Science.gov

Sample records for high luminosity insertion

  1. High luminosity muon collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  2. High luminosity muon scattering at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Bazizi, K. ); Conrad, J.; Fang, G. ); Erdmann, M. ); Geesaman, D.; Jackson, H. ); Guyot, C.; Virchaux, M. ); Holmgren, H. ); Malensek, A.; Melanson, H.; Morfin

    1990-02-01

    The charge of this group was to evaluate the physics that can be done with a high luminosity {mu} scattering experiment at FNAL using the upgraded Tevatron muon beam, and consider the apparatus required. In this report, the physics that can be accomplished with a high luminosity {mu} scattering experiment is evaluated. The CERN and FNAL {mu} beams are compared in the context of such an experiment. The expected muon flux with the upgraded machine is estimated. Two possible detectors are compared: the air-core toroid experiment proposed by Guyot et al., and an upgraded version of the E665 double-diode apparatus now in place at FNAL. The relative costs of the detectors are considered. A list of detailed questions that need to be answered regarding the double-diode experiment has be compiled. 2 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Readout control for high luminosity accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusevic, R.; Nixon, G.

    1991-09-01

    In this article we discuss some aspects of data acquisition at high luminosities and offer a set of design principles concerning readout control electronics and related software. As an example we include a brief description of a data transfer and processing system for future hadron colliders, featuring a transputer-based crate controller and a set of readout cards. This is a simplified and more efficient version of our design recently published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods. [A295 (1991) 391].

  4. Scintillating Fibre Tracking at High Luminosity Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joram, C.; Haefeli, G.; Leverington, B.

    2015-08-01

    The combination of small diameter scintillating plastic fibres with arrays of SiPM photodetectors has led to a new class of SciFi trackers usable at high luminosity collider experiments. After a short review of the main principles and history of the scintillating fibre technology, we describe the challenges and developments of the large area Scintillating Fibre Tracker currently under development for the upgraded LHCb experiment.

  5. Results From the DAFNE High Luminosity Test

    SciTech Connect

    Milardi, C.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, G.; Murtas, F.; Pellegrino, L.; /Frascati /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN /INFN, Cosenza /INFN, Rome /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Rome U. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Rome3 /SLAC

    2012-04-11

    The DAPHNE collider, based on a new collision scheme including Large Piwinsky angle and Crab-Waist, has been successfully commissioned and is presently delivering luminosity to the SIDDHARTA detector. Large crossing angle and Crab-Waist scheme proved to be effective in: (1) Increasing luminosity, now a factor 2.7 higher than in the past; and (2) controlling transverse beam blow-up due to the beam-beam. Work is in progress to reach the ultimate design luminosity goal 5.0 {center_dot} 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The new collision scheme is the main design concept for a new project aimed at building a Super-B factory that is expected to achieve a luminosity of the order of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and it has been also taken into account to upgrade one of the LHC interaction regions.

  6. Tevatron Experimental Issues at High Luminosities

    SciTech Connect

    Kreps, Michal; CDF, for the; collaborations, D0

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we describe the detector components, triggers and analysis techniques for flavor physics at the Tevatron experiments CDF and D0. As Tevatron performs very well and runs at higher luminosities regularly we also touch issues related to it and efforts to improve detectors and triggers for such running.

  7. High-field Magnet Development toward the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    The upcoming Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on the use of Accelerator Quality Nb3Sn Magnets which have been the focus of an intense R&D effort in the last decade. This contribution will describe the R&D and results of Nb3Sn Accelerator Quality High Field Magnets development efforts, with emphasis on the activities considered for the HL-LHC upgrades.

  8. Triggering at a high luminosity hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.; Wagner, R.G.; Abolins, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The extreme interaction rate occurring at the SSC as described in the Reference Design Report poses the principal new challenge for the triggering system compared with detectors at previous accelerators. At SSC we must plan for about 10/sup 8/ interactions per second. If bunch crossings occur each 33 ns, there will be an average of 3 interactions in each bunch crossing. Potential problems for triggering are presented both by the high total rate and by the multiple interactions per bunch crossing, so that triggering events must be selected in the presence of other interactions independent of the inherent speed of either detector elements or triggering electronics. Three principal topics are considered in this report: (1) Practical selections to be made in a first-level trigger to reduce the rate by a factor of 1000. (2) Electronics expected to implement this first-level trigger, and (3) the ultimate trigger selections that must be used to select the approximately 1 Hz that can practically be recorded for detailed analysis. 11 references, 6 figures.

  9. Study on high rate MRPC for high luminosity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Huang, X.; Lv, P.; Zhu, W.; Shi, L.; Xie, B.; Cheng, J.; Li, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) has been used to construct time-of-flight system in the field of nuclear and particle physics, due to their high-precision timing properties, high efficiency, reliability and coverage of large area. With the increase of accelerator luminosity, MRPCs have to withstand particle fluxes up to several tens of kHz/cm2 in view of the next generation physics experiments, such as the SIS-100/300 at FAIR-CBM, SoLID at JLab and NICA at JINR. But the MRPC assembled with float glass has very low rate capability not exceeding some hundreds of Hz/cm2. Two possible solutions for increasing rate capability, one is to reduce the bulk resistivity of glass and the other is to reduce the electrode thickness. Tsinghua University has done R&D on high rate MRPC for many years. A special low resistive glass with bulk resistivity around 1010Ω.cm was developed. We also studied the rate capability changes with glass thickness. In this paper we describe the performance of low resistive glass and two kinds of high rate MRPC (Pad readout and Strip readout) tested by deuterium beams. The results show that the tolerable particle flux can reach 70 kHz/cm2. In the mean time, MRPCs assembled with three thickness (0.7 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.35 mm) of float glass were also tested with deuteron beams, the results show that the three detectors can afford particle rate up to 500 Hz/cm2, 0.75 kHz/cm2 and 3 kHz/cm2, respectively.

  10. Physics of a high-luminosity Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper highlights the physics capabilities of a Tau-Charm Factory; i.e., high luminosity ({approximately}10{sup 33}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider operating in the center-of-mass energy range of 3-5 GeV, with a high-precision, general-purpose detector. Recent developments in {tau} and charm physics are emphasized.

  11. Dynamic aperture studies for the LHC high luminosity lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Maria, R. de; Giovannozzi, M.; McIntosh, E.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Cai, Y.; Wang, M. -H.

    2015-07-14

    Since quite some time, dynamic aperture studies have been undertaken with the aim of specifying the required field quality of the new magnets that will be installed in the LHC ring in the framework of the high-luminosity upgrade. In this paper the latest results concerning the specification work will be presented, taking into account both injection and collision energies and the field quality contribution from all the magnets in the newly designed interaction regions.

  12. IUE observations of blue halo high luminosity stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, M.; Franco, M. L.; Stalio, R.

    1981-01-01

    Two high luminosity population II blue stars of high galactic latitude, BD+33 deg 2642 and HD 137569 were observed at high resolution. The stellar spectra show the effect of mass loss in BD+33 deg 2642 and abnormally weak metallic lines in HD 137569. The interstellar lines in the direction of BD+33 deg 2642, which lies at a height z greater than or equal to 6.2 kpc from the galactic plane, are split into two components. No high ionization stages are found at the low velocity component; nor can they be detected in the higher velocity clouds because of mixing with the corresponding stellar/circumstellar lines.

  13. SLHC, the High-Luminosity Upgrade (public event)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    In the morning of June 23rd a public event is organised in CERN's Council Chamber with the aim of providing the particle physics community with up-to-date information about the strategy for the LHC luminosity upgrade and to describe the current status of preparation work. The presentations will provide an overview of the various accelerator sub-projects, the LHC physics prospects and the upgrade plans of ATLAS and CMS. This event is organised in the framework of the SLHC-PP project, which receives funding from the European Commission for the preparatory phase of the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade project. Informing the public is among the objectives of this EU-funded project. A simultaneous transmission of this meeting will be broadcast, available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  14. Disc outflows and high-luminosity true type 2 AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, Moshe; Netzer, Hagai

    2016-06-01

    The absence of intrinsic broad-line emission has been reported in a number of active galactic nuclei (AGN), including some with high Eddington ratios. Such `true type 2 AGN' are inherent to the disc-wind scenario for the broad-line region: broad-line emission requires a minimal column density, implying a minimal outflow rate and thus a minimal accretion rate. Here we perform a detailed analysis of the consequences of mass conservation in the process of accretion through a central disc. The resulting constraints on luminosity are consistent with all the cases where claimed detections of true type 2 AGN pass stringent criteria, and predict that intrinsic broad-line emission can disappear at luminosities as high as ˜4 × 1046 erg s-1 and any Eddington ratio, though more detections can be expected at Eddington ratios below ˜1 per cent. Our results are applicable to every disc outflow model, whatever its details and whether clumpy or smooth, irrespective of the wind structure and its underlying dynamics. While other factors, such as changes in spectral energy distribution or covering factor, can affect the intensities of broad emission lines, within this scenario they can only produce true type 2 AGN of higher luminosity then those prescribed by mass conservation.

  15. Radiation environment and shielding for a high luminosity collider detector

    SciTech Connect

    Diwan, M.V.; Fisyak, Y.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1995-12-01

    Detectors now under design for use in the proposed high energy high luminosity colliders must deal with unprecedented radiation levels. We have performed a comprehensive study for the GEM detector at the SSC to determine the best way to shield critical detector components from excessive radiation, with special attention paid to the low energy neutrons and photons. We have used several detailed Monte-Carlo simulations to calculate the particle fluxes in the detector. We describe these methods and demonstrate that two orders of magnitude reduction in the neutron and photon fluxes can be obtained with appropriate shielding of critical forward regions such as the low beta quadrupoles and the forward calorimeter.

  16. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  17. The winds of high luminosity late-type bright stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Carpenter, K. G.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence and characteristics of the Fe II line asymmetries were studied to determine the radial dependence of the wind velocity for each star. The dependence of the Fe II profiles on spectral type and luminosity class and thus the variation of the velocity fields with stellar type was also investigated. This allows the generality of the results reported for alpha Ori by Carpenter (1984b) to be judged. In addition, new atomic data was used along with observations of the C II (UV 0.01) multiplet to estimate N(sub e) in the stellar winds. Measures of relative Fe II fluxes can be used in a probability-of-escape model to determine the opacity and hydrogen column density versus height in the chromosphere of each star. Finally, analysis of the fluorescent Fe II lines (pumped by Ly alpha) near 2507 A will yield estimates of the intrinsic stellar Ly alpha flux that cannot be measured directly because of interstellar and circumstellar absorption. One important goal of the effort was to acquire high resolution spectra of the whole 2300 to 3200 A region of 13 luminous K and M stars as a data base that will be enormously valuable in planning observations with the Hubble Space Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph. It is also proposed to follow up the recent discovery of significant variations in the Fe II chromospheric emission line profiles from the M-giant Gamma Cru for the purpose of determining the underlying cause of the variations.

  18. High time resolution luminosity profiles of Jellyfish (Super) Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHarg, M. G.; Ahrns, J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Kammae, T.; Haaland, R. K.; Cummer, S. A.; Li, J.; Liu, N.; Yukman, P.

    2011-12-01

    We compare the time history of luminosity and VLF measurements associated with different classes of sprites. In particular we are interested in the larger "jellyfish, or super" sprites that are very bright, very brief duration sprites. Optical observations reveal these sprites are collections of multiple carrot sprites, comprised of both downward and upward propagating streamers. We find the time scales of super sprites are shorter than that for carrot sprites and column sprites. The exponential decrease in sprite luminosity has been related to the conductivity profile assumed for the middle atmosphere by [Barrington-Leigh et. al. (2002), doi: 10.1029/2001JA900117]. We investigate the possibility that the overall brighter and rapid decrease in jellyfish sprite luminosity compared to other types of sprites may be related to changes in the middle atmosphere conductivity, and/or in the driving electrostatic field associated with the causative lightning flash.

  19. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  20. SuperB: a Linear High-Luminosity B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Bettarini, S.; Biagini, M.; Bonneaud, G.; Cai, Y.; Calderini, G.; Ciuchini, M.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.P.; Ecklund, S.; Forti, F.; Gershon, T.J.; Giorgi, M.A.; Hitlin, D.G.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Lusiani, A.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Neri, N.; Novokhatski, A.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; /Caltech /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Frascati /Ecole Polytechnique /SLAC /Rome III U. /INFN, Rome3 /Warwick U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Edinburgh U. /Orsay, LAL

    2006-02-08

    This paper is based on the outcome of the activity that has taken place during the recent workshop on ''SuperB in Italy'' held in Frascati on November 11-12, 2005. The workshop was opened by a theoretical introduction of Marco Ciuchini and was structured in two working groups. One focused on the machine and the other on the detector and experimental issues.. The present status on CP is mainly based on the results achieved by BABAR and Belle. Establishment of the indirect CP violation in B sector in 2001 and of the direct CP violation in 2004 thanks to the success of PEP-II and KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric B Factories operating at the center of mass energy corresponding to the mass of the {Upsilon}(4S ). With the two B Factories taking data, the Unitarity Triangle is now beginning to be over constrained by improving the measurements of the sides and now also of the angles {alpha}, and {gamma}. We are also in presence of the very intriguing results about the measurements of sin2{beta} in the time dependent analysis of decay channels via penguin loops, where b {yields} s{bar s}s and b {yields} s{bar d}d. {tau} physics, in particular LFV search, as well as charm and ISR physics are important parts of the scientific program of a SuperB Factory. The physics case together with possible scenarios for the high luminosity SuperB Factory based on the concepts of the Linear Collider and the related experimental issues are discussed.

  1. Evaluation of a high resolution silicon PET insert module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grkovski, Milan; Brzezinski, Karol; Cindro, Vladimir; Clinthorne, Neal H.; Kagan, Harris; Lacasta, Carlos; Mikuž, Marko; Solaz, Carles; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Žontar, Dejan

    2015-07-01

    Conventional PET systems can be augmented with additional detectors placed in close proximity of the region of interest. We developed a high resolution PET insert module to evaluate the added benefit of such a combination. The insert module consists of two back-to-back 1 mm thick silicon sensors, each segmented into 1040 1 mm2 pads arranged in a 40 by 26 array. A set of 16 VATAGP7.1 ASICs and a custom assembled data acquisition board were used to read out the signal from the insert module. Data were acquired in slice (2D) geometry with a Jaszczak phantom (rod diameters of 1.2-4.8 mm) filled with 18F-FDG and the images were reconstructed with ML-EM method. Both data with full and limited angular coverage from the insert module were considered and three types of coincidence events were combined. The ratio of high-resolution data that substantially improves quality of the reconstructed image for the region near the surface of the insert module was estimated to be about 4%. Results from our previous studies suggest that such ratio could be achieved at a moderate technological expense by using an equivalent of two insert modules (an effective sensor thickness of 4 mm).

  2. High-energy high-luminosity µ+ µ- collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Robert B.; Fernow, Richard; Gallardo, Juan C.; Lee, Y. Y.; Torun, Yagmur; Neuffer, David; Winn, David

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the design of a high luminosity (1035 cm-2 s-1), high energy (2 + 2 TeV) µ+µ- collider, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muon beams and proceeding through the muon storage ring.

  3. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (1/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-22

    Calorimetry and Muon Spectrometers - Part I : In the first part of the lecture series, the motivation for a high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will be quickly reviewed together with the challenges for the LHC detectors. In particular, the plans and ongoing research for new calorimeter detectors will be explained. The main issues in the high-luminosity era are an improved radiation tolerance, natural ageing of detector components and challenging trigger and physics requirements. The new technological solutions for calorimetry at a high-luminosity LHC will be reviewed.

  4. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (1/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Calorimetry and Muon Spectrometers - Part I : In the first part of the lecture series, the motivation for a high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will be quickly reviewed together with the challenges for the LHC detectors. In particular, the plans and ongoing research for new calorimeter detectors will be explained. The main issues in the high-luminosity era are an improved radiation tolerance, natural ageing of detector components and challenging trigger and physics requirements. The new technological solutions for calorimetry at a high-luminosity LHC will be reviewed.

  5. UPGRADE OF RHIC VACUUM SYSTEMS FOR HIGH LUMINOSITY OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH, H.C.; MAPES, M.; SMART, L.A.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.

    2005-05-16

    With increasing ion beam intensity during recent RHIC operations, rapid pressure rises of several decades were observed at most warm sections and at a few cold sections. The pressure rises are associated with electron multi-pacting, electron stimulated desorption and beam ion induced desorption and have been one of the major intensity and luminosity limiting factors for RHIC. Improvement of the warm sections has been carried out in the last few years. Extensive in-situ bakes, additional UHV pumping and anti-grazing ridges have been implemented. Several hundred meters of NEG coated beam pipes have been installed and activated. Vacuum monitoring and logging were enhanced. Preventive measures, such as pumping before cool down to reduce monolayer condensates, were also taken to suppress the pressure rises in the cold sections. The effectiveness of these measures in reducing the pressure rises during machine studies and during physics runs are discussed and summarized.

  6. A high-energy high-luminosity {mu}{sup +} {minus} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.V.; Palmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    We present a candidate design for a high-energy high luminosity {mu}{sup +}-{mu} collider, with E{sub cm} = 4 TeV, L = 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}S{sup {minus}1}, using only existing technology. The design uses a rapid-cycling medium-energy proton synchrotron, which produces proton beam pulses which are focused onto two {pi}- producing targets, with two {pi}-decay transport lines producing {mu}{sup +}{prime}s and {mu}{sup {minus}}{prime}. The {mu}{prime}s are collected, rf-rotated, cooled and compressed into a recirculating linac for acceleration, and then transferred into a storage ring collider. The keys to high luminosity are maximal {mu} collection and cooling; innovations with these goals are included.

  7. Hints on the Broad Line Region Structure of Quasars at High and Low Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Zamfir, Sebastian; Negrete, C. A.; Dultzin, Deborah

    2011-08-01

    Quasars show a considerable spectroscopic diversity. However, the variety of quasar spectra at low redshifts is non-random: a principal component analysis applied to large samples customarily identifies two main eigenvectors. In this contribution we show that the range of quasar optical spectral properties observed at low-z\\ and associated with the first eigenvector is preserved up to z ≈ 2 in a sample of high luminosity quasars. We also describe two major luminosity effects.

  8. Overview of a high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of a 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. The authors discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  9. Extra-galactic high-energy transients: event rate density and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-08-01

    Several types of extra-galactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with a relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the reshift-dependent event rate densities and luminosity functions of these extra-galactic high-energy transients. We consider star formation history as the tracer of the redshift distribution for long GRBs and SBOs. For short GRBs, we consider the compact star merger model to introduce several possible merger delay time distribution models. For TDEs, we consider the mass distribution of supermassive black holes as a function of redshift. We derive some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate density for different types of transients. Based on the observed events, we derive the local specific event rate density, ρ0,L ∝ dρ0/dL for each type of transient, which represents its luminosity function. All the transients are consistent with having a single power law luminosity function, except the high luminosity long GRBs (HL-lGRBs), whose luminosity function can be well described by a broken power law. The total event rate density for a particular transient depends on the luminosity threshold, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: 2.82^{+0.41}_{-0.36} for HL-lGRBs above 4×1049 erg s-1 218^{+130}_{-86} for low luminosity long GRBs above 6×1046 erg s-1 3.18^{+0.88}_{-0.70}, 2.87^{+0.80}_{-0.64}, and 6.25^{+1.73}_{-1.38} above 5×1049 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, log-normal, and power law); 2.0^{+2.6}_{-1.3}×104 above 9×1043 erg s-1 for SBOs, 3.0^{+1.0}_{-0.8}×105 for normal TDEs above 1042 erg s-1 and 6.2^{+8.2}_{-4.0} above 3×1047 erg s-1for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the global specific event rate densities

  10. An Incremental High-Utility Mining Algorithm with Transaction Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Wensheng; Zhang, Binbin

    2015-01-01

    Association-rule mining is commonly used to discover useful and meaningful patterns from a very large database. It only considers the occurrence frequencies of items to reveal the relationships among itemsets. Traditional association-rule mining is, however, not suitable in real-world applications since the purchased items from a customer may have various factors, such as profit or quantity. High-utility mining was designed to solve the limitations of association-rule mining by considering both the quantity and profit measures. Most algorithms of high-utility mining are designed to handle the static database. Fewer researches handle the dynamic high-utility mining with transaction insertion, thus requiring the computations of database rescan and combination explosion of pattern-growth mechanism. In this paper, an efficient incremental algorithm with transaction insertion is designed to reduce computations without candidate generation based on the utility-list structures. The enumeration tree and the relationships between 2-itemsets are also adopted in the proposed algorithm to speed up the computations. Several experiments are conducted to show the performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of runtime, memory consumption, and number of generated patterns. PMID:25811038

  11. Morphology of high-luminosity compact radio sources.

    PubMed

    Zensus, J A; Krichbaum, T P; Lobanov, A P

    1995-12-01

    High-dynamic range imaging and monitoring with very-long-baseline interferometry reveal a rich morphology of luminous flat-spectrum radio sources. One-sided core-jet structures abound, and superluminal motion is frequently measured. In a few cases, both distinct moving features and diffuse underlying jet emission can be detected. Superluminal motion seen in such sources is typically complex, on curved trajectories or ridge lines, and with variable component velocities, including stationary features. The curved trajectories seen can be modeled by helical motion within the underlying jet flow. The very-long-baseline interferometry properties of the superluminal features in the jet of 3C 345 and other similar sources can be explained by models invoking the emission from shocks, at least within the vicinity of the compact core. Inverse-Compton calculations, constrained by x-ray observations, yield realistic estimates for the physical conditions in the parsec-scale jet. There is evidence for a transition region in this source beyond which other factors (e.g., plasma interactions and nonsynchrotron radiation processes) may become prominent. Multifrequency and polarization imaging (especially at high frequencies) are emerging as critical tools in testing model predictions. PMID:11607595

  12. Morphology of high-luminosity compact radio sources.

    PubMed Central

    Zensus, J A; Krichbaum, T P; Lobanov, A P

    1995-01-01

    High-dynamic range imaging and monitoring with very-long-baseline interferometry reveal a rich morphology of luminous flat-spectrum radio sources. One-sided core-jet structures abound, and superluminal motion is frequently measured. In a few cases, both distinct moving features and diffuse underlying jet emission can be detected. Superluminal motion seen in such sources is typically complex, on curved trajectories or ridge lines, and with variable component velocities, including stationary features. The curved trajectories seen can be modeled by helical motion within the underlying jet flow. The very-long-baseline interferometry properties of the superluminal features in the jet of 3C 345 and other similar sources can be explained by models invoking the emission from shocks, at least within the vicinity of the compact core. Inverse-Compton calculations, constrained by x-ray observations, yield realistic estimates for the physical conditions in the parsec-scale jet. There is evidence for a transition region in this source beyond which other factors (e.g., plasma interactions and nonsynchrotron radiation processes) may become prominent. Multifrequency and polarization imaging (especially at high frequencies) are emerging as critical tools in testing model predictions. PMID:11607595

  13. An Alternative High Luminosity LHC with Flat Optics and Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Fartoukh, Stephane; Valishev, Alexander; Shatilov, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    In the baseline scenario of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the geometric loss of luminosity in the two high luminosity experiments due to collisions with a large crossing angle is recovered by tilting the bunches in the interaction region with the use of crab cavities. A possible backup scenario would rely on a reduced crossing angle together with flat optics (with different horizontal and vertical $\\beta^{\\ast}$values) for the preservation of luminosity performance. However, the reduction of crossing angle coupled with the flat optics significantly enhances the strength of long-range beam-beam interactions. This paper discusses the possibility to mitigate the long-range beam-beam effects by current bearing wire compensators (or e-lens). We develop a new HL-LHC parameter list and analyze it in terms of integrated luminosity performance as compared to the baseline. Further, we evaluate the operational scenarios using numerical simulations of single-particle dynamics with beam-beam effects.

  14. Nb$_3$Sn High Field Magnets for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires a new generation of high field superconducting magnets. High field large aperture quadrupoles (MQXF) are needed for the low-beta triplets close to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, and high field two-in-one dipoles (11 T dipoles) are needed to make room for additional collimation. The MQXF quadrupoles, with a field gradient of 140 T/m in 150 mm aperture, have a peak coil field of 12.1 T at nominal current. The 11 T dipoles, with an aperture of 60 mm, have a peak coil field of 11.6 T at nominal current. Both magnets require Nb3Sn conductor and are the first applications of this superconductor to actual accelerator magnets.

  15. High luminosity {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider: Report of a feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.; Tollestrup, A.; Sessler, A.

    1996-12-01

    Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV (c-of-m) high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are analyzed. Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. We briefly mention the luminosity requirements of hadrons and lepton machines and their high-energy-physics advantages and disadvantages in reference to their effective center of mass energy. Finally, we present an R & D plan to determine whether such machines are practical.

  16. Final Cooling For a High-luminosity High-Energy Lepton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Sayed, H.; Hart, T.; Summers, D.

    2015-05-01

    The final cooling system for a high-energy high-luminosity heavy lepton collider requires reduction of the transverse emittance εt by an order of magnitude to ~0.00003 m (rms, N), while allowing longitudinal emittance εL to increase to ~0.1m. In the present baseline approach, this is obtained by transverse cooling of low-energy muons within a sequence of high-field solenoids with low-frequency rf systems. Recent studies of such systems are presented. Since the final cooling steps are mostly emittance exchange, a variant form of that final system can be obtained by a round to flat transform in x-y, with transverse slicing of the enlarged flat transverse dimension followed by longitudinal recombination of the sliced bunchlets. Other variants are discussed. More explicit emittance exchange can greatly reduce the cost of a final cooling system.

  17. Study of HTS Insert Coils for High Field Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Vito; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Fermilab is currently working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting materials (HTS) is being considered for these solenoids using Helium refrigeration. Several studies have been performed on insert coils made of BSCCO-2223 tapes and second generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors, which are tested at various temperatures and at external fields of up to 14 T. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of YBCO short samples are presented as a function of bending stress, magnetic field and field orientation with respect to the sample surface. An analytical fit of critical current data as a function of field and field orientation is also presented. Results from several single-layer and double-layer pancake coils are also discussed.

  18. Extragalactic High-energy Transients: Event Rate Densities and Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Several types of extragalactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with an associated relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the redshift-dependent event rate densities and the global luminosity functions (GLFs; ignoring redshift evolution) of these transients. We introduce some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate densities for different types of transients and derive the local specific event rate density, which also represents its GLF. Long GRBs (LGRBs) have a large enough sample to reveal features in the GLF, which is best charaterized as a triple power law (PL). All the other transients are consistent with having a single-power-law (SPL) LF. The total event rate density depends on the minimum luminosity, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc‑3 yr‑1: {0.8}-0.1+0.1 for high-luminosity LGRBs above 1050 erg s‑1 {164}-65+98 for low-luminosity LGRBs above 5 × 1046 erg s‑1 {1.3}-0.3+0.4, {1.2}-0.3+0.4, and {3.3}-0.8+1.0 above 1050 erg s‑1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, lognormal, and PL); {1.9}-1.2+2.4× {10}4 above 1044 erg s‑1 for SBOs, {4.8}-2.1+3.2× {10}2 for normal TDEs above 1044 erg s‑1 and {0.03}-0.02+0.04 above 1048 erg s‑1 for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the GLFs of different kinds of transients, which cover over 12 orders of magnitude, are consistent with an SPL with an index of ‑1.6.

  19. Extragalactic High-energy Transients: Event Rate Densities and Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Several types of extragalactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with an associated relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the redshift-dependent event rate densities and the global luminosity functions (GLFs; ignoring redshift evolution) of these transients. We introduce some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate densities for different types of transients and derive the local specific event rate density, which also represents its GLF. Long GRBs (LGRBs) have a large enough sample to reveal features in the GLF, which is best charaterized as a triple power law (PL). All the other transients are consistent with having a single-power-law (SPL) LF. The total event rate density depends on the minimum luminosity, and we obtain the following values in units of Gpc-3 yr-1: {0.8}-0.1+0.1 for high-luminosity LGRBs above 1050 erg s-1 {164}-65+98 for low-luminosity LGRBs above 5 × 1046 erg s-1 {1.3}-0.3+0.4, {1.2}-0.3+0.4, and {3.3}-0.8+1.0 above 1050 erg s-1 for short GRBs with three different merger delay models (Gaussian, lognormal, and PL); {1.9}-1.2+2.4× {10}4 above 1044 erg s-1 for SBOs, {4.8}-2.1+3.2× {10}2 for normal TDEs above 1044 erg s-1 and {0.03}-0.02+0.04 above 1048 erg s-1 for TDE jets as discovered by Swift. Intriguingly, the GLFs of different kinds of transients, which cover over 12 orders of magnitude, are consistent with an SPL with an index of -1.6.

  20. High-luminosity single carbon stars in stellar and galactic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1991-01-01

    In the solar neighborhood, approximately half of all intermediate mass main sequence stars with initially between 1 solar mass and about 5 solar masses become carbon stars with luminosities near 10,000 lunar luminosities for typically less than 1 million years. These high luminosity carbon stars lose mass at rates nearly always in excess of 10 to the -7th solar mass/yr and sometimes in excess of 0.00001 solar mass/yr. Locally, close to half of the mass returned into the interstellar medium by intermediate mass stars before they become white dwarfs is during the carbon star phase. A much greater fraction of lower metallicity stars become carbon-rich before they evolve into planetary nebulae, than do higher-metallicity stars; therefore, carbon stars are much more important in the outer than in the inner Galaxy.

  1. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (4/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-22

    Tracking Detectors - Part II. Calorimetry, muon detection, vertexing, and tracking will play a central role in determining the physics reach for the High Luminosity LHC Era. In these lectures we will cover the requirements, options, and the R&D; efforts necessary to upgrade the current LHC detectors and enabling discoveries.

  2. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (3/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-22

    Tracking Detectors - Part I. Calorimetry, muon detection, vertexing, and tracking will play a central role in determining the physics reach for the High Luminosity LHC Era. In these lectures we will cover the requirements, options, and the R&D; efforts necessary to upgrade the current LHC detectors and enabling discoveries.

  3. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (3/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Tracking Detectors - Part I. Calorimetry, muon detection, vertexing, and tracking will play a central role in determining the physics reach for the High Luminosity LHC Era. In these lectures we will cover the requirements, options, and the R&D; efforts necessary to upgrade the current LHC detectors and enabling discoveries.

  4. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (4/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Tracking Detectors - Part II. Calorimetry, muon detection, vertexing, and tracking will play a central role in determining the physics reach for the High Luminosity LHC Era. In these lectures we will cover the requirements, options, and the R&D; efforts necessary to upgrade the current LHC detectors and enabling discoveries.

  5. Luminosity enhancements at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, D.H.

    1984-04-01

    Several ideas are discussed that have been proposed to improve the luminosity at the SPEAR and PEP electron-positron storage rings and to insure good luminosity at the SLAC Linear Collider. There have been two proposals studied recently for SPEAR: a Microbeta insertion using Samarium Cobalt permanent magnets, and a Minibeta insertion using conventional quadrupole magnets. The notations Microbeta and minibeta used here are somewhat arbitrary since the front faces of the first quadrupole magnets for both insertions are at nearly the same distance from the interaction point.

