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Sample records for high frequency phonons

  1. Gravitational wave detection with high frequency phonon trapping acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Tobar, Michael E.

    2014-11-01

    There are a number of theoretical predictions for astrophysical and cosmological objects, which emit high frequency (1 06-1 09 Hz ) gravitation waves (GW) or contribute somehow to the stochastic high frequency GW background. Here we propose a new sensitive detector in this frequency band, which is based on existing cryogenic ultrahigh quality factor quartz bulk acoustic wave cavity technology, coupled to near-quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers at 20 mK. We show that spectral strain sensitivities reaching 1 0-22 per √{Hz } per mode is possible, which in principle can cover the frequency range with multiple (>100 ) modes with quality factors varying between 1 06 and 1 010 allowing wide bandwidth detection. Due to its compactness and well-established manufacturing process, the system is easily scalable into arrays and distributed networks that can also impact the overall sensitivity and introduce coincidence analysis to ensure no false detections.

  2. High-frequency homogenization of zero-frequency stop band photonic and phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonakakis, T.; Craster, R. V.; Guenneau, S.

    2013-10-01

    We present an accurate methodology for representing the physics of waves, in periodic structures, through effective properties for a replacement bulk medium: this is valid even for media with zero-frequency stop bands and where high-frequency phenomena dominate. Since the work of Lord Rayleigh in 1892, low-frequency (or quasi-static) behaviour has been neatly encapsulated in effective anisotropic media; the various parameters come from asymptotic analysis relying upon the ratio of the array pitch to the wavelength being sufficiently small. However, such classical homogenization theories break down in the high-frequency or stop band regime whereby the wavelength to pitch ratio is of order one. Furthermore, arrays of inclusions with Dirichlet data lead to a zero-frequency stop band, with the salient consequence that classical homogenization is invalid. Higher-frequency phenomena are of significant importance in photonics (transverse magnetic waves propagating in infinite conducting parallel fibres), phononics (anti-plane shear waves propagating in isotropic elastic materials with inclusions) and platonics (flexural waves propagating in thin-elastic plates with holes). Fortunately, the recently proposed high-frequency homogenization (HFH) theory is only constrained by the knowledge of standing waves in order to asymptotically reconstruct dispersion curves and associated Floquet-Bloch eigenfields: it is capable of accurately representing zero-frequency stop band structures. The homogenized equations are partial differential equations with a dispersive anisotropic homogenized tensor that characterizes the effective medium. We apply HFH to metamaterials, exploiting the subtle features of Bloch dispersion curves such as Dirac-like cones, as well as zero and negative group velocity near stop bands in order to achieve exciting physical phenomena such as cloaking, lensing and endoscope effects. These are simulated numerically using finite elements and compared to predictions

  3. High- and low-frequency phonon modes in dipolar quantum gases trapped in deep lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maluckov, Aleksandra; Gligorić, Goran; Hadžievski, Ljupčo; Malomed, Boris A.; Pfau, Tilman

    2013-02-01

    We study normal modes propagating on top of the stable uniform background in arrays of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) droplets trapped in a deep optical lattice. Both the on-site mean-field dynamics of the droplets and their displacement due to the repulsive dipole-dipole interactions (DDIs) are taken into account. Dispersion relations for two modes, viz., high- and low- frequency counterparts of optical and acoustic phonon modes in condensed matter, are derived analytically and verified by direct simulations, for both cases of the repulsive and attractive contact interactions. The (counterpart of the) optical-phonon branch does not exist without the DDIs. These results are relevant in the connection to emerging experimental techniques enabling real-time imaging of the condensate dynamics and direct experimental measurement of phonon dispersion relations in BECs.

  4. Experimental evidence of high-frequency complete elastic bandgap in pillar-based phononic slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Pourabolghasem, Reza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali A.; Adibi, Ali; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-12-08

    We present strong experimental evidence for the existence of a complete phononic bandgap, for Lamb waves, in the high frequency regime (i.e., 800 MHz) for a pillar-based phononic crystal (PnC) membrane with a triangular lattice of gold pillars on top. The membrane is composed of an aluminum nitride film stacked on thin molybdenum and silicon layers. Experimental characterization shows a large attenuation of at least 20 dB in the three major crystallographic directions of the PnC lattice in the frequency range of 760 MHz–820 MHz, which is in agreement with our finite element simulations of the PnC bandgap. The results of experiments are analyzed and the physics behind the attenuation in different spectral windows is explained methodically by assessing the type of Bloch modes and the in-plane symmetry of the displacement profile.

  5. Ultra-high frequency, high Q/volume micromechanical resonators in a planar AlN phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi Baboly, M.; Alaie, S.; Reinke, C. M.; El-Kady, I.; Leseman, Z. C.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the first design and experimental demonstration of an ultrahigh frequency complete phononic crystal (PnC) bandgap aluminum nitride (AlN)/air structure operating in the GHz range. A complete phononic bandgap of this design is used to efficiently and simultaneously confine elastic vibrations in a resonator. The PnC structure is fabricated by etching a square array of air holes in an AlN slab. The fabricated PnC resonator resonates at 1.117 GHz, which corresponds to an out-of-plane mode. The measured bandgap and resonance frequencies are in very good agreement with the eigen-frequency and frequency-domain finite element analyses. As a result, a quality factor/volume of 7.6 × 1017/m3 for the confined resonance mode was obtained that is the largest value reported for this type of PnC resonator to date. These results are an important step forward in achieving possible applications of PnCs for RF communication and signal processing with smaller dimensions.

  6. Beam paths of flexural Lamb waves at high frequency in the first band within phononic crystal-based acoustic lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Boyko, O.; Bonello, B.

    2014-12-15

    This work deals with an analytical and numerical study of the focusing of the lowest order anti-symmetric Lamb wave in gradient index phononic crystals. Computing the ray trajectories of the elastic beam allowed us to analyze the lateral dimensions and shape of the focus, either in the inner or behind the phononic crystal-based acoustic lenses, for frequencies within a broad range in the first band. We analyzed and discussed the focusing behaviors inside the acoustic lenses where the focalization at sub-wavelength scale was achieved. The focalization behind the gradient index phononic crystal is shown to be efficient as well: we report on FMHM = 0.63λ at 11MHz.

  7. Low Frequency Thermal Conductivity in Micro Phononic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, Virgilio; Arantes, Alison

    2015-03-01

    We study theoretically the cumulative thermal conductivity of a micro phononic crystal at low temperature regime. The phononic crystal considered presents carbon microtubes inclusions arranged periodically in a two-dimensional square lattice embebed in soft elastic matrix. Moderate and high impedance mismatch are considered concerning the material composition. The low frequency phonon spectra (up to tens of GHz) are obtained solving the generalized wave equation for inhomogeneous media within the Plane Wave Expansion method. We consider low temperatures in order to increase the participation of GHz thermal phonons. We observed suppression in the cumulative thermal conductivity at the band gap region and thus a reduction of thermal conductivity of the phononic crystal when compared with the bulk matrix. The authors would like to thank the Brazilian agencies, National Council of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq), Foundation for Research Support of Minas Gerais (FAPEMIG) and CAPES for their support.

  8. Thermally stimulated 3–15 THz emission at plasmon-phonon frequencies in polar semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Požela, J. Požela, K.; Šilėnas, A.; Širmulis, E.; Kašalynas, I.; Jucienė, V.; Venckevičius, R.

    2014-12-15

    The possibilities of distinguishing highly coherent terahertz emission at a specified frequency from the incoherent thermal emission of a hot body are considered. It is experimentally shown that the smooth planar surface (with no diffraction guides) of heated GaAs and AlGaAs wafers emits directed continuous-wave (cw) terahertz radiation at coupled surface plasmon-phonon vibrational frequencies. The recording of terahertz reflectance spectra is demonstrated as a method for the identification of plasmons, optical phonons, and coupled plasmon-phonon vibrations in semiconductors.

  9. Frequency stabilization of the zero-phonon line of a quantum dot via phonon-assisted active feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Hansom, Jack; Schulte, Carsten H. H.; Matthiesen, Clemens; Stanley, Megan J.; Atatüre, Mete

    2014-10-27

    We report on the feedback stabilization of the zero-phonon emission frequency of a single InAs quantum dot. The spectral separation of the phonon-assisted component of the resonance fluorescence provides a probe of the detuning between the zero-phonon transition and the resonant driving laser. Using this probe in combination with active feedback, we stabilize the zero-phonon transition frequency against environmental fluctuations. This protocol reduces the zero-phonon fluorescence intensity noise by a factor of 22 by correcting for environmental noise with a bandwidth of 191 Hz, limited by the experimental collection efficiency. The associated sub-Hz fluctuations in the zero-phonon central frequency are reduced by a factor of 7. This technique provides a means of stabilizing the quantum dot emission frequency without requiring access to the zero-phonon emission.

  10. A framework for solving atomistic phonon-structure scattering problems in the frequency domain using perfectly matched layer boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kakodkar, Rohit R.; Feser, Joseph P.

    2015-09-07

    We present a numerical approach to the solution of elastic phonon-interface and phonon-nanostructure scattering problems based on a frequency-domain decomposition of the atomistic equations of motion and the use of perfectly matched layer (PML) boundaries. Unlike molecular dynamic wavepacket analysis, the current approach provides the ability to simulate scattering from individual phonon modes, including wavevectors in highly dispersive regimes. Like the atomistic Green's function method, the technique reduces scattering problems to a system of linear algebraic equations via a sparse, tightly banded matrix regardless of dimensionality. However, the use of PML boundaries enables rapid absorption of scattered wave energies at the boundaries and provides a simple and inexpensive interpretation of the scattered phonon energy flux calculated from the energy dissipation rate in the PML. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated on connected monoatomic chains, for which an analytic solution is known. The parameters defining the PML are found to affect the performance and guidelines for selecting optimal parameters are given. The method is used to study the energy transmission coefficient for connected diatomic chains over all available wavevectors for both optical and longitudinal phonons; it is found that when there is discontinuity between sublattices, even connected chains of equivalent acoustic impedance have near-zero transmission coefficient for short wavelengths. The phonon scattering cross section of an embedded nanocylinder is calculated in 2D for a wide range of frequencies to demonstrate the extension of the method to high dimensions. The calculations match continuum theory for long-wavelength phonons and large cylinder radii, but otherwise show complex physics associated with discreteness of the lattice. Examples include Mie oscillations which terminate when incident phonon frequencies exceed the maximum available frequency in the embedded nanocylinder, and

  11. Low-frequency spatial wave manipulation via phononic crystals with relaxed cell symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Celli, Paolo; Gonella, Stefano

    2014-03-14

    Phononic crystals enjoy unique wave manipulation capabilities enabled by their periodic topologies. On one hand, they feature frequency-dependent directivity, which allows directional propagation of selected modes even at low frequencies. However, the stellar nature of the propagation patterns and the inability to induce single-beam focusing represent significant limitations of this functionality. On the other hand, one can realize waveguides by defecting the periodic structure of a crystal operating in bandgap mode along some desired path. Waveguides of this type are only activated in the relatively high and narrow frequency bands corresponding to total bandgaps, which limits their potential technological applications. In this work, we introduce a class of phononic crystals with relaxed cell symmetry and we exploit symmetry relaxation of a population of auxiliary microstructural elements to achieve spatial manipulation of elastic waves at very low frequencies, in the range of existence of the acoustic modes. By this approach, we achieve focusing without modifying the default static properties of the medium and by invoking mechanisms that are well suited to envision adaptive configurations for semi-active wave control.

  12. Fine Structure of the Low-Frequency Raman Phonon Bands of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliev, M. N.; Litvinchuk, A. P.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Scott, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Raman spectra of singled-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) produced by laser and are process were studied between 5 and 500 kappa. The line width vs. temperature dependence of the low-frequency Raman bands between 150 and 200/ cm deviates from that expected for phonon decay through phonon-phonon scattering mechanism. The experimental results and their analysis provided convincing evidence that each of the low-frequency Raman lines is a superposition of several narrower Raman lines corresponding to tubes of nearly the same diameter. The application of Raman spectroscopy to probe the distribution of SWNT by both diameter and chirality is discussed.

  13. Universal phonon mean free path spectra in crystalline semiconductors at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Justin P.; Leach, Jacob H.; Preble, Edward A.; Sitar, Zlatko; Davis, Robert F.; Malen, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal conductivity in non-metallic crystalline materials results from cumulative contributions of phonons that have a broad range of mean free paths. Here we use high frequency surface temperature modulation that generates non-diffusive phonon transport to probe the phonon mean free path spectra of GaAs, GaN, AlN, and 4H-SiC at temperatures near 80 K, 150 K, 300 K, and 400 K. We find that phonons with MFPs greater than 230 ± 120 nm, 1000 ± 200 nm, 2500 ± 800 nm, and 4200 ± 850 nm contribute 50% of the bulk thermal conductivity of GaAs, GaN, AlN, and 4H-SiC near room temperature. By non-dimensionalizing the data based on Umklapp scattering rates of phonons, we identified a universal phonon mean free path spectrum in small unit cell crystalline semiconductors at high temperature. PMID:24129328

  14. High-pressure phonon dispersion of copper by using the modified analytic embedded atom method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Chang-Le; Feng, Fei-Long

    2013-09-01

    By using the Born—von Kármán theory of lattice dynamics and the modified analytic embedded atom method, we reproduce the experimental results of the phonon dispersion in fcc metal Cu at zero pressure along three high symmetry directions and four off-symmetry directions, and then simulate the phonon dispersion curves of Cu at high pressures of 50, 100, and 150 GPa. The results show that the shapes of dispersion curves at high pressures are very similar to that at zero pressure. All the vibration frequencies of Cu in all vibration branches at high pressures are larger than the results at zero pressure, and increase correspondingly as pressure reaches 50, 100, and 150 GPa sequentially. Moreover, on the basis of phonon dispersion, we calculate the values of specific heat of Cu at different pressures. The prediction of thermodynamic quantities lays a significant foundation for guiding and judging experiments of thermodynamic properties of solids under high pressures.

  15. High temperature phonon dispersion in graphene using classical molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anees, P. Panigrahi, B. K.; Valsakumar, M. C.

    2014-04-24

    Phonon dispersion and phonon density of states of graphene are calculated using classical molecular dynamics simulations. In this method, the dynamical matrix is constructed based on linear response theory by computing the displacement of atoms during the simulations. The computed phonon dispersions show excellent agreement with experiments. The simulations are done in both NVT and NPT ensembles at 300 K and found that the LO/TO modes are getting hardened at the Γ point. The NPT ensemble simulations capture the anharmonicity of the crystal accurately and the hardening of LO/TO modes is more pronounced. We also found that at 300 K the C-C bond length reduces below the equilibrium value and the ZA bending mode frequency becomes imaginary close to Γ along K-Γ direction, which indicates instability of the flat 2D graphene sheets.

  16. Relevance of Phonons in High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, Takeshi; Chung, Jae-Ho; Piekarz, Przemek; Arai, Masatoshi; Tajima, Setsuko; Tachiki, Masashi

    2002-03-01

    For a long time phonons have been regarded to be irrelevant to high temperature superconductivity (HTSC). However, our recent measurements of phonon dispersion in YBCO with neutron inelastic scattering at MAPS of the ISIS and of electron dressing of phonons by x-ray inelastic scattering at the APS suggest otherwise. They show that the in-plane Cu-O bond-stretching mode interacts strongly with electrons, reflecting the SC order parameter, and the electronic structure is strongly anisotropic in the Cu-O plane. The results are consistent with the formation of a short-range stripe structure and a resonant vibronic state. We conjecture that the spin-charge stripe structure brings down the electronic energy scale close to those of phonons, creating the resonant condition. A model based upon overscreening of phonons by charge and formation of the vibronic state yields a SC transition temperature over 300K. While this magnitude may not be accurate it suggests that the phonons are likely to be closely involved in the mechanism of HTSC.

  17. Phonon frequencies and elastic constants of cubic Pu from electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, G.K.

    1996-11-01

    The phonon frequencies and elastic constants of plutonium are calculated using a model for the electronic structure that treats the valance electrons as a pseudopotential and the f-electrons in tight-binding theory. An effective interaction between ions is presented with electron screening treated in the Thomas-Fermi approximation and the f-electrons contributing bonding and repulsive terms to the potential. The phonon frequencies and elastic constants are calculated using the face-centered cubic lattice structure for both the {alpha}-, and {delta}-phases of Pu. The electronic structure predicts the qualitative behavior of the elastic constants and the transverse branches of the phonon dispersion curves in agreement with experimental values of the elastic constants for B-phase Pu.

  18. Electron–phonon metamaterial featuring nonlinear tri-interleaved piezoelectric topologies and its application in low-frequency vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Bin; Guyomar, Daniel; Lallart, Mickaël

    2016-09-01

    This article proposes a nonlinear tri-interleaved piezoelectric topology based on the synchronized switch damping on inductor (SSDI) technique, which can be applied to phononic metamaterials for elastic wave control and effective low-frequency vibration reduction. A comparison of the attenuation performance is made between piezoelectric phononic metamaterial with distributed SSDI topology (each SSDI shunt being independently connected to a single piezoelectric element) and piezoelectric phononic metamaterial with the proposed electronic topology. Theoretical results show excellent band gap hybridization (near-coupling between Bragg scattering mechanism and wideband resonance mechanism induced by synchronized switch damping networks in piezoelectric phononic metamaterials) with the proposed electronic topology over the investigated frequency domain. Furthermore, piezoelectric phononic metamaterials with proposed electronic topology generated a better low-frequency broadband gap, which is experimentally validated by measuring the harmonic response of a piezoelectric phononic metamaterial beam under clamped–clamped boundary conditions.

  19. High-speed asynchronous optical sampling for high-sensitivity detection of coherent phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekorsy, T.; Taubert, R.; Hudert, F.; Schrenk, G.; Bartels, A.; Cerna, R.; Kotaidis, V.; Plech, A.; Köhler, K.; Schmitz, J.; Wagner, J.

    2007-12-01

    A new optical pump-probe technique is implemented for the investigation of coherent acoustic phonon dynamics in the GHz to THz frequency range which is based on two asynchronously linked femtosecond lasers. Asynchronous optical sampling (ASOPS) provides the performance of on all-optical oscilloscope and allows us to record optically induced lattice dynamics over nanosecond times with femtosecond resolution at scan rates of 10 kHz without any moving part in the set-up. Within 1 minute of data acquisition time signal-to-noise ratios better than 107 are achieved. We present examples of the high-sensitivity detection of coherent phonons in superlattices and of the coherent acoustic vibration of metallic nanoparticles.

  20. Chiral phonons at high-symmetry points in monolayer hexagonal lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lifa; Niu, Qian

    2015-09-11

    In monolayer hexagonal lattices, the intravalley and intervalley scattering of electrons can involve chiral phonons at Brillouin-zone center and corners, respectively. At these high-symmetry points, there is a threefold rotational symmetry endowing phonon eigenmodes with a quantized pseudoangular momentum, which includes orbital and spin parts. Conservation of pseudoangular momentum yields selection rules for intravalley and intervalley scattering of electrons by phonons. Concrete predictions of helicity-resolved optical phenomena are made on monolayer molybdenum disulfide. The chiral phonons at Brillouin-zone corners excited by polarized photons can be detected by a valley phonon Hall effect. The chiral phonons, together with phonon circular polarization, phonon pseudoangular momentum, selection rules, and valley phonon Hall effect will extend the basis for valley-based electronics and phononics applications in the future. PMID:26406841

  1. Chiral Phonons at High-Symmetry Points in Monolayer Hexagonal Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lifa; Niu, Qian

    2015-09-01

    In monolayer hexagonal lattices, the intravalley and intervalley scattering of electrons can involve chiral phonons at Brillouin-zone center and corners, respectively. At these high-symmetry points, there is a threefold rotational symmetry endowing phonon eigenmodes with a quantized pseudoangular momentum, which includes orbital and spin parts. Conservation of pseudoangular momentum yields selection rules for intravalley and intervalley scattering of electrons by phonons. Concrete predictions of helicity-resolved optical phenomena are made on monolayer molybdenum disulfide. The chiral phonons at Brillouin-zone corners excited by polarized photons can be detected by a valley phonon Hall effect. The chiral phonons, together with phonon circular polarization, phonon pseudoangular momentum, selection rules, and valley phonon Hall effect will extend the basis for valley-based electronics and phononics applications in the future.

  2. Zero-frequency and slow elastic modes in phononic monolayer granular membranes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Yang; Pichard, Hélène; Tournat, Vincent; Theocharis, Georgios; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the dispersion properties of elastic waves in hexagonal and honeycomb monolayer granular membranes with either out-of-plane or in-plane particle motion. The particles interact predominantly via normal and transverse contact rigidities. When rotational degrees of freedom are taken into account, the bending and torsional rigidities of the intergrain contacts can control some of the phononic modes. The existence of zero-frequency modes, zero-group-velocity modes and their transformation into slow propagating phononic modes due to weak bending and torsional intergrain interactions are investigated. We also study the formation and manipulation of Dirac cones and multiple degenerated modes. This could motivate variety of potential applications in elastic waves control by manipulating the contact rigidities in granular phononic crystals. PMID:26607105

  3. Phonon characteristics of high {Tc} superconductors from neutron Doppler broadening measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trela, W.J.; Kwei, G.H.; Lynn, J.E.; Meggers, K.

    1994-12-01

    Statistical information on the phonon frequency spectrum of materials can be measured by neutron transmission techniques if they contain nuclei with low energy resonances, narrow enough to be Doppler-broadened, in their neutron cross sections. The authors have carried out some measurements using this technique for materials of the lanthanum barium cuprate class, La{sub 2{minus}x}Ba{sub x}CuO{sub 4}. Two samples with slightly different concentrations of oxygen, one being superconductive, the other not, were examined. Pure lanthanum cuprate was also measured. Lanthanum, barium and copper all have relatively low energy narrow resonances. Thus it should be possible to detect differences in the phonons carried by different kinds of atom in the lattice. Neutron cross section measurements have been made with high energy resolution and statistical precision on the 59m flight path of LANSCE, the pulsed spallation neutron source at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Measurements on all three materials were made over a range of temperatures from 15K to 300K, with small steps through the critical temperature region near 27K. No significant changes in the mean phonon energy of the lanthanum atoms were observed near the critical temperature of the super-conducting material. It appears however that the mean phonon energy of lanthanum in the superconductor is considerably higher than that in the non-superconductors. The samples used in this series of experiments were too thin in barium and copper to determine anything significant about their phonon spectra.

  4. Thickness-Dependent Coherent Phonon Frequency in Ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO₃ Films.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuolong; Sobota, Jonathan A; Leuenberger, Dominik; Kemper, Alexander F; Lee, James J; Schmitt, Felix T; Li, Wei; Moore, Rob G; Kirchmann, Patrick S; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-06-10

    Ultrathin FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 substrates are a recent milestone in atomic material engineering due to their important role in understanding unconventional superconductivity in Fe-based materials. By using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we study phonon frequencies in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. After optical excitation, we observe periodic modulations of the photoelectron spectrum as a function of pump-probe delay for 1-unit-cell, 3-unit-cell, and 60-unit-cell thick FeSe films. The frequencies of the coherent intensity oscillations increase from 5.00 ± 0.02 to 5.25 ± 0.02 THz with increasing film thickness. By comparing with previous works, we attribute this mode to the Se A1g phonon. The dominant mechanism for the phonon softening in 1-unit-cell thick FeSe films is a substrate-induced lattice strain. Our results demonstrate an abrupt phonon renormalization due to a lattice mismatch between the ultrathin film and the substrate. PMID:26027951

  5. Nonharmonic phonons in α-iron at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauger, L.; Lucas, M. S.; Muñoz, J. A.; Tracy, S. J.; Kresch, M.; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Fultz, B.

    2014-08-01

    Phonon densities of states (DOS) of bcc α-Fe57 were measured from room temperature through the 1044 K Curie transition and the 1185 K fcc γ-Fe phase transition using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. At higher temperatures all phonons shift to lower energies (soften) with thermal expansion, but the low transverse modes soften especially rapidly above 700 K, showing strongly nonharmonic behavior that persists through the magnetic transition. Interatomic force constants for the bcc phase were obtained by iteratively fitting a Born-von Kármán model to the experimental phonon spectra using a genetic algorithm optimization. The second-nearest-neighbor fitted axial force constants weakened significantly at elevated temperatures. An unusually large nonharmonic behavior is reported, which increases the vibrational entropy and accounts for a contribution of 35 meV/atom in the free energy at high temperatures. The nonharmonic contribution to the vibrational entropy follows the thermal trend of the magnetic entropy, and may be coupled to magnetic excitations. A small change in vibrational entropy across the α-γ structural phase transformation is also reported.

