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Sample records for high mutant frequency

  1. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  2. Spontaneous Auxotrophic and Pigmented Mutants Occurring at High Frequency in Bacillus pumilus NRRL B-3275

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, Paul S.

    1972-01-01

    Broth cultures of Bacillus pumilus NRRL B-3275 (BpB1) grown at 25, 30, or 37 C contain 1 to 2% spontaneous auxotrophic mutants in both the exponential and stationary phases of growth. Of 70 such mutants isolated from cultures grown at 37 C, approximately two-thirds reverted at such a high frequency as to preclude their study. Of the remaining 22 mutants, 18 required a single amino acid, 1 required adenine, and 1 required uracil. Two of the auxotrophs each required two unrelated amino acids resulting from two independent mutations. All of the mutations reverted spontaneously. Enhanced reversion of approximately one-third of the mutations was obtained with nitrosoguanidine, ethyl methane sulfonate, or diethyl sulfate, or with more than one of these mutagens. The reversion of one mutation was enhanced by 2-aminopurine. The reversion of the remaining mutations was not enhanced by the above mutagens, nor by mutagens known to induce (and revert) frameshift mutations in other bacterial systems. Nine of 10 mutants examined did not show a selective growth advantage over the parents. All but three of the mutations could be linked by PBS1 transduction to one of the previously described auxotrophic markers in strain BpB1. No evidence was obtained for clustering of the mutations on the BpB1 genome. Six of the mutations conferred a requirement for serine. One linked by transduction to trp-2, three linked to argA1, and two (ser-2, -3) linked to argO1. Pigmented mutants (containing a carotenoid-like pigment), which occur spontaneously in BpB1 cultures at a frequency on the order of 1 to 5 mutants per 104 cells, link by transduction to ser-2, -3. Spontaneous mutants of strain BpB1 resistant to rifampin, streptomycin, erythromycin, 5-fluorouracil, or 5-methyltryptophan occur at a frequency similar to that of strains of B. pumilus which do not exhibit a high rate of spontaneous mutation to auxotrophy. It is suggested that certain sites or regions of the BpB1 genome exhibit a high

  3. High-Frequency Phenotypic Reversion and Pathogenicity of an Acyclovir-Resistant Herpes Simplex Virus Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Anthony; Coen, Donald M.

    2003-01-01

    A double-guanine-insertion mutation within a run of guanines in the herpes simplex virus gene encoding thymidine kinase (TK) was previously found in an acyclovir-resistant clinical isolate. This mutation was engineered into strain KOS, and stocks were generated from single plaques. Plaque autoradiography revealed that most plaques in such stocks exhibited low levels of TK activity, while ∼3% of plaques exhibited high levels of TK activity, indicating a remarkably high frequency of phenotypic reversion. This virus was able to reactivate from latency in mouse ganglia; a fraction of the reactivating virus expressed a high level of TK activity due to an additional G insertion, suggesting that the observed genetic instability contributed to pathogenicity. PMID:12525666

  4. Novel rapid genotyping assays for neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs and high frequency of the mutant allele in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yabuki, Akira; Kawamichi, Takuji; Kawahara, Natsuko; Hayashi, Daisuke; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Yamato, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) constitutes a group of recessively inherited lysosomal storage diseases that primarily affect neuronal cells. Such diseases share certain clinical and pathologic features in human beings and animals. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs was first detected in Australia in the 1980s, and the pathogenic mutation was shown to be a nonsense mutation (c.619C>T) in exon 4 in canine CLN5 gene. In the present study, novel rapid genotyping assays including polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR primer-induced restriction analysis, mutagenically separated PCR, and real-time PCR with TaqMan minor groove binder probes, were developed. The utility of microchip electrophoresis was also evaluated. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of Border Collies in Japan using these assays to determine the current allele frequency in Japan, providing information to control and prevent this disease in the next stage. All assays developed in the current study are available to discriminate these genotypes, and microchip electrophoresis showed a timesaving advantage over agarose gel electrophoresis. Of all assays, real-time PCR was the most suitable for large-scale examination because of its high throughput. The genotyping survey demonstrated that the carrier frequency was 8.1%. This finding suggested that the mutant allele frequency of NCL in Border Collies is high enough in Japan that measures to control and prevent the disease would be warranted. The genotyping assays developed in the present study could contribute to the prevention of NCL in Border Collies. PMID:22362793

  5. Decremental response to high-frequency trains of acetylcholine pulses but unaltered fractional Ca2+ currents in a panel of "slow-channel syndrome" nicotinic receptor mutants.

    PubMed

    Elenes, Sergio; Decker, Michael; Cymes, Gisela D; Grosman, Claudio

    2009-02-01

    The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCCMS) is a disorder of the neuromuscular junction caused by gain-of-function mutations to the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (AChR). Although it is clear that the slower deactivation time course of the ACh-elicited currents plays a central role in the etiology of this disease, it has been suggested that other abnormal properties of these mutant receptors may also be critical in this respect. We characterized the kinetics of a panel of five SCCMS AChRs (alphaS269I, betaV266M, epsilonL221F, epsilonT264P, and epsilonL269F) at the ensemble level in rapidly perfused outside-out patches. We found that, for all of these mutants, the peak-current amplitude decreases along trains of nearly saturating ACh pulses delivered at physiologically relevant frequencies in a manner that is consistent with enhanced entry into desensitization during the prolonged deactivation phase. This suggests that the increasingly reduced availability of activatable AChRs upon repetitive stimulation may well contribute to the fatigability and weakness of skeletal muscle that characterize this disease. Also, these results emphasize the importance of explicitly accounting for entry into desensitization as one of the pathways for burst termination, if meaningful mechanistic insight is to be inferred from the study of the effect of these naturally occurring mutations on channel function. Applying a novel single-channel-based approach to estimate the contribution of Ca(2+) to the total cation currents, we also found that none of these mutants affects the Ca(2+)-conduction properties of the AChR to an extent that seems to be of physiological importance. Our estimate of the Ca(2+)-carried component of the total (inward) conductance of wild-type and SCCMS AChRs in the presence of 150 mM Na(+), 1.8 mM Ca(2+), and 1.7 mM Mg(2+) on the extracellular side of cell-attached patches turned out be in the 5.0-9.4 pS range, representing a fractional Ca

  6. Fixation probabilities of random mutants under frequency dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weini; Traulsen, Arne

    2010-03-21

    Evolutionary game dynamics describes frequency dependent selection in asexual, haploid populations. It typically considers predefined strategies and fixed payoff matrices. Mutations occur between these known types only. Here, we consider a situation in which a mutation has produced an entirely new type which is characterized by a random payoff matrix that does not change during the fixation or extinction of the mutant. Based on the probability distribution underlying the payoff values, we address the fixation probability of the new mutant. It turns out that for weak selection, only the first moments of the distribution matter. For strong selection, the probability that a new payoff entry is larger than the wild type's payoff against itself is the crucial quantity. PMID:19995564

  7. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Torrey, Heather L; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  8. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  9. Mutant frequency of radiotherapy technicians appears to be associated with recent dose of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, K.; Ferraris, J.; Bradley, W.E.; Swartz, J.; Seifert, A.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The frequency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants among peripheral T-lymphocytes of radiotherapy technicians primarily exposed to 60Co was measured by the T-cell cloning method. Mutant frequencies of these technicians in 1984 and 1986 were significantly higher than those of physiotherapy technicians who worked in a neighboring service, and correlated significantly with thermoluminescence dosimeter readings recorded during the 6 mo preceding mutant frequency determination. Correlations decreased when related to dose recorded over longer time intervals. HPRT mutant frequency determination in peripheral lymphocytes is a good measure of recently received biologically effective radiation dose in an occupationally exposed population.

  10. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  11. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  12. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  13. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  14. High-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M R

    1986-08-01

    Over the last six years high-frequency ventilation has been extensively evaluated both in the clinical and laboratory settings. It is now no longer the great mystery it once was, and it is now no longer believed (as many had hoped), that it will solve all the problems associated with mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Although the technique is safe and appears to cause no harm even in the long term, it has not yet been shown to offer any major advantages over conventional mechanical ventilation. PMID:3530042

  15. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  16. Frequency-dependent viability in mutant strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Curtsinger, J W; Sheen, F M

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the effects of genotypic frequencies on egg-to-adult viabilities in pairwise combinations of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The experiments involved mixture of a total of 42,000 eggs in varying proportions under controlled densities and observation of surviving adults. Viabilities were found to depend on frequencies in several genotypic combinations. In the most extreme case, the absolute viability of cn;bw females increased monotonically from 54% when common to 70% when rare. The results illustrate several statistical and methodological problems that might explain why some experiments have failed to detect frequency-dependent viabilities. These problems include heterogeneity between replications, sex differences in susceptibility to competition, and strong dependence of the experimental outcome on the choice of competitor genotypes. PMID:1901577

  17. High-Frequency Gated Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    New gated oscillator generates bursts of high-frequency sine waves, square waves, and triangular waves in response to control signals. Each burst starts at zero phase, with tight tolerances on signal amplitude and frequency. Frequencies in megahertz range are made possible by using high-speed comparators and high-speed flip-flop as fast-response threshold detector.

  18. Arabidopsis thaliana siRNA biogenesis mutants have the lower frequency of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Bilichak, Andriy; Golubov, Andrey; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are involved in the regulation of plant development and response to stress. We have previously shown that mutants impaired in Dicer-like 2 (DCL2), DCL3 and DCL4, RDR2, RDR6 and NPRD1 are partially impaired in their response to stress and dcl2 and dcl3 plants are also impaired in transgenerational response to stress, including changes in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). Here, we have analyzed genome stability of dcl2, dcl3, dcl4, dcl2 dcl3, dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 and rdr6 mutants by measuring the non-induced and the stress-induced recombination frequency. We found that all mutants had the lower spontaneous HRF. The analysis of strand breaks showed that all tested Arabidopsis mutants had a higher level of spontaneous strand breaks, suggesting that the lower HRF is not due to the unusually low level of breaks. Exposure to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) resulted in an increase in the level of strand breaks in wild-type plants and a decrease in mutants. All mutants had the higher methylation of cytosines at CpG sites under non-induced conditions. Exposure to MMS resulted in a decrease in methylation level in wild-type plants and an increase in methylation in all dcl mutants. The expression of several DNA repair genes was altered in dcl4 plants under non-induced and induced conditions. Our data suggest that siRNA biogenesis may be essential for the maintenance of the genome stability and stress response in Arabidopsis. PMID:26901311

  19. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  20. Measurement of in vivo mutant frequency in lymphocytes in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, J.L.; Morley, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    A limiting-dilution cloning technique for quantifying in vivo mutations at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in mouse splenocytes was developed. Mouse splenocytes were cultured in round-bottom microwells with irradiated feeder cells, concanavalin A, and a source of interleukin 2 at five cells/well in the absence of thioguanine, and at 5 X 10(4) cells/well in the presence of 2.5 micrograms/ml thioguanine; mutant frequency was calculated as the ratio of the cloning efficiencies with or without thioguanine. The geometric mean (95% range) for the mutant frequency in 20 mice was 1.54 X 10(-6) (4.7 X 10(-7) -2.6 X 10(6)) and whole-body X-irradiation resulted in a dose-related increase in mutant frequency of up to approximately 20 times the baseline level. The in vivo murine mutation assay should be a useful system for genotoxicity testing and may be of particular value in establishing risk estimates for human populations exposed to genotoxins.

  1. Mobile high frequency vibrator system

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, D.W.; Buller, P.L.

    1985-01-08

    A carrier mounted seismic vibrator system that is primarily adapted for generation of high force, high frequency seismic energy into an earth medium. The apparatus includes first and second vibrators as supported by first and second lift systems disposed in tandem juxtaposition generally centrally in said vehicle, and the lift systems are designed to maintain equal hold-down force on the vibrator coupling baseplates without exceeding the weight of the carrier vehicle. The juxtaposed vibrators are then energized in synchronized relationship to propagate increased amounts of higher frequency seismic energy into an earth medium.

  2. High frequency integrated MOS filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques exist for implementing integrated MOS filters. These techniques fit into the general categories of sampled and tuned continuous-time filters. Advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. This paper focuses primarily on the high frequency capabilities of MOS integrated filters.

  3. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  4. Stability analysis of a high fibre yield and low lignin content "thick stem" mutant in tossa jute (Corchorus olitorius L.).

    PubMed

    Mandal, Aninda; Datta, Animesh K

    2014-01-01

    A "thick stem" mutant of Corchorus olitorius L. was induced at M2 (0.50%, 4 h, EMS) and the true breeding mutant is assessed across generations (M5 to M7) considering morphometric traits as well as SEM analysis of pollen grains and raw jute fibres, stem anatomy, cytogenetical attributes, and lignin content in relation to control. Furthermore, single fibre diameter and tensile strength are also analysed. The objective is to assess the stability of mutant for its effective exploration for raising a new plant type in tossa jute for commercial exploitation and efficient breeding. The mutant trait is monogenic recessive to normal. Results indicate that "thick stem" mutant is stable across generations (2n = 14) with distinctive high seed and fibre yield and significantly low lignin content. Stem anatomy of the mutant shows significant enhancement in fibre zone, number of fibre pyramids and fibre bundles per pyramid, and diameter of fibre cell in relation to control. Moreover, tensile strength of mutant fibre is significantly higher than control fibre and the trait is inversely related to fibre diameter. However the mutant is associated with low germination frequency, poor seed viability, and high pollen sterility, which may be eliminated through mutational approach followed by rigorous selection and efficient breeding. PMID:24860822

  5. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  6. Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Rekha

    1995-01-01

    Frequency shifts of high frequency p-modes during the solar cycle are calculated for a non-magnetic polytrope convection zone model. An isothermal chromospheric atmosphere threaded by a uniform horizontal magnetic field is correlated to this model. The relevant observations of such frequency changes are discussed. The calculated simultaneous changes in the field strength and chromospheric temperature result in the frequency shifts that are similar to those of the observations.

  7. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  8. High frequency dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K; Swager, Timothy M; Temkin, Richard J; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-09-17

    During the three decades 1980-2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical, and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = 1/2 species (13)C or (15)N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, such as (17)O or (27)Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime, roughly 150-660 GHz, and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades, scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  9. High Frequency Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Swager, Timothy M.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus During the three decades 1980–2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = ½ species 13C or 15N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, like 17O or 27Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime — roughly 150–660 GHz — and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  10. Anti-folate drug resistance in Africa: meta-analysis of reported dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) mutant genotype frequencies in African Plasmodium falciparum parasite populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) genes of Plasmodium falciparum are associated with resistance to anti-folate drugs, most notably sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). Molecular studies document the prevalence of these mutations in parasite populations across the African continent. However, there is no systematic review examining the collective epidemiological significance of these studies. This meta-analysis attempts to: 1) summarize genotype frequency data that are critical for molecular surveillance of anti-folate resistance and 2) identify the specific challenges facing the development of future molecular databases. Methods This review consists of 220 studies published prior to 2009 that report the frequency of select dhfr and dhps mutations in 31 African countries. Maps were created to summarize the location and prevalence of the highly resistant dhfr triple mutant (N51I, C59R, S108N) genotype and dhps double mutant (A437G and K540E) genotype in Africa. A hierarchical mixed effects logistic regression was used to examine the influence of various factors on reported mutant genotype frequency. These factors include: year and location of study, age and clinical status of sampled population, and reporting conventions for mixed genotype data. Results A database consisting of dhfr and dhps mutant genotype frequencies from all African studies that met selection criteria was created for this analysis. The map illustrates particularly high prevalence of both the dhfr triple and dhps double mutant genotypes along the Kenya-Tanzania border and Malawi. The regression model shows a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of both the dhfr triple and dhps double mutant genotypes in Africa. Conclusion Increasing prevalence of the dhfr triple mutant and dhps double mutant genotypes in Africa are consistent with the loss of efficacy of SP for treatment of clinical malaria in most parts of this continent

  11. Real-time PCR genotyping assay for canine progressive rod-cone degeneration and mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds in Japan

    PubMed Central

    KOHYAMA, Moeko; TADA, Naomi; MITSUI, Hiroko; TOMIOKA, Hitomi; TSUTSUI, Toshihiko; YABUKI, Akira; RAHMAN, Mohammad Mahbubur; KUSHIDA, Kazuya; MIZUKAMI, Keijiro; YAMATO, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a middle- to late-onset, autosomal recessive, inherited retinal disorder caused by a substitution (c.5G>A) in the canine PRCD gene that has been identified in 29 or more purebred dogs. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed and evaluated for rapid genotyping and large-scale screening of the mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of the three most popular breeds in Japan (Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds) to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The assay separated all the genotypes of canine PRCD rapidly, indicating its suitability for large-scale surveys. The results of the survey showed that the mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles was high enough (approximately 0.09) to allow the establishment of measures for the prevention and control of this disorder in breeding kennels. The mutant allele was detected in Chihuahuas for the first time, but the frequency was lower (approximately 0.02) than that in Toy Poodles. The mutant allele was not detected in Miniature Dachshunds. This assay will allow the selective breeding of dogs from the two most popular breeds (Toy Poodle and Chihuahua) in Japan and effective prevention or control of the disorder. PMID:26549343

  12. Real-time PCR genotyping assay for canine progressive rod-cone degeneration and mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Moeko; Tada, Naomi; Mitsui, Hiroko; Tomioka, Hitomi; Tsutsui, Toshihiko; Yabuki, Akira; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Mizukami, Keijiro; Yamato, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a middle- to late-onset, autosomal recessive, inherited retinal disorder caused by a substitution (c.5G>A) in the canine PRCD gene that has been identified in 29 or more purebred dogs. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed and evaluated for rapid genotyping and large-scale screening of the mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of the three most popular breeds in Japan (Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds) to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The assay separated all the genotypes of canine PRCD rapidly, indicating its suitability for large-scale surveys. The results of the survey showed that the mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles was high enough (approximately 0.09) to allow the establishment of measures for the prevention and control of this disorder in breeding kennels. The mutant allele was detected in Chihuahuas for the first time, but the frequency was lower (approximately 0.02) than that in Toy Poodles. The mutant allele was not detected in Miniature Dachshunds. This assay will allow the selective breeding of dogs from the two most popular breeds (Toy Poodle and Chihuahua) in Japan and effective prevention or control of the disorder. PMID:26549343

  13. High-Frequency Inductor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, L. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Finemet-type nanocrystalline alloy represents an advanced soft-magnetic metal-metal-type nanocomposite with an eddy-current-determined high- frequency limit. A survey of different heat treatments under tensile stress is presented to tailor the hysteresis loop by induced transversal anisotropy. The flattened loop having reduced effective permeability enhances the eddy- current limit in the MHz region; For example, continuous stress annealing in a tubular furnace of 1 m length at 650°C, pulling the ribbon with a velocity of 4 m/min under a tensile stress of 200 MPa, results in a wound core having a permeability of 120 and a frequency limit of 10 MHz. Careful annealing preserves the static coercivity below 10 A/m. The power loss at 0.1 T and 100 kHz is only 82 mW/cm3, which is an order of magnitude lower then the values obtained for Sendust™ cores in similar conditions.

