Science.gov

Sample records for high level exposure

  1. Effects of high vs low-level radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to appreciate adequately the various possible effects of radiation, particularly from high-level vs low-level radiation exposure (HLRE, vs LLRE), it is necessary to understand the substantial differences between (a) exposure as used in exposure-incidence curves, which are always initially linear and without threshold, and (b) dose as used in dose-response curves, which always have a threshold, above which the function is curvilinear with increasing slope. The differences are discussed first in terms of generally familiar nonradiation situations involving dose vs exposure, and then specifically in terms of exposure to radiation, vs a dose of radiation. Examples are given of relevant biomedical findings illustrating that, while dose can be used with HLRE, it is inappropriate and misleading the LLRE where exposure is the conceptually correct measure of the amount of radiation involved.

  2. The effect of high dose oral manganese exposure on copper, iron and zinc levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Courtney J; Herrera, Carolina; Pettiglio, Michael A; Foster, Melanie L; Johnson, Laura C; Dorman, David C; Bartnikas, Thomas B

    2016-06-01

    Manganese is an essential dietary nutrient and trace element with important roles in mammalian development, metabolism, and antioxidant defense. In healthy individuals, gastrointestinal absorption and hepatobiliary excretion are tightly regulated to maintain systemic manganese concentrations at physiologic levels. Interactions of manganese with other essential metals following high dose ingestion are incompletely understood. We previously reported that gavage manganese exposure in rats resulted in higher tissue manganese concentrations when compared with equivalent dietary or drinking water manganese exposures. In this study, we performed follow-up evaluations to determine whether oral manganese exposure perturbs iron, copper, or zinc tissue concentrations. Rats were exposed to a control diet with 10 ppm manganese or dietary, drinking water, or gavage exposure to approximately 11.1 mg manganese/kg body weight/day for 7 or 61 exposure days. While manganese exposure affected levels of all metals, particularly in the frontal cortex and liver, copper levels were most prominently affected. This result suggests an under-appreciated effect of manganese exposure on copper homeostasis which may contribute to our understanding of the pathophysiology of manganese toxicity. PMID:26988220

  3. Recovery of otoacoustic emissions after high-level noise exposure in the American bullfrog

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Dwayne D.; Lohr, Rachel; Wotring, Helena; Burton, Miriam D.; Hooper, Rebecca A.; Baird, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    The American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) has an amphibian papilla (AP) that senses airborne, low-frequency sound and generates distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) similar to other vertebrate species. Although ranid frogs are typically found in noisy environments, the effects of noise on the AP have not been studied. First, we determined the noise levels that diminished DPOAE at 2f1–f2 using an f2 stimulus level at 80 dB SPL and that also produced morphological damage of the sensory epithelium. Second, we compared DPOAE (2f1–f2) responses with histopathologic changes occurring in bullfrogs after noise exposure. Consistent morphological damage, such as fragmented hair cells and missing bundles, as well as elimination of DPOAE responses were seen only after very high-level (>150 dB SPL) sound exposures. The morphological response of hair cells to noise differed along the mediolateral AP axis: medial hair cells were sensitive to noise and lateral hair cells were relatively insensitive to noise. Renewed or repaired hair cells were not observed until 9 days post-exposure. Following noise exposure, DPOAE responses disappeared within 24 h and then recovered to normal pre-exposure levels within 3–4 days. Our results suggest that DPOAEs in the bullfrog are sensitive to the initial period of hair cell damage. After noise-induced damage, the bullfrog AP has functional recovery mechanisms that do not depend on substantial hair cell regeneration or repair. Thus, the bullfrog auditory system might serve as an interesting model for investigation of ways to prevent noise damage. PMID:24501139

  4. Chronic exposure to high levels of particulate air pollution and small airway remodeling.

    PubMed Central

    Churg, Andrew; Brauer, Michael; del Carmen Avila-Casado, Maria; Fortoul, Teresa I; Wright, Joanne L

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that chronic exposure to high levels of ambient particulate matter (PM) is associated with decreased pulmonary function and the development of chronic airflow obstruction. To investigate the possible role of PM-induced abnormalities in the small airways in these functional changes, we examined histologic sections from the lungs of 20 women from Mexico City, a high PM locale. All subjects were lifelong residents of Mexico City, were never-smokers, never had occupational dust exposure, and never used biomass fuel for cooking. Twenty never-smoking, non-dust-exposed subjects from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, a low PM region, were used as a control. By light microscopy, abnormal small airways with fibrotic walls and excess muscle, many containing visible dust, were present in the Mexico City lungs. Formal grading analysis confirmed the presence of significantly greater amounts of fibrous tissue and muscle in the walls of the airways in the Mexico City compared with the Vancouver lungs. Electron microscopic particle burden measurements on four cases from Mexico City showed that carbonaceous aggregates of ultrafine particles, aggregates likely to be combustion products, were present in the airway mucosa. We conclude that PM penetrates into and is retained in the walls of small airways, and that, even in nonsmokers, long-term exposure to high levels of ambient particulate pollutants is associated with small airway remodeling. This process may produce chronic airflow obstruction. PMID:12727599

  5. Affective and behavioral changes following exposure to traumatic events: the moderating effect of religiosity on avoidance behavior among students studying under a high level of terror event exposure.

    PubMed

    Korn, Liat; Zukerman, Gil

    2011-12-01

    The goals of this study were to examine the development of affective and behavioral changes following exposure to traumatic events among Israeli students studying under a high level of terror event exposure and to assess the effects of religiosity on those changes development. A questionnaire was administered to 770 students in the Ariel University Center in Judea and Samaria. Higher levels of terror exposure were associated with higher levels of avoidance behavior, subjective feelings of insecurity, and emotional distress. Higher religiosity moderated avoidance behavior, even when controlling for the level of objective exposure to terror events exposure, but had no influence on subjective sense of insecurity, or the level of emotional distress. These findings suggest that religiosity moderates behavioral changes development after traumatic event exposure mainly by reducing avoidance behavior. PMID:21660614

  6. The identification of a selective dopamine D2 partial agonist, D3 antagonist displaying high levels of brain exposure.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ian P; Blunt, Richard J; Lorthioir, Olivier E; Blowers, Stephen M; Gribble, Andy; Payne, Andrew H; Stansfield, Ian G; Wood, Martyn; Woollard, Patrick M; Reavill, Charlie; Howes, Claire M; Micheli, Fabrizio; Di Fabio, Romano; Donati, Daniele; Terreni, Silvia; Hamprecht, Dieter; Arista, Luca; Worby, Angela; Watson, Steve P

    2010-03-15

    The identification of a highly selective D(2) partial agonist, D(3) antagonist tool molecule which demonstrates high levels of brain exposure and selectivity against an extensive range of dopamine, serotonin, adrenergic, histamine, and muscarinic receptors is described. PMID:20153647

  7. Influence of Acute Exposure to High Altitude on Basal and Postprandial Plasma Levels of Gastroenteropancreatic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Riepl, Rudolf L.; Fischer, Rainald; Hautmann, Hubert; Hartmann, Gunther; Müller, Timo D.; Tschöp, Matthias; Toepfer, Marcell; Otto, Bärbel

    2012-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is characterized by headache often accompanied by gastrointestinal complaints that vary from anorexia through nausea to vomiting. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of high altitude on plasma levels of gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) peptides and their association to AMS symptoms. Plasma levels of 6 GEP peptides were measured by radioimmunoassay in 11 subjects at 490 m (Munich, Germany) and, after rapid passive ascent to 3454 m (Jungfraujoch, Switzerland), over the course of three days. In a second study (n = 5), the same peptides and ghrelin were measured in subjects who consumed standardized liquid meals at these two elevations. AMS symptoms and oxygen saturation were monitored. In the first study, both fasting (morning 8 a.m.) and stimulated (evening 8 p.m.) plasma levels of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and cholecystokinin (CCK) were significantly lower at high altitude as compared to baseline, whereas gastrin and motilin concentrations were significantly increased. Fasting plasma neurotensin was significantly enhanced whereas stimulated levels were reduced. Both fasting and stimulated plasma motilin levels correlated with gastrointestinal symptom severity (r = 0.294, p = 0.05, and r = 0.41, p = 0.006, respectively). Mean O2-saturation dropped from 96% to 88% at high altitude. In the second study, meal-stimulated integrated ( = area under curve) plasma CCK, PP, and neurotensin values were significantly suppressed at high altitude, whereas integrated levels of gastrin were increased and integrated VIP and ghrelin levels were unchanged. In summary, our data show that acute exposure to a hypobaric hypoxic environment causes significant changes in fasting and stimulated plasma levels of GEP peptides over consecutive days and after a standardized meal. The changes of peptide levels were not uniform. Based on the inhibition of PP and neurotensin release a reduction of the cholinergic tone can be

  8. Neurobehavioral effects of chronic dietary and repeated high-level spike exposure to chlorpyrifos in rats.

    PubMed

    Moser, V C; Phillips, P M; McDaniel, K L; Marshall, R S; Hunter, D L; Padilla, S

    2005-08-01

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult Long-Evans male rats were maintained at 350 g body weight by limited access to a chlorpyrifos-containing diet to produce an intake of 0, 1, or 5 mg/kg/day chlorpyrifos. During the year-long exposure, half of the rats in each dose group received bi-monthly challenges (spikes) of chlorpyrifos, and the other half received vehicle. Rats were periodically tested using a neurological battery of evaluations and motor activity to evaluate the magnitude of the acute response (spike days) as well as recovery and ongoing chronic effects (non-spike days). Effects of the spikes differed as a function of dietary level for several endpoints (e.g., tremor, lacrimation), and in general, the high-dose feed groups showed greater effects of the spike doses. Animals receiving the spikes also showed some neurobehavioral differences among treatment groups (e.g., hypothermia, sensory and neuromotor differences) in the intervening months. During the eleventh month, rats were tested in a Morris water maze. There were some cognitive deficits observed, demonstrated by slightly longer latency during spatial training, and decreased preference for the correct quadrant on probe trials. A consistent finding in the water maze was one of altered swim patterning, or search strategy. The high-dose feed groups showed more tendency to swim in the outer annulus or to swim very close to the walls of the tank (thigmotaxic behavior). Overall, dietary exposure to chlorpyrifos produced long-lasting neurobehavioral changes and also altered the response to acute challenges. PMID:15901919

  9. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult rats were maintained on a chlorpyrifos-containing diet to p...

  10. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult Long-Evans male rats were maintained at 350g body weight by...

  11. Exposure to Organic Solvents Used in Dry Cleaning Reduces Low and High Level Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Barbosa, Ingrid Astrid

    2015-01-01

    were also significantly higher and almost double than that obtained from non dry-cleaners. However, reaction time performance on both parallel and serial visual search was not different between dry cleaners and non dry-cleaners. Conclusions Exposure to occupational levels of organic solvents is associated with neurotoxicity which is in turn associated with both low level deficits (such as the perception of contrast and discrimination of colour) and high level visual deficits such as the perception of global form and motion, but not visual search performance. The latter finding indicates that the deficits in visual function are unlikely to be due to changes in general cognitive performance. PMID:25933026

  12. Common Sole Larvae Survive High Levels of Pile-Driving Sound in Controlled Exposure Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bolle, Loes J.; de Jong, Christ A. F.; Bierman, Stijn M.; van Beek, Pieter J. G.; van Keeken, Olvin A.; Wessels, Peter W.; van Damme, Cindy J. G.; Winter, Hendrik V.; de Haan, Dick; Dekeling, René P. A.

    2012-01-01

    In view of the rapid extension of offshore wind farms, there is an urgent need to improve our knowledge on possible adverse effects of underwater sound generated by pile-driving. Mortality and injuries have been observed in fish exposed to loud impulse sounds, but knowledge on the sound levels at which (sub-)lethal effects occur is limited for juvenile and adult fish, and virtually non-existent for fish eggs and larvae. A device was developed in which fish larvae can be exposed to underwater sound. It consists of a rigid-walled cylindrical chamber driven by an electro-dynamical sound projector. Samples of up to 100 larvae can be exposed simultaneously to a homogeneously distributed sound pressure and particle velocity field. Recorded pile-driving sounds could be reproduced accurately in the frequency range between 50 and 1000 Hz, at zero to peak pressure levels up to 210 dB re 1µPa2 (zero to peak pressures up to 32 kPa) and single pulse sound exposure levels up to 186 dB re 1µPa2s. The device was used to examine lethal effects of sound exposure in common sole (Solea solea) larvae. Different developmental stages were exposed to various levels and durations of pile-driving sound. The highest cumulative sound exposure level applied was 206 dB re 1µPa2s, which corresponds to 100 strikes at a distance of 100 m from a typical North Sea pile-driving site. The results showed no statistically significant differences in mortality between exposure and control groups at sound exposure levels which were well above the US interim criteria for non-auditory tissue damage in fish. Although our findings cannot be extrapolated to fish larvae in general, as interspecific differences in vulnerability to sound exposure may occur, they do indicate that previous assumptions and criteria may need to be revised. PMID:22431996

  13. Increased Artemis levels confer radioresistance to both high and low LET radiation exposures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemis has a defined role in V(D)J recombination and has been implicated in the repair of radiation induced double-strand breaks. However the exact function(s) of Artemis in DNA repair and its preferred substrate(s) in vivo remain undefined. Our previous work suggests that Artemis is important for the repair of complex DNA damage like that inflicted by high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation. To establish the contribution of Artemis in repairing DNA damage caused by various radiation qualities, we evaluated the effect of over-expressing Artemis on cell survival, DNA repair, and cell cycle arrest after exposure to high and low LET radiation. Results Our data reveal that Artemis over-expression confers marked radioprotection against both types of radiation, although the radioprotective effect was greater following high LET radiation. Inhibitor studies reveal that the radioprotection imparted by Artemis is primarily dependent on DNA-PK activity, and to a lesser extent on ATM kinase activity. Together, these data suggest a DNA-PK dependent role for Artemis in the repair of complex DNA damage. Conclusions These findings indicate that Artemis levels significantly influence radiation toxicity in human cells and suggest that Artemis inhibition could be a practical target for adjuvant cancer therapies. PMID:22713703

  14. Reduced gene expression levels after chronic exposure to high concentrations of air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Pavel; Tulupova, Elena; Rossnerova, Andrea; Libalova, Helena; Honkova, Katerina; Gmuender, Hans; Pastorkova, Anna; Svecova, Vlasta; Topinka, Jan; Sram, Radim J

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the ability of particulate matter (PM) and chemicals adsorbed onto it to induce diverse gene expression profiles in subjects living in two regions of the Czech Republic differing in levels and sources of the air pollution. A total of 312 samples from polluted Ostrava region and 154 control samples from Prague were collected in winter 2009, summer 2009 and winter 2010. The highest concentrations of air pollutants were detected in winter 2010 when the subjects were exposed to: PM of aerodynamic diameter <2.5μm (PM2.5) (70 vs. 44.9μg/m(3)); benzo[a]pyrene (9.02 vs. 2.56ng/m(3)) and benzene (10.2 vs. 5.5μg/m(3)) in Ostrava and Prague, respectively. Global gene expression analysis of total RNA extracted from leukocytes was performed using Illumina Expression BeadChips microarrays. The expression of selected genes was verified by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Gene expression profiles differed by locations and seasons. Despite lower concentrations of air pollutants a higher number of differentially expressed genes and affected KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways was found in subjects from Prague. In both locations immune response pathways were affected, in Prague also neurodegenerative diseases-related pathways. Over-representation of the latter pathways was associated with the exposure to PM2.5. The qRT-PCR analysis showed a significant decrease in expression of APEX, ATM, FAS, GSTM1, IL1B and RAD21 in subjects from Ostrava, in a comparison of winter 2010 and summer 2009. In Prague, an increase in gene expression was observed for GADD45A and PTGS2. In conclusion, high concentrations of pollutants in Ostrava were not associated with higher number of differentially expressed genes, affected KEGG pathways and expression levels of selected genes. This observation suggests that chronic exposure to air pollution may result in reduced gene expression response with possible negative health consequences. PMID:26298100

  15. Hypertension`s lead connection: Does low-level exposure to lead cause high blood pressure?

    SciTech Connect

    Fackelmann, K.

    1996-06-15

    {open_quotes}Paying for the sins of the past.{close_quotes} is how researcher Howard Hu describes a proposed disease process in which lead stored for decades in the skeleton puts people at risk of high blood pressure. Previous research has linked this silvery white, poisonous metal to a host of ill effects in children, including learning disabilities, behavior problems, and brain damage. Now, Hu`s study indicates that past exposure may be causing today`s high blood pressure. If he`s right, the public health impact would be significant. {open_quotes}Tens of millions of Americans have been exposed over the years to lead,{close_quotes} says Philip J. Landrigan of Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York. {open_quotes}Adults today grew up at a time when we were still putting several hundred thousand tons of lead into gasoline each year.{close_quotes} Indeed, the men who developed high blood pressure during the recent study had in their bones lead concentrations, or lead burdens, that came from decades of everyday exposure. Such exposures resulted principally from breathing in fumes from leaded gasoline, drinking tap water from lead pipes or pipes soldered with lead, and inhaling or ingesting lead-laced paint dust or chips. This article goes on to discuss other studies and questions which still need to be answered.

  16. High Throughput Exposure Prioritization of Chemicals Using a Screening-Level Probabilistic SHEDS-Lite Exposure Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    These novel modeling approaches for screening, evaluating and classifying chemicals based on the potential for biologically-relevant human exposures will inform toxicity testing and prioritization for chemical risk assessment. The new modeling approach is derived from the Stocha...

  17. Effects of long-term exposure of tuffs to high-level nuclear waste-repository conditions. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Blacic, J.; Carter, J.; Halleck, P.; Johnson, P.; Shankland, T.; Andersen, R.; Spicochi, K.; Heller, A.

    1982-02-01

    Tests have been performed to explore the effects of extended exposure of tuffs from the southwestern portion of the Nevada Test Site to temperatures and pressures similar to those that will be encountered in a high-level nuclear waste repository. Tuff samples ranging from highly welded, nonzeolitized to unwelded, highly zeolitized varieties were subjected to temperatures of 80, 120, and 180{sup 0}C; confining pressures of 9.7 and 19.7 MPa; and water-pore pressures of 0.5 to 19.7 MPa for durations of 2 to 6 months. The following basic properties were measured before and after exposure and compared: tensile strength, uniaxial compressive strength, grain density, porosity, mineralogy, permeability, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity. Depending on rock type and exposure conditions, significant changes in ambient tensile strength, compressive strength, grain density, and porosity were measured. Mineralogic examination, permeability, and thermal property measurements remain to be completed.

  18. Exposure to medium and high ambient levels of ozone causes adverse systemic inflammatory and cardiac autonomic effects.

    PubMed

    Arjomandi, Mehrdad; Wong, Hofer; Donde, Aneesh; Frelinger, Jessica; Dalton, Sarah; Ching, Wendy; Power, Karron; Balmes, John R

    2015-06-15

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to ozone increases cardiovascular morbidity. However, the specific biological mechanisms mediating ozone-associated cardiovascular effects are unknown. To determine whether short-term exposure to ambient levels of ozone causes changes in biomarkers of cardiovascular disease including heart rate variability (HRV), systemic inflammation, and coagulability, 26 subjects were exposed to 0, 100, and 200 ppb ozone in random order for 4 h with intermittent exercise. HRV was measured and blood samples were obtained immediately before (0 h), immediately after (4 h), and 20 h after (24 h) each exposure. Bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 20 h after exposure. Regression modeling was used to examine dose-response trends between the endpoints and ozone exposure. Inhalation of ozone induced dose-dependent adverse changes in the frequency domains of HRV across exposures consistent with increased sympathetic tone [increase of (parameter estimate ± SE) 0.4 ± 0.2 and 0.3 ± 0.1 in low- to high-frequency domain HRV ratio per 100 ppb increase in ozone at 4 h and 24 h, respectively (P = 0.02 and P = 0.01)] and a dose-dependent increase in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) across exposures at 24 h [increase of 0.61 ± 0.24 mg/l in CRP per 100 ppb increase in ozone (P = 0.01)]. Changes in HRV and CRP did not correlate with ozone-induced local lung inflammatory responses (BAL granulocytes, IL-6, or IL-8), but changes in HRV and CRP were associated with each other after adjustment for age and ozone level. Inhalation of ozone causes adverse systemic inflammatory and cardiac autonomic effects that may contribute to the cardiovascular mortality associated with short-term exposure. PMID:25862833

  19. Pre-activating wounding response in tobacco prior to high-level ozone exposure prevents necrotic injury.

    PubMed

    Orvar, B L; McPherson, J; Ellis, B E

    1997-02-01

    In tobacco, both wounding and treatment with jasmonates prior to exposure of the tissue to high concentrations of ozone (250 to 500 p.p.b.) produce a dramatic decrease in ozone injury. A systemic pattern of increased ozone tolerance developed within 3-6 h after wounding and also after local application of jasmonates. Ozone treatment of transgenic (NahG) tobacco plants showed that the inability of these plants to accumulate salicylic acid is also accompanied by increased ozone tolerance. Expression of mRNA encoding the anti-oxidant enzyme ascorbate peroxidase is upregulated by ozone challenge, wounding and by methyl jasmonate exposure within 3-4 h, while levels of carbonic anhydrase mRNA are simultaneously depressed following ozone exposure and methyl jasmonate treatment. The pattern of these results shows that the response to ozone challenge in tobacco involves signalling mechanisms similar to those induced in plants by other environmental stresses that generate reactive oxygen species. PMID:9076988

  20. Mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) continue to successfully produce eggs after exposure to high levels of 17α-ethinylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Bosker, Thijs; Munkittrick, Kelly R; Lister, Andrea; MacLatchy, Deborah L

    2016-05-01

    17α-Ethinylestradiol (EE2) is a potent estrogen used in birth-control pills. Previous laboratory and field studies have shown negative impacts in a variety of fish species after exposure to low levels of EE2, most notably a nearly complete shutdown of egg production. The present study demonstrates that mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), a small-bodied estuarine species, is able to continue to produce eggs after exposure for 28 d to 100 ng of EE2/L. No effect of EE2 on egg production was observed, whereas a >35-fold increase in vitellogenin (vtg 1) gene expression in males was found. The lack of response in egg production in fish exposed to high levels of EE2 warrants further investigations on species-specific responses to estrogens and endocrine disruptors in general. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1107-1112. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:27089445

  1. Biological effects of short, high-level exposure to gases: nitrogen oxides. Phase report, May 1979-May 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, J.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents an analysis of the available literature describing the health and performance effects of exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx). The US Army's concern is with high-level, short-term exposures that may exceed present threshold limit values of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists: 5 ppm (9 mg/cum) as a TWA; intended changes are a TWA of 3 ppm (5.4 mg/cum) with a short term exposure limit of 5 ppm (9 mg/cum) for 15 minutes. Dose-response relationships were developed for intensities of exposure from the highest (fatal) level to thresholds of minimal response. It is concluded that NOx can in general be equated to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) because this is much more toxic than the only other oxide of importance, nitric oxide (NO), which oxidizes to NO2 in air. If NO is present in equal or greater concentration, an allowance for its effect is recommended. NO2 exhibits mainly two sets of toxicological characteristics: immediate irritancy and delayed reactions.

  2. Distinct Responses of Mycobacterium smegmatis to Exposure to Low and High Levels of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojing; Wu, Jun; Han, Jiao; Hu, Yongfei; Mi, Kaixia

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a natural oxidant produced by aerobic organisms and gives rise to oxidative damage, including DNA mutations, protein inactivation and lipid damage. The genus Mycobacterium utilizes redox sensors and H2O2 scavenging enzymes for the detoxification of H2O2. To date, the precise response to oxidative stress has not been fully elucidated. Here, we compared the effects of different levels of H2O2 on transcription in M. smegmatis using RNA-sequencing. A 0.2 mM H2O2 treatment had little effect on the growth and viability of M. smegmatis whereas 7 mM H2O2 was lethal. Analysis of global transcription showed that 0.2 mM H2O2 induced relatively few changes in gene expression, whereas a large proportion of the mycobacterial genome was found to be differentially expressed after treatment with 7 mM H2O2. Genes differentially expressed following treatment with 0.2 mM H2O2 included those coding for proteins involved in glycolysis-gluconeogenesis and fatty acid metabolism pathways, and expression of most genes encoding ribosomal proteins was lower following treatment with 7 mM H2O2. Our analysis shows that M. smegmatis utilizes the sigma factor MSMEG_5214 in response to 0.2 mM H2O2, and the RpoE1 sigma factors MSMEG_0573 and MSMEG_0574 in response to 7 mM H2O2. In addition, different transcriptional regulators responded to different levels of H2O2: MSMEG_1919 was induced by 0.2 mM H2O2, while high-level induction of DevR occurred in response to 7 mM H2O2. We detected the induction of different detoxifying enzymes, including genes encoding KatG, AhpD, TrxB and Trx, at different levels of H2O2 and the detoxifying enzymes were expressed at different levels of H2O2. In conclusion, our study reveals the changes in transcription that are induced in response to different levels of H2O2 in M. smegmatis. PMID:26225431

  3. Biological effects of short, high-level exposure to gases: ammonia. Phase report, May 1979-May 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Legters, L.J.

    1980-05-01

    This report presents an analysis and synthesis of the available literature concerned with possible health and performance effects of exposures to ammonia. The US Army's concern is with short, high-level exposures that may exceed present threshold limit values of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (25 ppm or 17 mg/cum as a TWA and a ceiling of 35 ppm or 24 mg/cum for 15 minutes). The organs primarily affected by exposure to ammonia gas are the respiratory tract and the eyes. During brief exposures to concentrations of 500 ppm (348 mg/cum) or less, the biologic responses are immediate, reversible, and mainly irritant. Below 50 ppm (35 mg/cum), there are no significant effects except that the odor of ammonia is detectable. Between 50-100 ppm (35-70 mg/cum), most people experience some degree of irritation of the eyes, nose and throat. There is some evidence indicating that personnel may become acclimated to the irritant effects after only 1 or 2 weeks of inhalation.

  4. Plant responses to short- and long-term exposures to high carbon dioxide levels in closed environments.

    PubMed

    Grodzinski, B; Woodrow, L; Leonardos, E D; Dixon, M; Tsujita, M J

    1996-01-01

    When higher plants are exposed to elevated levels of CO2 for both short- and long-term periods photosynthetic C-gain and photoassimilate export from leaves are generally increased. Water use efficiency is increased on a leaf area basis. During long-term exposures, photosynthesis rates on leaf and whole plants bases are altered in a species specific manner. The most common pattern in C3 plants is an enhanced rate of whole plant photosynthesis in a well irradiated canopy. Nevertheless, in some herbaceous species prolonged exposure to high CO2 results in remobilization of nitrogenous reserves (i.e., leaf protein degradation) and reduced rates of mature leaf photosynthesis when assayed at ambient CO2 and O2 levels. Both short- and long-term exposures to those CO2 levels (i.e., 100 to 2,000 microliter l-1) which modify photosynthesis and export, also modify both endogenous ethylene gas (C2H4) release, and substrate, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), saturated C2H4 release rates from irradiated leaves. Photosynthetically active canopy leaves contribute most of the C2H4 released from the canopy. Prolonged growth at high CO2 results in a persistent increase in the rate of endogenous C2H4 release from leaves which can, only in part, be attributed to the increase of the endogenous pools of C2H4 pathway intermediates (e.g., methionine, M-ACC, and ACC). The capacity for increasing the rate of C2H4 release in response to short-term exposures to varying CO2 levels does not decline after prolonged growth at high CO2. When leaves, whole plants, and model canopies of tomato plants are exposed to exogenous C2H4 a reduction in the rate of photosynthesis can, in each case, be attributed to the classical effects of C2H4 on plant development and morphology. The effect of C2H4 on CO2 gas exchange of plant canopies is shown to be dependent on the canopy leaf area index. PMID:11538799

  5. Plant responses to short- and long-term exposures to high carbon dioxide levels in closed environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzinski, B.; Woodrow, L.; Leonardos, E. D.; Dixon, M.; Tsujita, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    When higher plants are exposed to elevated levels of CO_2 for both short- and long-term periods photosynthetic C-gain and photoassimilate export from leaves are generally increased. Water use efficiency is increased on a leaf area basis. During long-term exposures, photosynthesis rates on leaf and whole plant bases are altered in a species specific manner. The most common pattern in C_3 plants is an enhanced rate of whole plant photosynthesis in a well irradiated canopy. Nevertheless, in some herbaceous species prolonged exposure to high CO_2 results in remobilization of nitrogenous reserves (i.e., leaf protein degradation) and reduced rates of mature leaf photosynthesis when assayed at ambient CO_2 and O_2 levels. Both short- and long-term exposures to those CO_2 levels (i.e., 100 to 2,000 mul.l^-1) which modify photosynthesis and export, also modify both endogenous ethylene gas (C_2H_4) release, and substrate, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), saturated C_2H_4 release rates from irradiated leaves. Photosynthetically active canopy leaves contribute most of the C_2H_4 released from the canopy. Prolonged growth at high CO_2 results in a persistent increase in the rate of endogenous C_2H_4 release from leaves which can, only in part, be attributed to the increase of the endogenous pools of C_2H_4 pathway intermediates (e.g., methionine, M-ACC, and ACC). The capacity for increasing the rate of C_2H_4 release in response to short-term exposures to varying CO_2 levels does not decline after prolonged growth at high CO_2. When leaves, whole plants, and model canopies of tomato plants are exposed to exogenous C_2H_4 a reduction in the rate of photosynthesis can, in each case, be attributed to the classical effects of C_2H_4 on plant development and morphology. The effect of C_2H_4 on CO_2 gas exchange of plant canopies is shown to be dependent on the canopy leaf area index.

  6. JP-8 jet fuel exposure rapidly induces high levels of IL-10 and PGE2 secretion and is correlated with loss of immune function.

    PubMed

    Harris, David T; Sakiestewa, Debbie; Titone, Dominic; Witten, Mark

    2007-05-01

    The US Air Force has implemented the widespread use of JP-8 jet fuel in its operations, although a thorough understanding of its potential effects upon exposed personnel is unclear. Previous work has demonstrated that JP-8 exposure is immunosuppressive. In the present study, the potential mechanisms for the effects of JP-8 exposure on the immune system were investigated. Exposure of mice to JP-8 for 1 h/day resulted in immediate secretion of two immunosuppressive agents; namely, interleukin-10 (IL-10) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). JP-8 exposure rapidly induced a persistently high level of serum IL-10 and PGE2 at an exposure concentration of 1000 mg/m3. IL-10 levels peaked at 2 h post-JP-8 exposure and then stabilized at significantly elevated serum levels, while PGE2 levels peaked after 2-3 days of exposure and then stabilized. Elevated IL-10 and PGE2 levels may at least partially explain the effects of JP-8 exposure on immune function. Elevated IL-10 and PGE2 levels, however, cannot explain all of the effects due to JP-8 exposure (e.g., decreased organ weights and decreased viable immune cells), as treatment with a PGE2 inhibitor did not completely reverse the immunosuppressive effects of jet fuel exposure. Thus, low concentration JP-8 jet fuel exposures have significant effects on the immune system, which can be partially explained by the secretion of immunosuppressive modulators, which are cumulative over time. PMID:18429382

  7. Severe multisystem dysfunction in a case of high level exposure to smoked cannabis.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Cannabis use is common, controversial and its clinical toxicology is likely under-recognised. A 56-year-old man presented with disabling shortness of breath. He smoked up to 7 g cannabis daily for 25 years (maximum 63 875 g) plus large amounts of hashish oil. Chest x ray suggested giant bullae. CT of the chest revealed over 40 bullae, the largest being 11 cm in diameter. Osteoporosis with multiple vertebral crush fractures was noted on plain films and bone densitometry (t=-3.19). His dental health was poor. Hypertension, complicated by a large occipital stroke was shown by CT of the brain, and increased vascular age (69.8 years) found by pulse wave analysis. The case is significant as it indicates the potential severity of cannabis lung damage and suggests that significant cannabis exposure may cause osteoporosis and accelerated vascular ageing. The association of alveolar destruction, bone lysis and destruction of arterial elastic laminae suggest possible underlying mechanisms such as tissue proteinase activation, immunomodulation or stem cell impairment. PMID:21887157

  8. The Effect of Exposure to High Noise Levels on the Performance and Rate of Error in Manual Activities

    PubMed Central

    Khajenasiri, Farahnaz; Zamanian, Alireza; Zamanian, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sound is among the significant environmental factors for people’s health, and it has an important role in both physical and psychological injuries, and it also affects individuals’ performance and productivity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of exposure to high noise levels on the performance and rate of error in manual activities. Methods This was an interventional study conducted on 50 students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (25 males and 25 females) in which each person was considered as its own control to assess the effect of noise on her or his performance at the sound levels of 70, 90, and 110 dB by using two factors of physical features and the creation of different conditions of sound source as well as applying the Two-Arm coordination Test. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Repeated measurements were used to compare the length of performance as well as the errors measured in the test. Results Based on the results, we found a direct and significant association between the levels of sound and the length of performance. Moreover, the participant’s performance was significantly different for different sound levels (at 110 dB as opposed to 70 and 90 dB, p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion This study found that a sound level of 110 dB had an important effect on the individuals’ performances, i.e., the performances were decreased. PMID:27123216

  9. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EVALUATION OF RATS EXPOSED TO CHLORPYRIFOS VIA CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF), and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult Long-Evans male rats were maintained at 350g body wei...

  10. Characterization of High-Level Daptomycin Resistance in Viridans Group Streptococci Developed upon In Vitro Exposure to Daptomycin

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Bradley D.; Monahan, Catherine; Alexander, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Viridans group streptococci (VGS) are part of the normal flora that may cause bacteremia, often leading to endocarditis. We evaluated daptomycin against four clinical strains of VGS (MICs = 1 or 2 μg/ml) using an in vitro-simulated endocardial vegetation model, a simulated bacteremia model, and kill curves. Daptomycin exposure was simulated at 6 mg/kg of body weight and 8 mg/kg every 24 h for endocardial and bacteremia models. Total drug concentrations were used for analyses containing protein (albumin and pooled human serum), and free (unbound) drug concentrations (93% protein bound) were used for analyses not containing protein. Daptomycin MICs in the presence of protein were significantly higher than those in the absence of protein. Despite MICs below or at the susceptible breakpoint, all daptomycin regimens demonstrated limited kill in both pharmacodynamic models. A reduction of approximately 1 to 2 log10 CFU was seen for all isolates and dosages except daptomycin at 6 mg/kg, which achieved a reduction of 2.7 log10 CFU/g against one strain (Streptococcus gordonii 1649) in the endocardial model. Activity was similar in both pharmacodynamic models in the presence or absence of protein. Similar activity was noted in the kill curves over all multiples of the MIC. Regrowth by 24 h was seen even at 8× MIC. Postexposure daptomycin MICs for both pharmacodynamic models increased to >256 μg/ml for all isolates by 24 and 72 h. Despite susceptibility to daptomycin by standard MIC methods, these VGS developed high-level daptomycin resistance (HLDR) after a short duration following drug exposure not attributed to modification or inactivation of daptomycin. Further evaluation is warranted to determine the mechanism of resistance and clinical implications. PMID:25624330

  11. Exposure to Hypoxia at High Altitude (5380 m) for 1 Year Induces Reversible Effects on Semen Quality and Serum Reproductive Hormone Levels in Young Male Adults.

