2 s. A frequency stability of 2 × 10-15 is obtained from 0.1 to 10 s, and the optical heterodyne beat of the two Nd:YAG lasers shows 1-Hz linewidth with a measurement time of 4.096 s. In addition, the experimentally determined linewidths agree well with the calculation according to a simplified relationship between the linewidth and the underlying flicker noise that modulates the laser frequency.

  18. A detector for high frequency modulation in auroral particle fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiger, R. J.; Oehme, D.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Murphree, J.; Anderson, H. R.; Anderson, R.

    1974-01-01

    A high time resolution electron detector has been developed for use in sounding rocket studies of the aurora. The detector is used to look for particle bunching in the range 50 kHz-10 MHz. The design uses an electron multiplier and an onboard frequency spectrum analyzer. By using the onboard analyzer, the data can be transmitted back to ground on a single 93-kHz voltage-controlled oscillator. The detector covers the 50 kHz-10 MHz range six times per second and detects modulation on the order of a new percent of the total electron flux. Spectra are presented for a flight over an auroral arc.

  19. Explanation of persistent high frequency density structure in coalesced bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Gerald P.

    1988-07-01

    It has been observed that after the Main Ring rf manipulation of coalescing (where 5 to 13 primary bunches are transferred into a single rf bucket) the new secondary bunch displays evidence of high frequency density structure superimposed on the approximately Gaussian longitudinal bunch length distribution. This structure is persistent over a period of many seconds (hundreds of synchrotron oscillation periods). With the help of multiparticle simulation programs, an explanation of this phenomenon is given in terms of single particle longitudinal phase space dynamics. No coherent effects need be taken into account. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Motor dysfunction in the tottering mouse is linked to cerebellar spontaneous low frequency oscillations revealed by flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Popa, Laurentiu S.; Wang, Xinming; Gao, Wangcai; Barnes, Justin; Hendrix, Claudia M.; Hess, Ellen J.; Ebner, Timothy J.

    2009-02-01

    Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging is developing into a powerful research tool to study neural activity, particularly in vivo. In this study we used this imaging technique to investigate the neuronal mechanism underlying the episodic movement disorder that is characteristic of the tottering (tg) mouse, a model of episodic ataxia type 2. Both EA2 and the tg mouse are caused by mutations in the gene encoding Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These mutations result in a reduction in P/Q Ca2+ channel function. Both EA2 patients and tg mice have a characteristic phenotype consisting of transient motor attacks triggered by stress, caffeine or ethanol. The neural events underlying these episodes of dystonia are unknown. Flavoprotein autofluorescence optical imaging revealed spontaneous, transient, low frequency oscillations in the cerebellar cortex of the tg mouse. Lasting from 30 - 120 minutes, the oscillations originate in one area then spread to surrounding regions over 30 - 60 minutes. The oscillations are reduced by removing extracellular Ca2+ and blocking Cav 1.2/1.3 (L-type) Ca2+ channels. The oscillations are not affected by blocking AMPA receptors or by electrical stimulation of the parallel fiber - Purkinje cell circuit, suggesting the oscillations are generated intrinsically in the cerebellar cortex. Conversely, L-type Ca2+ agonists generate oscillations with similar properties. In the awake tg mouse, transcranial flavoprotein imaging revealed low frequency oscillations that are accentuated during caffeine induced attacks of dystonia. The oscillations increase during the attacks of dystonia and are coupled to oscillations in face and hindlimb EMG activity. These transient oscillations and the associated cerebellar dysfunction provide a novel mechanism by which an ion channel disorder results in episodic motor dysfunction.

  1. Frequency Stability of 1x10(sup -13) in a Compensated Sapphire Oscillator Operating Above 77K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Santiago, D. G.; Wang, R. T.

    1996-01-01

    We report on the design and test of a whispering gallery sapphire resonator for which the dominant (WGH(sub n11)) microwave mode family shows frequency-stable, compensated operation for temperatures above 77 kelvin. The resonator makes possible a new ultra-stable oscillator (USO) capability that promises performance improvements over the best available crystal quartz oscillators in a compact cryogenic package.