  14. Pressurized high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas D.

    Acoustic heat engines show much promise for converting waste heat to electricity. Since most applications require high power levels, high frequency thermoacoustic engines can reach such performance by operating with a pressurized working gas. Results on a 3 kHz prime mover, consisting of a quarter-wave resonator and a random stack material between two heat exchangers, show that the acoustic power from such a device is raised substantially as the working gas is pressurized. At pressures up to approximately 10 bar, the increase in acoustic power is approximately linear to the increase in pressure, and thus is an effective way to increase the power output of thermoacoustic engines. Since the heat input was not changed during the experiments, the increases in acoustic power translate directly to increases in engine efficiency which is calculated as the output acoustic power divided by the input heat power. In most experiments run in this study, the engine efficiency increased by a factor of at least 4 as the pressure was increased from 2 bar up to about 10 bar. Further increases in pressure lead to acoustic power saturation and eventual attenuation. This is most likely due to a combination of several factors including the shrinking thermal penetration depth, and the fact that the losses increase faster with pressure in a random stack material than in traditional parallel plates. Pressurization also leads to a lower DeltaT for onset of oscillations in the range of 10 bar of mean pressure, potentially opening up even more heat sources that can power a thermoacoustic engine. Results from another 3 kHz engine, one that was pressurized itself as opposed to being placed in a pressurized chamber, are also presented. The configuration of this engine solves the problem of how to simultaneously pressurize the engine and inject heat into the hot heat exchanger. It was also noted that the geometry of the resonator cavity in the quarter wavelength pressurized engine plays an

  15. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  16. High power, high frequency helix TWT's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloley, H. J.; Willard, J.; Paatz, S. R.; Keat, M. J.

    The design and performance characteristics of a 34-GHz pulse tube capable of 75 W peak power output at 30 percent duty cycle and a broadband CW tube are presented. Particular attention is given to the engineering problems encountered during the development of the tubes, including the suppression of backward wave oscillation, the design of electron guns for small-diameter high-current beams, and the thermal capability of small helix structures. The discussion also covers the effects of various design parameters and choice of engineering materials on the ultimate practical limit of power and gain at the operating frequencies. Measurements are presented for advanced experimental tubes.

  17. Special Aspects in Designing High - Frequency Betatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, A. A.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to designing the high - frequency betatron. In high - frequency betatron most important problem is overheating of the elements of the body radiator unit. In an article some directions of solving this problem are shown.

  18. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  19. Tipping the mutation-selection balance: Limited migration increases the frequency of deleterious mutants.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jacob D; Neuhauser, Claudia; Dean, Antony M; Kerr, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    Typical mutation-selection models assume well-mixed populations, but dispersal and migration within many natural populations is spatially limited. Such limitations can lead to enhanced variation among locations as different types become clustered in different places. Such clustering weakens competition between unlike types relative to competition between like types; thus, the rate by which a fitter type displaces an inferior competitor can be affected by the spatial scale of movement. In this paper, we use a birth-death model to show that limited migration can affect asexual populations by creating competitive refugia. We use a moment closure approach to show that as population structure is introduced by limiting migration, the equilibrial frequency of deleterious mutants increases. We support and extend the model through stochastic simulation, and we use a spatially explicit cellular automaton approach to corroborate the results. We discuss the implications of these results for standing variation in structured populations and adaptive valley crossing in Wright's "shifting balance" process. PMID:25983046

  20. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  1. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz. PMID:12071247

  2. Elevated mutant frequencies in lymphoid tissues persist throughout plasmacytoma development in BALB/c.lambdaLIZ mice.

    PubMed

    Felix, K; Kelliher, K A; Bornkamm, G W; Janz, S

    1999-08-01

    Using the phage lambdaLIZ-based transgenic in vivo mutagenesis assay, the mean mutant frequencies in the target gene, lacI, were found to be significantly increased in lymphoid tissues of congenic BALB/c.lambdaLIZ N5 mice in the terminal stage of a plasmacytoma induction experiment, 213-280 days after the first i.p. injection of the plasmacytomagenic agent pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane). In plasmacytoma-bearing mice (n = 7), mutant frequencies in the spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes were elevated 2.46-fold and 5.35-fold, respectively, when compared with age-matched controls. In plasmacytoma-negative mice (n = 11), mutant frequencies were increased 2.30-fold (spleens) and 3.48-fold (mesenteric nodes). These results, interpreted in conjunction with our previous findings (K. Felix et al., Cancer Res., 58: 1616-1619, 1998) of approximately 3-fold elevations in pristane-induced splenic mutagenesis on day 42 postpristane, indicate that increased mutant levels in lymphoid tissues persist throughout plasmacytomagenesis in genetically susceptible BALB/c mice. PMID:10446972

  3. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  4. High frequency gyrokinetic particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, R. A.; Lee, W. W.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.

    2007-07-15

    The gyrokinetic approach for arbitrary frequency dynamics in magnetized plasmas is explored, using the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory. Contrary to low-frequency gyrokinetics, which views each particle as a rigid charged ring, arbitrary frequency response of a particle is described by a quickly changing Kruskal ring. This approach allows the separation of gyrocenter and gyrophase responses and thus allows for, in many situations, larger time steps for the gyrocenter push than for the gyrophase push. The gyrophase response which determines the shape of Kruskal rings can be described by a Fourier series in gyrophase for some problems, thus allowing control over the cyclotron harmonics at which the plasma responds. A computational algorithm for particle-in-cell simulation based on this concept has been developed. An example of the ion Bernstein wave is used to illustrate its numerical properties, and comparison with a direct Lorentz-force approach is presented.

  5. Transponder System for High-Frequency Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, C. L.; Shores, P. W.; Kobayashi, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transponder system uses phase difference between transmitted and reflected high-frequency radio waves to measure distance to target. To suppress spurious measurements of reflections from objects near target at transmitted frequency and its harmonics, transponder at target generates return signal at half transmitted frequency. System useful in such applications as surveying, docking of ships, and short-range navigation.

  6. Investigation of the low frequency dynamics of heme proteins: native and mutant cytochrome P450(cam) and redox partner complexes.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Venugopal; Denisov, Ilia; Sligar, Stephen G; Champion, Paul M

    2011-05-12

    Vibrational coherence spectroscopy (VCS) is used to investigate the low-frequency dynamics of camphor-free and camphor-bound cytochrome P450(cam) (CYP 101) and its L358P mutant. The low-frequency heme vibrations are found to be perturbed upon binding to the electron transfer partner putidaredoxin (Pdx). A strong correlation between the "detuned" vibrational coherence spectrum, which monitors frequencies between 100 and 400 cm(-1), and the lower frequency part of the Raman spectrum is also demonstrated. The very low frequency region ≤200 cm(-1), uniquely accessed by open-band VCS measurements, reveals a mode near 103 cm(-1) in P450(cam) when camphor is not present in the distal pocket. This reflects the presence of a specific heme distortion, such as saddling or ruffling, in the substrate-free state where water is coordinated to the low-spin iron atom. Such distortions are likely to retard the rate of electron transfer to the substrate-free protein. The presence of strong mode near ∼33 cm(-1) in the camphor-bound form suggests a significant heme-doming distortion, which is supported by analysis using normal coordinate structural decomposition. Pdx also displays a strong coherent vibration near 30 cm(-1) that in principle could be involved in vibrational resonance with its electron transfer target. A splitting of the 33 cm(-1) feature and intensification of a mode near 78 cm(-1) appear when the P450(cam)/Pdx complex is formed. These observations are consistent with vibrational mixing and heme geometric distortions upon Pdx binding that are coincident with the increased thiolate electron donation to the heme. The appearance of a mode near 65 cm(-1) in the coherence spectra of the L358P mutant is comparable to the mode at 78 cm(-1) seen in the P450(cam)/Pdx complex and is consistent with the view that the heme and its environment in the L358P mutant are similar to the Pdx-bound native protein. Resonance Raman spectra are presented for both P450(cam) and the L358P

  7. A porcine circovirus-2 mutant isolated in Brazil contains low-frequency substitutions in regions of immunoprotective epitopes in the capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Rafael Locatelli; Vidigal, Pedro Marcus Pereira; Gonzaga, Natalia F; de Souza, Luiz F L; Polêto, Marcelo D; Onofre, Thiago Souza; Eller, Monique R; Pereira, Carlos Eduardo Real; Fietto, Juliana L R; Bressan, Gustavo C; Guedes, Roberto M C; Almeida, Márcia R; Silva Júnior, Abelardo

    2015-11-01

    Porcine circovirus-2 (PCV2) is the etiologic agent of several diseases in pigs, including multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). In this work, a new mutant PCV2b was isolated from PMWS-affected pigs on a Brazilian farm. Its genome showed high sequence similarity (>99% identity) to those from a group of emerging mutants isolated from cases of PMWS outbreaks in vaccinated pigs in China, the USA and South Korea. Here, we show that these isolates share a combination of low-frequency substitutions (single amino acid polymorphisms with a frequency of ≤25%) in the viral capsid protein, mainly in regions of immunoprotective epitopes, and an additional lysine residue at position 234. These isolates were phylogenetically grouped in the PCV2b clade, reinforcing the idea of the emergence of a new group of mutants PCV2b associated with outbreaks worldwide. The identification of these polymorphisms in the viral capsid highlights the importance of considering these isolates for the development of more-effective vaccines. PMID:26271152

  8. High frequency oscillations in the intact brain

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, György; da Silva, Fernando Lopes

    2016-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs) constitute a novel trend in neurophysiology that is fascinating neuroscientists in general, and epileptologists in particular. But what are HFOs? What is the frequency range of HFOs? Are there different types of HFOs, physiological and pathological? How are HFOs generated? Can HFOs represent temporal codes for cognitive processes? These questions are pressing and this symposium volume attempts to give constructive answers. As a prelude to this exciting discussion, we summarize the physiological high frequency patterns in the intact brain, concentrating mainly on hippocampal patterns, where the mechanisms of high frequency oscillations are perhaps best understood. PMID:22449727

  9. Lightweight, high-frequency transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The 25-kVA space transformer was developed under contract by Thermal Technology Laboratory, Buffalo, N. Y. The NASA Lewis transformer technology program attempted to develop the baseline technology. For the 25-kVA transformer the input voltage was chosen as 200 V, the output voltage as 1500 V, the input voltage waveform as square wave, the duty cycle as continuous, the frequency range (within certain constraints) as 10 to 40 kHz, the operating temperatures as 85 deg. and 130 C, the baseplate temperature as 50 C, the equivalent leakage inductance as less than 10 micro-h, the operating environment as space, and the life expectancy as 10 years. Such a transformer can also be used for aircraft, ship and terrestrial applications.

  10. HIGH CURRENT RADIO FREQUENCY ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to a high current radio frequency ion source. A cylindrical plasma container has a coil disposed around the exterior surface thereof along the longitudinal axis. Means are provided for the injection of an unionized gas into the container and for applying a radio frequency signal to the coil whereby a radio frequency field is generated within the container parallel to the longitudinal axis thereof to ionize the injected gas. Cathode and anode means are provided for extracting transverse to the radio frequency field from an area midway between the ends of the container along the longitudinal axis thereof the ions created by said radio frequency field. (AEC)

  11. Longitudinal study of the in vivo hprt mutant frequency in human T-lymphocytes as determined by a cell cloning assay

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, J.P.; Sullivan, L.M.; Booker, J.K.; Pornelos, B.S.; Falta, M.T.; Greene, C.J.; Albertini, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo frequency of mutants resulting from mutation at the hprt locus in human T-lymphocytes can be determined by a cloning assay. This assay quantifies the frequency of 6-thioguanine-resistant (TG{sup r}) T-cells through growth of colonies in 96-well microtiter dishes. The reproducibility of the TG{sup r} mutant frequency values has now been assessed in a longitudinal study of six individuals employing 4-5 blood samples over a 26-37 week time period. Cloning assays were performed with both fresh and cryopreserved cell samples. No significant differences were found among the mutant frequency values for multiple samples from each individual with both fresh and cryopreserved cell samples. These results demonstrate the reproducibility of this cloning assay for in vivo mutant frequency determinations in human T-lymphocytes.

  12. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  13. Bilirubin UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) Gene Promoter Polymorphisms and HPRT, Glycophorin A, and Micronuclei Mutant Frequencies in Human Blood

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D; Hall, I J; Eastmond, D; Jones, I M; Bell, D A

    2004-10-06

    A dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-TA units) has been identified within the promoter region of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene (UGT1A1). The 7-TA repeat allele has been associated with elevated serum bilirubin levels that cause a mild hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert's syndrome). Studies suggest that promoter transcriptional activity of UGT1A1 is inversely related to the number of TA repeats and that unconjugated bilirubin concentration increases directly with the number of TA repeat elements. Because bilirubin is a known antioxidant, we hypothesized that UGT1A1 repeats associated with higher bilirubin may be protective against oxidative damage. We examined the effect of UGT1A1 genotype on somatic mutant frequency in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene in human lymphocytes and the glycophorin A (GPA) gene of red blood cells (both N0, NN mutants), and the frequency of lymphocyte micronuclei (both kinetochore (K) positive or micronuclei K negative) in 101 healthy smoking and nonsmoking individuals. As hypothesized, genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA displayed marginally lower GPA{_}NN mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). In contrast, our analysis showed that lower expressing UGT1A1 alleles (7-TA and 8-TA) were associated with modestly increased HPRT mutation frequency (p<0.05) while the same low expression genotypes were not significantly associated with micronuclei frequencies (K-positive or K-negative) when compared to high expression genotypes (5-TA and 6-TA). We found weak evidence that UGT1A1 genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA were associated with increased GPA{_}N0 mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). These data suggest that UGT1A1 genotype may modulate somatic mutation of some types, in some cell lineages, by a mechanism not involving bilirubin antioxidant activity. More detailed studies examining UGT1A1 promoter variation, oxidant/antioxidant balance and genetic

  14. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  15. Ultra-High-Frequency Capacitive Displacement Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.

    1994-01-01

    Improved class of compact, high-resolution capacitive displacement sensors operates at excitation frequency of 915 MHz and measures about 7.5 by 4 by 2 centimeters. Contains commercially available 915-MHz oscillator and transmission-line resonator. Resonator contains stripline inductor in addition to variable capacitor. Ultrahigh excitation frequency offers advantages of resolution and frequency response. Not deleteriously affected by mechanical overdriving, or contact between electrodes.

  16. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers.

    PubMed

    Vanapalli, S; ter Brake, H J M; Jansen, H V; Zhao, Y; Holland, H J; Burger, J F; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-04-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pressure oscillator is presented with the aim to power a micropulse tube cryocooler operating between 300 and 80 K, delivering a cooling power of 10 mW. Piezoelectric actuators operate efficiently at high frequencies and have high power density making them good candidates as drivers for high frequency pressure oscillator. The pressure oscillator described in this work consists of a membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator. A pressure ratio of about 1.11 was achieved with a filling pressure of 2.5 MPa and compression volume of about 22.6 mm(3) when operating the actuator with a peak-to-peak sinusoidal voltage of 100 V at a frequency of 1 kHz. The electrical power input was 2.73 W. The high pressure ratio and low electrical input power at high frequencies would herald development of microminiature cryocoolers. PMID:18447548

  17. Rapid genotyping assays for the 4-base pair deletion of canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene and low frequency of the mutant allele in Border Collie dogs.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yabuki, Akira; Kawamichi, Takuji; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, encoded by the MDR1 or ABCB1 gene, is an integral component of the blood-brain barrier as an efflux pump for xenobiotics crucial in limiting drug uptake into the central nervous system. Dogs homozygous for a 4-base pair deletion of the canine MDR1 gene show altered expression or function of P-glycoprotein, resulting in neurotoxicosis after administration of the substrate drugs. In the present study, the usefulness of microchip electrophoresis for genotyping assays detecting this deletion mutation was evaluated. Mutagenically separated polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) and real-time PCR assays were newly developed and evaluated. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of Border Collies dogs in Japan to determine the allele frequency in this breed. Microchip electrophoresis showed advantages in detection sensitivity and time saving over other modes of electrophoresis. The MS-PCR assay clearly discriminated all genotypes. Real-time PCR assay was most suitable for a large-scale survey due to its high throughput and rapidity. The genotyping survey demonstrated that the carrier and mutant allele frequencies were 0.49% and 0.25%, respectively, suggesting that the mutant allele frequency in Border Collies is markedly low compared to that in the susceptible dog breeds such as rough and smooth Collies. PMID:22362942

  18. Real-Time PCR Genotyping Assay for GM2 Gangliosidosis Variant 0 in Toy Poodles and the Mutant Allele Frequency in Japan

    PubMed Central

    RAHMAN, Mohammad Mahbubur; YABUKI, Akira; KOHYAMA, Moeko; MITANI, Sawane; MIZUKAMI, Keijiro; UDDIN, Mohammad Mejbah; CHANG, Hye-Sook; KUSHIDA, Kazuya; KISHIMOTO, Miori; YAMABE, Remi; YAMATO, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 (Sandhoff disease, SD) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the HEXB gene. In canine SD, a pathogenic mutation (c.283delG) of the canine HEXB gene has been identified in toy poodles. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR genotyping assay was developed and evaluated for rapid and large-scale genotyping and screening for this mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of toy poodles in Japan to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The real-time PCR assay clearly showed all genotypes of canine SD. The assay was suitable for large-scale survey as well as diagnosis, because of its high throughput and rapidity. The genotyping survey demonstrated a carrier frequency of 0.2%, suggesting that the current mutant allele frequency is low in Japan. However, there may be population stratification in different places, because of the founder effect by some carriers. Therefore, this new assay will be useful for the prevention and control of SD in toy poodles. PMID:24161966

  19. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  20. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  1. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  2. Stability Analysis of a High Fibre Yield and Low Lignin Content “Thick Stem” Mutant in Tossa Jute (Corchorus olitorius L.)