  6. Populations of High-Luminosity Density-Bounded HII Regions in Spiral Galaxies? Evidence and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, J. E.; Rozas, M.; Zurita, A.; Watson, R. A.; Knapen, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present evidence that the H II regions of high luminosity in disk galaxies may be density bounded, so that a significant fraction of the ionizing photons emitted by their exciting OB stars escape from the regions. The key piece of evidence is the presence, in the Ha luminosity functions (LFs) of the populations of H iI regions, of glitches, local sharp peaks at an apparently invariant luminosity, defined as the Stromgren luminosity Lstr), LH(sub alpha) = Lstr = 10(sup 38.6) (+/- 10(sup 0.1)) erg/ s (no other peaks are found in any of the LFs) accompanying a steepening of slope for LH(sub alpha) greater than Lstr This behavior is readily explicable via a physical model whose basic premises are: (a) the transition at LH(sub alpha) = Lstr marks a change from essentially ionization bounding at low luminosities to density bounding at higher values, (b) for this to occur the law relating stellar mass in massive star-forming clouds to the mass of the placental cloud must be such that the ionizing photon flux produced within the cloud is a function which rises more steeply than the mass of the cloud. Supporting evidence for the hypothesis of this transition is also presented: measurements of the central surface brightnesses of H II regions for LH(sub alpha) less than Lstr are proportional to L(sup 1/3, sub H(sub alpha)), expected for ionization bounding, but show a sharp trend to a steeper dependence for LH(sub alpha) greater than Lstr, and the observed relation between the internal turbulence velocity parameter, sigma, and the luminosity, L, at high luminosities, can be well explained if these regions are density bounded. If confirmed, the density-bounding hypothesis would have a number of interesting implications. It would imply that the density-bounded regions were the main sources of the photons which ionize the diffuse gas in disk galaxies. Our estimates, based on the hypothesis, indicate that these regions emit sufficient Lyman continuum not only to

  7. Selection of High-z Radio-Loud Quasars, and Their Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccillo, D.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Benn, C. R.

    We present the selection techniques based on the use of Neural Networks and on the cross match between FIRST and SDSS that lead to the spectroscopic identification of 15 new Radio Loud QSOs in the redshift range 3. 6 ≤ z ≤ 4. 4. These QSOs did not have previous spectroscopical identification in SDSS or other works. Our selection method is highly complete (97 %) and it allows the estimation of the binned luminosity function of radio-loud quasar at z ˜ 4 with unprecedented accuracy. Our luminosity function is compared with the results of other samples of RL QSOs in similar ranges of redshift and with the whole population of QSOs (RL+RQ). The evolution of the luminosity function with redshift was for many years interpreted as a flattening of the bright end slope, but has recently been re-interpreted as strong evolution of the break luminosity for high-z QSOs and our results, for the radio-loud population, are consistent with this. We also find indications of a constant radio-loud fraction for QSOs at high z. Our next investigation will select RL QSOs candidates in the range of redshift 4. 4 ≤ z ≤ 5. 7, and will make use of data in the radio (FIRST), in the optical (SDSS DR10) and in the infrared (UKIDSS Large Area Survey DR10, and WISE).

  8. Long Term Optical and Infrared Reverberation Mapping of High and Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Barth, Aaron; Brandt, Niel; Dawson, Kyle; Green, Paul; Ho, Luis; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Joner, Mike; Kenney, John; McGreer, Ian; Nordgren, Tyler; Schneider, Donald; Shen, Yue; Tao, Charling

    2016-08-01

    Previous Spitzer reverberation monitoring projects looking for UV/optical light absorbed and re-emitted in the IR by dust have been limited to very low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN) that could potentially show reverberation within a single cycle (~1 year). Cycle 11-12's two year baseline allowed for the reverberation mapping of 17 high luminosity quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. By combining ground based monitoring from Pan-STARRS, CFHT, and Steward Observatory telescopes with Spitzer data we have for the first time detected dust reverberation in quasars. We propose to continue this project to capitalize on the continuing optical motnoring from the ground and to increase the confidence in the detected lags. Additionally, the Call for Proposals asks for up to 1000 hours of observations in the Spitzer CVZ to accommodate battery charging needs. We propose to add to our quasar sample five lower luminosity Seyfert galaxies from the Pan-STARRS ground based optical survey that are in the Spitzer CVZ, which will increase the luminosity range of AGN we are studying and, combined with additional ground based observatories, provide for a continuous monitoring campaign lasting 2 years and thus provide the most detailed study of dust around AGN to date.

  9. Attaining high luminosity in linear e sup + e sup minus colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1990-11-01

    The attainment of high luminosity in linear colliders is a complex problem because of the interdependence of the critical parameters. For instance, changing the number of particles per bunch affects the damping ring design and thus the emittance; it affects the wakefields in the linac and thus the momentum spread; the momentum spread affects the final focus design and thus the final {beta}*; but the emittance change also affects the final focus design; and all these come together to determine the luminosity, disruption and beamstrahlung at the intersection. Changing the bunch length, or almost any other parameter, has a similar chain reaction. Dealing with this problem by simple scaling laws is very difficult because one does not know which parameter is going to be critical, and thus which should be held constant. One can only maximize the luminosity by a process of search and iteration. The process can be facilitated with the aid of a computer program. Examples can then be optimized for maximum luminosity, and compared to the optimized solutions with different approaches. This paper discusses these approaches.

  10. Performance of drift-tube detectors at high counting rates for high-luminosity LHC upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Bernhard; Dubbert, Jörg; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Manfredini, Alessandro; Nowak, Sebastian; Ott, Sebastian; Richter, Robert; Schwegler, Philipp; Zanzi, Daniele; Biebel, Otmar; Hertenberger, Ralf; Ruschke, Alexander; Zibell, Andre

    2013-12-01

    The performance of pressurized drift-tube detectors at very high background rates has been studied at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN and in an intense 20 MeV proton beam at the Munich Van-der-Graaf tandem accelerator for applications in large-area precision muon tracking at high-luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS muon drift-tube (MDT) chambers with 30 mm tube diameter have been designed to cope with γ and neutron background hit rates of up to 500 Hz/cm2. Background rates of up to 14 kHz/cm2 are expected at LHC upgrades. The test results with standard MDT readout electronics show that the reduction of the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm, while leaving the operating parameters unchanged, vastly increases the rate capability well beyond the requirements. The development of new small-diameter muon drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for LHC upgrades is completed. Further improvements of tracking efficiency and spatial resolution at high counting rates will be achieved with upgraded readout electronics employing improved signal shaping for high counting rates.

  11. High-energy high-luminosity electron-ion collider eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hammons, L.; Hao, Y.; Webb, S.; et al

    2011-08-09

    In this paper, we describe a future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference. The replacement cost of the RHIC facility is about two billion US dollars, and the eRHIC will fully take advantage and utilize this investment. We plan adding a polarized 5-30 GeV electron beam to collide with variety of species in the existing RHIC accelerator complex, from polarized protons with a top energy of 325 GeV, to heavy fully-striped ions with energies up to 130 GeV/u. Brookhaven's innovative design, is based on one of the RHIC's hadron rings and a multi-pass energy-recovery linac (ERL). Using the ERL as the electron accelerator assures high luminosity in the 10{sup 33}-10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range, and for the natural staging of eRHIC, with the ERL located inside the RHIC tunnel. The eRHIC will provide electron-hadron collisions in up to three interaction regions. We detail the eRHIC's performance in Section 2. Since first paper on eRHIC paper in 2000, its design underwent several iterations. Initially, the main eRHIC option (the so-called ring-ring, RR, design) was based on an electron ring, with the linac-ring (LR) option as a backup. In 2004, we published the detailed 'eRHIC 0th Order Design Report' including a cost-estimate for the RR design. After detailed studies, we found that an LR eRHIC has about a 10-fold higher luminosity than the RR. Since 2007, the LR, with its natural staging strategy and full transparency for polarized electrons, became the main choice for eRHIC. In 2009, we completed technical studies of the design and dynamics for MeRHIC with 3-pass 4 GeV ERL. We learned much from this evaluation, completed a bottom-up cost estimate for this $350M machine, but then shelved the design. In the same year, we turned again to considering the cost-effective, all-in-tunnel six-pass ERL for our design of the high-luminosity

  12. The New Transfer Line Collimation System for the LHC High Luminosity Era

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, Verena; Bracco, Chiara; Goddard, Brennan; Maciariello, Fausto; Meddahi, Malika; Mereghetti, Alessio; Steele, Genevieve; Velotti, Francesco; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2014-07-01

    A set of passive absorbers is located at the end of each of the 3 km long injection lines to protect the LHC in case of failures during the extraction process from the LHC’s last pre-injector or the beam transfer itself. In case of an erroneous extraction, the absorbers have to attenuate the beam to a safe level and be robust enough themselves to survive the impact. These requirements are difficult to fulfil with the very bright and intense beams produced by the LHC injectors for the high luminosity era. This paper revisits the requirements for the SPS-to-LHC transfer line collimation system and the adapted strategy to fulfill these for the LHC high luminosity operation. A possible solution for the new transfer line collimation system is presented.

  13. Luminosity Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1997-04-01

    In a symmetric or 'energy transparent' relativistic collider, the luminosity is given by L = N{sup 2}f{sub c}/4{pi}{sigma}*{sub x}{sigma}*{sub y} where N is the number of electrons or positrons per bunch, {sigma}*{sub x} ({sigma}*{sub y}) is the horizontal (vertical) rms beam size at the interaction point (IP), and f{sub c} is the collision frequency. If the beam sizes remain constant as the luminosity decreases, then the time dependence of luminosity is contained entirely in the time dependence of the beam currents, i.e., N O N(t), and we can rewrite the equation as L(t) = N{sup 2}(t)f{sub c}/4{pi}{sigma}*{sub x}{sigma}*{sub y}. There are two distinct categories for luminosity loss. In the first category are loss processes due to collisions between the two beams, that is, processes associated directly with the luminosity. In the second category (see below) are single-beam loss processes. The processes in the first category relevant to a high-energy collider are Bhabha scattering (e{sup +}e{sup -} O e{sup +}e{sup -}) and 'radiative' Bhabha scattering (e{sup +}e{sup -} O e{sup +}e{sup -}{gamma}). In the first process, a beam particle is lost if its angular deflection is beyond the ring's transverse acceptance; in the second process, loss occurs if the beam particle's momentum change is outside the longitudinal acceptance of the ring (typically determined by the RF bucket height).

  14. The Physics Program of a High-Luminosity Asymmetric B Factory at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Eisner, A.; Mandelkern, M.; Morrison, R.; Witherell, M.; Burchat, P.; Kent, J.; Erbacher, R.; Vernon, W.; Eigen, G.; Hitlin, D.; Porter, F.; Weinstein, A.; Wisniewski, W.; Wagner, S.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, M.; Averill, D.; Snyder, A.; Goldhaber, G.; Oddone, P.; Roe, N.; Ronan, M.; Spahn, M.; MacFarlane, D.; Bartelt, J.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Cords, D.; Dib, C.; Dorfan, J.; Dunietz, I.; Gilman, F.; Godfrey, G.; Hyer, T.; Jensen, G.; Leith, D.; Marsiske, H.; Nir, Y.; Lee-Franzini, J.

    1989-10-01

    A high-luminosity asymmetric energy B Factory, proposed as an upgrade to the PEP storage ring at SLAC, provides the best opportunity to study CP violation as a means of testing the consistency of the Standard Model. If the phenomenon of CP violation is xplained by the Standard Model simply through the non-zero angles and phase of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, then there are precise relations between the K-M parameters and the various measurable CP-violating asymmetries in B meson decay. Should these onsistency relations fail, the origin of CP violation must lie outside the Standard Model framework. Our measurements would then lead to the first experiment-driven extensions of the Standard Model. The B Factory will also carry out a varied, high-quality program of studies f other aspects of the physics of b quarks, as well as high-precision measurements in r and charm physics. We describe a detailed series of measurements to be carried out in the first few years at a peak luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1}, the initial luminosity goal of the B Factory, as well as the program accessible to a larger data sample.

  15. The physics program of a high-luminosity asymmetric B Factory at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    A high-luminosity asymmetric energy B Factory, proposed as an upgrade to the PEP storage ring at SLAC, provides the best opportunity to study CP violation as a means of testing the consistency of the Standard Model. If the phenomenon of CP violation is explained by the Standard Model simply through the non-zero angles and phase of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, then there are precise relations between the K-M parameters and the various measurable CP-violating asymmetries in B meson decay. Should these consistency relations fail, the origin of CP violation must lie outside the Standard Model framework. Our measurements would then lead to the first experiment-driven extensions of the Standard Model. The B Factory will also carry out a varied, high-quality program of studies of other aspects of the physics of b quarks, as well as high-precision measurements in {tau} and charm physics. We describe a detailed series of measurements to be carried out in the first few years at a peak luminosity of 3 {times} 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1}, the initial luminosity goal of the B Factory, as well as the program accessible to a larger data sample.

  16. Status report of a high luminosity muon collider and future research and development plans

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.; Sessler, A.

    1996-11-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV (c-of-m) high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are analyzed. Finally, we present an R & D plan to determine whether such machines are practical, and, if they are, lead to the construction of a 0.5 TeV demonstration by 2010, and to a 4 TeV collider by the year 2020.

  17. Development of a silicon-microstrip super module prototype for the high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, A.; Barbier, G.; Cadoux, F.; Endo, M.; Favre, Y.; Ferrere, D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Hanagaki, K.; Hara, K.; Iacobucci, G.; Ikegami, Y.; Koriki, T.; La Marra, D.; Pohl, M.; Takubo, Y.; Terada, S.; Unno, Y.; Weber, M.

    2013-01-01

    Following the Phase II upgrade of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) currently foreseen in 2022-2023, the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is expected to deliver a peak luminosity in excess of 5×1034 cm-2 s-1 and an integrated luminosity of order 3000 fb-1 until 2033. The ATLAS Collaboration plans to replace the existing Inner Tracking Detector by a new tracker, with readout electronics as well as silicon pixel and strip sensor technology capable of maintaining the excellent tracking performance of the existing tracker in the severe radiation and high collision rate environment of the HL-LHC. The promising super-module integration concept extends the proven design of the existing barrel silicon strip tracker to the HL-LHC, with double-sided stereo silicon micro-strip modules assembled into a low mass local support structure. The Super-Module R&D program is described, with reference to HL-LHC requirements, and key prototype results are summarized.

  18. IS THE OBSERVED HIGH-FREQUENCY RADIO LUMINOSITY DISTRIBUTION OF QSOs BIMODAL?

    SciTech Connect

    Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Murphy, Tara; Ekers, Ronald D.; Feain, Ilana J.

    2012-07-20

    The distribution of QSO radio luminosities has long been debated in the literature. Some argue that it is a bimodal distribution, implying that there are two separate QSO populations (normally referred to as 'radio-loud' and 'radio-quiet'), while others claim it forms a more continuous distribution characteristic of a single population. We use deep observations at 20 GHz to investigate whether the distribution is bimodal at high radio frequencies. Carrying out this study at high radio frequencies has an advantage over previous studies as the radio emission comes predominantly from the core of the active galactic nucleus, and hence probes the most recent activity. Studies carried out at lower frequencies are dominated by the large-scale lobes where the emission is built up over longer timescales (10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} yr), thereby confusing the sample. Our sample comprises 874 X-ray-selected QSOs that were observed as part of the 6dF Galaxy Survey. Of these, 40% were detected down to a 3{sigma} detection limit of 0.2-0.5 mJy. No evidence of bimodality is seen in either the 20 GHz luminosity distribution or in the distribution of the R{sub 20} parameter: the ratio of the radio to optical luminosities traditionally used to classify objects as being either radio-loud or radio-quiet. Previous results have claimed that at low radio luminosities, star formation processes can dominate the radio emission observed in QSOs. We attempt to investigate these claims by stacking the undetected sources at 20 GHz and discuss the limitations in carrying out this analysis. However, if the radio emission was solely due to star formation processes, we calculate that this corresponds to star formation rates ranging from {approx}10 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} to {approx}2300 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  19. L1Track: A fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS high luminosity upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerri, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    With the planned high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS detector will see its collision rate increase by approximately a factor of 5 with respect to the current LHC operation. The earliest hardware-based ATLAS trigger stage ("Level 1") will have to provide a higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment: a new improved Level 1 trigger architecture is under study, which includes the possibility of extracting with low latency and high accuracy tracking information in time for the decision taking process. In this context, the feasibility of potential approaches aimed at providing low-latency high-quality tracking at Level 1 is discussed.

  20. High-mass star formation at high luminosities: W31 at >106 L⊙

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, H.; Linz, H.; Henning, Th.; Bik, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Schuller, F.; Schilke, P.; Thorwirth, S.; Kim, K.-T.

    2011-07-01

    Context. High-mass star formation has been a very active field over the past decade; however, most studies have targeted regions of luminosities between 104 and 105 L⊙. In contrast to that, the highest mass stars reside in clusters exceeding 105 or even 106 L⊙. Aims: We want to study the physical conditions associated with the formation of the highest mass stars. Methods: To do this, we selected the W31 star-forming complex with a total luminosity of ~ 6 × 106 L⊙ (comprised of at least two subregions) for a multiwavelength spectral line and continuum study covering wavelengths from the near- and midinfrared via (sub)mm wavelength observations to radio data in the cm regime. Results: While the overall structure is similar among the multiwavelength continuum data, there are several intriguing differences. The 24 μm emission stemming largely from small dust grains tightly follows the spatial structure of the cm emission tracing the ionized free-free emission. As a result, warm dust resides in regions that are spatially associated with the ionized hot gas (~104 K) of the Hii regions. Furthermore, we find several evolutionary stages within the same complexes, ranging from infrared-observable clusters, via deeply embedded regions associated with active star formation traced by 24 μm and cm emission, to at least one high-mass gas clump devoid of any such signature. The 13CO(2-1) and C18O(2-1) spectral line observations reveal kinematic breadth in the entire region with a total velocity range of approximately 90 km s-1. Kinematic and turbulent structures are set into context. While the average virial mass ratio for W31 is close to unity, the line width analysis indicates large-scale evolutionary differences between the southern and northern subregions (G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1) of the whole W31 complex. A color - color analysis of the IRAC data also shows that the class II sources are broadly distributed throughout the entire complex, whereas the Class 0/I sources

  1. Energy deposition studies for the high-luminosity Large Hadron Collider inner triplet magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, N. V.; Rakhno, I. L.; Tropin, I. S.; Cerutti, F.; Esposito, L. S.; Lechner, A.

    2015-05-01

    A detailed model of the high-luminosity LHC inner triplet region with new large-aperture Nb3Sn magnets, field maps, corrector packages, and segmented tungsten inner absorbers was built and implemented into the fluka and mars15 codes. Detailed simulations have been performed coherently with the codes on the impact of particle debris from the 14-TeV center-of-mass pp-collisions on the short- and long-term stability of the inner triplet magnets. After optimizing the absorber configuration, the peak power density averaged over the magnet inner cable width is found to be safely below the quench limit at the luminosity of 5 ×1034 cm-2 s-1 . For the anticipated lifetime integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 , the peak dose calculated for the innermost magnet insulator ranges from 20 to 35 MGy, a figure close to the commonly accepted limit. Dynamic heat loads to the triplet magnet cold mass are calculated to evaluate the cryogenic capability. fluka and mars results on energy deposition are in very good agreement.

  2. High luminosity operation of large solid angle scintillator arrays in Jefferson Lab Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Ran Shneor

    2003-12-01

    This thesis describes selected aspects of high luminosity operation of large solid angle scintillator arrays in Hall A of the CEBAF (Central Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) at TJNAF (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility ). CEBAF is a high current, high duty factor electron accelerator with a maximum beam energy of about 6 GeV and a maximum current of 200 {micro}A. Operating large solid angle scintillator arrays in high luminosity environment presents several problems such as high singles rates, low signal to noise ratios and shielding requirements. To demonstrate the need for large solid angle and momentum acceptance detectors as a third arm in Hall A, we will give a brief overview of the physics motivating five approved experiments, which utilize scintillator arrays. We will then focus on the design and assembly of these scintillator arrays, with special focus on the two new detector packages built for the Short Range Correlation experiment E01-015. This thesis also contains the description and results of different tests and calibrations which where conducted for these arrays. We also present the description of a number of tests which were done in order to estimate the singles rates, data reconstruction, filtering techniques and shielding required for these counters.

  3. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (2/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Calorimetry and Muon Spectromers - Part II: When upgrading the LHC to higher luminosities, the detector and trigger performance shall be preserved - if not improved - with respect to the nominal performance. The ongoing R&D; for new radiation tolerant front-end electronics for calorimeters with higher read-out bandwidth are summarized and new possibilities for the trigger systems are presented. Similar developments are foreseen for the muon spectrometers, where also radiation tolerance of the muon detectors and functioning at high background rates is important. The corresponding plans and research work for the calorimeter and muon detectors at a LHC with highest luminsity are presented.

  4. Tracking for the Atlas Level 1 Trigger for the High Luminosity Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, M. R.

    2014-06-01

    At the HL-LHC, the increased luminosity will result in up to 200 pile-up interactions per bunch crossing. One of the greatest challenges for ATLAS will be to keep the Level 1 Trigger pT thresholds low enough to maintain high trigger efficiency for all interesting physics. The proposed two-stage design of the ATLAS Level 1 Trigger, and the incorporation of a Level-1 track trigger is described. The requirements and implications for the tracker readout architecture, and estimates of readout latency based on a detailed discrete event simulation of the data flow in the tracker front-end electronics are also presented.

  5. 22nd RD50 Workshop on Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for High Luminosity Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, Sally

    2013-05-06

    The 22nd RD50 Workshop on Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for High Luminosity Colliders was held on the campus of the University of New Mexico from June 3 to 5, 2013. This was the first North American meeting of the series going back to 2001. The sessions covered Material and Defect Characterization, Detector Characterization, Full Detector Systems, and New Structures. A half-day mini-workshop was allocated to radiation damage at LHC experiments. All talks are archived permanently available to the public at rd50.web.cern.ch. Financial support was used for room rental audiovisual equipment rental, and document preparation services.

  6. High Energy Neutrinos and Cosmic-Rays From Low-Luminosity Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Ioka, Kunihito; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Nakamura, Takashi; /Kyoto U.

    2006-07-10

    The recently discovered gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060218/SN 2006aj is classified as an X-ray Flash with very long duration driven possibly by a neutron star. Since GRB 060218 is very near {approx} 140 Mpc and very dim, one-year observation by Swift suggests that the true rate of GRB 060218-like events might be very high so that such low luminosity GRBs (LL-GRBs) might form a different population of GRBs from the cosmological high luminosity GRBs (HL-GRBs). We found that the high energy neutrino background from such LL-GRBs could be comparable with or larger than that from HL-GRBs. If each neutrino event is detected by IceCube, later optical-infrared follow-up observations such as by Subaru could identify a Type Ibc supernova associated with LL-GRBs, even if gamma- and X-rays are not observed by Swift. This is in a sense a new window from neutrino astronomy, which might enable us to confirm the existence of LL-GRBs and to obtain information about their rate and origin. We also argue LL-GRBs as high energy gamma-ray and cosmic-ray sources.

  7. Transverse emittance growth due to rf noise in the high-luminosity LHC crab cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudrenghien, P.; Mastoridis, T.

    2015-10-01

    The high-luminosity LHC (HiLumi LHC) upgrade with planned operation from 2025 onward has a goal of achieving a tenfold increase in the number of recorded collisions thanks to a doubling of the intensity per bunch (2.2e11 protons) and a reduction of β* to 15 cm. Such an increase would significantly expedite new discoveries and exploration. To avoid detrimental effects from long-range beam-beam interactions, the half crossing angle must be increased to 295 microrad. Without bunch crabbing, this large crossing angle and small transverse beam size would result in a luminosity reduction factor of 0.3 (Piwinski angle). Therefore, crab cavities are an important component of the LHC upgrade, and will contribute strongly to achieving an increase in the number of recorded collisions. The proposed crab cavities are electromagnetic devices with a resonance in the radio frequency (rf) region of the spectrum (400.789 MHz). They cause a kick perpendicular to the direction of motion (transverse kick) to restore an effective head-on collision between the particle beams, thereby restoring the geometric factor to 0.8 [K. Oide and K. Yokoya, Phys. Rev. A 40, 315 (1989).]. Noise injected through the rf/low level rf (llrf) system could cause significant transverse emittance growth and limit luminosity lifetime. In this work, a theoretical relationship between the phase and amplitude rf noise spectrum and the transverse emittance growth rate is derived, for a hadron machine assuming zero synchrotron radiation damping and broadband rf noise, excluding infinitely narrow spectral lines. This derivation is for a single beam. Both amplitude and phase noise are investigated. The potential improvement in the presence of the transverse damper is also investigated.

  8. The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel upgrade for High-Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gras, Philippe; CMS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will provide unprecedented instantaneous and integrated luminosity. The lead tungstate crystals forming the barrel part of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) will still perform well, even after the expected 3000 fb-1 at the end of HL-LHC. The scintillation light from the crystals is measured with avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Although the APDs will continue to be operational, there will be some increase in noise due to radiation-induced dark-currents. Triggering on electromagnetic objects with ~140 pileup events necessitates a change of the front-end electronics. New developments in high-speed optical links will allow single-crystal readout at 40 MHz to upgraded off-detector processors, allowing maximum flexibility and enhanced triggering possibilities. The very-front- end system will also be upgraded, to provide improved rejection of anomalous signals in the APDs as well as to mitigate the increase in APD noise. We are also considering lowering the ECAL barrel operating temperature from 18°C to about 8 ~10°C, in order to increase the scintillation light output and reduce the APD dark current.

  9. Jet cleansing: Separating data from secondary collision induced radiation at high luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D.; Low, Matthew; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2014-09-01

    One of the greatest impediments to extracting useful information from high luminosity hadron-collider data is radiation from secondary collisions (i.e. pileup) which can overlap with that of the primary interaction. In this paper we introduce a simple jet-substructure technique termed cleansing which can consistently correct for large amounts of pileup in an observable independent way. Cleansing works at the subjet level, combining tracker and calorimeter-based data to reconstruct the pileup-free primary interaction. The technique can be used on its own, with various degrees of sophistication, or in concert with jet grooming. We apply cleansing to both kinematic and jet shape reconstruction, finding in all cases a marked improvement over previous methods both in the correlation of the cleansed data with uncontaminated results and in measures like S/√B . Cleansing should improve the sensitivity of new-physics searches at high luminosity and could also aid in the comparison of precision QCD calculations to collider data.

  10. Matching into the Helical Bunch Coalescing Channel for a High Luminosity Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, Amy; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Neuffer, David; Yonehara, Katsuya; Yoshikawa, Cary; Johnson, R. P.

    2015-09-01

    For high luminosity in a muon collider, muon bunches that have been cooled in the six-dimensional helical cooling channel (HCC) must be merged into a single bunch and further cooled in preparation for acceleration and transport to the collider ring. The helical bunch coalescing channel has been previously simulated and provides the most natural match from helical upstream and downstream subsystems. This work focuses on the matching from the exit of the multiple bunch HCC into the start of the helical bunch coalescing channel. The simulated helical matching section simultaneously matches the helical spatial period lambda in addition to providing the necessary acceleration for efficient bunch coalescing. Previous studies assumed that the acceleration of muon bunches from p=209.15 MeV/c to 286.816 MeV/c and matching of lambda from 0.5 m to 1.0 m could be accomplished with zero particle losses and zero emittance growth in the individual bunches. This study demonstrates nonzero values for both particle loss and emittance growth, and provides considerations for reducing these adverse effects to best preserve high luminosity.

  11. Mid-infrared properties of nearby low-luminosity AGN at high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, D.; Gandhi, P.; Smette, A.; Hönig, S. F.; Duschl, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    We present high spatial resolution mid-infrared (MIR) 12 μm continuum imaging of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN) obtained with VLT/VISIR. Our goal is to determine whether the nuclear MIR emission of LLAGN is consistent with the existence of a dusty obscuring torus, the key component of the unification model for AGN. Based on available hard X-ray luminosities and the previously known tight correlation between the hard X-ray and 12 μm luminosities, we selected a sample of 17 nearby LLAGN without available VISIR N-band photometry. Combined with archival VISIR data of 9 additional LLAGN with available X-ray measurements, the dataset represents the bulk of southern LLAGN currently detectable from the ground in the MIR. Of the 17 observed LLAGN, 7 are detected, while upper limits are derived for the 10 non-detections. This increases the total number of AGN detected with VLT/VISIR to more than 50. All detections except NGC 3125 appear point-like on a spatial scale of ~0.35″. The detections do not significantly deviate from the known MIR-X-ray correlation but exceed it by a factor of ~10 down to luminosities <1041 erg/s with a narrow scatter (σ = 0.35 dex, Spearman rank ρ = 0.92). The latter is dominated by the uncertainties in the X-ray luminosity. Interestingly, a similar correlation with a comparable slope but with a normalization differing by ~2.6 orders of magnitude has been found for local starburst galaxies. In addition, we compared the VISIR data with lower spatial resolution data from Spitzer/IRS and IRAS. By using a scaled starburst template spectral energy distribution and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) 11.3 μm emission line, we were able to restrict the maximum nuclear star-formation contamination of the VISIR photometry to ≲30% for 75% of the LLAGN. Exceptions are NGC 1097 and NGC 1566, which may possess unresolved strong PAH emission. Furthermore, the MIR-X-ray luminosity ratio is unchanged over more than 4 orders of

  12. Prototyping of an HV-CMOS demonstrator for the High Luminosity-LHC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilella, E.; Benoit, M.; Casanova, R.; Casse, G.; Ferrere, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Peric, I.; Vossebeld, J.

    2016-01-01

    HV-CMOS sensors can offer important advantages in terms of material budget, granularity and cost for large area tracking systems in high energy physics experiments. This article presents the design and simulated results of an HV-CMOS pixel demonstrator for the High Luminosity-LHC. The pixel demonstrator has been designed in the 0.35 μm HV-CMOS process from ams AG and submitted for fabrication through an engineering run. To improve the response of the sensor, different wafers with moderate to high substrate resistivities are used to fabricate the design. The prototype consists of four large analog and standalone matrices with several pixel flavours, which are all compatible for readout with the FE-I4 ASIC. Details about the matrices and the pixel flavours are provided in this article.

  13. Soft X-ray spectral observations of quasars and high X-ray luminosity Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Krolik, J. H.; Holt, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 28 Einstein SSS observations of 15 high X-ray luminosity (L(x) 10 to the 435 power erg/s) quasars and Seyfert type 1 nuclei are presented. The 0.75-4.5 keV spectra are in general well fit by a simple model consisting of a power law plus absorption by cold gas. The averager spectral index alpha is 0.66 + or - .36, consistent with alpha for the spectrum of these objects above 2 keV. In all but one case, no evidence was found for intrinsic absorption, with an upper limit of 2 x 10 to the 21st power/sq cm. Neither was evidence found for partial covering of the active nucleus by dense, cold matter (N(H) 10 to the 22nd power/sq cm; the average upper limit on the partial covering fraction is 0.5. There is no obvious correlation between spectral index and 0175-4.5 keV X-ray luminosity (which ranges from 3 x 10 to the 43rd to 47th powers erg/s or with other source properties. The lack of intrinsic X-ray absorption allows us to place constraints on the density and temperature of the broad-line emission region, and narrow line emission region, and the intergalactic medium.

  14. The Host Galaxies of High-Luminosity Obscured Quasars at 2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Nicholas; Strauss, M. A.; Greene, J. E.; Zakamska, N. L.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexandroff, R.; Liu, G.; Smith, P. S.; The SDSS-III BOSS Quasar Working Group

    2014-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei play a key role in the evolution of galaxies. However, very little is known about the host galaxies of the most luminous quasars at redshift 2.5, the epoch when massive black hole growth peaked. The brightness of the quasar itself, which can easily outshine a galaxy by a large factor, makes it very difficult to study emission from extended gas or stars in the host galaxy. However, we have imaged the extended emission from the host galaxies of a unique sample of six optically extinguished (Type II) luminous quasars with 2.5, with the Hubble Space Telescope (Cycle 20, GO 13014) using ACS/F814W to access the rest-frame near-ultraviolet, and WFC3/F160W for the rest-frame optical longward of 4000A. These objects are selected from the spectroscopic database of the SDSS/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey to have strong, narrow emission lines and weak continua. With these images, we have quantified the luminosity, morphology, and dynamical state of the host galaxies, and searched for extended scattered light from the obscured central engine. These observations are the first comprehensive study of both host galaxy light and scattered light in high-luminosity quasars at the epoch of maximum black hole growth, and give insights into the relationship between host galaxies and black holes during this important, and yet largely unexplored period.

  15. Exploring the Standard Model with the High Luminosity, Polarized Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, Richard G.