    PubMed

    He, Jiang; Cui, Jianhua; Wang, Rui; Gao, Liang; Gao, Xiaokang; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Qiong; Cao, Jinjun; Yu, Wuzhong

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of hypoxia at high altitude on the semen quality and the serum reproductive hormone levels in male adults. A total of 52 male soldiers were enrolled in this cohort study. They were exposed to hypoxia at high altitude (5380 m) for 12 months when undergoing a service. After exposure, they were followed up for 6 months. The samples of semen and peripheral blood were collected at 1 month before exposure (M0), 6 months of exposure (M6), 12 months of exposure (M12), and 6 months after exposure (M18). The semen quality was assessed with computer-assisted analysis system, and the serum levels of reproductive hormones, including prolactin (PRL), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and testosterone were analyzed by ELISA. Compared with those at M0, total sperm count, sperm density, motility, survival rate, and serum levels of LH, PRL and testosterone were significantly decreased, whereas the liquefaction time was significantly prolonged and serum FSH level was significantly increased at M6 (p<0.05). At M12, total sperm count and sperm density increased, whereas sperm motility, survival rate, and the liquefaction time further decreased. Sperm velocities, progression ratios, and lateral head displacements were also decreased. Serum FSH level decreased while serum LH, PRL, and testosterone levels increased. Compared with those at M6, the changes in these detected parameters of semen and hormone at M12 were significant (p<0.05). At M18, all these detected parameters except testosterone level returned to levels comparable to those before exposure. In conclusion, hypoxia at high altitude causes adverse effects on semen quality and reproductive hormones, and these effects are reversible. PMID:26288097

  12. Exposure-based Interventions for the management of individuals with high levels of needle fear across the lifespan: a clinical practice guideline and call for further research.

    PubMed

    McMurtry, C Meghan; Taddio, Anna; Noel, Melanie; Antony, Martin M; Chambers, Christine T; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca; Shah, Vibhuti; MacDonald, Noni E; Rogers, Jess; Bucci, Lucie M; Mousmanis, Patricia; Lang, Eddy; Halperin, Scott; Bowles, Susan; Halpert, Christine; Ipp, Moshe; Rieder, Michael J; Robson, Kate; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Votta Bleeker, Elizabeth; Dubey, Vinita; Hanrahan, Anita; Lockett, Donna; Scott, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    Needle fear typically begins in childhood and represents an important health-related issue across the lifespan. Individuals who are highly fearful of needles frequently avoid health care. Although guidance exists for managing needle pain and fear during procedures, the most highly fearful may refuse or abstain from such procedures. The purpose of a clinical practice guideline (CPG) is to provide actionable instruction on the management of a particular health concern; this guidance emerges from a systematic process. Using evidence from a rigorous systematic review interpreted by an expert panel, this CPG provides recommendations on exposure-based interventions for high levels of needle fear in children and adults. The AGREE-II, GRADE, and Cochrane methodologies were used. Exposure-based interventions were included. The included evidence was very low quality on average. Strong recommendations include the following. In vivo (live/in person) exposure-based therapy is recommended (vs. no treatment) for children seven years and older and adults with high levels of needle fear. Non-in vivo (imaginal, computer-based) exposure (vs. no treatment) is recommended for individuals (over seven years of age) who are unwilling to undergo in vivo exposure. Although there were no included trials which examined children < 7 years, exposure-based interventions are discussed as good clinical practice. Implementation considerations are discussed and clinical tools are provided. Utilization of these recommended practices may lead to improved health outcomes due to better health care compliance. Research on the understanding and treatment of high levels of needle fear is urgently needed; specific recommendations are provided. PMID:27007463

  13. Exposure-based Interventions for the management of individuals with high levels of needle fear across the lifespan: a clinical practice guideline and call for further research

    PubMed Central

    McMurtry, C. Meghan; Taddio, Anna; Noel, Melanie; Antony, Martin M.; Chambers, Christine T.; Asmundson, Gordon J. G.; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca; Shah, Vibhuti; MacDonald, Noni E.; Rogers, Jess; Bucci, Lucie M.; Mousmanis, Patricia; Lang, Eddy; Halperin, Scott; Bowles, Susan; Halpert, Christine; Ipp, Moshe; Rieder, Michael J.; Robson, Kate; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Votta Bleeker, Elizabeth; Dubey, Vinita; Hanrahan, Anita; Lockett, Donna; Scott, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Needle fear typically begins in childhood and represents an important health-related issue across the lifespan. Individuals who are highly fearful of needles frequently avoid health care. Although guidance exists for managing needle pain and fear during procedures, the most highly fearful may refuse or abstain from such procedures. The purpose of a clinical practice guideline (CPG) is to provide actionable instruction on the management of a particular health concern; this guidance emerges from a systematic process. Using evidence from a rigorous systematic review interpreted by an expert panel, this CPG provides recommendations on exposure-based interventions for high levels of needle fear in children and adults. The AGREE-II, GRADE, and Cochrane methodologies were used. Exposure-based interventions were included. The included evidence was very low quality on average. Strong recommendations include the following. In vivo (live/in person) exposure-based therapy is recommended (vs. no treatment) for children seven years and older and adults with high levels of needle fear. Non-in vivo (imaginal, computer-based) exposure (vs. no treatment) is recommended for individuals (over seven years of age) who are unwilling to undergo in vivo exposure. Although there were no included trials which examined children < 7 years, exposure-based interventions are discussed as good clinical practice. Implementation considerations are discussed and clinical tools are provided. Utilization of these recommended practices may lead to improved health outcomes due to better health care compliance. Research on the understanding and treatment of high levels of needle fear is urgently needed; specific recommendations are provided. PMID:27007463

  14. High Levels of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S in Brazilian Thermal Paper Receipts and Estimation of Daily Exposure.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Bruno Alves; Azevedo, Lara Ferreira; Gallimberti, Matheus; Campiglia, Andres Dobal; Barbosa, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine and metabolic disruptor commonly employed as a color developer in thermal papers. Consequently, BPA derived from thermal papers has been considered an important source of exposure for humans, since this chemical may migrate from paper to skin upon contact. Further, due to recent restrictions on BPA use in some countries, it has been replaced by a new analogue, bisphenol S (BPS). The aim of the present study was to determine levels of BPA and BPS in 190 different thermal receipts, randomly collected from different locations in São Paulo State, Brazil, including receipts from supermarkets, general and fast-food restaurants, gas stations, bus and airplane tickets, and credit card and bank accounts. BPA and/or BPS were detected in 98% of samples at concentrations ranging from below the quantification limit to 4.3% (mg/100 mg paper). The obtained values were higher than amounts previously reported in other countries. The estimated daily intake through dermal absorption from handling of thermal receipt papers was estimated on the basis of concentrations and frequencies of handling of papers by humans in both the general population and occupationally exposed individuals. Fifth percentile, median, and 95th percentile daily intakes by the general population were 0.44, 1.42, and 2 μg/d, respectively, whereas the corresponding values for occupationally exposed population are 21.8, 71 and 101 μg/d. The potential adverse consequences of elevated occupational exposure are currently being examined. PMID:26407846

  15. High Exposure Facility Technical Description

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Gregory L.; Stithem, Arthur R.; Murphy, Mark K.; Smith, Alex K.

    2008-02-12

    The High Exposure Facility is a collimated high-level gamma irradiator that is located in the basement of the 318 building. It was custom developed by PNNL back in 1982 to meet the needs for high range radiological instrument calibrations and dosimeter irradiations. At the time no commercially available product existed that could create exposure rates up to 20,000 R/h. This document is intended to pass on the design criteria that was employed to create this unique facility, while maintaining compliance with ANSI N543-1974, "General Safety Standard for Installations Using Non-Medical X-Ray and Sealed Gamma-Ray Sources, Energies up to 10 MeV."

  16. High-throughput PBPK and Microdosimetry: Cell-level Exposures in a Virtual Tissue Context (WC9)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicokinetic (TK) models can determine whether chemical exposures produce potentially hazardous tissue concentrations. Tissue microdosimetry TK models relate whole-body chemical exposures to cell-scale concentrations. As a proof of concept, we approximated the micro-anatomic arc...

  17. Degradation of Saccharomyces cervisiae Rck2 upon exposure of cells to high levels of zinc is dependent on Pep4.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swarna; Sunnerhagen, Per

    2005-06-01

    In undisturbed cells, the MAPK-activated protein kinase Rck2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a stable protein with a turnover time exceeding 60 min. However, we have found that Rck2 is subject to intracellular degradation after exposure of cells to Zn2+ concentrations of 5 mM or more. In high-zinc medium, most of the Rck2 pool is degraded within 5 min. This degradation is blocked by inhibiting the vacuolar proteolytic pathway with the protease inhibitor phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride or by mutation of the PEP4 gene. By contrast, blocking the proteasomal pathway with the inhibitor MG132 does not prevent Rck2 degradation upon addition of Zn2+, nor is degradation inhibited in the proteasomal mutations pre1 pre2, cim3, or cim5. The stability of Rck2 is not affected by any of the other stress conditions examined, or by growth rate. Possible mechanisms of the degradation of Rck2 under high zinc conditions, and its physiological significance, are discussed. PMID:15887030

  18. Prolonged exposure to high and variable phenylalanine levels over the lifetime predicts brain white matter integrity in children with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Hood, Anna; Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V; Rutlin, Jerrel; Hershey, Tamara; Shimony, Joshua S; McKinstry, Robert C; Grange, Dorothy K; Christ, Shawn E; Steiner, Robert; White, Desiree A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we retrospectively examined the microstructural white matter integrity of children with early- and continuously-treated PKU (N=36) in relation to multiple indices of phenylalanine (Phe) control over the lifetime. White matter integrity was assessed using mean diffusivity (MD) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Eight lifetime indices of Phe control were computed to reflect average Phe (mean, index of dietary control), variability in Phe (standard deviation, standard error of estimate, % spikes), change in Phe with age (slope), and prolonged exposure to Phe (mean exposure, standard deviation exposure). Of these indices, mean Phe, mean exposure, and standard deviation exposure were the most powerful predictors of widespread microstructural white matter integrity compromise. Findings from the two previously unexamined exposure indices reflected the accumulative effects of elevations and variability in Phe. Given that prolonged exposure to elevated and variable Phe was particularly detrimental to white matter integrity, Phe should be carefully monitored and controlled throughout childhood, without liberalization of Phe control as children with PKU age. PMID:25481106

  19. Prolonged Exposure to High and Variable Phenylalanine Levels over the Lifetime Predicts Brain White Matter Integrity in Children with Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Anna; Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Hershey, Tamara; Shimony, Joshua S.; McKinstry, Robert C.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Christ, Shawn E.; Steiner, Robert; White, Desiree A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we retrospectively examined the microstructural white matter integrity of children with early- and continuously-treated PKU (N = 36) in relation to multiple indices of phenylalanine (Phe) control over the lifetime. White matter integrity was assessed using mean diffusivity (MD) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Eight lifetime indices of Phe control were computed to reflect average Phe (mean, index of dietary control), variability in Phe (standard deviation, standard error of estimate, % spikes), change in Phe with age (slope), and prolonged exposure to Phe (mean exposure, standard deviation exposure). Of these indices, mean Phe, mean exposure, and standard deviation exposure were the most powerful predictors of widespread microstructural white matter integrity compromise. Findings from the two previously unexamined exposure indices reflected the accumulative effects of elevations and variability in Phe. Given that prolonged exposure to elevated and variable Phe was particularly detrimental to white matter integrity, Phe should be carefully monitored and controlled throughout childhood, without liberalization of Phe control as children with PKU age. PMID:25481106

  20. Occupational noise exposure and hearing levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ambasankaran, M.; Brahmachari, D.; Chadda, V.K.; Phadnis, M.G.; Raju, A.; Ramamurthy, A.; Shah, V.R.

    1981-07-01

    A study was made at the Bhabha Atomic Research Center to measure the hearing levels of persons working in a noise environment. Two different workplaces, central air-conditioning plant and glass blowing shops, where a number of persons were exposed to noise levels exceeding 85 dB(A) were chosen. The occupational exposure to noise was determined using a sound level meter, an octave band filter and a personal noise dose meter. The hearing levels of persons exposed to these high levels of noise and a control group not exposed to occupational noise were measured by means of a pure-tone audiometer in a specially-built booth. These persons, aged between 20 to 60 years, were divided into four age groups for the study. The low ambient noise levels in the booth were measured using correlation technique since such low signals cannot be detected by an ordinary sound level meter. The audiometric findings and the results of the noise level survey are discussed in this paper.

  1. Health effects of high level exposure to traditional pollutants in East Germany--review and ongoing research.

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, H E; Heinrich, J

    1995-01-01

    In East Germany ambient air pollution is characterized by high concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and suspended particulates (SP). Since acidity and sulfate are surprisingly low, oxidation of SO2 seems to be incomplete and neutralization seems to play an important role. Few studies on health effects of air pollution in the former German Democratic Republic have been performed. They showed an increased prevalence in polluted areas of respiratory symptoms, lung function decrement, mild anemia, nonspecific stimulation of the immune system and, retardation of skeletal maturation of children. Since the German unification in 1990, several large-scale studies have been started. Short-term effects of air pollution on daily mortality have been investigated in Erfurt retrospectively for 1980 to 1989. Logarithmic exposure-effect curves have been found for both SO2 and SP. The number of deaths increased by about 10% with SO2 and by more than 20% with SP if the 95th percentile of the pollutant is compared to the 5th percentile. The logarithmic shape shows that the increase of ambient concentrations at the beginning of the heating season in fall is more important than further increases in concentrations later in winter. A second study on short-term effects was conducted using daily peak flow measurements and respiratory symptoms in 270 patients with asthma and other obstructive airway diseases in East Germany and the Czech Republic between 1990 and 1992. From regression analysis it follows that an increase by 500 micrograms/m3 of SO2 leads to a mean decrease of the average patient's peak flow below 2%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7614943

  2. Health effects of high level exposure to traditional pollutants in East Germany--review and ongoing research

    SciTech Connect

    Wichmann, H.E. |; Heinrich, J.

    1995-03-01

    In East Germany ambient air pollution is characterized by high concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and suspended particulates (SP). Since acidity and sulfate are surprisingly low, oxidation of SO{sub 2} seems to be incomplete and neutralization seems to play an important role. Few studies on health effects of air pollution in the former German Democratic Republic have been performed. They showed an increased prevalence in polluted areas of respiratory symptoms, lung function decrement, mild anemia, nonspecific stimulation of the immune system and, retardation of skeletal maturation of children. Since the German unification in 1990, several large-scale studies have been started. Short-term effects of air pollution on daily mortality have been investigated in Erfurt retrospectively for 1980 to 1989. Logarithmic exposure-effect curves have been found for both SO{sub 2} and SP. The number of deaths increased by about 10% with SO{sub 2} and by more than 20% with SP if the 95th percentile of the pollutant is compared to the 5th percentile. The logarithmic shape shows that the increase of ambient concentrations at the beginning of the heating season in fall is more important than further increases in concentrations later in winter. A second study on short-term effects was conducted using daily peak flow measurements and respiratory symptoms in 270 patients with asthma and other obstructive airway diseases in East Germany and the Czech Republic between 1990 and 1992. From regression analysis it follows that an increase by 500 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of SO{sub 2} leads to a mean decrease of the average patient`s peak flow below 2%. Three cross-sectional studies are in progress to compare the existing respiratory health status in East and West Germany. They consider about 9000 adults (20-44 years of age), 9000 school children (9-11 years of age) and 10,000 preschool children (age 6). Analysis is ongoing. 40 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Violent Youths' Responses to High Levels of Exposure to Community Violence: What Violent Events Reveal about Youth Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Deanna L.; Carr, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent work on the relationship between adolescent violence and its outcomes has posited that aggression by adolescents who are exposed to violence can be viewed as an adaptive strategy that seeks to order dangerous and unpredictable environments. Using reports from 416 active violent youth, we analyze lifetime exposure to community violence and…

  4. Long-term exposure to high-altitude chronic hypoxia during gestation induces neonatal pulmonary hypertension at sea level

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Emilio A.; Riquelme, Raquel A.; Ebensperger, Germán; Reyes, Roberto V.; Ulloa, César E.; Cabello, Gertrudis; Krause, Bernardo J.; Parer, Julian T.; Giussani, Dino A.

    2010-01-01

    We determined whether postnatal pulmonary hypertension induced by 70% of pregnancy at high altitude (HA) persists once the offspring return to sea level and investigated pulmonary vascular mechanisms operating under these circumstances. Pregnant ewes were divided into two groups: conception, pregnancy, and delivery at low altitude (580 m, LLL) and conception at low altitude, pregnancy at HA (3,600 m) from 30% of gestation until delivery, and return to lowland (LHL). Pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) was measured in vivo. Vascular reactivity and morphometry were assessed in small pulmonary arteries (SPA). Protein expression of vascular mediators was determined. LHL lambs had higher basal PAP and a greater increment in PAP after NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (20.9 ± 1.1 vs. 13.7 ± 0.5 mmHg; 39.9 ± 5.0 vs. 18.3 ± 1.3 mmHg, respectively). SPA from LHL had a greater maximal contraction to K+ (1.34 ± 0.05 vs. 1.16 ± 0.05 N/m), higher sensitivity to endothelin-1 and nitroprusside, and persistence of dilatation following blockade of soluble guanylate cyclase. The heart ratio of the right ventricle-to-left ventricle plus septum was higher in the LHL relative to LLL. The muscle area of SPA (29.3 ± 2.9 vs. 21.1 ± 1.7%) and the protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (1.7 ± 0.1 vs. 1.1 ± 0.2), phosphodiesterase (1.4 ± 0.1 vs. 0.7 ± 0.1), and Ca2+-activated K+ channel (0.76 ± 0.16 vs. 0.30 ± 0.01) were greater in LHL compared with LLL lambs. In contrast, LHL had decreased heme oxygenase-1 expression (0.82 ± 0.26 vs. 2.22 ± 0.44) and carbon monoxide production (all P < 0.05). Postnatal pulmonary hypertension induced by 70% of pregnancy at HA promotes cardiopulmonary remodeling that persists at sea level. PMID:20881096

  5. Is There a Safe Level of Exposure to a Carcinogen?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrudey, Steve E.; Krewski, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Presents an approach to estimating the "safe" levels of low-dose exposure to carcinogens that involves working upward from the smallest conceivable chronic dose instead of extrapolating downward from high exposures. Discusses expert and public opinion and other issues related to quantitative cancer risk assessment. (LZ)

  6. Pharyngeal pumping inhibition and avoidance by acute exposure to high CO2 levels are both regulated by the BAG neurons via different molecular pathways.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Kfir; Charar, Chayki; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a key molecule in many biological processes. Studies in humans, mice, D. melanogaster, C. elegans, unicellular organisms and plants have shed light on the molecular pathways activated by elevated levels of CO2. However, the mechanisms that organisms use to sense and respond to high CO2 levels remain largely unknown. Previous work has shown that C. elegans quickly avoid elevated CO2 levels using mechanisms that involve the BAG, ASE and AFD neurons via cGMP- and calcium- signaling pathways. Here, we discuss our recent finding that exposure of C. elegans to high CO2 levels leads to a very rapid cessation in the contraction of the pharynx muscles. Surprisingly, none of the tested CO2 avoidance mutants affected the rapid pumping inhibition response to elevated CO2 levels. A forward genetic screen identified that the hid-1-mediated pathway of dense core vesicle maturation regulates the pumping inhibition, probably through affecting neuropeptide secretion. Genetic studies and laser ablation experiments showed that the CO2 response of the pharyngeal muscle pumping is regulated by the BAG neurons, the same neurons that mediate CO2 avoidance. PMID:26430557

  7. Mapping probability of shipping sound exposure level.

    PubMed

    Gervaise, Cédric; Aulanier, Florian; Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie

    2015-06-01

    Mapping vessel noise is emerging as one method of identifying areas where sound exposure due to shipping noise could have negative impacts on aquatic ecosystems. The probability distribution function (pdf) of sound exposure levels (SEL) is an important metric for identifying areas of concern. In this paper a probabilistic shipping SEL modeling method is described to obtain the pdf of SEL using the sonar equation and statistical relations linking the pdfs of ship traffic density, source levels, and transmission losses to their products and sums. PMID:26093451

  8. Acute effects of bright light exposure on cortisol levels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Christopher M; Khalsa, Sat Bir S; Scheer, Frank A J L; Cajochen, Christian; Lockley, Steven W; Czeisler, Charles A; Wright, Kenneth P

    2010-06-01

    Multisynaptic neural and endocrine pathways from the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus have been hypothesized to communicate circadian and photic information to the adrenal glands. In humans, light exposure has been reported to have no effect, increase, or decrease cortisol levels. These inconsistent findings in humans may be related to differences among studies including the intensity (approximately 500 to 5500 lux), duration (15 min to 4 h), and circadian phase of light exposure. The authors assessed the influence of exposure to bright light on cortisol levels in humans during the rising and descending phases of the circadian rhythm of cortisol, that is, when cortisol levels are high. Twenty healthy men and women were studied using a within-subject research design. Subjects were studied in an environment free of time cues for 9 to 10 days. Subjects received a 6.7-h exposure of bright light (approximately 10,000 lux; equivalent to ambient light intensity just after sunrise or just before sunset) or dim light (approximately 3 lux; equivalent to candle light) during the biological night and morning. Bright light exposure significantly reduced plasma cortisol levels at both circadian phases studied, whereas dim light exposure had little effect on cortisol levels. The finding of an acute suppressive effect of bright light exposure on cortisol levels supports the existence of a mechanism by which photic information can acutely influence the human adrenal glands. PMID:20484692

  9. Early In Vitro and In Vivo Development of High-Level Daptomycin Resistance Is Common in Mitis Group Streptococci after Exposure to Daptomycin

    PubMed Central

    García-de-la-Mària, Cristina; Pericas, Juan M.; del Río, Ana; Castañeda, Ximena; Vila-Farrés, Xavier; Armero, Yolanda; Espinal, Paula A.; Cervera, Carlos; Soy, Dolors; Falces, Carlos; Ninot, Salvador; Almela, Manel; Mestres, Carlos A.; Gatell, Jose M.; Vila, Jordi; Moreno, Asuncion; Marco, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The development of high-level daptomycin resistance (HLDR; MIC of ≥256 mg/liter) after exposure to daptomycin has recently been reported in viridans group streptococcus (VGS) isolates. Our study objectives were as follows: to know whether in vitro development of HLDR after exposure to daptomycin was common among clinical isolates of VGS and Streptococcus bovis; to determine whether HLDR also developed during the administration of daptomycin to treat experimental endocarditis caused by the daptomycin-susceptible, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus mitis strain S. mitis 351; and to establish whether combination with gentamicin prevented the development of HLDR in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies were performed with 114 VGS strains (mitis group, 92; anginosus group, 10; mutans group, 8; and salivarius group, 4) and 54 Streptococcus bovis strains isolated from 168 consecutive patients with infective endocarditis diagnosed between 1995 and 2010. HLDR was only observed after 24 h of exposure to daptomycin in 27% of the mitis group, including 27% of S. mitis isolates, 47% of S. oralis isolates, and 13% of S. sanguis isolates. In our experimental model, HLDR was detected in 7/11 (63%) and 8/12 (67%) isolates recovered from vegetations after 48 h of daptomycin administered at 6 mg/kg of body weight/24 h and 10 mg/kg/24 h, respectively. In vitro, time-kill experiments showed that daptomycin plus gentamicin was bactericidal against S. mitis 351 at tested concentrations of 0.5 and 1 times the MIC and prevented the development of HLDR. In vivo, the addition of gentamicin at 1 mg/kg/8 h to both daptomycin arms prevented HLDR in 21 out of 23 (91%) rabbits. Daptomycin plus gentamicin was at least as effective as vancomycin plus gentamicin. In conclusion, HLDR develops rapidly and frequently in vitro and in vivo among mitis group streptococci. Combining daptomycin with gentamicin enhanced its activity and prevented the development of HLDR in most cases. PMID:23478959

  10. Dose level of occupational exposure in China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Liang'an; Ju, Yongjian

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the dose level of Chinese occupational exposures during 1986-2000. Data on occupational exposures from the main categories in nuclear fuel cycle (uranium enrichment and conversion, fuel fabrication, reactor operation, waste management and research activity, except for uranium mining and milling because of the lack of data), medical uses of radiation (diagnostic radiation, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy) and industrial uses of radiation (industrial radiography and radioisotope production) are presented and summarised in detail. These are the main components of occupational exposures in China. In general, the average annual effective doses show a steady decreasing trend over periods: from 2.16 to 1.16 mSv in medical uses of radiation during 1990-2000; from 1.92 to 1.18 mSv in industrial radiography during 1990-2000; from 8.79 to 2.05 mSv in radioisotope production during the period 1980-2000. Almost all the average annual effective doses in discussed occupations were lower than 5 mSv in recent years (except for well-logging: 6.86 mSv in 1999) and no monitored workers were found to have received the occupational exposure exceeding 50 mSv in a single year or 100 mSv in a five-year period. So the Chinese protection status of occupation exposure has been improved in recent years. However, the average annual effective doses in some occupations, such as diagnostic radiology and coal mining, were still much higher than that of the whole world. There are still needs for further improvement and careful monitoring of occupational exposure to protect every worker from excessive occupational exposure, especially for the workers who were neglected before. PMID:17878147

  11. Acute high-level exposure to WTC particles alters expression of genes associated with oxidative stress and immune function in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell D.; Vaughan, Joshua M.; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Ward, William O.; Peltier, Richard E.; Zelikoff, Judith; Chen, Lung-chi

    2015-01-01

    First responders (FR) present at Ground Zero in the first 72 h after the World Trade Center (WTC) collapsed have progressively exhibited significant respiratory injuries. The few toxicology studies performed to date evaluated effects from just fine (<2.5 µm) WTC dusts; none examined health effects/toxicities from atmospheres bearing larger particle sizes, despite the fact the majority (496%) of dusts were >10µm and most FR likely entrained dusts by mouth breathing. Using a system that generated/delivered supercoarse (10–53 µm) WTC dusts to F344 rats (in a manner that mimicked FR exposures), this study sought to examine potential toxicities in the lungs. In this exploratory study, rats were exposed for 2 h to 100 mg WTC dust/m3 (while under isoflurane [ISO] anesthesia) or an air/ISO mixture; this dose conservatively modeled likely exposures by mouth-breathing FR facing ≈750–1000 mg WTC dust/m3. Lungs were harvested 2 h post-exposure and total RNA extracted for subsequent global gene expression analysis. Among the > 1000 genes affected by WTC dust (under ISO) or ISO alone, 166 were unique to the dust exposure. In many instances, genes maximally-induced by the WTC dust exposure (relative to in naïve rats) were unchanged/inhibited by ISO only; similarly, several genes maximally inhibited in WTC dust rats were largely induced/unchanged in rats that received ISO only. These outcomes reflect likely contrasting effects of ISO and the WTC dust on lung gene expression. Overall, the data show that lungs of rats exposed to WTC dust (under ISO) – after accounting for any impact from ISO alone – displayed increased expression of genes related to lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle control, while several involved in anti-oxidant function were inhibited. These changes suggested acute inflammogenic effects and oxidative stress in the lungs of WTC dust-exposed rats. This study, thus, concludes that a single very high exposure to WTC dusts could

  12. Acute high-level exposure to WTC particles alters expression of genes associated with oxidative stress and immune function in the lung.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell D; Vaughan, Joshua M; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ward, William O; Peltier, Richard E; Zelikoff, Judith; Chen, Lung-chi

    2015-01-01

    First responders (FR) present at Ground Zero in the first 72 h after the World Trade Center (WTC) collapsed have progressively exhibited significant respiratory injuries. The few toxicology studies performed to date evaluated effects from just fine (< 2.5 µm) WTC dusts; none examined health effects/toxicities from atmospheres bearing larger particle sizes, despite the fact the majority (> 96%) of dusts were > 10 µm and most FR likely entrained dusts by mouth breathing. Using a system that generated/delivered supercoarse (10-53 µm) WTC dusts to F344 rats (in a manner that mimicked FR exposures), this study sought to examine potential toxicities in the lungs. In this exploratory study, rats were exposed for 2 h to 100 mg WTC dust/m(3) (while under isoflurane [ISO] anesthesia) or an air/ISO mixture; this dose conservatively modeled likely exposures by mouth-breathing FR facing ≈750-1000 mg WTC dust/m(3). Lungs were harvested 2 h post-exposure and total RNA extracted for subsequent global gene expression analysis. Among the >  1000 genes affected by WTC dust (under ISO) or ISO alone, 166 were unique to the dust exposure. In many instances, genes maximally-induced by the WTC dust exposure (relative to in naïve rats) were unchanged/inhibited by ISO only; similarly, several genes maximally inhibited in WTC dust rats were largely induced/unchanged in rats that received ISO only. These outcomes reflect likely contrasting effects of ISO and the WTC dust on lung gene expression. Overall, the data show that lungs of rats exposed to WTC dust (under ISO) - after accounting for any impact from ISO alone - displayed increased expression of genes related to lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle control, while several involved in anti-oxidant function were inhibited. These changes suggested acute inflammogenic effects and oxidative stress in the lungs of WTC dust-exposed rats. This study, thus, concludes that a single very high exposure

  13. High potassium level

    MedlinePlus

    High potassium level is a problem in which the amount of potassium in the blood is higher than normal. The medical ... There are often no symptoms with a high level of potassium. When symptoms do occur, they may ...

  14. 30 CFR 57.5042 - Revised exposure levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revised exposure levels. 57.5042 Section 57... exposure levels. If levels of permissible exposures to concentrations of radon daughters different from... President, no employee shall be permitted to receive exposures in excess of those levels after the...

  15. Insulin sensitivity following agent orange exposure in Vietnam veterans with high blood levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    PubMed

    Kern, Philip A; Said, Sufyan; Jackson, William G; Michalek, Joel E

    2004-09-01

    Our objective was to determine whether insulin sensitivity was related to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange. Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for spraying Agent Orange and other herbicides in Vietnam from 1962 to 1971, and comparison veterans who did not spray herbicides were included. We measured insulin sensitivity (S(I)) using a frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test in a matched study of 29 matched pairs of veterans and a quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) based on fasting glucose and insulin in 71 matched pairs. No group differences were found with regard to the mean values of S(I), QUICKI, TNFalpha, adiponectin, and two measures of insulin secretion. However, S(I) and QUICKI decreased significantly with regard to TCDD (P = 0.01 and 0.02). A corresponding pattern (although not significant) was found for blood levels of TNFalpha and adiponectin. These data suggest that high blood TCDD levels may promote an insulin-resistant state, but the magnitude of this effect appeared to be small, such that an 18-fold increase in blood TCDD due to increased exposure resulted in only a 10% change in S(I) in the 29 matched pairs. PMID:15356078

  16. Infection in Health Personnel with High and Low Levels of Exposure in a Hospital Setting during the H1N1 2009 Influenza A Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Carmen; Barrera, Aldo; Ferrés, Marcela; Cerda, Jaime; Retamal, Javiera; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Medina, Rafael A.; Hirsch, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    A novel H1N1 influenza A virus caused the first pandemic of the 21st century in 2009. Hospitals had an increased demand of health consultations, that made it difficult to estimate the incidence of infection in hospital personnel due to asymptomatic presentations and the under notification of cases. To estimate and compare the rate of exposure of high versus low risk health personnel to 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm2009) influenza A virus in a University Hospital in Chile, we performed a comparative and prospective study. Serum samples were obtained from 117 individuals that worked in the emergency room (ER) and the operating room (OR) during the peak of the pandemic. Antibody titers were determined by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Of the samples analyzed, 65% were workers at the ER and 35% at the OR. Of the total number of the subjects tested, 29.1% were seropositive. One out of 3 (36.8%) workers at the ER had positive HI titers, meanwhile only 1 out of 7 (14.6%) workers from the OR was seropositive to the virus. The possibility of being infected in the ER as compared to the OR was 3.4 times greater (OR 3.4; CI 95%, 1.27–9.1), and the individuals of the ER had almost twice as much antibody titers against H1N1pdm2009 than the personnel in the OR, suggesting the potential of more than one exposure to the virus. Of the 34 seropositive subjects, 12 (35.3%) did not develop influenza like illness, including 2 non-clinical personnel involved in direct contact with patients at the ER. Considering the estimated population attack rate in Chile of 13%, both groups presented a higher exposure and seropositive rate than the general population, with ER personnel showing greater risk of infection and a significantly higher level of antibodies. This data provide a strong rationale to design improved control measures aimed at all the hospital personnel, including those coming into contact with the patients prior to triage, to prevent the propagation and transmission

  17. 30 CFR 62.130 - Permissible exposure level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible exposure level. 62.130 Section 62... REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.130 Permissible exposure level. (a) The mine operator must assure that no miner is exposed during any work shift to noise that exceeds the permissible exposure level....

  18. High blood cholesterol levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000403.htm High blood cholesterol levels To use the sharing features on this page, ... called "bad" cholesterol For many people, abnormal cholesterol levels are partly due to an unhealthy lifestyle. This ...

  19. Health effects of low-level exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, A.D.; Costas, K.; Chang, H.G.; Vallet, H.L.

    1986-10-01

    A polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) spill resulting from a transformer explosion in Syracuse, New York, with no subsequent fire, provided an opportunity for the examination of the effects of low-level PCB exposure without the confounding presence of furans and dioxins. The incident provided 52 individuals exposed to PCB among building personnel, police, firemen, and public utility employees. Sixty-eight nonexposed were matched to the exposed group by sex, age, employer, and job description. Data were collected on the exposed relative to their activities at the spill site, their location, possible routes of exposure duration of exposure, and subsequent health effects. Exposed and nonexposed were interviewed for past medical history and relevant symptoms. Blood chemistries were studied inclusive of SGOT, SGPT, total protein, CBC, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels, as well as a fasting blood PCB level measurement. Six weeks after the spill, exposed and nonexposed were re-interviewed and had their blood work repeated except for the CBC and PCB levels. Exposed and nonexposed laboratory results were unremarkable. Some transient skin irritation believed to be associated with PCBs was noted. There were significant PCBs in blood level trends for occupation, age, duration of exposure, and level of alcohol consumption. Triglyceride level was highly correlated with PCB level. This relationship held when age and alcohol consumption were controlled for.

  20. Assessing the level of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in long-term resident children under conditions of high exposure to radon and its decay products.

    PubMed

    Druzhinin, Vladimir G; Sinitsky, Maxim Yu; Larionov, Aleksey V; Volobaev, Valentin P; Minina, Varvara I; Golovina, Tatiana A

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the frequency and spectrum of chromosomal aberrations were analysed in samples of peripheral blood from 372 (mean age = 12.24 ± 2.60 years old) long-term resident children in a boarding school (Tashtagol city, Kemerovo Region, Russian Federation) under conditions of high exposure to radon and its decay products. As a control group, we used blood samples from people living in Zarubino village (Kemerovo Region, Russian Federation). We discovered that the average frequencies of single and double fragments, chromosomal exchanges, total number of aberrations, chromatid type, chromosome type and all types of aberrations were significantly increased in the exposed group. This is evidence of considerable genotoxicity to children living under conditions of high exposure to radon compared to children living under ecological conditions without increased radon radiation. PMID:25904585

  1. 30 CFR 57.5042 - Revised exposure levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Revised exposure levels. 57.5042 Section 57..., Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5042 Revised exposure levels. If levels of permissible exposures to concentrations of radon daughters different...