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Aninda; Datta, Animesh K.

    2014-01-01

    A “thick stem” mutant of Corchorus olitorius L. was induced at M2 (0.50%, 4 h, EMS) and the true breeding mutant is assessed across generations (M5 to M7) considering morphometric traits as well as SEM analysis of pollen grains and raw jute fibres, stem anatomy, cytogenetical attributes, and lignin content in relation to control. Furthermore, single fibre diameter and tensile strength are also analysed. The objective is to assess the stability of mutant for its effective exploration for raising a new plant type in tossa jute for commercial exploitation and efficient breeding. The mutant trait is monogenic recessive to normal. Results indicate that “thick stem” mutant is stable across generations (2n = 14) with distinctive high seed and fibre yield and significantly low lignin content. Stem anatomy of the mutant shows significant enhancement in fibre zone, number of fibre pyramids and fibre bundles per pyramid, and diameter of fibre cell in relation to control. Moreover, tensile strength of mutant fibre is significantly higher than control fibre and the trait is inversely related to fibre diameter. However the mutant is associated with low germination frequency, poor seed viability, and high pollen sterility, which may be eliminated through mutational approach followed by rigorous selection and efficient breeding. PMID:24860822

  3. Rapid, Sensitive, and Accurate Evaluation of Drug Resistant Mutant (NS5A-Y93H) Strain Frequency in Genotype 1b HCV by Invader Assay.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Satoshi; Ochi, Hidenori; Murakami, Eisuke; Uchida, Takuro; Kan, Hiromi; Akamatsu, Sakura; Hayes, C Nelson; Abe, Hiromi; Miki, Daiki; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Aikata, Hiroshi; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    Daclatasvir and asunaprevir dual oral therapy is expected to achieve high sustained virological response (SVR) rates in patients with HCV genotype 1b infection. However, presence of the NS5A-Y93H substitution at baseline has been shown to be an independent predictor of treatment failure for this regimen. By using the Invader assay, we developed a system to rapidly and accurately detect the presence of mutant strains and evaluate the proportion of patients harboring a pre-treatment Y93H mutation. This assay system, consisting of nested PCR followed by Invader reaction with well-designed primers and probes, attained a high overall assay success rate of 98.9% among a total of 702 Japanese HCV genotype 1b patients. Even in serum samples with low HCV titers, more than half of the samples could be successfully assayed. Our assay system showed a better lower detection limit of Y93H proportion than using direct sequencing, and Y93H frequencies obtained by this method correlated well with those of deep-sequencing analysis (r = 0.85, P <0.001). The proportion of the patients with the mutant strain estimated by this assay was 23.6% (164/694). Interestingly, patients with the Y93H mutant strain showed significantly lower ALT levels (p=8.8 x 10-4), higher serum HCV RNA levels (p=4.3 x 10-7), and lower HCC risk (p=6.9 x 10-3) than those with the wild type strain. Because the method is both sensitive and rapid, the NS5A-Y93H mutant strain detection system established in this study may provide important pre-treatment information valuable not only for treatment decisions but also for prediction of disease progression in HCV genotype 1b patients. PMID:26083687

  4. [Evaluation of penicillin expandase mutants and complex substrate inhibition characteristics at high concentrations of penicillin G].

    PubMed

    Wu, Linjun; Fan, Keqiang; Ji, Junjie; Yang, Keqian

    2015-12-01

    Penicillin expandase, also known as deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS), is an essential enzyme involved in cephalosporin C biosynthesis. To evaluate the catalytic behaviors of penicillin expandase under high penicillin G concentration and to identify mutants suitable for industrial applications, the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and several mutants with increased activities toward penicillin G were determined by HPLC under high penicillin G concentrations. Their specific activity profiles were compared with theoretical predictions by different catalytic dynamics models. We evaluated the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and previous reported high-activity mutants H4, H5, H6 and H7 at concentrations ranging from 5.6 to 500 mmol/L penicillin G. The specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and mutant H4 increased as penicillin G concentration increased, but decreased when concentrations of substrate go above 200 mmol/L. Other mutants H5, H6 and H7 showed more complex behaviors under high concentration of penicillin G. Among all tested enzymes, mutant H6 showed the highest activity when concentration of penicillin G is above 100 mmol/L. Our results revealed that the substrate inhibition to wild-type DAOCS' by penicillin G is noncompetitive. Other DAOCS mutants showed more complex trends in their specific activities at high concentration of penicillin G (>100 mmol/L), indicating more complex substrate inhibition mechanism might exist. The substrate inhibition and activity of DAOCS mutants at high penicillin G concentration provide important insight to help select proper mutants for industrial application. PMID:27093832

  5. Generation and Evaluation of High β-Glucan Producing Mutant Strains of Sparassis crispa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Rak; Kang, Hyeon-Woo

    2013-01-01

    A chemical mutagenesis technique was employed for development of mutant strains of Sparassis crispa targeting the shortened cultivation time and the high β-glucan content. The homogenized mycelial fragments of S. crispa IUM4010 strain were treated with 0.2 vol% methyl methanesulfonate, an alkylating agent, yielding 199 mutant strains. Subsequent screening in terms of growth and β-glucan content yielded two mutant strains, B4 and S7. Both mutants exhibited a significant increase in β-glucan productivity by producing 0.254 and 0.236 mg soluble β-glucan/mg dry cell weight for the B4 and S7 strains, respectively, whereas the wild type strain produced 0.102 mg soluble β-glucan/mg dry cell weight. The results demonstrate the usefulness of chemical mutagenesis for generation of mutant mushroom strains. PMID:24198672

  6. Isolation and Characterization of High-Osmolarity-Sensitive Mutants of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Hirofumi; Kawaura, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yamada, Hisami; Takegawa, Kaoru; Mizuno, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    For the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adaptation to high-osmolarity medium is mediated by a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade, involving the Wis1 MAP kinase kinase and the Sty1 MAP kinase. The MAP kinase pathway transduces an osmotic signal and accordingly regulates the expression of the downstream target gene (gpd1+) that encodes NADH-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in order to adaptively accumulate glycerol inside the cells as an osmoprotectant. We previously characterized a set of high-osmolarity-sensitive S. pombe mutants, including wis1, sty1, and gpd1. In this study, we attempted to further isolate novel osmolarity-sensitive mutants. For some of the mutants isolated, profiles of glycerol production in response to the osmolarity of the growth medium were indistinguishable from that of the wild-type cells, suggesting that they are novel types. They were classified into three distinct types genetically and, thus, were designated hos1, hos2, and hos3 (high osmolarity sensitive) mutants. One of them, the hos1 mutant, was characterized in detail. The hos1 mutant was demonstrated to have a mutational lesion in the known ryh1+ gene, which encodes a small GTP-binding protein. Disruption of the ryh1+ gene results not only in osmosensitivity but also in temperature sensitivity for growth. It was also found that the Δryh1 mutant is severely sterile. These results are discussed with special reference to the osmoadaptation of S. pombe. PMID:9748434

  7. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  8. Combinations of mutant FAD2 and FAD3 genes to produce high oleic acid and low linolenic acid soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High oleic acid soybeans were produced by combining a mutant FAD2-1A and a mutant FAD2-1B gene. Despite having a high oleic acid content, the linolenic acid content of these soybeans was in the range of 4-6%. Therefore, a study was conducted to incorporate one or two mutant FAD3 genes into the high ...

  9. High power radio frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Quentin A.; Miller, Harold W.

    1984-01-01

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  10. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.R.

    1993-03-23

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counter bores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counter bores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  11. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, Brian; McDaniel, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  12. High frequency electromagnetic response of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Schwartz, K.

    1971-01-01

    It is shown that the contribution of higher harmonics to the lunar transfer functions for the tangential components of the surface magnetic field is significant at frequencies greater than 0.01 Hz. The inclusion of the higher harmonics shows that there are two distinct transfer functions corresponding to the components of the tangential surface magnetic field perpendicular and parallel to the direction of the wave vector of the external disturbance forcing the lunar induction. The dependences of these transfer functions on frequency and location are determined. The effects of the higher harmonics can: (1) account for a hitherto unexplained feature in the Apollo 12-Explorer 35 transfer functions, namely the rolloff at high frequencies; and (2) offer a possible explanation for the frequency dependence of the difference between the transfer functions for the two orthogonal components of the surface magnetic field. The harmonic response of a simple current layer model of the moon is derived.

  13. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  14. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  15. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  16. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz(-1) at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz(-1) at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100 s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  17. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than −60 dBc Hz−1 at 10 Hz, −90 dBc Hz−1 at 100 Hz and −170 dBc Hz−1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10−10 at 1–100 s integration time—orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  18. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W.; Eliyahu, D.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Matsko, A. B.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2015-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10 GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60 dBc Hz-1 at 10 Hz, -90 dBc Hz-1 at 100 Hz and -170 dBc Hz-1 at 10 MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10-10 at 1-100 s integration time--orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption.

  19. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period. PMID:12199947

  20. Molecular characterization of KU70 and KU80 homologues and exploitation of a KU70-deficient mutant for improving gene deletion frequency in Rhodosporidium toruloides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhodosporidium toruloides is a β-carotenoid accumulating, oleaginous yeast that has great biotechnological potential. The lack of reliable and efficient genetic manipulation tools have been a major hurdle blocking its adoption as a biotechnology platform. Results We report for the first time the development of a highly efficient targeted gene deletion method in R. toruloides ATCC 10657 via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. To further improve targeting frequency, the KU70 and KU80 homologs in R. toruloides were isolated and characterized in detail. A KU70-deficient mutant (∆ku70e) generated with the hygromycin selection cassette removed by the Cre-loxP recombination system showed a dramatically improved targeted gene deletion frequency, with over 90% of the transformants being true knockouts when homology sequence length of at least 1 kb was used. Successful gene targeting could be made with homologous flanking sequences as short as 100 bp in the ∆ku70e strain. KU70 deficiency did not perturb cell growth although an elevated sensitivity to DNA mutagenic agents was observed. Compared to the other well-known oleaginous yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, R. toruloides KU70/KU80 genes contain much higher density of introns and are the most GC-rich KU70/KU80 genes reported. Conclusions The KU70-deficient mutant generated herein was effective in improving gene deletion frequency and allowed shorter homology sequences to be used for gene targeting. It retained the key oleaginous and fast growing features of R. toruloides. The strain should facilitate both fundamental and applied studies in this important yeast, with the approaches taken here likely to be applicable in other species in subphylum Pucciniomycotina. PMID:25188820

  1. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  2. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  3. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  4. High-frequency resonant-tunneling oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Calawa, A. R.; Manfra, M. J.; Chen, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in high-frequency resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) oscillators are described. Oscillations up to a frequency of 420 GHz have been achieved in the GaAs/AlAs system. Recent results obtained with In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs and InAs/AlSb RTDs show a greatly increased power density and indicate the potential for fundamental oscillations up to about 1 THz. These results are consistent with a lumped-element equivalent circuit model of the RTD. The model shows that the maximum oscillation frequency of the GaAs/AlAs RTDs is limited primarily by series resistance, and that the power density is limited by low peak-to-valley current ratio.

  5. High Frequency Laser-Based Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, R; Chinn, D; Balogun, O; Murray, T

    2005-09-12

    To obtain micrometer resolution of materials using acoustics requires frequencies around 1 GHz. Attenuation of such frequencies is high, limiting the thickness of the parts that can be characterized. Although acoustic microscopes can operate up to several GHz in frequency, they are used primarily as a surface characterization tool. The use of a pulsed laser for acoustic generation allows generation directly in the part, eliminating the loss of energy associated with coupling the energy from a piezoelectric transducer to the part of interest. The use of pulsed laser acoustic generation in combination with optical detection is investigated for the non-contact characterization of materials with features that must be characterized to micrometer resolution.

  6. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  7. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  8. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  9. Performance of annular high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Ivan A.

    This thesis presents studies of the behavior of miniature annular thermoacoustic prime movers and the imaging of the complex sound fields using PIV inside the small acoustic wave guides when driven by a temperature gradient. Thermoacoustic engines operating in the standing wave mode are limited in their acoustic efficiency by a high degree of irreversibility that is inherent in how they work. Better performance can be achieved by using traveling waves in the thermoacoustic devices. This has led to the development of an annular high frequency thermoacoustic prime mover consisting of a regenerator, which is a random stack in-between a hot and cold heat exchanger, inside an annular waveguide. Miniature devices were developed and studied with operating frequencies in the range of 2-4 kHz. This corresponds to an average ring circumference of 11 cm for the 3 kHz device, the resonator bore being 6 mm. A similar device of 11 mm bore, length of 18 cm was also investigated; its resonant frequency was 2 kHz. Sound intensities as high as 166.8 dB were generated with limited heat input. Sound power was extracted from the annular structure by an impedance-matching side arm. The nature of the acoustic wave generated by heat was investigated using a high speed PIV instrument. Although the acoustic device appears symmetric, its performance is characterized by a broken symmetry and by perturbations that exist in its structure. Effects of these are observed in the PIV imaging; images show axial and radial components. Moreover, PIV studies show effects of streaming and instabilities which affect the devices' acoustic efficiency. The acoustic efficiency is high, being of 40% of Carnot. This type of device shows much promise as a high efficiency energy converter; it can be reduced in size for microcircuit applications.

  10. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  11. High frequency stimulation can block axonal conduction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Alicia L; Durand, Dominique M

    2009-11-01

    High frequency stimulation (HFS) is used to control abnormal neuronal activity associated with movement, seizure, and psychiatric disorders. Yet, the mechanisms of its therapeutic action are not known. Although experimental results have shown that HFS suppresses somatic activity, other data has suggested that HFS could generate excitation of axons. Moreover it is unclear what effect the stimulation has on tissue surrounding the stimulation electrode. Electrophysiological and computational modeling literature suggests that HFS can drive axons at the stimulus frequency. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that unlike cell bodies, axons are driven by pulse train HFS. This hypothesis was tested in fibers of the hippocampus both in-vivo and in-vitro. Our results indicate that although electrical stimulation could activate and drive axons at low frequencies (0.5-25 Hz), as the stimulus frequency increased, electrical stimulation failed to continuously excite axonal activity. Fiber tracts were unable to follow extracellular pulse trains above 50 Hz in-vitro and above 125 Hz in-vivo. The number of cycles required for failure was frequency dependent but independent of stimulus amplitude. A novel in-vitro preparation was developed, in which, the alveus was isolated from the remainder of the hippocampus slice. The isolated fiber tract was unable to follow pulse trains above 75 Hz. Reversible conduction block occurred at much higher stimulus amplitudes, with pulse train HFS (>150 Hz) preventing propagation through the site of stimulation. This study shows that pulse train HFS affects axonal activity by: (1) disrupting HFS evoked excitation leading to partial conduction block of activity through the site of HFS; and (2) generating complete conduction block of secondary evoked activity, as HFS amplitude is increased. These results are relevant for the interpretation of the effects of HFS for the control of abnormal neural activity such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. PMID

  12. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  13. High power and high SFDR frequency conversion using sum frequency generation in KTP waveguides.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Russell J; Brewer, Tyler; Barber, Zeb W

    2016-08-01

    We characterize the intermodulation distortion of high power and efficient frequency conversion of modulated optical signals based on sum frequency generation (SFG) in a periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) waveguide. Unwanted frequency two-tone spurs are generated near the converted signal via a three-step cascaded three-wave mixing process. Computer simulations describing the process are presented along with the experimental measurements. High-conversion efficiencies and large spur-free dynamic range of the converted optical signal are demonstrated. PMID:27472638

  14. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  15. High-level production of extracellular lipase by Yarrowia lipolytica mutants from methyl oleate.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Farshad; Destain, Jacqueline; Nahvi, Iraj; Thonart, Philippe; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid

    2011-10-01

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica degrades efficiently low-cost hydrophobic substrates for the production of various added-value products such as lipases. To obtain yeast strains producing high levels of extracellular lipase, Y. lipolytica DSM3286 was subjected to mutation using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and ultraviolet (UV) light. Twenty mutants were selected out of 1600 mutants of Y. lipolytica treated with EMS and UV based on lipase production ability on selective medium. A new industrial medium containing methyl oleate was optimized for lipase production. In the 20 L bioreactor containing new industrial medium, one UV mutant (U6) produced 356 U/mL of lipase after 24h, which is about 10.5-fold higher than that produced by the wild type strain. The properties of the mutant lipase were the same as those of the wild type: molecular weight 38 kDa, optimum temperature 37°C and optimum pH 7. Furthermore, the nucleotide sequences of extracellular lipase gene (LIP2) in wild type and mutant strains were determined. Only two silent substitutions at 362 and 385 positions were observed in the ORF region of LIP2. Two single substitutions and two duplications of the T nucleotide were also detected in the promoter region. LIP2 sequence comparison of the Y. lipolytica DSM3286 and U6 strains shows good targets to effective DNA recombinant for extracellular lipase of Y. lipolytica. PMID:21324386

  16. Adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii high-CO sub 2 -requiring mutants to limiting CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Spalding, M.H. )

    1989-07-01

    Photosynthetic characteristics of four high-CO{sub 2}-requiring mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were compared to those of wild type before and after a 24-hour exposure to limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations. The four mutants represent two loci involved in the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system of this unicellular alga. All mutants had a lower photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon than did the wild type when grown at an elevated CO{sub 2} concentration, indicating that the genetic lesion in each is expressed even at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations. Wild type and all four mutants exhibited adaptive responses to limiting CO{sub 2} characteristic of the induction of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system, resulting in an increased affinity for inorganic carbon only in wild type. Although other components of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system were induced in these mutants, the defective component in each was sufficient to prevent any increase in the affinity for inorganic carbon. It was concluded that the genes corresponding to the ca-1 and pmp-1 loci exhibit at least partially constitutive expression and that all components of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system may be required to significantly affect the photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon.