  6. Multilayer-split-tube resonators with low-frequency band gaps in phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong; Gao, Nansha

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, low-frequency band gaps in two-dimensional Helmholtz resonant phononic crystals (PCs) composed of multilayer-split-tube resonators are investigated. The band structures, transmission spectra, and pressure field of the acoustic modes of these PCs are calculated by using a finite element method (FEM). The numerical results show that the first band gap of the structure is from 88 to 140 Hz. The transmission spectra are in accordance with those of the dispersion relation calculations. The acoustic modes of the bands are analyzed to reveal the nature of this phenomenon. It is found that the interaction between the local resonance and the traveling wave modes in proposed structure is responsible for the formation of the first band gap. The influences of the structural parameters on the band gaps are investigated by using FEM and the electrical circuit analogy. Numerical results show that the band gaps can be modulated in an even wider frequency range by changing the structural parameters, such as the rotation angle, the number of tubes, and the radius of the outer tube. The structural design results provide an effective way for phononic crystals to obtain the low-frequency band gaps, which have potential application in the low-frequency noise reduction.

  7. Ultralow frequency acoustic bandgap and vibration energy recovery in tetragonal folding beam phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nansha; Wu, Jiu Hui; Yu, Lie; Hou, Hong

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates ultralow frequency acoustic properties and energy recovery of tetragonal folding beam phononic crystal (TFBPC) and its complementary structure. The dispersion curve relationships, transmission spectra and displacement fields of the eigenmodes are studied with FEA in detail. Compared with the traditional three layer phononic crystal (PC) structure, this structure proposed in this paper not only unfold bandgaps (BGs) in lower frequency range (below 300 Hz), but also has lighter weight because of beam structural cracks. We analyze the relevant physical mechanism behind this phenomenon, and discuss the effects of the tetragonal folding beam geometric parameters on band structure maps. FEM proves that the multi-cell structures with different arrangements have different acoustic BGs when compared with single cell structure. Harmonic frequency response and piezoelectric properties of TFBPC are specifically analyzed. The results confirm that this structure does have the recovery ability for low frequency vibration energy in environment. These conclusions in this paper could be indispensable to PC practical applications such as BG tuning and could be applied in portable devices, wireless sensor, micro-electro mechanical systems which can recycle energy from vibration environment as its own energy supply.

  8. Coherent phonon optics in a chip with an electrically controlled active device

    PubMed Central

    Poyser, Caroline L.; Akimov, Andrey V.; Campion, Richard P.; Kent, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Phonon optics concerns operations with high-frequency acoustic waves in solid media in a similar way to how traditional optics operates with the light beams (i.e. photons). Phonon optics experiments with coherent terahertz and sub-terahertz phonons promise a revolution in various technical applications related to high-frequency acoustics, imaging, and heat transport. Previously, phonon optics used passive methods for manipulations with propagating phonon beams that did not enable their external control. Here we fabricate a phononic chip, which includes a generator of coherent monochromatic phonons with frequency 378 GHz, a sensitive coherent phonon detector, and an active layer: a doped semiconductor superlattice, with electrical contacts, inserted into the phonon propagation path. In the experiments, we demonstrate the modulation of the coherent phonon flux by an external electrical bias applied to the active layer. Phonon optics using external control broadens the spectrum of prospective applications of phononics on the nanometer scale. PMID:25652241

  9. Investigation of anti-Stokes Raman processes at phonon-polariton resonance: from Raman oscillation, frequency upconversion to Raman amplification.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yujie J

    2015-03-01

    Raman oscillation, frequency upconversion, and Raman amplification can be achieved in a second-order nonlinear medium at the phonon-polariton resonance. By beating two optical fields, a second-order nonlinear polarization is generated inside the medium. Such a polarization induces a spatially uniform nonpropagating electric field at the beat frequency, which in turn mixes with the input optical field at the lower frequency to generate or amplify the anti-Stokes optical field. Raman oscillation can be efficiently reached for the copropagating configuration. In comparison, efficient frequency upconversion and large amplifications are achievable for the counterpropagating configuration. These Raman processes can be used to effectively remove transverse-optical phonons before decaying to lower-frequency phonons, achieve laser cooling, and significantly enhance coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The counterpropagating configuration offers advantages for amplifying extremely weak signals. PMID:25723418

  10. High Resolution Phonon-assisted Quasi-resonance Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Czarnocki, Cyprian; Kerfoot, Mark L; Casara, Joshua; Jacobs, Andrew R; Jennings, Cameron; Scheibner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    High resolution optical spectroscopy methods are demanding in terms of either technology, equipment, complexity, time or a combination of these. Here we demonstrate an optical spectroscopy method that is capable of resolving spectral features beyond that of the spin fine structure and homogeneous linewidth of single quantum dots (QDs) using a standard, easy-to-use spectrometer setup. This method incorporates both laser and photoluminescence spectroscopy, combining the advantage of laser line-width limited resolution with multi-channel photoluminescence detection. Such a scheme allows for considerable improvement of resolution over that of a common single-stage spectrometer. The method uses phonons to assist in the measurement of the photoluminescence of a single quantum dot after resonant excitation of its ground state transition. The phonon's energy difference allows one to separate and filter out the laser light exciting the quantum dot. An advantageous feature of this method is its straight forward integration into standard spectroscopy setups, which are accessible to most researchers. PMID:27405015

  11. Phonon manipulation with phononic crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim Bongsang; Hopkins, Patrick Edward; Leseman, Zayd C.; Goettler, Drew F.; Su, Mehmet F.; El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Reinke, Charles M.; Olsson, Roy H., III

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated engineered modification of propagation of thermal phonons, i.e. at THz frequencies, using phononic crystals. This work combined theoretical work at Sandia National Laboratories, the University of New Mexico, the University of Colorado Boulder, and Carnegie Mellon University; the MESA fabrication facilities at Sandia; and the microfabrication facilities at UNM to produce world-leading control of phonon propagation in silicon at frequencies up to 3 THz. These efforts culminated in a dramatic reduction in the thermal conductivity of silicon using phononic crystals by a factor of almost 30 as compared with the bulk value, and about 6 as compared with an unpatterned slab of the same thickness. This work represents a revolutionary advance in the engineering of thermoelectric materials for optimal, high-ZT performance. We have demonstrated the significant reduction of the thermal conductivity of silicon using phononic crystal structuring using MEMS-compatible fabrication techniques and in a planar platform that is amenable to integration with typical microelectronic systems. The measured reduction in thermal conductivity as compared to bulk silicon was about a factor of 20 in the cross-plane direction [26], and a factor of 6 in the in-plane direction. Since the electrical conductivity was only reduced by a corresponding factor of about 3 due to the removal of conductive material (i.e., porosity), and the Seebeck coefficient should remain constant as an intrinsic material property, this corresponds to an effective enhancement in ZT by a factor of 2. Given the number of papers in literature devoted to only a small, incremental change in ZT, the ability to boost the ZT of a material by a factor of 2 simply by reducing thermal conductivity is groundbreaking. The results in this work were obtained using silicon, a material that has benefitted from enormous interest in the microelectronics industry and that has a fairly large thermoelectric power

  12. Phonons and defects in semiconductors and nanostructures: Phonon trapping, phonon scattering, and heat flow at heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Estreicher, S. K. Gibbons, T. M.; Kang, By.; Bebek, M. B.

    2014-01-07

    Defects in semiconductors introduce vibrational modes that are distinct from bulk modes because they are spatially localized in the vicinity of the defect. Light impurities produce high-frequency modes often visible by Fourier-transform infrared absorption or Raman spectroscopy. Their vibrational lifetimes vary by orders of magnitude and sometimes exhibit unexpectedly large isotope effects. Heavy impurities introduce low-frequency modes sometimes visible as phonon replicas in photoluminescence bands. But other defects such as surfaces or interfaces exhibit spatially localized modes (SLMs) as well. All of them can trap phonons, which ultimately decay into lower-frequency bulk phonons. When heat flows through a material containing defects, phonon trapping at localized modes followed by their decay into bulk phonons is usually described in terms of phonon scattering: defects are assumed to be static scattering centers and the properties of the defect-related SLMs modes are ignored. These dynamic properties of defects are important. In this paper, we quantify the concepts of vibrational localization and phonon trapping, distinguish between normal and anomalous decay of localized excitations, discuss the meaning of phonon scattering in real space at the atomic level, and illustrate the importance of phonon trapping in the case of heat flow at Si/Ge and Si/C interfaces.

  13. Using high pressure to study thermal transport and phonon scattering mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohensee, Gregory Thomas

    The aerospace industry studies nanocomposites for heat dissipation and moderation of thermal expansion, and the semiconductor industry faces a Joule heating barrier in devices with high power density. My primary experimental tools are the diamond anvil cell (DAC) coupled with time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR). TDTR is a precise optical method well-suited to measuring thermal conductivities and conductances at the nanoscale and across interfaces. The DAC-TDTR method yields thermal property data as a function of pressure, rather than temperature. This relatively unexplored independent variable can separate the components of thermal conductance and serve as an independent test for phonon-defect scattering models. I studied the effect of non-equilibrium thermal transport at the aluminum-coated surface of an exotic cuprate material Ca9La5Cu 24O41, which boasts a tenfold enhanced thermal conductivity along one crystalline axis where two-leg copper-oxygen spin-ladder structures carry heat in the form of thermalized magnetic excitations. Highly anisotropic materials are of interest for controlled thermal management applications, and the spin-ladder magnetic heat carriers ("magnons") are not well understood. I found that below room temperature, the apparent thermal conductivity of Ca9La5Cu24O41 depends on the frequency of the applied surface heating in TDTR. This occurs because the thermal penetration depth in the TDTR experiment is comparable to the length-scale for the equilibration of the magnons that are the dominant channel for heat conduction and the phonons that dominate the heat capacity. I applied a two-temperature model to analyze the TDTR data and extracted an effective volumetric magnon-phonon coupling parameter g for Ca9La5Cu24O 41 at temperatures from 75 K to 300 K; g varies by approximately two orders of magnitude over this range of temperature and has the value g = 1015 W m-3 K-1 near the peak of the thermal conductivity at T ≈ 180 K. To examine

  14. Mode sequence, frequency change of nonsoft phonons, and LO-TO splitting in strained tetragonal BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeliarijaona, Aldo; Fu, Huaxiang

    2015-09-01

    Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy revealed the existence of an unusual large-frequency shift occurring to a nonsoft mode of E (TO4 ) when BaTiO3 is strained to a SrTiO3 substrate [D. Tenne et al., Science 313, 1614 (2006), 10.1126/science.1130306]. It raised two interesting questions: (i) whether there are other nonsoft modes that possess similar or even larger strain-induced frequency shifts and (ii) how the mode sequence is altered by these shifts in frequency. Note that mode sequence is also pivotal in correctly indexing and assigning the spectroscopy peaks observed in all Raman experiments. By mapping out the evolutions of individual phonon modes as a function of strain using first-principles density functional perturbation calculations, we determine the mode sequence and strain-induced phonon frequency shifts in prototypical BaTiO3. Our study reveals that the mode sequence is drastically different when BaTiO3 is strained to SrTiO3 compared to that in the unstrained structure, caused by multiple mode crossings. Furthermore, we predict that three other nonsoft modes, A1(TO2), E (LO4 ), and A1(TO3), display even larger strain-induced frequency shifts than E (TO4 ). The strain responses of individual modes are found to be highly mode specific, and a mechanism that regulates the magnitude of the frequency shift is provided. As another key outcome of this study, we tackle a long-standing problem of LO-TO splitting in ferroelectrics. A rigorous definition for the LO-TO splitting is formulated, which allows this critical quantity to be calculated quantitatively. The definition immediately reveals a new finding; that is, a large LO-TO splitting not only exists for E (LO4 ), which is previously known and originates from a soft mode, it also occurs for a nonsoft A1(LO3) mode. The LO-TO splitting is shown to decrease drastically with compressive strain, and this decrease cannot be explained by the Born effective charges and high-frequency dielectric constants.

  15. Phonon triggered rhombohedral lattice distortion in vanadium at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Farber, Daniel L.; Bosak, Alexei; Aracne, Chantel M.; Ruddle, David G.; Krisch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the simple body-centered-cubic crystal structure, the elements of group V, vanadium, niobium and tantalum, show strong interactions between the electronic properties and lattice dynamics. Further, these interactions can be tuned by external parameters, such as pressure and temperature. We used inelastic x-ray scattering to probe the phonon dispersion of single-crystalline vanadium as a function of pressure to 45 GPa. Our measurements show an anomalous high-pressure behavior of the transverse acoustic mode along the (100) direction and a softening of the elastic modulus C44 that triggers a rhombohedral lattice distortion occurring between 34 and 39 GPa. Our results provide the missing experimental confirmation of the theoretically predicted shear instability arising from the progressive intra-band nesting of the Fermi surface with increasing pressure, a scenario common to all transition metals of group V. PMID:27539662

  16. Phonon triggered rhombohedral lattice distortion in vanadium at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Farber, Daniel L; Bosak, Alexei; Aracne, Chantel M; Ruddle, David G; Krisch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the simple body-centered-cubic crystal structure, the elements of group V, vanadium, niobium and tantalum, show strong interactions between the electronic properties and lattice dynamics. Further, these interactions can be tuned by external parameters, such as pressure and temperature. We used inelastic x-ray scattering to probe the phonon dispersion of single-crystalline vanadium as a function of pressure to 45 GPa. Our measurements show an anomalous high-pressure behavior of the transverse acoustic mode along the (100) direction and a softening of the elastic modulus C44 that triggers a rhombohedral lattice distortion occurring between 34 and 39 GPa. Our results provide the missing experimental confirmation of the theoretically predicted shear instability arising from the progressive intra-band nesting of the Fermi surface with increasing pressure, a scenario common to all transition metals of group V. PMID:27539662

  17. Phononic crystal devices

    DOEpatents

    El-Kady, Ihab F.; Olsson, Roy H.

    2012-01-10

    Phononic crystals that have the ability to modify and control the thermal black body phonon distribution and the phonon component of heat transport in a solid. In particular, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be modified by altering the phonon density of states in a phononic crystal. The present invention is directed to phononic crystal devices and materials such as radio frequency (RF) tags powered from ambient heat, dielectrics with extremely low thermal conductivity, thermoelectric materials with a higher ratio of electrical-to-thermal conductivity, materials with phononically engineered heat capacity, phononic crystal waveguides that enable accelerated cooling, and a variety of low temperature application devices.

  18. Low-phonon-frequency chalcogenide crystalline hosts for rare earth lasers operating beyond three microns

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Page, Ralph H.; Schaffers, Kathleen I.; Nostrand, Michael C.; Krupke, William F.; Schunemann, Peter G.

    2000-01-01

    The invention comprises a RE-doped MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 crystalline gain medium, where M includes a divalent ion such as Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Pb, Eu, or Yb; A is selected from trivalent ions including Al, Ga, and In; X is one of the chalcogenide ions S, Se, and Te; and RE represents the trivalent rare earth ions. The MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 gain medium can be employed in a laser oscillator or a laser amplifier. Possible pump sources include diode lasers, as well as other laser pump sources. The laser wavelengths generated are greater than 3 microns, as becomes possible because of the low phonon frequency of this host medium. The invention may be used to seed optical devices such as optical parametric oscillators and other lasers.

  19. Optical phonon frequencies in the quaternary CdTe1-x-ySexSy mixed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, H. C.; Sood, Geeta; Malhotra, Jaishree; Tripathi, B. B.

    1986-08-01

    The optical phonon frequencies of the mixed-crystal system CdTe1-x-ySexSy are calculated theoretically by means of a concentration-dependent model utilizing the effect of nonrandomness. The calculations are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Extremely low-frequency Lamb wave band gaps in a sandwich phononic crystal thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li; Wu, Jiu Hui; Liu, Zhangyi; Fu, Gang

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a kind of sandwich phononic crystal (PC) plate with silicon rubber scatterers embedded in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix is proposed to demonstrate its low-frequency Lamb wave band gap (BG) characteristics. The dispersion relationship and the displacement vector fields of the basic slab modes and the locally resonant modes are investigated to show the BG formation mechanism. The anti-symmetric Lamb wave BG is further studied due to its important function in reducing vibration. The analysis on the BG characteristics of the PC through changing their geometrical parameters is performed. By optimizing the structure, a sandwich PC plate with a thickness of only 3 mm and a lower boundary (as low as 23.9 Hz) of the first anti-symmetric BG is designed. Finally, sound insulation experiment on a sandwich PC plate with the thickness of only 2.5 mm is conducted, showing satisfactory noise reduction effect in the frequency range of the anti-symmetric Lamb BG. Therefore, this kind of sandwich PC plate has potential applications in controlling vibration and noise in low-frequency ranges.

  1. Phase-sensitive optical detection of ballistic phonon heat pulses using frequency-modulation spectroscopy and persistent spectral holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, W. P.; Moerner, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    With the use of laser frequency-modulation (FM) spectroscopy and persistent spectral holes, time-resolved phase-sensitive probing of ballistic phonon heat pulses is accomplished in the interior of a NaF crystal. The ballistic phonon heat pulses are generated by the absorption of a Nd:YAG (neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet) laser pulse in a Cr film on the sample surface. Local measurement of the propagating stress-strain field is illustrated by detecting the modulation of a spectral hole in the inhomogeneously broadened 607-nm color-center absorption in x-irradiated NaF at liquid-helium temperatures. By examining the dependence of the observed phonon time-of-flight data on the polarization of the probing light, the position within the sample, and the phase of FM detection, an identification of the acoustic polarizations of the propagating phonons may be made. The effects of phonon focusing and mode conversion upon reflection must be taken into account to complete the identification. Along with the ability to determine the sign of the acoustic disturbance, this experiment features a strain detection limit of 4×10-9 at a time resolution of 50 ns.

  2. Extremely high electron mobility in a phonon-glass semimetal.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, S; Shiomi, Y; Lee, J S; Bahramy, M S; Suzuki, T; Uchida, M; Arita, R; Taguchi, Y; Tokura, Y

    2013-06-01

    The electron mobility is one of the key parameters that characterize the charge-carrier transport properties of materials, as exemplified by the quantum Hall effect as well as high-efficiency thermoelectric and solar energy conversions. For thermoelectric applications, introduction of chemical disorder is an important strategy for reducing the phonon-mediated thermal conduction, but is usually accompanied by mobility degradation. Here, we show a multilayered semimetal β-CuAgSe overcoming such a trade-off between disorder and mobility. The polycrystalline ingot shows a giant positive magnetoresistance and Shubnikov de Haas oscillations, indicative of a high-mobility small electron pocket derived from the Ag s-electron band. Ni doping, which introduces chemical and lattice disorder, further enhances the electron mobility up to 90,000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 10 K, leading not only to a larger magnetoresistance but also a better thermoelectric figure of merit. This Ag-based layered semimetal with a glassy lattice is a new type of promising thermoelectric material suitable for chemical engineering. PMID:23603851

  3. Frequency characteristics of defect states in a two-dimensional phononic crystal with slit structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. P.; Jiang, P.; Chen, T. N.; Yu, K. P.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the defect state and band gap characteristics in a two-dimensional slit structure phononic crystal, consisting of slotted steel tubes embedded in an air matrix, are investigated theoretically and experimentally. Using the finite element method and supercell technique, the dispersion relationships and power transmission spectra of the slit structures are calculated. The vibration modes of the band gap edges are analyzed to clarify the mechanism of the generation of the band gaps. Additionally, the influence of the slit width on the band gaps in slit structure is investigated. The slit width was found to influence the band gaps; this is critical to understand for practical applications. Based on this finding, a method to form defect scatterers by changing the slit width of a single central scatterer, or one row of scatterers, in the perfect PC was developed. Defect bands can be induced by creating defects inside the original complete band gaps. The frequency can then be tuned by changing the slit width of defect scatterers. Meanwhile, the relationship between point defect and line defect is investigated. Finally, we verify the results of theoretical research by experiments. These results will help in fabricating devices such as acoustic filters and waveguides whose band frequency can be modulated.

  4. Superconductivity in the two-dimensional electron gas induced by high-energy optical phonon mode and large polarization of the SrTiO3 substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstein, Baruch; Shapiro, B. Ya.; Shapiro, I.; Li, Dingping

    2016-07-01

    Pairing in one-atomic-layer-thick two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) by a single flat band of high-energy longitudinal optical phonons is considered. The polar dielectric SrTiO3 (STO) exhibits such an energetic phonon mode and the 2DEG is created both when one unit cell FeSe layer is grown on its (100 ) surface and on the interface with another dielectric like LaAlO3 (LAO). We obtain a quantitative description of both systems solving the gap equation for Tc for arbitrary Fermi energy ɛF, electron-phonon coupling λ , and the phonon frequency Ω , and direct (random-phase approximation) electron-electron repulsion strength α . The focus is on the intermediate region between the adiabatic, ɛF>>Ω , and the nonadiabatic, ɛF<<Ω , regimes. The high-temperature superconductivity in single-unit-cell FeSe/STO is possible due to a combination of three factors: high-longitudinal-optical phonon frequency, large electron-phonon coupling λ ˜0.5 , and huge dielectric constant of the substrate suppression the Coulomb repulsion. It is shown that very low density electron gas in the interfaces is still capable of generating superconductivity of the order of 0.1 K in LAO/STO.

  5. Influence of the electron-phonon interaction on the temperature dependence of the phonon mode frequency in the II-VI compound solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Woźny, M. Cebulski, J.; Sheregii, E. M.; Marcelli, A.; Piccinini, M.

    2015-01-14

    We present an experimental investigation of the temperature dependence of the TO-phonon mode frequencies for the HgTe-based II-VI semiconductor solid solutions. In the case of the ternary Hg{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te solid solution was shown a discontinuity in the temperature dependence of the HgTe-like T{sub 0}-mode and of the ZnTe-like T{sub 1}-mode, similar to the Hg{sub 0.85}Cd{sub 0.15}Te system [Sheregii et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 045504 (2009)]. A generalization of the theoretical temperature shift of the phonon mode frequency as analytic equation is derived that includes both the anharmonic contribution and the electron-phonon e-p interaction which in this case is returnable—the electron subsystem effect on the phonon one. Data show that our equation satisfactorily describes the temperature shift of both Hg{sub 0.85}Cd{sub 0.15}Te and Hg{sub 0.90}Zn{sub 0.10}Te containing Dirac point (E{sub g} ≡ Γ{sub 6} – Γ{sub 8} = 0) although one of the two constants describing the anharmonic shift of the HgTe-like mode should be positive what is abnormal too. In the case of the Hg{sub 0.80}Cd{sub 0.20}Te and Hg{sub 0.763}Zn{sub 0.237}Te solid solution, the role of the returnable e-p contribution is negligible but a positive temperature shift for the HgTe-like modes occurs. This result does not allow to explain the positive temperature shift of these modes merely by the contribution of the (e-p) interaction. Indeed, the relativistic contribution to the chemical bonds induces an abnormal temperature shift of the electron states in Hg-based semiconductors—the effect is expected since the Hg d spin-orbit split contribution to chemical bonds may lead to an abnormal temperature shift of the HgTe-like modes.

  6. Coherent acoustic phonons in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekorsy, T.; Taubert, R.; Hudert, F.; Bartels, A.; Habenicht, A.; Merkt, F.; Leiderer, P.; Köhler, K.; Schmitz, J.; Wagner, J.

    2008-02-01

    Phonons are considered as a most important origin of scattering and dissipation for electronic coherence in nanostructures. The generation of coherent acoustic phonons with femtosecond laser pulses opens the possibility to control phonon dynamics in amplitude and phase. We demonstrate a new experimental technique based on two synchronized femtosecond lasers with GHz repetition rate to study the dynamics of coherently generated acoustic phonons in semiconductor heterostructures with high sensitivity. High-speed synchronous optical sampling (ASOPS) enables to scan a time-delay of 1 ns with 100 fs time resolution with a frequency in the kHz range without a moving part in the set-up. We investigate the dynamics of coherent zone-folded acoustic phonons in semiconductor superlattices (GaAs/AlAs and GaSb/InAs) and of coherent vibration of metallic nanostructures of non-spherical shape using ASOPS.