  2. High temperature pressurized high frequency testing rig and test method

    DOEpatents

    De La Cruz, Jose; Lacey, Paul

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus is described which permits the lubricity of fuel compositions at or near temperatures and pressures experienced by compression ignition fuel injector components during operation in a running engine. The apparatus consists of means to apply a measured force between two surfaces and oscillate them at high frequency while wetted with a sample of the fuel composition heated to an operator selected temperature. Provision is made to permit operation at or near the flash point of the fuel compositions. Additionally a method of using the subject apparatus to simulate ASTM Testing Method D6079 is disclosed, said method involving using the disclosed apparatus to contact the faces of prepared workpieces under a measured load, sealing the workface contact point into the disclosed apparatus while immersing said contact point between said workfaces in a lubricating media to be tested, pressurizing and heating the chamber and thereby the fluid and workfaces therewithin, using the disclosed apparatus to impart a differential linear motion between the workpieces at their contact point until a measurable scar is imparted to at least one workpiece workface, and then evaluating the workface scar.

  3. Exploiting knowledge of jump-up and jump-down frequencies to determine the parameters of a Duffing oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlan, Roszaidi; Brennan, Michael J.; Kovacic, Ivana; Mace, Brian R.; Burrow, Stephen G.

    2016-08-01

    This work concerns the application of certain non-linear phenomena - jump frequencies in a base-excited Duffing oscillator - to the estimation of the parameters of the system. First, approximate analytical expressions are derived for the relationships between the jump-up and jump-down frequencies, the damping ratio and the cubic stiffness coefficient. Then, experimental results, together with the results of numerical simulations, are presented to show how knowledge of these frequencies can be exploited.

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of RXTE Data from Cyg X-1. Spectral Index-Quasi-Periodic Oscillation Frequency-Luminosity Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nickolai; Titarchuk, Lev

    2006-01-01

    We present timing and spectral analysis of approx. 2.2 Ms of Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE) archival data from Cyg X-1. Using the generic Comptonization model we reveal that the spectrum of Cyg X-1 consists of three components: a thermal seed photon spectrum, a Comptonized part of the seed photon spectrum and the iron line. We find a strong correlation between 0.1-20 Hz frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spectral power-law index. Presence of two spectral phases (states) are clearly seen in the data when the spectral indices saturate at low and high values of QPO frequencies. This saturation effect was discovered earlier in a number of black hole candidate (BHC) sources and now we strongly confirm this phenomenon in Cyg X-1. In the soft state this index- QPO frequency correlation shows a saturation of the photon index Gamma approx. 2.1 at high values of the low frequency upsilon(sub L). The saturation level of Gamma approx. 2.1 is the lowest value found yet in BHCs. The bolometric luminosity does not show clear correlation with the index. We also show that Fe K(sub alpha) emission line strength (equivalent width, EW) correlates with the QPO frequency. EW increases from 200 eV in the low/hard state to 1.5 keV in the high/soft state. The revealed observational correlations allow us to propose a scenario for the spectral transition and iron line formation which occur in BHC sources. We also present the spectral state (the power-law index) evolution for eight years of Cyg X-1 observations by RXTE.

  5. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  6. Measurement of the Bs anti-Bs oscillation frequency using semileptonic decays

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Vivek; /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2007-05-01

    This thesis reports a time dependent measurement of the B{sup 0}{sub s}-{bar B}{sup 0}{sub s} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub s} using semileptonic decays B{sup 0}{sub s} {yields} D{sup -}{sub s}{ell}{sup +}X. We use a data sample of 1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider to reconstruct {approx} 61, 500 semileptonic B{sup 0}{sub s} decays. This analysis of B{sup 0}{sub s}-{bar B}{sup 0}{sub s} mixing has a sensitivity of 19.4 ps{sup -1} and shows an evidence of B{sup 0}{sub s} oscillations at {Delta}m{sub s} {approx}17.75 ps{sup -1} with an amplitude significance of {approx}2. In combination with the analyses of {approx} 8,700 hadronic B{sup 0}{sub s} decays at CDF, we have made the first direct observation of time-dependent B{sup 0}{sub s}-{bar B}{sup 0}{sub s} flavor oscillations measuring {Delta}m{sub s} = 17.77 {sup +0.09}{sub -0.10} (stat) {+-} 0.07 (syst) ps{sup -1}. The obtained value of {Delta}m{sub s} agrees with the Standard Model expectation. When combined with the world average values for {Delta}m{sub d}, m{sub {bar B}0} and m{sub {bar B}0s}, along with other theoretical input, this result yields the ratio of CKM matrix elements |Vtd/Vts| = 0.2060 {+-} 0.0007 (exp) {sup +0.0081}{sub -0.0060} (theor).