  17. Application of high-resolution single-channel recording to functional studies of cystic fibrosis mutants.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhiwei; Sohma, Yoshiro; Bompadre, Silvia G; Sheppard, David N; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique is a powerful and versatile method to investigate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel, its malfunction in disease and modulation by small molecules. Here, we discuss how the molecular behaviour of CFTR is investigated using high-resolution single-channel recording and kinetic analyses of channel gating. We review methods used to quantify how cystic fibrosis (CF) mutants perturb the biophysical properties and regulation of CFTR. By explaining the relationship between macroscopic and single-channel currents, we demonstrate how single-channel data provide molecular explanations for changes in CFTR-mediated transepithelial ion transport elicited by CF mutants. PMID:21594800

  18. Application of High-Resolution Single-Channel Recording to Functional Studies of Cystic Fibrosis Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhiwei; Sohma, Yoshiro; Bompadre, Silvia G.; Sheppard, David N.; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique is a powerful and versatile method to investigate the cystic fibrosis transmem-brane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel, its malfunction in disease and modulation by small molecules. Here, we discuss how the molecular behaviour of CFTR is investigated using high-resolution single-channel recording and kinetic analyses of channel gating. We review methods used to quantify how cystic fibrosis (CF) mutants perturb the biophysical properties and regulation of CFTR. By explaining the relationship between macroscopic and single-channel currents, we demonstrate how single-channel data provide molecular explanations for changes in CFTR-mediated transepithelial ion transport elicited by CF mutants. PMID:21594800

  19. Isolation and characterization of high-temperature-induced Dauer formation mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Ailion, Michael; Thomas, James H

    2003-01-01

    Dauer formation in Caenorhabditis elegans is regulated by at least three signaling pathways, including an insulin receptor-signaling pathway. These pathways were defined by mutants that form dauers constitutively (Daf-c) at 25 degrees. Screens for Daf-c mutants at 25 degrees have probably been saturated, but failed to identify all the components involved in regulating dauer formation. Here we screen for Daf-c mutants at 27 degrees, a more strongly dauer-inducing condition. Mutations identified include novel classes of alleles for three known genes and alleles defining at least seven new genes, hid-1-hid-7. Many of the genes appear to act in the insulin branch of the dauer pathway, including pdk-1, akt-1, aex-6, and hid-1. We also molecularly identify hid-1 and show that it encodes a novel highly conserved putative transmembrane protein expressed in neurons. PMID:14504222

  20. High-efficiency generation of RNAi mutants of apple by use of multi-vector transformation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high-efficiency transformation and selection system was used to create apple RNAi mutants for determination of function of candidate genes in resistance of apple to Erwinia amylovora (fire blight). The M.26 apple genotype was transformed with a mixture of five RNAi EST-silencing vectors in each t...

  1. High frequency plasma generator for ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goede, H.; Divergilio, W. F.; Fosnight, V. V.; Komatsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program to experimentally develop two new types of plasma generators for 30 cm electrostatic argon ion thrusters are presented. The two plasma generating methods selected for this study were by radio frequency induction (RFI), operating at an input power frequency of 1 MHz, and by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) at an operating frequency of 5.0 GHz. Both of these generators utilize multiline cusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement and beam profile optimization. The program goals were to develop a plasma generator possessing the characteristics of high electrical efficiency (low eV/ion) and simplicity of operation while maintaining the reliability and durability of the conventional hollow cathode plasma sources. The RFI plasma generator has achieved minimum discharge losses of 120 eV/ion while the ECH generator has obtained 145 eV/ion, assuming a 90% ion optical transparency of the electrostatic acceleration system. Details of experimental tests with a variety of magnet configurations are presented.

  2. High-frequency graphene voltage amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Shu-Jen; Jenkins, Keith A; Valdes Garcia, Alberto; Franklin, Aaron D; Bol, Ageeth A; Haensch, Wilfried

    2011-09-14

    While graphene transistors have proven capable of delivering gigahertz-range cutoff frequencies, applying the devices to RF circuits has been largely hindered by the lack of current saturation in the zero band gap graphene. Herein, the first high-frequency voltage amplifier is demonstrated using large-area chemical vapor deposition grown graphene. The graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has a 6-finger gate design with gate length of 500 nm. The graphene common-source amplifier exhibits ∼5 dB low frequency gain with the 3 dB bandwidth greater than 6 GHz. This first AC voltage gain demonstration of a GFET is attributed to the clear current saturation in the device, which is enabled by an ultrathin gate dielectric (4 nm HfO(2)) of the embedded gate structures. The device also shows extrinsic transconductance of 1.2 mS/μm at 1 V drain bias, the highest for graphene FETs using large-scale graphene reported to date. PMID:21805988

  3. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  4. High Frequency Self-pulsing Microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassalle, John; Pollard, William; Staack, David

    2014-10-01

    Pulsing behavior in high-pressure microplasmas was studied. Microplasmas are of interest because of potential application in plasma switches for robust electronics. These devices require fast switching. Self-pulsing microplasmas were generated in a variable-length spark gap at pressures between 0 and 220 psig in Air, Ar, N2, H2, and He for spark gap lengths from 15 to 1810 μm. Resulting breakdown voltages varied between 90 and 1500 V. Voltage measurements show pulse frequencies as high as 8.9 MHz in argon at 100 psig. These findings demonstrate the potential for fast switching of plasma switches that incorporate high-pressure microplasmas. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant #1057175, and the Department of Defense, ARO Grant #W911NF1210007.

  5. High frequency ultrasonic mitigation of microbial corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almahamedh, Hussain H.; Meegan, G. Douglas; Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.; Spear, John R.

    2012-05-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a major problem in oil industry facilities, and considerable effort has been spent to mitigate this costly issue. More environmentally benign methods are under consideration as alternatives to biocides, among which are ultrasonic techniques. In this study, a high frequency ultrasonic technique (HFUT) was used as a mitigation method for MIC. The killing percentages of the HFUT were higher than 99.8 percent and their corrosivity on steel was reduced by more than 50 percent. The practice and result will be discussed.

  6. Inviscid fluid in high frequency excitation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of high frequency excitations (HFE) on a fluid is investigated. The response to these excitations is decomposed in two parts: 'slow' motion, which practically remains unchanged during the vanishingly small period tau, and 'fast' motion whose value during this period is negligible in terms of displacements, but is essential in terms of the kinetic energy. After such a decomposition the 'slow' and 'fast' motions become nonlinearly coupled by the corresponding governing equations. This coupling leads to an 'effective' potential energy which imparts some 'elastic' properties to the fluid and stabilizes laminar flows.

  7. High-throughput transformation method for Yarrowia lipolytica mutant library screening.

    PubMed

    Leplat, Christophe; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Rossignol, Tristan

    2015-09-01

    As a microorganism of major biotechnological importance, the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is subjected to intensive genetic engineering and functional genomic analysis. Future advancements in this area, however, require a system that will generate a large collection of mutants for high-throughput screening. Here, we report a rapid and efficient method for high-throughput transformation of Y. lipolytica in 96-well plates. We developed plasmids and strains for the large-scale screening of overexpression mutant strains, using Gateway® vectors that were adapted for specific locus integration in Y. lipolytica. As an example, a collection of mutants that overexpressed the alkaline extracellular protease (AEP) was obtained in a single transformation experiment. The platform strain that we developed to receive the overexpression cassette was designed to constitutively express a fluorescent protein as a convenient growth reporter for screening in non-translucid media. An example of growth comparison in skim milk-based medium between AEP overexpression and deletion mutants is provided. PMID:26100263

  8. A fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based strategy for rapid isolation of high-lipid Chlamydomonas mutants

    PubMed Central

    Terashima, Mia; Freeman, Elizabeth S; Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in farming algae for the direct production of biofuels and valuable lipids. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the leading model system for studying lipid metabolism in green algae, but current methods for isolating mutants of this organism with a perturbed lipid content are slow and tedious. Here, we present the Chlamydomonas high-lipid sorting (CHiLiS) strategy, which enables enrichment of high-lipid mutants by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of pooled mutants stained with the lipid-sensitive dye Nile Red. This method only takes 5 weeks from mutagenesis to mutant isolation. We developed a staining protocol that allows quantification of lipid content while preserving cell viability. We improved separation of high-lipid mutants from the wild type by using each cell's chlorophyll fluorescence as an internal control. We initially demonstrated 20-fold enrichment of the known high-lipid mutant sta1 from a mixture of sta1 and wild-type cells. We then applied CHiLiS to sort thousands of high-lipid cells from a pool of about 60 000 mutants. Flow cytometry analysis of 24 individual mutants isolated by this approach revealed that about 50% showed a reproducible high-lipid phenotype. We further characterized nine of the mutants with the highest lipid content by flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry lipidomics. All mutants analyzed had a higher triacylglycerol content and perturbed whole-cell fatty acid composition. One arbitrarily chosen mutant was evaluated by microscopy, revealing larger lipid droplets than the wild type. The unprecedented throughput of CHiLiS opens the door to a systems-level understanding of green algal lipid biology by enabling genome-saturating isolation of mutants in key genes. PMID:25267488

  9. High frequency homogenization for structural mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolde, E.; Craster, R. V.; Kaplunov, J.

    2011-03-01

    We consider a net created from elastic strings as a model structure to investigate the propagation of waves through semi-discrete media. We are particularly interested in the development of continuum models, valid at high frequencies, when the wavelength and each cell of the net are of similar order. Net structures are chosen as these form a general two-dimensional example, encapsulating the essential physics involved in the two-dimensional excitation of a lattice structure whilst retaining the simplicity of dealing with elastic strings. Homogenization techniques are developed here for wavelengths commensurate with the cellular scale. Unlike previous theories, these techniques are not limited to low frequency or static regimes, and lead to effective continuum equations valid on a macroscale with the details of the cellular structure encapsulated only through integrated quantities. The asymptotic procedure is based upon a two-scale approach and the physical observation that there are frequencies that give standing waves, periodic with the period or double-period of the cell. A specific example of a net created by a lattice of elastic strings is constructed, the theory is general and not reliant upon the net being infinite, none the less the infinite net is a useful special case for which Bloch theory can be applied. This special case is explored in detail allowing for verification of the theory, and highlights the importance of degenerate cases; the specific example of a square net is treated in detail. An additional illustration of the versatility of the method is the response to point forcing which provides a stringent test of the homogenized equations; an exact Green's function for the net is deduced and compared to the asymptotics.

  10. Characterization of subcellular morphology of single yeast cells using high frequency microfluidic impedance cytometer.

    PubMed

    Haandbæk, Niels; Bürgel, Sebastian C; Heer, Flavio; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Single-cell impedance cytometry is an electrical analysis method, which has been used to count and discriminate cells on the basis of their dielectric properties. The method has several advantages, such as being label free and requiring minimal sample preparation. So far, however, it has been limited to measuring cell properties that are visible at low frequencies, such as size and membrane capacitance. We demonstrate a microfluidic single cell impedance cytometer capable of dielectric characterization of single cells at frequencies up to 500 MHz. This device features a more than ten-fold increased frequency range compared to other devices and enables the study of both low and high frequency dielectric properties in parallel. The increased frequency range potentially allows for characterization of subcellular features in addition to the properties that are visible at lower frequencies. The capabilities of the cytometer are demonstrated by discriminating wild-type yeast from a mutant, which differs in size and distribution of vacuoles in the intracellular fluid. This discrimination is based on the differences in dielectric properties at frequencies around 250 MHz. The results are compared to a 3D finite-element model of the microfluidic channel accommodating either a wild-type or a mutant yeast cell. The model is used to derive quantitative values to characterize the dielectric properties of the cells. PMID:24264643

  11. High-frequency laser sonar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Sarma, Ashwin; Kirsteins, Ivars P.

    2002-11-01

    A set of measurements recently completed at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) demonstrated that a laser-based sonar system can be used to detect acoustic particle velocity on the surface of a thin acoustically-compliant plate embedded beneath a standard acoustic window. The theoretical acoustic and measured surface particle velocity varied by less than 1 dB (reference m/s) over a wide frequency band (10 kHz to 100 kHz). However, the Polytec Model PSV-100 Scanning Laser Vibrometer System (SLVS) used in the experiments had relatively poor acoustic sensitivity, presumably due to high electronic noise, speckle noise, stand-off distance, and drifting laser focus. The laser's acoustic sensitivity appears to be inversely proportional to the backscatter signal level. The existing SLVS can sample a grid of 512 by 512 points, with each grid point having a spot size of approximately 10 mm (0.0004 in.). Such fine sampling may be used to create essentially a continuous aperture, eliminating acoustic grating lobes at all frequencies of practical sonar interest.

  12. Frequency metrology using highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the scaling laws of relativistic fine structure splitting, many forbidden optical transitions appear within the ground state configurations of highly charged ions (HCI). In some hydrogen-like ions, even the hyperfine splitting of the 1s ground state gives rise to optical transitions. Given the very low polarizability of HCI, such laser-accessible transitions are extremely impervious to external perturbations and systematics that limit optical clock performance and arise from AC and DC Stark effects, such as black-body radiation and light shifts. Moreover, AC and DC Zeeman splitting are symmetric due to the much larger relativistic spin-orbit coupling and corresponding fine-structure splitting. Appropriate choice of states or magnetic sub-states with suitable total angular momentum and magnetic quantum numbers can lead to a cancellation of residual quadrupolar shifts. All these properties are very advantageous for the proposed use of HCI forbidden lines as optical frequency standards. Extremely magnified relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, and nuclear size contributions to the binding energies of the optically active electrons make HCI ideal tools for fundamental research, as in proposed studies of a possible time variation of the fine structure constant. Beyond this, HCI that cannot be photoionized by vacuum-ultraviolet photons could also provide frequency standards for future lasers operating in that range.

  13. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Liqiu, Wei E-mail: weiliqiu@hit.edu.cn; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-07

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  14. Modulating action of low frequency oscillations on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liqiu, Wei; Liang, Han; Ziyi, Yang; Jing, Li; Yong, Cao; Daren, Yu; Jianhua, Du

    2015-02-01

    It is found that the low frequency oscillations have modulating action on high frequency instabilities in Hall thrusters. The physical mechanism of this modulation is discussed and verified by numerical simulations. Theoretical analyses indicate that the wide-range fluctuations of plasma density and electric field associated with the low frequency oscillations affect the electron drift velocity and anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. The amplitude and frequency of high frequency oscillations are modulated by low frequency oscillations, which show the periodic variation in the time scale of low frequency oscillations.

  15. Electronic structure of the primary electron donor of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutants : high field EPR study.

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, N. S.; Poluektov, O. G.; Bylina, E. J.; Norris, J. R.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-09-01

    High-field electron paramagnetic resonance (HF EPR) has been employed to investigate the primary electron donor electronic structure of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutant reaction centers (RCs). In these mutants the amino acid substitution His(M200)Leu or His(L173)Leu eliminates a ligand to the primary electron donor, resulting in the loss of a magnesium in one of the constituent bacteriochlorophylls (BChl). Thus, the native BChl/BChl homodimer primary donor is converted into a BChl/bacteriopheophytin (BPhe) heterodimer. The heterodimer primary donor radical in chemically oxidized RCs exhibits a broadened EPR line indicating a highly asymmetric distribution of the unpaired electron over both dimer constituents. Observed triplet state EPR signals confirm localization of the excitation on the BChl half of the heterodimer primary donor. Theoretical simulation of the triplet EPR lineshapes clearly shows that, in the case of mutants, triplet states are formed by an intersystem crossing mechanism in contrast to the radical pair mechanism in wild type RCs. Photooxidation of the mutant RCs results in formation of a BPhe anion radical within the heterodimer pair. The accumulation of an intradimer BPhe anion is caused by the substantial loss of interaction between constituents of the heterodimer primary donor along with an increase in the reduction potential of the heterodimer primary donor D/D{sup +} couple. This allows oxidation of the cytochrome even at cryogenic temperatures and reduction of each constituent of the heterodimer primary donor individually. Despite a low yield of primary donor radicals, the enhancement of the semiquinone-iron pair EPR signals in these mutants indicates the presence of kinetically viable electron donors.