  2. Assessment of human exposure level to PM10 in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Xingqin; Hou, Qing; Li, Nan; Zhai, Shixian

    2013-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have found that atmospheric particulate matter, especially PM10 (inhalable particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 μm) is one of the pollutants that are harmful to human health. In recent years, particulate matter pollution in China is becoming increasingly serious and PM10 has become the primary pollutant in Beijing and other cities. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out studies and a health damage assessment of PM10. In human health damage assessment, measuring human exposure level to PM10 is required and crucial to provide accurate exposure data for the exposure-response relationship, and also for the accurate quantitative assessment of human exposure. The spatial distribution of particle concentration in China is variable because of spatial differences in the local economic level and the geographical environment. Along with the accelerating urbanisation in China, city population density is high, and the population distribution is variable between and within cities, thus resulting in different population numbers exposed to different concentration ranges. Therefore, an accurate assessment of China's level of exposure to particulate matter is a priority and the basis for assessing the damage to public health caused by particle pollution. Using high accuracy population and PM10 monitoring data, this study analysed the human exposure to PM10 in different regions and typical cities of China. The results show that for most areas of China, the population-weighted PM10 exposure concentration is slightly higher than the annual mean concentration, meaning that more of the population is exposed to high concentrations, and most of the population is exposed to levels that meet the second national standard (between 40 and 100 μg m-3), occupying about 83.7% of population and 76.3% of area in China. The population exposure to PM10 is higher in two types of typical regions and cities: areas with dense human populations

  3. Neuropsychological Effects of Low-Level Manganese Exposure in Welders

    PubMed Central

    Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Lin, Xihong; Herrick, Robert F.; Fang, Shona C.; Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Shrairman, Ruth; Landau, Alexander; Christiani, David C.; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    While the neuropsychological effects of high manganese (Mn) exposure in occupational settings are well known, the effects of lower levels of exposure are less understood. In this study, we investigated the neuropsychological effects of lower level occupational Mn exposure in 46 male welders (mean age = 37.4, sd = 11.7 years). Each welders’ cumulative Mn exposure indices (Mn-CEI) for the past 12 months and total work history Mn exposure were constructed based on air Mn measurements and work histories. The association between these exposure indices and performance on cognitive, motor control, and psychological tests was examined. In addition, among a subset of welders (n=24) who completed the tests both before and after a work shift, we examined the association between cross-shift Mn exposure assessed from personal monitoring and acute changes in test scores. Mn exposures in this study (median = 12.9 μg/m3) were much lower, as compared to those observed in other similar studies. Increasing total Mn-CEI was significantly associated with slower reaction time on the continuous performance test (CPT; p<0.01), as well as worse mood for several scales on the Profile of Mood States (POMS; confused, tired, and a composite of tired and energetic, all p≤0.03). Increasing Mn-CEI over the previous 12 months was significantly associated with worse mood on the sad, tense, and confused POMS scales (all p≤0.03) and the association with worse CPT performance approached significance (p=0.10). Higher Mn exposure over the course of a workday was associated with worse performance on the CPT test across the day (p=0.06) as well as declines in fine motor control over the work-shift (p=0.04), adjusting for age and time between the 2 tests. Our study suggests that even at relatively low Mn exposure levels neuropsychological effects may manifest particularly with respect to attention, mood, and fine motor control. PMID:21192973

  4. Long-term exposure to high levels of decabrominated diphenyl ether inhibits CD4 T-cell functions in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Zeng, Weihong; Wang, Ying; Shen, Hao; Wang, Yan

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the adverse health effects of decabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-209) have raised more concerns as a growing number of studies reported its persistence in the environment and abundance in the human population, especially in occupational environmental compartments and exposed personnel. This study applies our previous animal model simulating occupational exposure to BDE-209 to investigate its potential adverse effects on CD4 T cells. Female C57Bl/6 mice were orally gavaged with BDE-209 at a dose of 800 mg kg(-1) every 2 days for 10 months and the blood of each mouse was collected for analysis. Kinetic changes of the peripheral immune system were investigated from 1 to 5 months of exposure. The chronic effects on cytokine production, proliferation and the antigen-specific responses of CD4 T cells were evaluated at 7, 9 and 10 months, respectively. The results have shown that impaired proliferation and cytokine (IFN-γ, IL-2 or TNF-α) production of CD4 T cells were observed in BDE-209-exposed mice, accompanied by increased T regulatory cells in the blood. BDE-209 exposure in vitro also suppressed the reactivity of CD4 T cells at concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 μM. Furthermore, we observed weaker antigen-specific CD4 T-cell responses to Listeria monocytogenes infection in the mice exposed to BDE-209, suggesting decreased resistance to exogenous pathogens. Taken together, these observations indicate an impaired cellular immunity after long-term and relative high-dose exposure to BDE-209 in adult mice. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26682527

  5. High level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, J L

    1980-01-01

    The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

  6. Neurotoxicity and efficacy of arteether related to its exposure times and exposure levels in rodents.

    PubMed

    Li, Q G; Mog, S R; Si, Y Z; Kyle, D E; Gettayacamin, M; Milhous, W K

    2002-05-01

    seven-day treatment in rats, AE and DQHS exposure time and level varied based on the vehicle used. The extension of drug exposure time and the low peak level of AE and DQHS were more associated with severe neurotoxicity and lower antimalarial efficacy, whereas the high level and short exposure time of AE and DQHS resulted in higher efficacy and milder toxicity. PMID:12201585

  7. Estimation of Exposure Levels for Consequences of Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2016-01-01

    The potential for exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with fluxes that extend to high energies is a major concern during interplanetary transfer and extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Martian surfaces. Prediction of sporadic occurrence of SPEs is not accurate for near or long term scales, while the expected frequency of such events is strongly influenced by solar cycle activity. In the development of NASA’s operational strategies real-time estimation of exposure to SPEs has been considered, so that adequate responses can be applied in a timely manner to reduce exposures to well below the exposure limits. Previously, the organ doses of large historical SPEs had been calculated by using the complete energy spectra of each event, and then developing a prediction model for blood forming organ (BFO) dose based solely on an assumed value of integrated fluence above 30 millielectronvolts (phi (sub 30)) for an otherwise unspecified future SPE. Since BFO dose is determined primarily by solar protons with high energies, it was reasoned that more accurate BFO dose prediction models could be developed using integrated fluence above 60 millielectronvolts (phi (sub 60)) and above 100 millielectronvolts (phi (sub 100)) as predictors instead of phi (sub 30) . In the current study, re-analysis of major SPEs, in which the proton spectra of the ground level enhancement (GLE) events since 1956 are correctly described by Band functions, has been utilized in evaluation of exposure levels. More accurate prediction models for BFO dose and NASA effective dose are then developed using integrated fluence above 200 millielectronvolts (phi (sub 200)), which by far have the most weight in the calculation of doses for deep-seated organs from exposure to extreme SPEs (GLEs or sub-GLEs). The unconditional probability of a BFO dose exceeding a pre-specified BFO dose limit is simultaneously calculated by taking into account the distribution of the predictor (phi (sub 30

  8. Review of recent studies from central and eastern Europe associating respiratory health effects with high levels of exposure to {open_quotes}traditional{close_quotes} air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Jedrychowski, W.

    1995-03-01

    The serious environmental problems caused by decades of Communist mismanagement of natural resources in countries of Central and Eastern Europe have been brought to light in recent years. All environmental media, including air, water, food, and soil have been burdened with toxic chemicals. Large segments of the population have been, and are now being exposed to air pollution levels exceeding guidelines established by western countries and by international health organizations. This review focuses on epidemiologic evidence regarding health effects of poor air quality in Central and Eastern Europe. It appears that short-term high levels of air pollutants (primarily particulates and SO{sub 2}) may increase mortality in sensitive parts of the population. Associations were also seen between air pollution levels and prevalence of respiratory diseases as well as lung function disturbances in adults and children. One study indicated that urban air pollution increased the risk of lung cancer. Several investigations pointed to strong interactions between risk factors. The poor scientific standard of the studies often makes it difficult to evaluate the findings. Several steps should be taken to develop environmental epidemiology in Central and Eastern Europe, including international collaboration in research projects and training. 30 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

  9. Biochemical effects of low level exposure to soman vapour.

    PubMed

    Bajgar, J; Sevelová, L; Krejcová, G; Fusek, J; Vachek, J; Kassa, J; Herink, J; de Jong, L P A; Benschop, H

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate changes in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activities, tyrosine aminotransferase activity (TAT) and plasma corticosterone level, neuroexcitability and behavior following 24 hours and 4 weeks of soman sublethal inhalation exposure at low level. AChE activity in erythrocytes and BuChE activity in plasma was decreased (dependent on the concentration of soman) 24 h and 4 weeks after the exposure. Similar decrease in AChE activity in different brain parts was observed. One of stressogenic parameters (TAT) was changed after 24 h exposure only. 4 weeks after the exposure, these parameters (corticosterone and TAT) were in the range of normal values. Behaviour of experimental animals was changed 24 h after the exposure persisting 4 weeks after the exposure as well as neuroexcitability. PMID:15141961

  10. Human exposure assessment: a graduate level course

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The course has been offered three times. The content and the approach to each lecture has evolved after each time it was given. This is not unexpected since the field has been undergoing major transformations, and new approaches to measurement and modeling are being applied to current problems. The most recent student evaluation, 1990, indicates a difficulty rating of just right' (70%) to difficult' (30%). Most felt the course stimulated their interest in the topic (72%) and the examinations were learning experiences as well as a grading exercise. The major need for the discipline is an adequate text book. The GRAPE program has excellent potential as an educational tool, but it needs to make more interactions and allow introduction of activities and data. The major strengths of the course are the problems provided to the students for homework. These give the student quantitative perspective on the concepts, range in values, variables, and uncertainties necessary to complete an assessment. In addition, the development of the mathematical and conceptional continuum for placing exposure assessment in the context of toxicology, environmental science, epidemiology, and clinical intervention provides a basic framework for the discipline.

  11. The High Price of Noise Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Hearing Disorders The High Price of Noise Exposure Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table ... These tiny structures convert sound waves into electrical energy. Our auditory nerve sends this energy to the ...

  12. The influence of defect levels on the dose rate dependence of synthetic diamond detectors of various types on exposures to high-energy radiotherapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, N.; Nam, T. L.

    2015-03-01

    The linear response of a radiation dosimeter with absorbed dose rate is a principal requirement in radiotherapy. Fowler's model for electrical conductivity, σ of a solid-state detector and absorbed dose rate, Dr is of the form σ ∝ DrΔ where Δ is the linearity index that can take on a range of values around unity. Utilising synthetic diamond detectors of various types as sensors, this study investigates the influence of defect levels on the Δ values of the sensors and the dependence of Δ on bias voltage, beam energy and type in the dosimetry of high-energy photon and electron therapy beams. One main objective of the study was to establish whether for a given diamond detector, Δ could be determined only once for any given beam energy and then used for other beam energies of clinical interest. In order to attain the ICRU overall ±5% uncertainty of absorbed dose delivery in radiotherapy, ±2% accuracy was considered. The study was conducted on one HPHT and eight CVD synthesised diamonds of optical grade (OG) and detector grade (DG) qualities using 6 and 15 MV photon, and 7 and 12 MeV electron energies. Values of Δ ranging from 0.79-1.03 to 0.85-0.96 were obtained for the electron and photon beams, respectively for all the diamond sensors at 1 kV/cm. The Δ values were found to change with various defect levels present within the crystals as characterised by Raman spectroscopy, ESR, FTIR spectroscopy and TL emission, and it was observed that the Δ values of crystals with high defect levels varied strongly with bias voltage. Whereas the Δ values of the HPHT diamond were found not vary with the electron and photon energies, only those of three CVD samples of a given class showed a variation within 2% between the two energies of each beam type. However, for all the crystals tested Δ showed a maximum variation of 3.4% between the photon energies unlike the electron energies where a very strong variation (>5%) was observed for three OG CVD crystals. The results

  13. Occupational airways diseases from chronic low-level exposures to irritants.

    PubMed

    Balmes, John R

    2002-12-01

    Short-term, high-level exposures to dusts, gases, mists, fumes, and smoke that are irritating to the respiratory tract are capable of inducing asthma, the so-called reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Such exposures, however, do not occur frequently; chronic or recurrent exposures to lower levels of irritants are much more common. This article reviews the evidence that supports the concept that low-level exposures to respiratory tract irritants can contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. PMID:12512162

  14. Potential exposure levels and health effects of neighborhood exposure to a municipal incinerator bottom ash landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, A.H.; Munshi, A.A.; Goodman, A.K. )

    1988-10-01

    An investigation was conducted to assess the potential exposure levels and pursuant public health implications of neighborhood exposure to a municipal incinerator bottom ash landfill. This site received ash from a single incinerator without pollution control devices from 1954-1973. Soil was sampled for 10 heavy metals, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodioxin and furan congeners, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Soil concentrations for these substances were converted to estimates of exposure, health effects, and/or cancer risk by the application of a general exposure model and exposure/effect and exposure/risk models for specific substances. The results of soil analysis and modeling indicate that the level of lead detected on the site was considerably above the recommended levels of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and may lead to an elevated blood lead level in exposed children above that currently defining a case of lead poisoning. The potential for health effects resulting from exposure to other substances measured in the soil on this site is considered to be small, and no significant increased cancer risk is expected. Comparison of levels of various substances obtained at this site with levels obtained in fresh bottom ash in other studies suggests that these results may be applicable to exposures from other municipal incinerator bottom ash landfills.

  15. Potential exposure levels and health effects of neighborhood exposure to a municipal incinerator bottom ash landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, A.H.; Munshi, A.A.; Goodman, A.K.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to assess the potential exposure levels and pursuant public health implications of neighborhood exposure to a municipal incinerator bottom ash landfill. This site received ash from a single incinerator without pollution control devices from 1954-1973. Soil was sampled for 10 heavy metals, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodioxin and furan congeners, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Soil concentrations for these substances were converted to estimates of exposure, health effects, and/or cancer risk by the application of a general exposure model and exposure/effect and exposure/risk models for specific substances. The results of soil analysis and modeling indicate that the level of lead detected on the site was considerably above the recommended levels of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and may lead to an elevated blood lead level in exposed children above that currently defining a case of lead poisoning. The potential for health effects resulting from exposure to other substances measured in the soil on this site is considered to be small, and no significant increased cancer risk is expected. Comparison of levels of various substances obtained at this site with levels obtained in fresh bottom ash in other studies suggests that these results may be applicable to exposures from other municipal incinerator bottom ash landfills.

  16. Evaluation of mercury exposure level, clinical diagnosis and treatment for mercury intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ye, Byeong-Jin; Kim, Byoung-Gwon; Jeon, Man-Joong; Kim, Se-Yeong; Kim, Hawn-Cheol; Jang, Tae-Won; Chae, Hong-Jae; Choi, Won-Jun; Ha, Mi-Na; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2016-01-01

    Mercury occurs in various chemical forms, and it is different to health effects according to chemical forms. In consideration of the point, the evaluation of the mercury exposure to human distinguished from occupational and environmental exposure. With strict to manage occupational exposure in factory, it is declined mercury intoxication cases by metallic and inorganic mercury inhalation to occupational exposure. It is increasing to importance in environmental exposure and public health. The focus on the health impact of exposure to mercury is more on chronic, low or moderate grade exposure-albeit a topic of great controversy-, not high concentration exposure by methylmercury, which caused Minamata disease. Recently, the issue of mercury toxicity according to the mercury exposure level, health effects as well as the determination of what mercury levels affect health are in the spotlight and under active discussion. Evaluating the health effects and Biomarker of mercury exposure and establishing diagnosis and treatment standards are very difficult. It can implement that evaluating mercury exposure level for diagnosis by a provocation test uses chelating agent and conducting to appropriate therapy according to the result. but, indications for the therapy of chelating agents with mercury exposure have not yet been fully established. The therapy to symptomatic patients with mercury poisoning is chelating agents, combination therapy with chelating agents, plasma exchange, hemodialysis, plasmapheresis. But the further evaluations are necessary for the effects and side effects with each therapy. PMID:26807265

  17. Utilising polyphenylene oxide for high exposure solar UVA dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, D. J.; Schouten, P. W.

    2008-05-01

    A personal UV dosimeter that can quantitatively assess high exposure solar UVA exposures has been developed. The chemical polyphenylene oxide has been previously reported on its ability to measure high UVB exposures. This current research has found that polyphenylene oxide, cast in thin film form, is responsive to both the UVA and UVB parts of the solar spectrum. Further to this, the UVB wavelengths were filtered out with the use of mylar. This combined system responded to the UVA wavelengths only and underwent a change in optical absorbance as a result of UVA exposure. Preliminary results indicate that this UVA dosimeter saturates steadily when exposed to sunlight and can measure exposures of more than 20 MJ/m2 of solar UVA radiation with an uncertainty level of no more than ±5%.

  18. Emission factors and exposures from ground-level pyrotechnics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, Gerry; Dills, Russell; Beaudreau, Marc; Davis, Mac

    Potential exposures from ground-level pyrotechnics were assessed by air monitoring and developing emission factors. Total particulate matter, copper and SO 2 exposures exceeded occupational health guidelines at two outdoor performances using consumer pyrotechnics. Al, Ba, B, Bi, Mg, Sr, Zn, and aldehyde levels were elevated, but did not pose a health hazard based on occupational standards. Emission factors for total particulate matter, metals, inorganic ions, aldehydes, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined for seven ground-supported pyrotechnics through air sampling in an airtight room after combustion. Particle generation ranged from 5 to 13% of the combusted mass. Emission factors (g Kg -1) for metals common to pyrotechnics were also high: K, 23-45; Mg, 1-7; Cu, 0.05-7; and Ba, 0.03-6. Pb emission rates of 1.6 and 2.7% of the combusted mass for two devices were noteworthy. A high correlation ( r2 ≥ 0.89) between metal concentrations in pyrotechnic compositions and emission factors were noted for Pb, Cr, Mg, Sb, and Bi, whereas low correlations ( r2 ≤ 0.1) were observed for Ba, Sr, Fe, and Zn. This may be due to the inherent heterogeneity of multi-effect pyrotechnics. The generation of inorganic nitrogen in both the particulate (NO 2-, NO 3-) and gaseous (NO, NO 2) forms varied widely (<0.1-1000 mg Kg -1). Aldehyde emission factors varied by two orders of magnitude even though the carbon source was carbohydrates and charcoal for all devices: formaldehyde (<7.0-82 mg Kg -1), acetaldehyde (43-210 mg Kg -1), and acrolein (1.9-12 mg Kg -1). Formation of lower molecular weight PAHs such as naphthalene and acenaphthylene were favored, with their emission factors being comparable to that from the combustion of household refuse and agricultural debris. Ba, Sr, Cu, and Pb had emission factors that could produce exposures exceeding occupational exposure guidelines. Sb and unalloyed Mg, which are banned from consumer fireworks in the US, were present in

  19. Exposure assessment: Serum levels of TCDD in Seveso, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Needham, L.L.; Patterson, D.G. Jr.; Smith, S.J.; Sampson, E.J.; Gerthoux, P.M.; Brambilla, P.; Mocarelli, P.

    1999-02-01

    Accurate exposure assessment is an important step in both risk assessment and epidemiologic studies involving potential human exposure to environmental toxicants. Various methods have been used to assess human exposure. These methods include models based on one`s temporal and spatial nearness to the source, environmental levels of toxicant, and biological measures. The authors believe that the latter measure is the ``gold standard.`` In this article they present the serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin levels in residents of the contaminated zones in Seveso, Italy, in 1976, and delineate these data by age and gender. Some of these serum levels are among the highest ever reported and thus this population serves as a benchmark for comparison of human exposure and potential adverse health effects. One such potential population is that population consuming potentially contaminated fish.

  20. High blood cholesterol levels

    MedlinePlus

    Steps you can take to improve their cholesterol levels, and help prevent heart disease and a heart attack include: Quit smoking. This is the single biggest change you can make to reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke. Eat foods ...

  1. Validation of Aircraft Noise Models at Lower Levels of Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Juliet A.; Plotkin, Kenneth J.; Carey, Jeffrey N.; Bradley, Kevin A.

    1996-01-01

    Noise levels around airports and airbases in the United States arc computed via the FAA's Integrated Noise Model (INM) or the Air Force's NOISEMAP (NMAP) program. These models were originally developed for use in the vicinity of airports, at distances which encompass a day night average sound level in decibels (Ldn) of 65 dB or higher. There is increasing interest in aircraft noise at larger distances from the airport. including en-route noise. To evaluate the applicability of INM and NMAP at larger distances, a measurement program was conducted at a major air carrier airport with monitoring sites located in areas exposed to an Ldn of 55 dB and higher. Automated Radar Terminal System (ARTS) radar tracking data were obtained to provide actual flight parameters and positive identification of aircraft. Flight operations were grouped according to aircraft type. stage length, straight versus curved flight tracks, and arrival versus departure. Sound exposure levels (SEL) were computed at monitoring locations, using the INM, and compared with measured values. While individual overflight SEL data was characterized by a high variance, analysis performed on an energy-averaging basis indicates that INM and similar models can be applied to regions exposed to an Ldn of 55 dB with no loss of reliability.

  2. Estimation of Particulate Mass and Manganese Exposure Levels among Welders

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Angela; Seixas, Noah; Sterling, David; Racette, Brad A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Welders are frequently exposed to Manganese (Mn), which may increase the risk of neurological impairment. Historical exposure estimates for welding-exposed workers are needed for epidemiological studies evaluating the relationship between welding and neurological or other health outcomes. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a multivariate model to estimate quantitative levels of welding fume exposures based on welding particulate mass and Mn concentrations reported in the published literature. Methods: Articles that described welding particulate and Mn exposures during field welding activities were identified through a comprehensive literature search. Summary measures of exposure and related determinants such as year of sampling, welding process performed, type of ventilation used, degree of enclosure, base metal, and location of sampling filter were extracted from each article. The natural log of the reported arithmetic mean exposure level was used as the dependent variable in model building, while the independent variables included the exposure determinants. Cross-validation was performed to aid in model selection and to evaluate the generalizability of the models. Results: A total of 33 particulate and 27 Mn means were included in the regression analysis. The final model explained 76% of the variability in the mean exposures and included welding process and degree of enclosure as predictors. There was very little change in the explained variability and root mean squared error between the final model and its cross-validation model indicating the final model is robust given the available data. Conclusions: This model may be improved with more detailed exposure determinants; however, the relatively large amount of variance explained by the final model along with the positive generalizability results of the cross-validation increases the confidence that the estimates derived from this model can be used for estimating welder exposures

  3. Personal carbon monoxide exposures of preschool children in Helsinki, Finland: levels and determinants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alm, S.; Mukala, K.; Jantunen, M. J.

    Personal CO exposures of 194 preschool children were measured with personal exposure monitors during a 24 week sampling period from fall 1990 to spring 1991 in Helsinki, Finland. Arithmetic mean of the maximum 1 and 8 h exposure levels were 6.0 and 3.3 mg m -3. The then Finnish ambient air quality guideline values for 1/8 h maximum CO level (30/10 mg m -3) were exceeded in 2/4% of the children's daily maximum 1/8 h exposure levels. Gas stove at home, parents, especially mother, smoking in the home, and living in high rise buildings — reflecting higher local population and traffic density — increased the children's CO exposures. The presence of a fireplace in the home was associated with decreased CO exposures. Father's high education reduced the children's CO exposure while mother's education level had no significant effect. The peak (15 min) exposure levels of the children commuting to day care center by car or bus were higher than those of the children who walked or came by bike.

  4. The effects of high level infrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    This paper will attempt to survey the current knowledge on the effects of relative high levels of infrasound on humans. While this conference is concerned mainly about hearing, some discussion of other physiological effects is appropriate. Such discussion also serves to highlight a basic question, 'Is hearing the main concern of infrasound and low frequency exposure, or is there a more sensitive mechanism'. It would be comforting to know that the focal point of this conference is indeed the most important concern. Therefore, besides hearing loss and auditory threshold of infrasonic and low frequency exposure, four other effects will be provided. These are performance, respiration, annoyance, and vibration.

  5. Elevated blood lead levels from exposure via a radiator workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Treble, R.G.; Thompson, T.S.; Morton, D.N.

    1998-04-01

    Elevated lead levels were discovered in blood samples collected from family members where both the father and the mother worked in a radiator repair workshop. The father and mother were found to have blood lead levels of 2.0 and 0.5 {micro}mol/L, respectively. The father`s blood lead level was just below the Canadian occupational health and safety intervention level. The two children had blood lead levels of 1.0 and 0.8 {micro}mol/L, both of which are in excess of the recommended guideline for intervention in the case of children. The exposure of the two children was possibly due to a combination of pathways including exposure at the workshop itself during visits and also the transportation of lead-containing dust to the home environment.

  6. A National Assessment of Sea Level Rise Exposure Using Lidar Elevation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, B.; Kulp, S. A.; Tebaldi, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Third National Climate Assessment addressed sea level rise and aggravated coastal flood exposure in all regions, but was completed before high quality lidar-based elevation data became available throughout the entire coastal United States (excluding Alaska). Here we present what we believe to be the first full national assessment incorporating these data. The assessment includes tabulation of land less than 1-6 m above the local high tide line, and of a wide range of features sitting on that land, including total population, socially vulnerable population, housing, property value, road miles, power plants, schools, hospitals, and a wide range of other infrastructure and critical facilities, as well as EPA-listed facilities that are potential sources of contamination during floods or permanent inundation. Tabulations span from zip code to national levels. Notable patterns include the strong concentration of exposure across multiple scales, with a small number of states accounting for most of the total national exposure; and a small number of zip codes accounting for a large proportion of the exposure within many states. Additionally, different features show different exposure patterns; in one example, land and road miles have relatively high exposure but population and property have relatively low exposure in North Carolina. The assessment further places this exposure analysis in the context of localized sea level rise projections integrated with coastal flood risk.

  7. Noise exposure levels in stock car auto racing.

    PubMed

    Rose, Austin S; Ebert, Charles S; Prazma, Jiri; Pillsbury, Harold C

    2008-12-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss associated with the workplace has been well described. Far less is known, however, about the risks to hearing from recreational sources of noise. We investigated the popular sport of stock car racing as a potentially significant source of noise exposure, and we conducted a sound-level survey at a National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) event. Noise levels measured during the race ranged from 96.5 to 104 dB(A) at 46 meters ( approximately 150 feet) from the track and 99 to 109 dB(A) at 6 meters ( approximately 20 feet) from the track. The peak sound pressure level at 6 meters was 109 dB(A). Although significantly less than that associated with an immediate permanent threshold shift, such an exposure could cause a temporary threshold shift. Alhough hearing protection is recommended, particularly for track employees with longer periods of exposure, racing fans with only occasional exposure to such noise levels are unlikely to develop a permanent noise-induced hearing loss. PMID:19105144

  8. Children exposure to PM levels in a typical school morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, J.; Amorim, J. H.; Cascão, P.; Rodrigues, V.; Borrego, C.

    2012-10-01

    One of the major challenges to urban sustainability is the threat posed by air pollution, being exposure to ambient air pollutants associated with a high rate of premature deaths. Therefore, the study of the exposure of people, and in particular of vulnerable population groups such as children, to air pollution is a subject of paramount importance. In this paper a CFD model is used to simulate the particulate matter personal exposure of students in their school routine (both daily walk to and permanence in school). Under the concept of COST TU0801, the usability of a 3D city model is evaluated. The analysis was carried out for 4 children, with 4 alternative walking routes to school and using 4 different classrooms. Results indicate that the individual exposure of children is extremely spatially dependent, as a consequence of the wind flow and air pollutant dispersion patterns.

  9. Mercury Exposure Levels in Children with Dental Amalgam Fillings

    PubMed Central

    Miriam Varkey, Indu; Shetty, Rajmohan; Hegde, Amitha

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Objectives: Mercury combined with other metals to form solid amalgams has long been used in reconstructive dentistry but its use has been controversial since at least the middle of the 19th century. The exposure and body burden of mercury reviews have consistently stated that there is a deficiency of adequate epidemiological studies addressing this issue. Fish and dental amalgam are two major sources of human exposure to organic (MeHg) and inorganic Hg respectively. Materials and methods: A total of 150 subjects aged between 9 and 14 years were divided into two groups of 75 subjects each depending on their diet, i.e. seafood or nonseafood consuming. Each category was subdivided into three groups based on number of restorations. Scalp hair and urine samples were collected at baseline and 3 months later to assess the organic and inorganic levels of mercury respectively by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Results: The mean values of urinary mercury (inorganic mercury) in the group of children with restorations were 1.5915 μg/l as compared to 0.0130 μg/l in the groups with no amalgam restorations (p < 0.001) (Wilcoxon sign rank test and paired t-test). The hair mercury levels (organic mercury) varied signi-ficantly between the fsh-eating group and nonfsh-eating group, the average values being 1.03 μg/l and 0.84 μg/l respectively (p < 0.001) (Mann-Whitney U-test and paired t-test). Conclusion and significance: The notion about the mercury being released from the amalgam restorations as a sole exposure source needs to be put to a rest, as environmental factors collectively overpower the exposure levels from restorations alone. How to cite this article: Varkey IM, Shetty R, Hegde A. Mercury Exposure Levels in Children with Dental Amalgam Fillings. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):180-185. PMID:25709298

  10. Permissible Exposure Level for Lunar Dusts: Gaps are Closing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully Robert; Santana, Patricia; Cooper, Bonnie; McKay, David; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Castranova, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Space faring nations plan to return human explorers to the moon within the next decade. Experience during the Apollo flights suggests that lunar dust will invariably get into the habitat where the finest portion (less than 5 micrometers) could be inhaled by the crew before it is cleared from the atmosphere. NASA is developing a database from which a 6-month, episodic exposure standard for lunar dust can be set. Three kinds of moon dust were prepared from a parent sample of Apollo 14 regolith #14003,96. Our goal was to prepare each type of dust sample with a mean diameter less than 2 m, which is suitable for instillation into the lungs of rats. The three samples were prepared as follows: separation from the parent sample using a fluidized bed, grinding using a jet mill grinder, or grinding with a ball-mill grinder. Grinding simulated restoration of surface activation of dust expected to occur at the surface of the moon on native lunar dust. We used two grinding methods because they seemed to produce different modes of activation. The effects of grinding were preserved by maintaining the dust in ultra-pure nitrogen until immediately before it was placed in suspension for administration to rats. The dust was suspended in physiological saline with 10% Survanta, a lung surfactant. Rats were given intratrachael instillations of the dust suspension at three doses. In addition to the three moon dusts (A, C and E), we instilled the same amount of a negative control (TiO2, B) and a highly-toxic, positive control (quartz, D). These additional mineral dusts were selected because they have well-established and very different permissible exposure levels (PELs). Our goal was to determine where lunar dusts fit between these extremes, and then estimate a PEL for each lunar dust. We evaluated many indices of toxicity to the lung. The figure shows the changes in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a marker of cell death, for the five dusts. Benchmark dose software (Version 2.1.2) from the

  11. Chronic exposure to environmental levels of tribromophenol impairs zebrafish reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jun; Liu Chunsheng; Yu Liqin; Zhou Bingsheng

    2010-02-15

    Tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP) is ubiquitously found in aquatic environments and biota. In this study, we exposed zebrafish embryos (F{sub 0}; 2'''' days post-fertilization, dpf) to environmental concentration (0.3 mug/L) and a higher concentration (3.0 mug/L) of TBP and assessed the impact of chronic exposure (120 dpf) on reproduction. TBP exposure did not cause a significant increase in the malformation and reduction in the survival in the F{sub 0}-generation fish. After TBP exposure, the plasma testosterone and estradiol levels significantly increased in males and decreased in females. The transcription of steroidogenic genes (3beta-HSD, 17beta-HSD, CYP17, CYP19A, CYP19B) was significantly upregulated in the brain and testes in males and downregulated in the brain and ovary in females. TBP exposure significantly downregulated and upregulated the expression of VTG in the liver of female and male fish, respectively. Meanwhile, TBP exposure altered the sex ratio toward a male-dominant state. The F{sub 1}-generation larvae exhibited increased malformation, reduced survival, and retarded growth, suggesting that TBP in the aquatic environment has significant adverse effects on fish population.

  12. Increased oxidative stress following acute and chronic high altitude exposure.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, J Ashley; Simoni, Jan; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Swenson, Erik R; Wesson, Donald E; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Johnson, Richard J; Hurtado, Abdias

    2004-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species is typically associated with hyperoxia and ischemia reperfusion. Recent evidence has suggested that increased oxidative stress may occur with hypoxia. We hypothesized that oxidative stress would be increased in subjects exposed to high altitude hypoxia. We studied 28 control subjects living in Lima, Peru (sea level), at baseline and following 48 h exposure to high altitude (4300 m). To assess the effects of chronic altitude exposure, we studied 25 adult males resident in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude 4300 m). We also studied 27 subjects living in Cerro de Pasco who develop excessive erythrocytosis (hematocrit > 65%) and chronic mountain sickness. Acute high altitude exposure led to increased urinary F(2)-isoprostane, 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.31 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 2.15 +/- 1.1, p = 0.001) and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.37 +/- 0.09, p = 0.002), with a trend to increased plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 63.8 +/- 27, p = NS). High altitude residents had significantly elevated levels of urinary 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.3 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 4.1 +/- 3.4, p = 0.007), plasma TBARS (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 85 +/- 28, p = 0.008), and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.55 +/- 0.19, p < 0.0001) compared to sea level. High altitude residents with excessive erythrocytosis had higher levels of oxidative stress compared to high altitude residents with normal hematological adaptation. In conclusion, oxidative stress is increased following both acute exposure to high altitude without exercise and with chronic residence at high altitude. PMID:15072717

  13. Health effects of low-level exposure to formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Main, D.M.; Hogan, T.J.

    1983-12-01

    Twenty-one subjects exposed to formaldehyde (at levels between 0.12 and 1.6 parts per million (ppm)) in two mobile trailers and the remaining 18 unexposed workers of the same workforce were examined by questionnaire and spirometry. Symptoms of eye and throat irritation and increased headache and fatigue were significantly more common among the exposed group than the comparison group. Irritation of the nose, chest tightness, and shortness of breath were also more common among the exposed. Spirometry revealed no decrease in ventilatory function among the exposed workers. The significant increase in frequency of individuals with symptoms indicated an adverse health effect from exposure to formaldehyde at levels between 0.12 and 1.6 ppm. This may have implications regarding the adequacy of the US permissable exposure limit value and suggest the need for further examination of the health effects of formaldehyde in the nonoccupational environment.

  14. High-level-waste immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, J L

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of risks, environmental effects, process feasibility, and costs for disposal of immobilized high-level wastes in geologic repositories indicates that the disposal system safety has a low sensitivity to the choice of the waste disposal form.

  15. Bacillus thermoamylovorans Spores with Very-High-Level Heat Resistance Germinate Poorly in Rich Medium despite the Presence of ger Clusters but Efficiently upon Exposure to Calcium-Dipicolinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Berendsen, Erwin M.; Krawczyk, Antonina O.; Klaus, Verena; de Jong, Anne; Boekhorst, Jos; Eijlander, Robyn T.

    2015-01-01

    High-level heat resistance of spores of Bacillus thermoamylovorans poses challenges to the food industry, as industrial sterilization processes may not inactivate such spores, resulting in food spoilage upon germination and outgrowth. In this study, the germination and heat resistance properties of spores of four food-spoiling isolates were determined. Flow cytometry counts of spores were much higher than their counts on rich medium (maximum, 5%). Microscopic analysis revealed inefficient nutrient-induced germination of spores of all four isolates despite the presence of most known germination-related genes, including two operons encoding nutrient germinant receptors (GRs), in their genomes. In contrast, exposure to nonnutrient germinant calcium-dipicolinic acid (Ca-DPA) resulted in efficient (50 to 98%) spore germination. All four strains harbored cwlJ and gerQ genes, which are known to be essential for Ca-DPA-induced germination in Bacillus subtilis. When determining spore survival upon heating, low viable counts can be due to spore inactivation and an inability to germinate. To dissect these two phenomena, the recoveries of spores upon heat treatment were determined on plates with and without preexposure to Ca-DPA. The high-level heat resistance of spores as observed in this study (D120°C, 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.3 ± 0.1 min; z value, 12.2 ± 1.8°C) is in line with survival of sterilization processes in the food industry. The recovery of B. thermoamylovorans spores can be improved via nonnutrient germination, thereby avoiding gross underestimation of their levels in food ingredients. PMID:26341201

  16. Bacillus thermoamylovorans Spores with Very-High-Level Heat Resistance Germinate Poorly in Rich Medium despite the Presence of ger Clusters but Efficiently upon Exposure to Calcium-Dipicolinic Acid.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Erwin M; Krawczyk, Antonina O; Klaus, Verena; de Jong, Anne; Boekhorst, Jos; Eijlander, Robyn T; Kuipers, Oscar P; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2015-11-01

    High-level heat resistance of spores of Bacillus thermoamylovorans poses challenges to the food industry, as industrial sterilization processes may not inactivate such spores, resulting in food spoilage upon germination and outgrowth. In this study, the germination and heat resistance properties of spores of four food-spoiling isolates were determined. Flow cytometry counts of spores were much higher than their counts on rich medium (maximum, 5%). Microscopic analysis revealed inefficient nutrient-induced germination of spores of all four isolates despite the presence of most known germination-related genes, including two operons encoding nutrient germinant receptors (GRs), in their genomes. In contrast, exposure to nonnutrient germinant calcium-dipicolinic acid (Ca-DPA) resulted in efficient (50 to 98%) spore germination. All four strains harbored cwlJ and gerQ genes, which are known to be essential for Ca-DPA-induced germination in Bacillus subtilis. When determining spore survival upon heating, low viable counts can be due to spore inactivation and an inability to germinate. To dissect these two phenomena, the recoveries of spores upon heat treatment were determined on plates with and without preexposure to Ca-DPA. The high-level heat resistance of spores as observed in this study (D120°C, 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.3 ± 0.1 min; z value, 12.2 ± 1.8°C) is in line with survival of sterilization processes in the food industry. The recovery of B. thermoamylovorans spores can be improved via nonnutrient germination, thereby avoiding gross underestimation of their levels in food ingredients. PMID:26341201

  17. Occupational exposure to mercury. What is a safe level?

    PubMed Central

    Moienafshari, R.; Bar-Oz, B.; Koren, G.