  7. Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuolong; Sobota, Jonathan A.; Leuenberger, Dominik; Kemper, Alexander F.; Lee, James J.; Schmitt, Felix T.; Li, Wei; Moore, Rob G.; Kirchmann, Patrick S.; Shen, Zhi -Xun

    2015-06-01

    Ultrathin FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 substrates are a recent milestone in atomic material engineering due to their important role in understanding unconventional superconductivity in Fe-based materials. By using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we study phonon frequencies in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. After optical excitation, we observe periodic modulations of the photoelectron spectrum as a function of pump–probe delay for 1-unit-cell, 3-unit-cell, and 60-unit-cell thick FeSe films. The frequencies of the coherent intensity oscillations increase from 5.00 ± 0.02 to 5.25 ± 0.02 THz with increasing film thickness. By comparing with previous works, we attribute this mode to the Se A1g phonon. The dominant mechanism for the phonon softening in 1-unit-cell thick FeSe films is a substrate-induced lattice strain. Results demonstrate an abrupt phonon renormalization due to a lattice mismatch between the ultrathin film and the substrate.

  8. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  9. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  10. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  11. Evidence of scaling in the high pressure phonon dispersion relations of some elemental solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Divya; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Sarkar, Subir K.

    2014-07-01

    First principles searches are carried out for the existence of an asymptotic scaling law for the zero temperature phonon dispersion relation of several elemental crystalline solids in the high pressure regime. The solids studied are Cu, Ni, Pd, Au, Al, and Ir in the face-centered-cubic (fcc) geometry and Fe, Re, and Os in the hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) geometry. At higher pressures, the dependence of the scale of frequency on pressure can be fitted well by a power law. Elements with a given crystalline geometry have values of the scaling exponent very close to each other (0.32 for fcc and 0.27 for hcp - with a scatter below five percent of the average).

  12. Dirac-like point at the high symmetric M point in a square phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Han-Feng; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Fu-Gen; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Li, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Using the accidental degeneracy of a doubly degenerate state and a single state, a new Dirac-like point was constructed at the high symmetric M point in a two-dimensional phononic crystal (PnC) that consists of a square array of square rods in water. When a plane wave at a frequency near the Dirac-like point impinges on the PnC slab from the left, the spatial phase experiences a minor change in the regions located near the incident interface, but this phase remains uniform in the far field. We also demonstrate two important properties that are correlated to these special field patterns: acoustic cloaking and wavefront reshaping.

  13. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  14. High-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M R

    1986-08-01

    Over the last six years high-frequency ventilation has been extensively evaluated both in the clinical and laboratory settings. It is now no longer the great mystery it once was, and it is now no longer believed (as many had hoped), that it will solve all the problems associated with mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Although the technique is safe and appears to cause no harm even in the long term, it has not yet been shown to offer any major advantages over conventional mechanical ventilation. PMID:3530042

  15. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  16. Observation of low- and high-energy Gamow-Teller phonon excitations in nuclei.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Fujita, H; Adachi, T; Bai, C L; Algora, A; Berg, G P A; von Brentano, P; Colò, G; Csatlós, M; Deaven, J M; Estevez-Aguado, E; Fransen, C; De Frenne, D; Fujita, K; Ganioğlu, E; Guess, C J; Gulyás, J; Hatanaka, K; Hirota, K; Honma, M; Ishikawa, D; Jacobs, E; Krasznahorkay, A; Matsubara, H; Matsuyanagi, K; Meharchand, R; Molina, F; Muto, K; Nakanishi, K; Negret, A; Okamura, H; Ong, H J; Otsuka, T; Pietralla, N; Perdikakis, G; Popescu, L; Rubio, B; Sagawa, H; Sarriguren, P; Scholl, C; Shimbara, Y; Shimizu, Y; Susoy, G; Suzuki, T; Tameshige, Y; Tamii, A; Thies, J H; Uchida, M; Wakasa, T; Yosoi, M; Zegers, R G T; Zell, K O; Zenihiro, J

    2014-03-21

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in atomic nuclei are sensitive to both nuclear shell structure and effective residual interactions. The nuclear GT excitations were studied for the mass number A = 42, 46, 50, and 54 "f-shell" nuclei in ((3)He, t) charge-exchange reactions. In the (42)Ca → (42)Sc reaction, most of the GT strength is concentrated in the lowest excited state at 0.6 MeV, suggesting the existence of a low-energy GT phonon excitation. As A increases, a high-energy GT phonon excitation develops in the 6-11 MeV region. In the (54)Fe → (54)Co reaction, the high-energy GT phonon excitation mainly carries the GT strength. The existence of these two GT phonon excitations are attributed to the 2 fermionic degrees of freedom in nuclei. PMID:24702355

  17. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  18. Manipulation of thermal phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chung-Hao

    Developing materials that can conduct electricity easily, but block the motion of phonons is necessary in the applications of thermoelectric devices, which can generate electricity from temperature differences. In converse, a key requirement as chips get faster is to obtain better ways to dissipate heat. Controlling heat transfer in these crystalline materials devices --- such as silicon --- is important. The heat is actually the motion or vibration of atoms known as phonons. Finding ways to manipulate the behavior of phonons is crucial for both energy applications and the cooling of integrated circuits. A novel class of artificially periodic structured materials --- phononic crystals --- might make manipulation of thermal phonons possible. In many fields of physical sciences and engineering, acoustic wave propagation in solids attracts many researchers. Wave propagation phenomena can be analyzed by mathematically solving the acoustic wave equation. However, wave propagation in inhomogeneous media with various geometric structures is too complex to find an exact solution. Hence, the Finite Difference Time Domain method is developed to investigate these complicated problems. In this work, the Finite-Difference Time-Domain formula is derived from acoustic wave equations based on the Taylor's expansion. The numerical dispersion and stability problems are analyzed. In addition, the convergence conditions of numerical acoustic wave are stated. Based on the periodicity of phononic crystal, the Bloch's theorem is applied to fulfill the periodic boundary condition of the FDTD method. Then a wide-band input signal is used to excite various acoustic waves with different frequencies. In the beginning of the calculation process, the wave vector is chosen and fixed. By means of recording the displacement field and taking the Fourier transformation, we can obtain the eigenmodes from the resonance peaks of the spectrum and draw the dispersion relation curve of acoustic waves

  19. Anharmonicity in the High-Temperature Cmcm Phase of SnSe: Soft Modes and Three-Phonon Interactions.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Jonathan M; Burton, Lee A; Parker, Stephen C; Walsh, Aron; Kim, Chang-Eun; Soon, Aloysius; Buckeridge, John; Sokol, Alexey A; Catlow, C Richard A; Togo, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao

    2016-08-12

    The layered semiconductor SnSe is one of the highest-performing thermoelectric materials known. We demonstrate, through a first-principles lattice-dynamics study, that the high-temperature Cmcm phase is a dynamic average over lower-symmetry minima separated by very small energetic barriers. Compared to the low-temperature Pnma phase, the Cmcm phase displays a phonon softening and enhanced three-phonon scattering, leading to an anharmonic damping of the low-frequency modes and hence the thermal transport. We develop a renormalization scheme to quantify the effect of the soft modes on the calculated properties, and confirm that the anharmonicity is an inherent feature of the Cmcm phase. These results suggest a design concept for thermal insulators and thermoelectric materials, based on displacive instabilities, and highlight the power of lattice-dynamics calculations for materials characterization. PMID:27563974

  20. Spectroscopy of infrared-active phonons in high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvinchuk, A. P.; Thomsen, C.; Cardona, M.; Borjesson, L.

    1995-01-01

    For a large variety of superconducting materials both experimental and theoretical lattice dynamical studies have been performed to date. The assignment of the observed infrared- and Raman-active phonon modes to the particular lattice eigenmodes is generally accepted. We will concentrate here upon the analysis of the changes of the infrared-phonon parameters (frequency and linewidth) upon entering the superconducting state which, as will be shown, may provide information on the magnitude of the superconductivity-related gap and its dependence on the superconducting transition temperature Tc.

  1. Resonance laser-plasma excitation of coherent terahertz phonons in the bulk of fluorine-bearing crystals under high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Potemkin, F V; Mareev, E I; Khodakovskii, N G; Mikheev, P M

    2013-08-31

    The dynamics of coherent phonons in fluorine-containing crystals was investigated by pump-probe technique in the plasma production regime. Several phonon modes, whose frequencies are overtones of the 0.38-THz fundamental frequency, were simultaneously observed in a lithium fluoride crystal. Phonons with frequencies of 1 and 0.1 THz were discovered in a calcium fluoride crystal and coherent phonons with frequencies of 1 THz and 67 GHz were observed in a barium fluoride crystal. Furthermore, in the latter case the amplitudes of phonon mode oscillations were found to significantly increase 15 ps after laser irradiation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  2. Optical phonon modes in rhombohedral boron monosulfide under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cherednichenko, Kirill A.; Sokolov, Petr S.; Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Kalinko, Aleksandr; Le Godec, Yann; Polian, Alain; Itié, Jean-Paul

    2015-05-14

    Raman spectra of rhombohedral boron monosulfide (r-BS) were measured under pressures up to 34 GPa at room temperature. No pressure-induced structural phase transition was observed, while strong pressure shift of Raman bands towards higher wavenumbers has been revealed. IR spectroscopy as a complementary technique has been used in order to completely describe the phonon modes of r-BS. All experimentally observed bands have been compared with theoretically calculated ones and modes assignment has been performed. r-BS enriched by {sup 10}B isotope was synthesized, and the effect of boron isotopic substitution on Raman spectra was observed and analyzed.

  3. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  4. High-Frequency Gated Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    New gated oscillator generates bursts of high-frequency sine waves, square waves, and triangular waves in response to control signals. Each burst starts at zero phase, with tight tolerances on signal amplitude and frequency. Frequencies in megahertz range are made possible by using high-speed comparators and high-speed flip-flop as fast-response threshold detector.

  5. Manipulation of Phonons with Phononic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Leseman, Zayd Chad

    2015-07-09

    There were three research goals associated with this project. First, was to experimentally demonstrate phonon spectrum control at THz frequencies using Phononic Crystals (PnCs), i.e. demonstrate coherent phonon scattering with PnCs. Second, was to experimentally demonstrate analog PnC circuitry components at GHz frequencies. The final research goal was to gain a fundamental understanding of phonon interaction using computational methods. As a result of this work, 7 journal papers have been published, 1 patent awarded, 14 conference presentations given, 4 conference publications, and 2 poster presentations given.

  6. High T{sub c} in cuprates as a universal property of the electron–phonon system

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, E. A.; Kagan, Yu.

    2015-08-15

    The Eliashberg theory, which is generalized due to peculiar properties of the finite-width electron band for electron–phonon (EP) systems with a variable electron density of states (DOS), as well as with allowance for the electron–hole nonequivalence of the frequency behavior of the chemical potential renormalization depending on the doping level and electron correlations in the vertex function, is used to study T{sub c} in cuprates. The phonon contribution to the nodal anomalous electron Green’s function (GF) is considered. Pairing within the total width of the electron band, and not only in a narrow layer at the Fermi surface, is taken into account. The calculated frequency and temperature dependences, as well as the dependence on the doping level of the complex renormalization ReZ, ImZ of the mass, complex renormalization Reχ(ω), Imχ(ω) of the chemical potential, and DOS N(ε) renormalized due to the EP interaction are used to calculate the electron nodal anomalous GF. It is found that the effect of suppressing the high-frequency contribution to the Eliashberg equations derived anew for the EP system with a finite width of the electron band is a decisive factor for the manifestation of the effect of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC). It is shown that in the vicinity of the optimal hole-type doping level in cuprates, the high value of T{sub c} is reproduced by the spectral function of the electron–phonon interaction, which is obtained from tunneling experiments. Upon an increase in the doping level, leading to an increase in the degree of electron–hole nonequivalence, the new logarithmic term appearing in the equations for T{sub c} has a tendency to increase T{sub c}, while intensification of damping of charge carriers (especially suppression of the cutoff factor) leads to a decrease in T{sub c}.

  7. Ballistic phonon production in photoexcited Ge, GaAs, and Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msall, M. E.; Wolfe, J. P.

    2002-05-01

    Phonon imaging and photoluminescence measurements are used to determine the frequency and spatial distribution of optically generated nonequilibrium phonons in Si, Ge, and GaAs at 1.7 K. At low excitation levels the thermalization of photoexcited carriers and the subsequent phonon down-conversion produce a broad frequency distribution of acoustic phonons that ``quasidiffuse'' in the crystal. These phonons produce a temporally broad heat pulse when detected at a distance from the excitation point. At moderate excitation levels (typically a 10-nS pulse with a power density of ~20 W/mm2), the laser pulse produces a dense electron-hole plasma that can radically change the frequency distribution of nonequilibrium phonons. The plasma is a potentially rich source of low-frequency acoustic phonons, characterized by a temporally sharp heat pulse at a remote detector. The fraction of low-frequency phonons in the heat pulses is smallest in the direct-gap semiconductor GaAs, where rapid recombination depletes the populations of electrons and holes in just a few nanoseconds. More noticeable low frequency phonon components are seen in heat pulses in the indirect-gap semiconductors Ge and Si. At sufficiently high excitation densities (~60 W/mm2) in Ge, there is a suppression of the low-frequency phonon signal, which may result from phonon absorption within a cloud of electron hole droplets. An interesting alternative hypothesis is that the acoustic phonons created in the plasma are sufficiently dense to initiate phonon coalescence, whereby phonons are localized by phonon-phonon scattering over a relatively long period (500 ns). This localized ``hot spot'' could provide the phonon wind that drives the initial rapid expansion of the electron-hole plasma into the crystal.

  8. n-Type Bi2Te3-xSex Nanoplates with Enhanced Thermoelectric Efficiency Driven by Wide-Frequency Phonon Scatterings and Synergistic Carrier Scatterings.

    PubMed

    Hong, Min; Chasapis, Thomas C; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Lei; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Snyder, G Jeffrey; Zou, Jin

    2016-04-26

    Driven by the prospective applications of thermoelectric materials, massive efforts have been dedicated to enhancing the conversion efficiency. The latter is governed by the figure of merit (ZT), which is proportional to the power factor (S(2)σ) and inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity (κ). Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of high-quality ternary Bi2Te3-xSex nanoplates using a microwave-assisted surfactant-free solvothermal method. The obtained n-type Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 nanostructures exhibit a high ZT of 1.23 at 480 K measured from the corresponding sintered pellets, in which a remarkably low κ and a shift of peak S(2)σ to high temperature are observed. By detailed electron microscopy investigations, coupled with theoretical analysis on phonon transports, we propose that the achieved κ reduction is attributed to the strong wide-frequency phonon scatterings. The shifting of peak S(2)σ to high temperature is due to the weakened temperature dependent transport properties governed by the synergistic carrier scatterings and the suppressed bipolar effects by enlarging the band gap. PMID:27058746

  9. Studies of Phonon Anharmonicity in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tian

    the Fourier transformed velocity autocorrelation method to handle the big data of time-dependent atomic velocities from MD calculations, and efficiently reconstructs the phonon DOS and phonon dispersion relations. Our calculations can reproduce the phonon frequency shifts and lifetime broadenings very well at various temperatures. To understand non-harmonic interactions in a microscopic way, we have developed a numerical fitting method to analyze the decay channels of phonon-phonon interactions. Based on the quantum perturbation theory of many-body interactions, this method is used to calculate the three-phonon and four-phonon kinematics subject to the conservation of energy and momentum, taking into account the weight of phonon couplings. We can assess the strengths of phonon-phonon interactions of different channels and anharmonic orders with the calculated two-phonon DOS. This method, with high computational efficiency, is a promising direction to advance our understandings of non-harmonic lattice dynamics and thermal transport properties. These experimental techniques and theoretical methods have been successfully performed in the study of anharmonic behaviors of metal oxides, including rutile and cuprite stuctures, and will be discussed in detail in Chapters 4 to 6. For example, for rutile titanium dioxide (TiO2), we found that the anomalous anharmonic behavior of the B1g mode can be explained by the volume effects on quasiharmonic force constants, and by the explicit cubic and quartic anharmonicity. For rutile tin dioxide (SnO2), the broadening of the B2 g mode with temperature showed an unusual concave downwards curvature. This curvature was caused by a change with temperature in the number of down-conversion decay channels, originating with the wide band gap in the phonon dispersions. For silver oxide (Ag2O), strong anharmonic effects were found for both phonons and for the negative thermal expansion.

  10. Reasons for high-temperature superconductivity in the electron–phonon system of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Mazur, E. A.

    2015-08-15

    We have calculated the electron and phonon spectra, as well as the densities of the electron and phonon states, of the stable orthorhombic structure of hydrogen sulfide SH{sub 2} in the pressure interval 100–180 GPa. It is found that at a pressure of 175 GPa, a set of parallel planes of hydrogen atoms is formed due to a structural modification of the unit cell under pressure with complete accumulation of all hydrogen atoms in these planes. As a result, the electronic properties of the system become quasi-two-dimensional. We have also analyzed the collective synphase and antiphase vibrations of hydrogen atoms in these planes, leading to the occurrence of two high-energy peaks in the phonon density of states.

  11. Experimental and theoretical analysis of THz-frequency, direction-dependent, phonon polariton modes in a subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengliang; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Jingjun; Nelson, Keith A; Werley, Christopher A

    2010-12-01

    Femtosecond optical pulses were used to generate THz-frequency phonon polariton waves in a 50 micrometer lithium niobate slab, which acts as a subwavelength, anisotropic planar waveguide. The spatial and temporal electric field profiles of the THz waves were recorded for different propagation directions using a polarization gating imaging system, and experimental dispersion curves were determined via a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Dispersion relations for an anisotropic slab waveguide were derived via analytical analysis and found to be in excellent agreement with all observed experimental modes. From the dispersion relations, we analyze the propagation-direction-dependent behavior, effective refractive index values, and generation efficiencies for THz-frequency modes in the subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide. PMID:21164986

  12. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  13. Second Harmonic Generation and Confined Acoustic Phonons in HighlyExcited Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Dong Hee; Wittenberg, Joshua S.; Banin, Uri; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2006-03-30

    The photo-induced enhancement of second harmonic generation, and the effect of nanocrystal shape and pump intensity on confined acoustic phonons in semiconductor nanocrystals, has been investigated with time-resolved scattering and absorption measurements. The second harmonic signal showed a sublinear increase of the second order susceptibility with respect to the pump pulse energy, indicating a reduction of the effective one-electron second-order nonlinearity with increasing electron-hole density in the nanocrystals. The coherent acoustic phonons in spherical and rod-shaped semiconductor nanocrystals were detected in a time-resolved absorption measurement. Both nanocrystal morphologies exhibited oscillatory modulation of the absorption cross section, the frequency of which corresponded to their coherent radial breathing modes. The amplitude of the oscillation also increased with the level of photoexcitation, suggesting an increase in the amplitude of the lattice displacement as well.

  14. Complete low-frequency bandgap in a two-dimensional phononic crystal with spindle-shaped inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Wang; Hui, Wang; Mei-Ping, Sheng; Qing-Hua, Qin

    2016-04-01

    A two-dimensional phononic crystal (PC) structure possessing a relatively low frequency range of complete bandgap is presented. The structure is composed of periodic spindle-shaped plumbum inclusions in a rubber matrix which forms a square lattice. The dispersion relation, transmission spectrum and displacement field are studied using the finite element method in conjunction with the Bloch theorem. Numerical results show that the present PC structure can achieve a large complete bandgap in a relatively low frequency range compared with two inclusions of different materials, which is useful in low-frequency noise and vibration control and can be designed as a low frequency acoustic filter and waveguides. Moreover, the transmission spectrum and effective mass are evaluated to validate the obtained band structure. It is interesting to see that within the band gap the effective mass becomes negative, resulting in an imaginary wave speed and wave exponential attenuation. Finally, sensitivity analysis of the effect of geometrical parameters of the presented PC structure on the lowest bandgap is performed to investigate the variations of the bandgap width and frequency. Project supported by the China Scholarship Council.

  15. Characteristics of Low-Frequency Molecular Phonon Modes Studied by THz Spectroscopy and Solid-State ab Initio Theory: Polymorphs I and III of Diflunisal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Wang, Houng-Wei; Tominaga, Keisuke; Hayashi, Michitoshi

    2016-03-01

    THz absorption spectra of two polymorphs of diflunisal, form I and form III, exhibit distinct features due to the influence of packing conformations on the frequency distributions and IR activities of gamma point phonon modes within the 100 cm(-1) region. In order to understand the origins of these THz modes, we perform a detailed mode analysis. The result shows that although the spectral features are different, these low-frequency phonon modes of the two molecular polymorphs have similar vibrational characteristics in terms of harmonic couplings of intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations. PMID:26808927

  16. Coupled bipolarons and optical phonons as a model for high-T(sub c) superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasperczyk, J.

    1990-01-01

    The coherence length of the new high-temperature superconductors reaches very small value which is comparable to the dimensions of unit cell of these compounds. This means that a pair consists of two holes occupying the same site or two adjacent sites. Such a situation seems to be described by a model of the local-pairs (bipolarons). The origin of local-pairs may come not only from strong enough electron or hole-phonon interaction but also from other interactions. Independent of the specific nature of such local-pairs, they can undergo a Bose-like condensation to the superconducting state at a critical temperature which is usually much lower than the temperature of the pair formation. An interplay of ferroelectric and superconducting properties is considered within the model of hole-like local-pairs interacting with optical phonons. Therefore, researchers extend the usual local-pair Hamiltonian by including a direct interaction between the local-pairs and the optical phonons. These optical phonons are known to play an important role in the ferroelectric transition, if any, and they transform into an additional pseudo-acoustic branch at the ferroelectric critical temperature. (This is associated with nonzero electric polarization due to the existence of two separate lattices composed of negative and positive ions, respectively.)

  17. Coupled bipolarons and optical phonons as a model for high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasperczyk, J.

    1991-01-01

    The coherence length of the new high-temperature superconductors reaches a small value which is comparable to the dimensions of the unit cell of the compound. This means that a pair consists of two holes occupying the same site or two adjacent sites. Such a situation is described by a model of the local-pairs (bipolarons). The origin of local-pairs may come not only from strong enough electron or hole-phonon interaction but also from other interactions. Independent of the specific nature of such local-pairs, they can undergo a Bose-like condensation to the superconducting state at a critical temperature which is usually much lower than the temperature of the pair formation. An interplay of ferroelectric and superconducting properties is considered within the model of hole-like local-pairs interacting with optical phonons. Therefore, researchers extend the usual local-pair Hamiltonian by including a direct interaction between the local-pairs and the optical phonons. These optical phonons are known to play an important role in the ferroelectric transition and they transform into an additional pseudo-acoustic branch at the ferroelectric critical temperature. (This is associated with nonzero electric polarization due to the existence of two separate lattices composed of negative and positive ions, respectively.)

  18. Phonon populations and electrical power dissipation in carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Mathias; Freitag, Marcus; Perebeinos, Vasili; Tsang, James C; Small, Joshua P; Kinoshita, Megumi; Yuan, Dongning; Liu, Jie; Avouris, Phaedon

    2009-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene are candidate materials for nanoscale electronic devices. Both materials show weak acoustic phonon scattering and long mean free paths for low-energy charge carriers. However, high-energy carriers couple strongly to optical phonons, which leads to current saturation and the generation of hot phonons. A non-equilibrium phonon distribution has been invoked to explain the negative differential conductance observed in suspended metallic nanotubes, while Raman studies have shown the electrical generation of hot G-phonons in metallic nanotubes. Here, we present a complete picture of the phonon distribution in a functioning nanotube transistor including the G and the radial breathing modes, the Raman-inactive zone boundary K mode and the intermediate-frequency mode populated by anharmonic decay. The effective temperatures of the high- and intermediate-frequency phonons are considerably higher than those of acoustic phonons, indicating a phonon-decay bottleneck. Most importantly, inclusion of scattering by substrate polar phonons is needed to fully account for the observed electronic transport behaviour. PMID:19421219

  19. Real-time observation of phonon-polariton dynamics in ferroelectric LiNbO3 in time-frequency space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikegaya, Yuki; Sakaibara, Hiroyuki; Minami, Yasuo; Katayama, Ikufumi; Takeda, Jun

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate the real-time observation of phonon-polariton propagation in ferroelectric LiNbO3 using a single-shot spectroscopic setup that employs an echelon mirror. The echelon mirror provides a spatially encoded time delay for the probe pulse; therefore, the ultrafast transient behavior of materials can be detected on a single-shot basis. Using optical Kerr gate apparatus, forward and backward propagating E-mode phonon-polaritons were simultaneously induced via an impulsive stimulated Raman scattering process, and subsequently, their dynamics were readily mapped in time-frequency space using heterodyne detection. The two phonon-polaritons appeared on opposite sides of the central probe wavelength and were symmetrically imaged against the ordinary and extraordinary probe lights. By taking into account coupling of the lowest E-mode phonon-polariton to a low-frequency relaxational mode, not only the phonon-polariton dispersion but also the wavevector dependence of the damping rate was unveiled and quantitatively evaluated.