  16. A few key residues determine the high redox potential shift in azurin mutants.

    PubMed

    Zanetti-Polzi, Laura; Bortolotti, Carlo A; Daidone, Isabella; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea; Corni, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    The wide range of variability of the reduction potential (E(0)) of blue-copper proteins has been the subject of a large number of studies in the past several years. In particular, a series of azurin mutants have been recently rationally designed tuning E(0) over a very broad range (700 mV) without significantly altering the redox-active site [Marshall et al., Nature, 2009, 462, 113]. This clearly suggests that interactions outside the primary coordination sphere are relevant to determine E(0) in cupredoxins. However, the molecular determinants of the redox potential variability are still undisclosed. Here, by means of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and hybrid quantum/classical calculations, the mechanisms that determine the E(0) shift of two azurin mutants with high potential shifts are unravelled. The reduction potentials of native azurin and of the mutants are calculated obtaining results in good agreement with the experiments. The analysis of the simulations reveals that only a small number of residues (including non-mutated ones) are relevant in determining the experimentally observed E(0) variation via site-specific, but diverse, mechanisms. These findings open the path to the rational design of new azurin mutants with different E(0). PMID:26381463

  17. Highly Branched Phenotype of the Petunia dad1-1 Mutant Is Reversed by Grafting.

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, C.

    1996-01-01

    The recessive dad1-1 allele conditions a highly branched growth habit resulting from a proliferation of first- and second-order branches. Unlike the wild-type parent, which has lateral branching delayed until the third or fourth leaf node distal to the cotyledons, dad1-1 initiates lateral branching from each cotyledon axil. In addition to initiating lateral branching sooner than the wild type, dad1-1 sustains branching through more nodes on the main shoot axis than the wild type. In keeping with a propensity for branching at basal nodes, dad1-1 produces second-order branches at the proximal-most nodes on first-order branches and small shoots from accessory buds at basal nodes on the main shoot axis. Additional traits associated with the mutation are late flowering, adventitious root formation, shortened internodes, and mild leaf chlorosis. Graft studies show that a dad1-1 scion, when grafted onto wild-type stock, is converted to a phenotype resembling the wild type. Furthermore, a small wild-type interstock fragment inserted between a mutant root stock and a mutant scion is sufficient to convert the dad1-1 scion from mutant to a near wild-type appearance. The recessive dad1-1 phenotype combines traits associated with cytokinin overexpression, auxin overexpression, and gibberellin limitation, which suggests a complex interaction of hormones in establishing the mutant phenotype. PMID:12226274

  18. Inline high frequency ultrasonic particle sizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, F.; Petit, J.; Nassar, G.; Debreyne, P.; Delaplace, G.; Nongaillard, B.

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports the development of a new method of particle sizing in a liquid. This method uses high frequency focused ultrasounds to detect particles crossing the focal zone of an ultrasonic sensor and to determine their size distribution by processing the reflected echoes. The major advantage of this technique compared to optical sizing methods is its ability to measure the size of particles suspended in an opaque liquid without any dedicated sample preparation. Validations of ultrasonic measurements were achieved on suspensions of polymethyl methacrylate beads in a size range extending from a few micrometer to several hundred micrometer with a temporal resolution of 1 s. The inline detection of aggregate formation was also demonstrated.

  19. High frequency oscillators for chaotic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, A. N.; Blakely, J. N.; Corron, N. J.; Dean, R. N.

    2016-05-01

    This work focuses on implementing a class of exactly solvable chaotic oscillators at speeds that allow real world radar applications. The implementation of a chaotic radar using a solvable system has many advantages due to the generation of aperiodic, random-like waveforms with an analytic representation. These advantages include high range resolution, no range ambiguity, and spread spectrum characteristics. These systems allow for optimal detection of a noise-like signal by the means of a linear matched filter using simple and inexpensive methods. This paper outlines the use of exactly solvable chaos in ranging systems, while addressing electronic design issues related to the frequency dependence of the system's stretching function introduced by the use of negative impedance converters (NICs).

  20. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.

    1981-02-08

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (10/sup 70/K) and an electron density N = 3 x 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm/sup 3/ and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup -3/). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  1. High Power Third Gyroharmonic Frequency Multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, M. A.; Ganguly, A. K.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao; Yoder, R. B.; Wang, Mei

    1998-11-01

    A high power freqeuncy multplier which uses a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA)(M.A. LaPointe, R.B. Yoder, Changbiao Wang, A.K. Ganguly and J.L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. Lett., 76), 2718 (1996) and a third harmonic, TE_311 cavity is being tested. Primary power at 2.856 GHz is used to accelerate a 20--30 A, 75--96kV electron beam up to 320 kV in a CARA. The prepared beam interacts with the TE_311 cavity tuned to the third harmonic of the drive frequency. Simulations show that conversion efficiencies from beam power to microwave power can be as high as 48% producing up to 4.5 MW of 8.568 GHz power. Experiments to date have shown under certain conditions only third harmonic radiation has been generated with a FWHM of 350 kHz, the Fourier limit for the length of the radiation pulse. High power experiments are underway to measure the efficiency of the device.

  2. High relatedness maintains multicellular cooperation in a social amoeba by controlling cheater mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Owen M.; Foster, Kevin R.; Mehdiabadi, Natasha J.; Strassmann, Joan E.; Queller, David C.

    2007-01-01

    The control of cheating is important for understanding major transitions in evolution, from the simplest genes to the most complex societies. Cooperative systems can be ruined if cheaters that lower group productivity are able to spread. Kin-selection theory predicts that high genetic relatedness can limit cheating, because separation of cheaters and cooperators limits opportunities to cheat and promotes selection against low-fitness groups of cheaters. Here, we confirm this prediction for the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum; relatedness in natural wild groups is so high that socially destructive cheaters should not spread. We illustrate in the laboratory how high relatedness can control a mutant that would destroy cooperation at low relatedness. Finally, we demonstrate that, as predicted, mutant cheaters do not normally harm cooperation in a natural population. Our findings show how altruism is preserved from the disruptive effects of such mutant cheaters and how exceptionally high relatedness among cells is important in promoting the cooperation that underlies multicellular development. PMID:17496139

  3. High frequency of tumours in Mulibrey nanism.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Niklas; Karlberg, Susann; Karikoski, Riitta; Mikkola, Sakari; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Jalanko, Hannu

    2009-06-01

    Mulibrey nanism (MUL) is a monogenic disorder with prenatal-onset growth failure, typical clinical characteristics, cardiopathy and tendency for a metabolic syndrome. It is caused by recessive mutations in the TRIM37 gene encoding for the peroxisomal TRIM37 protein with ubiquitin-ligase activity. In this work, the frequency and pathology of malignant and benign tumours were analysed in a national cohort of 89 Finnish MUL patients aged 0.7-76 years. The subjects had a clinical and radiological evaluation, and histological and immunohistocemical analyses on specimens obtained from biopsy, surgery or autopsy, were performed. The results show that the MUL patients have disturbed architecture with ectopic tissues and a high frequency of both benign and malignant tumours detectable in several internal organs. A total of 210 tumorous lesions were detected in 66/89 patients (74%). Fifteen malignancies occurred in 13 patients (15%), seven of them in the kidney (five Wilms' tumours), three in the thyroid gland, two gynaecological cancers, one gastrointestinal carcinoid tumour, one neuropituitary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and one case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Tumours detected by radiology in the liver and other organs mainly comprised strongly dilated blood vessels (peliosis), vascularized cysts and nodular lesions. The lesions showed strong expression of the endothelial cell markers CD34 and CD31 as well as the myocyte marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). Our findings show that MUL is associated with frequent malignant tumours and benign adenomatous and vascular lesions, as well as disturbed organ development. PMID:19334051

  4. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  5. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  6. ENGLISH WORDS OF VERY HIGH FREQUENCY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARD, WILLIAM; MCDAVID, VIRGINIA

    THE BIAS OF THE FREQUENCY OF THE 122 MOST COMMONLY USED ENGLISH WORDS WAS STUDIED. THE METHOD USED TO ASSEMBLE THESE DATA IS DESCRIBED FULLY. THE MOST FREQUENTLY USED WORDS WERE TAKEN FROM A DISSERTATION BY GEORGE K. MONROE, "PHONEMIC TRANSCRIPTION OF GRAPHIC POSTBASE AFFIXES IN ENGLISH," GODFREY DEWEY, "RELATIVE FREQUENCY OF ENGLISH SPEECH…

  7. Analysis on the DNA Fingerprinting of Aspergillus Oryzae Mutant Induced by High Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Fan; Wang, Kai; Shen, Si-Le; Liu, Bing-Bing; Zou, Bo; Zou, Guang-Tian

    2011-01-01

    The mutant strains of aspergillus oryzae (HP300a) are screened under 300 MPa for 20 min. Compared with the control strains, the screened mutant strains have unique properties such as genetic stability, rapid growth, lots of spores, and high protease activity. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) are used to analyze the DNA fingerprinting of HP300a and the control strains. There are 67.9% and 51.3% polymorphic bands obtained by these two markers, respectively, indicating significant genetic variations between HP300a and the control strains. In addition, comparison of HP300a and the control strains, the genetic distances of random sequence and simple sequence repeat of DNA are 0.51 and 0.34, respectively.

  8. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  9. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mansfield, Dennis K.; Vocaturo, Michael; Guttadora, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  10. A High Frequency Model of Cascade Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1998-01-01

    Closed form asymptotic expressions for computing high frequency noise generated by an annular cascade in an infinite duct containing a uniform flow are presented. There are two new elements in this work. First, the annular duct mode representation does not rely on the often-used Bessel function expansion resulting in simpler expressions for both the radial eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the duct. In particular, the new representation provides an explicit approximate formula for the radial eigenvalues obviating the need for solutions of the transcendental annular duct eigenvalue equation. Also, the radial eigenfunctions are represented in terms of exponentials eliminating the numerical problems associated with generating the Bessel functions on a computer. The second new element is the construction of an unsteady response model for an annular cascade. The new construction satisfies the boundary conditions on both the cascade and duct walls simultaneously adding a new level of realism to the noise calculations. Preliminary results which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new elements are presented. A discussion of the utility of the asymptotic formulas for calculating cascade discrete tone as well as broadband noise is also included.

  11. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma-ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997.6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma-ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 deg of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 deg of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma-ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  12. A glutathione reductase mutant of yeast accumulates high levels of oxidized glutathione and requires thioredoxin for growth.

    PubMed Central

    Muller, E G

    1996-01-01

    A glutathione reductase null mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was isolated in a synthetic lethal genetic screen for mutations which confer a requirement for thioredoxin. Yeast mutants that lack glutathione reductase (glr1 delta) accumulate high levels of oxidized glutathione and have a twofold increase in total glutathione. The disulfide form of glutathione increases 200-fold and represents 63% of the total glutathione in a glr1 delta mutant compared with only 6% in wild type. High levels of oxidized glutathione are also observed in a trx1 delta, trx2 delta double mutant (22% of total), in a glr1 delta, trx1 delta double mutant (71% of total), and in a glr1 delta, trx2 delta double mutant (69% of total). Despite the exceptionally high ratio of oxidized/reduced glutathione, the glr1 delta mutant grows with a normal cell cycle. However, either one of the two thioredoxins is essential for growth. Cells lacking both thioredoxins and glutathione reductase are not viable under aerobic conditions and grow poorly anaerobically. In addition, the glr1 delta mutant shows increased sensitivity to the thiol oxidant diamide. The sensitivity to diamide was suppressed by deletion of the TRX2 gene. The genetic analysis of thioredoxin and glutathione reductase in yeast runs counter to previous studies in Escherichia coli and for the first time links thioredoxin with the redox state of glutathione in vivo. Images PMID:8930901

  13. Reversible tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Walsh, R M; Bath, A P; Bance, M L

    2000-01-01

    We report an unusual case of tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity with subsequent clinical and objective evidence of functional recovery. In those patients with a clinical presentation suggestive of aminoglycoside-induced bilateral vestibular toxicity (ataxia and oscillopsia) and normal low-frequency (ENG-caloric) responses, high-frequency rotation chair testing should be performed to exclude a high-frequency vestibular deficit. PMID:10810261

  14. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Rob; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the power frequencies for the doubled fiber laser. It includes information on the 780 nm laser, second harmonic generation in one crystal, cascading crystals, the tenability of laser systems, laser cooling, and directions for future work.

  15. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  16. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  17. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  18. Near infrared frequency dependence of high-order sideband generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaks, Benjamin; Banks, Hunter; Sherwin, Mark; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2013-12-04

    The near infrared frequency dependence of high order sideband generation in InGaAs quantum wells is discussed. The NIR frequency dependence of the sidebands indicates that the HSG phenomenon is excitonic in nature.

  19. High-performance iodine fiber frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Anna; Baynes, Fred N; Anstie, James D; Light, Philip S; Benabid, Fetah; Stace, Thomas M; Luiten, Andre N

    2011-12-15

    We have constructed a compact and robust optical frequency standard based around iodine vapor loaded into the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). A 532 nm laser was frequency locked to one hyperfine component of the R(56) 32-0 (127)I(2) transition using modulation transfer spectroscopy. The stabilized laser demonstrated a frequency stability of 2.3×10(-12) at 1 s, almost an order of magnitude better than previously reported for a laser stabilized to a gas-filled HC-PCF. This limit is set by the shot noise in the detection system. We present a discussion of the current limitations to the performance and a route to improve the performance by more than an order of magnitude. PMID:22179880

  20. A high-throughput method for isolation of salicylic acid metabolic mutants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Salicylic acid (SA) is a key defense signal molecule against biotrophic pathogens in plants. Quantification of SA levels in plants is critical for dissecting the SA-mediated immune response. Although HPLC and GC/MS are routinely used to determine SA concentrations, they are expensive and time-consuming. We recently described a rapid method for a bacterial biosensor Acinetobacter sp. ADPWH_lux-based SA quantification, which enables high-throughput analysis. In this study we describe an improved method for fast sample preparation, and present a high-throughput strategy for isolation of SA metabolic mutants. Results On the basis of the previously described biosensor-based method, we simplified the tissue collection and the SA extraction procedure. Leaf discs were collected and boiled in Luria-Bertani (LB), and then the released SA was measured with the biosensor. The time-consuming steps of weighing samples, grinding tissues and centrifugation were avoided. The direct boiling protocol detected similar differences in SA levels among pathogen-infected wild-type, npr1 (nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes), and sid2 (SA induction-deficient) plants as did the previously described biosensor-based method and an HPLC-based approach, demonstrating the efficacy of the protocol presented here. We adapted this protocol to a high-throughput format and identified six npr1 suppressors that accumulated lower levels of SA than npr1 upon pathogen infection. Two of the suppressors were found to be allelic to the previously identified eds5 mutant. The other four are more susceptible than npr1 to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326 and their identity merits further investigation. Conclusions The rapid SA extraction method by direct boiling of leaf discs further reduced the cost and time required for the biosensor Acinetobacter sp. ADPWH_lux-based SA estimation, and allowed the screening for npr1 suppressors that accumulated less SA than npr1

  1. Dielectric behavior of wild-type yeast and vacuole-deficient mutant over a frequency range of 10 kHz to 10 GHz.

    PubMed Central

    Asami, K; Yonezawa, T

    1996-01-01

    Dielectric behavior of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and vacuole-deficient mutant cells has been studied over a frequency range of 10 kHz to 10 GHz. Both types of cells harvested at the early stationary growth phase showed dielectric dispersion that was phenomenologically formulated by a sum of three separate dispersion terms: beta 1-dispersion (main dispersion) and beta 2-dispersion (additional dispersion) and gamma-dispersion due to orientation of water molecules. The beta 1-dispersion centered at a few MHz, which has been extensively studied so far, is due to interfacial polarization (or the Maxwell-Wagner effect) related to the plasma membrane. The beta 2-dispersion for the vacuole-deficient mutant centered at approximately 50 MHz was explained by taking the cell wall into account, whereas, for the wild-type cells, the beta 2-dispersion around a few tens MHz involved the contributions from the vacuole and cell wall. PMID:8889195

  2. High-Frequency, High-Temperature Fretting Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlik, J. F.; Farris, T. N.; Haake, F. K.; Swanson, G. R.; Duke, G. C.

    2005-01-01

    Fretting is a structural damage mechanism observed when two nominally clamped surfaces are subjected to an oscillatory loading. A critical location for fretting induced damage has been identified at the blade/disk and blade/damper interfaces of gas turbine engine turbomachinery and space propulsion components. The high-temperature, high-frequency loading environment seen by these components lead to severe stress gradients at the edge-of-contact. These contact stresses drive crack nucleation and propagation in fretting and are very sensitive to the geometry of the contacting bodies, the contact loads, materials, temperature, and contact surface tribology (friction). To diagnose the threat that small and relatively undetectable fretting cracks pose to damage tolerance and structural integrity of in-service components, the objective of this work is to develop a well-characterized experimental fretting rig capable of investigating fretting behavior of advanced aerospace alloys subjected to load and temperature conditions representative of such turbomachinery components.

  3. The High Frequency Stabilization of a Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirdyashev, K.

    2004-10-01

    Experimental data on the high-frequency stabilization of the MPD thruster and the suppression of low-frequency oscillations in the frequency range from 20 to 100 kHz are presented. Conditions for the stabilizing effect of a high-frequency magnetic field at the frequency of 40 MHz on the plasma jet produced by the thruster are determined, and the efficiency of this action is evaluated. The action of high frequency field on the MPD thruster consists in the contention of two processes - the stabilization of the plasma drift instability by the magnetic component of high frequency field and the energy conversion of natural plasma oscillations excited by the external field to the ion-sound wave energy.