  7. Rich-club network topology to minimize synchronization cost due to phase difference among frequency-synchronized oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu

    2013-03-01

    As exemplified by power grids and large-scale brain networks, some functions of networks consisting of phase oscillators rely on not only frequency synchronization, but also phase synchronization among the oscillators. Nevertheless, even after the oscillators reach frequency-synchronized status, the phase synchronization is not always accomplished because the phase difference among the oscillators is often trapped at non-zero constant values. Such phase difference potentially results in inefficient transfer of power or information among the oscillators, and avoids proper and efficient functioning of the networks. In the present study, we newly define synchronization cost by using the phase difference among the frequency-synchronized oscillators, and investigate the optimal network structure with the minimum synchronization cost through rewiring-based optimization. By using the Kuramoto model, we demonstrate that the cost is minimized in a network with a rich-club topology, which comprises the densely-connected center nodes and low-degree peripheral nodes connecting with the center module. We also show that the network topology is characterized by its bimodal degree distribution, which is quantified by Wolfson’s polarization index.

  8. Two generalized algorithms measuring phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling in neuronal oscillations network.

    PubMed

    Li, Qun; Zheng, Chen-Guang; Cheng, Ning; Wang, Yi-Yi; Yin, Tao; Zhang, Tao

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of studies pays attention to cross-frequency coupling in neuronal oscillations network, as it is considered to play an important role in exchanging and integrating of information. In this study, two generalized algorithms, phase-amplitude coupling-evolution map approach and phase-amplitude coupling-conditional mutual information which have been developed and applied originally in an identical rhythm, are generalized to measure cross-frequency coupling. The effectiveness of quantitatively distinguishing the changes of coupling strength from the measurement of phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is demonstrated based on simulation data. The data suggest that the generalized algorithms are able to effectively evaluate the strength of PAC, which are consistent with those traditional approaches, such as PAC-PLV and PAC-MI. Experimental data, which are local field potentials obtained from anaesthetized SD rats, have also been analyzed by these two generalized approaches. The data show that the theta-low gamma PAC in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 network is significantly decreased in the glioma group compared to that in the control group. The results, obtained from either simulation data or real experimental signals, are consistent with that of those traditional approaches PAC-MI and PAC-PLV. It may be considered as a proper indicator for the cross frequency coupling in sub-network, such as the hippocampal CA3 and CA1. PMID:27275379

  9. Chip Scale Atomic Resonator Frequency Stabilization System With Ultra-Low Power Consumption for Optoelectronic Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianye; Zhang, Yaolin; Lu, Haoyuan; Hou, Dong; Zhang, Shuangyou; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    We present a long-term chip scale stabilization scheme for optoelectronic oscillators (OEOs) based on a rubidium coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic resonator. By locking a single mode of an OEO to the (85)Rb 3.035-GHz CPT resonance utilizing an improved phase-locked loop (PLL) with a PID regulator, we achieved a chip scale frequency stabilization system for the OEO. The fractional frequency stability of the stabilized OEO by overlapping Allan deviation reaches 6.2 ×10(-11) (1 s) and  ∼ 1.45 ×10 (-11) (1000 s). This scheme avoids a decrease in the extra phase noise performance induced by the electronic connection between the OEO and the microwave reference in common injection locking schemes. The total physical package of the stabilization system is [Formula: see text] and the total power consumption is 400 mW, which provides a chip scale and portable frequency stabilization approach with ultra-low power consumption for OEOs. PMID:26529751

  10. Squeezing induced in a harmonic oscillator by a sudden change in mass or frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, M. Sebawe; Colegrave, R. K.

    1993-08-01

    The Kanai-Caldirola (Bateman) Hamiltonian is used to derive the dynamics of a simple harmonic oscillator, initially in a minimum uncertainty state, under the influence of an external agency which causes the mass parameter to change from M0 to M1 in a short time ɛ. Then the frequency changes from ω0 to ω1=(M0/M1)ω0+O(ɛ2). In the limit ɛ-->0, no squeezing or loss of coherence occurs. If M1/M0=1+/-η (0<η<<1), then a squeezing of order ɛ2η occurs. If M1/M0 is appreciably different from unity, then the quadrature variances are unequal but the state no longer has minimum uncertainty. An application could be made in quantum optics.