    1999-01-01

    QUESTION: One of my pregnant patients, a dental hygienist, uses mercury in her workplace, but appears to have no symptoms of mercury toxicity. She has heard that mercury might affect her fetus. What should I recommend to her? What is a safe level of mercury in the air for pregnant women? ANSWER: Testing for levels of mercury in whole blood and, preferably, urine is useful for confirming exposure. Currently, mercury vapour concentrations greater than 0.01 mg/m3 are considered unsafe. Also, women of childbearing age should avoid contact with mercury salts in the workplace. PMID:10889853

  18. Low level exposure to chemicals and immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Colosio, C. . E-mail: claudio.colosio@icps.it; Birindelli, S.; Corsini, E.; Galli, C.L.; Maroni, M.

    2005-09-01

    Industrialized countries are facing an increase of diseases attributable to an alteration of the immune system function, and concern is growing that this trend could be at least partially attributable to new and modified patterns of exposure to chemicals. Among chemicals matter of concern, pesticides can be included. The Authors have reviewed the existing evidence of pesticide immunotoxicity in humans, showing that existing data are inadequate to raise conclusions on the immunotoxic risk related to these compounds. The limits of existing studies are: poor knowledge on exposure levels, heterogeneity of the approach, and difficulty in giving a prognostic significance to the slight changes often observed. To overcome these limits, the Authors have proposed a tier approach, based on three steps: the first, addressed at pointing out a possible immunomodulation; the second, at refining the results and the third one, when needed, to finalize the study and to point out concordance with previous results. Studies should preferably be carried out through comparison of pre- and post-exposure findings in the same groups of subjects to be examined immediately after the end of the exposure. A simplification of the first step approach can be used by the occupational health physician and the occupational toxicologist. Conclusions on the prognostic significance of the slight changes often observed will be reached only by validating the hypothesis generated by field studies with an epidemiological approach. In this field, the most useful option is represented by longitudinal perspective studies.

  19. Glutathione level after long-term occupational elemental mercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kobal, Alfred Bogomir Prezelj, Marija; Horvat, Milena; Krsnik, Mladen; Gibicar, Darija; Osredkar, Josko

    2008-05-15

    Many in vitro and in vivo studies have elucidated the interaction of inorganic mercury (Hg) and glutathione. However, human studies are limited. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of remote long-term intermittent occupational elemental Hg vapour (Hg{sup o}) exposure on erythrocyte glutathione levels and some antioxidative enzyme activities in ex-mercury miners in the period after exposure. The study included 49 ex-mercury miners divided into subgroups of 28 still active, Hg{sup o}-not-exposed miners and 21 elderly retired miners, and 41 controls, age-matched to the miners subgroup. The control workers were taken from 'mercury-free works'. Reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized disulphide glutathione (GSSG) concentrations in haemolysed erythrocytes were determined by capillary electrophoresis, while total glutathione (total GSH) and the GSH/GSSG ratio were calculated from the determined values. Catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in erythrocytes were measured using commercially available reagent kits, while urine Hg (U-Hg) concentrations were determined by cold vapour atomic absorption (CVAAS). No correlation of present U-Hg levels, GSH, GSSG, and antioxidative enzymes with remote occupational biological exposure indices were found. The mean CAT activity in miners and retired miners was significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the controls. No differences in mean GPx activity among the three groups were found, whereas the mean GR activity was significantly higher (p<0.05) in miners than in retired miners. The mean concentrations of GSH (mmol/g Hb) in miners (13.03{+-}3.71) were significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the control group (11.68{+-}2.66). No differences in mean total GSH, GSSG levels, and GSH/GSSG ratio between miners and controls were found. A positive correlation between GSSG and present U-Hg excretion (r=0.41, p=0.001) in the whole group of ex-mercury miners was observed. The

  20. Modification of otoacoustic emissions following ear-level exposure to MP3 player music.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Shaum P; Davis, Anne M

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if a pre-determined exposure level and duration of MP3 player music would result in significant changes in cochlear function when measured with audiometric and physiological methods. Distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), synchronized spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SSOAEs), and hearing thresholds were measured in 20 normal-hearing adults before and after a 30-minute MP3 player music exposure. DPOAEs were acquired with 65/45 dB SPL primary tones (f(2)=0.842-7.996 kHz) with a frequency resolution of 8 points/octave. A probe microphone system recorded ear-canal music levels and was used to equalize levels at approximately 85 dBC across individuals during the music presentation. Comparison of pre- and post-exposure measurements revealed no significant differences in hearing thresholds, but DPOAE levels in half-octave bands centered from 1.4-6.0 kHz were significantly reduced following the music exposure. Post-exposure shifts in SSOAE frequency and level were highly variable in individuals identified with SSOAEs. The results for the exposure conditions explored in this study indicate that changes in otoacoustic emissions may precede the development of music-induced hearing threshold shifts. PMID:19085399

  1. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bean, Vern E.; Long, Frederick G.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  2. High Throughput Exposure Estimation Using NHANES Data (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the ExpoCast project, high throughput (HT) exposure models enable rapid screening of large numbers of chemicals for exposure potential. Evaluation of these models requires empirical exposure data and due to the paucity of human metabolism/exposure data such evaluations includ...

  3. Exposures influencing total IgA level in colostrum.

    PubMed

    Munblit, D; Sheth, S; Abrol, P; Treneva, M; Peroni, D G; Chow, L-Y; Boner, A L; Pampura, A; Warner, J O; Boyle, R J

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a predominant immunoglobulin present in human breast milk and is known to play an important role in infant gut immunity maturation. Breast milk composition varies between populations, but the environmental and maternal factors responsible for these variations are still unclear. We examined the relationship between different exposures and levels of IgA in colostrum. The objective of this study was to examine whether exposures analysed influence levels of IgA in colostrum. The present study used 294 colostrum samples from the MecMilk International cohort, collected from women residing in London, Moscow and Verona. Samples were analysed in automated Abbott Architect Analyser. We found an inverse correlation between time postpartum and colostrum total IgA level (r=-0.49, P<0.001). Adjusting for maternal parity, smoking, fresh fruit and fish consumption and allergen sensitization, multiple regression model showed that IgA levels were influenced by colostrum collection time (P<0.0001) and country of collection (P<0.01). Mode of delivery influence did not appear to be significant in univariate comparisons, once adjusted for the above maternal characteristics it showed a significant influence on total IgA (P=0.01). We conclude that the concentration of IgA in colostrum drops rapidly after birth and future studies should always consider this factor in analysis. IgA concentration varied significantly between countries, with the highest level detected in Moscow and lowest in Verona. Mode of delivery effect should be confirmed on larger cohorts. Further work is needed to determine ways to correct for IgA decline over time in colostrum, and to find the cause of variations in IgA levels between the countries. PMID:26387688

  4. Cardiopulmonary effects of high-impulse noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Dodd, K T; Mundie, T G; Lagutchik, M S; Morris, J R

    1997-10-01

    In high-energy impulse noise environments, the biomechanical coupling process between the external forces and the pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary injury is not well understood. A 12-in-diameter compressed air-driven shock tube with reflector plate was used to induce three levels of pulmonary contusion injury in a large animal model. Twenty-one anesthetized sheep were exposed to the various levels of impulse noise generated by the shock tube, with six additional sheep serving as a control group. Pathologic evaluations, performed 3 hours after exposure, showed pulmonary contusion ranging from minor petechial changes on the surface of the lung parenchyma to diffuse ecchymoses affecting as much as 60% of the lung. The gross pathologic observations of injury produced by exposure to the impulse noise produced by the shock tube were similar to those reported for blunt impact trauma or exposure to chemical or grain-dust explosions. The extent of lung injury (lung injury index) was quantitatively assessed. A semilogarithmic relationship between the lung injury index and the measured peak pressure was demonstrated. A significant linear correlation was demonstrated between lung injury index and lung weight-to-body weight ratio. Significant cardiopulmonary changes were also observed as a result of exposure to high-impulse noise. Although in most cases the degree of change was related to the severity of the injury, significant cardiopulmonary function changes were also observed in the absence of significant grossly observable pulmonary injury. Cardiac injury was indicated by decreased cardiac output and hypotension at all levels of injury and might be the result of myocardial contusion or air emboli. Pulmonary injury was demonstrated by respiratory acidosis, increases in lung resistance, and decreases in lung compliance and lung volume. Arterial PO2 appeared to be the most sensitive parameter of injury and was decreased for all measurement intervals for all exposure groups

  5. High-Level Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Howard C.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a method to calculate the amount of high-level radioactive waste by taking into consideration the following factors: the fission process that yields the waste, identification of the waste, the energy required to run a 1-GWe plant for one year, and the uranium mass required to produce that energy. Briefly discusses waste disposal and…

  6. Evidence on the Human Health Effects of Low-Level Methylmercury Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Anna L.; Oken, Emily; Horvat, Milena; Schoeny, Rita; Kamai, Elizabeth; Cowell, Whitney; Grandjean, Philippe; Korrick, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Methylmercury (MeHg) is a known neuro-toxicant. Emerging evidence indicates it may have adverse effects on the neuro-logic and other body systems at common low levels of exposure. Impacts of MeHg exposure could vary by individual susceptibility or be confounded by bene-ficial nutrients in fish containing MeHg. Despite its global relevance, synthesis of the available literature on low-level MeHg exposure has been limited. Objectives: We undertook a synthesis of the current knowledge on the human health effects of low-level MeHg exposure to provide a basis for future research efforts, risk assessment, and exposure remediation policies worldwide. Data sources and extraction: We reviewed the published literature for original human epidemio-logic research articles that reported a direct biomarker of mercury exposure. To focus on high-quality studies and those specifically on low mercury exposure, we excluded case series, as well as studies of populations with unusually high fish consumption (e.g., the Seychelles), marine mammal consumption (e.g., the Faroe Islands, circumpolar, and other indigenous populations), or consumption of highly contaminated fish (e.g., gold-mining regions in the Amazon). Data synthesis: Recent evidence raises the possibility of effects of low-level MeHg exposure on fetal growth among susceptible subgroups and on infant growth in the first 2 years of life. Low-level effects of MeHg on neuro-logic outcomes may differ by age, sex, and timing of exposure. No clear pattern has been observed for cardio-vascular disease (CVD) risk across populations or for specific CVD end points. For the few studies evaluating immunologic effects associated with MeHg, results have been inconsistent. Conclusions: Studies targeted at identifying potential mechanisms of low-level MeHg effects and characterizing individual susceptibility, sexual dimorphism, and non-linearity in dose response would help guide future prevention, policy, and regulatory efforts

  7. The CMS high level trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running on the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. Here we will present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simpler single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We will discuss the optimisation of the triggers and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  8. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  9. Chronic Exposure to Low Frequency Noise at Moderate Levels Causes Impaired Balance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Haruka; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Yajima, Ichiro; Iida, Machiko; Ohgami, Kyoko; Fujii, Noriko; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Kusudo, Tastuya; Yamashita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    We are routinely exposed to low frequency noise (LFN; below 0.5 kHz) at moderate levels of 60–70 dB sound pressure level (SPL) generated from various sources in occupational and daily environments. LFN has been reported to affect balance in humans. However, there is limited information about the influence of chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels for balance. In this study, we investigated whether chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level of 70 dB SPL affects the vestibule, which is one of the organs responsible for balance in mice. Wild-type ICR mice were exposed for 1 month to LFN (0.1 kHz) and high frequency noise (HFN; 16 kHz) at 70 dB SPL at a distance of approximately 10–20 cm. Behavior analyses including rotarod, beam-crossing and footprint analyses showed impairments of balance in LFN-exposed mice but not in non-exposed mice or HFN-exposed mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a decreased number of vestibular hair cells and increased levels of oxidative stress in LFN-exposed mice compared to those in non-exposed mice. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels causes impaired balance involving morphological impairments of the vestibule with enhanced levels of oxidative stress. Thus, the results of this study indicate the importance of considering the risk of chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level for imbalance. PMID:22768129

  10. Reproductive toxicity of low-level lead exposure in men

    SciTech Connect

    Telisman, Spomenka Colak, Bozo; Pizent, Alica; Jurasovic, Jasna; Cvitkovic, Petar

    2007-10-15

    Parameters of semen quality, seminal plasma indicators of secretory function of the prostate and seminal vesicles, sex hormones in serum, and biomarkers of lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and selenium body burden were measured in 240 Croatian men 19-52 years of age. The subjects had no occupational exposure to metals and no known other reasons suspected of influencing male reproductive function or metal metabolism. After adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol, blood cadmium, and serum copper, zinc, and selenium by multiple regression, significant (P<0.05) associations of blood lead (BPb), {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), and/or erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) with reproductive parameters indicated a lead-related increase in immature sperm concentration, in percentages of pathologic sperm, wide sperm, round sperm, and short sperm, in serum levels of testosterone and estradiol, and a decrease in seminal plasma zinc and in serum prolactin. These reproductive effects were observed at low-level lead exposure (BPb median 49 {mu}g/L, range 11-149 {mu}g/L in the 240 subjects) common for general populations worldwide. The observed significant synergistic effect of BPb and blood cadmium on increasing serum testosterone, and additive effect of a decrease in serum selenium on increasing serum testosterone, may have implications on the initiation and development of prostate cancer because testosterone augments the progress of prostate cancer in its early stages.

  11. Personal UV exposure in high albedo alpine sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siani, A. M.; Casale, G. R.; Diémoz, H.; Agnesod, G.; Kimlin, M. G.; Lang, C. A.; Colosimo, A.

    2008-07-01

    Mountain sites experience enhanced UV radiation levels due to the concurrent effects of shorter radiation path-length, low aerosol load and high reflectivity of the snow surfaces. This study was encouraged by the possibility to collect original data of personal dose on a specific anatomical site (erythemally effective UV dose on the forehead) of two groups of volunteers (ski instructors and skiers) in the mountainous areas of Italy (the Alpine site of La Thuile-Les Suches in Valle d'Aosta region). Personal doses were assessed using polysulphone dosimetry. Exposure Ratio (ER), defined as the ratio between the personal dose and the corresponding ambient dose (i.e. erythemally weighted dose received by a horizontal surface) during the same exposure period was taken into account. In addition measuring skin colours as biological markers of individual response to UV exposure, was also carried out on the forearm and cheek of each volunteer before and after exposure. The median ER, taking into account the whole sample, is 0.60 in winter, with a range of 0.29 to 1.46, and 1.02 in spring, ranging from 0.46 to 1.72. No differences in ERs were found between skiers and instructors in spring while in winter skiers experienced lower values. Regarding skin colorimetric parameters the main result was that both skiers and instructors had on average significantly lower values of luminance after exposure i.e.~they became darker. It was found that the use of sunscreen and individual skin photo-type did not produce significant variations in ER across instructor/skier group by day and by seasons (p>0.05). It seems that sunscreen use only at the beginning of the exposure or in a few cases a couple of times during exposure (at difference with the specific instructions sheets), was not sufficient to change significantly skin colorimetric parameters across participants. In conclusion UV personal doses on the ski-fields are often significantly higher than those on horizontal surfaces and

  12. Evaluation of noise pollution level based upon community exposure and response data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmiston, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    The results and procedures are reported from an evaluation of noise pollution level as a predictor of annoyance, based on aircraft noise exposure and community response data. The measures of noise exposure presented include composite noise rating, noise exposure forecast, noise and number index. A proposed measure as a universal noise exposure measure for noise pollution level (L sub NP) is discussed.

  13. Evaluating Rapid Models for High-Throughput Exposure Forecasting (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput exposure screening models can provide quantitative predictions for thousands of chemicals; however these predictions must be systematically evaluated for predictive ability. Without the capability to make quantitative, albeit uncertain, forecasts of exposure, the ...

  14. Biomarkers of low-level exposure to soman vapor: comparison of fluoride regeneration to acetylcholinesterase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Dabisch, P A; Davis, E A; Renner, J A; Jakubowski, E M; Mioduszewski, R J; Thomson, S A

    2008-01-01

    The nerve agent O-pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate, also known as soman or by its military designation GD, is a highly toxic organophosphorous compound that exerts its effects through inhibition of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). In the present study, a fluoride ion based regeneration assay was developed to quantify the level of soman present in the blood of rats following a low-level whole-body inhalation exposure. It was hypothesized that the amount of regenerated nerve agent in the blood would be dose dependent in rats subjected to a whole-body inhalation exposure to a low-level dose of soman vapor, and that the fluoride ion-based regeneration method would be more sensitive for the detection of a low-level exposure to soman vapor than the measurement of whole blood AChE activity. Regenerated soman was dose-dependently detected in both the red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma of exposed rats at all concentrations tested (0.033-0.280 mg/m(3) for a 240-min exposure). Significant inhibition of whole blood AChE activity did not occur below a concentration of 0.101 mg/m(3), and was only depressed by approximately 10-25% at concentrations ranging from 0.101 mg/m(3) to 0.280 mg/m(3). This study is the first to utilize a fluoride ion-based regeneration assay to demonstrate the dose-dependent increases in soman in the blood following whole-body inhalation exposure to low levels of vapor. Additionally, the results of the present study demonstrate that the fluoride ion based regeneration assay was approximately threefold more sensitive than the measurement of AChE activity in the blood for the detection of exposure to soman, and also that miosis is a more sensitive marker of soman exposure than inhibition of AChE activity. PMID:18236229

  15. Comparison of formaldehyde exposure levels in two multi-industry occupational exposure databanks using multimodel inference.

    PubMed

    Lavoué, J; Gérin, M; Vincent, R

    2011-01-01

    The recent increase in international multicenter epidemiologic studies of occupational hazards and the current development of risk analysis tools based on multinational exposure data provide an incentive to evaluate the extrapolation of exposure data across countries. We compared formaldehyde measurements in the French (COLCHIC) and U.S. (IMIS) occupational exposure databases for 1986-2001 using multimodel inference. In this approach, conclusions are based on a set of plausible models rather than on a single model. Modeled variables included data source, industry, year, and sample type (short-term or long-term). The model set included 72 models corresponding to testing all variables and 5 interactions and estimation of 93 coefficients. As it is impossible to classify non-detects (ND) as short-term or long-term samples, they were removed from IMIS prior to analysis. Respectively, 3143 and 2646 IMIS and COLCHIC data, spread across 28 common industries, were analyzed. The full model explained 21% of the total variability. All fixed effects and the source-industry interaction were shown as strong predictors of exposure. The temporal trend (5% yearly decrease) and difference between short-term and long-term data (short-term greater than long-term by two-fold) were similar across the two databanks. Industry-specific differences between IMIS and COLCHIC were detected only for health-related activities for which COLCHIC levels were higher (~ four-fold). Sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the impact of excluding NDs from IMIS. They showed initial predicted industry-specific geometric means for IMIS data potentially multiplied by factors from 0.42 to 0.98 (long-term data) and from 0.11 to 1.4 (short-term data) when NDs were included with various distributions across the short-term and long-term categories. The most realistic scenario yielded 0.82 for long-term (18% overestimation) data and 1.05 (5% underestimation) for short-term data. Although tempered by a

  16. Is Sound Exposure Level a Convenient Metric to Characterize Fatiguing Sounds? A Study in Beluga Whales.

    PubMed

    Supin, Alexander; Popov, Vladimir; Nechaev, Dmitry; Sysueva, Evgenia; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav

    2016-01-01

    Both the level and duration of fatiguing sounds influence temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) in odontocetes. These two parameters were combined into a sound exposure level (SEL). In the beluga whale Delphinapterus leucas, TTSs were investigated at various sound pressure level (SPL)-to-duration ratios at a specific SEL. At low SPL-to-duration ratios, the dependence was positive: shorter high-level sounds produced greater TTSs than long low-level sounds of the same SEL. At high SPL-to-duration ratios, the dependence was negative: long low-level sounds produced greater TTSs than short high-level sounds of the same SEL. Thus, the validity of SEL as a metric for fatiguing sound efficiency is limited. PMID:26611076

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyl exposure and corticosterone levels in seven polar seabird species.

    PubMed

    Tartu, S; Angelier, F; Bustnes, J O; Moe, B; Hanssen, S A; Herzke, D; Gabrielsen, G W; Verboven, N; Verreault, J; Labadie, P; Budzinski, H; Wingfield, J C; Chastel, O

    2015-02-01

    The role of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on exposure-related endocrine effects has been poorly investigated in wild birds. This is the case for stress hormones including corticosterone (CORT). Some studies have suggested that environmental exposure to PCBs and altered CORT secretion might be associated. Here we investigated the relationships between blood PCB concentrations and circulating CORT levels in seven free-ranging polar seabird species occupying different trophic positions, and hence covering a wide range of PCB exposure. Blood ∑₇PCB concentrations (range: 61-115,632 ng/g lw) were positively associated to baseline or stress-induced CORT levels in three species and negatively associated to stress-induced CORT levels in one species. Global analysis suggests that in males, baseline CORT levels generally increase with increasing blood ∑₇PCB concentrations, whereas stress-induced CORT levels decrease when reaching high blood ∑₇PCB concentrations. This study suggests that the nature of the PCB-CORT relationships may depend on the level of PCB exposure. PMID:25541072

  18. Mercury Exposure May Suppress Baseline Corticosterone Levels in Juvenile Birds.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, Garth; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herzog, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Mercury exposure has been associated with a wide variety of negative reproductive responses in birds, however few studies have examined the potential for chick impairment via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The HPA axis regulates corticosterone levels during periods of stress. We examined the relationship between baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations and mercury concentrations in down feathers of recently hatched (Sterna forsteri) chicks in San Francisco Bay, California. Baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in blood of older chicks (decreasing by 81% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and number of fledgling chicks within the colony and chick age. In recently hatched chicks, baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were weakly negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in down feathers (decreasing by 45% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for stronger positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and colony nest abundance and date. These results indicate that chronic mercury exposure may suppress baseline corticosterone concentrations in tern chicks and suggests that a juvenile bird's ability to respond to stress may be reduced via the downregulation of the HPA axis.

  19. Mercury exposure may suppress baseline corticosterone levels in juvenile birds.

    PubMed

    Herring, Garth; Ackerman, Joshua T; Herzog, Mark P

    2012-06-01

    Mercury exposure has been associated with a wide variety of negative reproductive responses in birds, however few studies have examined the potential for chick impairment via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The HPA axis regulates corticosterone levels during periods of stress. We examined the relationship between baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations and mercury concentrations in down feathers of recently hatched (<3 days) and blood of older (15-37 days) Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) chicks in San Francisco Bay, California. Baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in blood of older chicks (decreasing by 81% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and number of fledgling chicks within the colony and chick age. In recently hatched chicks, baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were weakly negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in down feathers (decreasing by 45% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for stronger positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and colony nest abundance and date. These results indicate that chronic mercury exposure may suppress baseline corticosterone concentrations in tern chicks and suggests that a juvenile bird's ability to respond to stress may be reduced via the downregulation of the HPA axis. PMID:22578153

  20. HELLE: Health Effects of Low Level Exposures/ Gezondheidseffecten van lage blootstellingniveaus [International workshop: Influence of low level exposures to chemicals and radiation on human and ecological health

    SciTech Connect

    Schoten, Eert

    1998-11-26

    The Health Council is closely involved in establishing the scientific foundation of exposure limits for substances and radiation in order to protect public health. Through the years, the Council has contributed to the formulation of principles and procedures, both for carcinogenic and for noncarcinogenic agents. As a rule, the discussion with regard to the derivation of health-based recommended exposure limits centers around the appropriateness of extrapolation methods (What can be inferred from data on high exposure levels and on experimental animals?). Generally speaking, there is a lack of direct information on the health effects of low levels of exposure. Effects at these levels cannot usually be detected by means of traditional animal experiments or epidemiological research. The capacity of these analytical instruments to distinguish between ''signal'' and ''noise'' is inadequate in most cases. Annex B of this report contains a brief outline of the difficulties and the established methods for tackling this problem. In spite of this, the hope exists that the posited weak signals, if they are indeed present, can be detected by other means. The search will have to take place on a deeper level. In other words, effort must be made to discover what occurs at underlying levels of biological organization when organisms are exposed to low doses of radiation or substances. Molecular and cell biology provide various methods and techniques which give an insight into the processes within the cell. This results in an increase in the knowledge about the molecular and cellular effects of exposure to agents, or stated differently, the working mechanisms which form the basis of the health effects. Last year, the Health Council considered that the time was ripe to take stock of the state of knowledge in this field. To this end, an international working conference was held from 19 to 21 October 1997, entitled ''Health Effects of Low Level Exposures: Scientific Developments and

  1. Low-Level Environmental Phthalate Exposure Associates with Urine Metabolome Alteration in a Chinese Male Cohort.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Liangpo; Wang, Xiaofei; Huang, Qingyu; Tian, Meiping; Shen, Heqing

    2016-06-01

    The general population is exposed to phthalates through various sources and routes. Integration of omics data and epidemiological data is a key step toward directly linking phthalate biomonitoring data with biological response. Urine metabolomics is a powerful tool to identify exposure biomarkers and delineate the modes of action of environmental stressors. The objectives of this study are to investigate the association between low-level environmental phthalate exposure and urine metabolome alteration in male population, and to unveil the metabolic pathways involved in the mechanisms of phthalate toxicity. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, we studied the urine metabolomic profiles of 364 male subjects exposed to low-level environmental phthalates. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) are the most widely used phthalates. ∑DEHP and MBP (the major metabolite of DBP) were associated with significant alteration of global urine metabolome in the male population. We observed significant increase in the levels of acetylneuraminic acid, carnitine C8:1, carnitine C18:0, cystine, phenylglycine, phenylpyruvic acid and glutamylphenylalanine; and meanwhile, decrease in the levels of carnitine C16:2, diacetylspermine, alanine, taurine, tryptophan, ornithine, methylglutaconic acid, hydroxyl-PEG2 and keto-PGE2 in high exposure group. The observations indicated that low-level environmental phthalate exposure associated with increased oxidative stress and fatty acid oxidation and decreased prostaglandin metabolism. Urea cycle, tryptophan and phenylalanine metabolism disruption was also observed. The urine metabolome disruption effects associated with ∑DEHP and MBP were similar, but not identical. The multibiomarker models presented AUC values of 0.845 and 0.834 for ∑DEHP and MBP, respectively. The predictive accuracy rates of established models were 81% for ΣDEHP and 73% for MBP. Our results suggest that low-level environmental phthalate

  2. Effects of Developmental Lead Exposure on the Hippocampal Transcriptome: Influences of Sex, Developmental Period, and Lead Exposure Level

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jay S

    2012-01-01

    Developmental lead (Pb) exposure has profound effects on cognition and behavior. Much is known about effects of Pb on hippocampal-mediated behaviors, but little is known about the molecular consequences of Pb exposure and the influences of developmental timing of exposure, level of exposure, and sex as effect modifiers of Pb exposure on the brain. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of different levels of Pb exposure (250 and 750 ppm Pb acetate) during perinatal (gestation/lactation) and postnatal (through postnatal day 45) periods on the hippocampal transcriptome in male and female Long Evans rats. Total RNA was extracted from hippocampus from four animals per experimental condition. RNA was hybridized to Affymetrix Rat Gene RNA Arrays using standard methods. Pb exposure per se influenced the expression of 717 transcripts (328 unique annotated genes), with many influenced in a sex-independent manner. Significant differences in gene expression patterns were also influenced by timing and level of exposure, with generally larger effects at the lower level of exposure across all groups. Statistically enriched biological functions included ion binding, regulation of RNA metabolic processes, and positive regulation of macromolecule biosynthetic processes. Processes of regulation of transcription and regulation of gene expression were preferentially enriched in males, regardless of timing or amount of Pb exposure. The effect on transcription factors and the diverse pathways or networks affected by Pb suggest a substantial effect of developmental Pb exposure on plasticity and adaptability, with these effects significantly modified by sex, developmental window of exposure, and level of Pb exposure. PMID:22641619

  3. Significance of smoking machine toxicant yields to blood-level exposure in waterpipe tobacco smokers

    PubMed Central

    Shihadeh, Alan L.; Eissenberg, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The global rise in tobacco smoking using a waterpipe (hookah, narghile, shisha) has made understanding its health consequences imperative. One key to developing this understanding is identifying and quantifying carcinogens and other toxicants present in waterpipe smoke. To do so, the toxicant yield of machine-generated waterpipe smoke has been measured. However, the relevance of toxicant yields of machine-generated smoke to actual human exposure has not been established. Methods In this study, we examined whether CO and nicotine yields measured using a smoking machine programmed to replicate the puffing behavior of 31 human participants who smoked a waterpipe could reliably predict these participant’s blood-level exposure. In addition to CO and nicotine, yields of PAH, volatile aldehydes, NO, and “tar” were measured. Results We found that when used in this puff-replicating manner, smoking machine yields are highly correlated with blood-level exposure (Nicotine: r>0.76, p<0.001; CO: r>0.78, p<0.001). Total drawn smoke volume was the best predictor of toxicant yield and exposure, accounting for approximately 75–100% of the variability across participants in yields of NO, CO, volatile aldehydes and “tar”, and blood-level CO and normalized nicotine. Conclusions Machine-based methods can be devised in which smoke toxicant yields reliably track human exposure. Impact This finding indicates the basic feasibility of valid analytical laboratory evaluation of tobacco products for regulatory purposes. PMID:21914836

  4. Exposure to a Highly Caloric Palatable Diet During Pregestational and Gestational Periods Affects Hypothalamic and Hippocampal Endocannabinoid Levels at Birth and Induces Adiposity and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in Male Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Vázquez, Mariam; Bindila, Laura; Lomazzo, Ermelinda; Hofmann, Clementine; Blanco, Rosario Noemí; Alén, Francisco; Antón, María; Decara, Juan; Ouro, Daniel; Orio, Laura; Suarez, Juan; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Gómez de Heras, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to unbalanced diets during pre-gestational and gestational periods may result in long-term alterations in metabolism and behavior. The contribution of the endocannabinoid system to these long-term adaptive responses is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the impact of female rat exposure to a hypercaloric-hypoproteic palatable diet during pre-gestational, gestational and lactational periods on the development of male offspring. In addition, the hypothalamic and hippocampal endocannabinoid contents at birth and the behavioral performance in adulthood were investigated. Exposure to a palatable diet resulted in low weight offspring who exhibited low hypothalamic contents of arachidonic acid and the two major endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) at birth. Palmitoylethanolamide, but not oleoylethanolamide, also decreased. Additionally, pups from palatable diet-fed dams displayed lower levels of anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide in the hippocampus. The low-weight male offspring, born from palatable diet exposed mothers, gained less weight during lactation and although they recovered weight during the post-weaning period, they developed abdominal adiposity in adulthood. These animals exhibited anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze and open field test and a low preference for a chocolate diet in a food preference test, indicating that maternal exposure to a hypercaloric diet induces long-term behavioral alterations in male offspring. These results suggest that maternal diet alterations in the function of the endogenous cannabinoid system can mediate the observed phenotype of the offspring, since both hypothalamic and hippocampal endocannabinoids regulate feeding, metabolic adaptions to caloric diets, learning, memory, and emotions. PMID:26778987

  5. Exposure to a Highly Caloric Palatable Diet During Pregestational and Gestational Periods Affects Hypothalamic and Hippocampal Endocannabinoid Levels at Birth and Induces Adiposity and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in Male Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Vázquez, Mariam; Bindila, Laura; Lomazzo, Ermelinda; Hofmann, Clementine; Blanco, Rosario Noemí; Alén, Francisco; Antón, María; Decara, Juan; Ouro, Daniel; Orio, Laura; Suarez, Juan; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Gómez de Heras, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to unbalanced diets during pre-gestational and gestational periods may result in long-term alterations in metabolism and behavior. The contribution of the endocannabinoid system to these long-term adaptive responses is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the impact of female rat exposure to a hypercaloric-hypoproteic palatable diet during pre-gestational, gestational and lactational periods on the development of male offspring. In addition, the hypothalamic and hippocampal endocannabinoid contents at birth and the behavioral performance in adulthood were investigated. Exposure to a palatable diet resulted in low weight offspring who exhibited low hypothalamic contents of arachidonic acid and the two major endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) at birth. Palmitoylethanolamide, but not oleoylethanolamide, also decreased. Additionally, pups from palatable diet-fed dams displayed lower levels of anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide in the hippocampus. The low-weight male offspring, born from palatable diet exposed mothers, gained less weight during lactation and although they recovered weight during the post-weaning period, they developed abdominal adiposity in adulthood. These animals exhibited anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze and open field test and a low preference for a chocolate diet in a food preference test, indicating that maternal exposure to a hypercaloric diet induces long-term behavioral alterations in male offspring. These results suggest that maternal diet alterations in the function of the endogenous cannabinoid system can mediate the observed phenotype of the offspring, since both hypothalamic and hippocampal endocannabinoids regulate feeding, metabolic adaptions to caloric diets, learning, memory, and emotions. PMID:26778987

  6. The High Price of Noise Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    ... too. Doctors, parents and educators worry about portable music players and other noisy gadgets damaging hearing in children and young adults. Just how much depends on both loudness and time—the longer the exposure, the more ...