  4. Electromagnetic inhibition of high frequency thermal bonding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong; Zhang, Qing-qing; Li, Hang; Zhang, Da-jian; Hou, Ming-feng; Zhu, Xian-wei

    2011-12-01

    The traditional high frequency thermal bonding machine had serious radiation problems at dominant frequency, two times frequency and three times frequency. Combining with its working principle, the problems of electromagnetic compatibility were studied, three following measures were adopted: 1.At the head part of the high frequency thermal bonding machine, resonant circuit attenuator was designed. The notch groove and reaction field can make the radiation being undermined or absorbed; 2.The electromagnetic radiation shielding was made for the high frequency copper power feeder; 3.Redesigned the high-frequency oscillator circuit to reduce the output of harmonic oscillator. The test results showed that these measures can make the output according with the national standard of electromagnetic compatibility (GB4824-2004-2A), the problems of electromagnetic radiation leakage can be solved, and good social, environmental and economic benefits would be brought.

  5. Mechanisms of high-frequency song generation in brachypterous crickets and the role of ghost frequencies.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Tony; Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Grandcolas, Philippe; Robert, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Sound production in crickets relies on stridulation, the well-understood rubbing together of a pair of specialised wings. As the file of one wing slides over the scraper of the other, a series of rhythmic impacts causes harmonic oscillations, usually resulting in the radiation of pure tones delivered at low frequencies (2-8 kHz). In the short-winged crickets of the Lebinthini tribe, acoustic communication relies on signals with remarkably high frequencies (>8 kHz) and rich harmonic content. Using several species of the subfamily Eneopterinae, we characterised the morphological and mechanical specialisations supporting the production of high frequencies, and demonstrated that higher harmonics are exploited as dominant frequencies. These specialisations affect the structure of the stridulatory file, the motor control of stridulation and the resonance of the sound radiator. We placed these specialisations in a phylogenetic framework and show that they serve to exploit high-frequency vibrational modes pre-existing in the phylogenetic ancestor. In Eneopterinae, the lower frequency components are harmonically related to the dominant peak, suggesting they are relicts of ancestral carrier frequencies. Yet, such ghost frequencies still occur in the wings' free resonances, highlighting the fundamental mechanical constraints of sound radiation. These results support the hypothesis that such high-frequency songs evolved stepwise, by a form of punctuated evolution that could be related to functional constraints, rather than by only the progressive increase of the ancestral fundamental frequency. PMID:23430987

  6. Processing of superconductive materials and high frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    We do not know yet if superconductivity will become useful without refrigeration. Now, the superconductors are so different from copper that it is difficult to imagine replacing copper with such a brittle material. Superconductors conduct dc with no loss, ac with small losses, and microwaves in co-axial lines with almost no loss and with no dispersion from dc to the highest frequencies. They will probably allow us to close the gap between radio frequency and infrared optical transmission. Clearly your industry should know some things about where superconductivity may lead us and must consider whether the greater risk is to develop them or to let others try it. There are no easy answers yet.

  7. High-Frequency Radiation and Tritium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonichev, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    In the process of deformation of titanium alloy samples preliminarily saturated by deuterium (at a temperature T = 710°C) radiation, which is not a neutron flux, was detected. Electromagnetic radiation in the range of radio frequencies was detected in titanium alloy samples in the process of their saturation by deuterium. The probable mechanism of its occurrence may be the retardation of charged particles in the metallic matrix.

  8. Coplanar stripline components for high frequency application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goverdhanam, Kavita; Simons, Rainee N.; Dib, Nihad; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, coplanar stripline discontinuities such as a slit, a right angle bend and a T-junction are characterized and their performance is parameterized with respect to frequency and geometry. Lumped equivalent circuits are presented for some of them. The element values are obtained from the measured discontinuity scattering (S) parameters. The experimental results are compared with theoretical data obtained using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FD-TD) technique for validation and show very good agreement.

  9. High-Frequency, Conformable Organic Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Reuveny, Amir; Lee, Sunghoon; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Fuketa, Hiroshi; Siket, Christian M; Lee, Sungwon; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Takayasu; Bauer, Siegfried; Someya, Takao

    2016-05-01

    Large-bandwidth, low-operation-voltage, and uniform organic amplifiers are fabricated on ultrathin foils. By the integration of short-channel OTFTs and AlOx capacitors, organic amplifiers with a bandwidth of 25 kHz are realized, demonstrating the highest gain-bandwidth product (GBWP) reported to date. Owing to material and process advancements, closed-loop architectures operate at frequencies of several kilohertz with an area smaller than 30 mm(2) . PMID:26922899

  10. High Precision Noise Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Eugene; Tobar, Michael

    2009-04-23

    We describe microwave noise measurement system capable of detecting the phase fluctuations of rms amplitude of 2{center_dot}10{sup -11} rad/{radical}(Hz). Such resolution allows the study of intrinsic fluctuations in various microwave components and materials, as well as precise tests of fundamental physics. Employing this system we discovered a previously unknown phenomenon of down-conversion of pump oscillator phase noise into the low-frequency voltage fluctuations.

  11. High-frequency Probing Diagnostic for Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Litvak; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-25

    High-frequency oscillations (1-100 MHz) in Hall thrusters have apparently eluded significant experimental scrutiny. A diagnostic setup, consisting of a single Langmuir probe, a special shielded probe connector-positioner, and an electronic impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been identified and characterized for various thruster operating conditions.

  12. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, E.S.; Campbell, D.V.

    1997-04-29

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer. 22 figs.

  13. On-clip high frequency reliability and failure test structures

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Eric S.; Campbell, David V.

    1997-01-01

    Self-stressing test structures for realistic high frequency reliability characterizations. An on-chip high frequency oscillator, controlled by DC signals from off-chip, provides a range of high frequency pulses to test structures. The test structures provide information with regard to a variety of reliability failure mechanisms, including hot-carriers, electromigration, and oxide breakdown. The system is normally integrated at the wafer level to predict the failure mechanisms of the production integrated circuits on the same wafer.

  14. Phoneme categorization relying solely on high-frequency energy.

    PubMed

    Vitela, A Davi; Monson, Brian B; Lotto, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception studies generally focus on the acoustic information present in the frequency regions below 6 kHz. Recent evidence suggests that there is perceptually relevant information in the higher frequencies, including information affecting speech intelligibility. This experiment examined whether listeners are able to accurately identify a subset of vowels and consonants in CV-context when only high-frequency (above 5 kHz) acoustic information is available (through high-pass filtering and masking of lower frequency energy). The findings reveal that listeners are capable of extracting information from these higher frequency regions to accurately identify certain consonants and vowels. PMID:25618101

  15. Phoneme categorization relying solely on high-frequency energy

    PubMed Central

    Vitela, A. Davi; Monson, Brian B.; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception studies generally focus on the acoustic information present in the frequency regions below 6 kHz. Recent evidence suggests that there is perceptually relevant information in the higher frequencies, including information affecting speech intelligibility. This experiment examined whether listeners are able to accurately identify a subset of vowels and consonants in CV-context when only high-frequency (above 5 kHz) acoustic information is available (through high-pass filtering and masking of lower frequency energy). The findings reveal that listeners are capable of extracting information from these higher frequency regions to accurately identify certain consonants and vowels. PMID:25618101

  16. A high frequency resonance gravity gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bagaev, S. N.; Kvashnin, N. L.; Skvortsov, M. N.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Krysanov, V. A.; Oreshkin, S. I.; Motylev, A. M.; Popov, S. M.; Samoilenko, A. A.; Yudin, I. S.; Rudenko, V. N.

    2014-06-15

    A new setup OGRAN—the large scale opto-acoustical gravitational detector is described. As distinguished from known gravitational bar detectors it uses the optical interferometrical readout for registering weak variations of gravity gradient at the kilohetz frequency region. At room temperature, its sensitivity is limited only by the bar Brownian noise at the bandwidth close to 100 Hz. It is destined for a search for rare events—gravitational pulses coincident with signals of neutrino scintillator (BUST) in the deep underground of Baksan Neutrino Observatory of INR RAS.

  17. Self isolating high frequency saturable reactor

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James A.

    1998-06-23

    The present invention discloses a saturable reactor and a method for decoupling the interwinding capacitance from the frequency limitations of the reactor so that the equivalent electrical circuit of the saturable reactor comprises a variable inductor. The saturable reactor comprises a plurality of physically symmetrical magnetic cores with closed loop magnetic paths and a novel method of wiring a control winding and a RF winding. The present invention additionally discloses a matching network and method for matching the impedances of a RF generator to a load. The matching network comprises a matching transformer and a saturable reactor.

  18. A high frequency resonance gravity gradiometer.

    PubMed

    Bagaev, S N; Bezrukov, L B; Kvashnin, N L; Krysanov, V A; Oreshkin, S I; Motylev, A M; Popov, S M; Rudenko, V N; Samoilenko, A A; Skvortsov, M N; Yudin, I S

    2014-06-01

    A new setup OGRAN--the large scale opto-acoustical gravitational detector is described. As distinguished from known gravitational bar detectors it uses the optical interferometrical readout for registering weak variations of gravity gradient at the kilohetz frequency region. At room temperature, its sensitivity is limited only by the bar Brownian noise at the bandwidth close to 100 Hz. It is destined for a search for rare events--gravitational pulses coincident with signals of neutrino scintillator (BUST) in the deep underground of Baksan Neutrino Observatory of INR RAS. PMID:24985859

  19. High efficiency, oxidation resistant radio frequency susceptor

    DOEpatents

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Klett, James W.

    2004-10-26

    An article and method of producing an article for converting energy from one form to another having a pitch-derived graphitic foam carbon foam substrate and a single layer coating applied to all exposed surfaces wherein the coating is either silicon carbide or carbides formed from a Group IVA metal. The article is used as fully coated carbon foam susceptors that more effectively absorb radio frequency (RF) band energy and more effectively convert the RF energy into thermal band energy or sensible heat. The essentially non-permeable coatings also serve as corrosion or oxidation resistant barriers.

  20. Calibration of High Frequency MEMS Microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Humphreys, William M.; Bartram, Scott M.; Zuckewar, Allan J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and controlling aircraft noise is one of the major research topics of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program. One of the measurement technologies used to acquire noise data is the microphone directional array (DA). Traditional direction array hardware, consisting of commercially available condenser microphones and preamplifiers can be too expensive and their installation in hard-walled wind tunnel test sections too complicated. An emerging micro-machining technology coupled with the latest cutting edge technologies for smaller and faster systems have opened the way for development of MEMS microphones. The MEMS microphone devices are available in the market but suffer from certain important shortcomings. Based on early experiments with array prototypes, it has been found that both the bandwidth and the sound pressure level dynamic range of the microphones should be increased significantly to improve the performance and flexibility of the overall array. Thus, in collaboration with an outside MEMS design vendor, NASA Langley modified commercially available MEMS microphone as shown in Figure 1 to meet the new requirements. Coupled with the design of the enhanced MEMS microphones was the development of a new calibration method for simultaneously obtaining the sensitivity and phase response of the devices over their entire broadband frequency range. Over the years, several methods have been used for microphone calibration. Some of the common methods of microphone calibration are Coupler (Reciprocity, Substitution, and Simultaneous), Pistonphone, Electrostatic actuator, and Free-field calibration (Reciprocity, Substitution, and Simultaneous). Traditionally, electrostatic actuators (EA) have been used to characterize air-condenser microphones for wideband frequency ranges; however, MEMS microphones are not adaptable to the EA method due to their construction and very small diaphragm size. Hence a substitution-based, free-field method was developed to

  1. High power single-frequency Innoslab amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Ke-Zhen; Ning, Jian; Zhang, Bai-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Hai-Kun; Nie, Hong-Kun; Sun, Xiao-Li; He, Jing-Liang

    2016-07-10

    A laser diode array (LDA) end-pumped continuous-wave single-frequency Innoslab amplifier has been demonstrated. The Gaussian ray bundle method was used to model the light propagation in the Innoslab amplifier for the first time to the best of our knowledge. With discrete reflectors, the maximum output of 60 W with a linewidth of 44 MHz was achieved under the pump power of 245 W, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 24.5%. The beam quality factor M2 at the output power of 51 W in the horizontal and vertical direction was measured to be 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. The long-term power instability in 2 h was less than 0.25%. PMID:27409308

  2. Use of the clonal assay for the measurement of frequencies of HPRT mutants in T-lymphocytes from five control populations.

    PubMed

    Tates, A D; van Dam, F J; van Mossel, H; Schoemaker, H; Thijssen, J C; Woldring, V M; Zwinderman, A H; Natarajan, A T

    1991-10-01

    The clonal assay was used to measure frequencies of 6-thioguanine-resistant (HPRT) T-lymphocytes in 111 donors from the following 5 control populations: 55 adult healthy volunteers; 20 untreated cancer patients; 8 healthy hospital workers serving as controls for 9 hospital workers sterilizing equipment with ethylene oxide; 15 factory workers serving as controls for 15 workers occupationally exposed to high doses of ethylene oxide; 13 pretreatment samples from donors undergoing a diagnostic test with Technetium-99m for an analysis of heart function. With respect to mutant frequency (MF), cloning efficiency (CE) and age distribution, the first 4 populations were identical. The Technetium group had significantly higher MFs and lower CEs but this can be attributed to the higher mean age of this group. Using the total data base, we calculated the following relationships between MF, CE, age and smoking: (1) ln MF = 4.23-0.63 x ln CE indicating that a doubling of the CE has the effect of decreasing the MF by 37%, (2) ln MF = 0.71 + 0.03 x age meaning that the MF increases by 3% from one year to the next, (3) ln CE = 4.87-0.04 X age indicating that the CE decreases by 0.98% from one year to the next, (4) ln MF = 3.25-0.52 x ln CE + 0.02 X age being the equation quantifying the interrelationship between MF, CE and age, (5) ln MF = 3.32-0.56 x ln CE + 0.01 x age + 0.31 s (where s = 1 for smokers and s = 0 for nonsmokers). Using the latter equation, which allows for effects of CE and age on the MF, a statistically significant effect of smoking could be established. For any combination of CE and age smoking has the effect of increasing the MF by 36%. The above conclusions and calculations remain essentially the same when donors with cloning efficiencies lower than 10 or 20% are excluded from the data base. PMID:1922146

  3. Effects of high frequency current in welding aluminum alloy 6061

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Uncontrolled high frequency current causes cracking in the heat-affected zone of aluminum alloy 6061 weldments during tungsten inert gas ac welding. Cracking developed when an improperly adjusted superimposed high frequency current was agitating the semimolten metal in the areas of grain boundary.

  4. Highly efficient gene targeting in Penicillium chrysogenum using the bi-partite approach in deltalig4 or deltaku70 mutants.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Paulo; Bastiaans, Jeroen; Touw, Hesselien; Kerkman, Richard; Bronkhof, Jurian; van den Berg, Marco; Offringa, Remko

    2010-10-01

    Inactivating the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway is a well established method to increase gene targeting (GT) efficiencies in filamentous fungi. In this study we have compared the effect of inactivating the NHEJ genes ku70 or lig4 on GT in the industrial penicillin producer Penicillium chrysogenum. Deletion of both genes resulted in strongly increased GT efficiencies at three different loci but not higher than 70%, implying that other, yet uncharacterized, recombination pathways are still active causing a part of the DNA to be integrated via non-homologous recombination. To further increase the GT efficiency we applied the bi-partite approach, in which the DNA fragment for integration was split in two non-functional overlapping parts that via homologous recombination invivo can form a functional selection marker. The combined NHEJ mutant and bi-partite approach further increased GT frequencies up to approximately 90%, which will enable the efficient high throughput engineering of the P. chrysogenum genome. We expect that this combined approach will function with similar high efficiencies in other filamentous fungi. PMID:20659576

  5. Monitoring method and apparatus using high-frequency carrier

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, H.D.

    1996-04-30

    A method and apparatus for monitoring an electrical-motor-driven device by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto the power line current. The method is accomplished by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto an AC power line current. The AC power line current supplies the electrical-motor-driven device with electrical energy. As a result, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the electrical-motor-driven device modulate the high frequency carrier signal and the AC power line current. The high frequency carrier signal is then monitored, conditioned and demodulated. Finally, the modulated high frequency carrier signal is analyzed to ascertain the operating condition of the electrical-motor-driven device. 6 figs.

  6. Monitoring method and apparatus using high-frequency carrier

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring an electrical-motor-driven device by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto the power line current. The method is accomplished by injecting a high frequency carrier signal onto an AC power line current. The AC power line current supplies the electrical-motor-driven device with electrical energy. As a result, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the electrical-motor-driven device modulate the high frequency carrier signal and the AC power line current. The high frequency carrier signal is then monitored, conditioned and demodulated. Finally, the modulated high frequency carrier signal is analyzed to ascertain the operating condition of the electrical-motor-driven device.

  7. Real-Time, High-Frequency QRS Electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; DePalma, Jude L.; Moradi, Saeed

    2003-01-01

    An electronic system that performs real-time analysis of the low-amplitude, high-frequency, ordinarily invisible components of the QRS portion of an electrocardiographic signal in real time has been developed. Whereas the signals readily visible on a conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) have amplitudes of the order of a millivolt and are characterized by frequencies <100 Hz, the ordinarily invisible components have amplitudes in the microvolt range and are characterized by frequencies from about 150 to about 250 Hz. Deviations of these high-frequency components from a normal pattern can be indicative of myocardial ischemia or myocardial infarction

  8. Condenser Microphone Protective Grid Correction for High Frequency Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Erik; Bennett, Reginald

    2010-01-01

    Use of a protective grid on small diameter microphones can prolong the lifetime of the unit, but the high frequency effects can complicate data interpretation. Analytical methods have been developed to correct for the grid effect at high frequencies. Specifically, the analysis pertains to quantifying the microphone protective grid response characteristics in the acoustic near field of a rocket plume noise source. A frequency response function computation using two microphones will be explained. Experimental and instrumentation setup details will be provided. The resulting frequency response function for a B&K 4944 condenser microphone protective grid will be presented, along with associated uncertainties

  9. High frequency microbubble-switched oscillations modulated by microfluidic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fanghao; Dai, Xianming; Li, Chen

    2012-08-01

    Creating high frequency two-phase oscillations (HF-TPOs) remains an important goal in advancing microscale fluidic logic devices, micro-mixers, micro-actuators, and flow controls. However, thermally driven TPO frequency has been hindered by confinements of compressible vapor bubbles and low thermal diffusivity in microfluidic systems. In this study, a mechanism creating high frequency microbubbles growth/collapse cycle has been developed to achieve HF-TPOs. A "microfluidic transistor" was conceptualized and fabricated to passively sustain and modulate HF-TPOs. Three orders of magnitude higher TPO frequency has been achieved compared to TPOs reported in literatures under similar working conditions.