  11. Are short-term variations in solar oscillation frequencies the signature of a second solar dynamo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broomhall, Anne-Marie; Fletcher, Stephen T.; Salabert, David; Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne; García, Rafael A.; Jiménez, Antonio; New, Roger

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the well-known 11-year solar cycle, the Sun's magnetic activity also shows significant variation on shorter time scales, e.g. between one and two years. We observe a quasi-biennial (2-year) signal in the solar p-mode oscillation frequencies, which are sensitive probes of the solar interior. The signal is visible in Sun-as-a-star data observed by different instruments and here we describe the results obtained using BiSON, GOLF, and VIRGO data. Our results imply that the 2-year signal is susceptible to the influence of the main 11-year solar cycle. However, the source of the signal appears to be separate from that of the 11-year cycle. We speculate as to whether it might be the signature of a second dynamo, located in the region of near-surface rotational shear.

  12. Viscosity profile and Quasi Periodic Oscillation frequency of few transient black hole candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Jana, Arghajit; Chatterjee, Debjit; Molla, Aslam Ali

    2016-07-01

    Matters enter into the potential well formed by the compact objects due to the transport of angular momentum by viscosity. We compute the amount of viscosity during the outburst time of the transient sources. In the progressive days as the viscosity increases inner edge of the Keplerian disc moves closer to the black holes. Thus the size of the Compton cloud reduces and the frequency of the Quasi Periodic Oscillations increases. We also compute the Compton cooling day by day, which is responsible for the movement of the shock both in rising and declining phases of the outburst. Our viscosity value rises/decays monotonically during the rising/declining phases of the outburst, well within the range proposed by magneto-rotational instability. For that we solve the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and derive the condition of shock formation in presence of Compton cooling.

  13. The signature of low-frequency oceanic forcing in the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Christopher H.; Huber, Markus; Woollings, Tim; Zanna, Laure

    2016-03-01

    The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) significantly influences the climate of the surrounding continents and has previously been attributed to variations in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Recently, however, similar multidecadal variability was reported in climate models without ocean circulation variability. We analyze the relationship between turbulent heat fluxes and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) over the midlatitude North Atlantic in observations and coupled climate model simulations, both with and without ocean circulation variability. SST anomalies associated with the AMO are positively correlated with heat fluxes on decadal time scales in both observations and models with varying ocean circulation, whereas in models without ocean circulation variability the anomalies are negatively correlated when heat flux anomalies lead. These relationships are captured in a simple stochastic model and rely crucially on low-frequency forcing of SST. The fully coupled models that better capture this signature more effectively reproduce the observed impact of the AMO on European summertime temperatures.

  14. Improved GPS-based coseismic displacement monitoring using high-precision oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinbach, U.; Schön, S.

    2015-05-01

    The determination of high-frequency displacements using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations with sampling frequencies > 1 Hz has attracted much interest in recent years, e.g., in seismology. We propose a new concept for GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) that takes advantage of a highly stable oscillator connected to the GPS receiver by modeling its behavior. We show that the high-frequency noise of kinematic GPS height estimates can be reduced by a factor of up to 4 to the level of 2-3 mm and the overall standard deviation including systematic long periodic errors by a factor of up to 2 to the 1 cm level. Consequently, valuable small and currently hidden vertical displacements can be detected that are not visible with classical PPP. Using data of the 2010 Chile earthquake, we demonstrate that coseismic vertical displacements with an amplitude of only 5 mm can be recovered using PPP with the proposed clock modeling strategy.

  15. An experimental study on resonance of oscillating air/vapor bubbles in water using a two-frequency acoustic apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaka, K.

    2003-05-01

    A two-frequency acoustic apparatus is employed to study the growth behavior of vapor-saturated bubbles driven in a volumetric mode. A unique feature of the apparatus is its capability of trapping a bubble by an ultrasonic standing wave while independently driving it into oscillations by a second lower-frequency acoustic wave. It is observed that the growing vapor bubbles exhibit a periodic shape transition between the volumetric and shape modes due to resonant coupling. In order to explain this observation, we performed an experimental investigation on resonant coupling of air bubbles and obtained the following results: First, the induced shape oscillations are actually a mixed mode that contains the volume component, thus, vapor bubbles can grow while they exhibit shape oscillations. Second, the acoustically levitated bubbles are deformed and therefore, degeneracy in resonant frequency is partially removed. As a result, the vapor bubbles exhibit the shape oscillations in both the axisymmetric mode and asymmetric (three-dimensional) modes. Nonlinear effects in addition to the frequency shift and split due to deformation creates overlapping of the coupling ranges for different modes, which leads to the continuous shape oscillations above a certain bubble radius as the bubble grows.