  20. Low-frequency phonons of few-layer graphene within a tight-binding model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Valentin N.; Van Alsenoy, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Few-layer graphene is a layered carbon material with covalent bonding in the layers and weak van der Waals interactions between the layers. The interlayer energy is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the intralayer one, which hinders the description of the static and dynamic properties within electron band structure models. We overcome this difficulty by introducing two sets of matrix elements—one set for the covalent bonds in the graphene layers and another one for the van der Waals interactions between adjacent graphene layers in a tight-binding model of the band structure. Both sets of matrix elements are derived from an ab initio study on carbon dimers. The matrix elements are applied in the calculation of the phonon dispersion of graphite and few-layer graphene with AB and ABC layer stacking. The results for few-layer graphene with AB stacking agree well with the available experimental data, which justifies the application of the matrix elements to other layered carbon structures with van der Waals interactions such as few-layer graphene nanoribbons, multiwall carbon nanotubes, and carbon onions.

  1. Phonon-induced polariton superlattices.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M M; van der Poel, M; Santos, P V; Hvam, J M

    2006-07-28

    We show that the coherent interaction between microcavity polaritons and externally stimulated acoustic phonons forms a tunable polariton superlattice with a folded energy dispersion determined by the phonon population and wavelength. Under high phonon concentration, the strong confinement of the optical and excitonic polariton components in the phonon potential creates weakly coupled polariton wires with a virtually flat energy dispersion. PMID:16907587

  2. Acoustic phonons in chrysotile asbestos probed by high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Kumzerov, Yu. A,; Alatas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic phonons in an individual, oriented fiber of chrysotile asbestos (chemical formula Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}) were observed at room temperature in the inelastic x-ray measurement with a very high (meV) resolution. The x-ray scattering vector was aligned along [1 0 0] direction of the reciprocal lattice, nearly parallel to the long axis of the fiber. The latter coincides with [1 0 0] direction of the direct lattice and the axes of the nano-channels. The data were analyzed using a damped harmonic oscillator model. Analysis of the phonon dispersion in the first Brillouin zone yielded the longitudinal sound velocity of (9200 {+-} 600) m/s.

  3. Mobile high frequency vibrator system

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, D.W.; Buller, P.L.

    1985-01-08

    A carrier mounted seismic vibrator system that is primarily adapted for generation of high force, high frequency seismic energy into an earth medium. The apparatus includes first and second vibrators as supported by first and second lift systems disposed in tandem juxtaposition generally centrally in said vehicle, and the lift systems are designed to maintain equal hold-down force on the vibrator coupling baseplates without exceeding the weight of the carrier vehicle. The juxtaposed vibrators are then energized in synchronized relationship to propagate increased amounts of higher frequency seismic energy into an earth medium.

  4. Phonons and hybrid modes in the high and low temperature far infrared dynamics of hexagonal TmMnO3.

    PubMed

    Massa, Néstor E; del Campo, Leire; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Echegut, Patrick; Martínez-Lope, María Jesús; Alonso, José Antonio

    2014-07-01

    We report on temperature dependent TmMnO3 far infrared emissivity and reflectivity spectra from 1910 K to 4 K. At the highest temperature the number of infrared bands is lower than that predicted for centrosymmetric P63/mmc (D(4)(6h)) (Z = 2) space group due to high temperature anharmonicity and possible defect induced bitetrahedra misalignments. On cooling, at ~1600 ± 40 K, TmMnO3 goes from non-polar to an antiferroelectric-ferroelectric polar phase reaching the ferroelectric onset at ~700 K. Room temperature reflectivity is fitted using 19 oscillators and this number of phonons is maintained down to 4 K. A weak phonon anomaly in the band profile at 217 cm(-1) (4 K) suggests subtle Rare Earth magneto-electric couplings at ~TN and below. A low energy collective excitation is identified as a THz instability associated with room temperature eg electrons in a d-orbital fluctuating environment. It condenses into two modes that emerge pinned to the E-type antiferromagnetic order hardening simultaneously down to 4 K. They obey power laws with TN as the critical temperature and match known zone center magnons. The one peaking at 26 cm(-1), with critical exponent β=0.42 as for antiferromagnetic order in a hexagonal lattice, is dependent on the Rare Earth ion. The higher frequency companion at ~50 cm(-1), with β=0.25, splits at ~TN into two peaks. The weaker band of the two is assimilated to the upper branch of the gap opening in the transverse acoustical (TA) phonon branch crossing the magnetic dispersion found in YMnO3. (Petit et al 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 266604). The stronger second band at ~36 cm(-1) corresponds to the lower branch of the TA gap. We assign both excitations as zone center magneto-electric hybrid quasiparticles, concluding that in NdMnO3 perovskite the equivalent picture corresponds to an instability which may be driven by an external field to transform NdMnO3 into a multiferroic compound by perturbation enhancing the TA

  5. High frequency integrated MOS filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques exist for implementing integrated MOS filters. These techniques fit into the general categories of sampled and tuned continuous-time filters. Advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. This paper focuses primarily on the high frequency capabilities of MOS integrated filters.

  6. Dynamical thermoelectric coefficients of bulk semiconductor crystals: Towards high thermoelectric efficiency at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzahri, Younès; Joulain, Karl

    2014-06-01

    We investigate in this work the fundamental behavior of the dynamical thermoelectric coefficients of a bulk cubic semiconductor (SC) crystal. The treatment is based on solving Boltzmann electron transport equation in the frequency domain after simultaneous excitations by dynamical temperature and electric potential gradients, within the framework of the single relaxation time approximation. The SC crystal is assumed to be a linear, elastic homogenous, and isotropic medium having a parabolic energy band structure. We further assume to deal with one type of carriers (electrons or holes) that reside in a single energy band, and we neglect any phonon drag effect. Our approach allows us to obtain very compact expressions for the different dynamical thermoelectric coefficients that nicely capture the essential features of the dynamics of electron transport. We emphasize our study about the dynamical behavior of the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT(Ω) of the SC crystal by considering the coupled electron-phonon transport. Our study revealed a very interesting and compelling result in which ZT increases in the high frequency regime with respect to its steady-state value. The fundamental reason of this enhancement is due to the intrinsic uncoupling in the dynamics of electrons and phonons in the high frequency regime.

  7. Dynamical thermoelectric coefficients of bulk semiconductor crystals: Towards high thermoelectric efficiency at high frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Ezzahri, Younès Joulain, Karl

    2014-06-14

    We investigate in this work the fundamental behavior of the dynamical thermoelectric coefficients of a bulk cubic semiconductor (SC) crystal. The treatment is based on solving Boltzmann electron transport equation in the frequency domain after simultaneous excitations by dynamical temperature and electric potential gradients, within the framework of the single relaxation time approximation. The SC crystal is assumed to be a linear, elastic homogenous, and isotropic medium having a parabolic energy band structure. We further assume to deal with one type of carriers (electrons or holes) that reside in a single energy band, and we neglect any phonon drag effect. Our approach allows us to obtain very compact expressions for the different dynamical thermoelectric coefficients that nicely capture the essential features of the dynamics of electron transport. We emphasize our study about the dynamical behavior of the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT(Ω) of the SC crystal by considering the coupled electron-phonon transport. Our study revealed a very interesting and compelling result in which ZT increases in the high frequency regime with respect to its steady-state value. The fundamental reason of this enhancement is due to the intrinsic uncoupling in the dynamics of electrons and phonons in the high frequency regime.

  8. Temperature dependence of phonon-defect interactions: phonon scattering vs. phonon trapping

    PubMed Central

    Bebek, M. B.; Stanley, C. M.; Gibbons, T. M.; Estreicher, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between thermal phonons and defects are conventionally described as scattering processes, an idea proposed almost a century ago. In this contribution, ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations provide atomic-level insight into the nature of these interactions. The defect is the Si|X interface in a nanowire containing a δ-layer (X is C or Ge). The phonon-defect interactions are temperature dependent and involve the trapping of phonons for meaningful lengths of time in defect-related, localized, vibrational modes. No phonon scattering occurs and the momentum of the phonons released by the defect is unrelated to the momentum of the phonons that generated the excitation. The results are extended to the interactions involving only bulk phonons and to phonon-defect interactions at high temperatures. These do resemble scattering since phonon trapping occurs for a length of time short enough for the momentum of the incoming phonon to be conserved. PMID:27535463

  9. Temperature dependence of phonon-defect interactions: phonon scattering vs. phonon trapping.

    PubMed

    Bebek, M B; Stanley, C M; Gibbons, T M; Estreicher, S K

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between thermal phonons and defects are conventionally described as scattering processes, an idea proposed almost a century ago. In this contribution, ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations provide atomic-level insight into the nature of these interactions. The defect is the Si|X interface in a nanowire containing a δ-layer (X is C or Ge). The phonon-defect interactions are temperature dependent and involve the trapping of phonons for meaningful lengths of time in defect-related, localized, vibrational modes. No phonon scattering occurs and the momentum of the phonons released by the defect is unrelated to the momentum of the phonons that generated the excitation. The results are extended to the interactions involving only bulk phonons and to phonon-defect interactions at high temperatures. These do resemble scattering since phonon trapping occurs for a length of time short enough for the momentum of the incoming phonon to be conserved. PMID:27535463

  10. Anharmonicity in the High-Temperature C m c m Phase of SnSe: Soft Modes and Three-Phonon Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, Jonathan M.; Burton, Lee A.; Parker, Stephen C.; Walsh, Aron; Kim, Chang-Eun; Soon, Aloysius; Buckeridge, John; Sokol, Alexey A.; Catlow, C. Richard A.; Togo, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao

    2016-08-01

    The layered semiconductor SnSe is one of the highest-performing thermoelectric materials known. We demonstrate, through a first-principles lattice-dynamics study, that the high-temperature C m c m phase is a dynamic average over lower-symmetry minima separated by very small energetic barriers. Compared to the low-temperature P n m a phase, the C m c m phase displays a phonon softening and enhanced three-phonon scattering, leading to an anharmonic damping of the low-frequency modes and hence the thermal transport. We develop a renormalization scheme to quantify the effect of the soft modes on the calculated properties, and confirm that the anharmonicity is an inherent feature of the C m c m phase. These results suggest a design concept for thermal insulators and thermoelectric materials, based on displacive instabilities, and highlight the power of lattice-dynamics calculations for materials characterization.

  11. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  12. Sound and noisy light: Optical control of phonons in photoswitchable structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklan, Sophia R.; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a means of controlling phonons via optical tuning. Taking as a model an array of photoresponsive materials (photoswitches) embedded in a matrix, we numerically analyze the vibrational response of an array of bistable harmonic oscillators with stochastic spring constants. Changing the intensity of light incident on the lattice directly controls the composition of the lattice and therefore the speed of sound. Furthermore, modulation of the phonon band structure at high frequencies results in a strong confinement of phonons. The applications of this regime for phonon waveguides, vibrational energy storage, and phononic transistors is examined.

  13. Phonon spectroscopy in high magnetic fields: The B + center in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshko, S.; Dietsche, W.

    1996-05-01

    Normal-state tunnel junctions have been used for phonon spectroscopY in high magnetic fields for the first time. The binding energy of the positively charged acceptor B + in Si has been measured as a function of magnetic field up to 12 Tesla. It is found to increase linearly with magnetic field. This linear dependence originates from the energy increase of the lowest Landau level of the free heavy holes. It indicates that the magnetic field dependence of both the neutral and the positively charged acceptors are small.

  14. Elastic anomalies and phonon damping in a metallic high spin-low spin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihlemann, J.; Bärner, K.

    1984-12-01

    The elastic constants and the sound attenuation in single crystals of the metallic high spin (hs)-low spin (ls) system MnAs 1- xP x have been measured for temperaturres between 10 and 500 K. Elastic anomalies and damping maxima have been found for the second-order displacive (B8 1⇌B31) phase transition, the hs-ls transition and for the magnetic order-disorder transition. The phenomena near the hs-ls transition, in particular, are interpreted in terms of a condensation of a soft static phonon at the ls (hs) site in a hs (ls) matrix.

  15. Geometrical tuning of thermal phonon spectrum in nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramiere, Aymeric; Volz, Sebastian; Amrit, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Phonon spectral energy transmission in silicon nanoribbons is investigated using Monte-Carlo simulations in the boundary scattering regime by changing the length and width geometrical parameters. We show that the transition frequency from specular scattering to diffuse scattering is inversely proportional to the edge roughness σ with a geometry independent factor of proportionality. The increase of the length over width ratio \\zeta leads to a decrease of the energy transmission in the diffuse scattering regime which evolves as {{≤ft(1+{{\\zeta}0.59}\\right)}-1} . This trend is explained by developing a model of phonon energy transmission in the fully diffuse scattering regime which takes into account the probability for a diffusively scattered phonon to be directly transmitted from any position on the edge of the nanoribbon. This model establishes the importance of the solid angles in the energy transmission evolution with \\zeta . The transition from unity energy transmission in the specular scattering regime to reduced transmission in the diffuse scattering regime constitutes a low-pass frequency filter for phonons. Our simulations show an energy rejection rate better than 90% for high \\zeta , which paves the way for potential high performance filters. Filtering out high frequency phonons is of significant interest for phononic crystal applications, which use band engineering of phonons in the wave regime with low frequencies.

  16. Anharmonic effects on Raman-active phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonico, Michael John

    This dissertation explores anharmonic properties of semiconductor materials associated with strain and phonon lifetime using Raman spectroscopy. In recent years, extensive research and development of strain engineered advanced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices utilizing high-k dielectrics and metal gate technology has been conducted to meet the challenges imposed by fundamental limits of device scaling. From a development and manufacturing viewpoint, the metrology required to drive these new technologies is critical to their success. In particular, UV-Raman spectroscopy has been extensively used to measure wafer and device strain due to the high spatial and spectral resolution coupled with an ultra-short optical penetration depth in Si. However, the strain-shift coefficients reported in the literature, which correlate the shift in Raman frequency with strain, have typically been measured in the visible portion of the spectrum and appear to differ from their UV counter-parts. This work presents a detailed measurement of the strain-shift coefficients in the UV at 325 and 364nm for Si, Ge, and Si:C and SiGe alloys. In addition, the temperature dependence of the frequencies and linewidths of the Raman-active longitudinal-optic (LO) phonons in GaAs and AlAs III-V semiconductor compounds is presented. Contrary to early theoretical predictions, the low temperature lifetime of the LO phonon is similar for the two materials with tau = 9.5 ps and 9.7 ps in GaAs and AlAs, respectively. The discrepancy between theory and experiment is caused by the accidental degeneracy between the AlAs LO phonon frequency and a Van Hove singularity in the two-phonon density of states. A new expression, based on the frequency dependence of the phonon self-energy, is derived to model the phonon lifetime.

  17. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  18. Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Rekha

    1995-01-01

    Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes during the solar cycle are calculated for a non-magnetic polytrope convection zone model. An isothermal chromospheric atmosphere threaded by a uniform horizontal magnetic field is correlated to this model. The relevant observations of such frequency changes are discussed. The calculated simultaneous changes in the field strength and chromospheric temperature result in the frequency shifts that are similar to those of the observations.

  19. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  20. High frequency dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K; Swager, Timothy M; Temkin, Richard J; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-09-17

    During the three decades 1980-2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical, and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = 1/2 species (13)C or (15)N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, such as (17)O or (27)Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime, roughly 150-660 GHz, and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades, scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  1. High Frequency Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Swager, Timothy M.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus During the three decades 1980–2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = ½ species 13C or 15N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, like 17O or 27Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime — roughly 150–660 GHz — and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  2. Shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave phononic device with high density filling material for ultra-low power sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.; Bhethanabotla, V. R.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.

    2014-06-23

    Finite element simulations of a phononic shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor based on ST 90°-X Quartz reveal a dramatic reduction in power consumption. The phononic sensor is realized by artificially structuring the delay path to form an acoustic meta-material comprised of a periodic microcavity array incorporating high-density materials such as tantalum or tungsten. Constructive interference of the scattered and secondary reflected waves at every microcavity interface leads to acoustic energy confinement in the high-density regions translating into reduced power loss. Tantalum filled cavities show the best performance while tungsten inclusions create a phononic bandgap. Based on our simulation results, SAW devices with tantalum filled microcavities were fabricated and shown to significantly decrease insertion loss. Our findings offer encouraging prospects for designing low power, highly sensitive portable biosensors.

  3. High-pressure hydrogen sulfide from first principles: a strongly anharmonic phonon-mediated superconductor.

    PubMed

    Errea, Ion; Calandra, Matteo; Pickard, Chris J; Nelson, Joseph; Needs, Richard J; Li, Yinwei; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Yunwei; Ma, Yanming; Mauri, Francesco

    2015-04-17

    We use first-principles calculations to study structural, vibrational, and superconducting properties of H_{2}S at pressures P≥200  GPa. The inclusion of zero-point energy leads to two different possible dissociations of H2S, namely 3H2S→2H3S+S and 5H2S→3H3S+HS2, where both H3S and HS2 are metallic. For H3S, we perform nonperturbative calculations of anharmonic effects within the self-consistent harmonic approximation and show that the harmonic approximation strongly overestimates the electron-phonon interaction (λ≈2.64 at 200 GPa) and Tc. Anharmonicity hardens H─S bond-stretching modes and softens H─S bond-bending modes. As a result, the electron-phonon coupling is suppressed by 30% (λ≈1.84 at 200 GPa). Moreover, while at the harmonic level Tc decreases with increasing pressure, the inclusion of anharmonicity leads to a Tc that is almost independent of pressure. High-pressure hydrogen sulfide is a strongly anharmonic superconductor. PMID:25933334

  4. PHONON PRECURSORS TO THE HIGH TEMPERATURE MARTENSITIC TRANSFORMATION IN TI50PD42CR8.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; WINN,B.L.; SCHLAGEL,D.L.; LOGRASSO,T.; ERWIN,R.

    2002-06-10

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements were carried out on the Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50-x}Cr{sub x} alloy, which has the potential for being a high temperature shape memory material. For x = 0, the transformation temperature is {approx}800K and for the composition studied (x = 8 at.%) T{sub M} {approx} 400K. The majority of the measurements were performed in the parent, {beta}-phase, up to 873K. Most of the phonons propagating along the three symmetry directions [{zeta}00], [{zeta}{zeta}{zeta}], and [{zeta}{zeta}0] were well defined with the exception of the [{zeta}{zeta}0] transverse acoustic mode with displacements along the [-{zeta}{zeta}0] corresponding to the C{prime} = 1/2(C{sub 11}-C{sub 12}) elastic constant. These phonons are well defined for small {zeta}, but for {zeta} > 0.15 they are strongly overdamped near the transition temperature, but become better defined at higher temperatures. An elastic peak develop in the cubic phase at {zeta} = 0.22 and increases in intensity as T{sub M} is approached. However, this dispersion curves show no anomaly at this particular wavevector, in marked contrast to the lattice dynamic studies of other systems exhibiting Martensitic transformations.

  5. High-Pressure Hydrogen Sulfide from First Principles: A Strongly Anharmonic Phonon-Mediated Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errea, Ion; Calandra, Matteo; Pickard, Chris J.; Nelson, Joseph; Needs, Richard J.; Li, Yinwei; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Yunwei; Ma, Yanming; Mauri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    We use first-principles calculations to study structural, vibrational, and superconducting properties of H2S at pressures P ≥200 GPa . The inclusion of zero-point energy leads to two different possible dissociations of H2S , namely 3 H2S →2 H3S +S and 5 H2S →3 H3S +HS2 , where both H3S and HS2 are metallic. For H3S , we perform nonperturbative calculations of anharmonic effects within the self-consistent harmonic approximation and show that the harmonic approximation strongly overestimates the electron-phonon interaction (λ ≈2.64 at 200 GPa) and Tc. Anharmonicity hardens H-S bond-stretching modes and softens H-S bond-bending modes. As a result, the electron-phonon coupling is suppressed by 30% (λ ≈1.84 at 200 GPa). Moreover, while at the harmonic level Tc decreases with increasing pressure, the inclusion of anharmonicity leads to a Tc that is almost independent of pressure. High-pressure hydrogen sulfide is a strongly anharmonic superconductor.

  6. Birefringent phononic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Psarobas, I. E. Exarchos, D. A.; Matikas, T. E.

    2014-12-15

    Within the framework of elastic anisotropy, caused in a phononic crystal due to low crystallographic symmetry, we adopt a model structure, already introduced in the case of photonic metamaterials, and by analogy, we study the effect of birefringence and acoustical activity in a phononic crystal. In particular, we investigate its low-frequency behavior and comment on the factors which determine chirality by reference to this model.

  7. High-Frequency Inductor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, L. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Finemet-type nanocrystalline alloy represents an advanced soft-magnetic metal-metal-type nanocomposite with an eddy-current-determined high- frequency limit. A survey of different heat treatments under tensile stress is presented to tailor the hysteresis loop by induced transversal anisotropy. The flattened loop having reduced effective permeability enhances the eddy- current limit in the MHz region; For example, continuous stress annealing in a tubular furnace of 1 m length at 650°C, pulling the ribbon with a velocity of 4 m/min under a tensile stress of 200 MPa, results in a wound core having a permeability of 120 and a frequency limit of 10 MHz. Careful annealing preserves the static coercivity below 10 A/m. The power loss at 0.1 T and 100 kHz is only 82 mW/cm3, which is an order of magnitude lower then the values obtained for Sendust™ cores in similar conditions.

  8. Coherent Acoustic Phonons in Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystal Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Poyser, Caroline L; Czerniuk, Thomas; Akimov, Andrey; Diroll, Benjamin T; Gaulding, E Ashley; Salasyuk, Alexey S; Kent, Anthony J; Yakovlev, Dmitri R; Bayer, Manfred; Murray, Christopher B

    2016-01-26

    The phonon properties of films fabricated from colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals play a major role in thermal conductance and electron scattering, which govern the principles for building colloidal-based electronics and optics including thermoelectric devices with a high ZT factor. The key point in understanding the phonon properties is to obtain the strength of the elastic bonds formed by organic ligands connecting the individual nanocrystallites. In the case of very weak bonding, the ligands become the bottleneck for phonon transport between infinitively rigid nanocrystals. In the opposite case of strong bonding, the colloids cannot be considered as infinitively rigid beads and the distortion of the superlattice caused by phonons includes the distortion of the colloids themselves. We use the picosecond acoustics technique to study the acoustic coherent phonons in superlattices of nanometer crystalline CdSe colloids. We observe the quantization of phonons with frequencies up to 30 GHz. The frequencies of quantized phonons depend on the thickness of the colloidal films and possess linear phonon dispersion. The measured speed of sound and corresponding wave modulus in the colloidal films point on the strong elastic coupling provided by organic ligands between colloidal nanocrystals. PMID:26696021

  9. Pressurized high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas D.

    Acoustic heat engines show much promise for converting waste heat to electricity. Since most applications require high power levels, high frequency thermoacoustic engines can reach such performance by operating with a pressurized working gas. Results on a 3 kHz prime mover, consisting of a quarter-wave resonator and a random stack material between two heat exchangers, show that the acoustic power from such a device is raised substantially as the working gas is pressurized. At pressures up to approximately 10 bar, the increase in acoustic power is approximately linear to the increase in pressure, and thus is an effective way to increase the power output of thermoacoustic engines. Since the heat input was not changed during the experiments, the increases in acoustic power translate directly to increases in engine efficiency which is calculated as the output acoustic power divided by the input heat power. In most experiments run in this study, the engine efficiency increased by a factor of at least 4 as the pressure was increased from 2 bar up to about 10 bar. Further increases in pressure lead to acoustic power saturation and eventual attenuation. This is most likely due to a combination of several factors including the shrinking thermal penetration depth, and the fact that the losses increase faster with pressure in a random stack material than in traditional parallel plates. Pressurization also leads to a lower DeltaT for onset of oscillations in the range of 10 bar of mean pressure, potentially opening up even more heat sources that can power a thermoacoustic engine. Results from another 3 kHz engine, one that was pressurized itself as opposed to being placed in a pressurized chamber, are also presented. The configuration of this engine solves the problem of how to simultaneously pressurize the engine and inject heat into the hot heat exchanger. It was also noted that the geometry of the resonator cavity in the quarter wavelength pressurized engine plays an

  10. Isotopic phonon effects in β-rhombohedral boron—non-statistical isotope distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werheit, H.; Filipov, V.; Kuhlmann, U.; Schwarz, U.; Armbrüster, M.; Antadze, M.