  10. High-frequency filtering of strong-motion records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas, J.; Boore, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of noise in strong-motion records is most problematic at low and high frequencies where the signal to noise ratio is commonly low compared to that in the mid-spectrum. The impact of low-frequency noise (5 Hz) on computed pseudo-absolute response spectral accelerations (PSAs). In contrast to the case of low-frequency noise our analysis shows that filtering to remove high-frequency noise is only necessary in certain situations and that PSAs can often be used up to 100 Hz even if much lower high-cut corner frequencies are required to remove the noise. This apparent contradiction can be explained by the fact that PSAs are often controlled by ground accelerations associated with much lower frequencies than the natural frequency of the oscillator because path and site attenuation (often modelled by Q and κ, respectively) have removed the highest frequencies. We demonstrate that if high-cut filters are to be used, then their corner frequencies should be selected on an individual basis, as has been done in a few recent studies.

  11. Natural plasmid transformation in a high-frequency-of transformation marine Vibrio strain

    SciTech Connect

    Frischer, M.E.; Thurmond, J.M.; Paul, J.H. )

    1990-11-01

    The estuarine bacterium Vibrio strain DI-9 has been shown to be naturally transformable with both broad host range plasmid multimers and homologous chromosomal DNA at average frequencies of 3.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} and 3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} transformants per recipient, respectively. Growth of plasmid transformants in nonselective medium resulted in cured strains that transformed 6 to 42,857 times more frequently than the parental strain, depending on the type of transforming DNA. These high-frequency-of-transformation (HfT) strains were transformed at frequencies ranging from 1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} to 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} transformants per recipient with plasmid DNA and at an average frequency of 8.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} transformants per recipient with homologous chromosomal DNA. The highest transformation frequencies were observed by using multimers of an R1162 derivative carrying the transposon Tn5 (pQSR50). Probing of total DNA preparations from one of the cured strains demonstrated that no plasmid DNA remained in the cured strains which may have provided homology to the transforming DNA. All transformants and cured strains could be differentiated from the parental strains by colony morphology. DNA binding studies indicated that late-log-phase HfT strains bound ({sup 3}H)bacteriophage lambda DNA 2.1 times more rapidly than the parental strain. These results suggest that the original plasmid transformation event of strain DI-9 was the result of uptake and expression of plasmid DNA by a competent mutant (HfT strain). Additionally, it was found that a strain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, USFS 3420, could be naturally transformed with plasmid DNA. Natural plasmid transformation by high-transforming mutants may be a means of plasmid acquisition by natural aquatic bacterial populations.

  12. Schlieren metrology for high frequency medical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zanelli, Claudio I; Howard, Samuel M

    2006-12-22

    The increased use of medical ultrasound above 40 MHz poses the challenge of measuring beam features that may be less than 40 microm. We have successfully used the optical Schlieren technique for transducers operating as high as 110 MHz. After a brief discussion of the technique, results are presented, including comparisons to state-of-the-art hydrophones and wire targets. PMID:16949117

  13. Gyrotron: A high-frequency microwave amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupiszewski, A.

    1979-01-01

    A proposed microwave amplifier mechanism for future generations of millimeter high power uplinks to spacecraft and planetary radar transmitters is introduced. Basic electron-electromagnetic field interaction theory for RF power gain is explained. The starting point for general analytical methods leading to detailed design results is presented.

  14. High temperature pressurized high frequency testing rig and test method

    DOEpatents

    De La Cruz, Jose; Lacey, Paul

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus is described which permits the lubricity of fuel compositions at or near temperatures and pressures experienced by compression ignition fuel injector components during operation in a running engine. The apparatus consists of means to apply a measured force between two surfaces and oscillate them at high frequency while wetted with a sample of the fuel composition heated to an operator selected temperature. Provision is made to permit operation at or near the flash point of the fuel compositions. Additionally a method of using the subject apparatus to simulate ASTM Testing Method D6079 is disclosed, said method involving using the disclosed apparatus to contact the faces of prepared workpieces under a measured load, sealing the workface contact point into the disclosed apparatus while immersing said contact point between said workfaces in a lubricating media to be tested, pressurizing and heating the chamber and thereby the fluid and workfaces therewithin, using the disclosed apparatus to impart a differential linear motion between the workpieces at their contact point until a measurable scar is imparted to at least one workpiece workface, and then evaluating the workface scar.

  15. Phenotype of the tomato high pigment-2 mutant is caused by a mutation in the tomato homolog of DEETIOLATED1.

    PubMed Central

    Mustilli, A C; Fenzi, F; Ciliento, R; Alfano, F; Bowler, C

    1999-01-01

    Tomato high pigment (hp) mutants are characterized by their exaggerated photoresponsiveness. Light-grown hp mutants display elevated levels of anthocyanins, are shorter and darker than wild-type plants, and have dark green immature fruits due to the overproduction of chlorophyll pigments. It has been proposed that HP genes encode negative regulators of phytochrome signal transduction. We have cloned the HP-2 gene and found that it encodes the tomato homolog of the nuclear protein DEETIOLATED1 (DET1) from Arabidopsis. Mutations in DET1 are known to result in constitutive deetiolation in darkness. In contrast to det1 mutants, tomato hp-2 mutants do not display any visible phenotypes in the dark but only very weak phenotypes, such as partial chloroplast development. Furthermore, whereas det1 mutations are epistatic to mutations in phytochrome genes, analysis of similar double mutants in tomato showed that manifestation of the phenotype of the hp-2 mutant is strictly dependent upon the presence of active phytochrome. Because only one DET1 gene is likely to be present in each of the two species, our data suggest that the phytochrome signaling pathways in which the corresponding proteins function are regulated differently in Arabidopsis and tomato. PMID:9927635

  16. A highly digestible sorghum mutant cultivar exhibits a unique folded structure of endosperm protein bodies

    PubMed Central

    Oria, Maria P.; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Axtell, John D.; Huang, Chia-Ping

    2000-01-01

    The endosperm of a sorghum mutant cultivar, with high in vitro uncooked and cooked protein digestibilities, was examined by transmission electron microscopy and α-, β-, and γ-kafirins (storage proteins) were localized within its protein bodies. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs revealed that these protein bodies had a unique microstructure related to high protein digestibility. They were irregular in shape and had numerous invaginations, often reaching to the central area of the protein body. Protein bodies from normal cultivars, such as P721N studied here, with much lower uncooked and cooked digestibilities are spherical and contain no invaginations. Immunocytochemistry results showed that the relative location of α- and β-kafirins within the protein bodies of the highly digestible genotype were similar to the normal cultivar, P721N. γ-Kafirin, however, was concentrated in dark-staining regions at the base of the folds instead of at the protein body periphery, as is typical of normal cultivars. The resulting easy accessibility of digestive enzymes to α-kafirin, the major storage protein, in addition to the increased surface area of the protein bodies of the highly digestible cultivar appear to account for its high in vitro protein digestibility. PMID:10792028

  17. High-frequency energy in singing and speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, Brian Bruce

    While human speech and the human voice generate acoustical energy up to (and beyond) 20 kHz, the energy above approximately 5 kHz has been largely neglected. Evidence is accruing that this high-frequency energy contains perceptual information relevant to speech and voice, including percepts of quality, localization, and intelligibility. The present research was an initial step in the long-range goal of characterizing high-frequency energy in singing voice and speech, with particular regard for its perceptual role and its potential for modification during voice and speech production. In this study, a database of high-fidelity recordings of talkers was created and used for a broad acoustical analysis and general characterization of high-frequency energy, as well as specific characterization of phoneme category, voice and speech intensity level, and mode of production (speech versus singing) by high-frequency energy content. Directionality of radiation of high-frequency energy from the mouth was also examined. The recordings were used for perceptual experiments wherein listeners were asked to discriminate between speech and voice samples that differed only in high-frequency energy content. Listeners were also subjected to gender discrimination tasks, mode-of-production discrimination tasks, and transcription tasks with samples of speech and singing that contained only high-frequency content. The combination of these experiments has revealed that (1) human listeners are able to detect very subtle level changes in high-frequency energy, and (2) human listeners are able to extract significant perceptual information from high-frequency energy.

  18. Advanced high frequency partial discharge measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karady, George G.

    1994-01-01

    This report explains the Advanced Partial Discharge Measuring System in ASU's High Voltage Laboratory and presents some of the results obtained using the setup. While in operation an insulation is subjected to wide ranging temperature and voltage stresses. Hence, it is necessary to study the effect of temperature on the behavior of partial discharges in an insulation. The setup described in this report can be used to test samples at temperatures ranging from -50 C to 200 C. The aim of conducting the tests described herein is to be able to predict the behavior of an insulation under different operating conditions in addition to being able to predict the possibility of failure.

  19. High frequency single mode traveling wave structure for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyan, M. I.; Danielyan, V. A.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Tsakanov, V. M.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the new high frequency slow traveling wave structures is one of the promising directions in accomplishment of charged particles high acceleration gradient. The disc and dielectric loaded structures are the most known structures with slowly propagating modes. In this paper a large aperture high frequency metallic two-layer accelerating structure is studied. The electrodynamical properties of the slowly propagating TM01 mode in a metallic tube with internally coated low conductive thin layer are examined.

  20. The Influence of High-Frequency Envelope Information on Low-Frequency Vowel Identification in Noise.

    PubMed

    Schubotz, Wiebke; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-01-01

    Vowel identification in noise using consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) logatomes was used to investigate a possible interplay of speech information from different frequency regions. It was hypothesized that the periodicity conveyed by the temporal envelope of a high frequency stimulus can enhance the use of the information carried by auditory channels in the low-frequency region that share the same periodicity. It was further hypothesized that this acts as a strobe-like mechanism and would increase the signal-to-noise ratio for the voiced parts of the CVCs. In a first experiment, different high-frequency cues were provided to test this hypothesis, whereas a second experiment examined more closely the role of amplitude modulations and intact phase information within the high-frequency region (4-8 kHz). CVCs were either natural or vocoded speech (both limited to a low-pass cutoff-frequency of 2.5 kHz) and were presented in stationary 3-kHz low-pass filtered masking noise. The experimental results did not support the hypothesized use of periodicity information for aiding low-frequency perception. PMID:26730702

  1. The Influence of High-Frequency Envelope Information on Low-Frequency Vowel Identification in Noise

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Vowel identification in noise using consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) logatomes was used to investigate a possible interplay of speech information from different frequency regions. It was hypothesized that the periodicity conveyed by the temporal envelope of a high frequency stimulus can enhance the use of the information carried by auditory channels in the low-frequency region that share the same periodicity. It was further hypothesized that this acts as a strobe-like mechanism and would increase the signal-to-noise ratio for the voiced parts of the CVCs. In a first experiment, different high-frequency cues were provided to test this hypothesis, whereas a second experiment examined more closely the role of amplitude modulations and intact phase information within the high-frequency region (4–8 kHz). CVCs were either natural or vocoded speech (both limited to a low-pass cutoff-frequency of 2.5 kHz) and were presented in stationary 3-kHz low-pass filtered masking noise. The experimental results did not support the hypothesized use of periodicity information for aiding low-frequency perception. PMID:26730702

  2. High-frequency Broadband Modulations of Electroencephalographic Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Onton, Julie; Makeig, Scott

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency cortical potentials in electroencephalographic (EEG) scalp recordings have low amplitudes and may be confounded with scalp muscle activities. EEG data from an eyes-closed emotion imagination task were linearly decomposed using independent component analysis (ICA) into maximally independent component (IC) processes. Joint decomposition of IC log spectrograms into source- and frequency-independent modulator (IM) processes revealed three distinct classes of IMs that separately modulated broadband high-frequency (∼15–200 Hz) power of brain, scalp muscle, and likely ocular motor IC processes. Multi-dimensional scaling revealed significant but spatially complex relationships between mean broadband brain IM effects and the valence of the imagined emotions. Thus, contrary to prevalent assumption, unitary modes of spectral modulation of frequencies encompassing the beta, gamma, and high gamma frequency ranges can be isolated from scalp-recorded EEG data and may be differentially associated with brain sources and cognitive activities. PMID:20076775

  3. Interface Strategy To Achieve Tunable High Frequency Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hualiang; Zhang, Haiqian; Ji, Guangbin; Xu, Zhichuan J

    2016-03-16

    Among all polarizations, the interface polarization effect is the most effective, especially at high frequency. The design of various ferrite/iron interfaces can significantly enhance the materials' dielectric loss ability at high frequency. This paper presents a simple method to generate ferrite/iron interfaces to enhance the microwave attenuation at high frequency. The ferrites were coated onto carbonyl iron and could be varied to ZnFe2O4, CoFe2O4, Fe3O4, and NiFe2O4. Due to the ferrite/iron interface inducing a stronger dielectric loss effect, all of these materials achieved broad effective frequency width at a coating layer as thin as 1.5 mm. In particular, an effective frequency width of 6.2 GHz could be gained from the Fe@NiFe2O4 composite. PMID:26918285

  4. Generation and Multi-phenotypic High-content Screening of Coxiella burnetii Transposon Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Eric; Cantet, Franck; Bonazzi, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Invasion and colonization of host cells by bacterial pathogens depend on the activity of a large number of prokaryotic proteins, defined as virulence factors, which can subvert and manipulate key host functions. The study of host/pathogen interactions is therefore extremely important to understand bacterial infections and develop alternative strategies to counter infectious diseases. This approach however, requires the development of new high-throughput assays for the unbiased, automated identification and characterization of bacterial virulence determinants. Here, we describe a method for the generation of a GFP-tagged mutant library by transposon mutagenesis and the development of high-content screening approaches for the simultaneous identification of multiple transposon-associated phenotypes. Our working model is the intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiellaburnetii, the etiological agent of the zoonosis Q fever, which is associated with severe outbreaks with a consequent health and economic burden. The obligate intracellular nature of this pathogen has, until recently, severely hampered the identification of bacterial factors involved in host pathogen interactions, making of Coxiella the ideal model for the implementation of high-throughput/high-content approaches. PMID:25992686

  5. Radio-frequency electromagnetic emissions from materials under high-frequency mechanical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, Christian; Moore, David

    2015-06-01

    Direct contact piezoelectric transducers were used to excite compacted polycrystalline dielectric material samples with high amplitude but short duration ultrasound through a frequency range of 50 kHz to 10 MHz, while near field RF emissions were measured in 12 frequency bands from 18 to 750 GHz using a suite of detectors. Emissions were observed only in three detectors, covering the 40-75 GHz, 110-170 GHz, and 170-260 GHz frequency ranges. Emission amplitudes appear to rise nonlinearly with applied ultrasound amplitude, and the emission amplitudes versus ultrasound frequency are different than the thermal responses of these samples. Data comparing thermal responses and electromagnetic emissions versus ultrasound frequency and amplitude for several sample types (oxidizers and energetic materials) will be presented. LA-UR-15-20605.

  6. High frequency energy cascades in inviscid hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Adam Smith N.; de Araújo, J. M.; Cohen, Nir; Lucena, Liacir S.; Viswanathan, G. M.

    2014-04-01

    With the aim of gaining insight into the notoriously difficult problem of energy and vorticity cascades in high dimensional incompressible flows, we take a simpler and very well understood low dimensional analog and approach it from a new perspective, using the Fourier transform. Specifically, we study, numerically and analytically, how kinetic energy moves from one scale to another in solutions of the hyperbolic or inviscid Burgers equation in one spatial dimension (1D). We restrict our attention to initial conditions which go to zero as x→±∞. The main result we report here is a Fourier analytic way of describing the cascade process. We find that the cascade proceeds by rapid growth of a crossover scale below which there is asymptotic power law decay of the magnitude of the Fourier transform.