  7. In vivo cGMP levels in frog photoreceptor cells as a function of light exposure.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, E K; Klotz, K L; Noelker, D M; Nelson, R; Chader, G J; Passonneau, J V

    1986-11-01

    By employing a combination of highly sensitive radioimmunoassays and histochemical techniques, an in vivo time course of cGMP levels has been determined in the outer segment, photoreceptor cell and outer plexiform layers of frog retina. Frogs (Rana pipiens) were dark-adapted overnight and either frozen rapidly (approximately 3 sec) in liquid nitrogen or exposed to periods of light varying between 0.1 sec and 2 hr before freezing. Frozen retinal sections were cut, freeze-dried, and samples of individual layers dissected out and analysed for cGMP. In the outer plexiform layer, there was a 42% drop in cGMP concentration after 2 sec of light (250 ft candles) followed by a 34% rise after 2 min; a steep concentration gradient formed around the layer after the 2 min exposure. In both the outer-segment layer and photoreceptor-cell layer (which includes outer segments, inner segments and outer nuclear layers), cGMP levels declined from a dark value of 56 mumol kg-1 (dry) to 9 mumol kg-1 (dry) as a result of increasing exposure to several types of light source: levels appear to be primarily a function of total ft candle min. Cyclic GMP concentrations at the longest exposures (2 min with a fiber optic light source or 2 hr with fluorescent room light) reached identical minimum levels. In the outer segments, a 15% decrease in cGMP was observed after 0.1 sec of light exposure. Although the freezing time is too long to be able to say whether the 15% decrease in cGMP at the 0.1 sec exposure is involved in transduction, the low identical levels reached gradually after longer exposures appear to indicate that a light-induced biochemical adjustment in cGMP metabolism occurs over a relatively long time period separate from the msec time course of the transduction process. PMID:3026825

  8. Tooth element levels indicating exposure profiles in diabetic and hypertensive subjects from Mysore, India.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, G; Sukumar, A; Nandlal, B; Vellaichamy, S; Thanasekaran, K; Ramanathan, A L

    2009-12-01

    Element contents of teeth elucidate exposure nature, but less is known about association of tooth element concentrations of diabetics and hypertensives with exposure profile. Present study aims to estimate copper, chromium, iron, zinc, nickel, and lead concentrations in the permanent teeth of control, diabetic, and hypertensive subjects from Mysore. The results show that lead levels of teeth (Pb-T) are higher in the hypertensives and diabetics, whereas copper levels of teeth (Cu-T) are lower in the hypertensives and users of stainless steel utensils than that of controls and users of mixed utensils. The elevated Cu-T levels found in the users of mixed utensils that being made of several metals are ascribed to leaching effect of sour and spicy food of Indian cuisine. The element levels were influenced by diet (Zn-T), place of living, sex and income (Pb-T) of the subjects, but not by age, drinking water from different sources, and certain habits viz., smoking, alcohol consumption, chewing betel, and nut. Thus, it is evident that high Pb-T and low Cu-T levels may be related with diabetes and hypertension and high Pb-T and Cu-T levels, respectively, in the urbanites, and the users of mixed utensils may show different exposure profiles from environment and utensils. PMID:19352596

  9. Respiratory symptoms associated with low level sulphur dioxide exposure in silicon carbide production workers.

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, J W; Greaves, I A; Smith, T J; Hammond, S K; Robins, J M; Thériault, G

    1989-01-01

    Relations between pulmonary symptoms and exposure to respirable dust and sulphur dioxide (SO2) were evaluated for 145 silicon carbide (SiC) production workers with an average of 13.9 (range 3-41) years of experience in this industry. Eight hour time weighted average exposures to SO2 were 1.5 ppm or less with momentary peaks up to 4 ppm. Cumulative SO2 exposure averaged 1.94 (range 0.02-19.5) ppm-years. Low level respirable dust exposures also occurred (0.63 +/- 0.26 mg/m3). After adjusting for age and current smoking status in multiple logistic regression models, highly significant, positive, dose dependent relations were found between cumulative and average exposure to SO2, and symptoms of usual and chronic phlegm, usual and chronic wheeze, and mild exertional dyspnoea. Mild and moderate dyspnoea were also associated with most recent exposure to SO2. Cough was not associated with SO2. No pulmonary symptoms were associated with exposure to respirable dust nor were any symptoms attributable to an interaction between dust and SO2. Cigarette smoking was strongly associated with cough, phlegm, and wheezing, but not dyspnoea. A greater than additive (synergistic) effect between smoking and exposure to SO2 was present for most symptoms. These findings suggest that long term, variable exposure to SO2 at 1.5 ppm or less was associated with significantly raised rates of phlegm, wheezing, and mild dyspnoea in SiC production workers, and that current threshold limits for SO2 may not adequately protect workers in this industry. PMID:2789966

  10. A low-level asbestos exposure case-control epidemiology study

    SciTech Connect

    Ocasio-Alvarex, A.

    1988-01-01

    The potential for low levels of airborne asbestos exposure in public schools and in public and commercial buildings in the United States has generated concern due to the large population at risk and the definite human carcinogenicity of asbestos at high levels. To assist in the clarification of the risk associated with low level asbestos exposure and in the decision-making in asbestos management in schools and in other buildings, a case-control study was conducted to estimate the risk relationship between low levels of asbestos exposure and pulmonary cancer among Indiana public school teachers. A total of 236 lung cancer cases and 154 controls to be used in this case-control study were identified from a previous proportionate mortality rate study which had examined over 8,000 teachers' death certificates. The controls were selected from teachers who died of chronic bronchitis, emphysema or a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The teachers' work history and their potential for asbestos exposure, as well as the reliability of the information obtained on the presence or absence of asbestos, was determined to calculate the odds ratio.

  11. Exposure levels for chemical threat compounds: information to facilitate chemical incident response.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, Veronique D; Watson, Annetta

    2013-01-01

    Although not widely known, a robust set of peer-reviewed public health and occupational exposure levels presently exist for key chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and certain acutely toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) identified as terrorist attack threats. Familiarity with these CWA and TIC exposure levels and their historic applications has facilitated emergency management decision-making by public and environmental health decision-makers. Specifically, multiple air, soil, and water exposure levels for CWAs and TICs summarized here have been extensively peer-reviewed and published; many have been recognized and are in use by federal and state health agencies as criteria for hazard zone prediction and assessment, occupational safety, and "how clean is clean enough" decisions. The key, however, is to know which criteria are most appropriate for specific decisions. While public safety is critical, high levels of concern often associated with perceived or actual proximity to extremely toxic chemical agents could result in overly cautious decisions that generate excessive delays, expenditure of scarce resources, and technological difficulties. Rapid selection of the most appropriate chemical exposure criteria is recommended to avoid such problems and expedite all phases of chemical incident response and recovery. PMID:24340456

  12. Testing surgical gowns for the "anticipated level of exposure".

    PubMed

    Belkin, N L

    2000-04-01

    Although the use of the surgeon's gown dates back to the turn of the century, the need for it to be made of a liquid-repellent material was disclosed only in 1952. Because of the relatively poor performance of the products that were introduced early on, the entire textile industry--makers of nonwoven disposable and woven reusable materials alike--was challenged to develop a test method to demonstrate a fabric's capability "under usual conditions of use." A cooperative attempt to do that was abandoned in 1983. With the emergence of HIV, the need to protect the wearer became the gown's priority. However, because there was no standard test method, the manufacturers used any of an array of tests to promote a product's suitability for use under what the Occupational Safety and Health Administration describes as the "level of exposure anticipated." Now, a standard test method has been adopted that describes the results on a pass/fail basis. However, the literature indicates that gowns made of materials that have passed this test have failed "under usual conditions of use." Nevertheless, the Food and Drug Administration is permitting manufacturers to mislead the surgical community by describing products as being "impervious" or "liquid proof." PMID:10794218

  13. 28 CFR 79.44 - Proof of working level month exposure to radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of working level month exposure to radiation. 79.44 Section 79.44 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.44 Proof of working level month exposure to...

  14. Exposure levels of farmers and veterinarians to particulate matter and gases during operational tasks in pig-fattening houses.

    PubMed

    Van Ransbeeck, Nele; Van Langenhove, Herman; Michiels, Annelies; Sonck, Bart; Demeyer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to assess particulate matter (PM) exposure levels for both the farmer and the veterinarian during different operational tasks in pig-fattening houses, and to estimate their exposure levels on a daily working basis (time-weighted average (TWA)). The measured PM fractions were: inhalable and respirable PM, PM10, PM2.5 and PM1. The effects of pig age, pen floor type (conventional or low emission surface) and cleaning of the pens on the personal PM exposure were also investigated. Indoor concentrations of NH3, CH4, and CO2 were additionally measured during some operational tasks. The results showed that personal exposure levels can become extremely high during some operational tasks performed by the farmer or veterinarian. The highest concentration levels were observed during feed shovelling and blood sampling, the lowest during the weighing of the pigs. For the farmer, the estimated TWA exposure levels of inhalable and respirable PM were 6.0 and 0.29 mg m(-3), respectively. These exposure levels for the veterinarian were, respectively, 10.6 and 0.74 mg m(-3). The PM concentration levels were mainly determined by the performed operational tasks. There was no significant effect of pig age, pen floor type, nor cleaning of the pens on the personal exposure levels. PMID:25292112

  15. An assessment of exposure to glutaraldehyde in hospitals: typical exposure levels and recommended control measures.

    PubMed Central

    Leinster, P; Baum, J M; Baxter, P J

    1993-01-01

    An assessment of exposure to glutaraldehyde in cold sterilisation and x ray development processes was undertaken in 14 locations at six hospitals in south east England. The results obtained indicate that routine exposures of hospital workers to airborne concentrations of the compound are within the current United Kingdom occupational exposure limit of 0.7 mg m-3. There was the potential for skin contact in many of the activities observed and alternative sterilisation and disinfection procedures would have been more appropriate in some situations. Recommendations are made on reducing exposures as the current occupational exposure limit for this compound may not be appropriate. PMID:8435342

  16. MIXED MODELS ANALYSIS OR URBANIZATION LEVEL ON CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) pilot studies were conducted from 1995 through 1997 to examine human population exposure to a wide range of environmental contaminants. In one of the studies, NHEXAS-Maryland, a longitudinal design was used to repeatedly m...

  17. 1-Hydroxypyrene Levels in Blood Samples of Rats After Exposure to Generator Fumes

    PubMed Central

    Ifegwu, Clinton; Igwo-Ezikpe, Miriam N.; Anyakora, Chimezie; Osuntoki, Akinniyi; Oseni, Kafayat A.; Alao, Eragbae O.

    2013-01-01

    Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a major component of fuel generator fumes. Carcinogenicity of these compounds has long been established. In this study, 37 Swiss albino rats were exposed to generator fumes at varied distances for 8 hours per day for a period of 42 days and the level of 1-hydroxypyrene in their blood was evaluated. This study also tried to correlate the level of blood 1-hyroxypyrene with the distance from the source of pollution. Plasma was collected by centrifuging the whole blood sample followed by complete hydrolysis of the conjugated 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide to yield the analyte of interest, 1-hydroxypyrene, which was achieved using beta glucuronidase. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detector was used to determine the 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations in the blood samples. The mobile phase was water:methanol (12:88 v/v) isocratic run at the flow rate of 1.2 mL/min with CI8 stationary phase at 250 nm. After 42 days of exposure, blood concentration level of 1-hydroxypyrene ranged from 34 μg/mL to 26.29 μg/mL depending on the distance from source of exposure. The control group had no 1-hydroxypyrene in their blood. After the period of exposure, percentage of death correlated with the distance from the source of exposure. Percentage of death ranged from 56% to zero depending on the proximity to source of pollution. PMID:24179393

  18. High level white noise generator

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  19. Arsenic, internal cancers, and issues in inference from studies of low-level exposures in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, Kenneth P. Lubin, Jay H.

    2007-08-01

    Epidemiologic data from regions of the world with very high levels of arsenic in drinking water (> 150 {mu}g/L) show a strong association between arsenic exposure and risk of several internal cancers. A causal interpretation of the data is warranted based on the strength and consistency of study findings. At lower levels of exposure (< 100 {mu}g/L), in the absence of unambiguous human data, extrapolation from the high-exposure studies has been used to estimate risk. Misclassification of exposure usually results in depressing observed levels of risk, and studies conducted in populations with exposures below 100 {mu}g/L have been limited by the challenge of estimating past exposures, a critically important aspect of studying relative small increases in risk. Relatively small study size contributes to the variability of findings in most studies and makes interpretation of results all the more challenging. The effects on risk estimates of exposure misclassification and small study size under various scenarios are graphically illustrated. Efforts are underway to improve exposure assessment in a large case-control study of bladder cancer in a region of the United States with moderately elevated levels of arsenic in drinking water.

  20. Personal exposure to ultrafine particles: Two-level statistical modeling of background exposure and time-activity patterns during three seasons.

    PubMed

    Deffner, Veronika; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Maier, Verena; Pitz, Mike; Cyrys, Josef; Breitner, Susanne; Schneider, Alexandra; Gu, Jianwei; Geruschkat, Uta; Peters, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Personal exposure to air pollution is associated with time- and location-specific factors including indoor and outdoor air pollution, meteorology and time activities. Our investigation aims at the description and identification of factors determining personal exposure to particle number concentration (PNC) in everyday situations. Ten volunteers recorded their personal exposure to PNC and kept an activity diary in three different seasons besides stationary measurements of ambient air pollution and meteorology. Background exposure to PNC was modelled using the most predictive variables. In a second step, the effects of the activities were calculated adjusted for the background exposure. The average personal PNC level was highest in winter and was three times higher than the mean stationary PNC level while staying indoors and two times higher while staying outdoors. Personal indoor PNC levels were significantly increased during the use of candles, cooking and the occurrence of smell of food. High stationary outdoor PNC levels and low dew point temperatures were associated with increased personal outdoor PNC levels. Times spent in public transport were associated with lower personal PNC levels than other times spent in transportation. Personal PNC levels in everyday situations exhibited a large variability because of seasonal, microenvironment-specific and activity-specific influences. PMID:25407347

  1. Aflatoxin levels and exposure assessment of Spanish infant cereals.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Raquel; Navarro-Blasco, Iñigo

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2) are immunosuppressant, mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic agents with a widespread presence in foodstuffs. Since human exposure to aflatoxins occurs primarily by contaminated food intake, and given the greater susceptibility of infants to their adverse effects, the quantification of these mycotoxins in infant food based on cereals is of relevance. Aflatoxin levels were determined in 91 Spanish infant cereals classified in terms of non- and organically produced and several types from 10 different manufacturers, using a extraction procedure followed by inmunoaffinity column clean-up step and HPLC with fluorescence detection (FLD) and post-column derivatisation (Kobra Cell system). Daily aflatoxin intake was also assessed. Preliminary analysis showed a valuable incidence of detected infant cereal samples at an upper concentration level than the detection limit for total aflatoxin (66%), corresponding to a 46, 40, 34 and 11% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. Lower aflatoxin values (median, Q1, Q3) in conventional infant cereal (n = 74, AFB1: levels. Gluten-free and cereals with dehydrated fruits had an intermediate level and milk- or honey-based cereals and multi-cereals contained the lowest levels. With the exception of the non-compliant cocoa-based organic formulation

  2. Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Gombert

    2005-09-01

    If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being

  3. Low-level arsenic exposure: Nutritional and dietary predictors in first-grade Uruguayan children.

    PubMed

    Kordas, Katarzyna; Queirolo, Elena I; Mañay, Nelly; Peregalli, Fabiana; Hsiao, Pao Ying; Lu, Ying; Vahter, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic exposure in children is a public health concern but is understudied in relation to the predictors, and effects of low-level exposure. We examined the extent and dietary predictors of exposure to inorganic arsenic in 5-8 year old children from Montevideo, Uruguay. Children were recruited at school; 357 were enrolled, 328 collected morning urine samples, and 317 had two 24-h dietary recalls. Urinary arsenic metabolites, i.e. inorganic arsenic (iAs), methylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICP-MS), and the sum concentration (U-As) used for exposure assessment. Proportions of arsenic metabolites (%iAs, %MMA and %DMA) in urine were modelled in OLS regressions as functions of food groups, dietary patterns, nutrient intake, and nutritional status. Exposure to arsenic was low (median U-As: 9.9µg/L) and household water (water As: median 0.45µg/L) was not a major contributor to exposure. Children with higher consumption of rice had higher U-As but lower %iAs, %MMA, and higher %DMA. Children with higher meat consumption had lower %iAs and higher %DMA. Higher scores on "nutrient dense" dietary pattern were related to lower %iAs and %MMA, and higher %DMA. Higher intake of dietary folate was associated with lower %MMA and higher %DMA. Overweight children had lower %MMA and higher %DMA than normal-weight children. In summary, rice was an important predictor of exposure to inorganic arsenic and DMA. Higher meat and folate consumption, diet rich in green leafy and red-orange vegetables and eggs, and higher BMI contributed to higher arsenic methylation capacity. PMID:26828624

  4. Domestic exposure to fungi and total serum IgE levels in asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Su, Huey-Jen Jenny; Wu, Pei-Chih; Lei, Huan-Yao; Wang, Jiu-Yao

    2005-08-14

    We measured the number of airborne, viable fungi and house dust mite (HDM) allergen levels in the homes of a group of asthmatic children. Blood samples were drawn and the amounts of total and specific serum IgE were determined. The association between the number of fungal colonies, dust mite allergen exposure, and specific and total IgE was evaluated. The number of viable airborne fungi was high (20,543 CFU/m(3)) in those investigated houses. Der p1 concentrations on child's mattress exceeding 2 microg/g were found in 78.6% of the houses. A quantitative dose-response relationship was demonstrated between the exposure to viable, airborne molds and the amount of total IgE (r = 0.4399 and P = .0249) and the level was further increased in children with coexposure to viable fungi and HDM. PMID:16106103

  5. Lead level in seminal plasma may affect semen quality for men without occupational exposure to lead

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infertility affects approximately 10–15% of reproductive-age couples. Poor semen quality contributes to about 25% of infertile cases. Resulting from the direct effect on testicular function or hormonal alterations, heavy metals exposure has been related to impaired semen quality. The objective of this study was to assess the level of lead in the seminal plasma in men without occupational exposure to lead, and to determine the relationship between semen quality and lead concentration in the semen. Methods This is a prospective and nonrandomized clinical study conducted in University infertility clinic and academic research laboratory. Three hundred and forty-one male partners of infertile couples undergoing infertility evaluation and management were recruited to the study. Semen samples collected for the analyses of semen quality were also used for the measurement of lead concentrations. Semen samples were evaluated according to the WHO standards. Results All subjects were married and from infertile couples without occupational exposure to lead. There is a significant inverse correlation between the lead concentration in seminal plasma and sperm count. A higher semen lead concentration was correlated with lower sperm count, but not with semen volume, sperm motility or sperm morphology as assessed by simple linear regression. Conclusions We found that semen lead concentration was significantly higher among the patients with lower sperm count. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that a high level of lead accumulation in semen may reduce the sperm count contributing to infertility of men without occupational exposure to lead. PMID:23137356

  6. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE EXPOSURES - WHERE ARE THE HIGH RISK CHILDREN?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to identify children at high-risk for organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure are difficult to develop because biological markers reflect only recent "snapshots" of exposure due to the short half-life of OP compounds (generally about 24 hours). We conducted a series of p...

  7. Effects of Low-Level Blast Exposure on the Nervous System: Is There Really a Controversy?

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Gregory A.; Stone, James R.; Ahlers, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    High-pressure blast waves can cause extensive CNS injury in human beings. However, in combat settings, such as Iraq and Afghanistan, lower level exposures associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or subclinical exposure have been much more common. Yet controversy exists concerning what traits can be attributed to low-level blast, in large part due to the difficulty of distinguishing blast-related mTBI from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We describe how TBI is defined in human beings and the problems posed in using current definitions to recognize blast-related mTBI. We next consider the problem of applying definitions of human mTBI to animal models, in particular that TBI severity in human beings is defined in relation to alteration of consciousness at the time of injury, which typically cannot be assessed in animals. However, based on outcome assessments, a condition of “low-level” blast exposure can be defined in animals that likely approximates human mTBI or subclinical exposure. We review blast injury modeling in animals noting that inconsistencies in experimental approach have contributed to uncertainty over the effects of low-level blast. Yet, animal studies show that low-level blast pressure waves are transmitted to the brain. In brain, low-level blast exposures cause behavioral, biochemical, pathological, and physiological effects on the nervous system including the induction of PTSD-related behavioral traits in the absence of a psychological stressor. We review the relationship of blast exposure to chronic neurodegenerative diseases noting the paradoxical lowering of Abeta by blast, which along with other observations suggest that blast-related TBI is pathophysiologically distinct from non-blast TBI. Human neuroimaging studies show that blast-related mTBI is associated with a variety of chronic effects that are unlikely to be explained by co-morbid PTSD. We conclude that abundant evidence supports low-level blast as having long

  8. High temperature liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

  9. Possible health risks from low level exposure to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Stange, A W; Hilmas, D E; Furman, F J

    1996-07-17

    The first case of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) was diagnosed in a machinist in 1984. Rocky Flats, located 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado, is part of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex. Research and development operations using beryllium began at Rocky Flats in 1953, and beryllium production operations began in 1957. Exposures could have occurred during foundry operations, casting, shearing, rolling, cutting, welding, machining, sanding, polishing, assembly, and chemical analysis operations. The Beryllium Health Surveillance Program (BHSP) was established in June 1991 at Rocky Flats to provide health surveillance for beryllium exposed employees using the Lymphocyte Proliferation Test (LPT) to identify sensitized individuals. Of the 29 cases of CBD and 76 cases of beryllium sensitization identified since 1991, several cases appear to have had only minimal opportunistic exposures to beryllium, since they were employed in administrative functions rather than primary beryllium operations. In conjunction with other health surveillance programs, a questionnaire and interview are administered to obtain detailed work and health histories. These histories, along with other data, are utilized to estimate the extent of an individual's exposure. Additional surveillance is in progress to attempt to characterize the possible risks from intermittent or brief exposures to beryllium in the workplace. PMID:8711738

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyl sources, environmental levels, and exposures in school buildings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Building materials and components containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were used in some U.S. school buildings until the late 1970s and may be present today. There is limited information on source factors and occupant exposures. Methods: Analysis of PCBs in mat...

  11. Hair mercury levels in pregnant women in Mahshahr, Iran: fish consumption as a determinant of exposure.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Zohreh; Esmaili-Sari, Abbas

    2010-09-15

    MeHg is a well-documented neurotoxicant even at low levels of exposure. Developing brain, in particular, is vulnerable to that. Through bioaccumulating to differing degrees in various fish species, it can have serious adverse effects on the development and functioning of the human central nervous system, especially during prenatal exposure. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate mercury concentration in hair samples of pregnant women living in Mahshahr located in Khuzestan province, Iran. It assessed the association between fish consumption and specific characteristics that can influence exposure. From April to June 2008, 149 pregnant women were invited to participate in this study. An interview administered questionnaire was used to collect information about age, body weight, height, fish (fresh, canned and shrimp) consumption, pregnancy stage, residence duration, education level, family income and number of dental amalgam fillings. The obtained results showed that the geometric mean and range for hair total Hg concentration was 3.52 microg/g (0.44-53.56 microg/g). About 5.4% of mothers had hair total Hg levels in excess of 10 microg/g. Maternal hair mercury level was less than threshold level of WHO (5 microg/g). As expected, there was a clear increase in hair Hg with reported fresh marine fish consumption (p=0.04). The highest mean for hair mercury level in a group who consumed fish several times per week, was 4.93 microg/g. Moreover, a significant effect of age and residential time on Hg concentration in the hair of the women was found. Pregnant women in Mahshahr consumed large amounts of fish; consequently, most of their offspring were prenatally exposed to moderately high levels of mercury. The results found suggest that pregnant women should decrease their fish consumption. PMID:20655095

  12. Expression levels of neuroimmune biomarkers in hypothalamus of allergic mice after phthalate exposure.

    PubMed

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Yanagisawa, Rie; Koike, Eiko; Nitta, Hiroshi; Takano, Hirohisa

    2013-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that maternal exposure to phthalates enhances atopic dermatitis in male mouse offspring. However, whether phthalate exposure affects neuroimmune biomarkers in allergic mice has not yet been studied. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-isononyl phthalate (DINP) are environmental chemicals that are commonly used as plasticizers. This study was designed to investigate the expression levels of neuroimmune biomarkers in the hypothalamus of a murine model of allergic asthma after phthalate exposure throughout juvenility until adulthood. Six-week-old C3H/HeJ Jcl male mice were treated with DEHP or DINP (0, 0.02, 0.4 or 8 nmol per body per week) and ovalbumin (OVA; 1 µg per body per 2 weeks) for 7 weeks intratracheally. On the day after the completion of the phthalate and OVA treatment, the hypothalamus from each mouse was collected, and the mRNA expression levels of neuroimmune biomarkers were examined using a real-time RT-PCR analysis. The mRNA expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, the chemokine CCL3, the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB, the oxidative stress marker heme-oxygenase (HO)1, a nerve growth factor, and the microglia marker Iba1 were remarkably up-regulated in the hypothalami of mice treated with 8 nmol of DEHP in the presence of the allergen. However, no significant changes were observed, except for reductions in the TNF-α and CCL2 mRNA levels, in mice exposed to DINP combined with the allergen. This study is the first report to show that high-dose DEHP exposure throughout juvenility until adulthood may induce neuroinflammation by modulating neuroimmune biomarkers in the hypothalami of allergic mice. PMID:23148021

  13. Nutritional aspects of high-altitude exposure in women.

    PubMed

    Hannon, J P; Klain, G J; Sudman, D M; Sullivan, F J

    1976-06-01

    The nutrient intake and urinary excretion characteristics of eight young university women were studied over a 4-day period at low altitude (140 m) and subsequently over a 7-day sojourn on Pikes Peak (4,300 m). High-altitude exposure was associated with a transient decrease in the consumption of protein, carbohydrate, fat, sodium, calcium, phosphorus, vitamin A, riboflavin, thiamin, and niacin and a more sustained decrease in the consumption of potassium and ascorbic acid. In most instances minimal values were observed during the first 3 days of exposure. The carbohydrate fraction of energy intake was increased at the expense of fat during this time period. Individual hypophagic responses appeared to be related to severity of acute mountain sickness. Altitude had no effect on water consumption but did lead to an average body weight loss of 1 kg. Urinary measurements revealed a marked oliguria during the entire sojourn. These measurements also showed the first 3 days to be associated with a net loss of body nitrogen and sodium. During this time period body potassium and phosphorus were conserved, and probably increased. The urea fraction of body potassium and phosphorus were conserved, and probably increased. The urea fraction of total urinary nitrogen was not affected by altitude exposure, nor was the daily excretion of uric acid and creatinine. Ammonia excretion, however, was reduced to 50% of the low-altitude value and remained at this level throughout the sojourn. With a few exceptions, the qualitative characteristics of altitude hypophagia in women were similar to those reported for men. Quantitatively, however, the responses were much more transient in women. PMID:1064332

  14. Increased Levels of 8-Hydroxy-2′-Deoxyguanosine Attributable to Carcinogenic Metal Exposure among Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ruey-Hong; Kuo, Chung-Yih; Hsu, Ming-Lin; Wang, Tsun-Yen; Chang, Pi-I; Wu, Tsung-Hsun; Huang, Shuai

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic, chromium, and nickel are reported in several epidemiologic studies to be associated with lung cancer. However, the health effects of arsenic, chromium, and nickel exposures are equivocal for children. Therefore, we performed a cross-sectional study to investigate possible associations between the internal concentrations of arsenic, chromium, and nickel and the level of oxidative stress to DNA in children. We measured urinary levels of arsenic, chromium, and nickel for 142 nonsmoking children using atomic absorption spectrometry. As a biomarker for oxidative stress, urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels were analyzed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. The median urinary 8-OHdG level for our subjects was 11.7 ng/mg creatinine. No obvious relationship between the levels of urinary nickel and 8-OHdG was found. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that children with higher urinary chromium had greater urinary 8-OHdG than did those with lower urinary chromium. Similarly, subjects with higher urinary arsenic had greater urinary 8-OHdG than did those with lower urinary arsenic. Furthermore, children with both high urinary arsenic and high urinary chromium had the highest 8-OHdG levels (mean ± SE, 16.0 ± 1.3; vs. low arsenic/low chromium, p < 0.01) in urine, followed by those with low arsenic/high chromium (13.7 ± 1.6; vs. low arsenic/low chromium, p = 0.25), high arsenic/low chromium (12.9 ± 1.6 vs. low arsenic/low chromium, p = 0.52), and low arsenic/low chromium (11.5 ± 1.3); the trend was significant (p < 0.001). Thus, environmental carcinogenic metal exposure to chromium and arsenic may play an important role in oxidative DNA damage to children. PMID:16203252

  15. Estimating Margin of Exposure to Thyroid Peroxidase Inhibitors Using High-Throughput in vitro Data, High-Throughput Exposure Modeling, and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Jeremy A; Tan, Yu-Mei; Gilbert, Mary; Isaacs, Kristin; El-Masri, Hisham

    2016-05-01

    Some pharmaceuticals and environmental chemicals bind the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) enzyme and disrupt thyroid hormone production. The potential for TPO inhibition is a function of both the binding affinity and concentration of the chemical within the thyroid gland. The former can be determined through in vitro assays, and the latter is influenced by pharmacokinetic properties, along with environmental exposure levels. In this study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was integrated with a pharmacodynamic (PD) model to establish internal doses capable of inhibiting TPO in relation to external exposure levels predicted through exposure modeling. The PBPK/PD model was evaluated using published serum or thyroid gland chemical concentrations or circulating thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) hormone levels measured in rats and humans. After evaluation, the model was used to estimate human equivalent intake doses resulting in reduction of T4 and T3 levels by 10% (ED10) for 6 chemicals of varying TPO-inhibiting potencies. These chemicals were methimazole, 6-propylthiouracil, resorcinol, benzophenone-2, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, and triclosan. Margin of exposure values were estimated for these chemicals using the ED10 and predicted population exposure levels for females of child-bearing age. The modeling approach presented here revealed that examining hazard or exposure alone when prioritizing chemicals for risk assessment may be insufficient, and that consideration of pharmacokinetic properties is warranted. This approach also provides a mechanism for integrating in vitro data, pharmacokinetic properties, and exposure levels predicted through high-throughput means when interpreting adverse outcome pathways based on biological responses. PMID:26865668

  16. Low level exposure to the flame retardant BDE-209 reduces thyroid hormone levels and disrupts thyroid signaling in fathead minnows

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Pamela D.; Lema, Sean C.; Macaulay, Laura J.; Douglas, Nora K.; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2013-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormone regulation, neurodevelopment, and reproduction in some animals. However, effects of the most heavily used PBDE, decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), on thyroid functioning remain unclear. This study examined low-dose effects of BDE-209 on thyroid hormone levels and signaling in fathead minnows. Adult males received dietary exposures of BDE-209 at a low dose (~3 ng/g bw-day) and high dose (~300 ng/g bw-day) for 28 days followed by a 14-day depuration to evaluate recovery. Compared to controls, fish exposed to the low dose for 28 days experienced a 53% and 46% decline in circulating total thyroxine (TT4) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (TT3), respectively, while TT4 and TT3 deficits at the high dose were 59% and 62%. Brain deiodinase activity (T4-ORD) was reduced by ~65% at both doses. BDE-209 elevated the relative mRNA expression of genes encoding deiodinases, nuclear thyroid receptors, and membrane transporters in the brain and liver in patterns that varied with time and dose, likely in compensation to hypothyroidism. Declines in the gonadal-somatic index (GSI) and increased mortality were also measured. Effects at the low dose were consistent with the high dose, suggesting non-linear relationships between BDE-209 exposures and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:23899252

  17. Exposure Time Optimization for Highly Dynamic Star Trackers

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xinguo; Tan, Wei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Under highly dynamic conditions, the star-spots on the image sensor of a star tracker move across many pixels during the exposure time, which will reduce star detection sensitivity and increase star location errors. However, this kind of effect can be compensated well by setting an appropriate exposure time. This paper focuses on how exposure time affects the star tracker under highly dynamic conditions and how to determine the most appropriate exposure time for this case. Firstly, the effect of exposure time on star detection sensitivity is analyzed by establishing the dynamic star-spot imaging model. Then the star location error is deduced based on the error analysis of the sub-pixel centroiding algorithm. Combining these analyses, the effect of exposure time on attitude accuracy is finally determined. Some simulations are carried out to validate these effects, and the results show that there are different optimal exposure times for different angular velocities of a star tracker with a given configuration. In addition, the results of night sky experiments using a real star tracker agree with the simulation results. The summarized regularities in this paper should prove helpful in the system design and dynamic performance evaluation of the highly dynamic star trackers. PMID:24618776

  18. Exposure time optimization for highly dynamic star trackers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xinguo; Tan, Wei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Under highly dynamic conditions, the star-spots on the image sensor of a star tracker move across many pixels during the exposure time, which will reduce star detection sensitivity and increase star location errors. However, this kind of effect can be compensated well by setting an appropriate exposure time. This paper focuses on how exposure time affects the star tracker under highly dynamic conditions and how to determine the most appropriate exposure time for this case. Firstly, the effect of exposure time on star detection sensitivity is analyzed by establishing the dynamic star-spot imaging model. Then the star location error is deduced based on the error analysis of the sub-pixel centroiding algorithm. Combining these analyses, the effect of exposure time on attitude accuracy is finally determined. Some simulations are carried out to validate these effects, and the results show that there are different optimal exposure times for different angular velocities of a star tracker with a given configuration. In addition, the results of night sky experiments using a real star tracker agree with the simulation results. The summarized regularities in this paper should prove helpful in the system design and dynamic performance evaluation of the highly dynamic star trackers. PMID:24618776

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL MANGANESE: GUIDELINE EXPOSURE LEVELS, EVIDENCE OF HEALTH EFFECTS AND RESEARCH NEEDS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction. The ubiquitous element, manganese (Mn), is an essential nutrient, but toxic at excessive exposure levels. The US EPA, therefore, set guideline levels for Mn exposure through inhalation (reference concentration-RfC=0.05 g/m3) and ingestion (reference dose-RfD=0.14 m...

  20. High-Level Data Races

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artho, Cyrille; Havelund, Klaus; Biere, Armin; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Data races are a common problem in concurrent and multi-threaded programming. They are hard to detect without proper tool support. Despite the successful application of these tools, experience shows that the notion of data race is not powerful enough to capture certain types of inconsistencies occurring in practice. In this paper we investigate data races on a higher abstraction layer. This enables us to detect inconsistent uses of shared variables, even if no classical race condition occurs. For example, a data structure representing a coordinate pair may have to be treated atomically. By lifting the meaning of a data race to a higher level, such problems can now be covered. The paper defines the concepts view and view consistency to give a notation for this novel kind of property. It describes what kinds of errors can be detected with this new definition, and where its limitations are. It also gives a formal guideline for using data structures in a multi-threading environment.

  1. Prenatal exposure to perfluorinated compounds affects thyroid hormone levels in newborn girls.

    PubMed

    Shah-Kulkarni, Surabhi; Kim, Byung-Mi; Hong, Yun-Chul; Kim, Hae Soon; Kwon, Eun Jin; Park, Hyesook; Kim, Young Ju; Ha, Eun-Hee

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are ubiquitous in the environment and have been detected in humans and wildlife. Exposure to PFCs has decreased in the United States recently, while exposure to PFCs continues in Asian countries, which represents a public health concern. Various mechanisms by which PFCs affect fetal growth have been proposed, such as activation of peroxisome proliferators, disruption of thyroid hormones and changes in lipid metabolism. However, the overall evidence for an association with thyroid hormones is not strong. Therefore, we examined the effect of various prenatal PFCs on cord blood thyroid hormones: triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels, and explored the endocrine disrupting effect of these PFCs on thyroid hormone levels in children according to gender. Two hundred and seventy-nine study participants were selected from among the enrolled participants in the Ewha Birth & Growth Retrospective Cohort, a retrospective birth cohort study conducted at Ewha Womans University Hospital, Seoul, Korea between 2006 and 2010. A generalized linear model was constructed to explore the association of PFCs and thyroid hormones. Further, an analysis stratified by gender was conducted. Our study shows that cord blood perfluoro n-pentanoic acid (PFPeA) was positively associated with cord blood T4 (p=0.01) level. Gender-specific analysis showed that prenatal PFCs: PFPeA and Perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) exposure significantly increased T4 (p<0.01) and T3 (p=0.03), respectively, while perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) decreased TSH (p=0.04) concentration in newborn girls. Thus, prenatal PFC exposure may disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis. Thyroid hormones play a crucial role in fetal development and may have gender specific action. Hence, these results are of utmost importance in high-risk groups, such as pregnant women and children. PMID:27395336

  2. Global Projection of Coastal Exposure Associated with Sea-level Rise beyond Tipping Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawatari, R.; Miyazaki, C.; Iseri, Y.; Kiguchi, M.; Kanae, S.