    2009-08-04

    The Standard Model is only a few decades old and has been successfully confirmed by experiment, particularly at the high energy frontier. This will continue with renewed vigor at the LHC. However, many important elements of the Standard Model remain poorly understood. In particular, the exploration of the strong interaction theory Quantum Chromodynamics is in its infancy. How does the spin-1/2 of the proton arise from the fundamental quark and gluon constituents? Can we understand the new QCD world of virtual quarks and gluons in the nucleon? Using precision measurements can we test the limits of the Standard Model and look for new physics? To address these and other important questions, physicists have developed a concept for a new type of accelerator, namely a high luminosity, polarized electron-ion collider. Here the scientific motivation is summarized and the accelerator concepts are outlined.

  16. Changes to the Transfer Line Collimation System for the High-Luminosity LHC Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, V.; Aberle, O.; Bracco, C.; Fraser, M.; Galleazzi, F.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Maciariello, F.; Meddahi, M.; Nuiry, F. X.; Steele, G.; Velotti, F.

    2015-06-01

    The current LHC transfer line collimation system will not be able to provide enough protection for the high brightness beams in the high-luminosity LHC era. The new collimation system will have to attenuate more and be more robust than its predecessor. The active jaw length of the new transfer line collimators will therefore be 2.1 m instead of currently 1.2 m. The transfer line optics will have to be adjusted for the new collimator locations and larger beta functions at the collimators for absorber robustness reasons. In this paper the new design of the transfer line collimation system will be presented with its implications on transfer line optics and powering, maintainability, protection of transfer line magnets in case of beam loss on a collimator and protection of the LHC aperture.

  17. A high-redshift IRAS galaxy with huge luminosity - Hidden quasar or protogalaxy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan-Robinson, M.; Broadhurst, T.; Oliver, S. J.; Taylor, A. N.; Lawrence, A.; Mcmahon, R. G.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Hacking, P. B.; Conrow, T.

    1991-01-01

    An emission line galaxy with the enormous far-IR luminosity of 3 x 10 to the 14th solar has been found at z = 2.286. The spectrum is very unusual, showing lines of high excitation but with very weak Lyman-alpha emission. A self-absorbed synchrotron model for the IR energy distribution cannot be ruled out, but a thermal origin seems more plausible. A radio-quiet quasar embedded in a very dusty galaxy could account for the IR emission, as might a starburst embedded in 1-10 billion solar masses of dust. The latter case demands so much dust that the object would probably be a massive galaxy in the process of formation. The presence of a large amount of dust in an object of such high redshift implies the generation of heavy elements at an early cosmological epoch.

  18. Research and development for a free-running readout system for the ATLAS LAr Calorimeters at the high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hils, Maximilian

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters were designed and built to measure electromagnetic and hadronic energy in proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to 1034 cm-2 s-1. The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) programme is now developed for up to 5-7 times the design luminosity, with the goal of accumulating an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1. In the HL-LHC phase, the increased radiation levels and an improved ATLAS trigger system require a replacement of the Front-end (FE) and Back-end (BE) electronics of the LAr Calorimeters. Results from research and development of individual components and their radiation qualification as well as the overall system design will be presented.

  19. Models of stellar population at high redshift, as constrained by PN yields and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraston, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    Stellar population models are the tool to derive the properties of real galaxies, or predict them via galaxy formation models. A constructive approach is to use nearby stellar systems to calibrate uncertain quantities in stellar evolution. These checks and comparisons are particulary needed for evolved and short stellar phases such as the Thermally-Pulsing Asymptotic giant branch, after whcih intermediate-mass stars evolve through the planetary nebula stage. Given the stellar mass range for which the fuel consumption along the TP-AGB is larger, high-redshift galaxies are the best probes of our modelling. I shall present the models, discuss how different prescription for the treatment of this stellar phase affects the integrated spectral energy distribution and how these compare to galaxy data, and discuss implications for the PN nebulae luminosity function and stellar remnants stemming from the various assumptions.

  20. Development of radiation hard semiconductor sensors for charged particle tracking at very high luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, Christopher; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Sadrozinski, Hartmut F.; Wright, John

    2010-09-01

    The RD50 collaboration (sponsored by the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN) has been exploring the development of radiation hard semiconductor devices for very high-luminosity colliders since 2002. The target fluence to qualify detectors set by the anticipated dose for the innermost tracking layers of the future upgrade of the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) is 1016 1 MeV neutron equivalent (neq) cm-2. This is much larger than typical fluences in space, but is mainly limited to displacement and total dose damage, without the single-event effects typical for the space environment. RD50 investigates radiation hardening from many angles, including: Search for alternative semiconductor to replace silicon, improvement of the intrinsic tolerance of the substrate material (p- vs. n-type, initial doping concentration, oxygen concentration), optimization of the readout geometry (collection of holes or electrons, surface treatment), novel detector designs (3D, edge-less, interconnects).

  1. CP violation in the B system: Physics at a high luminosity B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1991-06-01

    CP Violation remains one of the unsolved puzzles in particle physics. Measurements of CP violating asymmetries in {beta} meson decay will test the Standard Model of electro-weak interactions and tell whether this phenomenon can be explained simply through the non-zero angles and phase in the CKM matrix. A high luminosity, energy asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring provides the most versatile and best opportunity to measure CP violating effects and to test the consistency of the Standard Model, and should discrepancies occur, information will be available to establish the origin of CP violation outside the model. Such a machine is a very challenging, though technically achievable device, that when complemented with a suitable detector will represent a very exiting laboratory for studies of many aspects of beauty, charm, and {tau}{sup +-} physics in the coming decade. 26 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Constraining the minimum luminosity of high redshift galaxies through gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the effects of gravitational lensing on the source count of high redshift galaxies as projected to be observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields program and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in the near future. Taking the mass density profile of the lensing object to be the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) or the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, we model a lens residing at a redshift of zL = 0.5 and explore the radial dependence of the resulting magnification bias and its variability with the velocity dispersion of the lens, the photometric sensitivity of the instrument, the redshift of the background source population, and the intrinsic maximum absolute magnitude (Mmax) of the sources. We find that gravitational lensing enhances the number of galaxies with redshifts zgtrsim 13 detected in the angular region θE/2 <= θ <= 2θE (where θE is the Einstein angle) by a factor of ~ 3 and 1.5 in the HUDF (df/dν0 ~ 9 nJy) and medium-deep JWST surveys (df/dν0 ~ 6 nJy). Furthermore, we find that even in cases where a negative magnification bias reduces the observed number count of background sources, the lensing effect improves the sensitivity of the count to the intrinsic faint-magnitude cut-off of the Schechter luminosity function. In a field centered on a strong lensing cluster, observations of zgtrsim 6 and zgtrsim 13 galaxies with JWST can be used to infer this cut-off magnitude for values as faint as Mmax ~ -14.4 and -16.1 mag (Lmin ≈ 2.5 × 1026 and 1.2 × 1027 erg s-1 Hz-1) respectively, within the range bracketed by existing theoretical models. Gravitational lensing may therefore offer an effective way of constraining the low-luminosity cut-off of high-redshift galaxies.

  3. High-Redshift QSOs in the SWIRE Survey and the z~3 QSO Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siana, Brian; Polletta, Maria del Carmen; Smith, Harding E.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo; Farrah, Duncan; Babbedge, Tom S. R.; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Surace, Jason; Shupe, David; Fang, Fan; Franceschini, Alberto; Oliver, Seb

    2008-03-01

    We use a simple optical/infrared (IR) photometric selection of high-redshift QSOs that identifies a Lyman break in the optical photometry and requires a red IR color to distinguish QSOs from common interlopers. The search yields 100 z ~ 3 (U-dropout) QSO candidates with 19 < r' < 22 over 11.7 deg2 in the ELAIS-N1 (EN1) and ELAIS-N2 (EN2) fields of the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) Legacy Survey. The z ~ 3 selection is reliable, with spectroscopic follow-up of 10 candidates confirming that they are all QSOs at 2.83 < z < 3.44. We find that our z ~ 4 (g'-dropout) sample suffers from both unreliability and incompleteness but present seven previously unidentified QSOs at 3.50 < z < 3.89. Detailed simulations show our z ~ 3 completeness to be ~80%-90% from 3.0 < z < 3.5, significantly better than the ~30%-80% completeness of the SDSS at these redshifts. The resulting luminosity function extends 2 mag fainter than SDSS and has a faint-end slope of β = - 1.42 +/- 0.15, consistent with values measured at lower redshift. Therefore, we see no evidence for evolution of the faint-end slope of the QSO luminosity function. Including the SDSS QSO sample, we have now directly measured the space density of QSOs responsible for ~70% of the QSO UV luminosity density at z ~ 3. We derive a maximum rate of H I photoionization from QSOs at z ~ 3.2, Γ = 4.8 × 10-13 s-1, about half of the total rate inferred through studies of the Lyα forest. Therefore, star-forming galaxies and QSOs must contribute comparably to the photoionization of H I in the intergalactic medium at z ~ 3. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  4. Fabrication and performance of a new high-gradient trim quadrupole for the Fermilab luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsch, P.M.; Carson, J.A.; Gourlay, S.A.; Lamm, M.J.; Riddiford, A.W.

    1991-05-01

    A series of 16 high-gradient trim quadrupole magnets has been designed and built for the Tevatron luminosity upgrade (Fermilab III). These quadrupoles form part of the new Low-Beta system for the two interaction regions in the Tevatron Collider. The magnets have been installed in the Tevatron lattice in anticipation of the 1991 collider run. The one-shell design uses a cable'' of individually insulated rectangular strands. The cable is overwrapped with Kapton and epoxy impregnated glass tape. The winding, curing and collaring of the magnet is accomplished in the same manner as Tevatron-like magnets using Rutherford style cable. Once the magnet is assembled, the five strands are connected in series to achieve high gradient at low current. The required gradient is 0.63 T/cm at 1086 A. The production magnets reached maximum currents of about 1.1 T/cm at 1990 A. The success of this design approach suggests other applications in beam transport where magnets of high performance and low operating cost are required. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Constraining the minimum luminosity of high redshift galaxies through gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the effects of gravitational lensing on the source count of high redshift galaxies as projected to be observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields program and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in the near future. Taking the mass density profile of the lensing object to be the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) or the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, we model a lens residing at a redshift of z{sub L} = 0.5 and explore the radial dependence of the resulting magnification bias and its variability with the velocity dispersion of the lens, the photometric sensitivity of the instrument, the redshift of the background source population, and the intrinsic maximum absolute magnitude (M{sub max}) of the sources. We find that gravitational lensing enhances the number of galaxies with redshifts z∼> 13 detected in the angular region θ{sub E}/2 ≤ θ ≤ 2θ{sub E} (where θ{sub E} is the Einstein angle) by a factor of ∼ 3 and 1.5 in the HUDF (df/dν{sub 0} ∼ 9 nJy) and medium-deep JWST surveys (df/dν{sub 0} ∼ 6 nJy). Furthermore, we find that even in cases where a negative magnification bias reduces the observed number count of background sources, the lensing effect improves the sensitivity of the count to the intrinsic faint-magnitude cut-off of the Schechter luminosity function. In a field centered on a strong lensing cluster, observations of z∼> 6 and z∼> 13 galaxies with JWST can be used to infer this cut-off magnitude for values as faint as M{sub max} ∼ -14.4 and -16.1 mag (L{sub min} ≈ 2.5 × 10{sup 26} and 1.2 × 10{sup 27} erg s{sup −1} Hz{sup −1}) respectively, within the range bracketed by existing theoretical models. Gravitational lensing may therefore offer an effective way of constraining the low-luminosity cut-off of high-redshift galaxies.

  6. Design Study of the High Luminosity LHC Recombination Dipole (D2)

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, GianLuca; Wang, Xiaorong

    2014-05-26

    The interaction region design of the high-luminosity LHC requires replacing the recombination dipole magnets (D2) with new ones. The preliminary specifications include an aperture of 105 mm, with 186 mm separation between the twin-aperture axes, and an operating field in the range of 3.5 to 4.5 T. The main design challenge is to decouple the magnetic field in the two apertures and ensure good field quality. The approach adopted for the present D2 magnets, using the iron yoke as a shield between the two apertures, leads to large saturation effects. In this study, we propose an alternative approach where the iron yoke is designed primarily for low saturation, and the resulting large but current-independent cross-talk between the apertures is corrected with an asymmetric arrangement of the conductor blocks. A preliminary solution based on the LHC dipole cable is presented, and the expected harmonics for geometric, saturation and persistent current effects are provided. Finally, the feasibility of an operating field at the high end of the range considered is discussed, to minimize the D2 magnet length and facilitate the space allocation for other components.

  7. MAD Adaptive Optics Imaging of High-luminosity Quasars: A Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, E.; Falomo, R.; Paiano, S.; Treves, A.; Uslenghi, M.; Arcidiacono, C.; Baruffolo, A.; Diolaiti, E.; Farinato, J.; Lombini, M.; Moretti, A.; Ragazzoni, R.; Brast, R.; Donaldson, R.; Kolb, J.; Marchetti, E.; Tordo, S.

    2016-08-01

    We present near-IR images of five luminous quasars at z ∼ 2 and one at z ∼ 4 obtained with an experimental adaptive optics (AO) instrument at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. The observations are part of a program aimed at demonstrating the capabilities of multi-conjugated adaptive optics imaging combined with the use of natural guide stars for high spatial resolution studies on large telescopes. The observations were mostly obtained under poor seeing conditions but in two cases. In spite of these nonoptimal conditions, the resulting images of point sources have cores of FWHM ∼ 0.2 arcsec. We are able to characterize the host galaxy properties for two sources and set stringent upper limits to the galaxy luminosity for the others. We also report on the expected capabilities for investigating the host galaxies of distant quasars with AO systems coupled with future Extremely Large Telescopes. Detailed simulations show that it will be possible to characterize compact (2–3 kpc) quasar host galaxies for quasi-stellar objects at z = 2 with nucleus K-magnitude spanning from 15 to 20 (corresponding to absolute magnitude ‑31 to ‑26) and host galaxies that are 4 mag fainter than their nuclei.

  8. Operation of the Cherenkov Detector DIRC of BaBar at High Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Spanier, Stefane

    2001-03-07

    The DIRC (acronym for Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov (light)) is the ring imaging Cherenkov detector of the BaBar detector at the Pep-II ring of SLAC. It provides the identification of pions, kaons and protons for momenta up to 4 GeV/c with high efficiency. This is needed to reconstruct CP-violating B-decay final states and to provide B-meson flavour tagging for time dependent asymmetry measurements. The DIRC radiators consists of long rectangular bars made of synthetic fused silica and the photon detector is a water tank equipped with an array of 10,752 conventional photomultipliers. At the end of the year 2000 BaBar has recorded about 22 million {bar B}B pairs reaching the design luminosity of L = 3 x 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}s. The ability to keep the beam background level low at highest collision rates and the long term reliability of the DIRC components during continuous data taking are requirements of BaBar to accomplish its physics program.

  9. Influence of collective effects on the performance of high-luminosity colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1990-04-01

    The design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider to study B physics is a challenging task from many points of view. In this paper we consider the influence of collective effects on the machine performance; most of our findings are generic,'' in the sense that they depend rather weakly on the details of the machine design. Both single-bunch and coupled-bunch instabilities are described and their effects are estimated based upon an example machine design (APIARY-IV). In addition, we examine the possibility of emittance growth from intrabeam scattering and calculate the beam lifetime from both Touschek and gas scattering. We find that the single-bunch instabilities should not lead to difficulty, and that the emittance growth is essentially negligible. At a background gas pressure of 10 nTorr, beam lifetimes of only a few hours are expected. Multibunch growth rates are very severe, even when using an optimized RF system consisting of single-cell, room-temperature RF cavities with geometrical shapes typical of superconducting cavities. Thus, a powerful feedback system will be required. In terms of collective effects, it does not appear

  10. A new high-gradient correction quadrupole for the Fermilab luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsch, P.; Carson, J.; Riddiford, A.; Lamm, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    Special superconducting correction quadrupoles are needed for the luminosity upgrade of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These correctors are part of the low-beta system for the interaction regions at B/phi/ and D/phi/. The requirements are high gradient and low current. A quadrupole has been designed that meets the operating gradient of 0.63 T/cm at 1086 A. The one-layer quadrupole is wound with a cable consisting of five individually insulated rectangular strands. The five strands are overwrapped with Kapton and epoxy impregnated glass tape. The winding, curing and collaring of the magnet is accomplished in the same manner as Tevatron-like magnets using Rutherford style cable. Once the magnet is complete the five strands are connected in series. A prototype quadrupole has been assembled and tested. The magnet reached a plateau current of 1560 A corresponding to a gradient of 0.91 T/cm without training. The measured field harmonics are substantially better than required. 8 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Boosted Higgs bosons from chromomagnetic b 's: b b ¯h at high luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Delgado, Antonio; Lehman, Landon; Martin, Adam

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines detection prospects and constraints on the chromomagnetic dipole operator for the bottom quark. This operator has a flavor, chirality and Lorentz structure that is distinct from other dimension-6 operators considered in Higgs coupling studies. Its nonstandard Lorentz structure results in boosted b b ¯h events, providing a rate-independent signal of new physics. To date, we find this operator is unconstrained by p p →h +jets and p p →b ¯b searches: for order-1 couplings the permitted cutoff Λ for this operator can be as low as Λ ˜1 TeV . We show how to improve this bound with collider cuts that allow a b -tagged Higgs-plus-dijet search in the Higgs-to-diphoton decay channel to exclude cutoffs as high as ˜6 TeV at 2 σ with 3 ab-1 of luminosity at the 14 TeV LHC. Cuts on the pT of the Higgs are key to this search, because the chromomagnetic dipole yields a nonstandard fraction of boosted Higgses.

  12. Field Tolerances for the Triplet Quadrupoles of the LHC High Luminosity Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri; Cai, Y.; Jiao, Y.; Wang, M-H.; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Maria, R.de; McIntosh, E.

    2012-06-25

    It has been proposed to implement the so-called Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing (ATS) scheme in the LHC high luminosity (HL) lattice to reduce beta functions at the Interaction Points (IP) up to a factor of 8. As a result, the nominal 4.5 km peak beta functions reached in the Inner Triplets (IT) at collision will be increased by the same factor. This, therefore, justifies the installation of new, larger aperture, superconducting IT quadrupoles. The higher beta functions will enhance the effects of the triplet quadrupole field errors leading to smaller beam dynamic aperture (DA). To maintain the acceptable DA, the effects of the triplet field errors must be re-evaluated, thus specifying new tolerances. Such a study has been performed for the so-called '4444' collision option of the HL-LHC layout version SLHCV3.01, where the IP beta functions are reduced by a factor of 4 in both planes with respect to a pre-squeezed value of 60 cm at two collision points. The dynamic aperture calculations were performed using SixTrack. The impact on the triplet field quality is presented.

  13. A Compton-thick Wind in the High Luminosity Quasar, PDS 456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, J. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Behar, E.; Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Braito, V.; Fabian, A. C.; Kaspi, S.; Mushotzky, R.; Ward, M.

    2009-01-01

    PDS 456 is a nearby (z=0.184), luminous (L(sub bol) approximately equal to 10(exp 47) ergs(exp -1) type I quasar. A deep 190 ks Suzaku observation in February 2007 revealed the complex, broad band X-ray spectrum of PDS 456. The Suzaku spectrum exhibits highly statistically significant absorption features near 9 keV in the quasar rest-frame. We show that the most plausible origin of the absorption is from blue-shifted resonance (1s-2p) transitions of hydrogen-like iron (at 6.97 keV in the rest frame). This indicates that a highly ionized outflow may be present moving at near relativistic velocities (0.26-0.31c). A possible hard X-ray excess is detected above 15 keV with HXD (at 99.8% confidence), which may arise from high column density gas (N(sub H) greater than 10(exp 24)cm(exp -2) partially covering the X-ray emission, or through strong Compton reflection. Here we propose that the iron K-shell absorption in PDS 456 is associated with a thick, possibly clumpy outflow, covering about 20% of 4(pi) steradian solid angle. The outflow is likely launched from the inner accretion disk, within 15-100 gravitational radii of the black hole. The kinetic power of the outflow may be similar to the bolometric luminosity of PDS 456. Such a powerful wind could have a significant effect on the co-evolution of the host galaxy and its supermassive black hole, through feedback.

  14. The hard X-ray luminosity function of high-redshift (3 < z ≲ 5) active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vito, F.; Gilli, R.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Iwasawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present the hard-band (2-10 keV) X-ray luminosity function (HXLF) of 0.5-2 keV band selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshift. We have assembled a sample of 141 AGN at 3 < z ≲ 5 from X-ray surveys of different size and depth, in order to sample different regions in the LX - z plane. The HXLF is fitted in the range log LX ˜ 43-45 with standard analytical evolutionary models through a maximum likelihood procedure. The evolution of the HXLF is well described by a pure density evolution, with the AGN space density declining by a factor of ˜10 from z = 3 to 5. A luminosity-dependent density evolution model, which, normally, best represents the HXLF evolution at lower redshift, is also consistent with the data, but a larger sample of low-luminosity (log LX < 44), high-redshift AGN is necessary to constrain this model. We also estimated the intrinsic fraction of AGN obscured by a column density log NH ≥ 23 to be 0.54 ± 0.05, with no strong dependence on luminosity. This fraction is higher than the value in the Local Universe, suggesting an evolution of the luminous (LX > 1044 erg s-1) obscured AGN fraction from z = 0 to z > 3.

  15. An empirical model for the galaxy luminosity and star formation rate function at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Oesch, Pascal A.; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Using the most recent measurements of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions (LFs) and dust estimates of early galaxies, we derive updated dust-corrected star formation rate functions (SFRFs) at z ˜ 4-8, which we model to predict the evolution to higher redshifts, z > 8. We employ abundance matching techniques to calibrate a relation between galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and host halo mass Mh by mapping the shape of the observed SFRFs at z ˜ 4-8 to that of the halo mass function. The resulting scaling law remains roughly constant over this redshift range. We apply the average SFR-Mh relation to reproduce the observed SFR functions at 4 ≲ z ≲ 8 and also derive the expected UV LFs at higher redshifts. At z ˜ 9 and z ˜ 10 these model LFs are in excellent agreement with current observed estimates. Our predicted number densities and UV LFs at z > 10 indicate that James Webb Space Telescope will be able to detect galaxies out to z ˜ 15 with an extensive treasury sized program. We also derive the redshift evolution of the star formation rate density (SFRD) and associated reionization history by galaxies. Models which integrate down to the current HUDF12/XDF detection limit (MUV ˜ -17.7 mag) result in a SFRD that declines as (1 + z)-10.4 ± 0.3 at high redshift and fail to reproduce the observed cosmic microwave background electron scattering optical depth, τ ≃ 0.066, to within 1σ. On the other hand, we find that the inclusion of galaxies with SFRs well below the current detection limit (MUV < -5.7 mag) leads to a fully reionized universe by z ˜ 6.5 and an optical depth of τ ≃ 0.054, consistent with the recently derived Planck value at the 1σ level.

  16. A physical model for the evolving ultraviolet luminosity function of high redshift galaxies and their contribution to the cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhen-Yi; Lapi, Andrea; Bressan, Alessandro; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Danese, Luigi; Negrello, Mattia

    2014-04-10

    We present a physical model for the evolution of the ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies, taking into account in a self-consistent way their chemical evolution and the associated evolution of dust extinction. Dust extinction is found to increase fast with halo mass. A strong correlation between dust attenuation and halo/stellar mass for UV selected high-z galaxies is thus predicted. The model yields good fits of the UV and Lyman-α (Lyα) line luminosity functions at all redshifts at which they have been measured. The weak observed evolution of both luminosity functions between z = 2 and z = 6 is explained as the combined effect of the negative evolution of the halo mass function; of the increase with redshift of the star formation efficiency due to the faster gas cooling; and of dust extinction, differential with halo mass. The slope of the faint end of the UV luminosity function is found to steepen with increasing redshift, implying that low luminosity galaxies increasingly dominate the contribution to the UV background at higher and higher redshifts. The observed range of the UV luminosities at high z implies a minimum halo mass capable of hosting active star formation M {sub crit} ≲ 10{sup 9.8} M {sub ☉}, which is consistent with the constraints from hydrodynamical simulations. From fits of Lyα line luminosity functions, plus data on the luminosity dependence of extinction, and from the measured ratios of non-ionizing UV to Lyman-continuum flux density for samples of z ≅ 3 Lyman break galaxies and Lyα emitters, we derive a simple relationship between the escape fraction of ionizing photons and the star formation rate. It implies that the escape fraction is larger for low-mass galaxies, which are almost dust-free and have lower gas column densities. Galaxies already represented in the UV luminosity function (M {sub UV} ≲ –18) can keep the universe fully ionized up to z ≅ 6. This is consistent with (uncertain) data

  17. Final Cooling for a High-Energy High-Luminosity Lepton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Sayed, H.; Hart, T.; Summers, D.

    2015-12-03

    A high-energy muon collider scenario require a “final cooling” system that reduces transverse emittance by a factor of ~10 while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. The baseline approach has low-energy transverse cooling within high-field solenoids, with strong longitudinal heating. This approach and its recent simulation are discussed. Alternative approaches which more explicitly include emittance exchange are also presented. Round-to-flat beam transform, transverse slicing, and longitudinal bunch coalescence are possible components of an alternative approach. Wedge-based emittance exchange could provide much of the required transverse cooling with longitudinal heating. Li-lens and quadrupole focusing systems could also provide much of the required final cooling.

  18. THE CANADA-FRANCE HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: NINE NEW QUASARS AND THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT REDSHIFT 6

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Delorme, Philippe; Reyle, Celine; Albert, Loic; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; McLure, Ross J.

    2010-03-15

    We present discovery imaging and spectroscopy for nine new z {approx} 6 quasars found in the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) bringing the total number of CFHQS quasars to 19. By combining the CFHQS with the more luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample, we are able to derive the quasar luminosity function from a sample of 40 quasars at redshifts 5.74 < z < 6.42. Our binned luminosity function shows a slightly lower normalization and flatter slope than found in previous work. The binned data also suggest a break in the luminosity function at M {sub 1450} {approx} -25. A double power-law maximum likelihood fit to the data is consistent with the binned results. The luminosity function is strongly constrained (1{sigma} uncertainty <0.1 dex) over the range -27.5 < M {sub 1450} < -24.7. The best-fit parameters are {phi}(M*{sub 1450}) = 1.14 x 10{sup -8} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1}, break magnitude M*{sub 1450} = -25.13, and bright end slope {beta} = -2.81. However, the covariance between {beta} and M*{sub 1450} prevents strong constraints being placed on either parameter. For a break magnitude in the range -26 < M*{sub 1450} < -24, we find -3.8 < {beta} < -2.3 at 95% confidence. We calculate the z = 6 quasar intergalactic ionizing flux and show it is between 20 and 100 times lower than that necessary for reionization. Finally, we use the luminosity function to predict how many higher redshift quasars may be discovered in future near-IR imaging surveys.

  19. Run II luminosity progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gollwitzer, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron Collider Run II program continues at the energy and luminosity frontier of high energy particle physics. To the collider experiments CDF and D0, over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity has been delivered to each. Upgrades and improvements in the Antiproton Source of the production and collection of antiprotons have led to increased number of particles stored in the Recycler. Electron cooling and associated improvements have help make a brighter antiproton beam at collisions. Tevatron improvements to handle the increased number of particles and the beam lifetimes have resulted in an increase in luminosity.

  20. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, B.; Alberty, L.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Cullen, C.; Capatina, O.; Hammons, L.; Li, Z.; Marques, C.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  1. Medially-shifted rather than high-riding vertebral arteries preclude safe pedicle screw insertion.

    PubMed

    Maki, Satoshi; Koda, Masao; Iijima, Yasushi; Furuya, Takeo; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Junya; Okawa, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    We enrolled 100 patients who underwent preoperative CT angiography before cervical spine instrumentation and investigated the morphology of the C2 pedicle from the perspective of pedicle screw (PS) trajectory using volume rendering and multiplanar reconstruction. The narrowest portion of the pedicle was identified as the pedicle isthmus. Safe C2 PS insertion was regarded to be not feasible when the height of the medullary cavity of the pedicle isthmus and/or width of the medullary cavity of the pedicle isthmus was ⩽4mm. Forty-five (22.5%) pedicles were ⩽4mm in width, and safe insertion of a PS was determined to be not feasible. Among these, seven pedicles were ⩽4mm in both height and width. The remaining 38 pedicles were ⩽4mm in width with heights >4mm. There was no pedicle with a width >4mm and height <4mm. In other words, short pedicles were always concomitantly narrow. Therefore, the seven pedicles ⩽4mm in both height and width were considered to be morphologically narrow. The heights of the pedicle isthmus were not limited by the vertebral artery groove (VAG) and safe C2 PS insertion can be considered feasible where the VAG is marginally cranial, whereas the widths of the pedicle isthmus are limited by the VAG. Therefore, safe C2 PS insertion is precluded only when the VAG courses cranially and medially. It is a medially-shifted, rather than a high-riding, vertebral artery that precludes safe C2 PS insertion. Therefore to avoid vertebral artery injury an axial CT scan, parallel to the pedicle axis, should be evaluated before C2 PS insertion. PMID:26916906

  2. Recent Progress on Design Studies of High-Luminosity Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Bruell, A; Chevtsov, P; Derbenev, Y S; Ent, R; Krafft, G A; Li, R; Merminga, L; Yunn, B C

    2009-05-01

    The conceptual design of a ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF has been continuously optimized to cover a wide center-of-mass energy region and to achieve high luminosity and polarization to support next generation nuclear science programs. Here, we summarize the recent design improvements and R&D progress on interaction region optics with chromatic aberration compensation, matching and tracking of electron polarization in the Figure-8 ring, beam-beam simulations and ion beam cooling studies.

  3. PROBING HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY FORMATION AT THE HIGHEST LUMINOSITIES: NEW INSIGHTS FROM DEIMOS SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Dey, Arjun; Cooper, Michael C.; Reddy, Naveen; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2013-07-01

    We present Keck DEIMOS spectroscopic observations of the most UV-luminous star-forming galaxies at redshifts 3.2 < z < 4.6. Our sample, selected in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey, contains galaxies with luminosities of L* {approx}< L{sub UV} {approx}< 7 L* and is one of the largest samples to date of the most UV-luminous galaxies at these redshifts. Our spectroscopic data confirm 41 candidates as star-forming galaxies at 3.2 < z < 4.6 and validate the relatively clean selection of the photometric candidates with a contamination rate of 11%-28%. We find that the fraction of Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies increases with decreasing UV luminosity. None of the 12 galaxies with M{sub UV} < -22 (i.e., L{sub UV} > 3 L*) exhibit strong Ly{alpha} emission. We find strong evidence of large-scale outflows, transporting the neutral/ionized gas in the interstellar medium away from the galaxy. Galaxies exhibiting both interstellar absorption and Ly{alpha} emission lines show a significant offset between the two features, with a relative velocity of 200-1150 km s{sup -1}. We find tentative evidence that this measure of the outflow velocity increases with UV luminosity and/or stellar mass. The luminosity- and mass-dependent outflow strengths suggest that the efficiency of feedback and enrichment of the surrounding medium depend on these galaxy parameters. We also stack the individual spectra to construct composite spectra of the absorption-line-only and Ly{alpha}-emitting subsets of the UV luminous galaxies at z {approx_equal} 3.7. The composite spectra are very similar to those of lower-redshift and lower-luminosity Lyman break galaxy (LBG) samples, but with some subtle differences. Analyses of the composite spectra suggest that the UV luminous LBGs at z {approx_equal} 3.7 may have a higher covering fraction of absorbing gas, and may be older (or have had more prolonged star formation histories) than their lower-redshift and lower-luminosity counterparts. In

  4. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2010-12-28

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  5. Discovery of 1-5 Hz flaring at high luminosity in SAX J1808.4-3658

    SciTech Connect

    Bult, Peter; Van der Klis, Michiel

    2014-07-10

    We report the discovery of a 1-5 Hz X-ray flaring phenomenon observed at >30 mCrab near peak luminosity in the 2008 and 2011 outbursts of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 in observations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. In each of the two outbursts this high luminosity flaring is seen for ∼3 continuous days and switches on and off on a timescale of 1-2 hr. The flaring can be seen directly in the light curve, where it shows sharp spikes of emission at quasi-regular separation. In the power spectrum it produces a broad noise component, which peaks at 1-5 Hz. The total 0.05-10 Hz variability has a fractional rms amplitude of 20%-45%, well in excess of the 8%-12% rms broadband noise usually seen in power spectra of SAX J1808.4-3658. We perform a detailed timing analysis of the flaring and study its relation to the 401 Hz pulsations. We find that the pulse amplitude varies proportionally with source flux through all phases of the flaring, indicating that the flaring is likely due to mass density variations created at or outside the magnetospheric boundary. We suggest that this 1-5 Hz flaring is a high mass accretion rate version of the 0.5-2 Hz flaring which is known to occur at low luminosity (<13 mCrab), late in the tail of outbursts of SAX J1808.4-3658. We propose the dead-disk instability, previously suggested as the mechanism for the 0.5-2 Hz flaring, as a likely mechanism for the high luminosity flaring reported here.