    2012-05-01

    On the basis of the spectra of IR- and Raman-active phonons, the isotopic phonon effects in β-rhombohedral boron are analysed for polycrystalline 10B- and 11B-enriched samples of different origin and high-purity natB single crystals. Intra- and inter-icosahedral B-B vibrations are harmonic, hence meeting the virtual crystal approximation (VCA) requirements. Deviations from the phonon shift expected according to the VCA are attributed to the anharmonic share of the lattice vibrations. In the case of icosahedral vibrations, the agreement with calculations on α-rhombohedral boron by Shirai and Katayama-Yoshida is quite satisfactory. Phonon shifts due to isotopic disorder in natB are separated and determined. Some phonon frequencies are sensitive to impurities. The isotopic phonon effects yield valuable specific information on the nature of the different phonon modes. The occupation of regular boron sites by isotopes deviates significantly from the random distribution.

  11. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  12. Special Aspects in Designing High - Frequency Betatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, A. A.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to designing the high - frequency betatron. In high - frequency betatron most important problem is overheating of the elements of the body radiator unit. In an article some directions of solving this problem are shown.

  13. High power, high frequency helix TWT's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloley, H. J.; Willard, J.; Paatz, S. R.; Keat, M. J.

    The design and performance characteristics of a 34-GHz pulse tube capable of 75 W peak power output at 30 percent duty cycle and a broadband CW tube are presented. Particular attention is given to the engineering problems encountered during the development of the tubes, including the suppression of backward wave oscillation, the design of electron guns for small-diameter high-current beams, and the thermal capability of small helix structures. The discussion also covers the effects of various design parameters and choice of engineering materials on the ultimate practical limit of power and gain at the operating frequencies. Measurements are presented for advanced experimental tubes.

  14. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  15. GHz spurious mode free AlN lamb wave resonator with high figure of merit using one dimensional phononic crystal tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guoqiang; Zhu, Yao; Merugu, Srinivas; Wang, Nan; Sun, Chengliang; Gu, Yuandong

    2016-07-01

    This letter reports a spurious mode free GHz aluminum nitride (AlN) lamb wave resonator (LWR) towards high figure of merit (FOM). One dimensional gourd-shape phononic crystal (PnC) tether with large phononic bandgaps is employed to reduce the acoustic energy dissipation into the substrate. The periodic PnC tethers are based on a 1 μm-thick AlN layer with 0.26 μm-thick Mo layer on top. A clean spectrum over a wide frequency range is obtained from the measurement, which indicates a wide-band suppression of spurious modes. Experimental results demonstrate that the fabricated AlN LWR has an insertion loss of 5.2 dB and a loaded quality factor (Q) of 1893 at 1.02 GHz measured in air. An impressive ratio of the resistance at parallel resonance (Rp) to the resistance at series resonance (Rs) of 49.8 dB is obtained, which is an indication of high FOM for LWR. The high Rp to Rs ratio is one of the most important parameters to design a radio frequency filter with steep roll-off.

  16. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  17. Phonon-based scalable quantum computing and sensing (Presentation Video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kady, Ihab

    2015-04-01

    Quantum computing fundamentally depends on the ability to concurrently entangle and individually address/control a large number of qubits. In general, the primary inhibitors of large scale entanglement are qubit dependent; for example inhomogeneity in quantum dots, spectral crowding brought about by proximity-based entanglement in ions, weak interactions of neutral atoms, and the fabrication tolerances in the case of Si-vacancies or SQUIDs. We propose an inherently scalable solid-state qubit system with individually addressable qubits based on the coupling of a phonon with an acceptor impurity in a high-Q Phononic Crystal resonant cavity. Due to their unique nonlinear properties, phonons enable new opportunities for quantum devices and physics. We present a phononic crystal-based platform for observing the phonon analogy of cavity quantum electrodynamics, called phonodynamics, in a solid-state system. Practical schemes involve selective placement of a single acceptor atom in the peak of the strain field in a high-Q phononic crystal cavity that enables strong coupling of the phonon modes to the energy levels of the atom. A qubit is then created by entangling a phonon at the resonance frequency of the cavity with the atomic acceptor states. We show theoretical optimization of the cavity design and excitation waveguides, along with estimated performance figures of the phoniton system. Qubits based on this half-sound, half-matter quasi-particle, may outcompete other quantum architectures in terms of combined emission rate, coherence lifetime, and fabrication demands.

  18. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz. PMID:12071247

  19. Brillouin-zone integration schemes: an efficiency study for the phonon frequency moments of the harmonic, solid, one-component plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, R.C.; Gubernatis, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The efficiency of four different Brillouin-zone integration schemes including the uniform mesh, special point method, special directions method, and Holas method are compared for calculating moments of the harmonic phonon frequencies of the solid one-component plasma. Very accurate values for the moments are also presented. The Holas method for which weights and integration points can easily be generated has roughly the same efficiency as the special directions method, which is much superior to the uniform mesh and special point methods for this problem.

  20. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  1. Interaction of charge carriers with lattice and molecular phonons in crystalline pentacene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girlando, Alberto; Grisanti, Luca; Masino, Matteo; Brillante, Aldo; Della Valle, Raffaele G.; Venuti, Elisabetta

    2011-08-01

    The computational protocol we have developed for the calculation of local (Holstein) and non-local (Peierls) carrier-phonon coupling in molecular organic semiconductors is applied to both the low temperature and high temperature bulk crystalline phases of pentacene. The electronic structure is calculated by the semimpirical INDO/S (Intermediate Neglect of Differential Overlap with Spectroscopic parametrization) method. In the phonon description, the rigid molecule approximation is removed, allowing mixing of low-frequency intra-molecular modes with inter-molecular (lattice) phonons. A clear distinction remains between the low-frequency phonons, which essentially modulate the transfer integral from a molecule to another (Peierls coupling), and the high-frequency intra-molecular phonons, which modulate the on-site energy (Holstein coupling). The results of calculation agree well with the values extracted from experiment. The comparison with similar calculations made for rubrene allows us to discuss the implications for the current models of mobility.

  2. Analyzing Dirac Cone and Phonon Dispersion in Highly Oriented Nanocrystalline Graphene.

    PubMed

    Nai, Chang Tai; Xu, Hai; Tan, Sherman J R; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-01-26

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is one of the most promising growth techniques to scale up the production of monolayer graphene. At present, there are intense efforts to control the orientation of graphene grains during CVD, motivated by the fact that there is a higher probability for oriented grains to achieve seamless merging, forming a large single crystal. However, it is still challenging to produce single-crystal graphene with no grain boundaries over macroscopic length scales, especially when the nucleation density of graphene nuclei is high. Nonetheless, nanocrystalline graphene with highly oriented grains may exhibit single-crystal-like properties. Herein, we investigate the spectroscopic signatures of graphene film containing highly oriented, nanosized grains (20-150 nm) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The robustness of the Dirac cone, as well as dispersion of its phonons, as a function of graphene's grain size and before and after film coalescence, was investigated. In view of the sensitivity of atomically thin graphene to atmospheric adsorbates and intercalants, ARPES and HREELS were also used to monitor the changes in spectroscopic signatures of the graphene film following exposure to the ambient atmosphere. PMID:26713552

  3. High frequency gyrokinetic particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, R. A.; Lee, W. W.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.

    2007-07-15

    The gyrokinetic approach for arbitrary frequency dynamics in magnetized plasmas is explored, using the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory. Contrary to low-frequency gyrokinetics, which views each particle as a rigid charged ring, arbitrary frequency response of a particle is described by a quickly changing Kruskal ring. This approach allows the separation of gyrocenter and gyrophase responses and thus allows for, in many situations, larger time steps for the gyrocenter push than for the gyrophase push. The gyrophase response which determines the shape of Kruskal rings can be described by a Fourier series in gyrophase for some problems, thus allowing control over the cyclotron harmonics at which the plasma responds. A computational algorithm for particle-in-cell simulation based on this concept has been developed. An example of the ion Bernstein wave is used to illustrate its numerical properties, and comparison with a direct Lorentz-force approach is presented.

  4. Anharmonic phonon decay in cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuscó, R.; Domènech-Amador, N.; Novikov, S.; Foxon, C. T.; Artús, L.

    2015-08-01

    We present a Raman-scattering study of optical phonons in zinc-blende (cubic) GaN for temperatures ranging from 80 to 750 K. The experiments were performed on high-quality, cubic GaN films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs (001) substrates. The observed temperature dependence of the optical phonon frequencies and linewidths is analyzed in the framework of anharmonic decay theory, and possible decay channels are discussed in the light of density-functional-theory calculations. The longitudinal-optical (LO) mode relaxation is found to occur via asymmetric decay into acoustic phonons, with an appreciable contribution of higher-order processes. The transverse-optical mode linewidth shows a weak temperature dependence and its frequency downshift is primarily determined by the lattice thermal expansion. The LO phonon lifetime is derived from the observed Raman linewidth and an excellent agreement with previous theoretical predictions is found.

  5. Propagation of large-wavevector acoustic phonons new perspectives from phonon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, James P.

    Within the last decade a number of attempts have been made to observe the ballistic propagation of large wavevector acoustic phonons in crystals at low temperatures. Time-of-flight heat-pulse methods have difficulty in distinguishing between scattered phonons and ballistic phonons which travel dispersively at subsonic velocities. Fortunately, ballistic phonons can be identified by their highly anisotropic flux, which is observed by phonon imaging techniques. In this paper, several types of phonon imaging experiments are described which reveal the dispersive propagation of large-wavevector phonons and expose interesting details of the phonon scattering processes.

  6. Heat transport by phonons and the generation of heat by fast phonon processes in ferroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal conductivity of ferroelastic device materials can be reversibly controlled by strain. The nucleation and growth of twin boundaries reduces thermal conductivity if the heat flow is perpendicular to the twin wall. The twin walls act as phonon barriers whereby the thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of such phonon barriers. Ferroelastic materials also show elasto-caloric properties with a high frequency dynamics. The upper frequency limit is determined by heat generation on a time scale, which is some 5 orders of magnitude below the typical bulk phonon times. Some of these nano-structural processes are irreversible under stress release (but remain reversible under temperature cycling), in particular the annihilation of needle domains that are a key indicator for ferroelastic behaviour in multiferroic materials.

  7. Transponder System for High-Frequency Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, C. L.; Shores, P. W.; Kobayashi, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transponder system uses phase difference between transmitted and reflected high-frequency radio waves to measure distance to target. To suppress spurious measurements of reflections from objects near target at transmitted frequency and its harmonics, transponder at target generates return signal at half transmitted frequency. System useful in such applications as surveying, docking of ships, and short-range navigation.

  8. Phonon spectrum and interaction between nanotubes in single-walled carbon nanotube bundles at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meletov, K. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes at temperatures up to 730 K and pressures up to 7 GPa have been measured. The behavior of phonon modes and the interaction between nanotubes in bundles have been studied. It has been found that the temperature shift of the vibrational G mode is completely reversible, whereas the temperature shift of radial breathing modes is partially irreversible and the softening of the modes and narrowing of phonon bands are observed. The temperature shift and softening of radial breathing modes are also observed when samples are irradiated by laser radiation with a power density of 6.5 kW/mm2. The dependence of the relative frequency Ω/Ω0 for G + and G - phonon modes on the relative change A 0/ A in the triangular lattice constant of bundles of nanotubes calculated using the thermal expansion coefficient and compressibility coefficient of nanotube bundles shows that the temperature shift of the G mode is determined by the softening of the C-C bond in nanotubes. An increase in the equilibrium distances between nanotubes at the breaking of random covalent C-C bonds between nanotubes in bundles of nanotubes is in my opinion the main reason for the softening of the radial breathing modes.

  9. Phonon spectrum and interaction between nanotubes in single-walled carbon nanotube bundles at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Meletov, K. P.

    2012-12-15

    The Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes at temperatures up to 730 K and pressures up to 7 GPa have been measured. The behavior of phonon modes and the interaction between nanotubes in bundles have been studied. It has been found that the temperature shift of the vibrational G mode is completely reversible, whereas the temperature shift of radial breathing modes is partially irreversible and the softening of the modes and narrowing of phonon bands are observed. The temperature shift and softening of radial breathing modes are also observed when samples are irradiated by laser radiation with a power density of 6.5 kW/mm{sup 2}. The dependence of the relative frequency {Omega}/{Omega}{sub 0} for G{sup +} and G{sup -} phonon modes on the relative change A{sub 0}/A in the triangular lattice constant of bundles of nanotubes calculated using the thermal expansion coefficient and compressibility coefficient of nanotube bundles shows that the temperature shift of the G mode is determined by the softening of the C-C bond in nanotubes. An increase in the equilibrium distances between nanotubes at the breaking of random covalent C-C bonds between nanotubes in bundles of nanotubes is in my opinion the main reason for the softening of the radial breathing modes.

  10. Direct measurement of coherent subterahertz acoustic phonons mean free path in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, R.; Huynh, A.; Jusserand, B.; Perrin, B.; Lemaître, A.

    2016-05-01

    The phonon mean free path is generally inferred from the measurement of thermal conductivity and we are still lacking precise information on this quantity. Recent advances in the field of high-frequency phonons transduction using semiconductor superlattices give the opportunity to fill this gap. We present experimental results on the attenuation of longitudinal acoustic phonons in GaAs in the frequency and temperature ranges 0.2-1 THz and 10-80 K respectively. Surprisingly, we observe a plateau in the frequency dependence of the attenuation above 0.7 THz, that we ascribe to a breakdown of Herring processes.

  11. High frequency oscillations in the intact brain

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, György; da Silva, Fernando Lopes

    2016-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs) constitute a novel trend in neurophysiology that is fascinating neuroscientists in general, and epileptologists in particular. But what are HFOs? What is the frequency range of HFOs? Are there different types of HFOs, physiological and pathological? How are HFOs generated? Can HFOs represent temporal codes for cognitive processes? These questions are pressing and this symposium volume attempts to give constructive answers. As a prelude to this exciting discussion, we summarize the physiological high frequency patterns in the intact brain, concentrating mainly on hippocampal patterns, where the mechanisms of high frequency oscillations are perhaps best understood. PMID:22449727

  12. Lightweight, high-frequency transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The 25-kVA space transformer was developed under contract by Thermal Technology Laboratory, Buffalo, N. Y. The NASA Lewis transformer technology program attempted to develop the baseline technology. For the 25-kVA transformer the input voltage was chosen as 200 V, the output voltage as 1500 V, the input voltage waveform as square wave, the duty cycle as continuous, the frequency range (within certain constraints) as 10 to 40 kHz, the operating temperatures as 85 deg. and 130 C, the baseplate temperature as 50 C, the equivalent leakage inductance as less than 10 micro-h, the operating environment as space, and the life expectancy as 10 years. Such a transformer can also be used for aircraft, ship and terrestrial applications.

  13. Phonon interpretation of the 'boson peak' in supercooled liquids.

    PubMed

    Grigera, T S; Martín-Mayor, V; Parisi, G; Verrocchio, P

    2003-03-20

    Glasses are amorphous solids, in the sense that they display elastic behaviour. In crystalline solids, elasticity is associated with phonons, which are quantized vibrational excitations. Phonon-like excitations also exist in glasses at very high (terahertz; 10(12) Hz) frequencies; surprisingly, these persist in the supercooled liquids. A universal feature of such amorphous systems is the boson peak: the vibrational density of states has an excess compared to the Debye squared-frequency law. Here we investigate the origin of this feature by studying the spectra of inherent structures (local minima of the potential energy) in a realistic glass model. We claim that the peak is the signature of a phase transition in the space of the stationary points of the energy, from a minima-dominated phase (with phonons) at low energy to a saddle-point-dominated phase (without phonons). The boson peak moves to lower frequencies on approaching the phonon-saddle transition, and its height diverges at the critical point. Our numerical results agree with the predictions of euclidean random matrix theory on the existence of a sharp phase transition between an amorphous elastic phase and a phonon-free one. PMID:12646916

  14. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  15. Phonon dispersions and structural transitions of CrO2 under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sooran; Kim, Kyoo; Kang, Chang-Jong; Min, B. I.

    2012-02-01

    Phonon dispersions of chromium dioxide (CrO2) are calculated to investigate the structural phase transitions as a function of pressure. The structural phase transition has been confirmed from the ground state tetragonal CrO2 of rutile-type (t-CrO2) to the orthorhombic CrO2 of CaCl2-type (o-CrO2). The ferromagnetic and half-metallic property is preserved even in o-CrO2. The softening of Raman-active B1g phonon mode, which is relevant to the above structural transition, is also obtained. We will discuss the possible more structural phase transitions from o-CrO2 and the related phonon and magnetic properties at much higher pressure.

  16. First-principles prediction of doped graphane as a high-temperature electron-phonon superconductor.

    PubMed

    Savini, G; Ferrari, A C; Giustino, Feliciano

    2010-07-16

    We predict by first-principles calculations that p-doped graphane is an electron-phonon superconductor with a critical temperature above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen. The unique strength of the chemical bonds between carbon atoms and the large density of electronic states at the Fermi energy arising from the reduced dimensionality give rise to a giant Kohn anomaly in the optical phonon dispersions and push the superconducting critical temperature above 90 K. As evidence of graphane was recently reported, and doping of related materials such as graphene, diamond, and carbon nanostructures is well established, superconducting graphane may be feasible. PMID:20867792

  17. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  18. High-Q cross-plate phononic crystal resonator for enhanced acoustic wave localization and energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Yang, Chao; Wang, Decai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jiajia

    2015-05-01

    A high-Q cross-plate phononic crystal resonator (Cr-PCR) coupled with an electromechanical Helmholtz resonator (EMHR) is proposed to improve acoustic wave localization and energy harvesting. Owing to the strongly directional wave-scattering effect of the cross-plate corners, strong confinement of acoustic waves emerges. Consequently, the proposed Cr-PCR structure exhibits ∼353.5 times higher Q value and ∼6.1 times greater maximum pressure amplification than the phononic crystal resonator (Cy-PCR) (consisting of cylindrical scatterers) of the same size. Furthermore, the harvester using the proposed Cr-PCR and the EMHR has ∼22 times greater maximum output-power volume density than the previous harvester using Cy-PCR and EMHR structures.

  19. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  20. Ultra-High-Frequency Capacitive Displacement Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.

    1994-01-01

    Improved class of compact, high-resolution capacitive displacement sensors operates at excitation frequency of 915 MHz and measures about 7.5 by 4 by 2 centimeters. Contains commercially available 915-MHz oscillator and transmission-line resonator. Resonator contains stripline inductor in addition to variable capacitor. Ultrahigh excitation frequency offers advantages of resolution and frequency response. Not deleteriously affected by mechanical overdriving, or contact between electrodes.

  1. Variable-Range Hopping through Marginally Localized Phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sumilan; Altman, Ehud

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the effect of coupling Anderson localized particles in one dimension to a system of marginally localized phonons having a symmetry protected delocalized mode at zero frequency. This situation is naturally realized for electrons coupled to phonons in a disordered nanowire as well as for ultracold fermions coupled to phonons of a superfluid in a one-dimensional disordered trap. To determine if the coupled system can be many-body localized we analyze the phonon-mediated hopping transport for both the weak and strong coupling regimes. We show that the usual variable-range hopping mechanism involving a low-order phonon process is ineffective at low temperature due to discreteness of the bath at the required energy. Instead, the system thermalizes through a many-body process involving exchange of a diverging number n ∝-log T of phonons in the low temperature limit. This effect leads to a highly singular prefactor to Mott's well-known formula and strongly suppresses the variable range hopping rate. Finally, we comment on possible implications of this physics in higher dimensional electron-phonon coupled systems.

  2. Heat transport by phonons in crystalline materials and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Yee Kan

    This dissertation presents experimental studies of heat transport by phonons in crystalline materials and nanostructures, and across solid-solid interfaces. Particularly, this dissertation emphasizes advancing understanding of the mean-free-paths (i.e., the distance phonons propagate without being scattered) of acoustic phonons, which are the dominant heat carriers in most crystalline semiconductor nanostructures. Two primary tools for the studies presented in this dissertation are time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) for measurements of thermal conductivity of nanostructures and thermal conductance of interfaces; and frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), which I developed as a direct probe of the mean-free-paths of dominant heat-carrying phonons in crystalline solids. The foundation of FDTR is the dependence of the apparent thermal conductivity on the frequency of periodic heat sources. I find that the thermal conductivity of semiconductor alloys (InGaP, InGaAs, and SiGe) measured by TDTR depends on the modulation frequency, 0.1 ≤ f ≤ 10 MHz, used in TDTR measurements. Reduction in the thermal conductivity of the semiconductor alloys at high f compares well to the reduction in the thermal conductivity of epitaxial thin films, indicating that frequency dependence and thickness dependence of thermal conductivity are fundamentally equivalent. I developed the frequency dependence of thermal conductivity into a convenient probe of phonon mean-free-paths, a technique which I call frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR). In FDTR, I monitor the changes in the intensity of the reflected probe beam as a function of the modulation frequency. To facilitate the analysis of FDTR measurements, I developed a nonlocal theory for heat conduction by phonons at high heating frequencies. Calculations of the nonlocal theory confirm my experimental findings that phonons with mean-free-paths longer than two times the penetration depth do not contribute to the apparent thermal

  3. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers.

    PubMed

    Vanapalli, S; ter Brake, H J M; Jansen, H V; Zhao, Y; Holland, H J; Burger, J F; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-04-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pressure oscillator is presented with the aim to power a micropulse tube cryocooler operating between 300 and 80 K, delivering a cooling power of 10 mW. Piezoelectric actuators operate efficiently at high frequencies and have high power density making them good candidates as drivers for high frequency pressure oscillator. The pressure oscillator described in this work consists of a membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator. A pressure ratio of about 1.11 was achieved with a filling pressure of 2.5 MPa and compression volume of about 22.6 mm(3) when operating the actuator with a peak-to-peak sinusoidal voltage of 100 V at a frequency of 1 kHz. The electrical power input was 2.73 W. The high pressure ratio and low electrical input power at high frequencies would herald development of microminiature cryocoolers. PMID:18447548

  4. Phonon mean free path spectrum and thermal conductivity for Si1-xGex nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guofeng; Guo, Yuan; Wei, Xiaolin; Zhang, Kaiwang; Sun, Lizhong; Zhong, Jianxin; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    We reformulate the linearized phonon Boltzmann transport equation by incorporating the direction-dependent phonon-boundary scattering, and based on this equation, we study the thermal conductivity of Si1-xGex nanowires and derive their phonon mean free path spectrum. Due to the severe suppression of high-frequency phonons by alloy scattering, the low frequency phonons in Si1-xGex nanowires have a much higher contribution to the thermal conductivity than pure silicon nanowires. We also find that Si1-xGex nanowires possess a stronger length-dependent, weaker diameter-dependent, and weaker surface roughness-dependent thermal conductivity than silicon nanowires. These findings are potentially useful for engineering Si1-xGex nanowires for thermoelectric applications.

  5. Phonon Gas Model (PGM) workflow in the VLab Science Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira, P.; Zhang, D.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    This contribution describes a scientific workflow for first principles computations of free energy of crystalline solids using the phonon gas model (PGM). This model was recently implemented as a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics and phonon normal mode analysis to extract temperature dependent phonon frequencies and life times beyond perturbation theory. This is a demanding high throughout workflow and is currently being implemented in VLab Cyberinfrastructure [da Silveira et al., 2008], which has recently been integrated to the XSEDE. First we review the underlying PGM, its practical implementation, and calculation requirements. We then describe the workflow management and its general method for handling actions. We illustrate the PGM application with a calculation of MgSiO3-perovskite's anharmonic phonons. We conclude with an outlook of workflows to compute other material's properties that will use the PGM workflow. Research supported by NSF award EAR-1019853.

  6. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  7. Phonon-Assisted Resonant Tunnelling through a Triple-Quantum-Dot: a Phonon-Signal Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiao-Yun; Dong, Bing; Lei, Xiao-lin

    2008-02-01

    We study the effect of electron-phonon interaction on current and zero-frequency shot noise in resonant tunnelling through a series triple-quantum-dot coupling to a local phonon mode by means of a nonperturbative mapping technique along with the Green function formulation. By fixing the energy difference between the first two quantum dots to be equal to phonon frequency and sweeping the level of the third quantum dot, we find a largely enhanced current spectrum due to phonon effect, and in particular we predict current peaks corresponding to phonon-absorption and phonon-emission assisted resonant tunnelling processes, which show that this system can be acted as a sensitive phonon-signal detector or as a cascade phonon generator.

  8. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  9. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  10. Phononic crystals of spherical particles: A tight binding approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mattarelli, M.; Secchi, M.; Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Trento ; Montagna, M.