    2015-12-01

    Sea-level rise due to global warming becomes a great matter of concern for global coastal area. Additionally, it has reported in fifth report of IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) that deglaciation of Greenland ice sheet and Antarctic ice sheet would occur rapidly and enhance sea-level rise if temperature passes certain "Tipping point". In terms of projecting damage induced by sea-level rise globally, some previous studies focused on duration until mainly 2100. Furthermore long-term estimations on centuries to millennial climatic response of the ice sheets which are supposed to be triggered within this or next century would be also important to think about future climate and lifestyle in coastal . In this study, I estimated the long term sea-level which take into account the tipping points of Greenland ice sheet (1.4℃) as sum of 4 factors (thermal expansion, glacier and ice cap, Greenland ice sheet, Antarctic ice sheet). The sea-level follows 4 representative concentration pathways up to 3000 obtained through literature reviewing since there were limited available sea-level projections up to 3000. I also estimated a number of affected population lives in coastal area up to 3000 with using the estimated sea-level. The cost for damage, adaptation and mitigation would be also discussed. These estimations would be useful when decision-makers propose policies for construction of dikes and proposing mitigation plans for sustainable future. The result indicates there would be large and relatively rapid increases in both sea-level rise and coastal exposure if global mean temperature passes the tipping point of Greenland ice sheet. However the tipping points, melting rate and timescale of response are highly uncertain and still discussed among experts. Thus more precise and credible information is required for further accurate estimation of long-term sea-level rise and population exposure in the future.

  3. Chronic low-level domoic acid exposure alters gene transcription and impairs mitochondrial function in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Hiolski, Emma M; Kendrick, Preston S; Frame, Elizabeth R; Myers, Mark S; Bammler, Theo K; Beyer, Richard P; Farin, Federico M; Wilkerson, Hui-wen; Smith, Donald R; Marcinek, David J; Lefebvre, Kathi A

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid is an algal-derived seafood toxin that functions as a glutamate agonist and exerts excitotoxicity via overstimulation of glutamate receptors (AMPA, NMDA) in the central nervous system (CNS). At high (symptomatic) doses, domoic acid is well-known to cause seizures, brain lesions and memory loss; however, a significant knowledge gap exists regarding the health impacts of repeated low-level (asymptomatic) exposure. Here, we investigated the impacts of low-level repetitive domoic acid exposure on gene transcription and mitochondrial function in the vertebrate CNS using a zebrafish model in order to: 1) identify transcriptional biomarkers of exposure; and 2) examine potential pathophysiology that may occur in the absence of overt excitotoxic symptoms. We found that transcription of genes related to neurological function and development were significantly altered, and that asymptomatic exposure impaired mitochondrial function. Interestingly, the transcriptome response was highly-variable across the exposure duration (36 weeks), with little to no overlap of specific genes across the six exposure time points (2, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 weeks). Moreover, there were no apparent similarities at any time point with the gene transcriptome profile exhibited by the glud1 mouse model of chronic moderate excess glutamate release. These results suggest that although the fundamental mechanisms of toxicity may be similar, gene transcriptome responses to domoic acid exposure do not extrapolate well between different exposure durations. However, the observed impairment of mitochondrial function based on respiration rates and mitochondrial protein content suggests that repetitive low-level exposure does have fundamental cellular level impacts that could contribute to chronic health consequences. PMID:25033243

  4. Analysis of breast milk to assess exposure to chlorinated contaminants in Kazakstan: high levels of 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in agricultural villages of southern Kazakstan.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, K; Petreas, M X; Chuvakova, T; Kazbekova, G; Druz, N; Seminova, G; Sharmanov, T; Hayward, D; She, J; Visita, P; Winkler, J; McKinney, M; Wade, T J; Grassman, J; Stephens, R D

    1998-01-01

    To assess levels of chlorinated contaminants in breast milk, we measured organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in breast milk samples collected in 1994 according to the World Health Organization protocol from 92 donors that were representative of regional populations in southern Kazakstan. High levels (10-120 pg/g fat) of 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most toxic of the PCDD/PCDF congeners, were found in breast milk samples from an agricultural region. TCDD was the major contributor (75%) to the international toxicity equivalents of these samples. The same distinctive PCDD/PCDF congener pattern was found in 15 breast milk samples and 4 serum samples collected in 1996 in a follow-up study, and has now been confirmed by three analytical laboratories. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9831540

  5. Exposure to aerosols during high-pressure cleaning and relationship with health effects.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Anne Mette; Matthiesen, Christoffer B

    2013-01-01

    In different occupations cleaning has been identified as the work task causing the highest exposure to aerosol components. High pressure cleaning (hpc) is a cleaning method used in many environments and seems to be considered as a cleaning method causing high exposure. In the presented study, the literature concerning exposure to aerosols during hpc is reviewed. Only a few studies have been published about exposure to aerosols during hpc. Exposure during hpc has been measured on farms, at waste water treatment plants, at a chemical factory and for graffiti removers. High exposures to bacterial endotoxin or chemical components were found in these environments during hpc. Few cases have been published documenting acute health effects caused by exposure to microorganisms and endotoxin during hpc. High pressure cleaners are also used in private settings but no papers have been found about exposure or related health effects during work in private settings. The use of clean water during hpc is important since effluent water or roof-collected rain water can cause a higher exposure to bioaerosols and related health effects. However, tap water in some areas also seems to have a high content of endotoxin, and this too should be considered when deliberating the protection of the airways of workers. Different attempts have been made to reduce workers' exposure and the health effects of exposure during hpc, among them the use of respiratory protection, ventilation and automation of work processes have been used with some degree of success. However, some of these studies only show tendencies. A high number of repeats seem to be necessary in order to obtain conclusive results. The material to be cleaned, as well as the degree of dirtiness, highly influences the exposure level; therefore, in comparative studies it is important also to consider these parameters. No study has been found which compares exposure during the use of different high pressure cleaners. The comparison of

  6. Aircraft noise exposure affects rat behavior, plasma norepinephrine levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Di, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Bing; Li, Zheng-Guang; Lin, Qi-Li

    2011-12-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effects of airport noise exposure on organisms, in this study, we exposed Sprague-Dawley rats in soundproof chambers to previously recorded aircraft-related noise for 65 d. For comparison, we also used unexposed control rats. Noise was arranged according to aircraft flight schedules and was adjusted to its weighted equivalent continuous perceived noise levels (L(WECPN)) of 75 and 80 dB for the two experimental groups. We examined rat behaviors through an open field test and measured the concentrations of plasma norepinephrine (NE) by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD). We also examined the morphologies of neurons and synapses in the temporal lobe by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results showed that rats exposed to airport noise of 80 dB had significantly lower line crossing number (P<0.05) and significantly longer center area duration (P<0.05) than control animals. After 29 d of airport noise exposure, the concentration of plasma NE of exposed rats was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). We also determined that the neuron and synapsis of the temporal lobe of rats showed signs of damage after aircraft noise of 80 dB exposure for 65 d. In conclusion, exposing rats to long-term aircraft noise affects their behaviors, plasma NE levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe. PMID:22135145

  7. Coastal Vertebrate Exposure to Predicted Habitat Changes Due to Sea Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Elizabeth A.; Nibbelink, Nathan P.; Alexander, Clark R.; Barrett, Kyle; Mengak, Lara F.; Guy, Rachel K.; Moore, Clinton T.; Cooper, Robert J.

    2015-12-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) may degrade habitat for coastal vertebrates in the Southeastern United States, but it is unclear which groups or species will be most exposed to habitat changes. We assessed 28 coastal Georgia vertebrate species for their exposure to potential habitat changes due to SLR using output from the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model and information on the species' fundamental niches. We assessed forecasted habitat change up to the year 2100 using three structural habitat metrics: total area, patch size, and habitat permanence. Almost all of the species ( n = 24) experienced negative habitat changes due to SLR as measured by at least one of the metrics. Salt marsh and ocean beach habitats experienced the most change (out of 16 categorical land cover types) across the three metrics and species that used salt marsh extensively (rails and marsh sparrows) were ranked highest for exposure to habitat changes. Species that nested on ocean beaches (Diamondback Terrapins, shorebirds, and terns) were also ranked highly, but their use of other foraging habitats reduced their overall exposure. Future studies on potential effects of SLR on vertebrates in southeastern coastal ecosystems should focus on the relative importance of different habitat types to these species' foraging and nesting requirements. Our straightforward prioritization approach is applicable to other coastal systems and can provide insight to managers on which species to focus resources, what components of their habitats need to be protected, and which locations in the study area will provide habitat refuges in the face of SLR.

  8. Aircraft noise exposure affects rat behavior, plasma norepinephrine levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe*

    PubMed Central

    Di, Guo-qing; Zhou, Bing; Li, Zheng-guang; Lin, Qi-li

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effects of airport noise exposure on organisms, in this study, we exposed Sprague-Dawley rats in soundproof chambers to previously recorded aircraft-related noise for 65 d. For comparison, we also used unexposed control rats. Noise was arranged according to aircraft flight schedules and was adjusted to its weighted equivalent continuous perceived noise levels (L WECPN) of 75 and 80 dB for the two experimental groups. We examined rat behaviors through an open field test and measured the concentrations of plasma norepinephrine (NE) by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD). We also examined the morphologies of neurons and synapses in the temporal lobe by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results showed that rats exposed to airport noise of 80 dB had significantly lower line crossing number (P<0.05) and significantly longer center area duration (P<0.05) than control animals. After 29 d of airport noise exposure, the concentration of plasma NE of exposed rats was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). We also determined that the neuron and synapsis of the temporal lobe of rats showed signs of damage after aircraft noise of 80 dB exposure for 65 d. In conclusion, exposing rats to long-term aircraft noise affects their behaviors, plasma NE levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe. PMID:22135145

  9. Coastal Vertebrate Exposure to Predicted Habitat Changes Due to Sea Level Rise.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Elizabeth A; Nibbelink, Nathan P; Alexander, Clark R; Barrett, Kyle; Mengak, Lara F; Guy, Rachel K; Moore, Clinton T; Cooper, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) may degrade habitat for coastal vertebrates in the Southeastern United States, but it is unclear which groups or species will be most exposed to habitat changes. We assessed 28 coastal Georgia vertebrate species for their exposure to potential habitat changes due to SLR using output from the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model and information on the species' fundamental niches. We assessed forecasted habitat change up to the year 2100 using three structural habitat metrics: total area, patch size, and habitat permanence. Almost all of the species (n = 24) experienced negative habitat changes due to SLR as measured by at least one of the metrics. Salt marsh and ocean beach habitats experienced the most change (out of 16 categorical land cover types) across the three metrics and species that used salt marsh extensively (rails and marsh sparrows) were ranked highest for exposure to habitat changes. Species that nested on ocean beaches (Diamondback Terrapins, shorebirds, and terns) were also ranked highly, but their use of other foraging habitats reduced their overall exposure. Future studies on potential effects of SLR on vertebrates in southeastern coastal ecosystems should focus on the relative importance of different habitat types to these species' foraging and nesting requirements. Our straightforward prioritization approach is applicable to other coastal systems and can provide insight to managers on which species to focus resources, what components of their habitats need to be protected, and which locations in the study area will provide habitat refuges in the face of SLR. PMID:26163199

  10. Coastal vertebrate exposure to predicted habitat changes due to sea level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Elizabeth A.; Nibbelink, Nathan P.; Alexander, Clark R.; Barrett, Kyle; Mengak, Lara F.; Guy, Rachel; Moore, Clinton; Cooper, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) may degrade habitat for coastal vertebrates in the Southeastern United States, but it is unclear which groups or species will be most exposed to habitat changes. We assessed 28 coastal Georgia vertebrate species for their exposure to potential habitat changes due to SLR using output from the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model and information on the species’ fundamental niches. We assessed forecasted habitat change up to the year 2100 using three structural habitat metrics: total area, patch size, and habitat permanence. Almost all of the species (n = 24) experienced negative habitat changes due to SLR as measured by at least one of the metrics. Salt marsh and ocean beach habitats experienced the most change (out of 16 categorical land cover types) across the three metrics and species that used salt marsh extensively (rails and marsh sparrows) were ranked highest for exposure to habitat changes. Species that nested on ocean beaches (Diamondback Terrapins, shorebirds, and terns) were also ranked highly, but their use of other foraging habitats reduced their overall exposure. Future studies on potential effects of SLR on vertebrates in southeastern coastal ecosystems should focus on the relative importance of different habitat types to these species’ foraging and nesting requirements. Our straightforward prioritization approach is applicable to other coastal systems and can provide insight to managers on which species to focus resources, what components of their habitats need to be protected, and which locations in the study area will provide habitat refuges in the face of SLR.

  11. High fertility level in Tibet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T

    1997-08-01

    This article presents a profile of fertility patterns in Tibet Autonomous Region for 1989. Data were obtained from the 1982 and 1990 China Censuses and from a 1988 fertility and contraception survey. Findings indicate that the total fertility rate (TFR) was 4.36 children/woman in 1989. TFR in Tibet is higher than in other provinces with a Tibetan population. Tibetan TFR was 4.07 among Tibetan women in Qinghai, 3.30 in Sichuan, 3.0 in Yunnan, and 2.8 in Gansu. TFR was 2.16 in Tibet's towns and 1.82 in Lhasa city, compared to 4.57 in counties. In Tibet, the birth rate rose from 31.05/1000 in 1981, to 31.14 in 1989. Ngari prefecture had an even higher birth rate of 35.67 in 1989. Other Tibetan prefectures had lower birth rates. During 1982-89, the birth rate declined to 26.19 in Lhasa City, to 29.36 in Shannan prefecture, and to 27.09 in Nagqu prefecture. Tibet's TFR fluctuated during 1950-57 between 3.20 and 3.80. It rose after 1958, from 4.0 to over 5.0, and remained high at 4.22 in 1989. TFR increased from older to younger women. The average number of live births also increased from older to younger women. This unusual feature is linked with high infertility and the number of women remaining celibate. Infertility was 17.7% among women aged 60-64 years, 14.8% among women aged 55-59, and 12.2% among women aged 50-54. 45.29% of women had parities of 1-2 children, ranging from 85.21% in the city, 77.92% in towns, and 42.20% in rural areas. The percentage of Tibetan women having 4 or more children was 5.82% in the city, 10.14% in towns, and 42.91% in rural areas. TFR was reversely correlated with educational status. TFR was highest among illiterates and semiliterates (4.59) and lowest for college educated women (1.28). Illiterate and semi-literate women comprised 13% of women with 4 children. PMID:12321529

  12. Salivary cortisol levels are elevated in the afternoon and at bedtime in children with prenatal alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Keiver, Kathy; Bertram, Chris P; Orr, Alison Pritchard; Clarren, Sterling

    2015-02-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can cause dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which may underlie some of the behavioral and adaptive problems seen in individuals with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Infants prenatally exposed to alcohol show altered basal and post-stress cortisol levels, but it is unknown if this persists beyond 2 years of age. It is also unknown if cortisol levels can be normalized through intervention programs. In this study, we investigated the effects of a physical activity program for children with FASD to determine: 1) if HPA dysregulation persists in school-age children with FASD, and 2) the effect of our program on cortisol levels. Twenty six children (ages 6-14 years) with FASD participated in an 8 week motor skill development program. Salivary cortisol levels were measured in 24 children and compared at 4 time points: before, immediately after, 3 months, and 1 year after program completion. Cortisol levels were also compared to 32 control children to evaluate the long-term effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on HPA regulation. For each time point, saliva was collected on each of 2 days at 3 times in the diurnal cycle: awakening, after school, and just before bedtime. Cortisol levels were significantly higher in the afternoon and at bedtime in children with FASD with confirmed prenatal exposure to high levels of alcohol (alcohol exposure rank 4), compared with Control children or children with FASD with exposure to low or unknown levels of alcohol (alcohol exposure rank 3). The program did not significantly affect cortisol levels in children with FASD as a group. These results provide support for long-term effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the HPA system in humans, which could increase vulnerability to mental health issues and diseases later in life. PMID:25583378

  13. Determinations of personal carbon monoxide exposure and blood carboxyhemoglobin levels in Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y; Park, S E; Lee, K; Yanagisawa, Y; Spengler, J D

    1994-12-01

    Determinant factors for personal carbon monoxide (CO) exposures were sought in Korea, where CO poisoning has been a major public health problem due to coal briquette (Yeontan) combustion for space heating and cooking. Personal 24-hr CO exposures of 15 housewives were measured by CO passive samplers on 2 days of the week (Wednesday and Sunday). Blood samples were taken to measure carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) just after the exposure sampling. Average CO exposure and COHb level were 5.6 ppm and 2.4%, respectively. Personal CO exposures as well as COHb levels were significantly increased by the use of Yeontan, especially on a weekday. Carboxyhemoglobin levels were closely related to the time between blood collection and replacement of Yeontan: the closer the blood collection was to replace Yeontan, the higher the COHb levels were. Assuming a background COHb of 1.34%, COHb increased on average by 1.8% with a 24-hr personal CO exposure of 10 ppm. The relationship between CO exposure and COHb level was provided by simultaneous direct measurements in real environment, although a measurement of COHb at the end of exposure could not represent previous 24-hr exposure thoroughly. PMID:7871846

  14. Association between Blood Dioxin Level and Chronic Kidney Disease in an Endemic Area of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Yuan; Wu, Cheng-Long; Wu, Jin-Shang; Chang, Jung-Wei; Cheng, Ya-Yun; Kuo, Yau-Chang; Yang, Yi-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Background Dioxin is an industrial pollutant related to various diseases, but epidemiological data on its effects on the kidney are limited. Therefore, we conducted a study to evaluate the association between dioxin exposure and chronic kidney disease (CKD) and identify the related factors. Methods We conducted a community-based cross-sectional study and recruited participants from an area where the residents were exposed to dioxin released from a factory. We defined a “high dioxin level” as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) ≥ 20 pg WHO98-TEQDF/g lipid in the serum and defined CKD as having an estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR) ≤ 60 mL/min/1.73m2 or a diagnosis of CKD by a physician. The renal function was assessed between 2005 and 2010, and we excluded those who had had kidney diseases before the study started. Comparisons between patients of CKD and those who did not have CKD were made to identify the risk factors for CKD. Results Of the 2898 participants, 1427 had high dioxin levels, and 156 had CKD. In the univariate analyses, CKD was associated with high dioxin levels, age, gender, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and high insulin and uric acid levels. After adjusting for other factors, we found high dioxin levels (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04–2.99), female gender (AOR = 1.74, 95%CI: 1.20–2.53), hypertension (AOR = 1.68, 95%CI: 1.17–2.42), high insulin levels (AOR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.26–3.61), high uric acid levels (AOR = 4.25, 95% CI: 2.92–6.20), and older age (AOR = 4.66, 95% CI: 1.87–11.62 for 40–64 year and AOR = 26.66, 95% CI: 10.51–67.62 for age ≥ 65 year) were independent predictors of CKD. Conclusion A high dioxin level was associated with an increased prevalence of CKD. Therefore, the kidney function of populations with exposure to dioxin should be monitored. PMID:26963719

  15. Towards a street-level pollen concentration and exposure forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Molen, Michiel; Krol, Maarten; van Vliet, Arnold; Heuvelink, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric pollen are an increasing source of nuisance for people in industrialised countries and are associated with significant cost of medication and sick leave. Citizen pollen warnings are often based on emission mapping based on local temperature sum approaches or on long-range atmospheric model approaches. In practise, locally observed pollen may originate from both local sources (plants in streets and gardens) and from long-range transport. We argue that making this distinction is relevant because the diurnal and spatial variation in pollen concentrations is much larger for pollen from local sources than for pollen from long-range transport due to boundary layer processes. This may have an important impact on exposure of citizens to pollen and on mitigation strategies. However, little is known about the partitioning of pollen into local and long-range origin categories. Our objective is to study how the concentrations of pollen from different sources vary temporally and spatially, and how the source region influences exposure and mitigation strategies. We built a Hay Fever Forecast system (HFF) based on WRF-chem, Allergieradar.nl, and geo-statistical downscaling techniques. HFF distinguishes between local (individual trees) and regional sources (based on tree distribution maps). We show first results on how the diurnal variation of pollen concentrations depends on source proximity. Ultimately, we will compare the model with local pollen counts, patient nuisance scores and medicine use.

  16. Fabrication of high exposure nuclear fuel pellets

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, James R.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for making a fuel pellet for a nuclear reactor. A mixture is prepared of PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 powders, where the mixture contains at least about 30% PuO.sub.2, and where at least about 12% of the Pu is the Pu.sup.240 isotope. To this mixture is added about 0.3 to about 5% of a binder having a melting point of at least about 250.degree. F. The mixture is pressed to form a slug and the slug is granulated. Up to about 4.7% of a lubricant having a melting point of at least about 330.degree. F. is added to the granulated slug. Both the binder and the lubricant are selected from a group consisting of polyvinyl carboxylate, polyvinyl alcohol, naturally occurring high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, chemically modified high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, and mixtures thereof. The mixture is pressed to form a pellet and the pellet is sintered.

  17. Failure of urinary trans,trans-muconic acid as a biomarker for indoor environmental benzene exposure at PPB levels.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, G; Accorsi, A; Barbieri, A; Raffi, G B; Violante, F S

    2001-08-24

    Benzene is a widespread pollutant whose main source in the environment is automotive emission. There is increasing interest in the exposure of the population to this pollutant as benzene is present also in the indoor environment due to cigarette smoke, drinking water, and food. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in an adult nonsmoking population not occupationally exposed to benzene, whether it is possible to detect differences in the urinary concentration of trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) between low and high environmental exposure to benzene. A study sample of 31 employees working in pharmacies in a large town in Italy with low environmental exposure to benzene (4.8 microg/m3) was compared to a high (8.1 microg/m3) benzene exposure group. Analysis of urinary t,t-MA was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC; photodiode array detector); analysis of environmental benzene samples was by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). The statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in urinary levels of t,t-MA of subjects with high (mean concentration: 157.9 microg/g creatinine) versus low exposure (mean concentration: 114.2 microg/g creatinine). Data show that it is difficult to correlate urinary t,t-MA with benzene exposure at parts per billion levels. PMID:11549119

  18. High Plasticizer Levels In Males Linked to Delayed Pregnancy for Female Partners

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Release Wednesday, March 5, 2014 High plasticizer levels in males linked to delayed pregnancy for female ... particular aspects of reproductive health, such as hormone levels. “Our study shows that exposure to certain phthalates ...

  19. Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Infants and Mothers in Benin and Potential Sources of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bodeau-Livinec, Florence; Glorennec, Philippe; Cot, Michel; Dumas, Pierre; Durand, Séverine; Massougbodji, Achille; Ayotte, Pierre; Le Bot, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Lead in childhood is well known to be associated with poor neurodevelopment. As part of a study on maternal anemia and offspring neurodevelopment, we analyzed blood lead level (BLL) with no prior knowledge of lead exposure in 225 mothers and 685 offspring 1 to 2 years old from Allada, a semi-rural area in Benin, sub-Saharan Africa, between May 2011 and May 2013. Blood samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Environmental assessments in households and isotopic ratio measurements were performed for eight children with BLL > 100 µg/L. High lead levels (BLL > 50 µg/L) were found in 44% of mothers and 58% of children. The median BLL was 55.1 (interquartile range 39.2–85.0) and 46.6 (36.5–60.1) µg/L, respectively. Maternal BLL was associated with offspring’s consumption of piped water and animals killed by ammunition. Children’s BLL was associated with presence of paint chips in the house and consumption of animals killed by ammunition. In this population, with 98% of children still breastfed, children’s BLL was highly associated with maternal BLL on multivariate analyses. Environmental measures and isotopic ratios supported these findings. Offspring may be highly exposed to lead in utero and probably via breastfeeding in addition to lead paint exposure. PMID:26978384

  20. Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Infants and Mothers in Benin and Potential Sources of Exposure.

    PubMed

    Bodeau-Livinec, Florence; Glorennec, Philippe; Cot, Michel; Dumas, Pierre; Durand, Séverine; Massougbodji, Achille; Ayotte, Pierre; Le Bot, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Lead in childhood is well known to be associated with poor neurodevelopment. As part of a study on maternal anemia and offspring neurodevelopment, we analyzed blood lead level (BLL) with no prior knowledge of lead exposure in 225 mothers and 685 offspring 1 to 2 years old from Allada, a semi-rural area in Benin, sub-Saharan Africa, between May 2011 and May 2013. Blood samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Environmental assessments in households and isotopic ratio measurements were performed for eight children with BLL > 100 µg/L. High lead levels (BLL > 50 µg/L) were found in 44% of mothers and 58% of children. The median BLL was 55.1 (interquartile range 39.2-85.0) and 46.6 (36.5-60.1) µg/L, respectively. Maternal BLL was associated with offspring's consumption of piped water and animals killed by ammunition. Children's BLL was associated with presence of paint chips in the house and consumption of animals killed by ammunition. In this population, with 98% of children still breastfed, children's BLL was highly associated with maternal BLL on multivariate analyses. Environmental measures and isotopic ratios supported these findings. Offspring may be highly exposed to lead in utero and probably via breastfeeding in addition to lead paint exposure. PMID:26978384

  1. The relationship between low-level benzene exposure and leukemia in Canadian petroleum distribution workers.

    PubMed

    Schnatter, A R; Armstrong, T W; Thompson, L S; Nicolich, M J; Katz, A M; Huebner, W W; Pearlman, E D

    1996-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between leukemia occurrence and long-term, low-level benzene exposures in petroleum distribution workers. Fourteen cases were identified among a previously studied cohort [Schnatter et al., Environ Health Perspect 101 (Suppl 6):85-89 (1993)]. Four controls per case were selected from the same cohort, controlling for birth year and time at risk. Industrial hygienists estimated workplace exposures for benzene, without knowledge of case-control status. Average benzene concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.2 ppm. Company medical records were used to abstract information on other potential confounders such as cigarette smoking. Odds ratios were calculated for several exposure metrics. Conditional logistic regression modeling was used to control for potential confounders. The risk of leukemia was not associated with increasing cumulative exposure to benzene for these exposure levels. Duration of benzene exposure was more closely associated with leukemia risk than other exposure metrics, although results were not statistically significant. A family history of cancer and cigarette smoking were the two strongest risk factors for leukemia, with cumulative benzene exposure showing no additional risk when considered in the same models. This study is consistent with other data in that it was unable to demonstrate a relationship between leukemia and long-term, low-level benzene exposures. The power of the study was limited. Thus, further study on benzene exposures in this concentration range are warranted. PMID:9118923

  2. Neurological outcomes associated with low-level manganese exposure in an inception cohort of asymptomatic welding trainees

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Marissa G; Criswell, Susan R; Racette, Brad A; Simpson, Christopher D; Sheppard, Lianne; Checkoway, Harvey; Seixas, Noah S

    2015-01-01

    Objective Long-term, high-level exposure to manganese (Mn) is associated with impaired central nervous system (CNS) function. We quantitatively explored relations between low-level Mn exposure and selected neurological outcomes in a longitudinal inception cohort of asymptomatic welder trainees. Methods Welders with no previous occupational Mn exposure were observed approximately every three months over the course of the five-quarter traineeship. Fifty-six welders were assessed for motor function using the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor subsection part 3 (UPDRS3) and Grooved Pegboard tests. A subset of 17 also had MRI scans to assess T1-weighted indices. Personal exposure to Mn in welding fume was quantitatively assessed during the study period using a mixed model to obtain estimates of subject-specific exposure level by welding type. These estimates were summed to estimate cumulative exposure at the time of each neurological outcome test. Results When adjusting for possible learning effects, there were no associations between cumulative exposure and UPDRS3 score or Grooved Pegboard time. T1-weighted indices of the basal ganglia (caudate, anterior putamen, posterior putamen, and combined basal ganglia, but not the pallidal index) exhibited statistically significant increases in signal intensity in relation to increased cumulative Mn exposure. Conclusions This study demonstrates that T1-weighted changes can be detected in the brain even at very low levels of exposure among humans before any clinically evident deficits. This suggests that with continued follow-up we could identify a T1 threshold of toxicity at which clinical symptoms begin to manifest. PMID:25380186

  3. Re-exposure to the hypobaric hypoxic brain injury of high altitude: plasma S100B levels and the possible effect of acclimatisation on blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Winter, C D; Whyte, T; Cardinal, J; Kenny, R; Ballard, E

    2016-04-01

    Hypobaric hypoxic brain injury results in elevated peripheral S100B levels which may relate to blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. A period of acclimatisation or dexamethasone prevents altitude-related illnesses and this may involve attenuation of BBB compromise. We hypothesised that both treatments would diminish the S100B response (a measure of BBB dysfunction) on re-ascent to the hypobaric hypoxia of high altitude, in comparison to an identical ascent completed 48 h earlier by the same group. Twelve healthy volunteers, six of which were prescribed dexamethasone, ascended Mt Fuji (summit 3700 m) and serial plasma S100B levels measured. The S100B values reduced from a baseline 0.183 µg/l (95 % CI 0.083-0.283) to 0.145 µg/l (95 % CI 0.088-0.202) at high altitude for the dexamethasone group (n = 6) and from 0.147 µg/l (95 % CI 0.022-0.272) to 0.133 µg/l (95 % CI 0.085-0.182) for the non-treated group (n = 6) [not statistically significant (p = 0.43 and p = 0.82) for the treated and non-treated groups respectively]. [These results contrasted with the statistically significant increase during the first ascent, S100B increasing from 0.108 µg/l (95 % CI 0.092-0.125) to 0.216 µg/l (95 % CI 0.165-0.267) at high altitude]. In conclusion, an increase in plasma S100B was not observed in the second ascent and this may relate to the effect of acclimatisation (or hypoxic pre-conditioning) on the BBB. An exercise stimulated elevation of plasma S100B levels was also not observed during the second ascent. The small sample size and wide confidence intervals, however, precludes any statistically significant conclusions and a larger study would be required to confirm these findings. PMID:26924650

  4. DPOAE level mapping for detecting noise-induced cochlear damage from short-duration music exposures

    PubMed Central

    Buckey, Jay C.; Fellows, Abigail M.; Clavier, Odile H.; Allen, Lindsay V.; Brooks, Chris A.; Norris, Jesse A.; Gui, Jiang; Meinke, Deanna K.

    2015-01-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) level mapping provides a comprehensive picture of cochlear responses over a range of DP frequencies and f2/f1 ratios. We hypothesized that individuals exposed to high-level sound would show changes detectable by DPOAE mapping, but not apparent on a standard DP-gram. Thirteen normal hearing subjects were studied before and after attending music concerts. Pure-tone audiometry (500-8,000 Hz), DP-grams (0.3-10 kHz) at 1.22 ratio, and DPOAE level maps were collected prior to, as soon as possible after, and the day after the concerts. All maps covered the range of 2,000-6,000 Hz in DP frequency and from 1.3 to -1.3 in ratio using equi-level primary tone stimuli. Changes in the pure-tone audiogram were significant (P ≤ 0.01) immediately after the concert at 1,000 Hz, 4,000 Hz, and 6,000 Hz. The DP-gram showed significant differences only at f2 = 4,066 (P = 0.01) and f2 = 4,348 (P = 0.04). The postconcert changes were readily apparent both visually and statistically (P ≤ 0.01) on the mean DP level maps, and remained statistically significantly different from baseline the day after noise exposure although no significant changes from baseline were seen on the DP-gram or audiogram the day after exposure. Although both the DP-gram and audiogram showed recovery by the next day, the average DPOAE level maps remained significantly different from baseline. The mapping data showed changes in the cochlea that were not detected from the DP-gram obtained at a single ratio. DPOAE level mapping provides comprehensive information on subtle cochlear responses, which may offer advantages for studying and tracking noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). PMID:26356368

  5. DPOAE level mapping for detecting noise-induced cochlear damage from short-duration music exposures.

    PubMed

    Buckey, Jay C; Fellows, Abigail M; Clavier, Odile H; Allen, Lindsay V; Brooks, Chris A; Norris, Jesse A; Gui, Jiang; Meinke, Deanna K

    2015-01-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) level mapping provides a comprehensive picture of cochlear responses over a range of DP frequencies and f₂/f₁ratios. We hypothesized that individuals exposed to high-level sound would show changes detectable by DPOAE mapping, but not apparent on a standard DP-gram. Thirteen normal hearing subjects were studied before and after attending music concerts. Pure-tone audiometry (500-8,000 Hz), DP-grams (0.3-10 kHz) at 1.22 ratio, and DPOAE level maps were collected prior to, as soon as possible after, and the day after the concerts. All maps covered the range of 2,000-6,000 Hz in DP frequency and from 1.3 to -1.3 in ratio using equi-level primary tone stimuli. Changes in the pure-tone audiogram were significant (P ≤ 0.01) immediately after the concert at 1,000 Hz, 4,000 Hz, and 6,000 Hz. The DP-gram showed significant differences only at f₂= 4,066 (P = 0.01) and f₂= 4,348 (P = 0.04). The postconcert changes were readily apparent both visually and statistically (P ≤ 0.01) on the mean DP level maps, and remained statistically significantly different from baseline the day after noise exposure although no significant changes from baseline were seen on the DP-gram or audiogram the day after exposure. Although both the DP-gram and audiogram showed recovery by the next day, the average DPOAE level maps remained significantly different from baseline. The mapping data showed changes in the cochlea that were not detected from the DP-gram obtained at a single ratio. DPOAE level mapping provides comprehensive information on subtle cochlear responses, which may offer advantages for studying and tracking noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). PMID:26356368

  6. Mercury exposure in French Guiana: Levels and determinants

    SciTech Connect

    Cordier, S.; Mandereau, L.; Grasmick, C.; Paquier-Passelaigue, M.; Weber, J.P.; Jouan, M.

    1998-07-01

    Mercury is used widely for gold extraction in French Guiana and throughout the entire Amazon basin. To evaluate contamination among the general population, the authors chose individuals who attended 13 health centers and maternity hospitals dispersed geographically across the territory and served Guiana`s different populations. Five hundred individuals (109 pregnant women, 255 other adults, and 136 children) who received care at one of the centers were selected randomly for this study. Each individual answered a questionnaire and provided a hair sample. The authors determined mercury in hair with atomic absorption spectrometry. The following mean levels of mercury were observed: 1.6 {micro}g/g among pregnant women; 3.4 {micro}g/g among other adults; and 2.5 {micro}g/g among children. Diet factors contributed the most to mercury levels, especially consumption of freshwater fish and livers from game. Other factors, including age, dental amalgams, use of skin-lightening cosmetics, and residence near a gold-mining community, did not contribute significantly to mercury levels. Overall, 12% of the samples contained mercury levels in excess of 10 {micro}g/g, but in some Amerindian communities up to 79% of the children had hair mercury levels that exceeded 10 {micro}g/g. The results of this study indicated that (a) diet played a predominant role in total mercury burden, and (b) in some communities, mercury contamination exceeded safe levels.