  6. Support Structure Design of the $$\\hbox{Nb}_{3}\\hbox{Sn}$$ Quadrupole for the High Luminosity LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Cheng, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Schmalzle, J.

    2014-10-31

    New low-β quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb₃Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of themore » detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.« less

  7. GEM tracker for high luminosity experiments at the JLab Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, Vincenzo G; Cisbani, Evaristo; Capogni, Marco; Colilli, Stephano P; De Leo, Raffaele A; De Oliveira, Denny M; De Smet, Fabienne; Fratoni, Rolando; Frullani, Salvatore; Giuliani, Fausto; Gricia, Massimo; Librizzi, F; Maurizio, Lucentini; Mammoliti, Francesco D; Minutoli, Saverio G; Musico, Paolo; Noto, Francesco; Perrino, Roberto; Santavenere, Fabio; Sutera, Concetta

    2012-05-01

    A new large-area, lightweight tracker based on the GEM technology is under development for the upcoming experiments in Hall A at Jefferson Lab, where a longitudinally polarized electron beam of 11 GeV will be available in late 2013. This beam, combined with innovative polarized targets, will provide luminosity up to 10{sup 39}/(s-cm{sup 2}) opening exciting opportunities to investigate unexplored aspects of the inner structure of the nucleon and the dynamics of its constituents. The GEM tracker design is presented in this paper.

  8. SuperB: A High-Luminosity Asymmetric e+e- Super Flavor Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bona, M.; /et al.

    2007-05-18

    We discuss herein the exciting physics program that can be accomplished with a very large sample of heavy quark and heavy lepton decays produced in the very clean environment of an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider; a program complementary to that of an experiment such as LHCb at a hadronic machine. It then presents the conceptual design of a new type of e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that produces a nearly two-order-of-magnitude increase in luminosity over the current generation of asymmetric B Factories. The key idea is the use of low emittance beams produced in an accelerator lattice derived from the ILC Damping Ring Design, together with a new collision region, again with roots in the ILC final focus design, but with important new concepts developed in this design effort. Remarkably, SuperB produces this very large improvement in luminosity with circulating currents and wallplug power similar to those of the current B Factories. There is clear synergy with ILC R&D; design efforts have already influenced one another, and many aspects of the ILC Damping Rings and Final Focus would be operationally tested at SuperB. Finally, the design of an appropriate detector, based on an upgrade of BABAR as an example, is discussed in some detail. A preliminary cost estimate is presented, as is an example construction timeline.

  9. Ultra-low power, highly uniform polymer memory by inserted multilayer graphene electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Byung Chul; Seong, Hyejeong; Kim, Jong Yun; Koo, Beom Jun; Kim, Sung Kyu; Yang, Sang Yoon; Gap Im, Sung; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2015-12-01

    Filament type resistive random access memory (RRAM) based on polymer thin films is a promising device for next generation, flexible nonvolatile memory. However, the resistive switching nonuniformity and the high power consumption found in the general filament type RRAM devices present critical issues for practical memory applications. Here, we introduce a novel approach not only to reduce the power consumption but also to improve the resistive switching uniformity in RRAM devices based on poly(1,3,5-trimethyl-3,4,5-trivinyl cyclotrisiloxane) by inserting multilayer graphene (MLG) at the electrode/polymer interface. The resistive switching uniformity was thereby significantly improved, and the power consumption was markedly reduced by 250 times. Furthermore, the inserted MLG film enabled a transition of the resistive switching operation from unipolar resistive switching to bipolar resistive switching and induced self-compliance behavior. The findings of this study can pave the way toward a new area of application for graphene in electronic devices.

  10. A proposed Drift Tubes-seeded muon track trigger for the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzobon, N.; Lazzizzera, I.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.

    2016-07-01

    The LHC program at 13 and 14 TeV, after the observation of the candidate SM Higgs boson, will help clarify future subjects of study and shape the needed tools. Any upgrade of the LHC experiments for unprecedented luminosities, such as the High Luminosity-LHC ones, must then maintain the acceptance on electroweak processes that can lead to a detailed study of the properties of the candidate Higgs boson. The acceptance of the key lepton, photon and hadron triggers should be kept such that the overall physics acceptance, in particular for low-mass scale processes, can be the same as the one the experiments featured in 2012. In such a scenario, a new approach to early trigger implementation is needed. One of the major steps will be the inclusion of high-granularity tracking sub-detectors, such as the CMS Silicon Tracker, in taking the early trigger decision. This contribution can be crucial in several tasks, including the confirmation of triggers in other subsystems, and the improvement of the on-line momentum measurement resolution. A muon track-trigger for the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity-LHC is presented. A back-extrapolation of Drift Tubes trigger primitives is proposed to match tracks found at Level 1 with muon candidates. The main figures-of-merit are presented, featuring sharp thresholds and less contamination from lower momentum muons, and an expected rate reduction of a factor of 5-10 at typical thresholds with respect to the muon trigger configuration used in 2012.

  11. X-ray View of Four High-Luminosity Swift-BAT AGN: Unveiling Obscuration and Reflection with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorettil, V.; Angelini, L.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Koss, M.; Malaguti, G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. A complete census of obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is necessary to reveal the history of the super massive black hole (SMBH) growth and galaxy evolution in the Universe given the complex feedback processes and the fact that much of this growth occurs in an obscured phase. In this context, hard X-ray surveys and dedicated follow-up observations represent a unique tool for selecting highly absorbed AGN and for characterizing the obscuring matter surrounding the SMBH. Here we focus on the absorption and reflection occurring in highly luminous, quasar-like AGN, to study the relation between the geometry of the absorbing matter and the AGN nature (e.g. X-ray, optical, and radio properties), and to help to determine the column density dependency on the AGN luminosity. Methods. The Swift/BAT nine-month survey observed 153 AGN, all with ultra-hard X-ray BAT fluxes in excess of 10(exp -11) erg per square centimeter and an average redshift of 0.03. Among them, four of the most luminous BAT AGN (44.73 less than LogLBAT less than 45.31) were selected as targets of Suzaku follow-up observations: J2246.0+3941 (3C 452), J0407.4+0339 (3C 105), J0318.7+6828, and J0918.5+0425. The column density, scattered/reflected emission, the properties of the Fe K line, and a possible variability are fully analyzed. For the latter, the spectral properties from Chandra, XMM-Newton and Swift/XRT public observations were compared with the present Suzaku analysis, adding an original spectral analysis when non was available from the literature. Results. Of our sample, 3C 452 is the only certain Compton-thick AGN candidate because of i) the high absorption (N(sub H) approximately 4 × 10(exp 23) per square centimeter) and strong Compton reflection; ii) the lack of variability; iii) the "buried" nature, i.e. the low scattering fraction (less than 0.5%) and the extremely low relative [OIII] luminosity. In contrast 3C 105 is not reflection-dominated, despite the comparable column density

  12. Pile up management at the high-luminosity LHC and introduction to the crab-kissing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fartoukh, Stéphane

    2014-11-01

    Upgrading the integrated performance of the LHC, while preserving the quality of the physics data delivered to the experiments, is a real challenge for the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). This paper will give an overview of the situation in terms of performance and so-called pile up density which directly impacts on the reconstruction efficiency of the primary vertices at the interaction point. Both the present HL-LHC baseline and its possible extension with the so-called crab-kissing scheme will be discussed in this context.

  13. HIGHER LUMINOSITY B-FACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, John T

    2002-08-20

    The present B-factories PEP-II and KEKB have reached luminosities of 3-4 x 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}/s and delivered integrated luminosity at rates in excess of 4fb{sup -1} per month [1,2]. The recent turn on of these two B-Factories has shown that modern accelerator physics, design, and engineering can produce colliders that rapidly reach their design luminosities and deliver integrated luminosities capable of frontier particle physics discoveries. PEP-II and KEK-B with ongoing upgrade programs should reach luminosities of over 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s in a few years and with more aggressive improvements may reach luminosities of order 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/s by the end of the decade. However, due to particle physics requirements, the next generation B-Factory may require significantly more luminosity. Initial parameters of a very high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} B-Factory or Super B-Factory (SBF) are being developed incorporating several new ideas from the successful operation of the present generation e{sup +}e{sup -} accelerators [3,4]. A luminosity approaching 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s{sup -1} appears possible. Furthermore, the ratio of average to peak luminosity may be increased by 30% due to continuous injection. The operation of this accelerator will be qualitatively different from present e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders due to this continuous injection.

  14. Plasma engineering models of tandem mirror devices with high-field test-cell inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Campbell, R.B.

    1985-04-03

    Plasma physics and engineering models of tandem mirror devices operated with a high-field technology test-cell insert in the central cell, which have been incorporated recently in the TMRBAR tandem mirror reactor physics code, are described. The models include particle and energy balance in the test-cell region as well as the interactions between the test-cell particles and those flowing through the entire device. The code calculations yield consistent operating parameters for the test-cell, central cell, and end cell systems. A benchmark case for the MFTF-..cap alpha..+T configuration is presented which shows good agreement between the code results and previous calculations.

  15. On the faint-end of the high-z galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Bin; Ferrara, Andrea; Xu, Yidong

    2016-08-01

    Recent measurements of the Luminosity Function (LF) of galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (EoR, zlower.5ex buildrel> over ˜ 6) indicate a very steep increase of the number density of low-mass galaxies populating the LF faint-end. However, as star formation in low-mass halos can be easily depressed or even quenched by ionizing radiation, a turnover is expected at some faint UV magnitudes. Using a physically-motivated analytical model, we quantify reionization feedback effects on the LF faint-end shape. We find that if reionization feedback is neglected, the power-law Schechter parameterization characterizing the LF faint-end remains valid up to absolute UV magnitude ˜-9. If instead radiative feedback is strong enough that quenches star formation in halos with circular velocity smaller than 50 km s-1, the LF starts to drop at absolute UV magnitude ˜-15, i.e. slightly below the detection limits of current (unlensed) surveys at z ˜ 5. The LFs may rise again at higher absolute UV magnitude, where, as a result of interplay between reionization process and galaxy formation, most of the galaxy light is from relic stars formed before the EoR. We suggest that the galaxy number counts data, particularly in lensed fields, can put strong constraints on reionization feedback. In models with stronger reionization feedback, stars in galaxies with absolute UV magnitude higher than ˜-13 and smaller than ˜-8 are typically older. Hence, the stellar age - UV magnitude relation can be used as an alternative feedback probe.

  16. Effect of Wedge Insertion Angle on Posterior Tibial Slope in Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Kazu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Kentaro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a well-established surgery for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) wherein the lower extremity is realigned to shift the load distribution from the medial compartment of the knee to the lateral compartment. However, this surgery is known to affect the posterior tibial slope angle (PTSA), which could lead to abnormal knee kinematics and instability, and eventually to knee OA. Although PTSA control is as important as coronal realignment, few appropriate measurements for this parameter have been reported. The placement of a wedge spacer might have an effect on PTSA. Purpose: To elucidate the relationship between the PTSA and the direction of insertion of a wedge spacer. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study assessed 43 knees from 34 patients who underwent medial opening wedge HTO for knee OA. Pre- and postoperative lateral radiographs of the knee as well as postoperative computed tomography scans were performed to evaluate the relationship among PTSA, wedge insertion angle (WIA), and opening gap ratio (distance of the anterior opening gap/distance of the posterior opening gap at the osteotomy site). Results: The PTSA significantly increased from 9.0° ± 2.8° preoperatively to 13.2° ± 4.1° postoperatively (P < .001), resulting in a mean ΔPTSA of 4.7° ± 4.5°. The mean opening gap ratio was 0.86 ± 0.11, and the mean WIA was 25.9° ± 8.4°. The WIA and opening gap ratio were both highly correlated with ΔPTSA (r = 0.71 and 0.72, respectively), implying that a smaller WIA or smaller gap ratio leads to less increase in posterior slope. Conclusion: The direction of wedge insertion is highly correlated with PTSA increase, which suggests that the PTSA can be controlled for by adjusting the direction of wedge insertion during surgery. Clinical Relevance: Study results suggest that it is possible to adjust the PTSA by controlling the WIA during surgery. Proper

  17. Conceptual Design of the Cryogenic System for the High-luminosity Upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Ferlin, G.; Tavian, L.; Wagner, U.; Van Weelderen, R.

    The discovery of a Higgs boson at CERN in 2012 is the start of a major program of work to measure this particle's properties with the highest possible precision for testing the validity of the Standard Model and to search for further new physics at the energy frontier. The LHC is in a unique position to pursue this program. Europe's top priority is the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with an objective to collect ten times more data than in the initial design, by around 2030. To reach this objective, the LHC cryogenic system must be upgraded to withstand higher beam current and higher luminosity at top energy while keeping the same operation availability by improving the collimation system and the protection of electronics sensitive to radiation. This paper will present the conceptual design of the cryogenic system upgrade with recent updates in performance requirements, the corresponding layout and architecture of the system as well as the main technical challenges which have to be met in the coming years.

  18. Mechanical Analysis of the 400 MHz RF-Dipole Crabbing Cavity Prototype for LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Subashini U.; Park, HyeKyoung; Delayen, Jean R.; Li, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The proposed LHC high luminosity upgrade requires two crabbing systems in increasing the peak luminosity, operating both vertically and horizontally at two interaction points of IP1 and IP5. The required system has tight dimensional constraints and needs to achieve higher operational gradients. A proof-of-principle 400 MHz crabbing cavity design has been successfully tested and has proven to be an ideal candidate for the crabbing system. The cylindrical proof-of-principle rf-dipole design has been adapted in to a square shaped design to further meet the dimensional requirements. The new rf-dipole design has been optimized in meeting the requirements in rf-properties, higher order mode damping, and multipole components. A crabbing system in a cryomodule is expected to be tested on the SPS beam line prior to the test at LHC. The new prototype is required to achieve the mechanical and thermal specifications of the SPS test followed by the test at LHC. This paper discusses the detailed mechanical and thermal analysis in minimizing Lorentz force detuning and sensitivity to liquid He pressure fluctuations.

  19. High-luminosity primary vertex selection in top-quark studies using the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Buzatu, Adrian; /McGill U.

    2006-08-01

    Improving our ability to identify the top quark pair (t{bar t}) primary vertex (PV) on an event-by-event basis is essential for many analyses in the lepton-plus-jets channel performed by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Collaboration. We compare the algorithm currently used by CDF (A1) with another algorithm (A2) using Monte Carlo simulation at high instantaneous luminosities. We confirm that A1 is more efficient than A2 at selecting the t{bar t} PV at all PV multiplicities, both with efficiencies larger than 99%. Event selection rejects events with a distance larger than 5 cm along the proton beam between the t{bar t} PV and the charged lepton. We find flat distributions for the signal over background significance of this cut for all cut values larger than 1 cm, for all PV multiplicities and for both algorithms. We conclude that any cut value larger than 1 cm is acceptable for both algorithms under the Tevatron's expected instantaneous luminosity improvements.

  20. Traumatic Dislodgement of Tibial Polyethylene Insert after a High-Flex Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Astoul Bonorino, Juan Felix; Slullitel, Pablo Ariel Isidoro; Kido, Gonzalo Rodrigo; Bongiovanni, Santiago; Vestri, Renato; Carbó, Lisandro

    2015-01-01

    Many pathologic entities can produce a painful total knee replacement (TKR) that may lead to potential prosthetic failure. Polyethylene insert dissociation from the tibial baseplate has been described most frequently after mobile-bearing and cruciate-retaining TKRs. However, only 3 tibial insert dislocations in primary fixed-bearing High-Flex posterior-stabilized TKRs have been reported. We present a new case of tibial insert dislocation in a High-Flex model that shares similarities and differences with the cases reported, facilitating the analysis of the potential causes, which still remain undefined. PMID:26457215

  1. Environments of High Luminosity X-Ray Sources in the Antennae Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Brandl, B. R.; Wilson, J. C.; Carson, J. C.; Henderson, C. P.; Hayward, T. P.; Barry, D. J.; Houck, J. R.; Ptak, A.; Colbert, E.

    2003-12-01

    We use deep J (1.25 μ m) and Ks (2.15 μ m) images of the Antennae (NGC 4038/9) obtained with the Wide-field InfraRed Camera on the Palomar 200-inch telescope, together with the Chandra X-ray source list of Zezas et al. (2001), to establish an X-ray/IR astrometric frame tie with ˜ 0.5 ″ RMS residuals over a ˜ 5 ‧ field. We find 13 ``strong" IR counterparts <1.0 ″ from X-ray sources, and an additional 6 ``possible" IR counterparts between 1.0 ″ and 1.5 ″ from X-ray sources. Based on detailed study of the surface density of IR sources near the X-ray sources, we expect only ˜ 2 of the ``strong" counterparts and ˜ 3 of the ``possible" counterparts to be chance superpositions of unrelated objects. Comparing the IR counterparts to our photometric study of ˜ 250 IR clusters in the Antennae, we find that IR counterparts to X-ray sources are Δ MK ˜ 1.2 mag more luminous than average non-X-ray clusters (>99.9% confidence), and that the X-ray/IR matches are concentrated in the spiral arms and ``bridge" regions of the Antennae. This implies that these X-ray sources lie in the most ``super" of the Antennae's Super Star Clusters, and thus trace the recent massive star formation history here. Based on the NH inferred from the X-ray sources without IR counterparts, we determine that the absence of most of the ``missing" IR counterparts is not due to extinction, but that these sources are intrinsically less luminous in the IR, implying that they trace a different (older?) stellar population. We find no clear correlation between X-ray luminosity classes and IR properties of the sources, though small number statistics hamper this analysis. Finally, we find a Ks = 16.2 mag counterpart to the Ultra-Luminous X-ray (ULX) source X-37 within <0.5 ″ , eliminating the need for the ``runaway binary" hypothesis proposed by previous authors for this object. We discuss some of the implications of this detection for models of ULX emission. This work is funded by an NSF CAREER

  2. High luminosity, slow ejecta and persistent carbon lines: SN 2009dc challenges thermonuclear explosion scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenberger, S.; Benetti, S.; Childress, M.; Pakmor, R.; Hachinger, S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Stanishev, V.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Agnoletto, I.; Bufano, F.; Ergon, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kromer, M.; Navasardyan, H.; Nicolas, J.; Pastorello, A.; Prosperi, E.; Salgado, F.; Sollerman, J.; Stritzinger, M.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2011-04-01

    Extended optical and near-IR observations reveal that SN 2009dc shares a number of similarities with normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), but is clearly overluminous, with a (pseudo-bolometric) peak luminosity of log (L) = 43.47 (erg s-1). Its light curves decline slowly over half a year after maximum light [Δm15(B)true= 0.71], and the early-time near-IR light curves show secondary maxima, although the minima between the first and the second peaks are not very pronounced. The bluer bands exhibit an enhanced fading after ˜200 d, which might be caused by dust formation or an unexpectedly early IR catastrophe. The spectra of SN 2009dc are dominated by intermediate-mass elements and unburned material at early times, and by iron-group elements at late phases. Strong C II lines are present until ˜2 weeks past maximum, which is unprecedented in thermonuclear SNe. The ejecta velocities are significantly lower than in normal and even subluminous SNe Ia. No signatures of interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) are found in the spectra. Assuming that the light curves are powered by radioactive decay, analytic modelling suggests that SN 2009dc produced ˜1.8 M⊙ of 56Ni assuming the smallest possible rise time of 22 d. Together with a derived total ejecta mass of ˜2.8 M⊙, this confirms that SN 2009dc is a member of the class of possible super-Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia similar to SNe 2003fg, 2006gz and 2007if. A study of the hosts of SN 2009dc and other superluminous SNe Ia reveals a tendency of these SNe to explode in low-mass galaxies. A low metallicity of the progenitor may therefore be an important prerequisite for producing superluminous SNe Ia. We discuss a number of possible explosion scenarios, ranging from super-Chandrasekhar-mass white-dwarf progenitors over dynamical white-dwarf mergers and Type I? SNe to a core-collapse origin of the explosion. None of the models seems capable of explaining all properties of SN 2009dc, so that the true nature of this SN

  3. Dry Sliding Wear Behaviours of Valve Seat Inserts Produced from High Chromium White Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyon, Ali; Özyürek, Dursun; Günay, Mustafa; Aztekin, Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In this present study, wear behaviours of high chromium white iron valve seat inserts and tappets used in the automotive sector were investigated. Wear behaviours of three different rates of high chromium white cast irons (containing 10, 12 and 14% chromium) were examined under heavy service conditions. For that purpose, the produced valve seat inserts were characterized through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and hardness measurements. They were tested at a sliding speed of 1 ms-1, under 120 N load and for six different sliding distances (500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000 m) by using a standard wear apparatus (pin-on-disk type). The result showed that as the amount of Cr increased in the alloys, their hardness decreased. The decrease in the hardness were considered to be as the result of transformation of M7C3 carbides into M23C6 carbides in the structure. This decrease in hardness with increasing chromium content also increased the weight loss. Thus, it was determined that the white iron with 14% Cr (which had a greater amount of M23C6 carbides) was subjected to the highest wear.

  4. Seamless Insert-Plasmid Assembly at High Efficiency and Low Cost.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Roger M; Ostermeier, Christian; Geiser, Martin; Li, Julia Su Zhou; Widmer, Hans; Auer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Seamless cloning methods, such as co-transformation cloning, sequence- and ligation-independent cloning (SLIC) or the Gibson assembly, are essential tools for the precise construction of plasmids. The efficiency of co-transformation cloning is however low and the Gibson assembly reagents are expensive. With the aim to improve the robustness of seamless cloning experiments while keeping costs low, we examined the importance of complementary single-stranded DNA ends for co-transformation cloning and the influence of single-stranded gaps in circular plasmids on SLIC cloning efficiency. Most importantly, our data show that single-stranded gaps in double-stranded plasmids, which occur in typical SLIC protocols, can drastically decrease the efficiency at which the DNA transforms competent E. coli bacteria. Accordingly, filling-in of single-stranded gaps using DNA polymerase resulted in increased transformation efficiency. Ligation of the remaining nicks did not lead to a further increase in transformation efficiency. These findings demonstrate that highly efficient insert-plasmid assembly can be achieved by using only T5 exonuclease and Phusion DNA polymerase, without Taq DNA ligase from the original Gibson protocol, which significantly reduces the cost of the reactions. We successfully used this modified Gibson assembly protocol with two short insert-plasmid overlap regions, each counting only 15 nucleotides. PMID:27073895

  5. Alternative Paths for Insertion of Probes in High Inclination Lunar Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, C. F.; Winter, O. C.

    The dynamics of the circular planar restricted three-body Earth-Moon-particle problem predicts the existence of direct periodic orbits around the Lagrangian equilibrium point L1 From these orbits derive a group of paths that form links between the Earth and the Moon Moreover they are capable of carrying out transfers between terrestrial and lunar orbits of low altitudes When we considered more complex dynamical systems such as the three-dimensional full four-body Sun-Earth-Moon-probe problem which takes into account besides other factors the inclination of the orbit of the Moon these paths leaving terrestrial orbits of low altitudes LEO gain inclination when they penetrate in the sphere of lunar influence allowing the insertion of probes in lunar orbits of high inclinations and low altitudes We studied this property giving emphasis to two types of transfer maneuvers Firstly we investigated direct transfers by inserting probes in lunar orbits with inclinations varying between 29 o and 42 o Next we investigated directed transfers with the application of a Delta V along of the trajectory in order to lead the probe into lunar orbits with inclinations between 0 o and 180 o The results allowed the definition of a group of paths capable of carrying out Earth-moon transfers with flight time between 13 and 16 days with relatively low costs

  6. Seamless Insert-Plasmid Assembly at High Efficiency and Low Cost

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Roger M.; Ostermeier, Christian; Geiser, Martin; Li, Julia Su Zhou; Widmer, Hans; Auer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Seamless cloning methods, such as co-transformation cloning, sequence- and ligation-independent cloning (SLIC) or the Gibson assembly, are essential tools for the precise construction of plasmids. The efficiency of co-transformation cloning is however low and the Gibson assembly reagents are expensive. With the aim to improve the robustness of seamless cloning experiments while keeping costs low, we examined the importance of complementary single-stranded DNA ends for co-transformation cloning and the influence of single-stranded gaps in circular plasmids on SLIC cloning efficiency. Most importantly, our data show that single-stranded gaps in double-stranded plasmids, which occur in typical SLIC protocols, can drastically decrease the efficiency at which the DNA transforms competent E. coli bacteria. Accordingly, filling-in of single-stranded gaps using DNA polymerase resulted in increased transformation efficiency. Ligation of the remaining nicks did not lead to a further increase in transformation efficiency. These findings demonstrate that highly efficient insert-plasmid assembly can be achieved by using only T5 exonuclease and Phusion DNA polymerase, without Taq DNA ligase from the original Gibson protocol, which significantly reduces the cost of the reactions. We successfully used this modified Gibson assembly protocol with two short insert-plasmid overlap regions, each counting only 15 nucleotides. PMID:27073895

  7. Insertion of field-emission displays into high-performance cockpit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marticello, Daniel N., Jr.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1996-05-01

    The high performance military aircraft has proceeded down the path to an 'all glass' cockpit with larger and larger area head down displays. The transition from electro-mechanical instruments was started with cathode ray tube (CRT) displays and accelerated with active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCD). Now, another technology, field emission, is poised to enter the cockpit with promises of better performance than its two predecessors. Field emission display (FED) devices will soon be available for civilian and commercial applications. It is crucial that applications such as high performance large area military aircraft displays be examined up front before fabrication decisions preclude construction of such devices. It is also important that experience gained, problems encountered, and lessons learned from insertion of CRT and AMLCD technology be considered.

  8. Mitigation of effects of beam-induced energy deposition in the LHC high-luminosity interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov et al.

    2003-05-28

    Beam-induced energy deposition in the LHC high luminosity interaction region components is one of the serious limits for the machine performance. The results of further optimization and comprehensive MARS14 calculations in the IP1 and IP5 inner and outer triplets are summarized for the updated lattice, calculation model, baseline pp-collision source term, and for realistic engineering constraints on the hardware design. It is shown that the optimized layout and absorbers would provide a sufficient reduction of peak power density and dynamic heat load in the superconducting components with an adequate safety margin. Accumulated dose and residual dose rates in and around the region components are also kept below the tolerable limits in the proposed design.

  9. Errata: A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, Z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Stephen J.; Hewett, Paul C.; Osmer, Patrick S.

    1995-01-01

    In the paper "A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function" by Stephen. Warren, Paul C. Hewett and Patrick S. Osmer (ApJ, 421,412 [1994]), two equations should be corrected: On page 419, column one, line 11, the expression following the words "the error,, should have an opening parenthesis just before the integral sign, to read: [{SIGMA} 1/({integral} ρ(z)dV_a_)^2^]^1/2^. On page 421, equation (15) is missing the asterisk (*) in the M_c_^*^ term just prior to (β + 1); that is, the exponent in the second term the denominator should read: 0.4(M_c_ - M_c_^*^)(β + 1). The authors wish to draw these errors to the attention of any readers who will be using the expression and equation.

  10. Development of edgeless silicon pixel sensors on p-type substrate for the ATLAS high-luminosity upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderini, G.; Bagolini, A.; Bomben, M.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Chauveau, J.; Giacomini, G.; La Rosa, A.; Marchiori, G.; Zorzi, N.

    2014-11-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade for the high luminosity phase (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment is planning to replace the inner detector with an all-silicon system. The n-in-p bulk technology represents a valid solution for the modules of most of the layers, given the significant radiation hardness of this option and the reduced cost. The large area necessary to instrument the outer layers will demand to tile the sensors, a solution for which the inefficient region at the border of each sensor needs to be reduced to the minimum size. This paper reports on a joint R&D project by the ATLAS LPNHE Paris group and FBK Trento on a novel n-in-p edgeless planar pixel design, based on the deep-trench process available at FBK.

  11. Experimental study on a Nb3Al insert coil under high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guang; Dai, Yinming; Cheng, Junsheng; Chang, Kun; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Qiuliang; Pan, Xifeng; Li, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Nb3Al is one of the most promising superconductors to replace Nb3Sn in large scale, high field superconducting magnet. Since the complicated conductor manufacturing process, long and stable Nb3Al conductor is difficult to acquire in a commercial scale. Based on a 70 m length of Nb-Al precursor conductor, we designed and fabricated a Nb3Al coil. The coil winding, low temperature diffusion heat treatment and epoxy impregnation are described in detail. The finished Nb3Al coil is tested as an insert in a background magnet. The test is performed at the background field from 7 T to 15 T. The test results are analyzed and presented in this paper.

  12. An ionization chamber shower detector for the LHC Luminosity Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Speziali, V.; Beche, J.F.; Burks, M.T.; Datte, P.S.; Haguenauer, M.; manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J.E.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Riot, V.J.; Schmickler, H.; Turner, W.C.

    2000-10-01

    The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) each absorb approximately 1.8 TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction (~;;235W at design luminosity 1034cm-2s-1). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. A novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/ electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The system design choices have been strongly influenced by optimization of signal to noise ratio and by the very high radiation environment. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. Data on each bunch are to be separately accumulated over multiple bunch crossings until the desired statistical accuracy is obtained. At design luminosity approximately 2x103 bunch crossings will suffice for a 1percent luminosity measurement. In this paper we report the first experimental results of the ionization chamber and analog electronics. Single 450GeV protons from the SPS at CERN are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC.

  13. GRB 120422A/SN 2012bz: Bridging the gap between low- and high-luminosity gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, S.; Malesani, D.; Cucchiara, A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Krühler, T.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Leloudas, G.; Lyman, J.; Bersier, D.; Wiersema, K.; Perley, D. A.; Schady, P.; Gorosabel, J.; Anderson, J. P.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Cenko, S. B.; De Cia, A.; Ellerbroek, L. E.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Greiner, J.; Hjorth, J.; Kann, D. A.; Kaper, L.; Klose, S.; Levan, A. J.; Martín, S.; O'Brien, P. T.; Page, K. L.; Pignata, G.; Rapaport, S.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, I. A.; Sparre, M.; Thöne, C. C.; Watson, D. J.; Xu, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Bayliss, M.; Björnsson, G.; Bremer, M.; Cano, Z.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Frail, D. A.; Geier, S.; Goldoni, P.; Hartoog, O. E.; Jakobsson, P.; Korhonen, H.; Lee, K. Y.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Oguri, M.; Pandey, S. B.; Petitpas, G.; Rossi, A.; Sandberg, A.; Schmidl, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tilanus, R. P. J.; Winters, J. M.; Wright, D.; Wuyts, E.