    2013-11-07

    The vibrational dynamics of a fcc phononic crystal of spheres is studied and compared with that of a single free sphere, modelled either by a continuous homogeneous medium or by a finite cluster of atoms. For weak interaction among the spheres, the vibrational dynamics of the phononic crystal is described by shallow bands, with low degree of dispersion, corresponding to the acoustic spheroidal and torsional modes of the single sphere. The phonon displacements are therefore related to the vibrations of a sphere, as the electron wave functions in a crystal are related to the atomic wave functions in a tight binding model. Important dispersion is found for the two lowest phonon bands, which correspond to zero frequency free translation and rotation of a free sphere. Brillouin scattering spectra are calculated at some values of the exchanged wavevectors of the light, and compared with those of a single sphere. With weak interaction between particles, given the high acoustic impedance mismatch in dry systems, the density of phonon states consist of sharp bands separated by large gaps, which can be well accounted for by a single particle model. Based on the width of the frequency gaps, tunable with the particle size, and on the small number of dispersive acoustic phonons, such systems may provide excellent materials for application as sound or heat filters.

  11. Heating-frequency-dependent thermal conductivity: An analytical solution from diffusive to ballistic regime and its relevance to phonon scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Dames, Chris

    2015-04-01

    The heating-frequency dependence of the apparent thermal conductivity in a semi-infinite body with periodic planar surface heating is explained by an analytical solution to the Boltzmann transport equation. This solution is obtained using a two-flux model and gray mean free time approximation and verified numerically with a lattice Boltzmann method and numerical results from the literature. Extending the gray solution to the nongray regime leads to an integral transform and accumulation-function representation of the phonon scattering spectrum, where the natural variable is mean free time rather than mean free path, as often used in previous work. The derivation leads to an approximate cutoff conduction similar in spirit to that of Koh and Cahill [Phys. Rev. B 76, 075207 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevB.76.075207] except that the most appropriate criterion involves the heater frequency rather than thermal diffusion length. The nongray calculations are consistent with Koh and Cahill's experimental observation that the apparent thermal conductivity shows a stronger heater-frequency dependence in a SiGe alloy than in natural Si. Finally these results are demonstrated using a virtual experiment, which fits the phase lag between surface temperature and heat flux to obtain the apparent thermal conductivity and accumulation function.

  12. Band gaps in the low-frequency range based on the two-dimensional phononic crystal plates composed of rubber matrix with periodic steel stubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kunpeng; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the numerical investigation of elastic wave propagation in two-dimensional phononic crystals composed of an array of steel stepped resonators on a thin rubber slab is presented. For the first time the rubber material is used as the matrix of the PCs. With the finite-element method, the dispersion relations of this novel PCs structure and some factors of the band structure are studied. Results show that, with the rubber material as matrix, the PC structures exhibit extremely low-frequency band gaps, in the frequency range of hundreds of Hz or even tens of Hz; the geometrical parameters and the material parameters can modulate the band gaps to different extents. Furthermore, to understand the low-frequency band gaps caused by this new structure, some resonance eigenmodes of the structure are calculated. Results show that the vibration of the unit cell of the structure can be seen as several mass-spring systems, in which the vibration of the steel stepped resonator decides the lower boundary of the first band gap and the vibration of the rubber that is not in contact with the resonator decides the upper boundary.

  13. Edge waves and resonances in two-dimensional phononic crystal plates

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Jin-Chen Hsu, Chih-Hsun

    2015-05-07

    We present a numerical study on phononic band gaps and resonances occurring at the edge of a semi-infinite two-dimensional (2D) phononic crystal plate. The edge supports localized edge waves coupling to evanescent phononic plate modes that decay exponentially into the semi-infinite phononic crystal plate. The band-gap range and the number of edge-wave eigenmodes can be tailored by tuning the distance between the edge and the semi-infinite 2D phononic lattice. As a result, a phononic band gap for simultaneous edge waves and plate waves is created, and phononic cavities beside the edge can be built to support high-frequency edge resonances. We design an L3 edge cavity and analyze its resonance characteristics. Based on the band gap, high quality factor and strong confinement of resonant edge modes are achieved. The results enable enhanced control over acoustic energy flow in phononic crystal plates, which can be used in designing micro and nanoscale resonant devices and coupling of edge resonances to other types of phononic or photonic crystal cavities.

  14. Nature of One- and Two-Phonon Mixed Symmetry States in 92Zr and 94Mo from High-Resolution Electron and Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Burda, O.; Kuhar, M.; Lenhardt, A.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Botha, N. T.; Fearick, R. W.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fransen, C.; Fujita, H.; Pietralla, N.

    2006-03-13

    High-resolution inelastic electron (performed at the S-DALINAC) and proton (performed at iThemba LABS) scattering experiments on 92Zr and 94Mo with emphasis on E2 transitions are presented The measured form factors and angular distributions provide a measure for the F-spin purity, respectively the isovector nature, of the proposed one-phonon mixed symmetry states and furthermore provide a sensitive test of a possible two-phonon character of excited 2+ states.

  15. Fourier-transform inelastic x-ray scattering from time- and momentum- dependent phonon-phonon correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, Mariano; Reis, David

    2014-03-01

    In a solid, the elementary excitations of the crystalline lattice (phonons) determine the macroscopic properties such as thermal transport and structural stability. The spectrum of these elementary excitations is normally obtained from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering near equilibrium conditions, which is a Fourier transform of the spatial and temporal correlations of the system. Recent advances in Free Electron Laser sources provide sufficient flux and time-resolution to explore the dynamics of solids at the fundamental time- and length-scales of the atomic motions. In this talk I will show that by probing phonon correlations by femtosecond diffuse scattering in photoexcited germanium, we were able to obtain the phonon dispersion with extreme frequency and momentum resolution without analyzing the energy of the outgoing photon. I will show that time-dependent coherences are generated when an ultrafast laser pulse slightly quenches the phonon frequencies, generating pairs of correlated phonons at equal and opposite momenta. Using this approach we obtain an extremely high-resolution probe of the excited-state phonon dispersion over large sections of momentum space by a simple Fourier transform.

  16. Theoretical Predictions for High-Pressure Elastic, Mechanical, and Phonon Properties of SiGe Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, M.; Güler, E.

    2016-04-01

    Elastic, mechanical, and phonon properties of zinc blende (ZB)-type SiGe ordered alloy were theoretically investigated in detail under pressures up to 12 GPa. Unlike earlier theoretical calculations of literature, a Stillinger-Weber-type interatomic potential was applied to this work for the first time with geometry optimization calculations. Pressure dependence of typical cubic elastic constants, bulk, shear and Young moduli, elastic wave velocities, Kleinman parameter, elastic anisotropy factor, phonon dispersion, as well as density of states of SiGe alloy were calculated and compared with other results when available. In general, our results for the above considered quantities of SiGe alloy are satisfactory and compare well the former theoretical data of alloy.

  17. High-Throughput Computational Screening of Electrical and Phonon Properties of Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Izaak; Hernandez, Andres Correa; Wong-Ng, Winnie; Li, Lan

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDs) are of broadening research interest due to their novel physical, electrical, and thermoelectric properties. Having the chemical formula MX 2, where M is a transition metal and X is a chalcogen, there are many possible combinations to consider for materials-by-design exploration. By identifying novel compositions and utilizing the lower dimensionality, which allows for improved thermoelectric performance (e.g., increased Seebeck coefficients without sacrificing electron concentration), MX 2 materials are promising candidates for thermoelectric applications. However, to develop these materials into wide-scale use, it is crucial to comprehensively understand the compositional affects. This work investigates the structure, electronic, and phonon properties of 18 different MX 2 materials compositions as a benchmark to explore the impact of various elements. There is significant correlation between properties of constituent transition metals (atomic mass and radius) and the structure/properties of the corresponding 2D-TMDs. As the mass of M increases, the n-type power factor and phonon frequency gap increases. Similarly, increases in the radius of M lead to increased layer thickness and Seebeck coefficient S. Our results identify key factors to optimize MX 2 compositions for desired performance.

  18. Optimization of phononic filters via genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M. I.; El-Beltagy, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    A phononic crystal is commonly characterized by its dispersive frequency spectrum. With appropriate spatial distribution of the constituent material phases, spectral stop bands could be generated. Moreover, it is possible to control the number, the width, and the location of these bands within a frequency range of interest. This study aims at exploring the relationship between unit cell configuration and frequency spectrum characteristics. Focusing on 1D layered phononic crystals, and longitudinal wave propagation in the direction normal to the layering, the unit cell features of interest are the number of layers and the material phase and relative thickness of each layer. An evolutionary search for binary- and ternary-phase cell designs exhibiting a series of stop bands at predetermined frequencies is conducted. A specially formulated representation and set of genetic operators that break the symmetries in the problem are developed for this purpose. An array of optimal designs for a range of ratios in Young's modulus and density are obtained and the corresponding objective values (the degrees to which the resulting bands match the predetermined targets) are examined as a function of these ratios. It is shown that a rather complex filtering objective could be met with a high degree of success. Structures composed of the designed phononic crystals are excellent candidates for use in a wide range of applications including sound and vibration filtering.

  19. Thermally triggered phononic gaps in liquids at THz scale

    PubMed Central

    Bolmatov, Dima; Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Zav’yalov, Dmitry; Stoupin, Stanislav; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Cai, Yong Q.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present inelastic X-ray scattering experiments in a diamond anvil cell and molecular dynamic simulations to investigate the behavior of phononic excitations in liquid Ar. The spectra calculated using molecular dynamics were found to be in a good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, we observe that, upon temperature increases, a low-frequency transverse phononic gap emerges while high-frequency propagating modes become evanescent at the THz scale. The effect of strong localization of a longitudinal phononic mode in the supercritical phase is observed for the first time. The evidence for the high-frequency transverse phononic gap due to the transition from an oscillatory to a ballistic dynamic regimes of motion is presented and supported by molecular dynamics simulations. This transition takes place across the Frenkel line thermodynamic limit which demarcates compressed liquid and non-compressed fluid domains on the phase diagram and is supported by calculations within the Green-Kubo phenomenological formalism. These results are crucial to advance the development of novel terahertz thermal devices, phononic lenses, mirrors, and other THz metamaterials. PMID:26763899

  20. Thermally triggered phononic gaps in liquids at THz scale

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bolmatov, Dima; Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Zavyalov, Dmitry; Stoupin, Stanislav; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Cai, Yong Q.

    2016-01-14

    In this study we present inelastic X-ray scattering experiments in a diamond anvil cell and molecular dynamic simulations to investigate the behavior of phononic excitations in liquid Ar. The spectra calculated using molecular dynamics were found to be in a good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, we observe that, upon temperature increases, a low-frequency transverse phononic gap emerges while high-frequency propagating modes become evanescent at the THz scale. The effect of strong localization of a longitudinal phononic mode in the supercritical phase is observed for the first time. The evidence for the high-frequency transverse phononic gap due to themore » transition from an oscillatory to a ballistic dynamic regimes of motion is presented and supported by molecular dynamics simulations. This transition takes place across the Frenkel line thermodynamic limit which demarcates compressed liquid and non-compressed fluid domains on the phase diagram and is supported by calculations within the Green-Kubo phenomenological formalism. These results are crucial to advance the development of novel terahertz thermal devices, phononic lenses, mirrors, and other THz metamaterials.« less

  1. Thermally triggered phononic gaps in liquids at THz scale.

    PubMed

    Bolmatov, Dima; Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Zav'yalov, Dmitry; Stoupin, Stanislav; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Cai, Yong Q

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present inelastic X-ray scattering experiments in a diamond anvil cell and molecular dynamic simulations to investigate the behavior of phononic excitations in liquid Ar. The spectra calculated using molecular dynamics were found to be in a good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, we observe that, upon temperature increases, a low-frequency transverse phononic gap emerges while high-frequency propagating modes become evanescent at the THz scale. The effect of strong localization of a longitudinal phononic mode in the supercritical phase is observed for the first time. The evidence for the high-frequency transverse phononic gap due to the transition from an oscillatory to a ballistic dynamic regimes of motion is presented and supported by molecular dynamics simulations. This transition takes place across the Frenkel line thermodynamic limit which demarcates compressed liquid and non-compressed fluid domains on the phase diagram and is supported by calculations within the Green-Kubo phenomenological formalism. These results are crucial to advance the development of novel terahertz thermal devices, phononic lenses, mirrors, and other THz metamaterials. PMID:26763899

  2. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  3. High power radio frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Quentin A.; Miller, Harold W.

    1984-01-01

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  4. Expansion of lower-frequency locally resonant band gaps using a double-sided stubbed composite phononic crystals plate with composite stubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suobin; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Li, Yinggang; Chen, Weihua

    2016-06-01

    We studied the expansion of locally resonant complete band gaps in two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) using a double-sided stubbed composite PC plate with composite stubs. Results show that the introduction of the proposed structure gives rise to a significant expansion of the relative bandwidth by a factor of 1.5 and decreases the opening location of the first complete band gap by a factor of 3 compared to the classic double-sided stubbed PC plate with composite stubs. Furthermore, more band gaps appear in the lower-frequency range (0.006). These phenomena can be attributed to the strong coupling between the "analogous rigid mode" of the stub and the anti-symmetric Lamb modes of the plate. The "analogous rigid mode" of the stub is produced by strengthening the localized resonance effect of the composite plates through the double-sided stubs, and is further strengthened through the introduction of composite stubs. The "analogous rigid mode" of the stubs expands the out-of-plane band gap, which overlaps with in-plane band gap in the lower-frequency range. As a result, the complete band gap is expanded and more complete band gaps appear.

  5. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.R.

    1993-03-23

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counter bores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counter bores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  6. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, Brian; McDaniel, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  7. Infrared study of lattice dynamics and spin-phonon and electron-phonon interactions in multiferroic TbF e3(BO3) 4 and GdF e3(BO3) 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimin, S. A.; Kuzmenko, A. B.; Kashchenko, M. A.; Popova, M. N.

    2016-02-01

    We present a comparative far-infrared reflection spectroscopy study of phonons, phase transitions, spin-phonon, and electron-phonon interactions in isostructural multiferroic iron borates of gadolinium and terbium. The behavior of phonon modes registered in a wide temperature range is consistent with a weak first-order structural phase transition [Ts=143 for GdF e3(BO3) 4 and 200 K for TbF e3(BO3) 4 ] from a high-symmetry high-temperature R 32 structure into a low-symmetry low-temperature P 3121 one. The temperature dependences of frequencies, oscillator strengths, and damping constants of some low-frequency modes reveal an appreciable lattice anharmonicity. Peculiarities in the phonon mode behavior in both compounds at the temperature of an antiferromagnetic ordering [TN=32 K for GdF e3(BO3) 4 and 40 K for TbF e3(BO3) 4 ] evidence the spin-phonon interaction. In the energy range of phonons, GdF e3(BO3) 4 has no electronic levels, but TbF e3(BO3) 4 possesses several. We observe an onset of new bands in the excitation spectrum of TbF e3(BO3) 4 due to a resonance interaction between a lattice phonon and 4 f electronic crystal-field (CF) excitations of T b3 + . This interaction causes delocalization of the CF excitations, their Davydov splitting, and formation of coupled electron-phonon modes.

  8. High-performance Brillouin spectroscopy of phonons induced by a piezoelectric thin film with a coaxial microwave resonator.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hiroyuki; Yanagitani, Takahiko; Takayanagi, Shinji; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Matsukawa, Mami

    2013-05-01

    To overcome the low accuracy of acoustic velocity measurements based on Brillouin scattering from thermal phonons, we attempted to utilize induced coherent phonons, which cause intense Brillouin scattering. A ZnO piezoelectric film was used to induce gigahertz-range coherent phonons in a silica glass block sample. An evanescent electromagnetic wave leaked from a coaxial resonator was applied into the film to excite phonons. The scattered light obtained using this simple system was much more intense than that obtained from thermal phonons. This technique will improve the accuracy and reduce the measurement time. PMID:23661120

  9. Optically driven quantum dots as source of coherent cavity phonons: a proposal for a phonon laser scheme.

    PubMed

    Kabuss, Julia; Carmele, Alexander; Brandes, Tobias; Knorr, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    We present a microscopically based scheme for the generation of coherent cavity phonons (phonon laser) by an optically driven semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a THz acoustic nanocavity. External laser pump light on an anti-Stokes resonance creates an effective Lambda system within a two-level dot that leads to coherent phonon statistics. We use an inductive equation of motion method to estimate a realistic parameter range for an experimental realization of such phonon lasers. This scheme for the creation of nonequilibrium phonons is robust with respect to radiative and phononic damping and only requires optical Rabi frequencies of the order of the electron-phonon coupling strength. PMID:23006175

  10. High frequency electromagnetic response of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Schwartz, K.

    1971-01-01

    It is shown that the contribution of higher harmonics to the lunar transfer functions for the tangential components of the surface magnetic field is significant at frequencies greater than 0.01 Hz. The inclusion of the higher harmonics shows that there are two distinct transfer functions corresponding to the components of the tangential surface magnetic field perpendicular and parallel to the direction of the wave vector of the external disturbance forcing the lunar induction. The dependences of these transfer functions on frequency and location are determined. The effects of the higher harmonics can: (1) account for a hitherto unexplained feature in the Apollo 12-Explorer 35 transfer functions, namely the rolloff at high frequencies; and (2) offer a possible explanation for the frequency dependence of the difference between the transfer functions for the two orthogonal components of the surface magnetic field. The harmonic response of a simple current layer model of the moon is derived.

  11. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  12. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  13. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  14. Phonons in two-dimensional colloidal crystals with bond-strength disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratale, Matthew D.; Yunker, Peter J.; Chen, Ke; Still, Tim; Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Yodh, A. G.

    2013-05-01

    We study phonon modes in two-dimensional colloidal crystals composed of soft microgel particles with hard polystyrene particle dopants distributed randomly on the triangular lattice. This experimental approach produces close-packed lattices of spheres with random bond strength disorder, i.e., the effective springs coupling nearest neighbors are very stiff, very soft, or of intermediate stiffness. Particle tracking video microscopy and covariance matrix techniques are then employed to derive the phonon modes of the corresponding “shadow” crystals with bond strength disorder as a function of increasing dopant concentration. At low frequencies, hard and soft particles participate equally in the phonon modes, and the samples exhibit Debye-like density of states behavior characteristic of crystals. For mid- and high-frequency phonons, the relative participation of hard versus soft particles in each mode is found to vary systematically with dopant concentration. Additionally, a few localized modes, primarily associated with hard particle motions, are found at the highest frequencies.

  15. Reversible optical switching of highly confined phonon-polaritons with an ultrathin phase-change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peining; Yang, Xiaosheng; Maß, Tobias W. W.; Hanss, Julian; Lewin, Martin; Michel, Ann-Katrin U.; Wuttig, Matthias; Taubner, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Surface phonon-polaritons (SPhPs), collective excitations of photons coupled with phonons in polar crystals, enable strong light-matter interaction and numerous infrared nanophotonic applications. However, as the lattice vibrations are determined by the crystal structure, the dynamical control of SPhPs remains challenging. Here, we realize the all-optical, non-volatile, and reversible switching of SPhPs by controlling the structural phase of a phase-change material (PCM) employed as a switchable dielectric environment. We experimentally demonstrate optical switching of an ultrathin PCM film (down to 7 nm, <λ/1,200) with single laser pulses and detect ultra-confined SPhPs (polariton wavevector kp > 70k0, k0 = 2π/λ) in quartz. Our proof of concept allows the preparation of all-dielectric, rewritable SPhP resonators without the need for complex fabrication methods. With optimized materials and parallelized optical addressing we foresee application potential for switchable infrared nanophotonic elements, for example, imaging elements such as superlenses and hyperlenses, as well as reconfigurable metasurfaces and sensors.

  16. A Bond-order Theory on the Phonon Scattering by Vacancies in Two-dimensional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guofeng; Shen, Yulu; Wei, Xiaolin; Yang, Liwen; Xiao, Huaping; Zhong, Jianxin; Zhang, Gang

    2014-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the phonon scattering by vacancies, including the impacts of missing mass and linkages () and the variation of the force constant of bonds associated with vacancies () by the bond-order-length-strength correlation mechanism. We find that in bulk crystals, the phonon scattering rate due to change of force constant is about three orders of magnitude lower than that due to missing mass and linkages . In contrast to the negligible in bulk materials, in two-dimensional materials can be 3-10 folds larger than . Incorporating this phonon scattering mechanism to the Boltzmann transport equation derives that the thermal conductivity of vacancy defective graphene is severely reduced even for very low vacancy density. High-frequency phonon contribution to thermal conductivity reduces substantially. Our findings are helpful not only to understand the severe suppression of thermal conductivity by vacancies, but also to manipulate thermal conductivity in two-dimensional materials by phononic engineering.

  17. Hybrid surface-phonon-plasmon polariton modes in graphene/monolayer h-BN heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Brar, Victor W; Jang, Min Seok; Sherrott, Michelle; Kim, Seyoon; Lopez, Josue J; Kim, Laura B; Choi, Mansoo; Atwater, Harry

    2014-07-01

    Infrared transmission measurements reveal the hybridization of graphene plasmons and the phonons in a monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheet. Frequency-wavevector dispersion relations of the electromagnetically coupled graphene plasmon/h-BN phonon modes are derived from measurement of nanoresonators with widths varying from 30 to 300 nm. It is shown that the graphene plasmon mode is split into two distinct optical modes that display an anticrossing behavior near the energy of the h-BN optical phonon at 1370 cm(-1). We explain this behavior as a classical electromagnetic strong-coupling with the highly confined near fields of the graphene plasmons allowing for hybridization with the phonons of the atomically thin h-BN layer to create two clearly separated new surface-phonon-plasmon-polariton (SPPP) modes. PMID:24874205

  18. A Bond-order Theory on the Phonon Scattering by Vacancies in Two-dimensional Materials

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guofeng; Shen, Yulu; Wei, Xiaolin; Yang, Liwen; Xiao, Huaping; Zhong, Jianxin; Zhang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the phonon scattering by vacancies, including the impacts of missing mass and linkages () and the variation of the force constant of bonds associated with vacancies () by the bond-order-length-strength correlation mechanism. We find that in bulk crystals, the phonon scattering rate due to change of force constant is about three orders of magnitude lower than that due to missing mass and linkages . In contrast to the negligible in bulk materials, in two-dimensional materials can be 3–10 folds larger than . Incorporating this phonon scattering mechanism to the Boltzmann transport equation derives that the thermal conductivity of vacancy defective graphene is severely reduced even for very low vacancy density. High-frequency phonon contribution to thermal conductivity reduces substantially. Our findings are helpful not only to understand the severe suppression of thermal conductivity by vacancies, but also to manipulate thermal conductivity in two-dimensional materials by phononic engineering. PMID:24866858

  19. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  20. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz(-1) at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100 s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  1. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz-1 at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz-1 at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz-1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10-10 at 1-100 s integration time--orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  2. Optical phonons in PbTe/CdTe multilayer heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Novikova, N. N.; Yakovlev, V. A.; Kucherenko, I. V.; Karczewski, G.; Aleshchenko, Yu. A.; Muratov, A. V.; Zavaritskaya, T. N.; Melnik, N. N.

    2015-05-15

    The infrared reflection spectra of PbTe/CdTe multilayer nanostructures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy are measured in the frequency range of 20–5000 cm{sup −1} at room temperature. The thicknesses and high-frequency dielectric constants of the PbTe and CdTe layers and the frequencies of the transverse optical (TO) phonons in these structures are determined from dispersion analysis of the spectra. It is found that the samples under study are characterized by two TO phonon frequencies, equal to 28 and 47 cm{sup −1}. The first frequency is close to that of TO phonons in bulk PbTe, and the second is assigned to the optical mode in structurally distorted interface layers. The Raman-scattering spectra upon excitation with the radiation of an Ar{sup +} laser at 514.5 nm are measured at room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures. The weak line at 106 cm{sup −1} observed in these spectra is attributed to longitudinal optical phonons in the interface layers.

  3. Phonon Heat Conduction In Nanostructures: Ballistic, Coherent, Localized, Hydrodynamic, and Divergent Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang

    In this talk, we will discuss different modes of heat conduction in nanostructures. Ballistic transport happens when phonon mean free path is longer than the characteristic size of the structure. We will discuss how we compute phonon mean free path distributions based on first-principles and measure the distributions with optical pump-probe techniques by exploring ballistic phonon transport processes. In superlattice structures, ballistic phonon transport across the whole thickness of the superlattices implies phase coherence. We observed this coherent transport in GaAs/AlAs superlattices with fixed periodic thickness and varying number of periods. Simulations show that although high frequency phonons are scattering by roughness, remaining long wavelength phonons maintain their phase and traverse the superlattices ballistically. Accessing the coherent heat conduction regime opens a new venue for phonon engineering. We show further that phonon heat conduction localization happens in GaAs/AlAs superlattice by placing ErAs nanodots at interfaces. This heat-conduction localization phenomenon is confirmed by nonequilibrium atomic Green's function simulation. These ballistic and localization effects can be exploited to improve thermoelectric energy conversion materials via reducing their thermal conductivity. In another opposite, we will discuss phonon hydrodynamic transport mode in graphene via first-principle simulations. In this mode, phonons drift with an average velocity under a temperature gradient, similar to fluid flow in a pipe. Conditions for observing such phonon hydrodynamic modes will be discussed. Finally, we will talk about the one-dimensional nature of heat conduction in polymer chains. Such 1D nature can lead to divergent thermal conductivity. Inspired by simulation, we have experimentally demonstrated high thermal conductivity in ultra-drawn polyethylene nanofibers and sheets. Work supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number: DE

  4. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period. PMID:12199947

  5. Temperature Dependence of Phonons in Pyrolitic Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, B. N.; Shirane, G.