  7. The revised electromagnetic fields directive and worker exposure in environments with high magnetic flux densities.

    PubMed

    Stam, Rianne

    2014-06-01

    Some of the strongest electromagnetic fields (EMF) are found in the workplace. A European Directive sets limits to workers' exposure to EMF. This review summarizes its origin and contents and compares magnetic field exposure levels in high-risk workplaces with the limits set in the revised Directive. Pubmed, Scopus, grey literature databases, and websites of organizations involved in occupational exposure measurements were searched. The focus was on EMF with frequencies up to 10 MHz, which can cause stimulation of the nervous system. Selected studies had to provide individual maximum exposure levels at the workplace, either in terms of the external magnetic field strength or flux density or as induced electric field strength or current density. Indicative action levels and the corresponding exposure limit values for magnetic fields in the revised European Directive will be higher than those in the previous version. Nevertheless, magnetic flux densities in excess of the action levels for peripheral nerve stimulation are reported for workers involved in welding, induction heating, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The corresponding health effects exposure limit values for the electric fields in the worker's body can be exceeded for welding and MRI, but calculations for induction heating and transcranial magnetic stimulation are lacking. Since the revised European Directive conditionally exempts MRI-related activities from the exposure limits, measures to reduce exposure may be necessary for welding, induction heating, and transcranial nerve stimulation. Since such measures can be complicated, there is a clear need for exposure databases for different workplace scenarios with significant EMF exposure and guidance on good practices. PMID:24557933

  8. The Revised Electromagnetic Fields Directive and Worker Exposure in Environments With High Magnetic Flux Densities

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Rianne

    2014-01-01

    Some of the strongest electromagnetic fields (EMF) are found in the workplace. A European Directive sets limits to workers’ exposure to EMF. This review summarizes its origin and contents and compares magnetic field exposure levels in high-risk workplaces with the limits set in the revised Directive. Pubmed, Scopus, grey literature databases, and websites of organizations involved in occupational exposure measurements were searched. The focus was on EMF with frequencies up to 10 MHz, which can cause stimulation of the nervous system. Selected studies had to provide individual maximum exposure levels at the workplace, either in terms of the external magnetic field strength or flux density or as induced electric field strength or current density. Indicative action levels and the corresponding exposure limit values for magnetic fields in the revised European Directive will be higher than those in the previous version. Nevertheless, magnetic flux densities in excess of the action levels for peripheral nerve stimulation are reported for workers involved in welding, induction heating, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The corresponding health effects exposure limit values for the electric fields in the worker’s body can be exceeded for welding and MRI, but calculations for induction heating and transcranial magnetic stimulation are lacking. Since the revised European Directive conditionally exempts MRI-related activities from the exposure limits, measures to reduce exposure may be necessary for welding, induction heating, and transcranial nerve stimulation. Since such measures can be complicated, there is a clear need for exposure databases for different workplace scenarios with significant EMF exposure and guidance on good practices. PMID:24557933

  9. [Assessment of occupational exposure to aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons determining urinary levels of 1-pyrenol].

    PubMed

    Pavanello, S; Genova, A; Foà, V; Clonfero, E

    2000-01-01

    In conformity with Italian law 626/94, occupational exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) in several types of work environments was assessed by analysing urinary levels of 1-pyrenol. A total of 231 non-smokers exposed to PAH (82 workers, employed in two different thermoelectric power plants using combustible oil (30 subjects from plant A and 52 from plant B), 18 subjects working for a company recovering exhausted oils, 12 working on rubber production, 10 on road surface asphalting operations, 22 working in the anodizing section of an aluminium plant, 27 chimney-sweeps, and 60 coke-oven workers (30 topside workers, and 30 doing other jobs)) were enrolled. There were also 53 non-smoker control subjects, not occupationally exposed to PAH. Current smokers were excluded, since smoking is an important confounding factor when occupational exposure to low PAH concentrations are monitored. Confounding factors, i.e., diet and passive smoking, were checked by means of a questionnaire which, in addition to personal data and habits, also requested specific details about the type of diet followed and possible exposure to passive smoking during the 24-hour period preceding urine collection. In controls, exposure to PAH in the diet significantly increased 1-pyrenol levels in urine: in subjects introducing > or = 1 microgram of pyrene with the diet, the mean urinary level of 1-pyrenol was significantly higher than that introduced with < 1 microgram (high versus low dietary intake, mean +/- SD, 0.08 +/- 0.13 and 0.04 +/- 0.06 1-pyrenol mumoles/mole of creatinine, respectively; Mann-Whitney U-test Z = 2.67, p < 0.01). Conversely, passive smoking did not influence 1-pyrenol levels. In the overall population (controls and exposed), multiple linear regression analysis showed that levels of urinary 1-pyrenol were significantly influenced by occupational exposure to PAH in asphalt workers, anodizing plant workers, chimney-sweeps, and coke-oven workers, both those working at

  10. Associations between cadmium exposure and circulating levels of sex hormones in postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Imran; Engström, Annette; Vahter, Marie; Skerfving, Staffan; Lundh, Thomas; Lidfeldt, Jonas; Samsioe, Göran; Halldin, Krister; Åkesson, Agneta

    2014-10-15

    Recent epidemiological as well as in vivo and in vitro studies collectively suggest that the metalloestrogen cadmium (Cd) could be a potential risk factor for hormone-related cancers in particularly breast cancer. Assessment of the association between Cd exposure and levels of endogenous sex hormones is of pivotal importance, as increased levels of such have been associated with a higher risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The present study investigated the perceived relationship (multivariable-adjusted linear regression analyses) between Cd exposure [blood Cd (B-Cd) and urinary Cd (U-Cd)], and serum levels of androstenedione, testosterone, estradiol, and sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), in 438 postmenopausal Swedish women without hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A significant positive association between B-Cd (median 3.4 nmol/L) and serum testosterone levels, as well as a significant inverse association between B-Cd and serum estradiol levels and with the estradiol/testosterone ratio were encountered. However, U-Cd (median 0.69 nmol/mmol creatinine) was inversely associated with serum estradiol levels only. Our data may suggest that Cd interferes with the levels of testosterone and estradiol in postmenopausal women, which might have implications for breast cancer risk. - Highlights: • Low level cadmium exposure may interfere with the levels of steroid hormones. • Cadmium exposure was associated with increased serum testosterone concentrations. • Cadmium exposure was associated with decreased estradiol/testosterone ratio. • Cadmium exposure may have implications for breast-cancer promotion.

  11. High throughput illumination systems for solar simulators and photoresist exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Arkady

    2010-08-01

    High throughput illumination systems are critical component in photolithography, solar simulators, UV curing, microscopy, and spectral analysis. A good refractive condenser system has F/# .60, or N.A .80, but it captures only 10 to 15% of energy emitted by an incandescent or gas-discharge lamp, as these sources emit light in all directions. Systems with ellipsoidal or parabolic reflectors are much more efficient, they capture up to 80% of total energy emitted by lamps. However, these reflectors have large aberrations when working with real sources of finite dimensions, resulting in poor light concentrating capability. These aberrations also increase beam divergence, collimation, and affect edge definition in flood exposure systems. The problem is aggravated by the geometry of high power Arc lamps where, for thermal considerations, the anode has a larger diameter than the cathode and absorbs and obscures part of the energy. This results in an asymmetrical energy distribution emitted by the lamp and makes efficiency of Lamp - reflector configuration dependent on orientation of lamp in the reflector. This paper presents the analysis of different configurations of Lamp - Reflector systems of different power levels and their energy distribution in the image plane. Configuration, which results in significant improvement of brightness, is derived.

  12. Effects of Oral Exposure to Fungicides on Honey Bee Nutrition and Virus Levels.

    PubMed

    Degrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Chen, Yanping; Watkins Dejong, Emily; Chambers, Mona L; Hidalgo, Geoffrey

    2015-12-01

    Sublethal exposure to fungicides can affect honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in ways that resemble malnutrition. These include reduced brood rearing, queen loss, and increased pathogen levels. We examined the effects of oral exposure to the fungicides boscalid and pyraclostrobin on factors affecting colony nutrition and immune function including pollen consumption, protein digestion, hemolymph protein titers, and changes in virus levels. Because the fungicides are respiratory inhibitors, we also measured ATP concentrations in flight muscle. The effects were evaluated in 3- and 7-d-old worker bees at high fungicide concentrations in cage studies, and at field-relevant concentrations in colony studies. Though fungicide levels differed greatly between the cage and colony studies, similar effects were observed. Hemolymph protein concentrations were comparable between bees feeding on pollen with and without added fungicides. However, in both cage and colony studies, bees consumed less pollen containing fungicides and digested less of the protein. Bees fed fungicide-treated pollen also had lower ATP concentrations and higher virus titers. The combination of effects we detected could produce symptoms that are similar to those from poor nutrition and weaken colonies making them more vulnerable to loss from additional stressors such as parasites and pathogens. PMID:26318004

  13. Effective exposure level and diagnostic performance in endodontic radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, T.; Wiebe, J.D.; Webber, R.L.; Wagner, R.F.

    1983-05-01

    Image quality is limited by the information capacity of the image-forming system and can be computed from three parameters: contrast, resolution, and noise. These parameters can be combined to yield a single measure which determines the maximum amount of information obtainable from any x-ray system and is called the noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) per unit area. The effects of image quality, expressed as noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) per unit area, on the radiographic performance by dentists reading the position of an endodontic file in a root canal were studied. Three different speed films were used in conjunction with a fixed screen. Components of variance associated with the position of the tooth apex and the tip of an endodontic file in a root canal were compared for the effect of different NEQs and observers. Results show that the standard deviation in locating a file tip and tooth apex may be a linear function of log NEQ. These findings indicate that a significant reduction in exposure would have a relatively small effect on the precision of endodontic distance measurements.

  14. Effective exposure level and diagnostic performance in endodontic radiography.

    PubMed

    Okano, T; Wiebe, J D; Webber, R L; Wagner, R F

    1983-05-01

    Image quality is limited by the information capacity of the image-forming system and can be computed from three parameters: contrast, resolution, and noise. These parameters can be combined to yield a single measure which determines the maximum amount of information obtainable from any x-ray system and is called the noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) per unit area. The effects of image quality, expressed as noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) per unit area, on the radiographic performance by dentists reading the position of an endodontic file in a root canal were studied. Three different speed films were used in conjunction with a fixed screen. NEQ values ranged between 0.64 x 10(4) and 14.3 x 10(4) per square millimeter. Components of variance associated with the position of the tooth apex and the tip of an endodontic file in a root canal were compared for the effect of different NEQs and observers. Results show that the standard deviation in locating a file tip and tooth apex may be a linear function of log NEQ. The estimated standard deviation associated with changes in NEQ was found to be relatively small compared to that observed among dentists. These findings indicate that a significant reduction in exposure would have a relatively small effect on the precision of endodontic distance measurements. PMID:6575345

  15. Accommodating brightness and exposure levels in densitometry of stained polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Han Yen; Ng, Tuck Wah; Liew, Oi Wah

    2010-03-20

    Flatbed scanner densitometers can be operated under various illumination and recording exposure levels. In this work, we show that optical density measurement accuracy, sensitivity, and stability of stained polyacrylamide electrophoresis gel densitometry are crucially dependent on these two factors (brightness and exposure level), notwithstanding that the source is monochromatic, spatially uniform, and the measurements are made using an accurately calibrated step wedge in tandem. We further outline a method to accommodate the intensity deviations over a range of illumination and exposure levels in order to maintain sensitivity and repeatability in the computed optical densities. Comparisons were also made with results from a commercial densitometer.

  16. Is level of exposure to a 12-step facilitation therapy associated with treatment outcome?

    PubMed

    Wells, Elizabeth A; Donovan, Dennis M; Daley, Dennis C; Doyle, Suzanne R; Brigham, Greg; Garrett, Sharon B; Ingalsbe, Michelle H; Hatch-Maillette, Mary A; Perl, Harold I; Walker, Robrina

    2014-10-01

    This study examined whether level of exposure to Stimulant Abuser Groups to Engage in 12-Step (STAGE-12), a 12-Step facilitative therapy, is related to treatment outcome. Data were from a large National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) study comparing STAGE-12 combined with treatment-as-usual (TAU) to TAU alone. These analyses include only those randomized to STAGE-12 (n=234). Assessments occurred at baseline and 30, 60, 90, and 180 days following randomization. High-exposure patients (n=158; attended at least 2 of 3 individual, and 3 of 5 group, sessions), compared to those with less exposure (n=76), demonstrated: (1) higher odds of self-reported abstinence from, and lower rates of, stimulant and non-stimulant drug use; (2) lower probabilities of stimulant-positive urines; (3) more days of attending and lower odds of not attending 12-Step meetings; (4) greater likelihood of reporting no drug problems; (5) more days of duties at meetings; and (6) more types of 12-Step activities. Many of these differences declined over time, but several were still significant by the last follow-up. Treatment and research implications are discussed. PMID:25064421

  17. Diagnostic reference levels for medical exposure of patients: ICRP guidance and related ICRU quantities.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Marvin

    2008-11-01

    In Publication 60 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection reference levels were described as values of measured quantities at which some specified action or decision should be taken. One particular form of reference level, the diagnostic reference level, applies specifically to medical exposure of patients. The objective of a diagnostic reference level is to help avoid radiation dose to the patient that does not contribute to the clinical purpose of a medical imaging task. This is accomplished by comparison between the numerical value of the diagnostic reference level and the mean or other appropriate value observed in practice for a suitable reference group of patients or a suitable reference phantom. A diagnostic reference level is not applied to individual patients. Diagnostic reference levels have no direct linkage to the numerical values for dose limits or dose constraints, and it is inappropriate to use them for regulatory or commercial purposes. Diagnostic reference levels should be selected by professional medical bodies (often in conjunction with health and radiation protection authorities) and their values may be specific to a country or region. A diagnostic reference level can be used: (1) to improve a regional, national or local distribution of observed results for a general medical imaging task, by reducing the frequency of unjustified high or low values; (2) to promote attainment of a narrower range of values that represent good practice for a more specific medical imaging task; or (3) to promote attainment of an optimum range of values for a specified medical imaging protocol. Authorized bodies are encouraged to set diagnostic reference levels that best meet their specific needs and that are consistent for the regional, national or local area to which they apply. Report 74 of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements includes a commentary regarding quantities useful in establishing diagnostic reference levels

  18. Prediction of frequency and exposure level of solar particle events.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Hayat, Matthew J; Feiveson, Alan H; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2009-07-01

    For future space missions outside of the Earth's magnetic field, the risk of radiation exposure from solar particle events (SPEs) during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) or in lightly shielded vehicles is a major concern when designing radiation protection including determining sufficient shielding requirements for astronauts and hardware. While the expected frequency of SPEs is strongly influenced by solar modulation, SPE occurrences themselves are chaotic in nature. We report on a probabilistic modeling approach, where a cumulative expected occurrence curve of SPEs for a typical solar cycle was formed from a non-homogeneous Poisson process model fitted to a database of proton fluence measurements of SPEs that occurred during the past 5 solar cycles (19-23) and those of large SPEs identified from impulsive nitrate enhancements in polar ice. From the fitted model, we then estimated the expected frequency of SPEs at any given proton fluence threshold with energy >30 MeV (Phi(30)) during a defined space mission period. Analytic energy spectra of 34 large SPEs observed in the space era were fitted over broad energy ranges extending to GeV, and subsequently used to calculate the distribution of mGy equivalent (mGy-Eq) dose for a typical blood-forming organ (BFO) inside a spacecraft as a function of total Phi(30) fluence. This distribution was combined with a simulation of SPE events using the Poisson model to estimate the probability of the BFO dose exceeding the NASA 30-d limit of 250 mGy-Eq per 30 d. These results will be useful in implementing probabilistic risk assessment approaches at NASA and guidelines for protection systems for astronauts on future space exploration missions. PMID:19509510

  19. Effects of Hypergravity Exposure on Prolactin Levels in Pre-parturient , Parturient and Lactating Rat Dams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer. Lisa A.; Wade, Charles E.; Ronca, April E.; Sun, Sid (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of 2.0-g, 1.75-g and 1.5-g hypergravity exposure on plasma concentrations of the lactotrophic hormone, prolactin (PRL), in female rats on pre-parturient (Gestation Day 20), parturient (Post-natal day 0) and lactating (P10) days. PRL levels have been found to be reduced in rat dams around the time of birth following exposure to gravitational loads varying from 2.16 to 3.14-g (Megory et. al., Aviation, Space and Environs 1129-1135, 1984). It has also been reported that at these high gravitational loads, neonatal mortality has been extremely high, suggesting a possible interaction between dam PRL concentration and neonatal outcome. We have previously reported no significant differences in PRL levels of parturient (PO) and lactating (P6 & P 15) dams when exposed to 1.5-g hypergravity, but did observe a slight elevation of PRL on PO and P 15, with a decrease on P6. In the present study, time-bred pregnant dams were exposed to either continuous 2.0-g, 1.75-g or 1.5-g centrifugation, beginning on Gestational day (G) 11 of the rats' 22-day pregnancy. We observed no significant differences in PRL concentrations between SC and any of the HG conditions. On G20 and PO, PRL concentrations of the 2.0-g and 1.5-g groups were slightly elevated as compared to SC. Similar to what we previously reported. PRL secretion was elevated in both HG and SC conditions on the day of birth relative to later during lactation, but on P10 it appeared to be reduced in HG relative to SC dams. These findings suggests that hypergravity slightly elevates plasma concentration of PRL in pre-parturient and lactating rat dams, with effects most pronounced during the periparturitional period and in a direction opposite to that observed following microgravity exposure.

  20. 28 CFR 79.44 - Proof of working level month exposure to radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... radiation. 79.44 Section 79.44 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.44 Proof of working level month exposure to radiation. (a) If one or more of the sources in § 79.43(a) contain...

  1. 28 CFR 79.44 - Proof of working level month exposure to radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... radiation. 79.44 Section 79.44 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.44 Proof of working level month exposure to radiation. (a) If one or more of the sources in § 79.43(a) contain...

  2. 28 CFR 79.44 - Proof of working level month exposure to radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... radiation. 79.44 Section 79.44 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.44 Proof of working level month exposure to radiation. (a) If one or more of the sources in § 79.43(a) contain...

  3. 28 CFR 79.44 - Proof of working level month exposure to radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... radiation. 79.44 Section 79.44 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Miners § 79.44 Proof of working level month exposure to radiation. (a) If one or more of the sources in § 79.43(a) contain...

  4. PROPORTION OF MODERATELY EXERCISING INDIVIDUALS RESPONDING TO LOW-LEVEL, MULTI-HOUR OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to describe the proportion of moderately exercising individuals experiencing significant respiratory responses to low-level, multi-hour ozone exposure as a function of ozone concentration and exposure duration. ixty-eight healthy, nonsmoking adults, ...

  5. Exposure level and distribution characteristics of airborne bacteria and fungi in Seoul metropolitan subway stations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Youn; Kim, Yoon Shin; Kim, Daekeun; Kim, Hyeon Tae

    2011-01-01

    The exposure level and distribution characteristics of airborne bacteria and fungi were assessed in the workers' activity areas (station office, bedroom, ticket office and driver's seat) and passengers' activity areas (station precinct, inside the passenger carriage, and platform) of the Seoul metropolitan subway. Among investigated areas, the levels of airborne bacteria and fungi in the workers' bedroom and station precincts were relatively high. No significant difference was found in the concentration of airborne bacteria and fungi between the underground and above ground activity areas of the subway. The genera identified in all subway activity areas with a 5% or greater detection rate were Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Bacillus and Corynebacterium for airborne bacteria and Penicillium, Cladosporium, Chrysosporium, Aspergillus for airborne fungi. Staphylococcus and Micrococcus comprised over 50% of the total airborne bacteria and Penicillium and Cladosporium comprised over 60% of the total airborne fungi, thus these four genera are the predominant genera in the subway station. PMID:21173524

  6. Gain, Level, And Exposure Control For A Television Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Geoffrey J.; Hetherington, Rolfe W.

    1992-01-01

    Automatic-level-control/automatic-gain-control (ALC/AGC) system for charge-coupled-device (CCD) color television camera prevents over-loading in bright scenes using technique for measuring brightness of scene from red, green, and blue output signals and processing these into adjustments of video amplifiers and iris on camera lens. System faster, does not distort video brightness signals, and built with smaller components.

  7. Acute low-level microwave exposure and central cholinergic activity: studies on irradiation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake was measured in the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus of rats after acute exposure (45 min) to pulsed (2 microseconds, 500 pps) or continuous-wave 2,450-MHz microwaves in cylindrical waveguides or miniature anechoic chambers. In all exposure conditions, the average whole-body specific absorption rate was at 0.6 W/kg. Decrease in choline uptake was observed in the frontal cortex after microwave exposure in all of the above irradiation conditions. Regardless of the exposure system used, hippocampal choline uptake was decreased after exposure to pulsed but not continuous-wave microwaves. Striatal choline uptake was decreased after exposure to either pulsed or continuous-wave microwaves in the miniature anechoic chamber. No significant change in hypothalamic choline uptake was observed under any of the exposure conditions studied. We conclude that depending on the parameters of the radiation, microwaves can elicit specific and generalized biological effects.

  8. Low G preconditioning reduces liver injury induced by high +Gz exposure in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bin; Feng, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Wen-Bing; Zhang, Hong-Yi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of repeated lower +Gz exposure on liver injury induced by high +Gz exposure in rats. METHODS: Sixty male Wister rats were randomly divided into a blank control group, a low G preconditioning group (LG) (exposed to +4 Gz/5 min per day for 3 d before +10 Gz/5 min exposure), and a +10 Gz/5 min group (10G) (n = 20 in each group). Blood specimens and liver tissue were harvested at 0 h and 6 h after +10 Gz/5 min exposure. Liver function was analyzed by measuring serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, and liver injury was further assessed by histopathological observation. Malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Na+-K+-ATPase were determined in hepatic tissue. RESULTS: The group LG had lower ALT, AST, and MDA values at 0 h after exposure than those in group 10G. SOD values and Na+-K+-ATPase activity in the LG group were higher than in group 10G 0 h post-exposure. Hepatocyte injury was significantly less in group LG than in group 10G on histopathological evaluation. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that repeated low +Gz exposure shows a protective effect on liver injury induced by high +Gz exposure in rats. PMID:26074692

  9. Exposure to environmental levels of waterborne cadmium impacts corticosteroidogenic and metabolic capacities, and compromises secondary stressor performance in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Navdeep; McGeer, James C; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2014-01-01

    The physiological responses to waterborne cadmium exposure have been well documented; however, few studies have examined animal performances at low exposure concentrations of this metal. We tested the hypothesis that longer-term exposure to low levels of cadmium will compromise the steroidogenic and metabolic capacities, and reduce the cortisol response to a secondary stressor in fish. To test this, juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to 0 (control), 0.75 or 2.0 μg/L waterborne cadmium in a flow-through system and were sampled at 1, 7 and 28 d of exposure. There were only very slight disturbances in basal plasma cortisol, lactate or glucose levels in response to cadmium exposure over the 28 d period. Chronic cadmium exposure significantly affected key genes involved in corticosteroidogenesis, including melanocortin 2 receptor, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme. At 28 d, the high cadmium exposure group showed a significant drop in the glucocorticoid receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor protein expressions in the liver and brain, respectively. There were also perturbations in the metabolic capacities in the liver and gill of cadmium-exposed trout. Subjecting these fish to a secondary handling disturbance led to a significant attenuation of the stressor-induced plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate levels in the cadmium groups. Collectively, although trout appears to adjust to subchronic exposure to low levels of cadmium, it may be at the cost of impaired interrenal steroidogenic and tissue-specific metabolic capacities, leading to a compromised secondary stress performance in rainbow trout. PMID:24269906

  10. Effect of short-term ozone exposure on exogenous thyroxine levels in thyroidectomized and hypophysectomized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, G.K.; Wei, D.

    1984-06-15

    Short-term ozone exposure (1 ppm X 24 hr) of male rats results in a significant reduction of circulating thyroid hormones and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The reduction of thyroid hormone levels after ozone exposure has been hypothesized as a possible adaptive mechanism to enhance survival of rats during ozone exposure. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of ozone on thyroid hormone (T4) levels in thyroidectomized and hypophysectomized rats which received exogenous T4 in the drinking water. Groups of normal, intact rats, thyroidectomized rats maintained on T4 at doses ranging from 75 to 1000 micrograms/liter, and hypophysectomized rats maintained on 300 micrograms T4/liter were exposed to ozone (1 ppm X 24 hr), Plasma T4 concentrations were significantly reduced after ozone exposure, and the results indicated that the higher the circulating T4 levels before exposure the more they were reduced after ozone exposure. This reduction in T4 levels cannot be accounted for in these animals by reduced pituitary TSH levels or the effects of fasting, but is likely to be due to peripheral changes in plasma thyroid binding proteins initiated by ozone exposure.

  11. Tracking electric field exposure levels through radio frequency dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, P.D.; Moore, M.R.; Rochelle, R.W.; Thomas, R.S.; Hess, R.A.; Hoffheins, B.S.

    1991-01-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) dosimeter developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a portable, pocket-sized cumulative-dose recording device designed to detect and record the strengths and durations of electric fields present in the work areas of naval vessels. The device measures an integrated dose and records the electric fields that exceed the permissible levels set by the American National Standards Institute. Features of the rf dosimeter include a frequency range of 30 MHz to 10 GHz and a three-dimensional sensor. Data obtained with the rf dosimeter will be used to determine the ambient field-strength profile for shipboard personnel over an extended time. Readings are acquired and averaged over a 6-min period corresponding to the rise time of the core body temperature. These values are stored for up to 6 months, after which the data are transferred to a computer via the dosimeter's serial port. The rf dosimeter should increase knowledge of the levels of electric fields to which individuals are exposed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Quantification of personal exposure concentrations to gasoline vehicle emissions in high-end exposure microenvironments: effects of fuel and season.

    PubMed

    Zielinska, B; Fujita, E; Ollison, W; Campbell, D; Sagebiel, J

    2012-11-01

    Mobile-source air toxic (MSAT) levels increase in confining microenvironments (MEs) with numerous emission sources of vehicle exhaust or evaporative emissions or during high-load and cold-start conditions. Reformulated fuels are expected to reduce MSAT and ozone precursor emissions. This study, required under the Clean Air Act Section 211b, evaluated high-end exposures in cities using reformulated (methyl tertiary-butyl ether [MTBE] or ethanol [EtOH]) fuels and conventional gasoline blends. The study investigates 13 high-end MEs, sampling under enhanced exposure conditions expected to result in maximal fuel and exhaust component exposures to carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes), MTBE, 1,3-butadiene (1,3-BD), EtOH,formaldehyde (HCHO), and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO). The authors found that day-to-day ME variations in high-end benzene, 1,3-BD, HCHO, and CO concentrations are substantial, but independent of gasoline composition and season, and related to the activity and emission rates of ME sources, which differ from day to day. PMID:23210226

  13. Exhaled nitric oxide decreases upon acute exposure to high-altitude hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel E; Beall, Cynthia M; Strohl, Kingman P; Mills, Phoebe S

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a vasodilator that plays a role in blood flow and oxygen delivery. Acute hypoxia down regulates NO synthesis, a response that may exacerbate hypoxic stress by decreasing blood flow. This study was designed to test the hypotheses that pulmonary NO decreases upon acute exposure to high-altitude hypoxia and that relatively low levels of NO at altitude are associated with greater stress as reflected in more symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS). A sample of 47 healthy, adult, nonsmoking, sea-level residents provided measurements at sea level, at 2,800 m, and at 0-, 2-, and 3-h exposure times at 4,200 m altitude on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Measurements were made of exhaled NO, oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, heart rate, and reported symptoms of AMS. The partial pressure of NO concentration in exhaled breath decreased significantly from a sea level mean of 4.2 nmHg to 3.8 nmHg at 2,800 m and 3.4 nmHg at 4,200 m. NO concentration in exhaled breath did not change significantly over a 3-h exposure at 4,200 m and recovered to pre-exposure baseline upon return to sea level. There was no significant association between the level of NO exhaled and the number of self-reported symptoms of AMS during this brief exposure. PMID:16493632

  14. High levels of concomitant behavioral health disorders among patients presenting for HIV non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis at a Boston community health center between 1997 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sachin; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    A paucity of information regarding mental health exists for patients presenting for HIV non occupational post-exposure prophylaxis (nPEP). We reviewed electronic medical records of 894 adult nPEP patients seen at a large Boston community health center between 1997 and 2013. Of 821 patients with consensual sexual exposures, 88.3% were men who have sex with men, and 40.0% had a mental health diagnosis. Diagnoses included: depression (24.4%), anxiety (21.9%), attention deficit disorder (7.8%), post-traumatic stress disorder (3.3%), and psychotic disorders (3.3%). Of 129 patients with substance use disorders, alcohol dependence (65.9%) and crystal methamphetamine (43.4%) predominated. Unprotected receptive anal intercourse was associated with psychotic disorders (aOR=4.86;95%CI:1.76–13.5) and substance use disorders (aOR=1.89;95%CI:1.28–2.80). Substance use at the time of exposure was associated with: depression (aOR=1.95;95%CI:1.36–2.80), anxiety (aOR=2.22;95%CI:1.51–3.25), attention deficit disorder (aOR=1.96;95%CI:1.18–3.27), and substance use disorder (aOR=4.78;95%CI:3.30–6.93). Mental illness should be screened for and addressed at nPEP visits to optimize HIV risk-reduction. PMID:25689892

  15. High Levels of Concomitant Behavioral Health Disorders Among Patients Presenting for HIV Non-occupational Post-exposure Prophylaxis at a Boston Community Health Center Between 1997 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sachin; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2016-07-01

    A paucity of information regarding mental health exists for patients presenting for HIV non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis (nPEP). We reviewed electronic medical records of 894 adult nPEP patients seen at a large Boston community health center between 1997 and 2013. Of 821 patients with consensual sexual exposures, 88.3 % were men who have sex with men, and 40.0 % had a mental health diagnosis. Diagnoses included: depression (24.4 %), anxiety (21.9 %), attention deficit disorder (7.8 %), post-traumatic stress disorder (3.3 %), and psychotic disorders (3.3 %). Of 129 patients with substance use disorders, alcohol dependence (65.9 %) and crystal methamphetamine (43.4 %) predominated. Unprotected receptive anal intercourse was associated with psychotic disorders (aOR = 4.86; 95 %CI:1.76-13.5) and substance use disorders (aOR = 1.89; 95 %CI:1.28-2.80). Substance use at the time of exposure was associated with: depression (aOR = 1.95; 95 %CI:1.36-2.80), anxiety (aOR = 2.22; 95 %CI:1.51-3.25), attention deficit disorder (aOR = 1.96; 95 %CI:1.18-3.27), and substance use disorder (aOR = 4.78; 95 %CI:3.30-6.93). Mental illness should be screened for and addressed at nPEP visits to optimize HIV risk-reduction. PMID:25689892

  16. 75 FR 14153 - National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Substances; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ...A meeting of the National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Substances (NAC/AEGL Committee) will be held on April 13-15, 2010, in San Francisco, CA. At this meeting, the NAC/AEGL Committee will address, as time permits, the various aspects of the acute toxicity and the development of Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) for the following chemicals: 1,3-......

  17. Ozone Exposure System Designed and Used to High-Altitude Airship Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2005-01-01

    High-altitude airships can receive high doses of ozone over short mission durations. For example, in 1 year at an altitude of 70,000 ft, the ozone fluence (number arriving per unit area) can be as high as 1.2 1024 molecules/sq cm. Ozone exposure at these levels can embrittle materials or change the performance of solar cells. It is important to expose components and materials to the expected ozone dosage to determine if the ozone exposure could cause any mission-critical failures.

  18. Levels and source apportionment of children's lead exposure: could urinary lead be used to identify the levels and sources of children's lead pollution?

    PubMed

    Cao, Suzhen; Duan, Xiaoli; Zhao, Xiuge; Wang, Beibei; Ma, Jin; Fan, Delong; Sun, Chengye; He, Bin; Wei, Fusheng; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-04-01

    As a highly toxic heavy metal, the pollution and exposure risks of lead are of widespread concern for human health. However, the collection of blood samples for use as an indicator of lead pollution is not always feasible in most cohort or longitudinal studies, especially those involving children health. To evaluate the potential use of urinary lead as an indicator of exposure levels and source apportionment, accompanying with environmental media samples, lead concentrations and isotopic measurements (expressed as (207)Pb/(206)Pb, (208)Pb/(206)Pb and (204)Pb/(206)Pb) were investigated and compared between blood and urine from children living in the vicinities of a typical coking plant and lead-acid battery factory. The results showed urinary lead might not be a preferable proxy for estimating blood lead levels. Fortunately, urinary lead isotopic measurements could be used as an alternative for identifying the sources of children's lead exposure, which coincided well with the blood lead isotope ratio analysis. PMID:25617855

  19. New High Throughput Methods to Estimate Chemical Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has made many recent advances in high throughput bioactivity testing. However, concurrent advances in rapid, quantitative prediction of human and ecological exposures have been lacking, despite the clear importance of both measures for a risk-based approach to prioritizing an...

  20. Increased levels of oxidative DNA damage attributable to cooking-oil fumes exposure among cooks.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yuebin; Cheng, Jinquan; Zhang, Zhicheng; Zhang, Renli; Zhang, Zhunzhen; Shuai, Zhihong; Wu, Tangchun

    2009-07-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that cooks are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from cooking-oil fumes. However, Emission of PAH and their carcinogenic potencies from cooking oil fumes sources have not been investigated among cooks. To investigate the urinary excretion of a marker for oxidative DNA damage, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), in different groups of cooks and different exposure groups, and to study the association between 8-OHdG and 1-hydroxypyrene(1-OHP), a biological marker for PAH exposure. Urine samples were collected from different groups of cooks (n = 86) and from unexposed controls (n = 36); all were male with similar age and smoking habits. The health status, occupational history, smoking, and alcohol consumption 24 h prior to sampling was estimated from questionnaires. The urine samples were frozen for later analyses of 8-OHdG and 1-OHP levels by high-performance liquid chromatography. Excretion in urine of 8-OHdG was similar for controls (mean 1.2micromol/mol creatinine, n = 36), and for those who had been in the kitchen with an exhaust-hood operating (mean 1.5micromol/mol creatinine, n = 45). Cooks exposed to cooking-oil fumes without exhaust-hood operation had significantly increased excretion of 8-OHdG (mean 2.3micromol/mol creatinine, n = 18), compared with controls. The urinary levels of ln 1-OHP and ln 8-OHdG were still significantly correlated in a multiple regression analysis. The results indicate that exposure to PAH or possibly other compounds in cooking-oil fumes may cause oxidative DNA damage. PMID:19225966

  1. Fusion reactor high vacuum pumping: Charcoal cryosorber tritium exposure results

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Walthers, C.R.; Jenkins, E.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent experiments, have shown the practically of using activated charcoal (coconut charcoal) at 4{degrees}K to pump helium and hydrogen isotopes for a fusion reactor. Both speed and capacity for deuterium/helium and tritium/helium-3 mixtures were shown to be satisfactory. The long term effects of tritium on the charcoal/cement system developed by Grumman and LLNL were not known and a program was undertaken to see what, if any, effect long term tritium exposure has on the cryosorber. Several charcoal on aluminum test samples were subjected to six months exposure of tritium at approximately 77{degrees}K. The tritium was scanned several times with a residual gas analyzer and the speed-capacity performance of the samples was measured before, approximately half way through and after the exposure. Modest effects were noted which would not seriously restrict charcoal's use as a cryosorber for fusion reactor high vacuum pumping applications. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Non-ionic PAG behavior under high energy exposure sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Richard A.; Noga, David E.; Tolbert, Laren M.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2009-03-01

    A series of non-ionic PAGs were synthesized and their acid generation efficiency measured under deep ultraviolet and electron beam exposures. The acid generation efficiency was determined with an on-wafer method that uses spectroscopic ellipsometry to measure the absorbance of an acid sensitive dye (Coumarin 6). Under DUV exposures, common ionic onium salt PAGs showed excellent photoacid generation efficiency, superior to most non-ionic PAGS tested in this work. In contrast, under 100 keV high energy e-beam exposures, almost all of the non-ionic PAGs showed significantly better acid generation performance than the ionic onium salt PAGs tested. In particular, one non-ionic PAG showed almost an order of magnitude improvement in the Dill C acid generation rate constant as compared to a triarylsulfonium PAG. The high energy acid generation efficiency was found to correlate well with the electron affinity of the PAGs, suggesting that improvements in PAG design can be predicted. Non-ionic PAGs merit further investigation as a means for producing higher sensitivity resists under high energy exposure sources.

  3. High-resolution simulations of the thermophysiological effects of human exposure to 100 MHz RF energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David A.; Curran, Allen R.; Nyberg, Hans A.; Marttila, Eric A.; Mason, Patrick A.; Ziriax, John M.