    2014-06-01

    Context. At low redshift, a handful of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been discovered with luminosities that are substantially lower (Liso ≲ 1048.5 erg s-1) than the average of more distant ones (Liso ≳ 1049.5 erg s-1). It has been suggested that the properties of several low-luminosity (low-L) GRBs are due to shock break-out, as opposed to the emission from ultrarelativistic jets. This has led to much debate about how the populations are connected. Aims: The burst at redshift z = 0.283 from 2012 April 22 is one of the very few examples of intermediate-L GRBs with a γ-ray luminosity of Liso ~ 1049.6-49.9 erg s-1 that have been detected up to now. With the robust detection of its accompanying supernova SN 2012bz, it has the potential to answer important questions on the origin of low- and high-L GRBs and the GRB-SN connection. Methods: We carried out a spectroscopy campaign using medium- and low-resolution spectrographs with 6-10-m class telescopes, which covered a time span of 37.3 days, and a multi-wavelength imaging campaign, which ranged from radio to X-ray energies over a duration of ~270 days. Furthermore, we used a tuneable filter that is centred at Hα to map star-formation in the host and the surrounding galaxies. We used these data to extract and model the properties of different radiation components and fitted the spectral energy distribution to extract the properties of the host galaxy. Results: Modelling the light curve and spectral energy distribution from the radio to the X-rays revealed that the blast wave expanded with an initial Lorentz factor of Γ0 ~ 50, which is a low value in comparison to high-L GRBs, and that the afterglow had an exceptionally low peak luminosity density of ≲2 × 1030 erg s-1 Hz-1 in the sub-mm. Because of the weak afterglow component, we were able to recover the signature of a shock break-out in an event that was not a genuine low-L GRB for the first time. At 1.4 hr after the burst, the stellar envelope had a blackbody

  14. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment in the High Temperature Insert-Reflight (HTI-R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.; Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre, Carole; Zappoli, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Current research on supercritical water processes on board the International Space Station (ISS) focuses on salt precipitation and transport in a test cell designed for supercritical water. This study, known as the Supercritical Water Mixture Experiment (SCWM) serves as a precursor experiment for developing a better understanding of inorganic salt precipitation and transport during supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) processes for the eventual application of this technology for waste management and resource reclamation in microgravity conditions. During typical SCWO reactions any inorganic salts present in the reactant stream will precipitate and begin to coat reactor surfaces and control mechanisms (e.g., valves) often severely impacting the systems performance. The SCWM experiment employs a Sample Cell Unit (SCU) filled with an aqueous solution of Na2SO4 0.5-w at the critical density and uses a refurbished High Temperature Insert, which was used in an earlier ISS experiment designed to study pure water at near-critical conditions. The insert, designated as the HTI-Reflight (HTI-R) will be deployed in the DECLIC (Device for the Study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization) Facility on the International Space Station (ISS). Objectives of the study include measurement of the shift in critical temperature due to the presence of the inorganic salt, assessment of the predominant mode of precipitation (i.e., heterogeneously on SCU surfaces or homogeneously in the bulk fluid), determination of the salt morphology including size and shapes of particulate clusters, and the determination of the dominant mode of transport of salt particles in the presence of an imposed temperature gradient. Initial results from the ISS experiments will be presented and compared to findings from laboratory experiments on the ground.

  15. THE ELECTRON ION COLLIDER. A HIGH LUMINOSITY PROBE OF THE PARTONIC SUBSTRUCTURE OF NUCLEONS AND NUCLEI.

    SciTech Connect

    EDITED BY M.S. DAVIS

    2002-02-01

    By the end of this decade, the advancement of current and planned research into the fundamental structure of matter will require a new facility, the Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The EIC will collide high-energy beams of polarized electrons from polarized protons and neutrons, and unpolarized beams of electrons off atomic nuclei with unprecedented intensity. Research at the EIC will lead to a detailed understanding of the structure of the proton, neutron, and atomic nuclei as described by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), the accepted theory of the strong interaction. The EIC will establish quantitative answers to important questions by delivering dramatically increased precision over existing and planned experiments and by providing completely new experimental capabilities. Indeed, the EIC will probe QCD in a manner not possible previously. This document presents the scientific case for the design, construction and operation of the EIC. While realization of the EIC requires a significant advance in the development of efficient means of producing powerful beams of energetic electrons, an important consideration for choosing the site of the EIC is the planned upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The upgrade planned for RHIC will fully meet the requirements for the ion beam for the EIC, providing a distinct advantage in terms of cost, schedule and the final operation.

  16. Common envelope mechanisms: constraints from the X-ray luminosity function of high-mass X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Zhao-Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn

    2014-12-10

    We use the measured X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in nearby star-forming galaxies to constrain the common envelope (CE) mechanisms, which play a key role in governing the binary evolution. We find that the XLF can be reproduced quite closely under both CE mechanisms usually adopted, i.e., the α{sub CE} formalism and the γ algorithm, with a reasonable range of parameters considered. Provided that the parameter combination is the same, the γ algorithm is likely to produce more HMXBs than the α{sub CE} formalism, by a factor of up to ∼10. In the framework of the α{sub CE} formalism, a high value of α{sub CE} is required to fit the observed XLF, though it does not significantly affect the global number of the HMXB populations. We present the detailed components of the HMXB populations under the γ algorithm and compare them with those in Zuo et al. and observations. We suggest the distinct observational properties, as well as period distributions of HMXBs, may provide further clues to discriminate between these two types of CE mechanisms.

  17. Highly stable charge generation layers using caesium phosphate as n-dopants and inserting interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, Carola; Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Lang, Erwin; Dobbertin, Thomas; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2012-05-01

    Highly stable and efficient charge generation layers (CGLs) comprising caesium phosphate (Cs3PO4) doped 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) as n-type organic semiconductor and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) doped N,N'-di-(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-diphenyl-benzidine (α-NPD) as p-type organic semiconductor, respectively, are presented. By inserting narrow-gap organic copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) and wide-gap insulating aluminum oxide (Al2O3) as interlayer (IL), we show that the long-term stability of the CGL can be improved. The variation of the CuPc IL thickness yields an optimum of 8 nm as a trade-off between minimal operating voltage and maximum voltage stability of the CGL. Luminance-current density-voltage characteristics and lifetime measurements of stacked green organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) confirm the functionality and high voltage stability of the presented CGL. The luminous efficacy of the stacked OLED compared to the non-stacked reference device is nearly unchanged. However, the lifetime of the stacked device is enhanced by a factor of 3.5. Consistent with our experimental findings, we propose a model of the energy-level diagram of a fully doped CGL with IL based on a field-assisted tunneling mechanism.

  18. Variable exit beam height double-crystal monochromator for high-power insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Oyanagi, H.; Haga, K.; Kuwahara, Y.

    1996-02-01

    A variable exit beam height double-crystal monochromator for high-power insertion devices was built and tested at the Photon Factory. The second crystal is mounted on a high-precision {ital XY} translational stage and its position in the parallel and perpendicular direction to the reflecting plane ({ital x},{ital y}) is computer controlled. In this design, the exit beam height ({ital y}) and geometrically required positioning of the second crystal ({ital x}) are separately controlled. Either a fixed or variable exit beam height is obtained over the Bragg angle ({theta}) range from 6{degree} to 25{degree}. A systematic noise caused by degraded parallelity between the two crystals is observed in extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra when {ital x} and {ital y} are simultaneously controlled. This noise is significantly reduced by a versatile control of ({ital x},{ital y}): for a typical scan ({approximately}1 keV) only {ital y} is allowed to vary while both coordinates are controlled when a monochromator is tuned over a wider energy range. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. MID-INFRARED DETERMINATION OF TOTAL INFRARED LUMINOSITY AND STAR FORMATION RATES OF LOCAL AND HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rujopakarn, W.; Rieke, G. H.; Weiner, B. J.; Perez-Gonzalez, P.; Rex, M.; Walth, G. L.; Kartaltepe, J. S.

    2013-04-10

    We demonstrate estimating the total infrared luminosity, L(TIR), and star formation rates (SFRs) of star-forming galaxies at redshift 0 < z < 2.8 from single-band 24 {mu}m observations, using local spectral energy distribution (SED) templates without introducing additional free parameters. Our method is based on characterizing the SEDs of galaxies as a function of their L(TIR) surface density, which is motivated by the indications that the majority of IR luminous star-forming galaxies at 1 < z < 3 have extended star-forming regions, in contrast to the strongly nuclear concentrated, merger-induced starbursts in local luminous and ultraluminous IR galaxies. We validate our procedure for estimating L(TIR) by comparing the resulting L(TIR) with those measured from far-IR observations, such as those from Herschel in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) and Hubble Deep Field North (HDFN), as well as L(TIR) measured from stacked far-IR observations at redshift 0 < z < 2.8. Active galactic nuclei were excluded using X-ray and 3.6-8.0 {mu}m observations, which are generally available in deep cosmological survey fields. The Gaussian fits to the distribution of the discrepancies between the L(TIR) measurements from single-band 24 {mu}m and Herschel observations in the ECDFS and HDFN samples have {sigma} < 0.1 dex, with {approx}10% of objects disagreeing by more than 0.2 dex. Since the 24 {mu}m estimates are based on SEDs for extended galaxies, this agreement suggests that {approx}90% of IR galaxies at high z are indeed much more physically extended than local counterparts of similar L(TIR), consistent with recent independent studies of the fractions of galaxies forming stars in the main-sequence and starburst modes, respectively. Because we have not introduced empirical corrections to enhance these estimates, in principle, our method should be applicable to lower luminosity galaxies. This will enable use of the 21 {mu}m band of the Mid-Infrared Instrument on board

  20. Mid-infrared Determination of Total Infrared Luminosity and Star Formation Rates of Local and High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rujopakarn, W.; Rieke, G. H.; Weiner, B. J.; Pérez-González, P.; Rex, M.; Walth, G. L.; Kartaltepe, J. S.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate estimating the total infrared luminosity, L(TIR), and star formation rates (SFRs) of star-forming galaxies at redshift 0 < z < 2.8 from single-band 24 μm observations, using local spectral energy distribution (SED) templates without introducing additional free parameters. Our method is based on characterizing the SEDs of galaxies as a function of their L(TIR) surface density, which is motivated by the indications that the majority of IR luminous star-forming galaxies at 1 < z < 3 have extended star-forming regions, in contrast to the strongly nuclear concentrated, merger-induced starbursts in local luminous and ultraluminous IR galaxies. We validate our procedure for estimating L(TIR) by comparing the resulting L(TIR) with those measured from far-IR observations, such as those from Herschel in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) and Hubble Deep Field North (HDFN), as well as L(TIR) measured from stacked far-IR observations at redshift 0 < z < 2.8. Active galactic nuclei were excluded using X-ray and 3.6-8.0 μm observations, which are generally available in deep cosmological survey fields. The Gaussian fits to the distribution of the discrepancies between the L(TIR) measurements from single-band 24 μm and Herschel observations in the ECDFS and HDFN samples have σ < 0.1 dex, with ~10% of objects disagreeing by more than 0.2 dex. Since the 24 μm estimates are based on SEDs for extended galaxies, this agreement suggests that ~90% of IR galaxies at high z are indeed much more physically extended than local counterparts of similar L(TIR), consistent with recent independent studies of the fractions of galaxies forming stars in the main-sequence and starburst modes, respectively. Because we have not introduced empirical corrections to enhance these estimates, in principle, our method should be applicable to lower luminosity galaxies. This will enable use of the 21 μm band of the Mid-Infrared Instrument on board the James Webb Space Telescope

  1. SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF LOW-LUMINOSITY RADIO GALAXIES AT z {approx}1-3: A HIGH-z VIEW OF THE HOST/AGN CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Chiaberge, Marco; Rodriguez-Zaurin, Javier; Deustua, Susana; Sparks, William B.; Capetti, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We study the spectral energy distributions, SEDs (from FUV to MIR bands), of the first sizeable sample of 34 low-luminosity radio galaxies at high redshifts, selected in the COSMOS field. To model the SEDs, we use two different template-fitting techniques: (1) the Hyperz code that only considers single stellar templates and (2) our own developed technique 2SPD that also includes the contribution from a young stellar population and dust emission. The resulting photometric redshifts range from z {approx} 0.7 to 3 and are in substantial agreement with measurements from earlier work, but significantly more accurate. The SED of most objects is consistent with a dominant contribution from an old stellar population with an age {approx}1-3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} years. The inferred total stellar mass range is {approx}10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} M {sub Sun }. Dust emission is needed to account for the 24 {mu}m emission in 15 objects. Estimates of the dust luminosity yield values in the range L {sub dust} {approx} 10{sup 43.5}-10{sup 45.5} erg s{sup -1}. The global dust temperature, crudely estimated for the sources with an MIR excess, is {approx}300-850 K. A UV excess is often observed with a luminosity in the range {approx}10{sup 42}-10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} at 2000 A rest frame. Our results show that the hosts of these high-z low-luminosity radio sources are old massive galaxies, similar to the local FR Is. However, the UV and MIR excesses indicate the possible significant contribution from star formation and/or nuclear activity in such bands, not seen in low-z FR Is. Our sources display a wide variety of properties: from possible quasars at the highest luminosities to low-luminosity old galaxies.

  2. Spectral Energy Distributions of Low-luminosity Radio Galaxies at z ~1-3: A High-z View of the Host/AGN Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Chiaberge, Marco; Capetti, Alessandro; Rodriguez-Zaurin, Javier; Deustua, Susana; Sparks, William B.

    2013-01-01

    We study the spectral energy distributions, SEDs (from FUV to MIR bands), of the first sizeable sample of 34 low-luminosity radio galaxies at high redshifts, selected in the COSMOS field. To model the SEDs, we use two different template-fitting techniques: (1) the Hyperz code that only considers single stellar templates and (2) our own developed technique 2SPD that also includes the contribution from a young stellar population and dust emission. The resulting photometric redshifts range from z ~ 0.7 to 3 and are in substantial agreement with measurements from earlier work, but significantly more accurate. The SED of most objects is consistent with a dominant contribution from an old stellar population with an age ~1-3 × 109 years. The inferred total stellar mass range is ~1010-1012 M ⊙. Dust emission is needed to account for the 24 μm emission in 15 objects. Estimates of the dust luminosity yield values in the range L dust ~ 1043.5-1045.5 erg s-1. The global dust temperature, crudely estimated for the sources with an MIR excess, is ~300-850 K. A UV excess is often observed with a luminosity in the range ~1042-1044 erg s-1 at 2000 Å rest frame. Our results show that the hosts of these high-z low-luminosity radio sources are old massive galaxies, similar to the local FR Is. However, the UV and MIR excesses indicate the possible significant contribution from star formation and/or nuclear activity in such bands, not seen in low-z FR Is. Our sources display a wide variety of properties: from possible quasars at the highest luminosities to low-luminosity old galaxies.

  3. High-energy cosmic-ray nuclei from high- and low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts and implications for multimessenger astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-07-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are one of the candidates of ultrahigh-energy (> or approx. 10{sup 18.5} eV) cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources. We investigate high-energy cosmic-ray acceleration including heavy nuclei in GRBs by using Geant 4, and discuss its various implications, taking both high-luminosity (HL) and low-luminosity (LL) GRBs into account. This is because LL GRBs may also make a significant contribution to the observed UHECR flux if they form a distinct population. We show that not only protons, but also heavier nuclei can be accelerated up to ultrahigh energies in the internal, (external) reverse, and forward shock models. We also show that the condition for ultrahigh-energy heavy nuclei such as iron to survive is almost the same as that for {approx}TeV gamma rays to escape from the source and for high-energy neutrinos not to be much produced. The multimessenger astronomy by neutrino and GeV-TeV gamma-ray telescopes such as IceCube and KM3Net, GLAST and MAGIC will be important to see whether GRBs can be accelerators of ultrahigh-energy heavy nuclei. We also demonstrate expected spectra of high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays, and discuss their detectabilities. In addition, we discuss implications of the GRB-UHECR hypothesis. We point out, since the number densities of HL GRBs and LL GRBs are quite different, its determination by UHECR observations is also important.

  4. ARTIST: High-Resolution Genome-Wide Assessment of Fitness Using Transposon-Insertion Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Sören; Davis, Brigid M.; Baranowski, Catherine; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Rubin, Eric J.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    Transposon-insertion sequencing (TIS) is a powerful approach for deciphering genetic requirements for bacterial growth in different conditions, as it enables simultaneous genome-wide analysis of the fitness of thousands of mutants. However, current methods for comparative analysis of TIS data do not adjust for stochastic experimental variation between datasets and are limited to interrogation of annotated genomic elements. Here, we present ARTIST, an accessible TIS analysis pipeline for identifying essential regions that are required for growth under optimal conditions as well as conditionally essential loci that participate in survival only under specific conditions. ARTIST uses simulation-based normalization to model and compensate for experimental noise, and thereby enhances the statistical power in conditional TIS analyses. ARTIST also employs a novel adaptation of the hidden Markov model to generate statistically robust, high-resolution, annotation-independent maps of fitness-linked loci across the entire genome. Using ARTIST, we sensitively and comprehensively define Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Vibrio cholerae loci required for host infection while limiting inclusion of false positive loci. ARTIST is applicable to a broad range of organisms and will facilitate TIS-based dissection of pathways required for microbial growth and survival under a multitude of conditions. PMID:25375795

  5. Use of Illumina sequencing to identify transposon insertions underlying mutant phenotypes in high-copy Mutator lines of maize.

    PubMed

    Williams-Carrier, Rosalind; Stiffler, Nicholas; Belcher, Susan; Kroeger, Tiffany; Stern, David B; Monde, Rita-Ann; Coalter, Robert; Barkan, Alice

    2010-07-01

    High-copy transposons have been effectively exploited as mutagens in a variety of organisms. However, their utility for phenotype-driven forward genetics has been hampered by the difficulty of identifying the specific insertions responsible for phenotypes of interest. We describe a new method that can substantially increase the throughput of linking a disrupted gene to a known phenotype in high-copy Mutator (Mu) transposon lines in maize. The approach uses the Illumina platform to obtain sequences flanking Mu elements in pooled, bar-coded DNA samples. Insertion sites are compared among individuals of suitable genotype to identify those that are linked to the mutation of interest. DNA is prepared for sequencing by mechanical shearing, adapter ligation, and selection of DNA fragments harboring Mu flanking sequences by hybridization to a biotinylated oligonucleotide corresponding to the Mu terminal inverted repeat. This method yields dense clusters of sequence reads that tile approximately 400 bp flanking each side of each heritable insertion. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by identifying the causal insertions in four genes whose disruption blocks chloroplast biogenesis at various steps: thylakoid protein targeting (cpSecE), chloroplast gene expression (polynucleotide phosphorylase and PTAC12), and prosthetic group attachment (HCF208/CCB2). This method adds to the tools available for phenotype-driven Mu tagging in maize, and could be adapted for use with other high-copy transposons. A by-product of the approach is the identification of numerous heritable insertions that are unrelated to the targeted phenotype, which can contribute to community insertion resources. PMID:20409008

  6. A semi-automated high-throughput approach to the generation of transposon insertion mutants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Yohann; Belougne, Jérôme; Scaglione, Sarah; Brandli, Dominique; Beclin, Christophe; Ewbank, Jonathan J

    2007-01-01

    The generation of a large collection of defined transposon insertion mutants is of general interest to the Caenorhabditis elegans research community and has been supported by the European Union. We describe here a semi-automated high-throughput method for mutant production and screening, using the heterologous transposon Mos1. The procedure allows routine culture of several thousand independent nematode strains in parallel for multiple generations before stereotyped molecular analyses. Using this method, we have already generated >17 500 individual strains carrying Mos1 insertions. It could be easily adapted to forward and reverse genetic screens and may influence researchers faced with making a choice of model organism. PMID:17164286

  7. Comparison of Tibial Insert Polyethylene Damage in Rotating Hinge and Highly Constrained Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Retrieval Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bali, Kamal; Naudie, Douglas D; Howard, James L; McCalden, Richard W; MacDonald, Steven J; Teeter, Matthew G

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the damage scores and damage patterns in 19 tibial inserts from rotating hinge (RH) implants with 19 inserts from highly constrained (HC) implants. Each insert was divided into 16 damage zones and each zone was subjectively graded from a scale of 0-3 for seven different damage modes. The overall damage scores were comparable for the two groups (RH: 64.1 ± 15.4; HC: 66.1 ± 29.0; P = 0.59). The HC group, however, had greater post damage (compared to the post-hole of RH) while the RH group had greater backside damage. The pattern of damage was also different, with burnishing and cold flow being more common in HC group while pitting, scratching and embedded debris were more common in the RH group. PMID:26253478

  8. Compensation of the long-range beam-beam interactions as a path towards new configurations for the high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fartoukh, Stéphane; Valishev, Alexander; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Shatilov, Dmitry

    2015-12-01

    Colliding bunch trains in a circular collider demands a certain crossing angle in order to separate the two beams transversely after the collision. The magnitude of this crossing angle is a complicated function of the bunch charge, the number of long-range beam-beam interactions, of β* and type of optics (flat or round), and possible compensation or additive effects between several low-β insertions in the ring depending on the orientation of the crossing plane at each interaction point. About 15 years ago, the use of current bearing wires was proposed at CERN in order to mitigate the long-range beam-beam effects [J. P. Koutchouk, CERN Report No. LHC-Project-Note 223, 2000], therefore offering the possibility to minimize the crossing angle with all the beneficial effects this might have: on the luminosity performance by reducing the need for crab-cavities or lowering their voltage, on the required aperture of the final focus magnets, on the strength of the orbit corrector involved in the crossing bumps, and finally on the heat load and radiation dose deposited in the final focus quadrupoles. In this paper, a semianalytical approach is developed for the compensation of the long-range beam-beam interactions with current wires. This reveals the possibility of achieving optimal correction through a careful adjustment of the aspect ratio of the β functions at the wire position. We consider the baseline luminosity upgrade plan of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC project), and compare it to alternative scenarios, or so-called "configurations," where modifications are applied to optics, crossing angle, or orientation of the crossing plane in the two low-β insertions of the ring. For all these configurations, the beneficial impact of beam-beam compensation devices is then demonstrated on the tune footprint, the dynamical aperture, and/or the frequency map analysis of the nonlinear beam dynamics as the main figures of merit.

  9. Quantitative insertion-site sequencing (QIseq) for high throughput phenotyping of transposon mutants.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Iraad F; Otto, Thomas D; Zhang, Min; Udenze, Kenneth; Wang, Chengqi; Quail, Michael A; Jiang, Rays H Y; Adams, John H; Rayner, Julian C

    2016-07-01

    Genetic screening using random transposon insertions has been a powerful tool for uncovering biology in prokaryotes, where whole-genome saturating screens have been performed in multiple organisms. In eukaryotes, such screens have proven more problematic, in part because of the lack of a sensitive and robust system for identifying transposon insertion sites. We here describe quantitative insertion-site sequencing, or QIseq, which uses custom library preparation and Illumina sequencing technology and is able to identify insertion sites from both the 5' and 3' ends of the transposon, providing an inbuilt level of validation. The approach was developed using piggyBac mutants in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum but should be applicable to many other eukaryotic genomes. QIseq proved accurate, confirming known sites in >100 mutants, and sensitive, identifying and monitoring sites over a >10,000-fold dynamic range of sequence counts. Applying QIseq to uncloned parasites shortly after transfections revealed multiple insertions in mixed populations and suggests that >4000 independent mutants could be generated from relatively modest scales of transfection, providing a clear pathway to genome-scale screens in P. falciparum QIseq was also used to monitor the growth of pools of previously cloned mutants and reproducibly differentiated between deleterious and neutral mutations in competitive growth. Among the mutants with fitness defects was a mutant with a piggyBac insertion immediately upstream of the kelch protein K13 gene associated with artemisinin resistance, implying mutants in this gene may have competitive fitness costs. QIseq has the potential to enable the scale-up of piggyBac-mediated genetics across multiple eukaryotic systems. PMID:27197223

  10. Quantitative insertion-site sequencing (QIseq) for high throughput phenotyping of transposon mutants

    PubMed Central

    Bronner, Iraad F.; Otto, Thomas D.; Zhang, Min; Udenze, Kenneth; Wang, Chengqi; Quail, Michael A.; Jiang, Rays H.Y.; Adams, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic screening using random transposon insertions has been a powerful tool for uncovering biology in prokaryotes, where whole-genome saturating screens have been performed in multiple organisms. In eukaryotes, such screens have proven more problematic, in part because of the lack of a sensitive and robust system for identifying transposon insertion sites. We here describe quantitative insertion-site sequencing, or QIseq, which uses custom library preparation and Illumina sequencing technology and is able to identify insertion sites from both the 5′ and 3′ ends of the transposon, providing an inbuilt level of validation. The approach was developed using piggyBac mutants in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum but should be applicable to many other eukaryotic genomes. QIseq proved accurate, confirming known sites in >100 mutants, and sensitive, identifying and monitoring sites over a >10,000-fold dynamic range of sequence counts. Applying QIseq to uncloned parasites shortly after transfections revealed multiple insertions in mixed populations and suggests that >4000 independent mutants could be generated from relatively modest scales of transfection, providing a clear pathway to genome-scale screens in P. falciparum. QIseq was also used to monitor the growth of pools of previously cloned mutants and reproducibly differentiated between deleterious and neutral mutations in competitive growth. Among the mutants with fitness defects was a mutant with a piggyBac insertion immediately upstream of the kelch protein K13 gene associated with artemisinin resistance, implying mutants in this gene may have competitive fitness costs. QIseq has the potential to enable the scale-up of piggyBac-mediated genetics across multiple eukaryotic systems. PMID:27197223

  11. Generation of highly N-type, defect passivated transition metal oxides using plasma fluorine insertion

    DOEpatents

    Baker, L. Robert; Seo, Hyungtak; Hervier, Antoine; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2016-04-12

    A new composition of matter is disclosed wherein oxygen vacancies in a semiconducting transition metal oxide such as titanium dioxide are filled with a halogen such as Fluorine, whereby the conductivity of the composition is greatly enhanced, while at the same time the chemical stability of the composition is greatly improved. Stoichiometric titanium dioxide having less than 3 % oxygen vacancies is subject to fluorine insertion such that oxygen vacancies are filled, limited amounts of fluorine replace additional oxygen atoms and fluorine interstitially inserts into the body of the TiO.sub.2 composition.

  12. Development of Novel High-Resolution Melting-Based Assays for Genotyping Two Alu Insertion Polymorphisms (FXIIIB and PV92).

    PubMed

    González-Giraldo, Yeimy; Rodríguez-Dueñas, Marisol; Forero, Diego A

    2016-03-01

    Insertion/Deletion polymorphisms (InDels) are a common type of genetic variation, with a growing role in population genetics and applied genomics. There is the need for the development of novel cost-effective assays for genotyping InDels of high importance. The main objective of this study was to develop high-resolution melting-based assays for genotyping two commonly studied Alu insertion polymorphisms: FXIIIB and PV92 (rs70942849 and rs3138523). Three primers (two forward and one reverse) were designed for each marker, and high-resolution melting (HRM) analyses in a qPCR platform were performed, using EvaGreen fluorescent dye. For each one of the two Alu insertion polymorphisms, HRM analyses identified distinguishable peaks for the three genotypes, allowing a robust genotyping. Results were validated using 96 DNA samples previously genotyped and the assays worked with different DNA concentrations. In this study, we developed novel cost-effective assays, using qPCR, for genotyping two Alu insertion polymorphisms (widely used as ancestry markers). Our results highlight the feasibility of using HRM analyses for genotyping InDel polymorphisms of medical and biotechnological importance. PMID:26843017

  13. Higher order mode filter design for double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC high luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burt, G.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Hall, B.; Jones, T.; Skaritka, J.; Verdu-Andres, S.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    A Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A compact Higher Order Mode (HOM) filter with wide stop band at the deflecting mode is developed for this cavity. Multiphysics finite element simulation results are presented. The integration of this design to the cavity cryomodule is described.

  14. Luminosity monitor at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Franklin, M.E.B.

    1981-02-01

    The luminosity monitor system utilized by the MKII Detector and by the PEP operators is described. This system processes information from 56 photomultipliers and calculates independent luminosities for each of the 3 colliding bunches in PEP. Design considerations, measurement techniques, and sources of error in the luminosity measurement are discussed.

  15. MiMIC: a highly versatile transposon insertion resource for engineering Drosophila melanogaster genes

    PubMed Central

    Venken, Koen J. T.; Schulze, Karen L.; Haelterman, Nele A.; Pan, Hongling; He, Yuchun; Evans-Holm, Martha; Carlson, Joseph W.; Levis, Robert W.; Spradling, Allan C.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the versatility of a collection of insertions of the transposon Minos mediated integration cassette (MiMIC), in Drosophila melanogaster. MiMIC contains a gene-trap cassette and the yellow+ marker flanked by two inverted bacteriophage ΦC31 attP sites. MiMIC integrates almost at random in the genome to create sites for DNA manipulation. The attP sites allow the replacement of the intervening sequence of the transposon with any other sequence through recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). We can revert insertions that function as gene traps and cause mutant phenotypes to wild type by RMCE and modify insertions to control GAL4 or QF overexpression systems or perform lineage analysis using the Flp system. Insertions within coding introns can be exchanged with protein-tag cassettes to create fusion proteins to follow protein expression and perform biochemical experiments. The applications of MiMIC vastly extend the Drosophila melanogaster toolkit. PMID:21985007

  16. Unidentified IRAS sources: Ultrahigh luminosity galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Schneider, D. P.; Danielson, G. E.; Beichman, C. A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    Optical imaging and spectroscopy measurements were obtained for six of the high galactic latitude infrared sources reported by Houck, et al. (1984) from the IRAS survey to have no obvious optical counterparts on the POSS prints. All are identified with visually faint galaxies that have total luminosities in the range 5 x 10 to the 11th power stellar luminosity to 5 x 10 to the 12th power stellar luminosity. This luminosity emerges virtually entirely in the infrared. The origin of the luminosity, which is one to two orders of magnitude greater than that of normal galaxies, is not known at this time.

  17. The Suzaku view of highly ionized outflows in AGN - II. Location, energetics and scalings with bolometric luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofford, J.; Reeves, J. N.; McLaughlin, D. E.; Braito, V.; Turner, T. J.; Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.

    2015-08-01

    Ongoing studies with XMM-Newton have shown that powerful accretion disc winds, as revealed through highly ionized Fe K-shell absorption at E ≥ 6.7 keV, are present in a significant fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the local Universe (Tombesi et al. 2010a). In Gofford et al., we analysed a sample of 51 Suzaku-observed AGNs and independently detected Fe K absorption in ˜40 per cent of the sample, and we measured the properties of the absorbing gas. In this work, we build upon these results to consider the properties of the associated wind. On average, the fast winds (vw > 0.01c) are located ˜ 1015-18 cm (typically ˜102-4 rs) from their black hole, their mass outflow rates are of the order of < dot{M}_w > ˜ 0.01-1 M⊙ yr-1 or {˜ }(0.01-1)dot{M}_Edd and kinetic power is constrained to ˜ 1043-45 erg s-1, equivalent to ˜(0.1-10 per cent)LEdd. We find a fundamental correlation between the source bolometric luminosity and the wind velocity, with v_w ∝ L_bol^{α } and α =0.4^{+0.3}_{-0.2} (90 per cent confidence), which indicates that more luminous AGN tend to harbour faster Fe K winds. The mass outflow rate dot{M}_w, kinetic power Lw and momentum flux dot{p}_w of the winds are also consequently correlated with Lbol, such that more massive and more energetic winds are present in more luminous AGN. We investigate these properties in the framework of a continuum-driven wind, showing that the observed relationships are broadly consistent with a wind being accelerated by continuum-scattering. We find that, globally, a significant fraction (˜85 per cent) of the sample can plausibly exceed the Lw/Lbol ˜ 0.5 per cent threshold thought necessary for feedback, while 45 per cent may also exceed the less conservative ˜5 per cent of Lbol threshold as well. This suggests that the winds may be energetically significant for AGN-host-galaxy feedback processes.