    1977-01-01

    Dispersion curves for longitudinal and transverse phonons propagating along and near the c-axis in pyrolitic graphite at temperatures between 4°K and 1500°C have been measured by neutron spectroscopy. The observed frequencies decrease markedly with increasing temperature (except for the transverse optical ''rippling'' modes in the hexagonal planes). The neutron groups show interesting asymmetrical broadening ascribed to interference between one phonon and many phonon processes.

  6. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  7. Phonon density of states of Fe2O3 across high-pressure structural and electronic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Tse, John S.; Alp, Esen E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Lerche, Michael; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul

    2011-08-24

    High-pressure phonon density of states (PDOS) of Fe₂O₃ across structural and electronic transitions has been investigated by nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and first-principles calculations together with synchrotron Mössbauer, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray emission spectroscopies. Drastic changes in elastic, thermodynamic, and vibrational properties of Fe₂O₃ occur across the Rh₂O₃(II)-type structural transition at 40–50 GPa, whereas the Mott insulator-metal transition occurring after the structural transition only causes nominal changes in the properties of the Fe₂O₃. The observed anomalous mode-softening behavior of the elastic constants is associated with the structural transition at 40–50 GPa, leading to substantial changes in the Debye-like part of the PDOS in the terahertz acoustic phonons. Our experimental and theoretical studies provide new insights into the effects of the structural and electronic transitions in the transition-metal oxide (TMO) compounds.

  8. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  9. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  10. High Frequency Laser-Based Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, R; Chinn, D; Balogun, O; Murray, T

    2005-09-12

    To obtain micrometer resolution of materials using acoustics requires frequencies around 1 GHz. Attenuation of such frequencies is high, limiting the thickness of the parts that can be characterized. Although acoustic microscopes can operate up to several GHz in frequency, they are used primarily as a surface characterization tool. The use of a pulsed laser for acoustic generation allows generation directly in the part, eliminating the loss of energy associated with coupling the energy from a piezoelectric transducer to the part of interest. The use of pulsed laser acoustic generation in combination with optical detection is investigated for the non-contact characterization of materials with features that must be characterized to micrometer resolution.

  11. High-frequency resonant-tunneling oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Calawa, A. R.; Manfra, M. J.; Chen, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in high-frequency resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) oscillators are described. Oscillations up to a frequency of 420 GHz have been achieved in the GaAs/AlAs system. Recent results obtained with In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs and InAs/AlSb RTDs show a greatly increased power density and indicate the potential for fundamental oscillations up to about 1 THz. These results are consistent with a lumped-element equivalent circuit model of the RTD. The model shows that the maximum oscillation frequency of the GaAs/AlAs RTDs is limited primarily by series resistance, and that the power density is limited by low peak-to-valley current ratio.

  12. Enhanced plane wave expansion analysis for the band structure of bulk modes in two-dimensional high-contrast solid-solid phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baboly, Mohammadhosein Ghasemi; Soliman, Yasser; Su, Mehmet F.; Reinke, Charles M.; Leseman, Zayd C.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2014-11-01

    Plane wave expansion analyses that use the inverse rule to obtain the Fourier coefficients of the elastic tensor instead of the more conventional Laurent's rule, exhibit faster convergence rates for solid-solid phononic crystals. In this work, the band structure convergence of calculations using the inverse rule is investigated and applied to the case of high acoustic impedance contrast solid-solid phononic crystals, previously known for convergence difficulties. Results are contrasted to those obtained with the conventional plane wave expansion method. The inverse rule is found to converge at a much rate for all ranges of impedance contrast, and the ratio between the computational times needed to obtain a convergent band structure for a high-contrast solid-solid phononic crystal with the conventional plane wave expansion method using 1369 reciprocal lattice vectors is as large as 6800:1. This ratio decreases for material sets with lower impedance contrast; however, the inverse rule is still faster for a given error threshold for even the lowest impedance contrast phononic crystals reported in the literature. This convergence enhancement is a major factor in reconsidering the plane wave expansion method as an important tool in obtaining propagating elastic modes in phononic crystals.

  13. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  14. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  15. An informatics based analysis of the impact of isotope substitution on phonon modes in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Scott; Srinivasan, Srikant; Rajan, Krishna; Ray, Upamanyu; Balasubramanian, Ganesh

    2014-06-16

    It is shown by informatics that the high frequency short ranged modes exert a significant influence in impeding thermal transport through isotope substituted graphene nanoribbons. Using eigenvalue decomposition methods, we have extracted features in the phonon density of states spectra that reveal correlations between isotope substitution and phonon modes. This study also provides a data driven computational framework for the linking of materials chemistry and transport properties in 2D systems.

  16. Anisotropic phonon coupling in the relaxor ferroelectric (Na1/2Bi1/2)TiO3 near its high-temperature phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ling; Toulouse, Jean; Luo, Haosu; Tian, Wei

    2014-08-01

    The lead free relaxor Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3 (NBT) undergoes a structural cubic-to-tetragonal transition near 800 K which is caused by the cooperative rotations of O6 octahedra. These rotations are also accompanied by the displacements of the cations and the formation of the polar nanodomains (PNDs) that are responsible for the characteristic dielectric dispersion of relaxor ferroelectrics. Because of their intrinsic properties, spontaneous polarization, and lack of inversion symmetry, these PNDs are also piezoelectric and can mediate an interaction between polarization and strain or couple the optic and acoustic phonons. Because PNDs introduce a local tetragonal symmetry, the phonon coupling they mediate is found to be anisotropic. In this paper we present inelastic neutron scattering results on coupled transverse acoustic (TA) and transverse optic (TO) phonons in the [110] and [001] directions and across the cubic-tetragonal phase transition at TC˜800 K. The phonon spectra are analyzed using a mode coupling model. In the [110] direction, as in other relaxors and some ferroelectric perovskites, a precipitous drop of the TO phonon into the TA branch or "waterfall" is observed at a certain qwf˜0.14 r.l.u. In the [001] direction, the highly overdamped line shape can be fitted with closely positioned bare mode energies which are largely overlapping along the dispersion curves. Two competing lattice coupling mechanism are proposed to explain these observations.

  17. Performance of annular high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Ivan A.

    This thesis presents studies of the behavior of miniature annular thermoacoustic prime movers and the imaging of the complex sound fields using PIV inside the small acoustic wave guides when driven by a temperature gradient. Thermoacoustic engines operating in the standing wave mode are limited in their acoustic efficiency by a high degree of irreversibility that is inherent in how they work. Better performance can be achieved by using traveling waves in the thermoacoustic devices. This has led to the development of an annular high frequency thermoacoustic prime mover consisting of a regenerator, which is a random stack in-between a hot and cold heat exchanger, inside an annular waveguide. Miniature devices were developed and studied with operating frequencies in the range of 2-4 kHz. This corresponds to an average ring circumference of 11 cm for the 3 kHz device, the resonator bore being 6 mm. A similar device of 11 mm bore, length of 18 cm was also investigated; its resonant frequency was 2 kHz. Sound intensities as high as 166.8 dB were generated with limited heat input. Sound power was extracted from the annular structure by an impedance-matching side arm. The nature of the acoustic wave generated by heat was investigated using a high speed PIV instrument. Although the acoustic device appears symmetric, its performance is characterized by a broken symmetry and by perturbations that exist in its structure. Effects of these are observed in the PIV imaging; images show axial and radial components. Moreover, PIV studies show effects of streaming and instabilities which affect the devices' acoustic efficiency. The acoustic efficiency is high, being of 40% of Carnot. This type of device shows much promise as a high efficiency energy converter; it can be reduced in size for microcircuit applications.

  18. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  19. Optical-phonon-mediated photocurrent in terahertz quantum-well photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, L. L.; Guo, X. G. Fu, Z. L.; Wan, W. J.; Zhang, R.; Tan, Z. Y.; Cao, J. C.

    2015-03-16

    Strong and sharp photocurrent peak at longitudinal optical (LO) phonon frequency (8.87 THz) is found in GaAs/(Al,Ga)As terahertz quantum-well photodetectors (QWPs). Two mesa-structure terahertz QWPs with and without one-dimensional metal grating are fabricated to investigate the behavior of such photoresponse peak. The experimental and simulation results indicate that the photocurrent peak originates from a two-step process. First, at the LO phonon frequency, a large number of non-equilibrium LO phonons are excited by the incident electromagnetic field, and the electromagnetic energy is localized and enhanced in the thin multi-quantum-well layer. Second, through the Frohlich interaction, the localized electrons are excited to continuum states by absorbing the non-equilibrium LO phonons, which leads to the strong photoresponse peak. This finding is useful for exploring strong light-matter interaction and realizing high sensitive terahertz photodetectors.

  20. High frequency stimulation can block axonal conduction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Alicia L; Durand, Dominique M

    2009-11-01

    High frequency stimulation (HFS) is used to control abnormal neuronal activity associated with movement, seizure, and psychiatric disorders. Yet, the mechanisms of its therapeutic action are not known. Although experimental results have shown that HFS suppresses somatic activity, other data has suggested that HFS could generate excitation of axons. Moreover it is unclear what effect the stimulation has on tissue surrounding the stimulation electrode. Electrophysiological and computational modeling literature suggests that HFS can drive axons at the stimulus frequency. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that unlike cell bodies, axons are driven by pulse train HFS. This hypothesis was tested in fibers of the hippocampus both in-vivo and in-vitro. Our results indicate that although electrical stimulation could activate and drive axons at low frequencies (0.5-25 Hz), as the stimulus frequency increased, electrical stimulation failed to continuously excite axonal activity. Fiber tracts were unable to follow extracellular pulse trains above 50 Hz in-vitro and above 125 Hz in-vivo. The number of cycles required for failure was frequency dependent but independent of stimulus amplitude. A novel in-vitro preparation was developed, in which, the alveus was isolated from the remainder of the hippocampus slice. The isolated fiber tract was unable to follow pulse trains above 75 Hz. Reversible conduction block occurred at much higher stimulus amplitudes, with pulse train HFS (>150 Hz) preventing propagation through the site of stimulation. This study shows that pulse train HFS affects axonal activity by: (1) disrupting HFS evoked excitation leading to partial conduction block of activity through the site of HFS; and (2) generating complete conduction block of secondary evoked activity, as HFS amplitude is increased. These results are relevant for the interpretation of the effects of HFS for the control of abnormal neural activity such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. PMID

  1. Enhanced electron-phonon coupling for a semiconductor charge qubit in a surface phonon cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. C. H.; Sato, Y.; Kosaka, R.; Hashisaka, M.; Muraki, K.; Fujisawa, T.

    2015-10-01

    Electron-phonon coupling is a major decoherence mechanism, which often causes scattering and energy dissipation in semiconductor electronic systems. However, this electron-phonon coupling may be used in a positive way for reaching the strong or ultra-strong coupling regime in an acoustic version of the cavity quantum electrodynamic system. Here we propose and demonstrate a phonon cavity for surface acoustic waves, which is made of periodic metal fingers that constitute Bragg reflectors on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. Phonon band gap and cavity phonon modes are identified by frequency, time and spatially resolved measurements of the piezoelectric potential. Tunneling spectroscopy on a double quantum dot indicates the enhancement of phonon assisted transitions in a charge qubit. This encourages studying of acoustic cavity quantum electrodynamics with surface phonons.

  2. Enhanced electron-phonon coupling for a semiconductor charge qubit in a surface phonon cavity.

    PubMed

    Chen, J C H; Sato, Y; Kosaka, R; Hashisaka, M; Muraki, K; Fujisawa, T

    2015-01-01

    Electron-phonon coupling is a major decoherence mechanism, which often causes scattering and energy dissipation in semiconductor electronic systems. However, this electron-phonon coupling may be used in a positive way for reaching the strong or ultra-strong coupling regime in an acoustic version of the cavity quantum electrodynamic system. Here we propose and demonstrate a phonon cavity for surface acoustic waves, which is made of periodic metal fingers that constitute Bragg reflectors on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. Phonon band gap and cavity phonon modes are identified by frequency, time and spatially resolved measurements of the piezoelectric potential. Tunneling spectroscopy on a double quantum dot indicates the enhancement of phonon assisted transitions in a charge qubit. This encourages studying of acoustic cavity quantum electrodynamics with surface phonons. PMID:26469629

  3. Enhanced electron-phonon coupling for a semiconductor charge qubit in a surface phonon cavity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J. C. H.; Sato, Y.; Kosaka, R.; Hashisaka, M.; Muraki, K.; Fujisawa, T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron-phonon coupling is a major decoherence mechanism, which often causes scattering and energy dissipation in semiconductor electronic systems. However, this electron-phonon coupling may be used in a positive way for reaching the strong or ultra-strong coupling regime in an acoustic version of the cavity quantum electrodynamic system. Here we propose and demonstrate a phonon cavity for surface acoustic waves, which is made of periodic metal fingers that constitute Bragg reflectors on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. Phonon band gap and cavity phonon modes are identified by frequency, time and spatially resolved measurements of the piezoelectric potential. Tunneling spectroscopy on a double quantum dot indicates the enhancement of phonon assisted transitions in a charge qubit. This encourages studying of acoustic cavity quantum electrodynamics with surface phonons. PMID:26469629

  4. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  5. High power and high SFDR frequency conversion using sum frequency generation in KTP waveguides.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Russell J; Brewer, Tyler; Barber, Zeb W

    2016-08-01

    We characterize the intermodulation distortion of high power and efficient frequency conversion of modulated optical signals based on sum frequency generation (SFG) in a periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) waveguide. Unwanted frequency two-tone spurs are generated near the converted signal via a three-step cascaded three-wave mixing process. Computer simulations describing the process are presented along with the experimental measurements. High-conversion efficiencies and large spur-free dynamic range of the converted optical signal are demonstrated. PMID:27472638

  6. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  7. Phonon quarticity induced by changes in phonon-tracked hybridization during lattice expansion and its stabilization of rutile TiO2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lan, Tian; Li, Chen W.; Hellman, O.; Kim, D. S.; Muñoz, Jorge A.; Smith, Hillary; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Fultz, B.

    2015-08-11

    Although the rutile structure of TiO2 is stable at high temperatures, the conventional quasiharmonic approximation predicts that several acoustic phonons decrease anomalously to zero frequency with thermal expansion, incorrectly predicting a structural collapse at temperatures well below 1000 K. In this paper, inelastic neutron scattering was used to measure the temperature dependence of the phonon density of states (DOS) of rutile TiO2 from 300 to 1373 K. Surprisingly, these anomalous acoustic phonons were found to increase in frequency with temperature. First-principles calculations showed that with lattice expansion, the potentials for the anomalous acoustic phonons transform from quadratic to quartic, stabilizingmore » the rutile phase at high temperatures. In these modes, the vibrational displacements of adjacent Ti and O atoms cause variations in hybridization of 3d electrons of Ti and 2p electrons of O atoms. Finally, with thermal expansion, the energy variation in this “phonon-tracked hybridization” flattens the bottom of the interatomic potential well between Ti and O atoms, and induces a quarticity in the phonon potential.« less

  8. Phonon quarticity induced by changes in phonon-tracked hybridization during lattice expansion and its stabilization of rutile TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tian; Li, C. W.; Hellman, O.; Kim, D. S.; Muñoz, J. A.; Smith, H.; Abernathy, D. L.; Fultz, B.

    2015-08-01

    Although the rutile structure of TiO2 is stable at high temperatures, the conventional quasiharmonic approximation predicts that several acoustic phonons decrease anomalously to zero frequency with thermal expansion, incorrectly predicting a structural collapse at temperatures well below 1000 K. Inelastic neutron scattering was used to measure the temperature dependence of the phonon density of states (DOS) of rutile TiO2 from 300 to 1373 K. Surprisingly, these anomalous acoustic phonons were found to increase in frequency with temperature. First-principles calculations showed that with lattice expansion, the potentials for the anomalous acoustic phonons transform from quadratic to quartic, stabilizing the rutile phase at high temperatures. In these modes, the vibrational displacements of adjacent Ti and O atoms cause variations in hybridization of 3 d electrons of Ti and 2 p electrons of O atoms. With thermal expansion, the energy variation in this "phonon-tracked hybridization" flattens the bottom of the interatomic potential well between Ti and O atoms, and induces a quarticity in the phonon potential.

  9. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  10. High frequency plasma generator for ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goede, H.; Divergilio, W. F.; Fosnight, V. V.; Komatsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program to experimentally develop two new types of plasma generators for 30 cm electrostatic argon ion thrusters are presented. The two plasma generating methods selected for this study were by radio frequency induction (RFI), operating at an input power frequency of 1 MHz, and by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) at an operating frequency of 5.0 GHz. Both of these generators utilize multiline cusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement and beam profile optimization. The program goals were to develop a plasma generator possessing the characteristics of high electrical efficiency (low eV/ion) and simplicity of operation while maintaining the reliability and durability of the conventional hollow cathode plasma sources. The RFI plasma generator has achieved minimum discharge losses of 120 eV/ion while the ECH generator has obtained 145 eV/ion, assuming a 90% ion optical transparency of the electrostatic acceleration system. Details of experimental tests with a variety of magnet configurations are presented.

  11. High-frequency graphene voltage amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Shu-Jen; Jenkins, Keith A; Valdes Garcia, Alberto; Franklin, Aaron D; Bol, Ageeth A; Haensch, Wilfried

    2011-09-14

    While graphene transistors have proven capable of delivering gigahertz-range cutoff frequencies, applying the devices to RF circuits has been largely hindered by the lack of current saturation in the zero band gap graphene. Herein, the first high-frequency voltage amplifier is demonstrated using large-area chemical vapor deposition grown graphene. The graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has a 6-finger gate design with gate length of 500 nm. The graphene common-source amplifier exhibits ∼5 dB low frequency gain with the 3 dB bandwidth greater than 6 GHz. This first AC voltage gain demonstration of a GFET is attributed to the clear current saturation in the device, which is enabled by an ultrathin gate dielectric (4 nm HfO(2)) of the embedded gate structures. The device also shows extrinsic transconductance of 1.2 mS/μm at 1 V drain bias, the highest for graphene FETs using large-scale graphene reported to date. PMID:21805988

  12. Phonon Spectrum of SrFe2As2 determined by multizone phonon refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Parshall, D; Heid, R; Niedziela, Jennifer L; Wolf, Th.; Stone, Matthew B; Abernathy, Douglas L; Reznik, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The ferropnictidesuperconductors exhibit a sensitive interplay between the lattice and magnetic degrees of freedom, including a number of phonon modes that are much softer than predicted by nonmagnetic calculations using density functional theory (DFT). However, it is not known what effect, if any, the long-range magnetic order has on phonon frequencies above 23 meV, where several phonon branches are very closely spaced in energy and it is challenging to isolate them from each other. We measured these phonons using inelastic time-of-flight neutron scattering in 40 Brillouin zones, and developed a technique to determine their frequencies. We find this method capable of determining phonon energies to 0.1 meV accuracy, and that the DFT calculations using the experimental structure yield qualitatively correct energies and eigenvectors. We do not find any effect of the magnetic transition on these phonons.

  13. High Frequency Self-pulsing Microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassalle, John; Pollard, William; Staack, David

    2014-10-01

    Pulsing behavior in high-pressure microplasmas was studied. Microplasmas are of interest because of potential application in plasma switches for robust electronics. These devices require fast switching. Self-pulsing microplasmas were generated in a variable-length spark gap at pressures between 0 and 220 psig in Air, Ar, N2, H2, and He for spark gap lengths from 15 to 1810 μm. Resulting breakdown voltages varied between 90 and 1500 V. Voltage measurements show pulse frequencies as high as 8.9 MHz in argon at 100 psig. These findings demonstrate the potential for fast switching of plasma switches that incorporate high-pressure microplasmas. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant #1057175, and the Department of Defense, ARO Grant #W911NF1210007.

  14. High frequency ultrasonic mitigation of microbial corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almahamedh, Hussain H.; Meegan, G. Douglas; Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.; Spear, John R.

    2012-05-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a major problem in oil industry facilities, and considerable effort has been spent to mitigate this costly issue. More environmentally benign methods are under consideration as alternatives to biocides, among which are ultrasonic techniques. In this study, a high frequency ultrasonic technique (HFUT) was used as a mitigation method for MIC. The killing percentages of the HFUT were higher than 99.8 percent and their corrosivity on steel was reduced by more than 50 percent. The practice and result will be discussed.

  15. Inviscid fluid in high frequency excitation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of high frequency excitations (HFE) on a fluid is investigated. The response to these excitations is decomposed in two parts: 'slow' motion, which practically remains unchanged during the vanishingly small period tau, and 'fast' motion whose value during this period is negligible in terms of displacements, but is essential in terms of the kinetic energy. After such a decomposition the 'slow' and 'fast' motions become nonlinearly coupled by the corresponding governing equations. This coupling leads to an 'effective' potential energy which imparts some 'elastic' properties to the fluid and stabilizes laminar flows.

  16. Origin of large electron-phonon coupling in the metallic hydride TiH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veedu, Shanavas K.; Parker, David S.

    The recent discovery of large superconducting transition temperature of Tc = 190 K in metallic H2S under high pressures of 200 GPa, has renewed the interest in the superconducting properties of metal-hydrogen systems. These materials are expected to be electron-phonon superconductors and hydrogen with its low mass can contribute new optic phonons that may couple with the conduction electrons. Often, though not always, a large electron-phonon coupling parameter λ (and consequently high Tc) can result from a high electronic density of states at the Fermi level (N (EF)) and the presence of soft phonons. With the help of first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we studied the cubic TiH2 which has a large 3 d N (EF) = 2 . 8 states/eV/f.u. Our calculated phonon dispersions show that Ti modes active below frequencies of 10 THz whereas much lighter H modes are active between 32 and 40 THz. Electron-phonon coupling calculations reveal a λ = 0 . 98 which corresponds to a Tc = 6 . 1 K. However, the large N (EF) also leads to a tetragonal instability at low temperatures in TiH2, which may be overcome by a uniaxial strain, potentially making it a candidate for electron-phonon superconductor. This research was supported by the US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  17. Phonon dispersion in thalous halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    1984-07-01

    The phonon dispersion relations, phonon density of states, g( v), and Debye-characteristic temperature, θ D, of TlCl and TlBr have been studied. The theoretical model adopted for this purpose is a 9-parameter bond-bending force model (BBFM) which was recently developed and successfully applied to study the crystal dynamics of CsCl-structure crystals. The theoretical results compare well with the available measurements for phonon dispersion in the high symmetry directions. The discrepancy between calculated and experimental values of θ D, particularly at higher temperatures, is reasonably attributed to the predominating anharmonic effects. The values of the compressibilities (χ), calculated using the Brout sum rule, are in a reasonably good agreement with the existing observed values. A critical-point-phonon analysis has also been performed to interpret the observed infrared (IR) and Raman peaks.

  18. Phonons in binary glass Cu65Zr35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khambholja, S. G.; Ladva, A. L.; Thakore, B. Y.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, the longitudinal and transverse phonon frequencies in binary metallic glass Cu65Zr35 is reported using the phenomenological model of Hubbard and Beeby in conjunction with model potential formalism. The ion-ion interaction is calculated within second order perturbation theory. The results of phonon frequencies are discussed in terms of collective excitation in glassy system. Further, some elastic constants are also calculated from the long wavelength limit of phonon frequencies.

  19. A wrinkly phononic crystal slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Alireza; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2015-03-01

    The buckling induced surface instability is employed to propose a tunable phononic crystal slab composed of a stiff thin film bonded on a soft elastomer. Wrinkles formation is used to generate one-dimensional periodic scatterers at the surface of a finitely thick slab. Wrinkles' pattern change and corresponding stress is employed to control wave propagation triggered by a compressive strain. Simulation results show that the periodic wrinkly structure can be used as a transformative phononic crystal which can switch band diagram of the structure in a reversible behavior. Results of this study provide opportunities for the smart design of tunable switch and elastic wave filters at ultrasonic and hypersonic frequency ranges.

  20. High frequency homogenization for structural mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolde, E.; Craster, R. V.; Kaplunov, J.