  16. GNSS Signal Tracking Performance Improvement for Highly Dynamic Receivers by Gyroscopic Mounting Crystal Oscillator.

    PubMed

    Abedi, Maryam; Jin, Tian; Sun, Kewen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the efficiency of the gyroscopic mounting method is studied for a highly dynamic GNSS receiver's reference oscillator for reducing signal loss. Analyses are performed separately in two phases, atmospheric and upper atmospheric flights. Results show that the proposed mounting reduces signal loss, especially in parts of the trajectory where its probability is the highest. This reduction effect appears especially for crystal oscillators with a low elevation angle g-sensitivity vector. The gyroscopic mounting influences frequency deviation or jitter caused by dynamic loads on replica carrier and affects the frequency locked loop (FLL) as the dominant tracking loop in highly dynamic GNSS receivers. In terms of steady-state load, the proposed mounting mostly reduces the frequency deviation below the one-sigma threshold of FLL (1σ(FLL)). The mounting method can also reduce the frequency jitter caused by sinusoidal vibrations and reduces the probability of signal loss in parts of the trajectory where the other error sources accompany this vibration load. In the case of random vibration, which is the main disturbance source of FLL, gyroscopic mounting is even able to suppress the disturbances greater than the three-sigma threshold of FLL (3σ(FLL)). In this way, signal tracking performance can be improved by the gyroscopic mounting method for highly dynamic GNSS receivers. PMID:26404286

  17. GNSS Signal Tracking Performance Improvement for Highly Dynamic Receivers by Gyroscopic Mounting Crystal Oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Abedi, Maryam; Jin, Tian; Sun, Kewen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the efficiency of the gyroscopic mounting method is studied for a highly dynamic GNSS receiver’s reference oscillator for reducing signal loss. Analyses are performed separately in two phases, atmospheric and upper atmospheric flights. Results show that the proposed mounting reduces signal loss, especially in parts of the trajectory where its probability is the highest. This reduction effect appears especially for crystal oscillators with a low elevation angle g-sensitivity vector. The gyroscopic mounting influences frequency deviation or jitter caused by dynamic loads on replica carrier and affects the frequency locked loop (FLL) as the dominant tracking loop in highly dynamic GNSS receivers. In terms of steady-state load, the proposed mounting mostly reduces the frequency deviation below the one-sigma threshold of FLL (1σFLL). The mounting method can also reduce the frequency jitter caused by sinusoidal vibrations and reduces the probability of signal loss in parts of the trajectory where the other error sources accompany this vibration load. In the case of random vibration, which is the main disturbance source of FLL, gyroscopic mounting is even able to suppress the disturbances greater than the three-sigma threshold of FLL (3σFLL). In this way, signal tracking performance can be improved by the gyroscopic mounting method for highly dynamic GNSS receivers. PMID:26404286

  18. Investigation of anti-Stokes Raman processes at phonon-polariton resonance: from Raman oscillation, frequency upconversion to Raman amplification.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yujie J

    2015-03-01

    Raman oscillation, frequency upconversion, and Raman amplification can be achieved in a second-order nonlinear medium at the phonon-polariton resonance. By beating two optical fields, a second-order nonlinear polarization is generated inside the medium. Such a polarization induces a spatially uniform nonpropagating electric field at the beat frequency, which in turn mixes with the input optical field at the lower frequency to generate or amplify the anti-Stokes optical field. Raman oscillation can be efficiently reached for the copropagating configuration. In comparison, efficient frequency upconversion and large amplifications are achievable for the counterpropagating configuration. These Raman processes can be used to effectively remove transverse-optical phonons before decaying to lower-frequency phonons, achieve laser cooling, and significantly enhance coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The counterpropagating configuration offers advantages for amplifying extremely weak signals. PMID:25723418

  19. Some comments on high precision study of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenky, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    I discuss here some problems connected with the high precision study of neutrino oscillations. In the general case of n-neutrino mixing I derive a convenient expression for transition probability in which only independent terms (and mass-squared differences) enter. For three-neutrino mixing I discuss a problem of a definition of a large (atmospheric) neutrino mass-squared difference. I comment also possibilities to reveal the character of neutrino mass spectrum in future reactor neutrino experiments.

  20. High gain amplifiers: Power oscillations and harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Ottaviani, P. L.; Pagnutti, S.

    2007-08-01

    We discuss the power oscillations in saturated high gain free electron laser amplifiers and show that the relevant period can be written in terms of the gain length. We use simple arguments following from the solution of the pendulum equation in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Nontrivial effects due to nonlinear harmonic generation and inhomogeneous broadening are discussed too, as well as the saturated dynamics of short pulses.