  18. Hadron physics potential of future high-luminosity B-factories at the ϒ(5S) and above

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drutskoy, A. G.; Guo, F.-K.; Llanes-Estrada, F. J.; Nefediev, A. V.; Torres-Rincon, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    We point out the physics opportunities of future high-luminosity B-factories at the ϒ(5 S) resonance and above. Currently the two B-factories, the SuperB factory in Tor Vergata, Italy and the Belle II factory in KEK, Japan, are under development and are expected to start operation in 2017 and 2016, respectively. In this paper we discuss numerous interesting investigations, which can be performed in the e + e - center-of-mass energy region from the ϒ(5 S) and up to 11.5GeV, where an efficient data taking operation should be possible with the planned B-factories. These studies include abundant Bs production and decay properties; independent confirmation and, if found, exhaustive exploration of Belle's claimed charged bottomonia; clarification of puzzles of interquarkonium dipion transitions; extraction of the light-quark mass ratio from hadronic ϒ(5 S) decays; analysis of quarkonium and exotic internal structure from open flavour decays, leading to severe SU(3) symmetry violations; clarification of whether a hybrid state has similar mass to the ϒ(5 S) bottomonium, making it a double state; searches for molecular/tetraquark states that should be more stable with heavy quarks; completion of the table of positive-parity BJ mesons and study of their basic properties; production of Λ _b bar Λ _b heavy baryon pairs, that, following weak decay, open vistas on the charmed baryon spectrum and new channels to study CP violation; confirmation or refutation of the deviation from pQCD of the pion transition form factor, by extending the Q2 reach of current analysis; and possibly reaching the threshold for the production of triply charmed baryons. If, in addition, the future colliders can be later upgraded to 12.5GeV, then the possibility of copious production of B_c bar B_c pairs opens, entailing new studies of CP violation and improved, independent tests of the CKM picture (through determination of V bc , and of effective theories for heavy quarks.

  19. A Recent Adaptive Transposable Element Insertion Near Highly Conserved Developmental Loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    González, Josefa; Macpherson, J. Michael; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2009-01-01

    A recent genomewide screen identified 13 transposable elements that are likely to have been adaptive during or after the spread of Drosophila melanogaster out of Africa. One of these insertions, Bari-Juvenile hormone epoxy hydrolase (Bari-Jheh), was associated with the selective sweep of its flanking neutral variation and with reduction of expression of one of its neighboring genes: Jheh3. Here, we provide further evidence that Bari-Jheh insertion is adaptive. We delimit the extent of the selective sweep and show that Bari-Jheh is the only mutation linked to the sweep. Bari-Jheh also lowers the expression of its other flanking gene, Jheh2. Subtle consequences of Bari-Jheh insertion on life-history traits are consistent with the effects of reduced expression of the Jheh genes. Finally, we analyze molecular evolution of Jheh genes in both the long- and the short-term and conclude that Bari-Jheh appears to be a very rare adaptive event in the history of these genes. We discuss the implications of these findings for the detection and understanding of adaptation. PMID:19458110

  20. Insert Coil Test for HEP High Field Magnets Using YBCO Coated Conductor Tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, V.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-15

    The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 30-50 T. In this paper we present progress in insert coil development using commercially available YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} Coated Conductor. Technological aspects covered in the development, including coil geometry, insulation, manufacturing process and testing are summarized and discussed. Test results of double pancake coils operated in liquid nitrogen and liquid helium are presented and compared with the performance of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} tape short samples.

  1. High rates of Ac/Ds germinal transposition in Arabidopsis suitable for gene isolation by insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Grevelding, C; Becker, D; Kunze, R; von Menges, A; Fantes, V; Schell, J; Masterson, R

    1992-01-01

    Overexpression of the Activator (Ac) transposase gene in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in a minimal germinal transposition frequency of 27% in which independent Dissociation (Ds) transposition events were observed. Molecular analysis of 45 F1 generation Ac/Ds plants indicated that high rates of somatic excision had occurred, and independent germinal insertions were identified in F2 generation progeny plants. A tandem cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter fused to two different Ac coding sequences significantly increased the rate of Ds transposition. The CaMV-Ac fusions activated single and multiple copies of two different Ds elements, DsDHFR and Ds35S-1, and reciprocal crosses resulted in similar transposition frequencies. The improved rate of independent germinal transposition observed makes Arabidopsis an ideal system for insertional mutagenesis. Images PMID:1321434

  2. High-Resolution Tracking Asymmetric Lithium Insertion and Extraction and Local Structure Ordering in SnS2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yu-Yang; Huang, Yuan; Liao, Lei; Sutter, Peter; Liu, Kaihui; Yu, Dapeng; Wang, En-Ge

    2016-09-14

    In the rechargeable lithium ion batteries, the rate capability and energy efficiency are largely governed by the lithium ion transport dynamics and phase transition pathways in electrodes. Real-time and atomic-scale tracking of fully reversible lithium insertion and extraction processes in electrodes, which would ultimately lead to mechanistic understanding of how the electrodes function and why they fail, is highly desirable but very challenging. Here, we track lithium insertion and extraction in the van der Waals interactions dominated SnS2 by in situ high-resolution TEM method. We find that the lithium insertion occurs via a fast two-phase reaction to form expanded and defective LiSnS2, while the lithium extraction initially involves heterogeneous nucleation of intermediate superstructure Li0.5SnS2 domains with a 1-4 nm size. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the Li0.5SnS2 is kinetically favored and structurally stable. The asymmetric reaction pathways may supply enlightening insights into the mechanistic understanding of the underlying electrochemistry in the layered electrode materials and also suggest possible alternatives to the accepted explanation of the origins of voltage hysteresis in the intercalation electrode materials. PMID:27504584

  3. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  4. B_c Meson Production Around the Z^0 Peak at a High Luminosity e^+ e^- Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhi; Wu, Xing-Gang; Chen, Gu; Liao, Qi-Li; Zhang, Jia-Wei; /Chongqing U.

    2012-05-22

    Considering the possibility to build an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the energies around the Z{sup 0}-boson resonance with a planned luminosity so high as L {proportional_to} 10{sup 34} {approx} 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} (super Z-factory), we make a detailed discussion on the (c{bar b})-quarkonium production through e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (c{bar b})[n] + b + {bar c} within the framework of non-relativistic QCD. Here [n] stands for the Fock-states |(c{sub b}){sub 1}[{sup 1}S{sub 0}]>, |(c{bar b})8[{sup 1}S{sub 0}]g>, |(c{bar b} ){sub 1}[{sup 3}S{sub 1}]>, |(c{bar b}){sub 8}[{sup 3}S{sub 1}]g>, |(c{bar b}){sub 1}[{sup 1}P{sub 1}]> and |(c{bar b}){sub 1}[{sup 3}P{sub J}]> (with J = (1, 2, 3)) respectively. To simplify the hard-scattering amplitude as much as possible and to derive analytic expressions for the purpose of future events simulation, we adopt the 'improved trace technology' to do our calculation, which deals with the hard scattering amplitude directly at the amplitude level other than the conventional way at the squared-amplitude level. Total cross-section uncertainties caused by the quark masses are predicted by taking m{sub c} = 1.50 {+-} 0.30 GeV and m{sub b} = 4.90 {+-} 0.40 GeV. If all higher (c{bar b})-quarkonium states decay to the ground state B{sub c} (|(c{bar b}){sub 1}[{sup 1}S{sub 0}]>) with 100% efficiency, we obtain {sigma}{sub e{sup +}+e{sup -}{yields}B{sub c}+b+{bar c}} = 5.190{sub -2.419}{sup +6.222} pb, which shows that about 10{sup 5} {approx} 10{sup 7} B{sub c} events per operation year can be accumulated in the super Z-factory. If taking the collider energy runs slightly off the Z{sup 0}-peak, i.e. {radical}S = (1.00 {+-} 0.05)m{sub Z}, the total cross-section shall be lowered by about one-order from its peak value. Such a super Z-factory shall provide another useful platform to study the properties of B{sub c} meson, or even the properties of its excited P-wave states, in addition to its production at the hadronic colliders

  5. The High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC: Physics and Technology Challenges for the Accelerator and the Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Burkhard

    2016-04-01

    In the second phase of the LHC physics program, the accelerator will provide an additional integrated luminosity of about 2500/fb over 10 years of operation to the general purpose detectors ATLAS and CMS. This will substantially enlarge the mass reach in the search for new particles and will also greatly extend the potential to study the properties of the Higgs boson discovered at the LHC in 2012. In order to meet the experimental challenges of unprecedented pp luminosity, the experiments will need to address the aging of the present detectors and to improve the ability to isolate and precisely measure the products of the most interesting collisions. The lectures gave an overview of the physics motivation and described the conceptual designs and the expected performance of the upgrades of the four major experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, along with the plans to develop the appropriate experimental techniques and a brief overview of the accelerator upgrade. Only some key points of the upgrade program of the four major experiments are discussed in this report; more information can be found in the references given at the end.

  6. STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY QUASAR HOSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE AGN BLACK HOLE MASS SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Grier, C. J.; Martini, P.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Zu, Y.; Watson, L. C.; Bentz, M. C.; Dasyra, K. M.; Dietrich, M.; Ferrarese, L.

    2013-08-20

    We present new stellar velocity dispersion measurements for four luminous quasars with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer instrument and the ALTAIR laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Gemini North 8 m telescope. Stellar velocity dispersion measurements and measurements of the supermassive black hole (BH) masses in luminous quasars are necessary to investigate the coevolution of BHs and galaxies, trace the details of accretion, and probe the nature of feedback. We find that higher-luminosity quasars with higher-mass BHs are not offset with respect to the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation exhibited by lower-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with lower-mass BHs, nor do we see correlations with galaxy morphology. As part of this analysis, we have recalculated the virial products for the entire sample of reverberation-mapped AGNs and used these data to redetermine the mean virial factor (f) that places the reverberation data on the quiescent M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation. With our updated measurements and new additions to the AGN sample, we obtain (f) = 4.31 {+-} 1.05, which is slightly lower than, but consistent with, most previous determinations.

  7. Construction of a linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms in sweetpotato via high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Monden, Yuki; Hara, Takuya; Okada, Yoshihiro; Jahana, Osamu; Kobayashi, Akira; Tabuchi, Hiroaki; Onaga, Shoko; Tahara, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is an outcrossing hexaploid species with a large number of chromosomes (2n = 6x = 90). Although sweetpotato is one of the world’s most important crops, genetic analysis of the species has been hindered by its genetic complexity combined with the lack of a whole genome sequence. In the present study, we constructed a genetic linkage map based on retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms using a mapping population derived from a cross between ‘Purple Sweet Lord’ (PSL) and ‘90IDN-47’ cultivars. High-throughput sequencing and subsequent data analyses identified many Rtsp-1 retrotransposon insertion sites, and their allele dosages (simplex, duplex, triplex, or double-simplex) were determined based on segregation ratios in the mapping population. Using a pseudo-testcross strategy, 43 and 47 linkage groups were generated for PSL and 90IDN-47, respectively. Interestingly, most of these insertions (~90%) were present in a simplex manner, indicating their utility for linkage map construction in polyploid species. Additionally, our approach led to savings of time and labor for genotyping. Although the number of markers herein was insufficient for map-based cloning, our trial analysis exhibited the utility of retrotransposon-based markers for linkage map construction in sweetpotato. PMID:26069444

  8. The CMS pixel luminosity telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornmayer, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a new complement to the CMS detector for the LHC Run II data taking period. It consists of eight 3-layer telescopes based on silicon pixel detectors that are placed around the beam pipe on each end of CMS viewing the interaction point at small angle. A fast 3-fold coincidence of the pixel planes in each telescope will provide a bunch-by-bunch measurement of the luminosity. Particle tracking allows collision products to be distinguished from beam background, provides a self-alignment of the detectors, and a continuous in-time monitoring of the efficiency of each telescope plane. The PLT is an independent luminometer, essential to enhance the robustness on the measurement of the delivered luminosity and to reduce its systematic uncertainties. This will allow to determine production cross-sections, and hence couplings, with high precision and to set more stringent limits on new particle production.

  9. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, Michael; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical "beam-beam limit"), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value for the total beam-beam tune shift or for the event pileup in the detector. Our results are illustrated by examples for the proton-proton luminosity of the existing Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at its design parameters, of the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), and of the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh).

  10. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 Quasars and Bright Galaxies at 5.7 z > 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z AB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Lyα lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M 1450 ˜ ‑22 mag or z AB ˜ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  11. The Intermediate Luminosity Optical Transient SN 2010da: The Progenitor, Eruption and Aftermath of an Unusual Supergiant High-mass X-ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villar, Victoria; Berger, Edo; Chornock, Ryan; Laskar, Tanmoy; Margutti, Raffaella; Brown, Peter J.

    2016-06-01

    We present high- and medium-resolution optical spectroscopy, optical/UV imaging and archival Chandra, Hubble and Spitzer observations of the intermediate luminosity optical transient (ILOT) SN 2010da, discovered in the nearby galaxy NGC 300 (d=1.86 Mpc). SN 2010da had a peak absolute magnitude of M ~ -10.4 mag, dimmer than other recent ILOTs and supernova impostors. We detect hydrogen Balmer, Paschen and Ca II emission lines in our high-resolution spectra, which indicate a dusty and complex circumstellar environment. Based on SN 2010da's light curve and multi-epoch SEDs, we conclude that the progenitor of SN 2010da is a ~10-12 Msol yellow supergiant possibly transitioning into a blue loop phase. Since the 2010 eruption, the star has brightened by a factor of ~5 and remains highly variable in the optical. SN 2010da is a unique ILOT which seems to stem from a different physical origin than red SN 2008S-like events and luminous blue variable outbursts. Furthermore, we detect SN 2010da in archival Swift observations as an ultraluminous X-ray source. We additionally attribute He II 4686 and coronal Fe emission in addition to a steady X-ray luminosity of ~10^{37} erg/s to the presence of a compact companion.

  12. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 Quasars and Bright Galaxies at 5.7 z > 6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100% at the brighter magnitudes (z AB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Lyα lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z ≥ 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M 1450 ∼ ‑22 mag or z AB ∼ 24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  13. Hiding from the moonlight: luminosity and temperature affect activity of Asian nocturnal primates in a highly seasonal forest.

    PubMed

    Starr, Carly; Nekaris, K A I; Leung, Luke

    2012-01-01

    The effect of moonlight and temperature on activity of slow lorises was previously little known and this knowledge might be useful for understanding many aspects of their behavioural ecology, and developing strategies to monitor and protect populations. In this study we aimed to determine if the activity of the pygmy loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) is affected by ambient temperature and/or moonlight in a mixed deciduous forest. We radio-collared five females and five males in the Seima Protection Forest, Cambodia, in February to May, 2008 and January to March, 2009 and recorded their behaviour at 5 minutes intervals, totalling 2736 observations. We classified each observation as either inactive (sleeping or alert) or active behaviour (travel, feeding, grooming, or others). Moon luminosity (bright/dark) and ambient temperature were recorded for each observation. The response variable, activity, was binary (active or inactive), and a logit link function was used. Ambient temperature alone did not significantly affect mean activity. Although mean activity was significantly affected by moonlight, the interaction between moonlight and temperature was also significant: on bright nights, studied animals were increasingly more active with higher temperature; and on dark nights they were consistently active regardless of temperature. The most plausible explanation is that on bright cold nights the combined risk of being seen and attacked by predators and heat loss outweigh the benefit of active behaviours. PMID:22558461

  14. Second-generation coil design of the Nb3Sn low-β quadrupole for the high luminosity LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bermudez, S. Izquierdo; Ambrosio, G.; Ballarino, A.; Cavanna, E.; Bossert, R.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A.; Hagen, P.; et al

    2016-01-18

    As part of the Large Hadron Collider Luminosity upgrade (HiLumi-LHC) program, the US LARP collaboration and CERN are working together to design and build a 150 mm aperture Nb3Sn quadrupole for the LHC interaction regions. A first series of 1.5 m long coils were fabricated and assembled in a first short model. A detailed visual inspection of the coils was carried out to investigate cable dimensional changes during heat treatment and the position of the windings in the coil straight section and in the end region. The analyses allow identifying a set of design changes which, combined with a finemore » tune of the cable geometry and a field quality optimization, were implemented in a new, second-generation, coil design. In this study, we review the main characteristics of the first generation coils, describe the modification in coil lay-out, and discuss their impact on parts design and magnet analysis.« less

  15. Hiding from the Moonlight: Luminosity and Temperature Affect Activity of Asian Nocturnal Primates in a Highly Seasonal Forest

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Carly; Nekaris, K. A. I.; Leung, Luke

    2012-01-01

    The effect of moonlight and temperature on activity of slow lorises was previously little known and this knowledge might be useful for understanding many aspects of their behavioural ecology, and developing strategies to monitor and protect populations. In this study we aimed to determine if the activity of the pygmy loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) is affected by ambient temperature and/or moonlight in a mixed deciduous forest. We radio-collared five females and five males in the Seima Protection Forest, Cambodia, in February to May, 2008 and January to March, 2009 and recorded their behaviour at 5 minutes intervals, totalling 2736 observations. We classified each observation as either inactive (sleeping or alert) or active behaviour (travel, feeding, grooming, or others). Moon luminosity (bright/dark) and ambient temperature were recorded for each observation. The response variable, activity, was binary (active or inactive), and a logit link function was used. Ambient temperature alone did not significantly affect mean activity. Although mean activity was significantly affected by moonlight, the interaction between moonlight and temperature was also significant: on bright nights, studied animals were increasingly more active with higher temperature; and on dark nights they were consistently active regardless of temperature. The most plausible explanation is that on bright cold nights the combined risk of being seen and attacked by predators and heat loss outweigh the benefit of active behaviours. PMID:22558461

  16. Detector Technologies for Sub-500um High-Sensitivity PET Imaging via a Novel PET Insert Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2011-12-21

    The objective of this project was to develop detector technologies that would enable an ultrahigh resolution Virtual Pinhole (VP) PET insert device to provide sub-500 um resolution high-sensitivity PET imaging of a mouse in the future. To achieve this goal, we proposed to develop and characterize finely pixellated cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors and the associated readout electronics with the following specific aims: 1. Develop pixellated CZT detectors with 350um pitches using 2-5 mm substrates; characterize their spatial, energy and timing performance through experiments; and optimize the anode design with steering grid if found necessary. 2. Develop a high-bandwidth readout system using a novel ASIC that can be directly bonded to CZT detectors with 2048 anodes of 350um pitches; optimize its overall performance for VP-PET applications considering the tradeoffs between spatial resolution (in 3D), count rate capability, timing and energy resolutions. 3. Evaluate the performance of a VP-PET insert based on the proposed detector technology through Monte Carlo simulation and experimental validation. Overall, we have completed all three specific aims and demonstrated that pixelated CZT detectors of 350um pitches, combined with VP-PET geometry, can provide PET image resolution of ~460 um FWHM for small animal imaging applications.

  17. Effect of High-speed Milling tool path strategies on the surface roughness of Stavax ESR mold insert machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebrahitom, A.; Rizuan, D.; Azmir, M.; Nassif, M.

    2016-02-01

    High speed milling is one of the recent technologies used to produce mould inserts due to the need for high surface finish. It is a faster machining process where it uses a small side step and a small down step combined with very high spindle speed and feed rate. In order to effectively use the HSM capabilities, optimizing the tool path strategies and machining parameters is an important issue. In this paper, six different tool path strategies have been investigated on the surface finish and machining time of a rectangular cavities of ESR Stavax material. CAD/CAM application of CATIA V5 machining module for pocket milling of the cavities was used for process planning.

  18. A rotational and axial motion system load frame insert for in situ high energy x-ray studies.

    PubMed

    Shade, Paul A; Blank, Basil; Schuren, Jay C; Turner, Todd J; Kenesei, Peter; Goetze, Kurt; Suter, Robert M; Bernier, Joel V; Li, Shiu Fai; Lind, Jonathan; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    High energy x-ray characterization methods hold great potential for gaining insight into the behavior of materials and providing comparison datasets for the validation and development of mesoscale modeling tools. A suite of techniques have been developed by the x-ray community for characterizing the 3D structure and micromechanical state of polycrystalline materials; however, combining these techniques with in situ mechanical testing under well characterized and controlled boundary conditions has been challenging due to experimental design requirements, which demand new high-precision hardware as well as access to high-energy x-ray beamlines. We describe the design and performance of a load frame insert with a rotational and axial motion system that has been developed to meet these requirements. An example dataset from a deforming titanium alloy demonstrates the new capability. PMID:26429452

  19. A rotational and axial motion system load frame insert for in situ high energy x-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shade, Paul A. Schuren, Jay C.; Turner, Todd J.; Blank, Basil; Kenesei, Peter; Goetze, Kurt; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan; Suter, Robert M.; Bernier, Joel V.; Li, Shiu Fai; Lind, Jonathan

    2015-09-15

    High energy x-ray characterization methods hold great potential for gaining insight into the behavior of materials and providing comparison datasets for the validation and development of mesoscale modeling tools. A suite of techniques have been developed by the x-ray community for characterizing the 3D structure and micromechanical state of polycrystalline materials; however, combining these techniques with in situ mechanical testing under well characterized and controlled boundary conditions has been challenging due to experimental design requirements, which demand new high-precision hardware as well as access to high-energy x-ray beamlines. We describe the design and performance of a load frame insert with a rotational and axial motion system that has been developed to meet these requirements. An example dataset from a deforming titanium alloy demonstrates the new capability.

  20. High pressure coolant effect on PVD coated inserts during end milling of Ti-6AL-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Arvind

    Titanium alloys are being employed extensively in engineering and aerospace applications for their high strength to weight ratio, mechanical strength and ability to withstand high temperatures. Out of the different alloys of titanium available, the most commonly used alloy is Ti-6Al-4V. It is also called `Grade-5 titanium alloy' or 'α+β titanium alloy'. High speed machining of titanium alloys generates high temperatures in the cutting zone, promoting accelerated tool wear and reducing the efficiency in metal cutting. Consequently, the ability of the coolant to remove heat from the cutting zone plays an increasingly important role in the economics of the process as well as on the life of tool inserts. With the introduction of thru-tool coolant delivery, the coolant can now be delivered directly at the point of machining without having to flood the area of machining. This research tries to address the effects that high pressure and thru-tool coolant has on insert wear while end milling Ti-6Al-4V. The parameters used in this study are speed, feed, axial depth of cut, radial depth of cut and coolant pressure. A structured design of experiments along with a central composite design approach is used to determine the main effects of coolant pressure and its interactions with the remaining parameters. The results show that, within the parameters of this experiment, coolant pressure was not a significant main effect. However, pressure seems to react positively with feed rate. Contributions from this research can be used to recommend settings of the cutting factors in order to obtain the minimal tool wear.

  1. STS atmospheric luminosities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.

    1984-01-01

    During the STS-8 space shuttle mission special photographic and TV operations were carried out to record the properties of the spacecraft induced luminosities. One of these luminous phenomena is the quiescent vehicle glow which was photographed during the STS-8 mission with an image intensified photographic camera, with and without an objective grating. During the latter part of the mission the altitude of the shuttle was relatively low (120 n.m. = 222 km) and unprecedentedly high intensity of the glow was observed. The crew reported that the glow was easily visible to the naked eye. The proper orientation of the shuttle with respect to the velocity vector and the objective grating permitted the exposure of good objective spectrum of the glow in the visible region. From the results it is clear that the spectrum appears to be a continuum as observed by the image intensifier objective grating camera. Qualitative examination of the data shows that there is very tail little glow ion the wavelength range of 4300 to about 5000 angstroms. Above 5000 angstroms the glow becomes stronger towards the red and then it falls off towards higher wavelength and of the spectrum presumably because of the responsivity of the device.

  2. The First Detection of [O IV] from an Ultraluminous X-ray Source with Spitzer. II. Evidence for High Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Weaver, K. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    This is the second of two papers examining Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. Here we perform detailed photoionization modeling of they infrared lines. Our analysis suggests that the luminosity and morphology of the [O IV] 25.89 micron emission line is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is matter-bounded both in the line of sight direction and to the east, and probably radiation-bounded to the west. A bolometric luminosity in excess of 1040 erg per second would be needed to produce the measured [O IV] flux. We use modeling and previously published studies to conclude that shacks likely contribute very little, if at all, to the high excitation line fluxes observed in the Holmberg II ULX. Additionally, we find that the spectral type of the companion star has a surprisingly strong effect on they predicted strength of the [O IV] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O IV] hi some starburst systems containing black hole binaries.

  3. Mechanical studies towards a silicon micro-strip super module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade at the high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, G.; Cadoux, F.; Clark, A.; Endo, M.; Favre, Y.; Ferrere, D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Hanagaki, K.; Hara, K.; Iacobucci, G.; Ikegami, Y.; Jinnouchi, O.; La Marra, D.; Nakamura, K.; Nishimura, R.; Perrin, E.; Seez, W.; Takubo, Y.; Takashima, R.; Terada, S.; Todome, K.; Unno, Y.; Weber, M.

    2014-04-01

    It is expected that after several years of data-taking, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) physics programme will be extended to the so-called High-Luminosity LHC, where the instantaneous luminosity will be increased up to 5 × 1034 cm-2 s-1. For the general-purpose ATLAS experiment at the LHC, a complete replacement of its internal tracking detector will be necessary, as the existing detector will not provide the required performance due to the cumulated radiation damage and the increase in the detector occupancy. The baseline layout for the new ATLAS tracker is an all-silicon-based detector, with pixel sensors in the inner layers and silicon micro-strip detectors at intermediate and outer radii. The super-module (SM) is an integration concept proposed for the barrel strip region of the future ATLAS tracker, where double-sided stereo silicon micro-strip modules (DSM) are assembled into a low-mass local support (LS) structure. Mechanical aspects of the proposed LS structure are described.

  4. A double-sided silicon micro-strip Super-Module for the ATLAS Inner Detector upgrade in the High-Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Affolder, A. A.; Allport, P. P.; Anghinolfi, F.; Barbier, G.; Bates, R.; Beck, G.; Benitez, V.; Bernabeu, J.; Blanchot, G.; Bloch, I.; Blue, A.; Booker, P.; Brenner, R.; Buttar, C.; Cadoux, F.; Casse, G.; Carroll, J.; Church, I.; Civera, J. V.; Clark, A.; Dervan, P.; Díez, S.; Endo, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Farthouat, P.; Favre, Y.; Ferrere, D.; Friedrich, C.; French, R.; Gallop, B.; García, C.; Gibson, M.; Greenall, A.; Gregor, I.; Grillo, A.; Haber, C. H.; Hanagaki, K.; Hara, K.; Hauser, M.; Haywood, S.; Hessey, N.; Hill, J.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ikegami, Y.; Jones, T.; Kaplon, J.; Kuehn, S.; Lacasta, C.; La Marra, D.; Lynn, D.; Mahboubin, K.; Marco, R.; Martí-García, S.; Martínez-McKinney, F.; Matheson, J.; McMahon, S.; Nelson, D.; Newcomer, F. M.; Parzefall, U.; Phillips, P. W.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Santoyo, D.; Seiden, A.; Soldevila, U.; Spencer, E.; Stanitzki, M.; Sutcliffe, P.; Takubo, Y.; Terada, S.; Tipton, P.; Tsurin, I.; Ullán, M.; Unno, Y.; Villani, E. G.; Warren, M.; Weber, M.; Wilmut, I.; Wonsak, S.; Witharm, R.; Wormald, M.

    2014-02-01

    The ATLAS experiment is a general purpose detector aiming to fully exploit the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It is foreseen that after several years of successful data-taking, the LHC physics programme will be extended in the so-called High-Luminosity LHC, where the instantaneous luminosity will be increased up to 5 × 1034 cm-2 s-1. For ATLAS, an upgrade scenario will imply the complete replacement of its internal tracker, as the existing detector will not provide the required performance due to the cumulated radiation damage and the increase in the detector occupancy. The current baseline layout for the new ATLAS tracker is an all-silicon-based detector, with pixel sensors in the inner layers and silicon micro-strip detectors at intermediate and outer radii. The super-module is an integration concept proposed for the strip region of the future ATLAS tracker, where double-sided stereo silicon micro-strip modules are assembled into a low-mass local support structure. An electrical super-module prototype for eight double-sided strip modules has been constructed. The aim is to exercise the multi-module readout chain and to investigate the noise performance of such a system. In this paper, the main components of the current super-module prototype are described and its electrical performance is presented in detail.

  5. The First Detection of [O IV] from an Ultraluminous X-ray Source with Spitzer. 2; Evidence for High Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Weaver, K. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    This is the second of two papers examining Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. Here we perform detailed photoionization modeling of the infrared lines. Our analysis suggests that the luminosity and morphology of the [O IV] 25.89 micron emission line is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is matter-bounded both in the line of sight direction and to the east, and probably radiation-bounded to the west. A bolometric luminosity in excess of 10(exp 40) erg/s would be needed to produce the measured [O IV] flux. We use modeling and previously published studies to conclude that shocks likely contribute very little, if at all, to the high-excitation line fluxes observed in the Holmberg II ULX. Additionally, we find that the spectral type of the companion star has a surprisingly strong effect on the predicted strength of the [O IV] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O IV] in some starburst systems containing black hole binaries.

  6. The First Detection of (O IV) from an Ultraluminous X-Ray Source with Spitzer. 2. Evidence for High Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C T.; Dudik, R P.; Weaver, K A.; Kallman, T R.

    2010-01-01

    This is the second of two papers examining Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. Here, we perform detailed photoionization modeling of the infrared lines. Our analysis suggests that the luminosity and morphology of the [Oiv] 25.89 micronmeters emission line is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is matter bounded both in the line-of-sight direction and to the east, and probably radiation-bounded to the west. A bolometric luminosity in excess of 10(exp 40) erg s(exp -1) would be needed to produce the measured [O iv] flux. We use modeling and previously published studies to conclude that shocks likely contribute very little, if at all,to the high-ionization line fluxes observed in the Holmberg II ULX. Additionally, we find that the spectral type of the companion star has a surprisingly strong effect on the predicted strength of the [O iv] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O iv] in some starburst systems containing black hole binaries.

  7. Large-scale preparation of graphene by high temperature insertion of hydrogen into graphite.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Fray, Derek J

    2015-07-14

    Experimental evidence for high temperature diffusion of hydrogen into the interlayer space of graphite is provided. This process is discussed as a possible method for the rapid production of high-quality, inexpensive graphene in large quantities, which could lead to the widespread application of graphene. It was found that hydrogen cations, dissolved in molten LiCl, can be discharged on cathodically polarized graphite rods, which then intercalate into the graphite structure, leading to the peeling of graphite to produce graphene. The graphene nanosheets produced displayed a single-crystalline structure with a lateral size of several hundred nanometers and a high degree of crystallinity and thermal stability. The method introduced could be scaled up to produce industrial quantities of high-quality graphene. PMID:26053881

  8. Insertion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahillon, Jacques; Chandler, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) constitute an important component of most bacterial genomes. Over 500 individual ISs have been described in the literature to date, and many more are being discovered in the ongoing prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome-sequencing projects. The last 10 years have also seen some striking advances in our understanding of the transposition process itself. Not least of these has been the development of various in vitro transposition systems for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements and, for several of these, a detailed understanding of the transposition process at the chemical level. This review presents a general overview of the organization and function of insertion sequences of eubacterial, archaebacterial, and eukaryotic origins with particular emphasis on bacterial elements and on different aspects of the transposition mechanism. It also attempts to provide a framework for classification of these elements by assigning them to various families or groups. A total of 443 members of the collection have been grouped in 17 families based on combinations of the following criteria: (i) similarities in genetic organization (arrangement of open reading frames); (ii) marked identities or similarities in the enzymes which mediate the transposition reactions, the recombinases/transposases (Tpases); (iii) similar features of their ends (terminal IRs); and (iv) fate of the nucleotide sequence of their target sites (generation of a direct target duplication of determined length). A brief description of the mechanism(s) involved in the mobility of individual ISs in each family and of the structure-function relationships of the individual Tpases is included where available. PMID:9729608

  9. Cermet insert high voltage holdoff improvement for ceramic/metal vacuum devices

    DOEpatents

    Ierna, W.F.