    2011-03-01

    We consider a net created from elastic strings as a model structure to investigate the propagation of waves through semi-discrete media. We are particularly interested in the development of continuum models, valid at high frequencies, when the wavelength and each cell of the net are of similar order. Net structures are chosen as these form a general two-dimensional example, encapsulating the essential physics involved in the two-dimensional excitation of a lattice structure whilst retaining the simplicity of dealing with elastic strings. Homogenization techniques are developed here for wavelengths commensurate with the cellular scale. Unlike previous theories, these techniques are not limited to low frequency or static regimes, and lead to effective continuum equations valid on a macroscale with the details of the cellular structure encapsulated only through integrated quantities. The asymptotic procedure is based upon a two-scale approach and the physical observation that there are frequencies that give standing waves, periodic with the period or double-period of the cell. A specific example of a net created by a lattice of elastic strings is constructed, the theory is general and not reliant upon the net being infinite, none the less the infinite net is a useful special case for which Bloch theory can be applied. This special case is explored in detail allowing for verification of the theory, and highlights the importance of degenerate cases; the specific example of a square net is treated in detail. An additional illustration of the versatility of the method is the response to point forcing which provides a stringent test of the homogenized equations; an exact Green's function for the net is deduced and compared to the asymptotics.

  1. High-frequency laser sonar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Sarma, Ashwin; Kirsteins, Ivars P.

    2002-11-01

    A set of measurements recently completed at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) demonstrated that a laser-based sonar system can be used to detect acoustic particle velocity on the surface of a thin acoustically-compliant plate embedded beneath a standard acoustic window. The theoretical acoustic and measured surface particle velocity varied by less than 1 dB (reference m/s) over a wide frequency band (10 kHz to 100 kHz). However, the Polytec Model PSV-100 Scanning Laser Vibrometer System (SLVS) used in the experiments had relatively poor acoustic sensitivity, presumably due to high electronic noise, speckle noise, stand-off distance, and drifting laser focus. The laser's acoustic sensitivity appears to be inversely proportional to the backscatter signal level. The existing SLVS can sample a grid of 512 by 512 points, with each grid point having a spot size of approximately 10 mm (0.0004 in.). Such fine sampling may be used to create essentially a continuous aperture, eliminating acoustic grating lobes at all frequencies of practical sonar interest.

  2. Frequency metrology using highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the scaling laws of relativistic fine structure splitting, many forbidden optical transitions appear within the ground state configurations of highly charged ions (HCI). In some hydrogen-like ions, even the hyperfine splitting of the 1s ground state gives rise to optical transitions. Given the very low polarizability of HCI, such laser-accessible transitions are extremely impervious to external perturbations and systematics that limit optical clock performance and arise from AC and DC Stark effects, such as black-body radiation and light shifts. Moreover, AC and DC Zeeman splitting are symmetric due to the much larger relativistic spin-orbit coupling and corresponding fine-structure splitting. Appropriate choice of states or magnetic sub-states with suitable total angular momentum and magnetic quantum numbers can lead to a cancellation of residual quadrupolar shifts. All these properties are very advantageous for the proposed use of HCI forbidden lines as optical frequency standards. Extremely magnified relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, and nuclear size contributions to the binding energies of the optically active electrons make HCI ideal tools for fundamental research, as in proposed studies of a possible time variation of the fine structure constant. Beyond this, HCI that cannot be photoionized by vacuum-ultraviolet photons could also provide frequency standards for future lasers operating in that range.

  3. Revealing the mechanism of passive transport in lipid bilayers via phonon-mediated nanometre-scale density fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Bolmatov, Dima; Soloviov, Dmitry; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P.; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Bosak, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q.

    2016-01-01

    The passive transport of molecules through a cell membrane relies on thermal motions of the lipids. However, the nature of transmembrane transport and the precise mechanism remain elusive and call for a comprehensive study of phonon excitations. Here we report a high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering study of the in-plane phonon excitations in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine above and below the main transition temperature. In the gel phase, for the first time, we observe low-frequency transverse modes, which exhibit a phonon gap when the lipid transitions into the fluid phase. We argue that the phonon gap signifies the formation of short-lived nanometre-scale lipid clusters and transient pores, which facilitate the passive molecular transport across the bilayer plane. Our findings suggest that the phononic motion of the hydrocarbon tails provides an effective mechanism of passive transport, and illustrate the importance of the collective dynamics of biomembranes. PMID:27175859

  4. Revealing the mechanism of passive transport in lipid bilayers via phonon-mediated nanometre-scale density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Bolmatov, Dima; Soloviov, Dmitry; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P.; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Bosak, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q.

    2016-05-01

    The passive transport of molecules through a cell membrane relies on thermal motions of the lipids. However, the nature of transmembrane transport and the precise mechanism remain elusive and call for a comprehensive study of phonon excitations. Here we report a high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering study of the in-plane phonon excitations in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine above and below the main transition temperature. In the gel phase, for the first time, we observe low-frequency transverse modes, which exhibit a phonon gap when the lipid transitions into the fluid phase. We argue that the phonon gap signifies the formation of short-lived nanometre-scale lipid clusters and transient pores, which facilitate the passive molecular transport across the bilayer plane. Our findings suggest that the phononic motion of the hydrocarbon tails provides an effective mechanism of passive transport, and illustrate the importance of the collective dynamics of biomembranes.

  5. Revealing the mechanism of passive transport in lipid bilayers via phonon-mediated nanometre-scale density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Bolmatov, Dima; Soloviov, Dmitry; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Bosak, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q

    2016-01-01

    The passive transport of molecules through a cell membrane relies on thermal motions of the lipids. However, the nature of transmembrane transport and the precise mechanism remain elusive and call for a comprehensive study of phonon excitations. Here we report a high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering study of the in-plane phonon excitations in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine above and below the main transition temperature. In the gel phase, for the first time, we observe low-frequency transverse modes, which exhibit a phonon gap when the lipid transitions into the fluid phase. We argue that the phonon gap signifies the formation of short-lived nanometre-scale lipid clusters and transient pores, which facilitate the passive molecular transport across the bilayer plane. Our findings suggest that the phononic motion of the hydrocarbon tails provides an effective mechanism of passive transport, and illustrate the importance of the collective dynamics of biomembranes. PMID:27175859

  6. Phononic plate waves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Tsong; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Sun, Jia-Hong

    2011-10-01

    In the past two decades, phononic crystals (PCs) which consist of periodically arranged media have attracted considerable interest because of the existence of complete frequency band gaps and maneuverable band structures. Recently, Lamb waves in thin plates with PC structures have started to receive increasing attention for their potential applications in filters, resonators, and waveguides. This paper presents a review of recent works related to phononic plate waves which have recently been published by the authors and coworkers. Theoretical and experimental studies of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plate structures are covered. On the theoretical side, analyses of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plates using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and finite-element (FE) method are addressed. These methods were applied to study the complete band gaps of Lamb waves, characteristics of the propagating and localized wave modes, and behavior of anomalous refraction, called negative refraction, in the PC plates. The theoretical analyses demonstrated the effects of PC-based negative refraction, lens, waveguides, and resonant cavities. We also discuss the influences of geometrical parameters on the guiding and resonance efficiency and on the frequencies of waveguide and cavity modes. On the experimental side, the design and fabrication of a silicon-based Lamb wave resonator which utilizes PC plates as reflective gratings to form the resonant cavity are discussed. The measured results showed significant improvement of the insertion losses and quality factors of the resonators when the PCs were applied. PMID:21989878

  7. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liqiu, Wei; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-01

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  8. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Liqiu, Wei E-mail: weiliqiu@hit.edu.cn; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-07

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  9. High frequency oscillators for chaotic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, A. N.; Blakely, J. N.; Corron, N. J.; Dean, R. N.

    2016-05-01

    This work focuses on implementing a class of exactly solvable chaotic oscillators at speeds that allow real world radar applications. The implementation of a chaotic radar using a solvable system has many advantages due to the generation of aperiodic, random-like waveforms with an analytic representation. These advantages include high range resolution, no range ambiguity, and spread spectrum characteristics. These systems allow for optimal detection of a noise-like signal by the means of a linear matched filter using simple and inexpensive methods. This paper outlines the use of exactly solvable chaos in ranging systems, while addressing electronic design issues related to the frequency dependence of the system's stretching function introduced by the use of negative impedance converters (NICs).

  10. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.

    1981-02-08

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (10/sup 70/K) and an electron density N = 3 x 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm/sup 3/ and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup -3/). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  11. Inline high frequency ultrasonic particle sizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, F.; Petit, J.; Nassar, G.; Debreyne, P.; Delaplace, G.; Nongaillard, B.

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports the development of a new method of particle sizing in a liquid. This method uses high frequency focused ultrasounds to detect particles crossing the focal zone of an ultrasonic sensor and to determine their size distribution by processing the reflected echoes. The major advantage of this technique compared to optical sizing methods is its ability to measure the size of particles suspended in an opaque liquid without any dedicated sample preparation. Validations of ultrasonic measurements were achieved on suspensions of polymethyl methacrylate beads in a size range extending from a few micrometer to several hundred micrometer with a temporal resolution of 1 s. The inline detection of aggregate formation was also demonstrated.

  12. High Power Third Gyroharmonic Frequency Multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, M. A.; Ganguly, A. K.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao; Yoder, R. B.; Wang, Mei

    1998-11-01

    A high power freqeuncy multplier which uses a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA)(M.A. LaPointe, R.B. Yoder, Changbiao Wang, A.K. Ganguly and J.L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. Lett., 76), 2718 (1996) and a third harmonic, TE_311 cavity is being tested. Primary power at 2.856 GHz is used to accelerate a 20--30 A, 75--96kV electron beam up to 320 kV in a CARA. The prepared beam interacts with the TE_311 cavity tuned to the third harmonic of the drive frequency. Simulations show that conversion efficiencies from beam power to microwave power can be as high as 48% producing up to 4.5 MW of 8.568 GHz power. Experiments to date have shown under certain conditions only third harmonic radiation has been generated with a FWHM of 350 kHz, the Fourier limit for the length of the radiation pulse. High power experiments are underway to measure the efficiency of the device.

  13. Monolithic phononic crystals with a surface acoustic band gap from surface phonon-polariton coupling.

    PubMed

    Yudistira, D; Boes, A; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Pennec, Y; Yeo, L Y; Mitchell, A; Friend, J R

    2014-11-21

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the existence of complete surface acoustic wave band gaps in surface phonon-polariton phononic crystals, in a completely monolithic structure formed from a two-dimensional honeycomb array of hexagonal shape domain-inverted inclusions in single crystal piezoelectric Z-cut lithium niobate. The band gaps appear at a frequency of about twice the Bragg band gap at the center of the Brillouin zone, formed through phonon-polariton coupling. The structure is mechanically, electromagnetically, and topographically homogeneous, without any physical alteration of the surface, offering an ideal platform for many acoustic wave applications for photonics, phononics, and microfluidics. PMID:25479504

  14. Probing electronic lifetimes and phonon anharmonicities in high-quality chemical vapor deposited graphene by magneto-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Christoph; Halpaap, Donatus; Reichardt, Sven; Banszerus, Luca; Schmitz, Michael; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Beschoten, Bernd; Stampfer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    We present a magneto-Raman study on high-quality single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) that is fully encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride by a dry transfer technique. By analyzing the Raman D, G, and 2D peaks, we find that the structural quality of the samples is comparable with state-of-the-art exfoliated graphene flakes. From B-field dependent Raman measurements, we extract the broadening and associated lifetime of the G peak due to anharmonic effects. Furthermore, we determine the decay width and lifetime of Landau level (LL) transitions from magneto-phonon resonances as a function of laser power. At low laser power, we find a minimal decay width of 140 cm-1 highlighting the high electronic quality of the CVD-grown graphene. At higher laser power, we observe an increase of the LL decay width leading to a saturation, with the corresponding lifetime saturating at a minimal value of 18 fs.

  15. Probing electronic lifetimes and phonon anharmonicities in high-quality chemical vapor deposited graphene by magneto-Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, Christoph Stampfer, Christoph; Halpaap, Donatus; Banszerus, Luca; Schmitz, Michael; Beschoten, Bernd; Reichardt, Sven; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2015-12-07

    We present a magneto-Raman study on high-quality single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) that is fully encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride by a dry transfer technique. By analyzing the Raman D, G, and 2D peaks, we find that the structural quality of the samples is comparable with state-of-the-art exfoliated graphene flakes. From B-field dependent Raman measurements, we extract the broadening and associated lifetime of the G peak due to anharmonic effects. Furthermore, we determine the decay width and lifetime of Landau level (LL) transitions from magneto-phonon resonances as a function of laser power. At low laser power, we find a minimal decay width of 140 cm{sup −1} highlighting the high electronic quality of the CVD-grown graphene. At higher laser power, we observe an increase of the LL decay width leading to a saturation, with the corresponding lifetime saturating at a minimal value of 18 fs.

  16. High frequency of tumours in Mulibrey nanism.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Niklas; Karlberg, Susann; Karikoski, Riitta; Mikkola, Sakari; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Jalanko, Hannu

    2009-06-01

    Mulibrey nanism (MUL) is a monogenic disorder with prenatal-onset growth failure, typical clinical characteristics, cardiopathy and tendency for a metabolic syndrome. It is caused by recessive mutations in the TRIM37 gene encoding for the peroxisomal TRIM37 protein with ubiquitin-ligase activity. In this work, the frequency and pathology of malignant and benign tumours were analysed in a national cohort of 89 Finnish MUL patients aged 0.7-76 years. The subjects had a clinical and radiological evaluation, and histological and immunohistocemical analyses on specimens obtained from biopsy, surgery or autopsy, were performed. The results show that the MUL patients have disturbed architecture with ectopic tissues and a high frequency of both benign and malignant tumours detectable in several internal organs. A total of 210 tumorous lesions were detected in 66/89 patients (74%). Fifteen malignancies occurred in 13 patients (15%), seven of them in the kidney (five Wilms' tumours), three in the thyroid gland, two gynaecological cancers, one gastrointestinal carcinoid tumour, one neuropituitary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and one case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Tumours detected by radiology in the liver and other organs mainly comprised strongly dilated blood vessels (peliosis), vascularized cysts and nodular lesions. The lesions showed strong expression of the endothelial cell markers CD34 and CD31 as well as the myocyte marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). Our findings show that MUL is associated with frequent malignant tumours and benign adenomatous and vascular lesions, as well as disturbed organ development. PMID:19334051

  17. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  18. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  19. High frequency dielectric properties of A5B4O15 microwave ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamba, S.; Petzelt, J.; Buixaderas, E.; Haubrich, D.; Vaněk, P.; Kužel, P.; Jawahar, I. N.; Sebastian, M. T.; Mohanan, P.

    2001-04-01

    High-frequency dielectric properties of A5B4O15 (A=Ba, Sr, Mg, Zn, Ca; B=Nb, Ta) dielectric ceramics are studied by means of the microwave cavity technique, a combination of far-infrared reflection and transmission spectroscopy and time-resolved terahertz transmission spectroscopy. Microwave permittivity ɛ' and Q×f factor vary, depending on the chemical composition, between 11 and 51, and 2.4 and 88 THz, respectively. The temperature coefficient τf varies between -73 and 232 ppm/°C, and in two samples |τf| is less than 15 ppm/°C. It is shown that the microwave permittivity ɛ' of the ceramics studied is determined by the polar phonon contributions and that linear extrapolation of the submillimeter dielectric loss ɛ″ down to the microwave region is in agreement with the microwave data of single phase samples. The relationship among phonon spectra, the crystal structure, and the unit cell volume is discussed.

  20. Phonon analog of topological nodal semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po, Hoi Chun; Bahri, Yasaman; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2016-05-01

    Topological band structures in electronic systems like topological insulators and semimetals give rise to highly unusual physical properties. Analogous topological effects have also been discussed in bosonic systems, but the novel phenomena typically occur only when the system is excited by finite-frequency probes. A mapping recently proposed by C. L. Kane and T. C. Lubensky [Nat. Phys. 10, 39 (2014), 10.1038/nphys2835], however, establishes a closer correspondence. It relates the zero-frequency excitations of mechanical systems to topological zero modes of fermions that appear at the edges of an otherwise gapped system. Here we generalize the mapping to systems with an intrinsically gapless bulk. In particular, we construct mechanical counterparts of topological semimetals. The resulting gapless bulk modes are physically distinct from the usual acoustic Goldstone phonons and appear even in the absence of continuous translation invariance. Moreover, the zero-frequency phonon modes feature adjustable momenta and are topologically protected as long as the lattice coordination is unchanged. Such protected soft modes with tunable wave vector may be useful in designing mechanical structures with fault-tolerant properties.

  1. High Efficiency Four-Wave Mixing with Relaxation Coupling of Longitude-Optical Phonons in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Yan-Chao; Zheng, Xue-Jun; Wang, Deng-Long; Ding, Jian-Wen

    2015-05-01

    The time-dependent analysis of four-wave mixing (FWM) has been performed in four-level double semiconductor quantum wells (SQWs) considering the cross-coupling of the longitude-optical phonons (LOP) relaxation. It is shown that both the amplitude and the conversion efficiency of the FWM field enhance greatly with the increasing strength of cross-coupling of LOP relaxation. Interestingly, a double peak value of the conversion efficiency is obtained under a relatively weak single-photon detuning considering the LOP coupling. When the detuning becomes stronger, the double peaks turn into one peak appearing at the line respect to the about equality two control fields. The results can be interpreted by the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency and the indirect transition. Such controlled high efficiency FWM based on the cross-coupling LOP may have potential applications in quantum control and communications. Supported by Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University under Grant (IRT1080), National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 51272158, 11374252, and 51372214, Changjiang Scholar Incentive Program under Grant No. [2009] 17, Scientific Research Fund of Hunan Provincial Education Department of China under Grant No. 12A140, the Science and Technology Foundation of Guizhou Province of China under Grant No. J20122314

  2. ENGLISH WORDS OF VERY HIGH FREQUENCY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARD, WILLIAM; MCDAVID, VIRGINIA

    THE BIAS OF THE FREQUENCY OF THE 122 MOST COMMONLY USED ENGLISH WORDS WAS STUDIED. THE METHOD USED TO ASSEMBLE THESE DATA IS DESCRIBED FULLY. THE MOST FREQUENTLY USED WORDS WERE TAKEN FROM A DISSERTATION BY GEORGE K. MONROE, "PHONEMIC TRANSCRIPTION OF GRAPHIC POSTBASE AFFIXES IN ENGLISH," GODFREY DEWEY, "RELATIVE FREQUENCY OF ENGLISH SPEECH…

  3. Fourier-transform inelastic X-ray scattering from time- and momentum-dependent phonon-phonon correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, M.; Fuchs, M.; Chen, J.; Jiang, M. P.; Cammarata, M.; Fahy, S.; Fritz, D. M.; Gaffney, K.; Ghimire, S.; Higginbotham, A.; Johnson, S. L.; Kozina, M. E.; Larsson, J.; Lemke, H.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Ndabashimiye, G.; Quirin, F.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Uher, C.; Wang, G.; Wark, J. S.; Zhu, D.; Reis, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The macroscopic characteristics of a material are determined by its elementary excitations, which dictate the response of the system to external stimuli. The spectrum of excitations is related to fluctuations in the density-density correlations and is typically measured through frequency-domain neutron or X-ray scattering. Time-domain measurements of these correlations could yield a more direct way to investigate the excitations of solids and their couplings both near to and far from equilibrium. Here we show that we can access large portions of the phonon dispersion of germanium by measuring the diffuse scattering from femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser pulses. A femtosecond optical laser pulse slightly quenches the vibrational frequencies, producing pairs of high-wavevector phonons with opposite momenta. These phonons manifest themselves as time-dependent coherences in the displacement correlations probed by the X-ray scattering. As the coherences are preferentially created in regions of strong electron-phonon coupling, the time-resolved approach is a natural spectroscopic tool for probing low-energy collective excitations in solids, and their microscopic interactions.

  4. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  5. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, Dennis K.; Vocaturo, Michael; Guttadora, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  6. A High Frequency Model of Cascade Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1998-01-01

    Closed form asymptotic expressions for computing high frequency noise generated by an annular cascade in an infinite duct containing a uniform flow are presented. There are two new elements in this work. First, the annular duct mode representation does not rely on the often-used Bessel function expansion resulting in simpler expressions for both the radial eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the duct. In particular, the new representation provides an explicit approximate formula for the radial eigenvalues obviating the need for solutions of the transcendental annular duct eigenvalue equation. Also, the radial eigenfunctions are represented in terms of exponentials eliminating the numerical problems associated with generating the Bessel functions on a computer. The second new element is the construction of an unsteady response model for an annular cascade. The new construction satisfies the boundary conditions on both the cascade and duct walls simultaneously adding a new level of realism to the noise calculations. Preliminary results which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new elements are presented. A discussion of the utility of the asymptotic formulas for calculating cascade discrete tone as well as broadband noise is also included.

  7. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma-ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997.6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma-ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 deg of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 deg of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma-ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  8. Compressibility measurements and phonon spectra of hexagonal transition-metal nitrides at high pressure: {epsilon}-TaN, {delta}-MoN, and Cr{sub 2}N

    SciTech Connect

    Soignard, Emmanuel; Shebanova, Olga; McMillan, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    We report compressibility measurements for three transition metal nitrides ({epsilon}-TaN, {delta}-MoN, Cr{sub 2}N) that have structures based on hexagonal arrangements of the metal atoms. The studies were performed using monochromatic synchrotron x-ray diffraction at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell. The three nitride compounds are well-known high hardness materials, and they are found to be highly incompressible. The bulk modulus values measured for {epsilon}-TaN, Cr{sub 2}N, and {delta}-MoN are K{sub 0}=288(6) GPa, 275(23) GPa, and 345(9) GPa, respectively. The data were analyzed using a linearized plot of reduced pressure (F) vs the Eulerian finite strain variable f within a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state formulation. The K{sub 0}{sup '} values for {epsilon}-TaN and {delta}-MoN were 4.7(0.5) and 3.5(0.3), respectively, close to the value of K{sub 0}{sup '}=4 that is typically assumed in fitting compressibility data in equation of state studies using a Birch-Murnaghan equation. However, Cr{sub 2}N was determined to have a much smaller value, K{sub 0}{sup '}=2.0(2.0), indicating a significantly smaller degree of structural stiffening with increased pressure. We also present Raman data for {epsilon}-TaN and {delta}-MoN at high pressure in order to characterize the phonon behavior in these materials. All of the Raman active modes for {epsilon}-TaN were identified using polarized spectroscopy. Peaks at low frequency are due to Ta motions, whereas modes at higher wave number contain a large component of N motion. The high frequency modes associated with Ta-N stretching vibrations are more sensitive to compression than the metal displacements occurring at lower wave number. The mode assignments can be generally extended to {delta}-MoN, that has a much more complex Raman spectrum. The x-ray and Raman data for {epsilon}-TaN show evidence for structural disordering occurring above 20 GPa, whereas no such change is observed for {delta}-MoN.

  9. Studies of transverse phonon modes in premartensitic indium-thallium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Finlayson, T.R.; Donovan, D.; Larese, J.Z.; Smith, H.G.

    1987-01-01

    The measured phonon dispersion relations along the high symmetry directions for a face-centered In-Tl alloy have been reasonably well fitted using a general Born-von Karman force constant model. However, for the (zeta zeta 0)(zeta anti zeta 0) branch at low zeta, there is poor agreement between the neutron measurements and the extrapolation of the line of initial slope determined from an ultrasonic velocity measurements. Phonon frequencies have been measured for wave vectors to within q = 0.033 (..sqrt..2 2..pi../a) of the zone centre, and, contrary to the phonon softening with decreasing temperature, which might be expected from the known decrease in (C/sub 11/ - C/sub 12/)/2, phonon frequencies showed the normal trend of frequency increasing (hardening) as temperature was decreased in the premartensitic regime. To reconcile the disagreement between the extrapolation of the ultrasonic data and the measured (zeta zeta0)(zeta anti zeta 0) phonon frequencies, there must exist a positive curvature in the dispersion relation at q < 0.03 (..sqrt..2 2..pi../a). This is consistent with one recent theory for martensite nucleation. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Reversible tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Walsh, R M; Bath, A P; Bance, M L

    2000-01-01

    We report an unusual case of tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity with subsequent clinical and objective evidence of functional recovery. In those patients with a clinical presentation suggestive of aminoglycoside-induced bilateral vestibular toxicity (ataxia and oscillopsia) and normal low-frequency (ENG-caloric) responses, high-frequency rotation chair testing should be performed to exclude a high-frequency vestibular deficit. PMID:10810261