    2013-03-01

    Human exposure to radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic energy is known to result in tissue heating and can raise temperatures substantially in some situations. Standards for safe exposure to RF do not reflect bio-heat transfer considerations however. Thermoregulatory function (vasodilation, sweating) may mitigate RF heating effects in some environments and exposure scenarios. Conversely, a combination of an extreme environment (high temperature, high humidity), high activity levels and thermally insulating garments may exacerbate RF exposure and pose a risk of unsafe temperature elevation, even for power densities which might be acceptable in a normothermic environment. A high-resolution thermophysiological model, incorporating a heterogeneous tissue model of a seated adult has been developed and used to replicate a series of whole-body exposures at a frequency (100 MHz) which approximates that of human whole-body resonance. Exposures were simulated at three power densities (4, 6 and 8 mW cm-2) plus a sham exposure and at three different ambient temperatures (24, 28 and 31 °C). The maximum hypothalamic temperature increase over the course of a 45 min exposure was 0.28 °C and occurred in the most extreme conditions (Tamb = 31 °C, PD = 8 mW cm-2). Skin temperature increases attributable to RF exposure were modest, with the exception of a ‘hot spot’ in the vicinity of the ankle where skin temperatures exceeded 39 °C. Temperature increases in internal organs and tissues were small, except for connective tissue and bone in the lower leg and foot. Temperature elevation also was noted in the spinal cord, consistent with a hot spot previously identified in the literature.

  4. Neighborhood disorder and telomeres: Connecting children’s exposure to community level stress and cellular response

    PubMed Central

    Theall, Katherine P.; Brett, Zoë H.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Dunn, Erin C.; Drury, Stacy S.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to explore the utility of salivary telomere length (sTL) as an early indicator of neighborhood level social environmental risk during child development. We therefore tested the hypothesis that sTL would be associated with markers of social stress exposure in children. Children age 4–14 from 87 neighborhoods were recruited through five urban schools in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S. Data were collected at the level of the child, family/household, and neighborhood. DNA was obtained from saliva using commercially available kits and sTL was determined for 104 children using quantitative PCR. Analysis was performed on 99 children who had complete data including sTL, social environmental stress, and additional covariates. The mean sTL value was 7.4 T/S (telomere signal/single copy signal) ratio units (± 2.4, range=2.5–18.0), and 4.7% of the variance in sTL was attributed to differences across neighborhoods. Children living in neighborhoods characterized by high disorder had an sTL value 3.2 units lower than children not living in high disordered environments (p<0.05) and their odds of having low relative sTL (defined as < 1 standard deviation below standardized z score mean) values was 3.43 times that of children not living in high disorder environments (adjusted OR=3.43, 95% CI=1.22, 9.62). Our findings are consistent with previous studies in adults demonstrating a strong link between psychosocial stress and sTL obtained from peripheral blood, consistent with previous studies in youth demonstrating an association between early life stress and sTL obtained from buccal cell DNA and offer increased support for the hypothesis that sTL represents a non-invasive biological indicator of psychosocial stress exposure (i.e., neighborhood disorder) able to reflect differences in stress exposure levels even in young children. PMID:23540366

  5. Analysis of the asbestos permissible-exposure-level threshold standard. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.W.

    1991-06-01

    This thesis examines the reasoning of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) decision to set stringent exposure levels for airborne asbestos in the work place. Technical recommendations from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Bureau of Mines, and the American conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists were presented to OSHA for consideration. OSHA and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set industry standards for permissible exposure levels (PEL) of airborne asbestos. Exposure to asbestos poses a health hazard to workers, their families, and consumers of asbestos products. Because it poses an unreasonable risk human life, OSHA has repeatedly lowered the Permissible Exposure Levels and the EPA will ban the manufacture, importation, processing and commercial distribution of asbestos containing products from the United States in phases by 1997. These decisions may have been made too hastily because of the long latency (15-40 years) period before cancer develops, and the added risks that smoking imposes.

  6. Secondhand Smoke Exposure Levels in Outdoor Hospitality Venues: A Qualitative and Quantitative Review of the Research Literature

    PubMed Central

    LICHT, ANDREA S; HYLAND, ANDREW; TRAVERS, MARK J; CHAPMAN, SIMON

    2013-01-01

    Objective This paper considers the evidence on whether outdoor secondhand smoke (SHS) is present in high enough levels of hospitality venues to potentially pose health risks, particularly among employees of such establishments. Data Sources Search strings in PubMed and Web of Science included combinations of environmental tobacco smoke, secondhand smoke, or passive smoke AND outdoor, yielding 217 and 5,199 results, respectively through June, 2012. Study Selection Sixteen studies were selected based on abstract review that either entirely or partly measured outdoor SHS exposures (particulate matter (PM) or other SHS indicators). Data Extraction The methods used to measure SHS indicators, particularly PM, were assessed for inclusion of extraneous variables that may affect such measurements or the corroboration of ambient levels with known standards. Data Synthesis The magnitude of SHS exposure (PM2.5) is dependent on the number of smokers present, proximity to the measuring device, outdoor enclosures, and wind. Under specific conditions, peak outdoor PM2.5 levels can be comparable to those recorded in indoor smoky environments. Using data from both observational and experimental studies, annual excess PM2.5 exposure of full-time waitstaff at outdoor smoking environments could average 4.0 to 12.2 μg/m3 under variable smoking conditions. Conclusions Although highly transitory, outdoor SHS exposures could occasionally exceed annual ambient air quality exposure guidelines. However, such exposures are likely to be higher for occupationally exposed individuals compared to patrons due to repeated and cumulative outdoor SHS exposures. Personal monitoring studies of waitstaff are warranted to corroborate these modeled estimates. PMID:23220937

  7. Visual acuity changes in rhesus following low-level Q-switched exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, David O.; Zwick, Harry; Bearden, Bradley D.; Evans, Brenda S.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    1997-05-01

    Previously we have shown that visual deficits can be produced by long duration pulses at or slightly below traditional threshold levels for retinal injury. Initially the deficits produced were only transient shifts in baseline acuity that lasted less than 30 min, but successive exposures over a period of days at these same power levels were shown to be cumulative and their impact on visual acuity lengthened and became permanent. The present investigation extended these exposures to Q-switched, 532 nm Nd/YAG pulses presented to awake, task-oriented nonhuman primates performing Landolt ring discriminations. At and above the ED50, single pulses of minimal spot diameter produced only minor, transient shifts in visual acuity while repeated exposures produced significant shifts in acuity that became permanent over time. At lower energies, minimal spot, single-pulsed exposures again produced little observable consequence until either retinal spot sizes or number of pulses were increased. At these lower energy levels, however, no permanent functional loss was observed. Hence, the functional impact of single Q-switched pulses was more difficult to assess than longer time domain exposures. Multiple, low level Q-switched pulses, and/or larger spot sizes produced visual deficits similar to those observed for msec time domain exposures, suggesting both temporal and spatial summation at energy levels where no permanent effects have been noted.

  8. Short-term high-altitude pre-exposure improves neurobehavioral ability

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenyun; Chen, Guozhu; Qin, Jun; Zhang, Jihang; Guo, Xubin; Yu, Jie; Song, Pan; Lu, Wei; Xu, Baida; Li, Jiabei; Ding, Xiaohan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of the duration of high-altitude (HA) pre-exposure on human neurobehavioral parameters including mood states and cognitive performance at HA. One hundred and eleven healthy individuals (ranging in age from 18 to 35 years) were recruited to participate in this study. They were divided into two groups: a 4-day short-term HA pre-exposure group (n=57) and a 3-month long-term HA pre-exposure group (n=54). All participants lived in the area at 400 m altitude above sea level before pre-exposure to HA. They were then transported to 3700 m plateau for either a 4-day or a 3-month HA pre-exposure, and finally delivered to 4400 m plateau. On the last day of pre-exposure at 3700 m and on the 10th day at 4400 m, neurobehavioral parameters of the participants in the two groups were evaluated. At the end of pre-exposure and on the 10th day of HA exposure, participants in the short-term group had significantly lower negative mood states, better cognitive performance with higher sensorimotor, attention, and psychomotor abilities, and less acute mountain sickness in comparison with the participants in the long-term pre-exposure group. Our field study with large samples showed that in comparison with 3-month long-term pre-exposure, 4-day short-term HA pre-exposure at 3700 m has a better effect in improving human neurobehavioral parameters including mood states and cognitive performance and reducing acute mountain sickness when exposed to a HA at 4400 m. PMID:26966781

  9. Comparison of screening-level and Monte Carlo approaches for wildlife food web exposure modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pastorok, R.; Butcher, M.; LaTier, A.; Ginn, T.

    1995-12-31

    The implications of using quantitative uncertainty analysis (e.g., Monte Carlo) and site-specific tissue residue data for wildlife exposure modeling were examined with data on trace elements at the Clark Fork River Superfund Site. Exposure of white-tailed deer, red fox, and American kestrel was evaluated using three approaches. First, a screening-level exposure model was based on conservative estimates of exposure parameters, including estimates of dietary residues derived from bioconcentration factors (BCFs) and soil chemistry. A second model without Monte Carlo was based on site-specific data for tissue residues of trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) in key dietary species and plausible assumptions for habitat spatial segmentation and other exposure parameters. Dietary species sampled included dominant grasses (tufted hairgrass and redtop), willows, alfalfa, barley, invertebrates (grasshoppers, spiders, and beetles), and deer mice. Third, the Monte Carlo analysis was based on the site-specific residue data and assumed or estimated distributions for exposure parameters. Substantial uncertainties are associated with several exposure parameters, especially BCFS, such that exposure and risk may be greatly overestimated in screening-level approaches. The results of the three approaches are compared with respect to realism, practicality, and data gaps. Collection of site-specific data on trace elements concentrations in plants and animals eaten by the target wildlife receptors is a cost-effective way to obtain realistic estimates of exposure. Implications of the results for exposure and risk estimates are discussed relative to use of wildlife exposure modeling and evaluation of remedial actions at Superfund sites.

  10. Occupational EMF exposure from radar at X and Ku frequency band and plasma catecholamine levels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarika; Kapoor, Neeru

    2015-09-01

    Workers in certain occupations such as the military may be exposed to technical radiofrequency radiation exposure above current limits, which may pose a health risk. The present investigation intended to find the effect of chronic electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure from radar on plasma catecholamines in the military workforce. In the study, 166 male personnel selected randomly were categorized into three groups: control (n = 68), exposure group-I (X-band, 8-12 GHz, n = 40), and exposure group-II (Ku-band, 12.5-18 GHz, n = 58). The three clusters were further divided into two groups according to their years of service (YOS) (up to 9 years and ≥10 years) to study the effect of years of radar exposure. Enzyme immunoassay was employed to assess catecholamine concentrations. EMF levels were recorded at different occupational distances from radar. Significant adrenaline diminution was registered in exposure group-II with no significant difference in exposure group-I when both groups were weighed against control. Nor-adrenaline and dopamine levels did not vary significantly in both exposure groups when compared to controls. Exposure in terms of YOS also did not yield any significant alteration in any of the catecholamines and in any of the exposure groups when compared with their respective control groups. The shift from baseline catecholamine values due to stress has immense significance for health and well-being. Their continual alteration may prove harmful in due course. Suitable follow-up studies are needed to further strengthen these preliminary observations and for now, exposures should be limited as much as possible with essential safeguards. PMID:26058851

  11. Microcosm procedure for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a method for determining safe levels of chemical exposure in shallow-water communities, using laboratory microcosms as test subjects. The safe level is considered to be the maximum exposure that causes no persistent, ecologically significant changes in the ecosystem. In experiments completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, microcosm-derived estimates of safe exposure levels were confirmed using outdoor artificial ponds, which suggests that the microcosm procedure can be an efficient and economical means of determining safe levels for shallow-water communities. Details of microcosm construction, techniques for monitoring ecological variables in microcosms, and an experimental design for determining safe exposure levels are provided here. The microcosms are assembled by transferring components of natural ecosystems to 80-litre aquaria in a controlled laboratory environment. The communities that develop in these systems are typically dominated by common, cosmopolitan littoral species of macrophytes, algae, and invertebrates. Methods are described for measuring changes in water chemistry, phytoplankton, periphyton, macrophytes, zooplankton, and ecosystem production and respiration. By monitoring these variables over a gradient of pollutant exposure levels, the safe level can be determined accurately and precisely. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Does short-term exposure to elevated levels of natural gamma radiation in Ramsar cause oxidative stress?

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, SMJ; Niroomand-Rad, A; Roshan-Shomal, P; Razavi-Toosi, SMT; Mossayeb-Zadeh, M; Moghadam, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, has areas with some of the highest recorded levels of natural radiation among inhabited areas measured on the earth. Aims: To determine whether short-term exposure to extremely high levels of natural radiation induce oxidative stress. Materials and Methods: In this study, 53 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups of 10-12 animals. Animals in the 1st group were kept for 7 days in an outdoor area with normal background radiation while the 2nd , 3rd , 4th and 5th groups were kept in four different outdoor areas with naturally elevated levels of gamma radiation in Ramsar. A calibrated RDS-110 survey meter, mounted on a tripod approximately 1 m above the ground, was used to measure exposure rate at each location. On days 7 and 9 blood sampling was performed to assess the serum levels of catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA). On day 8, all animals were exposed to a lethal dose of 8 Gy gamma radiations emitted by a Theratron Phoenix (Theratronics, Canada) Cobalt-60 (55 cGy/min) at Radiotherapy Department of Razi Hospital in Rasht, Iran. Results: Findings obtained in this study indicate that high levels of natural radiation cannot induce oxidative stress. CAT and MDA levels in almost all groups were not significantly different (P = 0.69 and P = 0.05, respectively). After exposure to the lethal dose, CAT and MDA levels in all groups were not significantly different (P = 0.054 and P = 0.163, respectively). Conclusions: These findings indicate that short-term exposure to extremely high levels of natural radiation (up to 196 times higher than the normal background) does not induce oxidative stress. PMID:25143879

  13. Elevated triglyceride and decreased high density lipoprotein level in carbon disulfide workers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiin-Chyuan John; Chang, Ho-Yuan; Chang, Shu-Ju; Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Chen, Chiou-Jong; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Huang, Chin-Chang

    2003-01-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS2) is a man-made product utilized primarily in the manufacture of viscose rayon. Overexposure to CS2 has been associated with an increase in coronary heart disease. The aims of this study were to examine the dose-response relationship of CS2 exposure and elevated lipid profile tests among CS2-exposed workers in Taiwan. A total of 132 workers were recruited from two viscose rayon plants. Air sampling was performed to determine the CS2 exposure of workers. Demographic data and work history were gathered by a standard self-administered questionnaire. Lipid profile tests were also performed by routine methods. The average CS2 exposure concentration was 50.6 +/- 25.6 ppm (range: 24-127 ppm) in the high-exposure group, 12.9 +/- 5 ppm (range: 5.2-22.3 ppm) in the mid-exposure group, and 3.5 +/- 1.2 ppm (range 0.97-5.2 ppm) in the low-exposure group. There were 21 out of 33 (63.7%) elevated triglyceride levels among high-CS2-exposure workers, 27 out of 64 (42.2%) among the middle-CS2-exposure, and 14 out of 35 (40%) among low-CS2-exposure workers, respectively. Compared to the low-CS2-exposure workers, the age- and weight-adjusted odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of the prevalence of elevated triglyceride value were 1.12 (0.5, 2.7) for middle-CS2-exposure workers, and 2.81 (1.02, 7.8) for high-CS2-exposure workers. There was a significant linear trend between CS2 exposure and the prevalence of elevated triglyceride value (P = 0.046) after adjusting for other factors. There was also a lower prevalence of elevated HDL level in high-CS2-exposure workers than low-CS2-exposure workers (15.2% versus 31.4%). Compared to the low-CS2-exposure workers, the age- and weight-adjusted odds ratio (and 95% confidence intervals) of elevated HDL level were 0.34 (0.1, 1.18) for high-CS2-exposure workers, which was borderline significant. In conclusion, this study suggests that elevated triglyceride level and decreased HDL level are associated with CS2 exposure

  14. DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS DEGRADATION

    SciTech Connect

    W. Ebert

    2001-09-20

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the analyses that were done to develop models for radionuclide release from high-level waste (HLW) glass dissolution that can be integrated into performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted to support site recommendation and license application for the Yucca Mountain site. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000a). It specifically addresses the item, ''Defense High Level Waste Glass Degradation'', of the product technical work plan. The AP-3.15Q Attachment 1 screening criteria determines the importance for its intended use of the HLW glass model derived herein to be in the category ''Other Factors for the Postclosure Safety Case-Waste Form Performance'', and thus indicates that this factor does not contribute significantly to the postclosure safety strategy. Because the release of radionuclides from the glass will depend on the prior dissolution of the glass, the dissolution rate of the glass imposes an upper bound on the radionuclide release rate. The approach taken to provide a bound for the radionuclide release is to develop models that can be used to calculate the dissolution rate of waste glass when contacted by water in the disposal site. The release rate of a particular radionuclide can then be calculated by multiplying the glass dissolution rate by the mass fraction of that radionuclide in the glass and by the surface area of glass contacted by water. The scope includes consideration of the three modes by which water may contact waste glass in the disposal system: contact by humid air, dripping water, and immersion. The models for glass dissolution under these contact modes are all based on the rate expression for aqueous dissolution of borosilicate glasses. The mechanism and rate expression for aqueous dissolution are adequately understood; the analyses in this AMR were conducted to

  15. Interventions for Individuals With High Levels of Needle Fear

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Melanie; Taddio, Anna; Antony, Martin M.; Asmundson, Gordon J.G.; Riddell, Rebecca Pillai; Chambers, Christine T.; Shah, Vibhuti

    2015-01-01

    Background: This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of exposure-based psychological and physical interventions for the management of high levels of needle fear and/or phobia and fainting in children and adults. Design/Methods: A systematic review identified relevant randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of children, adults, or both with high levels of needle fear, including phobia (if not available, then populations with other specific phobias were included). Critically important outcomes were self-reported fear specific to the feared situation and stimulus (psychological interventions) or fainting (applied muscle tension). Data were pooled using standardized mean difference (SMD) or relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. Results: The systematic review included 11 trials. In vivo exposure-based therapy for children 7 years and above showed benefit on specific fear (n=234; SMD: −1.71 [95% CI: −2.72, −0.7]). In vivo exposure-based therapy with adults reduced fear of needles posttreatment (n=20; SMD: −1.09 [−2.04, −0.14]) but not at 1-year follow-up (n=20; SMD: −0.28 [−1.16, 0.6]). Compared with single session, a benefit was observed for multiple sessions of exposure-based therapy posttreatment (n=93; SMD: −0.66 [−1.08, −0.24]) but not after 1 year (n=83; SMD: −0.37 [−0.87, 0.13]). Non in vivo e.g., imaginal exposure-based therapy in children reduced specific fear posttreatment (n=41; SMD: −0.88 [−1.7, −0.05]) and at 3 months (n=24; SMD: −0.89 [−1.73, −0.04]). Non in vivo exposure-based therapy for adults showed benefit on specific fear (n=68; SMD: −0.62 [−1.11, −0.14]) but not procedural fear (n=17; SMD: 0.18 [−0.87, 1.23]). Applied tension showed benefit on fainting posttreatment (n=20; SMD: −1.16 [−2.12, −0.19]) and after 1 year (n=20; SMD: −0.97 [−1.91, −0.03]) compared with exposure alone. Conclusions: Exposure-based psychological interventions and applied muscle tension show

  16. Alteration of blood glucose levels in the rat following exposure to hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Eynan, Mirit; Mullokandov, Michael; Krinsky, Nitzan; Biram, Adi; Arieli, Yehuda

    2015-09-01

    Findings regarding blood glucose level (BGL) on exposure to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) are contradictory. We investigated the influence of HBO on BGL, and of BGL on latency to central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT). The study was conducted on five groups of rats: Group 1, exposure to oxygen at 2.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA), 90 min/day for 7 days; Group 2, exposure to oxygen once a week from 2 to 6 ATA in increments of 1 ATA/wk, for a period of time calculated as 60% of the latency to CNS-OT (no convulsions); Group 3, exposure to 6 ATA breathing a gas mixture with a pO2 of 0.21; Group 4, received 10 U/kg insulin to induce hypoglycemia before exposure to HBO; Group 5, received 33% glucose to induce hyperglycemia before exposure to HBO. Blood samples were drawn before and after exposures for measurement of BGL. No change was observed in BGL after exposure to oxygen at 2.5 ATA, 90 min/day for 7 days. BGL was significantly elevated after exposure to oxygen at 6 ATA until the appearance of convulsions, and following exposure to 4, 5, and 6 ATA without convulsions (P < 0.01). No change was observed in BGL after exposure to 6 ATA breathing a gas mixture with a pO2 of 0.21. Hypoglycemia shortened latency to CNS oxygen toxicity, whereas hyperglycemia had no effect. Our results demonstrate an influence of HBO exposure on elevation of BGL, starting at 4 ATA. This implies that BGL may serve as a marker for the generation of CNS-OT. PMID:26183474

  17. The Impact of Different Permissible Exposure Limits on Hearing Threshold Levels Beyond 25 dBA

    PubMed Central

    Sayapathi, Balachandar S; Su, Anselm Ting; Koh, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: Development of noise-induced hearing loss is reliant on a few factors such as frequency, intensity, and duration of noise exposure. The occurrence of this occupational malady has doubled from 120 million to 250 million in a decade. Countries such as Malaysia, India, and the US have adopted 90 dBA as the permissible exposure limit. According to the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the exposure limit for noise is 90 dBA, while that of the US National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is 85 dBA for 8 hours of noise exposure. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the development of hearing threshold levels beyond 25 dBA on adoption of 85 dBA as the permissible exposure limit compared to 90 dBA. Patients and Methods: This is an intervention study done on two automobile factories. There were 203 employees exposed to noise levels beyond the action level. Hearing protection devices were distributed to reduce noise levels to a level between the permissible exposure limit and action level. The permissible exposure limits were 90 and 85 dBA in factories 1 and 2, respectively, while the action levels were 85 and 80 dBA, respectively. The hearing threshold levels of participants were measured at baseline and at first month of postshift exposure of noise. The outcome was measured by a manual audiometer. McNemar and chi-square tests were used in the statistical analysis. Results: We found that hearing threshold levels of more than 25 dBA has changed significantly from pre-intervention to post-intervention among participants from both factories (3000 Hz for the right ear and 2000 Hz for the left ear). There was a statistically significant association between participants at 3000 Hz on the right ear at ‘deteriorated’ level ( χ² (1) = 4.08, φ = - 0.142, P = 0.043), whereas there was worsening of hearing threshold beyond 25 dBA among those embraced 90 dBA. Conclusions: The adoption of 85 dBA as the permissible exposure

  18. Biochemical responses and metals levels in Ruditapes decussatus after exposure to treated municipal effluents.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Naouel; Jebali, Jamel; Banni, Mohamed; Ben Khedher, Sana; Chouba, Lassaad; Boussetta, Hamadi

    2012-08-01

    This study assessed the responses of biochemical biomarkers and metals levels in Ruditapes decussatus exposed to the increasing concentrations of treated municipal effluents (TME) discharged into the Tunisian coastal area. Clams were exposed to 0%, 1%, 3% and 10% for 7 and 14 day and the following biochemical responses were measured: (1) catalase activity and lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS) as oxidative stress biomarkers, (2) gluthathione S-transferase (GST) activity as a phase II conjugation enzyme; (3) cholinesterase activity (ChE) as biomarker of neurotoxicity, and (4) metallothioneins as a proteins highly induced by heavy metals. A significant uptake of Cu, Cd and Zn in digestive gland and serious biochemical alterations were observed. Thus, exposure of clams to croissant concentration of TME have the potential to increase the oxidative stress biomarkers (TBARS, CAT activity) and MT levels; and decrease ChE activity in both gills and digestive gland. Current experimental results suggest that CAT, GST, ChE activities and MT and TBARs levels in gills and digestive gland of clam R. decussatus are sensitive and suitable responses for assessing the effects of anthropogenic contaminants on the aquatic ecosystems, particularly effluent complex mixtures. PMID:22664226

  19. Low-level exposures: some implications for the U.S. Department of Energy.

    PubMed Central

    Beall, J R

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) maintains several programs to study and understand the health and environmental effects of exposure to low levels of energy-related agents. These programs include research to understand the mechanisms of action of agents of concern and to assess the risks associated with exposures of people and ecological systems to these agents. They also include implementing appropriate occupational safety and health standards and remediating waste sites to environmental standards. These programs require that the U.S. DOE pursue a realistic understanding of the effects of exposures to small amounts of energy-related agents. The largest of these programs involves hazardous waste remediation and includes potentially harmful exposures to low levels of numerous agents. The U.S. DOE conducts research to establish the scientific bases for the realistic assessment of risks of exposure to such wastes. As part of the U.S. DOE efforts to understand the risks of low-level exposures to hazardous waste, the Office of Health and Environmental Research and the Office of Environmental Management recently launched a broad cooperative program. It is comprised of research projects in nine general scientific areas and includes research on the health impacts and risk estimation of exposure to low levels of hazardous wastes. Projects for this new cooperative research program were selected from 610 applications and totaled approximately $47 million in fiscal year 1996. This program marks a new approach by using basic research to reduce cleanup costs and to develop scientific foundations for advances in environmental technologies. The research will also examine the effects of exposure to low levels of chemical and radiological wastes. PMID:9539034

  20. Multi-exposure laser speckle contrast imaging using a high frame rate CMOS sensor with a field programmable gate array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shen; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R; He, Diwei; Zhu, Yiqun; Morgan, Stephen P

    2015-10-15

    A system has been developed in which multi-exposure laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is implemented using a high frame rate CMOS imaging sensor chip. Processing is performed using a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The system allows different exposure times to be simulated by accumulating a number of short exposures. This has the advantage that the image acquisition time is limited by the maximum exposure time and that regulation of the illuminating light level is not required. This high frame rate camera has also been deployed to implement laser Doppler blood flow processing, enabling a direct comparison of multi-exposure laser speckle imaging and laser Doppler imaging (LDI) to be carried out using the same experimental data. Results from a rotating diffuser indicate that both multi-exposure LSCI and LDI provide a linear response to changes in velocity. This cannot be obtained using single-exposure LSCI, unless an appropriate model is used for correcting the response. PMID:26469570

  1. Rising Level of Public Exposure to Mobile Phones: Accumulation through Additivity and Reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondou, Tsuyoshi

    2002-02-01

    A dramatic development occurring in our daily life is the increasing use of mobile equipment including mobile phones and wireless access to the Internet. They enable us to access several types of information more easily than in the past. Simultaneously, the density of mobile users is rapidly increasing. When hundreds of mobile phones emit radiation, their total power is found to be comparable to that of a microwave oven or a satellite broadcasting station. Thus, the question arises: what is the public exposure level in an area with many sources of electromagnetic wave emission? We show that this level can reach the reference level for general public exposure (ICNIRP Guideline) in daily life. This is caused by the fundamental properties of electromagnetic field, namely, reflection and additivity. The level of exposure is found to be much higher than that estimated by the conventional framework of analysis that assumes that the level rapidly decreases with the inverse square distance between the source and the affected person. A simple formula for the exposure level is derived by applying energetics to the electromagnetic field. The formula reveals a potential risk of intensive exposure.

  2. Area-level socioeconomic deprivation, nitrogen dioxide exposure, and term birth weight in New York City.

    PubMed

    Shmool, Jessie L C; Bobb, Jennifer F; Ito, Kazuhiko; Elston, Beth; Savitz, David A; Ross, Zev; Matte, Thomas D; Johnson, Sarah; Dominici, Francesca; Clougherty, Jane E

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies have linked air pollution with adverse birth outcomes, but relatively few have examined differential associations across the socioeconomic gradient. To evaluate interaction effects of gestational nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and area-level socioeconomic deprivation on fetal growth, we used: (1) highly spatially-resolved air pollution data from the New York City Community Air Survey (NYCCAS); and (2) spatially-stratified principle component analysis of census variables previously associated with birth outcomes to define area-level deprivation. New York City (NYC) hospital birth records for years 2008-2010 were restricted to full-term, singleton births to non-smoking mothers (n=243,853). We used generalized additive mixed models to examine the potentially non-linear interaction of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and deprivation categories on birth weight (and estimated linear associations, for comparison), adjusting for individual-level socio-demographic characteristics and sensitivity testing adjustment for co-pollutant exposures. Estimated NO2 exposures were highest, and most varying, among mothers residing in the most-affluent census tracts, and lowest among mothers residing in mid-range deprivation tracts. In non-linear models, we found an inverse association between NO2 and birth weight in the least-deprived and most-deprived areas (p-values<0.001 and 0.05, respectively) but no association in the mid-range of deprivation (p=0.8). Likewise, in linear models, a 10 ppb increase in NO2 was associated with a decrease in birth weight among mothers in the least-deprived and most-deprived areas of -16.2g (95% CI: -21.9 to -10.5) and -11.0 g (95% CI: -22.8 to 0.9), respectively, and a non-significant change in the mid-range areas [β=0.5 g (95% CI: -7.7 to 8.7)]. Linear slopes in the most- and least-deprived quartiles differed from the mid-range (reference group) (p-values<0.001 and 0.09, respectively). The complex patterning in air pollution exposure and deprivation

  3. Development of a multimedia radionuclide exposure model for low-level waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Whelan, G.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1982-03-01

    A method is being developed for assessing exposures of the air, water, and plants to low-level waste (LLW) as a part of an overall development effort of a LLW site evaluation methodology. The assessment methodology will predict LLW exposure levels in the environment by simulating dominant mechanisms of LLW migration and fate. The methodology consists of a series of physics-based models with proven histories of success; the models interact with each other to simulate LLW transport in the ecosystem. A scaled-down version of the methodology was developed first by combining the terrestrial ecological model, BIOTRAN; the overland transport model, ARM; the instream hydrodynamic model, DKWAV; and the instream sediment-contaminant transport model, TODAM (a one-dimensional version of SERATRA). The methodology was used to simulate the migration of /sup 239/Pu from a shallow-land disposal site (known as Area C) located near the head of South Mortandad Canyon on the LANL site in New Mexico. The scenario assumed that /sup 239/Pu would be deposited on the land surface through the natural processes of plant growth, LLW uptake, dryfall, and litter decomposition. Runoff events would then transport /sup 239/Pu to and in the canyon. The model provided sets of simulated LLW levels in soil, water and terrestrial plants in the region surrounding the site under a specified land-use and a waste management option. Over a 100-yr simulation period, only an extremely small quantity (6 x 10/sup -9/ times the original concentration) of buried /sup 239/Pu was taken up by plants and deposited on the land surface. Only a small fraction (approximately 1%) of that contamination was further removed by soil erosion from the site and carried to the canyon, where it remained. Hence, the study reveals that the environment around Area C has integrity high enough to curtail LLW migration under recreational land use.

  4. Modeling Human Exposure Levels to Airborne Volatile Organic Compounds by the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Ho; Kwak, Byoung Kyu; Ha, Mina; Cheong, Hae-Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The goal was to model and quantify the atmospheric concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as the result of the Hebei Spirit oil spill, and to predict whether the exposure levels were abnormally high or not. Methods We developed a model for calculating the airborne concentration of VOCs that are produced in an oil spill accident. The model was applied to a practical situation, namely the Hebei Spirit oil spill. The accuracy of the model was verified by comparing the results with previous observation data. The concentrations were compared with the currently used air quality standards. Results Evaporation was found to be 10- to 1,000-fold higher than the emissions produced from a surrounding industrial complex. The modeled concentrations for benzene failed to meet current labor environmental standards, and the concentration of benzene, toluene, ortho- meta- para-xylene were higher than the values specified by air quality standards and guideline values on the ocean. The concentrations of total VOCs were much higher than indoor environmental criteria for the entire Taean area for a few days. Conclusions The extent of airborne exposure was clearly not the same as that for normal conditions. PMID:22468262

  5. Parallel Processing at the High School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheary, Kathryn Anne

    This study investigated the ability of high school students to cognitively understand and implement parallel processing. Data indicates that most parallel processing is being taught at the university level. Instructional modules on C, Linux, and the parallel processing language, P4, were designed to show that high school students are highly…

  6. Perinatal ethanol exposure alters met-enkephalin levels of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Joaquin N; Wilson, Marlene A; Kelly, Sandra J

    2006-01-01

    This study used a rat model of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome to investigate whether combined prenatal and postnatal ethanol exposure affects met-enkephalin levels in the brains of male and female Long-Evans adult rats. Intragastric ethanol was administered to a group of rats (ET) from gestational day (GD) 1 through 22 and from postnatal day (PD) 2 through 10. The control groups consisted of a nontreated control group (NTC) and an intubated control group (IC) that received the intragastric intubation procedure but no exposure to ethanol. We measured met-enkephalin levels in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, central and basolateral nucleus of amygdala and ventral tegmental area. Met-enkephalin levels in the hypothalamus of male and female ET animals were significantly higher than those in either the NTC or IC animals. Met-enkephalin levels in the central nucleus of the amygdala of male and female ET animals were significantly lower than the levels in the NTC animals. Met-enkephalin levels in the nucleus accumbens of ET females were significantly greater than those in the IC females. These results demonstrate that the combination of prenatal and postnatal ethanol exposure affects basal met-enkephalin levels in specific regions in a sex-specific manner. These changes in met-enkephalin levels may explain how early ethanol exposure affects opioid-regulated behaviors such as social play, sexual behavior, and other social behaviors. PMID:16457985

  7. Low level ozone exposure induces airways inflammation and modifies cell surface phenotypes in healthy humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The effects of low level ozone exposure (0.08 ppm) on pulmonary function in healthy young adults are well known, however much less is known about the inflammatory and immuno-modulatory effects oflow level ozone in the airways. Techniques such as induced sputum and flo...

  8. LOW-LEVEL CARBON MONOXIDE EXPOSURE AND WORK CAPACITY AT 1600 METERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    At sea level, low-level carbon monoxide (CO) exposure impairs exercise performance. To determine if altitude residence at 1600 m augments this CO effect, two studies of graded treadmill work capacity were done. The Initial Study investigated nine, non-smoking male subjects breath...

  9. Accounting for time-dependent covariates whose levels are influenced by exposure status.

    PubMed

    Weiss, N S; Dublin, S

    1998-07-01

    When measuring the association between an exposure and disease, one must decide whether to account for confounding or modifying variables whose levels are altered by the presence of the exposure. For example, to assess the impact of cessation of unopposed estrogen therapy on the occurrence of endometrial cancer, a researcher needs to consider the duration of the estrogen therapy, a strong risk factor for endometrial cancer, as a potential confounder or effect modifier. Duration of estrogen therapy, however, is itself influenced by the decision to stop the therapy (the "exposure" of interest). In such a case, two distinct approaches may be taken, depending upon the question being considered. One may wish to assess the degree to which the exposure predicts disease incidence, over and above the additional variable, at some later point in time. In this case, it is appropriate to consider the value of the other variable (for example, duration) at that later time. On the other hand, one may also wish to measure the rate of disease beginning at the time of cessation of the exposure, relative to the corresponding rate in persons with continuing exposure Here, the most appropriate analysis considers the level of the confounding variable (for example, duration) measured only until the time of exposure of interest occurs (for example, cessation of unopposed estrogen therapy). Examples are given to illustrate that the specific question being addressed dictates the handling of covariates of this type. PMID:9647909

  10. High-Level Application Framework for LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P; Chevtsov, S.; Fairley, D.; Larrieu, C.; Rock, J.; Rogind, D.; White, G.; Zalazny, M.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22

    A framework for high level accelerator application software is being developed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The framework is based on plug-in technology developed by an open source project, Eclipse. Many existing functionalities provided by Eclipse are available to high-level applications written within this framework. The framework also contains static data storage configuration and dynamic data connectivity. Because the framework is Eclipse-based, it is highly compatible with any other Eclipse plug-ins. The entire infrastructure of the software framework will be presented. Planned applications and plug-ins based on the framework are also presented.