    1986-03-11

    An improved metal-to-ceramic seal is provided wherein the ceramic body of the seal contains an integral region of cermet material in electrical contact with the metallic member, e.g., an electrode, of the seal. The seal is useful in high voltage vacuum devices, e.g., vacuum switches, and increases the high-voltage holdoff capabilities of such devices. A method of fabricating such seals is also provided.

  10. Cermet insert high voltage holdoff for ceramic/metal vacuum devices

    DOEpatents

    Ierna, William F.

    1987-01-01

    An improved metal-to-ceramic seal is provided wherein the ceramic body of the seal contains an integral region of cermet material in electrical contact with the metallic member, e.g., an electrode, of the seal. The seal is useful in high voltage vacuum devices, e.g., vacuum switches, and increases the high-voltage holdoff capabilities of such devices. A method of fabricating such seals is also provided.

  11. Highly Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yuyan; Gu, Meng; Li, Xiaolin; Nie, Zimin; Zuo, Pengjian; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Xiao, Jie; Cheng, Yingwen; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-08

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries have attracted wide attention for energy storage. Currently, most studies focus on Mg metal as the anode, but this approach is still limited by the properties of the electrolyte and poor control of the Mg plating/stripping processes.1,2 Here we report the synthesis and application of Bi nanotubes as a high performance anode material for rechargeable Mg ion batteries. The nanostructured Bi anode delivers a high reversible specific capacity (350 mAh/gBi, or 3430 mAh/cm3 Bi), excellent stability, and high columbic efficiency (95 % initial and very close to 100% afterwards). The good performance is attributed to the unique properties of in-situ formed, interconnected nanoporous bismuth. Such nanostructures can effectively accommodate the large volume change without losing electric contact and significantly reduce diffusion length for Mg2+. Significantly, the nanostructured Bi anode can be used with conventional electrolytes which will open new opportunities to study Mg ion battery chemistry and further improve the properties. The performance and the stability of a full cell Mg ion battery have been demonstrated with conventional electrolytes. This work suggests that other high energy density alloy compounds may also be considered for Mg-ion chemistry for high capacity electrode materials.

  12. Luminosity measurements at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we discuss luminosity measurements at Tevatron and HERA as well as plans for luminosity measurements at LHC. We discuss luminosity measurements using the luminosity detectors of the experiments as well as measurements by the machine. We address uncertainties of the measurements, challenges and lessons learned.

  13. The X-ray luminosity function of very rich clusters and the luminosity-richness relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltan, A.; Henry, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    For a sample of galactic clusters that includes richness class three, four, and five clusters, the significance of the luminosity-richness relation is estimated using nonparametric methods which are valid for any luminosity function. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to determine the significance at which the X-ray luminosities of clusters in one richness class are statistically equal to those in another. The a priori expectation that the high richness clusters are more luminous on average than lower richness objects is confirmed, but it is found that the luminosity function for clusters of richness class three or higher turns over for luminosities less than about 3 x 10 to the 44th ergs/s, while that for lower richness classes extends to at least an order of magnitude lower luminosity.

  14. Insertion of N2 into the Channels of AFI Zeolite under High Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hang; yao, Mingguang; Li, Quanjun; Liu, Ran; Liu, Bo; Yao, Zhen; Liu, Dedi; Liu, Zhaodong; Liu, Jing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zou, Bo; Cui, Tian; Liu, Bingbing

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental study of a new hybrid material where nitrogen is encapsulated in the channels of porous zeolite AlPO4-5 (AFI) single crystals by a high-pressure method. The high-pressure behavior of nitrogen confined inside the AFI nano-channels is then investigated by Raman spectroscopy up to 44 GPa. Under pressure, the Raman modes of confined nitrogen show behaviors different from those of the bulk nitrogen. After the return to atmospheric pressure, it is demonstrated that non-gaseous nitrogen can be effectively stabilized by being confined inside the intact AFI sample. This result provides new insight into nitrogen capture and storage technologies. PMID:26282881

  15. Highly reversible Mg insertion in nanostructured Bi for Mg ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuyan; Gu, Meng; Li, Xiaolin; Nie, Zimin; Zuo, Pengjian; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Tianbiao; Xiao, Jie; Cheng, Yingwen; Wang, Chongmin; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries have attracted wide attention for energy storage. Currently, most studies focus on Mg metal as the anode, but this approach is still limited by the properties of the electrolyte and poor control of the Mg plating/stripping processes. This paper reports the synthesis and application of Bi nanotubes as a high-performance anode material for rechargeable Mg ion batteries. The nanostructured Bi anode delivers a high reversible specific capacity (350 mAh/gBi or 3430 mAh/cm(3)Bi), excellent stability, and high Coulombic efficiency (95% initial and very close to 100% afterward). The good performance is attributed to the unique properties of in situ formed, interconnected nanoporous bismuth. Such nanostructures can effectively accommodate the large volume change without losing electric contact and significantly reduce diffusion length for Mg(2+). Significantly, the nanostructured Bi anode can be used with conventional electrolytes which will open new opportunities to study Mg ion battery chemistry and further improve its properties. PMID:24279987

  16. The search for low-luminosity high-mass X-ray binaries and the study of X-ray populations in the Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasini, Francesca; Tomsick, John; Bodaghee, Arash; Rahoui, Farid; Krivonos, Roman; Corral-Santana, Jesus; An, Hongjun; Bauer, Franz E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Stern, Daniel; NuSTAR Galactic Plane Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which consist of a neutron star (NS) or black hole (BH) accreting material from a massive stellar companion, provide valuable insights into the evolution of massive stars and the merger rates of NS/NS, NS/BH, and BH/BH binaries whose gravitational wave signatures will soon be detectable by facilities such as Advanced-LIGO. INTEGRAL discoveries of new classes of lower-luminosity HMXBs, some highly obscured and some showing extreme transient activity, as well as the recent discovery of the very quiescent and only known Be-BH binary, have considerably changed our understanding of clumping in massive stellar winds and the relative importance of different binary evolutionary channels. In order to better characterize the low-luminosity HMXB population, we have performed a survey of a square degree region in the direction of the Norma spiral arm with Chandra and NuSTAR. These surveys, combined with optical and infrared spectroscopic follow-up of the counterparts of hard X-ray sources, have yielded three HMXB candidates to date. Future radial-velocity follow-up of these candidates, as well as other Be HMXB candidates from the NuSTAR serendipitous survey, will help determine whether these sources truly are HMXBs and, if so, constrain the mass of the compact object in these systems. If confirmed, these HMXB candidates could extend our measurement of the HMXB luminosity function by about two orders of magnitude and provide important constraints on massive binary evolutionary models. In addition, the colliding wind binaries and pulsar wind nebulae discovered in the Norma X-ray survey will help shed light on other aspects of massive stellar evolution and massive stellar remnants. Finally, these surveys provide the opportunity to compare the hard X-ray populations in the Galactic disk and the Galactic Center. While the dominant hard X-ray populations in both of these Galactic regions appear to be cataclysmic variables (CVs), those in the Norma

  17. Perspectives on Higher Luminosity B-Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J

    2004-04-22

    The present B-factories PEP-II and KEKB have reached luminosities of 4-6 x 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}/s and delivered integrated luminosity at rates in excess of 6 fb{sup -1} per month [1,2]. The recent turn on of these two B-Factories has shown that modern accelerator physics, design, and engineering can produce colliders that rapidly reach their design luminosities and deliver integrated luminosities capable of frontier particle physics discoveries. PEP-II and KEK-B with ongoing upgrade programs should reach luminosities of over 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s in a few years and with more aggressive improvements may reach luminosities of order 4 x 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s by the end of the decade. However, due to particle physics requirements, the next generation B-Factory may require significantly more luminosity. Initial parameters of a very high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} B-Factory or Super B-Factory (SBF) are being developed incorporating several new ideas from the successful operation of the present generation e{sup +}e{sup -} accelerators [3,4]. A luminosity approaching 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} may be possible. Furthermore, the ratio of average to peak luminosity may be increased by 30% due to continuous injection. The operation of this new accelerator will be qualitatively different from present e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders due to this continuous injection.

  18. High-Throughput Genotyping of Green Algal Mutants Reveals Random Distribution of Mutagenic Insertion Sites and Endonucleolytic Cleavage of Transforming DNA[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ru; Patena, Weronika; Armbruster, Ute; Gang, Spencer S.; Blum, Sean R.; Jonikas, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    A high-throughput genetic screening platform in a single-celled photosynthetic eukaryote would be a transformative addition to the plant biology toolbox. Here, we present ChlaMmeSeq (Chlamydomonas MmeI-based insertion site Sequencing), a tool for simultaneous mapping of tens of thousands of mutagenic insertion sites in the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We first validated ChlaMmeSeq by in-depth characterization of individual insertion sites. We then applied ChlaMmeSeq to a mutant pool and mapped 11,478 insertions, covering 39% of annotated protein coding genes. We observe that insertions are distributed in a manner largely indistinguishable from random, indicating that mutants in nearly all genes can be obtained efficiently. The data reveal that sequence-specific endonucleolytic activities cleave the transforming DNA and allow us to propose a simple model to explain the origin of the poorly understood exogenous sequences that sometimes surround insertion sites. ChlaMmeSeq is quantitatively reproducible, enabling its use for pooled enrichment screens and for the generation of indexed mutant libraries. Additionally, ChlaMmeSeq allows genotyping of hits from Chlamydomonas screens on an unprecedented scale, opening the door to comprehensive identification of genes with roles in photosynthesis, algal lipid metabolism, the algal carbon-concentrating mechanism, phototaxis, the biogenesis and function of cilia, and other processes for which C. reinhardtii is a leading model system. PMID:24706510

  19. ALS insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1990-11-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system. 18 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  1. High-resolution definition of the Vibrio cholerae essential gene set with hidden Markov model–based analyses of transposon-insertion sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Michael C.; Pritchard, Justin R.; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Rubin, Eric J.; Livny, Jonathan; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of high-density transposon mutagenesis to high-throughput DNA sequencing (transposon-insertion sequencing) enables simultaneous and genome-wide assessment of the contributions of individual loci to bacterial growth and survival. We have refined analysis of transposon-insertion sequencing data by normalizing for the effect of DNA replication on sequencing output and using a hidden Markov model (HMM)-based filter to exploit heretofore unappreciated information inherent in all transposon-insertion sequencing data sets. The HMM can smooth variations in read abundance and thereby reduce the effects of read noise, as well as permit fine scale mapping that is independent of genomic annotation and enable classification of loci into several functional categories (e.g. essential, domain essential or ‘sick’). We generated a high-resolution map of genomic loci (encompassing both intra- and intergenic sequences) that are required or beneficial for in vitro growth of the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. This work uncovered new metabolic and physiologic requirements for V. cholerae survival, and by combining transposon-insertion sequencing and transcriptomic data sets, we also identified several novel noncoding RNA species that contribute to V. cholerae growth. Our findings suggest that HMM-based approaches will enhance extraction of biological meaning from transposon-insertion sequencing genomic data. PMID:23901011

  2. Hipparcos luminosities and asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedding, Timothy R.

    Asteroseismology involves using the resonant frequencies of a star to infer details about its internal structure and evolutionary state. Large efforts have been made and continue to be made to measure oscillation frequencies with both ground- and space-based telescopes, with typical precisions of one part in 103-104. However, oscillation frequencies are most useful when accompanied by accurate measurements of the more traditional stellar parameters such as luminosity and effective temperature. The Hipparcos catalogue provides luminosities with precisions of a few percent or better for many oscillating stars. I briefly discuss the importance of Hipparcos measurements for interpreting asteroseismic data on three types of oscillating stars: δ Scuti variables, rapidly oscillating Ap stars and solar-like stars.

  3. Association of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion polymorphism with high HBV replication in chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Laaribi, A B; Zidi, I; Hannachi, N; Ben Yahia, H; Chaouch, H; Bortolotti, D; Zidi, N; Letaief, A; Yacoub, S; Boudabous, A; Rizzo, R; Boukadida, J

    2015-10-01

    Identification of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion (Ins/Del) polymorphism at the 3' untranslated region of HLA-G revealed its importance in HLA-G mRNA stability and HLA-G protein level variation. We evaluated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism in patients with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a case-control study. Genomic DNA was extracted from 263 patients with chronic HBV hepatitis and 246 control subjects and was examined for the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism by PCR. The polymorphic variants were genotyped in chronic HBV seropositive cases stratified according to HBV DNA levels, fibrosis stages and in a control population. There was no statistical significant association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and increased susceptibility to HBV infection neither for alleles (P = 0.09) nor for genotypes (P = 0.18). The stratification of HBV patients based on HBV DNA levels revealed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and an enhanced HBV activity with high HBV DNA levels. In particular, the Ins allele was significantly associated with high HBV DNA levels (P = 0.0024, OR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.2-2.4). The genotype Ins/Ins was associated with a 2.5-fold (95% CI, 1.29-4.88) increased risk of susceptibility to high HBV replication compared with the Del/Del and Ins/Del genotypes. This susceptibility is linked to the presence of two Ins alleles. No association was observed between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and fibrosis stage of HBV infection. We observed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and high HBV replication characterized by high HBV DNA levels in chronic HBV patients. These results suggest a potential prognostic value for disease outcome evaluation. PMID:25619305

  4. CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Yu Guisheng

    2012-11-10

    In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit M{sub r} = -18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

  5. Clinical outcome and bone healing of implants placed with high insertion torque: 12-month results from a multicenter controlled cohort study.

    PubMed

    Grandi, T; Guazzi, P; Samarani, R; Grandi, G

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated the clinical outcome and the crestal bone resorption of implants placed with high insertion torque (up to 80 N cm). 102 patients were treated with 156 tapered implants. 42 implants (control group) presented insertion torque between 30 and 45 N cm (mean=37.4 SD 8.2). 114 implants (experimental group) were placed with insertion torque between 50 and 80 N cm (mean=74.8 SD 7.9). All implants were early loaded after 2 months. Peri-implant marginal bone levels were assessed immediately after surgery, and at 6- and 12-month follow up examinations. At the 12-month follow up all implants were clinically stable. After 12 months, patients in the experimental group lost an average of 0.41 mm (CI 95% 0.522; 0.263) of crestal bone compared with 0.45 mm (CI 95% 0.561; 0.286) for those in the control group. There were no significant differences between the two groups. No direct or inverse relationship was observed between the insertion torque values and crestal bone resorption. The results show that the use of high insertion torque (up to 80 N cm) did not prevent osseointegration and did not increase bone resorption around tapered implants early loaded up to 1 year after implant placement. PMID:23159169

  6. On-line air-tightness and insertion loss simultaneous detection method of high air-tightness fiber optic penetration connector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingchuan; Yang, Xiaoning; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Junfeng

    2015-08-01

    The high air-tightness multicore fiber optic penetration connector is a core component for the optical fiber sensing and communication technologies applied in the space environment simulator under the vacuum thermal environment. High air-tightness and insertion loss are the two key indexes of the fiber optic penetration connector. The air-tightness and insertion loss on-line synchronous detection method was proposed. First, established hardware-in-the-loop testing platform by using the vacuum pumping system, the vacuum vessel, the helium mass spectrometer leak detector and optical time-domain reflectmeter, then, described the air tightness and insertion loss on-line detection principle, finally, designed a detection test scheme and air-tightness and insertion loss were tested. Experimental results indicate that the leakage rate is lower than 1.0×10-7Pa•L/S, the minimum of which is1.0×10-10Pa•L/S and the insertion loss at wave length window 1550 nm is +/-0.07db, which is less than +/-0.1db. It can lay the data basis for the design of opto-mechanical combination and later period fine processing.

  7. Constraining the Infrared Luminosity and Star Formation Rate Function in the Local Universe: a benchmark for high-z galaxy evolution studies exploiting Spitzer and Herschel large-area surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Lucia; Vaccari, Mattia; Franceschini, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    Infrared wavelengths contain fundamental information about the origin of galaxies and black holes and about the evolutionary history of star formation, metal production and gravitational accretion, and the luminosity function has effectively been used to quantify the statistical nature of the evolution of galaxies and black holes through their luminosity distribution as a function of redshift and environment. While the determination of high-redshift luminosity functions requires deep observations, local luminosity functions can be estimated from shallower and wider-area sky maps and are fundamental benchmarks for high-redshift galaxy formation and evolution studies as well as for models describing these processes. To this aim, large-area infrared surveys have been jointly carried out over the last few years with the Spitzer and Herschel satellites as e.g. part of the SWIRE and HerMES projects, and in our work we exploited these datasets as well as supporting multi-wavelength photometry and spectroscopy to provide the most accurate determination to date of the local (0Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate Function. I will discuss these new constraints and how they compare with semi-analytic model predictions as well as other multi-wavelength estimates of the evolving star formation rate. Finally I will discuss the future development of these studies in the context of new facilities like SPICA and SKA.

  8. GAMA/WiggleZ: the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity functions of high- and low-excitation radio galaxies and their redshift evolution to z = 0.75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pracy, Michael B.; Ching, John H. Y.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Couch, Warrick J.; Davis, Tamara M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J.; Loveday, J.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Prescott, M.; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David

    2016-07-01

    We present radio active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosity functions over the redshift range 0.005 < z < 0.75. The sample from which the luminosity functions are constructed is an optical spectroscopic survey of radio galaxies, identified from matched Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey (FIRST) sources and Sloan Digital Sky Survey images. The radio AGN are separated into low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and high-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs) using the optical spectra. We derive radio luminosity functions for LERGs and HERGs separately in the three redshift bins (0.005 < z < 0.3, 0.3 < z < 0.5 and 0.5 < z < 0.75). The radio luminosity functions can be well described by a double power law. Assuming this double power-law shape the LERG population displays little or no evolution over this redshift range evolving as {˜ } (1+z)^{0.06^{+0.17}_{-0.18}} assuming pure density evolution or {˜ } (1+z)^{0.46^{+0.22}_{-0.24}} assuming pure luminosity evolution. In contrast, the HERG population evolves more rapidly, best fitted by {˜ } (1+z)^{2.93^{+0.46}_{-0.47}} assuming a double power-law shape and pure density evolution. If a pure luminosity model is assumed, the best-fitting HERG evolution is parametrized by {˜ } (1+z)^{7.41^{+0.79}_{-1.33}}. The characteristic break in the radio luminosity function occurs at a significantly higher power (≳1 dex) for the HERG population in comparison to the LERGs. This is consistent with the two populations representing fundamentally different accretion modes.

  9. Effect of Insertion of a Heat Flux Gage into a High Temperature Cylindrical Blackbody Cavity on the Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.; Horn, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed transient thermal models have been developed to simulate a heat flux gage calibration process capable of generating high heat flux levels. These heat flux levels are of interest to the reciprocating and gas turbine engine industries as well as the aerospace industry. The transient models are based on existing, experimentally validated steady state models of a cylindrical blackbody calibration system. The steady state models were modified to include insertion of a heat flux gage into the hot zone of the calibration system, time-varying electrical current that passes through the resistance heated blackbody, and the resulting heating of the heat flux gage. Heat fluxes computed using detailed transient models were compared to experimental measurements. The calculated and measured transient heat fluxes agreed to within 2 percent, indicating that the models had captured the physical phenomena in the transient calibration. The predicted and measured transient heat fluxes were also compared for two different blackbody configurations. The effect of convection on the blackbody extension was evaluated and found to be a minor factor.

  10. Effect of primordial non-Gaussianities on the far-UV luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies: implications for cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallard, Jacopo; Silk, Joseph; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Habouzit, Melanie; Mamon, Gary A.; Peirani, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how the intergalactic medium (IGM) was reionized at z ≳ 6 is one of the big challenges of current high-redshift astronomy. It requires modelling the collapse of the first astrophysical objects (Pop III stars, first galaxies) and their interaction with the IGM, while at the same time pushing current observational facilities to their limits. The observational and theoretical progress of the last few years have led to the emergence of a coherent picture in which the budget of hydrogen-ionizing photons is dominated by low-mass star-forming galaxies, with little contribution from Pop III stars and quasars. The reionization history of the Universe therefore critically depends on the number density of low-mass galaxies at high redshift. In this work, we explore how changes in the cosmological model, and in particular in the statistical properties of initial density fluctuations, affect the formation of early galaxies. Following Habouzit et al. (2014), we run five different N-body simulations with Gaussian and (scale-dependent) non-Gaussian initial conditions, all consistent with Planck constraints. By appealing to a phenomenological galaxy formation model and to a population synthesis code, we compute the far-UV galaxy luminosity function down to MFUV = -14 at redshift 7 ≤ z ≤ 15. We find that models with strong primordial non-Gaussianities on ≲ Mpc scales show a far-UV luminosity function significantly enhanced (up to a factor of 3 at z = 14) in low-mass galaxies. We adopt a reionization model calibrated from state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations and show that such scale-dependent non-Gaussianities leave a clear imprint on the Universe reionization history and electron Thomson scattering optical depth τe. Although current uncertainties in the physics of reionization and on the determination of τe still dominate the signatures of non-Gaussianities, our results suggest that τe could ultimately be used to constrain the statistical properties

  11. The First Detection of [O IV] from an Ultraluminous X-ray Source with Spitzer: Evidence of High Unbeamed Luminosity in Holmberg II ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P.; Weaver, K. A.; Kallman, T. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the [O IV] 25.89 micron emission line detected from the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in Holmberg II. This line is a well established signature of high excitation, usually associated with AGN. Its detection suggests that the ULX has a strong impact on the surrounding gas. A Spitzer high resolution spectral map shows that the [O IV] is coincident with the X-ray position of the Holmberg II ULX. We find that the luminosity and the morphology of the line emission is consistent with photoionization by the soft X-ray and far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from the accretion disk of the binary system and inconsistent with narrow beaming. We show that the emission nebula is radiation bounded both in the line of sight direction and to the west, and probably matter bounded to the east. Evidence for a massive black hole (BH) in this ULX is mounting. Detailed photoionization models favor an intermediate mass black hole of at least 85 Solar Mass as the ionization source for the [OIV] emission. We find that the spectral type of the companion star strongly affects the expected strength of the [O IV] emission. This finding could explain the origin of [O IV] in some starburst galaxies containing black hole binaries.

  12. High-Quality Perovskite Films Grown with a Fast Solvent-Assisted Molecule Inserting Strategy for Highly Efficient and Stable Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Qiu, Zhiwen; Gao, Chaomin; Zhang, Hailiang; Jiang, Yanan; Li, Cuncheng; Yu, Jinghua; Cao, Bingqiang

    2016-08-31

    The performance of organolead halide perovskites based solar cells has been enhanced dramatically due to the morphology control of the perovskite films. In this paper, we present a fast solvent-assisted molecule inserting (S-AMI) strategy to grow high-quality perovskite film, in which the methylammonium iodide/2-propanol (MAI/IPA) solution is spin-coated onto a dimethylformamide (DMF) wetted mixed lead halide (PbX2) precursor film. The DMF can help the inserting of MAI molecules into the PbX2 precursor film and provide a solvent environment to help the grain growth of the perovskite film. The perovskite film grown by the S-AMI approach shows large and well-oriented grains and long carrier lifetime due to the reduced grain boundary. Solar cells constructed with these perovskite films yield an average efficiency over 17% along with a high average fill factor of 80%. Moreover, these unsealed solar cell devices exhibit good stability in an ambient atmosphere. PMID:27526617

  13. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your ...

  14. Dihalocarbene Insertion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the insertion reaction using the insertion of carbenes into carbon-hydrogen bonds as an example. Outlines an experiment that will illustrate dihalocarbene insertions into diisopropyl ether. (GS)

  15. SDSS J013127.34-032100.1: A Newly Discovered Radio-loud Quasar at z = 5.18 with Extremely High Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wei-Min; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Bai, Jin-Ming; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, William N.; Ho, Luis C.; Zuo, Wenwen; Kim, Minjin; Wang, Ran; Yang, Qian; Zhang, Ju-jia; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ai, Yanli; Fan, Yu-Feng; Chang, Liang; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Lun, Bao-Li; Xin, Yu-Xin

    2014-11-01

    Very few of the z > 5 quasars discovered to date have been radio-loud, with radio-to-optical flux ratios (radio-loudness parameters) higher than 10. Here we report the discovery of an optically luminous radio-loud quasar, SDSS J013127.34-032100.1 (J0131-0321 in short), at z = 5.18 ± 0.01 using the Lijiang 2.4 m and Magellan telescopes. J0131-0321 has a spectral energy distribution consistent with that of radio-loud quasars. With an i-band magnitude of 18.47 and a radio flux density of 33 mJy, its radio-loudness parameter is ~100. The optical and near-infrared spectra taken by Magellan enable us to estimate its bolometric luminosity to be L bol ~ 1.1 × 1048 erg s-1, approximately 4.5 times greater than that of the most distant quasar known to date. The black hole mass of J0131-0321 is estimated to be 2.7 × 109 M ⊙, with an uncertainty up to 0.4 dex. Detailed physical properties of this high-redshift, radio-loud, potentially super-Eddington quasar can be probed in the future with more dedicated and intensive follow-up observations using multi-wavelength facilities.

  16. Mechanical qualification of the support structure for MQXF, the Nb3Sn low-β quadrupole for the high luminosity LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Bajas, H.; Bajko, M.; Bourcey, N.; Cheng, D. W.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Grosclaude, P.; et al

    2016-01-26

    Within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC project, the collaboration between CERN and U.S. LARP is developing new low-β quadrupoles using the Nb3Sn superconducting technology for the upgrade of the LHC interaction regions. The magnet support structure of the first short model was designed and two units were fabricated and tested at CERN and at LBNL. The structure provides the preload to the collars-coils subassembly by an arrangement of outer aluminum shells pre-tensioned with water-pressurized bladders. For the mechanical qualification of the structure and the assembly procedure, superconducting coils were replaced with solid aluminum “dummy coils”, the structure wasmore » preloaded at room temperature, and then cooled-down to 77 K. Mechanical behavior of the magnet structure was monitored with the use of strain gauges installed on the aluminum shells, the dummy coils and the axial preload system. As a result, this paper reports on the outcome of the assembly and the cool-down tests with dummy coils, which were performed at CERN and at LBNL, and presents the strain gauge measurements compared to the 3D finite element model predictions.« less

  17. Evaluation of Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in composite wires for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity LHC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Michinaka; Ballarino, Amalia; Bartova, Barbora; Bjoerstad, Roger; Gerardin, Alexandre; Scheuerlein, Christian

    2016-02-01

    MgB2 wire is a promising superconductor for the superconducting links for the high-luminosity upgrade of the large Hadron collider at CERN. The mechanical properties of MgB2 must be fully quantified for the cable design, and in this study, we evaluate the Young’s modulus of MgB2 filaments in wires with a practical level of critical current. The Young’s moduli of MgB2 filaments by two different processes, in situ and ex situ, were compared. Two different evaluation methods were applied to an in situ MgB2 wire, a single-fiber tensile test and a tensile test after removing Monel. In addition, the Young’s modulus of the few-micron-thick Nb-Ni reaction layer in an ex situ processed wire was evaluated using a nanoindentation testing technique to improve the accuracy of analysis based on the rule of mixtures. The Young’s moduli of the in situ and ex situ MgB2 wires were in the range of 76-97 GPa and no distinct difference depending on the fabrication process was found.

  18. SDSS J013127.34–032100.1: A NEWLY DISCOVERED RADIO-LOUD QUASAR AT z = 5.18 WITH EXTREMELY HIGH LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Wei-Min; Bai, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Ju-jia; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Fan, Yu-Feng; Chang, Liang; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Lun, Bao-Li; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Ho, Luis C.; Zuo, Wenwen; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, William N.; Kim, Minjin; Wang, Ran; and others

    2014-11-10

    Very few of the z > 5 quasars discovered to date have been radio-loud, with radio-to-optical flux ratios (radio-loudness parameters) higher than 10. Here we report the discovery of an optically luminous radio-loud quasar, SDSS J013127.34–032100.1 (J0131–0321 in short), at z = 5.18 ± 0.01 using the Lijiang 2.4 m and Magellan telescopes. J0131–0321 has a spectral energy distribution consistent with that of radio-loud quasars. With an i-band magnitude of 18.47 and a radio flux density of 33 mJy, its radio-loudness parameter is ∼100. The optical and near-infrared spectra taken by Magellan enable us to estimate its bolometric luminosity to be L {sub bol} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 48} erg s{sup –1}, approximately 4.5 times greater than that of the most distant quasar known to date. The black hole mass of J0131–0321 is estimated to be 2.7 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, with an uncertainty up to 0.4 dex. Detailed physical properties of this high-redshift, radio-loud, potentially super-Eddington quasar can be probed in the future with more dedicated and intensive follow-up observations using multi-wavelength facilities.

  19. SMA observations on faint submillimeter galaxies with S {sub 850} < 2 mJy: Ultra dusty low-luminosity galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2014-07-01

    We obtained Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of eight faint (intrinsic 850 μm fluxes < 2 mJy) submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) discovered in SCUBA images of the massive lensing cluster fields A370, A2390, and A1689 and detected five. In total, we obtain five SMA detections, all of which have de-lensed fluxes <1 mJy with estimated total infrared luminosities 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}, comparable to luminous infrared galaxies and normal star-forming galaxies. Based on the latest number counts, these galaxies contribute ∼70% of the 850 μm extragalactic background light and represent the dominant star-forming galaxy population in the dusty universe. However, only 40{sub −16}{sup +30}% of our faint SMGs would be detected in deep optical or near-infrared surveys, which suggests many of these sources are at high redshifts (z ≳ 3) or extremely dusty, and they are not included in current star formation history estimates.

  20. High thermal stability in W/MgO/CoFeB/W/CoFeB/W stacks via ultrathin W insertion with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Yu, Tao; Zhu, Zhengyong; Zhong, Huicai; Khamis, Khamis Masoud; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-07-01

    The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of a series of top MgO/CoFeB/W stacks were studied. In these stacks, the thickness of CoFeB is limited in a range of 1.1-2.2 nm. It was found that the stack can still maintain PMA in a 1.9 nm thick CoFeB free layer. Besides, we investigated the thermal stability factor ∆ of a spin transfer torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) by inserting an ultra-thin W film of 0.8 nm between two CoFeB films. The result shows a clear PMA behavior for the samples with CoFeB thickness up to 2.5 nm, and an in-plane magnetic anisotropy (IMA) when the CoFeB is thicker than 2.5 nm. Moreover, the thermal stability factor ∆ of the CoFeB stack with W insertion is about 132 for a 50 nm size STT-MRAM device, which is remarkably improved compared to 112 for a sample without W insertion. Our results represent an alternative way to realize the endurance at high annealing temperature, high-density and high ∆ in STT-MRAM device by ultra-thin W insertion.

  1. Luminosity Functions for Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Fabio; Ventura, Paolo; D'Antona, Francesca; Mazzitelli, Italo

    1998-12-01

    We present theoretical mass-luminosity relations and luminosity functions (LFs) for globular cluster stars, from luminosities above the horizontal branch down to the minimum luminosity of hydrogen-burning stars. The LFs are available for metal mass fraction Z from Z = 10-4 to Z = 4 × 10-3, in the Johnson V band and in the Bessell-Cousins I band, and are based on tracks especially computed for this program, with the input physics of the models developed recently by D'Antona et al., Mazzitelli et al., and D'Antona & Mazzitelli. Two typical comparisons with observations are presented and discussed: (1) comparisons and statistical analysis with the LFs of the lower giant branch, turnoff region, and upper main sequence of several globular clusters from low to high metallicity, (2) derivation of the initial mass function (IMF) for the stars below the turnoff for several globular clusters for which Hubble Space Telescope data are available. In the first analysis we find that, for relatively large metallicities (Z >= 10-3) a good fit between theoretical and observed LFs can be found, although a simple χ2 statistical analysis shows that it is not possible to derive a strongly preferred age (or, equivalently, distance modulus) from the LF comparison. The fit with lower metallicity [Z ~ (1-2) × 10-4] LFs is less good but statistically acceptable. The main result is that the difference between observed and theoretical LFs of low-metallicity clusters reported by VandenBerg, Bolte, & Stetson appears to be much reduced in present models, and we give the possible reason why this happens and its consequences for the important parameter of the helium core mass at the flash. In the second application, we explore the effect of varying age and distance modulus on the mass function derived for a globular cluster. Distance moduli corresponding to the ``long'' distance scale (and relatively low ages) seem to be preferred based on these comparisons. The resulting index of the IMF is

  2. Operational results from the LHC luminosity monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Ratti, A.; Matis, H.S.; Stezelberger, T.; Turner, W.C.; Yaver, H.; Bravin, E.

    2011-03-28

    The luminosity monitors for the high luminosity regions in the LHC have been operating to monitor and optimize the luminosity since 2009. The device is a gas ionization chamber inside the neutral particle absorber 140 m from the interaction point and monitors showers produced by high energy neutral particles from the collisions. It has the ability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation in the nominal LHC operation. We present operational results of the device during proton and lead ion operations in 2010 and make comparisons with measurements of experiments. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN can accelerate proton and lead ion beams to 7 TeV and 547 TeV and produce collisions of these particles. Luminosity measures performance of the LHC and is particularly important for experiments in high luminosity interaction points (IPs), ATLAS (IP1) and CMS (IP5). To monitor and optimize the luminosities of these IPs, BRAN (Beam RAte Neutral) detectors [1, 2] have been installed and operating since the beginning of the 2009 operation [3]. A neutral particle absorber (TAN) protects the D2 separation dipole from high energy forward neutral particles produced in the collisions [4]. These neutral particles produce electromagnetic and hadronic showers inside the TAN and their energy flux is proportional to the collision rate and hence to the luminosity. The BRAN detector is an Argon gas ionization chamber installed inside the TANs on both sides of the IP1 and IP5 and monitors the relative changes in the luminosity by detecting the ionization due to these showers. When the number of collisions per bunch crossing (multiplicity) is small, the shower rate inside the TAN is also proportional to the luminosity. Hence, the detector is designed to operate by measuring either the shower rate (counting mode for low and intermediate luminosities) or the average shower flux (pulse height mode for high luminosities). The detector is

  3. The high-mass end of the red sequence at z ˜ 0.55 from SDSS-III/BOSS: completeness, bimodality and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Swanson, Molly; Dawson, Kyle; Prada, Francisco; Eisenstein, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel; Comparat, Johan; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; McBride, Cameron K.; Favole, Ginevra; Guo, Hong; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an analytical method based on forward-modelling techniques to characterize the high-mass end of the red sequence (RS) galaxy population at redshift z ˜ 0.55, from the DR10 BOSS (Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey) CMASS spectroscopic sample, which comprises ˜600 000 galaxies. The method, which follows an unbinned maximum likelihood approach, allows the deconvolution of the intrinsic CMASS colour-colour-magnitude distributions from photometric errors and selection effects. This procedure requires modelling the covariance matrix for the i-band magnitude, g - r colour and r - i colour using Stripe 82 multi-epoch data. Our results indicate that the error-deconvolved intrinsic RS distribution is consistent, within the photometric uncertainties, with a single point (<0.05 mag) in the colour-colour plane at fixed magnitude, for a narrow redshift slice. We have computed the high-mass end (0.55Mi ≲ -22) of the 0.55i-band RS luminosity function (RS LF) in several redshift slices within the redshift range 0.52 < z < 0.63. In this narrow redshift range, the evolution of the RS LF is consistent, within the uncertainties in the modelling, with a passively evolving model with Φ* = (7.248 ± 0.204) × 10- 4 Mpc-3 mag-1, fading at a rate of 1.5 ± 0.4 mag per unit redshift. We report RS completeness as a function of magnitude and redshift in the CMASS sample, which will facilitate a variety of galaxy-evolution and clustering studies using BOSS. Our forward-modelling method lays the foundations for future studies using other dark-energy surveys like the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey or the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, which are affected by the same type of photometric blurring/selection effects.

  4. Status of the MSSM Higgs sector using global analysis and direct search bounds, and future prospects at the High Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Chakraborty, Amit; Choudhury, Arghya

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we search for the regions of the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model (pMSSM) parameter space where one can expect to have moderate Higgs mixing angle (α ) with relatively light (up to 600 GeV) additional Higgses after satisfying the current LHC data. We perform a global fit analysis using most updated data (till December 2014) from the LHC and Tevatron experiments. The constraints coming from the precision measurements of the rare b-decays Bs→μ+μ- and b →s γ are also considered. We find that low MA(≲350 ) and high tan β (≳25 ) regions are disfavored by the combined effect of the global analysis and flavor data. However, regions with Higgs mixing angle α ˜0.1 - 0.8 are still allowed by the current data. We then study the existing direct search bounds on the heavy scalar/pseudoscalar (H /A ) and charged Higgs boson (H±) masses and branchings at the LHC. It has been found that regions with low to moderate values of tan β with light additional Higgses (mass ≤600 GeV ) are unconstrained by the data, while the regions with tan β >20 are excluded considering the direct search bounds by the LHC-8 data. The possibility to probe the region with tan β ≤20 at the high luminosity run of LHC are also discussed, giving special attention to the H →hh , H /A →t t ¯ and H /A →τ+τ- decay modes.

  5. [Orthopedic shoe treatment : Inserts].

    PubMed

    Schuh, R; Windhager, R

    2016-03-01

    The use of inserts and orthopedic shoe adjustment represents an essential component of the conservative therapy of degenerative diseases and deformities of the musculoskeletal system. Inserts can have supportive, bedding and corrective effects and are used in particular for complaints of the feet and ankles. The combination of diverse materials allows a high level of cushioning and supporting features and corresponding longevity to be accomplished. The production is carried out on an individual basis and if necessary computer-assisted in order to achieve an optimal fit. For severe and rigid deformities the formation of pressure ulcers can be prevented by orthopedic shoe adjustment and by the use of orthopedic tailor-made shoes. PMID:26861757

  6. Inserted layer of AZO thin film with high work function between transparent conductive oxide and p-layer and its solar cell application.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeongsik; Lee, Jaehyeong; Lee, Youn-Jung; Kim, Heewon; Jung, Junhee; Hussain, S Qamar; Park, Jinjoo; Shin, Chonghoon; Kim, Sunbo; Ahn, Shihyun; Yil, Junsin

    2013-10-01

    We report aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) films with high work function as an insertion layer between transparent conducting oxides (TCO) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) layer to improve open circuit voltage (V(oc)) and fill factor (FF) for thin film solar cells. Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells exhibit poor fill factors due to a Schottky barrier at the interface between a-SiC:H window and TCO. The interface engineering is carried out by inserting an AZO layer with high work function (4.95 eV at O2 = 2 sccm). As a result, V(oc) and FF improved significantly. FF as high as 63.35% is obtained. PMID:24245205

  7. Schottky barrier height reduction for metal/n-InP by inserting ultra-thin atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Shan; Yang, Wen; Sun, Qing-Qing E-mail: linchen@fudan.edu.cn; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Peng-Fei; Wei Zhang, David; Chen, Lin; Xiao, Fei

    2013-12-23

    Fermi level pinning at metal/n-InP interface and effective Schottky barrier height (Φ{sub B,eff}) were optimized by inserting ultrathin dielectrics in this work. Comparing the inserted monolayer and bilayer high-k dielectrics, we demonstrated that the introduction of bilayer dielectrics can further reduce Φ{sub B,eff} (from 0.49 eV to 0.22 eV) than the monolayer dielectric (from 0.49 eV to 0.32 eV) even though the overall dielectric thickness was thicker. The additional dipole formed at high-k/high-k interfaces could be used to expound the mechanism. This work proposed an effective solution to reduce resistance contacts for InP based transistors and Schottky barrier transistors.

  8. Wear Mechanism of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Carbide Insert in Orthogonal Cutting Ti-6Al-4V ELI at High Cutting Speed

    SciTech Connect

    Gusri, A. I.; Che Hassan, C. H.; Jaharah, A. G.

    2011-01-17

    The performance of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) carbide insert with ISO designation of CCMT 12 04 04 LF, when turning titanium alloys was investigated. There were four layers of coating materials for this insert i.e.TiN-Al2O3-TiCN-TiN. The insert performance was evaluated based on the insert's edge resistant towards the machining parameters used at high cutting speed range of machining Ti-6Al-4V ELI. Detailed study on the wear mechanism at the cutting edge of CVD carbide tools was carried out at cutting speed of 55-95 m/min, feed rate of 0.15-0.35 mm/rev and depth of cut of 0.10-0.20 mm. Wear mechanisms such as abrasive and adhesive were observed on the flank face. Crater wear due to diffusion was also observed on the rake race. The abrasive wear occurred more at nose radius and the fracture on tool were found at the feed rate of 0.35 mm/rev and the depth of cut of 0.20 mm. The adhesion wear takes place after the removal of the coating or coating delaminating. Therefore, adhesion or welding of titanium alloy onto the flank and rake faces demonstrates a strong bond at the workpiece-tool interface.

  9. THE STRUCTURE AND SPECTRAL FEATURES OF A THIN DISK AND EVAPORATION-FED CORONA IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. Y.; Mineshige, S. E-mail: bfliu@nao.cas.cn

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the accretion process in high-luminosity active galactic nuclei (HLAGNs) in the scenario of the disk evaporation model. Based on this model, the thin disk can extend down to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) at accretion rates higher than 0.02 M-dot{sub Edd} while the corona is weak since part of the coronal gas is cooled by strong inverse Compton scattering of the disk photons. This implies that the corona cannot produce as strong X-ray radiation as observed in HLAGNs with large Eddington ratio. In addition to the viscous heating, other heating to the corona is necessary to interpret HLAGN. In this paper, we assume that a part of accretion energy released in the disk is transported into the corona, heating up the electrons, and is thereby radiated away. For the first time, we compute the corona structure with additional heating, fully taking into account the mass supply to the corona, and find that the corona could indeed survive at higher accretion rates and that its radiation power increases. The spectra composed of bremsstrahlung and Compton radiation are also calculated. Our calculations show that the Compton-dominated spectrum becomes harder with the increase of energy fraction (f) liberating in the corona, and the photon index for hard X-ray (2-10 keV) is 2.2 < {Gamma} < 2.7. We discuss possible heating mechanisms for the corona. Combining the energy fraction transported to the corona with the accretion rate by magnetic heating, we find that the hard X-ray spectrum becomes steeper at a larger accretion rate and the bolometric correction factor (L{sub bol}/L{sub 2-10keV}) increases with increasing accretion rate for f < 8/35, which is roughly consistent with the observational results.

  10. Luminosity Distributions of Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Meegan, Charles A.; Horack, John M.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Koshut, Thomas M.; Preece, Robert D.; Paciesas, William S.

    1996-05-01

    The intrinsic luminosities of gamma-ray bursts are found to be constrained by the BATSE/PVO combined intensity distribution, assuming that (1) bursts originate in {LAMBDA} = 0, {OMEGA} = 1 Friedmann cosmology with a nonevolving density distribution, (2) the nonevolving intrinsic luminosity function can be modeled as a truncated power law, and (3) burst spectra are modeled as power laws with identical spectral indices. These simplifying assumptions allow constraints to be placed on luminosity functions in cosmological gamma-ray burst scenarios and indicate that standard-candle sources are not favored. In general, either the minimum burst luminosity L_min_ or the maximum burst luminosity L_max_ are known, with the opposite end of the luminosity function unconstrained. Both L_max_ and L_min_ must be specified for luminosity power-law indices near 2. When these results are combined with other studies measuring other cosmological burst signatures, it is possible that the intrinsic luminosity function contains more low-luminosity bursts than high-luminosity ones.

  11. Insert coil test for HEP high field magnets using yba2cu3o7-δ coated conductor tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Vito; Barzi, Emanuela; Turrioni, Daniele; Zlobin, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 30-50 T. In this paper we present progress in insert coil development using commercially available YBa2Cu3O7.δ Coated Conductor. Technological aspects covered in the development, including coil geometry, insulation, manufacturing process and testing are summarized and discussed. Test results of double pancake coils operated in liquid nitrogen and liquid helium are presented and compared with the performance of YBa2Cu3O7.δ tape short samples.

  12. Luminosity determination at proton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafström, P.; Kozanecki, W.

    2015-03-01

    Luminosity is a key parameter in any particle collider, and its precise determination has proven particularly challenging at hadron colliders. After introducing the concept of luminosity in its multiple incarnations and offering a brief survey of the pp and p p bar colliders built to date, this article outlines the various methods that have been developed for relative-luminosity monitoring, as well as the complementary approaches considered for establishing an absolute luminosity scale. This is followed by a survey, from both a historical and a technical perspective, of luminosity determination at the ISR, the S p p ¯ S, the Tevatron, RHIC and the LHC. For each of these, we first delineate the interplay between the experimental context, the specificities of the accelerator, and the precision targets suggested by the physics program. We then detail how the different methods were applied to specific experimental environments and how successfully they meet the precision goals.

  13. The Effect of Malrotation of Tibial Component of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Tibial Insert during High Flexion Using a Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Mitsugu

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common errors of total knee arthroplasty procedure is a malrotation of tibial component. The stress on tibial insert is closely related to polyethylene failure. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of malrotation of tibial component for the stress on tibial insert during high flexion using a finite element analysis. We used Stryker NRG PS for analysis. Three different initial conditions of tibial component including normal, 15° internal malrotation, and 15° external malrotation were analyzed. The tibial insert made from ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene was assumed to be elastic-plastic while femoral and tibial metal components were assumed to be rigid. Four nonlinear springs attached to tibial component represented soft tissues around the knee. Vertical load was applied to femoral component which rotated from 0° to 135° while horizontal load along the anterior posterior axis was applied to tibial component during flexion. Maximum equivalent stresses on the surface were analyzed. Internal malrotation caused the highest stress which arose up to 160% of normal position. External malrotation also caused higher stress. Implanting prosthesis in correct position is important for reducing the risk of abnormal wear and failure. PMID:24895658

  14. Mechanical analysis of insertion problems and pain during colonoscopy: Why highly skill-dependent colonoscopy routines are necessary in the first place... and how they may be avoided

    PubMed Central

    Loeve, Arjo J; Fockens, Paul; Breedveld, Paul

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colonoscopy requires highly skill-dependent manoeuvres that demand a significant amount of training, and can cause considerable discomfort to patients, which increases the use of sedatives. Understanding the underlying fundamental mechanics behind insertion difficulties and pain during colonoscopy may help to simplify colonoscopy and reduce the required extent of training and reliance on sedatives. METHODS: A literature search, anatomical studies, models of the colon and colonoscope, and bench tests were used to qualitatively analyze the fundamental mechanical causes of insertion difficulties and pain. A categorized review resulted in an overview of potential alternatives to current colonoscopes. RESULTS: To advance a colonoscope through the colon, the colon wall, ligaments and peritoneum must be stretched, thus creating tension in the colon wall, which resists further wall deformation. This resistance forces the colonoscope to bend and follow the curves of the colon. The deformations that cause insertion difficulties and pain (necessitating the use of complex conventional manoeuvres) are the stretching of ligaments, and stretching of colon wall in the transverse and longitudinal directions, and the peritoneum. CONCLUSIONS: Four fundamental mechanical solutions to prevent these deformations were extracted from the analysis. The current results may help in the development of new colonoscopy devices that reduce – or eliminate – the necessity of using highly skill-dependent manoeuvres, facilitate training and reduce the use of sedatives. PMID:23712305

  15. First Detection of the [O(sub III)] 88 Micrometers Line at High Redshifts: Characterizing the Starburst and Narrow-Line Regions in Extreme Luminosity Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferkinhoff, C.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Parshley, S. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    We have made the first detections of the 88 micrometers [O(sub III)] line from galaxies in the early universe, detecting the line from the lensed active galactic nucleus (AGN)/starburst composite systems APM 08279+5255 at z 3.911 and SMM J02399-0136 at z = 2.8076. The line is exceptionally bright from both systems, with apparent (lensed) luminosities approx.10(exp 11) Solar Luminosity, For APM 08279, the [O(sub III)] line flux can be modeled in a star formation paradigm, with the stellar radiation field dominated by stars with effective temperatures, T(sub eff) > 36,000 K, similar to the starburst found in M82. The model implies approx.35% of the total far-IR luminosity of the system is generated by the starburst, with the remainder arising from dust heated by the AGN. The 881,tm line can also be generated in the narrow-line region of the AGN if gas densities are around a few 1000 cu cm. For SMM J02399, the [O(sub III)] line likely arises from HII regions formed by hot (T(sub eff) > 40,000 K) young stars in a massive starburst that dominates the far-IR luminosity of the system. The present work demonstrates the utility of the [O(sub III)] line for characterizing starbursts and AGN within galaxies in the early universe. These are the first detections of this astrophysically important line from galaxies beyond a redshift of 0.05.s

  16. A novel, simple, high-throughput method for isolation of genome-wide transposon insertion mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takeyoshi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Matsuda, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    We developed a novel, simple, high-throughput method for isolation of genome-wide transposon insertion mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. The basic idea of the method is to randomly disrupt the genes on the DNA fragments cloned on the Kohara library by inserting a mini-transposon first, and then transfer the disrupted genes from the lambda vector to the E. coli chromosome by homologous recombination. Using this method, we constructed a set of 8402 Km(r) cis-diploid mutants harboring a mini-Tn10 insertion mutation and the corresponding wild-type gene on a chromosome, as well as a set of 6954 haploid mutants derived from the cis-diploid mutants. The major advantage of the strategy used is that the indispensable genes or sites for growth can be identified. Preliminary results suggest that 415 open reading frames are indispensable for growth in E. coli cells. A total of 6404 haploid mutants were deposited to Genetic Strains Research Center, National Institute of Genetics, Japan (Chapter 26) and are available for public distribution upon request (http://shigen.lab.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/strain/nbrp/resource.jsp). PMID:18392969

  17. RHIC PLANS TOWARDS HIGHER LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide luminosity over a wide range of beam energies and species, including heavy ions, polarized protons, and tric beam collisions. In the first seven years of operation there has been a rapid increase in the achieved peak and average luminosity, substantially exceeding design values. Work is presently underway to achieve the Enhanced Design parameters. Planned major upgrades include the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), RHIC-11, and construction of an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). We review the expected RHIC upgrade performance. Electron cooling and its impact on the luminosity both for heavy ions and protons are discussed in detail.

  18. Support Structure Design of the $\\hbox{Nb}_{3}\\hbox{Sn}$ Quadrupole for the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Cheng, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Schmalzle, J.

    2014-10-31

    New low-β quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb₃Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of the detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.

  19. Ion bunch length effects on the beam-beam interaction and its compensation in a high-luminosity ring-ring electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Oeftiger, A.; Fischer, W.

    2012-05-20

    One of the luminosity limits in a ring-ring electron-ion collider is the beam-beam effect on the electrons. In the limit of short ion bunches, simulation studies have shown that this limit can be significantly increased by head-on beam-beam compensation with an electron lens. However, with an ion bunch length comparable to the beta-function at the IP in conjunction with a large beam-beam parameter, the electrons perform a sizeable fraction of a betatron oscillation period inside the long ion bunches. We present recent simulation results on the compensation of this beam-beam interaction with multiple electron lenses.

  20. Precision luminosity measurements at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    Measuring cross-sections at the LHC requires the luminosity to be determined accurately at each centre-of-mass energy √s. In this paper results are reported from the luminosity calibrations carried out at the LHC interaction point 8 with the LHCb detector for √s = 2.76, 7 and 8 TeV (proton-proton collisions) and for √sNN = 5 TeV (proton-lead collisions). Both the "van der Meer scan" and "beam-gas imaging" luminosity calibration methods were employed. It is observed that the beam density profile cannot always be described by a function that is factorizable in the two transverse coordinates. The introduction of a two-dimensional description of the beams improves significantly the consistency of the results. For proton-proton interactions at √s = 8 TeV a relative precision of the luminosity calibration of 1.47% is obtained using van der Meer scans and 1.43% using beam-gas imaging, resulting in a combined precision of 1.12%. Applying the calibration to the full data set determines the luminosity with a precision of 1.16%. This represents the most precise luminosity measurement achieved so far at a bunched-beam hadron collider.

  1. Finely tuning MOFs towards high performance in C2H2 storage: synthesis and properties of a new MOF-505 analogue with an inserted amide functional group.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingxing; Li, Bin; Li, Yunzhi; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Wenwei; Chen, Banglin; Li, Shuhua; Pan, Yi; You, Xiaozeng; Bai, Junfeng

    2016-06-01

    Aiming to improve the acetylene (C2H2) storage capability of MOFs, we successfully designed NJU-Bai 17, a new analogue of MOF-505 with an inserted amide functional group which exhibits almost record high C2H2 uptakes of 222.4 cm(3) g(-1) at 296 K and 296 cm(3) g(-1) at 273 K under 1 bar. This result has been further supported by the determination of the heat of C2H2 adsorption and Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) and first-principle calculations. PMID:27173153

  2. High Inter-Individual Diversity of Point Mutations, Insertions, and Deletions in Human Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein-Specific Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Bianca M.; Horn, Susanne; Sieg, Michael; Jassoy, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of virus-specific antibodies and of B cells among different individuals is unknown. Using single-cell cloning of antibody genes, we generated recombinant human monoclonal antibodies from influenza nucleoprotein-specific memory B cells in four adult humans with and without preceding influenza vaccination. We examined the diversity of the antibody repertoires and found that NP-specific B cells used numerous immunoglobulin genes. The heavy chains (HCs) originated from 26 and the kappa light chains (LCs) from 19 different germ line genes. Matching HC and LC chains gave rise to 43 genetically distinct antibodies that bound influenza NP. The median lengths of the CDR3 of the HC, kappa and lambda LC were 14, 9 and 11 amino acids, respectively. We identified changes at 13.6% of the amino acid positions in the V gene of the antibody heavy chain, at 8.4 % in the kappa and at 10.6 % in the lambda V gene. We identified somatic insertions or deletions in 8.1% of the variable genes. We also found several small groups of clonal relatives that were highly diversified. Our findings demonstrate broadly diverse memory B cell repertoires for the influenza nucleoprotein. We found extensive variation within individuals with a high number of point mutations, insertions, and deletions, and extensive clonal diversification. Thus, structurally conserved proteins can elicit broadly diverse and highly mutated B-cell responses. PMID:26086076

  3. Luminosity of initial breakdown in lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, M.; Marshall, T. C.; Karunarathne, S.; Karunarathna, N.; Vickers, L. E.; Warner, T. A.; Orville, R. E.; Betz, H.-D.

    2013-04-01

    Time correlated high-speed video and electromagnetic data for 15 cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning flashes reveal bursts of light, bright enough to be seen through intervening cloud, during the initial breakdown (IB) stage and within the first 3 ms after flash initiation. Each sudden increase in luminosity is coincident with a CG type (12 cases) or an IC type (3 cases) IB pulse in fast electric field change records. The E-change data for 217 flashes indicate that all CG and IC flashes have IB pulses. The luminosity bursts of 14 negative CG flashes occur 11-340 ms before the first return stroke, at altitudes of 4-8 km, and at 4-41 km range from the camera. In seven cases, linear segments visibly advance away from the first light burst for 55-200 µs, then the entire length dims, then the luminosity sequence repeats along the same path. These visible initial leaders or streamers lengthen intermittently to about 300-1500 m. Their estimated 2-D speeds are 4-18 × 105 m s-1 over the first few hundred microseconds and decrease by about 50% over the first 2 ms. In other cases, only a bright spot or a broad area of diffuse light, presumably scattered by intervening cloud, is visible. The bright area grows larger over 20-60 µs before the luminosity fades in about 100 µs, then this sequence may repeat several times. In several flashes, a 1-2 ms period of little or no luminosity and small E-change is observed following the IB stage prior to stepped leader development.

  4. A complete X-ray sample of the high latitude sky from HEAO-1 A-2: log N lo S and luminosity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piccinotti, G.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Marshall, F. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Shafer, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment was performed in which a complete X-ray survey of the 8.2 steradians of the sky at galactic latitudes where the absolute value of b is 20 deg down to a limiting sensitivity of 3.1 x ten to the minus 11th power ergs/sq cm sec in the 2-10 keV band. Of the 85 detected sources 17 were identified with galactic objects, 61 were identified with extragalactic objects, and 7 remain unidentified. The log N - log S relation for the non-galactic objects is well fit by the Euclidean relationship. The X-ray spectra of these objects were used to construct log N - log S in physical units. The complete sample of identified sources was used to construct X-ray luminosity functions, using the absolute maximum likelihood method, for clusters galaxies and active galactic nuclei.

  5. Supermassive Black Holes with High Accretion Rates in Active Galactic Nuclei. V. A New Size–Luminosity Scaling Relation for the Broad-line Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Pu; Lu, Kai-Xing; Zhang, Zhi-Xiang; Huang, Ying-Ke; Wang, Kai; Hu, Chen; Qiu, Jie; Li, Yan-Rong; Fan, Xu-Liang; Fang, Xiang-Er; Bai, Jin-Ming; Bian, Wei-Hao; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Ho, Luis C.; Wang, Jian-Min; SEAMBH collaboration

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports results of the third-year campaign of monitoring super-Eddington accreting massive black holes (SEAMBHs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) between 2014 and 2015. Ten new targets were selected from the quasar sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), which have generally been more luminous than the SEAMBH candidates in the last two years. Hβ lags ({τ }{{H}β }) in five of the 10 quasars have been successfully measured in this monitoring season. We find that the lags are generally shorter, by large factors, than those of objects with same optical luminosity, in light of the well-known R H β–L 5100 relation. The five quasars have dimensionless accretion rates of \\dot{{M}\\quad }=10–103. Combining these with measurements of the previous SEAMBHs, we find that the reduction of Hβ lags depends tightly on accretion rates, {τ }{{H}β }/{τ }R-L\\propto {\\dot{{M}}}-0.42, where {τ }R-L is the Hβ lag from the normal R H β–L 5100 relation. Fitting 63 mapped AGNs, we present a new scaling relation for the broad-line region: {R}{{H}β }={α }1{{\\ell }}44{β 1} {min} [1,{(\\dot{{M}}/{\\dot{{M}}}c)}-{γ 1}], where {{\\ell }}44={L}5100/{10}44 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 is the 5100 Å continuum luminosity, and the coefficients are {α }1={29.6}-2.8+2.7 lt-day, {β }1={0.56}-0.03+0.03, {γ }1={0.52}-0.16+0.33, and {\\dot{{M}}}c={11.19}-6.22+2.29. This relation is applicable to AGNs over a wide range of accretion rates, from 10‑3 to 103. Implications of this new relation are briefly discussed.

  6. The quasar mass-luminosity plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles Louis

    2010-11-01

    This thesis investigates the quasar mass-luminosity plane, as a new tool to explore the relationship between black hole mass and quasar luminosity over time. Previous techniques used quasar luminosity function and mass functions, which are one-dimensional projections of the mass-luminosity plane. The M --- L plane contains information that cannot be seen in these projections. We use 62,185 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5 sample to develop several new constraints on quasar accretion. Black hole masses, based on the widths of their Hbeta, Mg II, and C IV lines and adjacent continuum luminosities, were used assuming using standard virial mass estimate scaling laws. In each redshift interval over the range 0.2 < z < 4.0, low-mass quasars reach at their Eddington luminosity, but high-mass quasars fall short, even by a factor of ten or more at 0.2 < z < 0.6. We examine several potential sources of measurement uncertainty or bias and show that none of them can account for this effect. We also show the statistical uncertainty in virial mass estimation to have an upper bound of ˜ 0.2 dex, smaller than the 0.4 dex previously reported. The maximum mass of quasars at each redshift is sharp and evolving. High-mass black holes turn off their luminous accretion at higher redshift than lower-mass black holes. Further, turnoff for quasars at any given mass is synchronized to within 0.7--3 Gyr, tighter than would be expected given the dynamics of their host galaxies. We find potential signatures of the quasar turnoff mechanism, including a dearth of high-mass quasars at low Eddington ratio, low CIV/MgII emission line ratio, and a red spectral tilt. Finally, we use these new constraints to analyze models for the evolution of individual quasars over time. We find a restricted family of tracks that lie within the M --- L plane at all redshifts, suggesting that a single, constant feedback mechanism between all supermassive black holes and their host galaxies might apply

  7. The genetic diversity and evolution of field pea (Pisum) studied by high throughput retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) marker analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genetic diversity of crop species is the result of natural selection on the wild progenitor and human intervention by ancient and modern farmers and breeders. The genomes of modern cultivars, old cultivated landraces, ecotypes and wild relatives reflect the effects of these forces and provide insights into germplasm structural diversity, the geographical dimension to species diversity and the process of domestication of wild organisms. This issue is also of great practical importance for crop improvement because wild germplasm represents a rich potential source of useful under-exploited alleles or allele combinations. The aim of the present study was to analyse a major Pisum germplasm collection to gain a broad understanding of the diversity and evolution of Pisum and provide a new rational framework for designing germplasm core collections of the genus. Results 3020 Pisum germplasm samples from the John Innes Pisum germplasm collection were genotyped for 45 retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) markers by the Tagged Array Marker (TAM) method. The data set was stored in a purpose-built Germinate relational database and analysed by both principal coordinate analysis and a nested application of the Structure program which yielded substantially similar but complementary views of the diversity of the genus Pisum. Structure revealed three Groups (1-3) corresponding approximately to landrace, cultivar and wild Pisum respectively, which were resolved by nested Structure analysis into 14 Sub-Groups, many of which correlate with taxonomic sub-divisions of Pisum, domestication related phenotypic traits and/or restricted geographical locations. Genetic distances calculated between these Sub-Groups are broadly supported by principal coordinate analysis and these, together with the trait and geographical data, were used to infer a detailed model for the domestication of Pisum. Conclusions These data provide a clear picture of the major distinct gene

  8. AMMONIA AND CO OBSERVATIONS TOWARD LOW-LUMINOSITY 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. W.; Xu, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhang, S. B.; Pandian, J. D.; Henkel, C.; Menten, K. M.

    2010-09-01

    To investigate whether distinctions exist between low- and high-luminosity Class II 6.7 GHz methanol masers, we have undertaken multi-line mapping observations of various molecular lines, including the NH{sub 3} (1,1), (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), and {sup 12}CO (1-0) transitions, toward a sample of nine low-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers and {sup 12}CO (1-0) observations toward a sample of eight high-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers, for which we already had NH{sub 3} spectral line data. Emission in the NH{sub 3} (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) transitions was detected in eight out of nine low-luminosity maser sources, in which 14 cores were identified. We derive densities, column densities, temperatures, core sizes, and masses of both low- and high-luminosity maser regions. A comparative analysis of the physical quantities reveals marked distinctions between the low-luminosity and high-luminosity groups: in general, cores associated with high-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers are larger and more massive than those traced by low-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers; regions traced by the high-luminosity masers have larger column densities but lower densities than those of the low-luminosity maser regions. Further, strong correlations between 6.7 GHz maser luminosity and NH{sub 3} (1,1) and (2,2) line widths are found, indicating that internal motions in high-luminosity maser regions are more energetic than those in low-luminosity maser regions. A {sup 12}CO (1-0) outflow analysis also shows distinctions in that outflows associated with high-luminosity masers have wider line wings and larger sizes than those associated with low-luminosity masers.

  9. [Suprapubic catheter insertion].

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eva; Schwentner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The suprapubic catheter enables a percutaneous drainage of urine. The insertion is made superior of the pubic bone through the abdominal wall into the bladder. It allows a permanent drainage of urine bypassing the urethra. The insertion of a suprapubic catheter requires knowledge and expertise. This paper summarizes the basic background and allows to follow the practical application step by step. PMID:26800072

  10. Diamond Pixel Luminosity Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Halyo, Valerie

    2014-12-23

    In this document, Halyo summaries her key contributions to CMS at the LHC and provide an explanation of their importance and her role in each project. At the end Halyo describes her recent research interest that includes GPU/MIC Acceleration of the High Level Trigger (HLT) to Extend the Physics Research at the LHC. A descriptionof her work the recent promising results that she accomplished and the deliverable are also elaborated. These contribution were only possible thanks to DOE support of junior faculty research and their clear goal to promote research and innovations. Princeton University i