  7. High-frequency multimodal atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nievergelt, Adrian P; Adams, Jonathan D; Odermatt, Pascal D

    2014-01-01

    Summary Multifrequency atomic force microscopy imaging has been recently demonstrated as a powerful technique for quickly obtaining information about the mechanical properties of a sample. Combining this development with recent gains in imaging speed through small cantilevers holds the promise of a convenient, high-speed method for obtaining nanoscale topography as well as mechanical properties. Nevertheless, instrument bandwidth limitations on cantilever excitation and readout have restricted the ability of multifrequency techniques to fully benefit from small cantilevers. We present an approach for cantilever excitation and deflection readout with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, enabling multifrequency techniques extended beyond 2 MHz for obtaining materials contrast in liquid and air, as well as soft imaging of delicate biological samples. PMID:25671141

  8. High-frequency hearing in seals and sea lions.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Kane A; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Existing evidence suggests that some pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses) can detect underwater sound at frequencies well above the traditional high-frequency hearing limits for their species. This phenomenon, however, is not well studied: Sensitivity patterns at frequencies beyond traditional high-frequency limits are poorly resolved, and the nature of the auditory mechanism mediating hearing at these frequencies is unknown. In the first portion of this study, auditory sensitivity patterns in the 50-180 kHz range were measured for one California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), one harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and one spotted seal (Phoca largha). Results show the presence of two distinct slope-regions at the high-frequency ends of the audiograms of all three subjects. The first region is characterized by a rapid decrease in sensitivity with increasing frequency-i.e. a steep slope-followed by a region of much less rapid sensitivity decrease-i.e. a shallower slope. In the second portion of this study, a masking experiment was conducted to investigate how the basilar membrane of a harbor seal subject responded to acoustic energy from a narrowband masking noise centered at 140 kHz. The measured masking pattern suggests that the initial, rapid decrease in sensitivity on the high-frequency end of the subject's audiogram is not due to cochlear constraints, as has been previously hypothesized, but rather to constraints on the conductive mechanism. PMID:26519092

  9. Factors Affecting the Benefits of High-Frequency Amplification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwitz, Amy R.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the extent to which high-frequency amplification helped or hindered speech recognition as a function of hearing loss, gain-frequency response, and background noise. Method: Speech recognition was measured monaurally under headphones for nonsense syllables low-pass filtered in one-third-octave steps…

  10. High frequency eddy current device for near surface material characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmann, S.; Heuer, H.; Meyendorf, N.

    2009-03-01

    For near surface characterization a new high frequency eddy current device was been developed. By using a measurement frequency up to 100 MHz information of near surface areas can be acquired. Depending on the investigated material high resolution depth profiles can be derived. The obtained data with the new device were compared to those obtained with a high precision impedance analyser. It could be demonstrated that the new device measures the eddy current conductivity signal in the high frequencies much better than the impedance analyser. By sweeping the frequency from 100 kHz up to 100 MHz the technique delivers a depth profile of the electrical conductivity of the material. This kind of high frequency eddy current technique can be used for quality assurance, surface contamination control or near surface material characterization e.g. microstructure and cold work influences. It can be a powerful tool to obtain information for process control or a good / bad decision in mass production processes like for example rolling, coating, and surface treatments. The big advantage of the high frequency eddy current method is that it is fast und precise. This paper presents results with a new developed prototype Eddy-Current-Device for measurement frequencies up to 100 MHz which is first time suitable in rough industrial environment and makes expensive lab network analysers unnecessary for this kind of investigations.

  11. Residual absorption of high temperature superconductors at THz frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, P.; Barowski, H.S.; Prenninger, M.; Pechen, E.V.; Renk, K.F.

    1996-12-31

    The authors report on a study of the residual absorption of high temperature superconductors (HTS) at THz frequencies. Using transmission Fabry-Perot interferometry, they determined both, real and imaginary part of the conductivity. They especially studied YBCO thin films. They found that the dynamical conductivity varied strongly from sample to sample. As a main result, they find that the absorptivity increases at frequencies above 1 THz much weaker than quadratically, i.e., the {omega}{sup 2} behavior of the absorptivity at microwave frequencies is not continued in the THz frequency range.

  12. High performance vapour-cell frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Bandi, T.; Gruet, F.; Pellaton, M.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We report our investigations on a compact high-performance rubidium (Rb) vapour-cell clock based on microwave-optical double-resonance (DR). These studies are done in both DR continuous-wave (CW) and Ramsey schemes using the same Physics Package (PP), with the same Rb vapour cell and a magnetron-type cavity with only 45 cm3 external volume. In the CW-DR scheme, we demonstrate a DR signal with a contrast of 26% and a linewidth of 334 Hz; in Ramsey-DR mode Ramsey signals with higher contrast up to 35% and a linewidth of 160 Hz have been demonstrated. Short-term stabilities of 1.4×10-13 τ-1/2 and 2.4×10-13 τ-1/2 are measured for CW-DR and Ramsey-DR schemes, respectively. In the Ramsey-DR operation, thanks to the separation of light and microwave interactions in time, the light-shift effect has been suppressed which allows improving the long-term clock stability as compared to CW-DR operation. Implementations in miniature atomic clocks are considered.

  13. Pigeons use high spatial frequencies when memorizing pictures.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Matthew S; Brooks, Daniel I; Cook, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    The ability of animals to visually memorize and categorize a large number of pictures is well established. Determining the kinds of information animals use to accomplish these goals has been more difficult. This experiment examined the contribution of spatial frequency information to picture memorization by pigeons. A series of grayscale pictures were notch-filtered to eliminate different portions of the spatial frequency spectrum of memorized pictures. The results indicated that the higher spatial frequencies in the pictures were most important to accurate recognition, suggesting that the detection of fine detail at the high range of pigeon visual acuity was a critical component to their memorized representations. Subsequent tests with band-pass and hybrid conflict stimuli confirmed this conclusion. It is suggested that cognitive and task demands may determine how spatial frequency is used by pigeons, with higher frequencies more important to item memorization, while lower spatial frequencies may contribute to categorization in other types of discrimination tasks. PMID:25915753

  14. High-Frequency Subband Compressed Sensing MRI Using Quadruplet Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyunghyun; Hargreaves, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To presents and validates a new method that formalizes a direct link between k-space and wavelet domains to apply separate undersampling and reconstruction for high- and low-spatial-frequency k-space data. Theory and Methods High- and low-spatial-frequency regions are defined in k-space based on the separation of wavelet subbands, and the conventional compressed sensing (CS) problem is transformed into one of localized k-space estimation. To better exploit wavelet-domain sparsity, CS can be used for high-spatial-frequency regions while parallel imaging can be used for low-spatial-frequency regions. Fourier undersampling is also customized to better accommodate each reconstruction method: random undersampling for CS and regular undersampling for parallel imaging. Results Examples using the proposed method demonstrate successful reconstruction of both low-spatial-frequency content and fine structures in high-resolution 3D breast imaging with a net acceleration of 11 to 12. Conclusion The proposed method improves the reconstruction accuracy of high-spatial-frequency signal content and avoids incoherent artifacts in low-spatial-frequency regions. This new formulation also reduces the reconstruction time due to the smaller problem size. PMID:23280540

  15. High density terahertz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, S.; Pirali, O.; Roy, P.; Lampin, J.-F.; Ducournau, G.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-01-01

    Frequency combs have enabled significant progress in frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy extending the achievable resolution while increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. In its coherent mode, synchrotron radiation is accepted to provide an intense terahertz continuum covering a wide spectral range from about 0.1 to 1 THz. Using a dedicated heterodyne receiver, we reveal the purely discrete nature of this emission. A phase relationship between the light pulses leads to a powerful frequency comb spanning over one decade in frequency. The comb has a mode spacing of 846 kHz, a linewidth of about 200 Hz, a fractional precision of about 2 × 10−10 and no frequency offset. The unprecedented potential of the comb for high-resolution spectroscopy is demonstrated by the accurate determination of pure rotation transitions of acetonitrile. PMID:26190043

  16. Disruption of microalgal cells using high-frequency focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yuan, Wenqiao; Jiang, Xiaoning; Jing, Yun; Wang, Zhuochen

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of high-frequency focused ultrasound (HFFU) in microalgal cell disruption. Two microalgal species including Scenedesmus dimorphus and Nannochloropsis oculata were treated by a 3.2-MHz, 40-W focused ultrasound and a 100-W, low-frequency (20kHz) non-focused ultrasound (LFNFU). The results demonstrated that HFFU was effective in the disruption of microalgal cells, indicated by significantly increased lipid fluorescence density, the decrease of cell sizes, and the increase of chlorophyll a fluorescence density after treatments. Compared with LFNFU, HFFU treatment was more energy efficient. The combination of high and low frequency treatments was found to be even more effective than single frequency treatment at the same processing time, indicating that frequency played a critical role in cell disruption. In both HFFU and LFNFU treatments, the effectiveness of cell disruption was found to be dependent on the cell treated. PMID:24374364

  17. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  18. High frequency jet ventilation in fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, A; Simpson, D

    1986-11-01

    The use of high frequency jet ventilation in the management of a patient with fat embolism syndrome is described. Its principal advantage over conventional intermittent positive pressure ventilation is a reduction in the amount of sedation necessary. PMID:3789371

  19. Shift of the shadow boundary in high frequency scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zworski, Maciej

    1991-02-01

    The microlocal theory of diffraction is used to establish the conjecture of Keller and Rubinow relating the shift of the shadow boundary in high frequency scattering to the directional curvatures of a strictly convex obstacle.

  20. A deletion mutant of the latency-associated transcript of herpes simplex virus type 1 reactivates from the latent state with reduced frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Leib, D A; Bogard, C L; Kosz-Vnenchak, M; Hicks, K A; Coen, D M; Knipe, D M; Schaffer, P A

    1989-01-01

    We have generated and characterized a deletion mutant of herpes simplex virus type-1, dlLAT1.8, which lacks the putative promoter region, transcriptional start site, and 1,015 base pairs of the DNA sequences specifying the latency-associated transcripts (LATs). When tested in a CD-1 mouse ocular model, dlLAT1.8 was replication competent in the eye and in ganglia during acute infection but reactivated from explant cultures of ganglia with reduced efficiency (49%) relative to those of wild-type and marker-rescued viruses (94 and 85%, respectively) despite the fact that levels of mutant viral DNA in ganglia during latent infection were comparable to wild-type levels. The neurovirulence of KOS was not significantly altered by the removal of sequences specifying the LATs, as judged by numbers of animals dying on or before 30 days postinfection. Examination of ganglia latently infected with dlLAT1.8 by in situ hybridization revealed no LAT expression. The genotype of reactivated virus was identical to that of input dlLAT1.8 virus as judged by Southern blot analysis. These studies suggest that although the LATs are not essential for the establishment and reactivation of latency in our model, they may play a role in determining the frequency of reactivation of virus from the latent state. Images PMID:2542601

  1. High frequency, small signal MH loops of ferromagnetic thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Ong, K. G.

    2000-01-01

    A method is presented for transforming the high frequency bias susceptibility measurements of ferromagnetic thin films into the form of a MH loop with, depending upon the measurement geometry, the y-axis zero crossing giving a measure of the coercive force or anisotropy field. The loops provide a measure of the quantitative and qualitative high frequency switching properties of ferromagnetic thin films. c2000 American Institute of Physics.

  2. SEPP-ZVS High Frequency Inverter Incorporating Auxiliary Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Hiroyuki; Itoi, Misao; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper presents a novel circuit topology to attain ZVS operation of a high frequency inverter over a wide range output power regulation using a PWM control technique by connecting an auxiliary switch to the conventional single ended push-pull (SEPP) ZVS high frequency inverter. A switching current is injected into the main switches via the auxiliary switch only during the short period between its turn-on and off times to supply a current required for its ZVS operation.

  3. Soft Switching SEPP High Frequency Inverter for Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Hiroyuki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper presents a novel circuit topology to attain soft switching operation of a high frequency inverter. Its output power is regulated over a wide range using a PWM control technique by connecting an auxiliary resonant circuit to the conventional single ended push pull (SEPP) high frequency inverter for induction heating. All switching devices in the proposed inverter are operated soft switching mode. This paper describes its circuit constitution and obtained experimental results from a practical point of view.

  4. High-flow frequencies for selected streams in Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntzinger, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    Streamflow records are analyzed statistically to determine high-flow characteristics of selected streams in Oklahoma. Tables are included which show the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year high-flow frequencies for durations of 1, 3, 7, 30, 90, and 365 days. The log-Pearson Type III frequency distribution was used in the computations. Streamflow records used include data extending from 1903 to 1974.

  5. High frequency ultrasound with color Doppler in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Barcaui, Elisa de Oliveira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Lopes, Flavia Paiva Proença Lobo; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a method of imaging that classically is used in dermatology to study changes in the hypoderma, as nodules and infectious and inflammatory processes. The introduction of high frequency and resolution equipments enabled the observation of superficial structures, allowing differentiation between skin layers and providing details for the analysis of the skin and its appendages. This paper aims to review the basic principles of high frequency ultrasound and its applications in different areas of dermatology. PMID:27438191

  6. Characterizing Earthquake Rupture Properties Using Peak High-Frequency Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, L.; Meng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Teleseismic array back-projection (BP) of high frequency (~1Hz) seismic waves has been recently applied to image the aftershock sequence of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The BP method proves to be effective in capturing early aftershocks that are difficult to be detected due to the contamination of the mainshock coda wave. Furthermore, since the event detection is based on the identification of the local peaks in time series of the BP power, the resulting event location corresponds to the peak high-frequency energy rather than the hypocenter. In this work, we show that the comparison between the BP-determined catalog and conventional phase-picking catalog provides estimates of the spatial and temporal offset between the hypocenter and the peak high-frequency radiation. We propose to measure this peak high-frequency shift of global earthquakes between M4.0 to M7.0. We average the BP locations calibrated by multiple reference events to minimize the uncertainty due to the variation of 3D path effects. In our initial effort focusing on the foreshock and aftershock sequence of the 2014 Iquique earthquake, we find systematic shifts of the peak high-frequency energy towards the down-dip direction. We find that the amount of the shift is a good indication of rupture length, which scales with the earthquake magnitude. Further investigations of the peak high frequency offset may provide constraints on earthquake source properties such as rupture directivity, rupture duration, rupture speed, and stress drop.

  7. High-frequency homogenization of zero-frequency stop band photonic and phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonakakis, T.; Craster, R. V.; Guenneau, S.

    2013-10-01

    We present an accurate methodology for representing the physics of waves, in periodic structures, through effective properties for a replacement bulk medium: this is valid even for media with zero-frequency stop bands and where high-frequency phenomena dominate. Since the work of Lord Rayleigh in 1892, low-frequency (or quasi-static) behaviour has been neatly encapsulated in effective anisotropic media; the various parameters come from asymptotic analysis relying upon the ratio of the array pitch to the wavelength being sufficiently small. However, such classical homogenization theories break down in the high-frequency or stop band regime whereby the wavelength to pitch ratio is of order one. Furthermore, arrays of inclusions with Dirichlet data lead to a zero-frequency stop band, with the salient consequence that classical homogenization is invalid. Higher-frequency phenomena are of significant importance in photonics (transverse magnetic waves propagating in infinite conducting parallel fibres), phononics (anti-plane shear waves propagating in isotropic elastic materials with inclusions) and platonics (flexural waves propagating in thin-elastic plates with holes). Fortunately, the recently proposed high-frequency homogenization (HFH) theory is only constrained by the knowledge of standing waves in order to asymptotically reconstruct dispersion curves and associated Floquet-Bloch eigenfields: it is capable of accurately representing zero-frequency stop band structures. The homogenized equations are partial differential equations with a dispersive anisotropic homogenized tensor that characterizes the effective medium. We apply HFH to metamaterials, exploiting the subtle features of Bloch dispersion curves such as Dirac-like cones, as well as zero and negative group velocity near stop bands in order to achieve exciting physical phenomena such as cloaking, lensing and endoscope effects. These are simulated numerically using finite elements and compared to predictions

  8. Frequencies of Inaudible High-Frequency Sounds Differentially Affect Brain Activity: Positive and Negative Hypersonic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10–13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC. PMID:24788141

  9. High frequency source localization in a shallow ocean sound channel using frequency difference matched field processing.

    PubMed

    Worthmann, Brian M; Song, H C; Dowling, David R

    2015-12-01

    Matched field processing (MFP) is an established technique for source localization in known multipath acoustic environments. Unfortunately, in many situations, particularly those involving high frequency signals, imperfect knowledge of the actual propagation environment prevents accurate propagation modeling and source localization via MFP fails. For beamforming applications, this actual-to-model mismatch problem was mitigated through a frequency downshift, made possible by a nonlinear array-signal-processing technique called frequency difference beamforming [Abadi, Song, and Dowling (2012). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 3018-3029]. Here, this technique is extended to conventional (Bartlett) MFP using simulations and measurements from the 2011 Kauai Acoustic Communications MURI experiment (KAM11) to produce ambiguity surfaces at frequencies well below the signal bandwidth where the detrimental effects of mismatch are reduced. Both the simulation and experimental results suggest that frequency difference MFP can be more robust against environmental mismatch than conventional MFP. In particular, signals of frequency 11.2 kHz-32.8 kHz were broadcast 3 km through a 106-m-deep shallow ocean sound channel to a sparse 16-element vertical receiving array. Frequency difference MFP unambiguously localized the source in several experimental data sets with average peak-to-side-lobe ratio of 0.9 dB, average absolute-value range error of 170 m, and average absolute-value depth error of 10 m. PMID:26723312

  10. Frequencies of inaudible high-frequency sounds differentially affect brain activity: positive and negative hypersonic effects.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10-13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC. PMID:24788141

  11. Switch over to the high frequency rf systems near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Wei, J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to point out that since bunch narrowing naturally occurs in the acceleration process in the vicinity of transition, it should be possible to switch over to the high frequency system close to transition when the bunch has narrowed enough to fit directly into the high frequency bucket. The advantage of this approach is the simplicity, no extra components or gymnastics are required of the low frequency system. The disadvantage, of course, is for protons which do not go through transition. But on the other hand, there is no shortage of intensity for protons and so it should be possible to keep the phase space area low for protons, and then matching to the high frequency bucket should be easily accomplished by adiabatic compression. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Parametric Study of High Frequency Pulse Detonation Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Anderw D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes development of high frequency pulse detonation tubes similar to a small pulse detonation engine (PDE). A high-speed valve injects a charge of a mixture of fuel and air at rates of up to 1000 Hz into a constant area tube closed at one end. The reactants detonate in the tube and the products exit as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers are used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device and thrust is measured with a balance. The effects of injection frequency, fuel and air flow rates, tube length, and injection location are considered. Both H2 and C2H4 fuels are considered. Optimum (maximum specific thrust) fuel-air compositions and resonant frequencies are identified. Results are compared to PDE calculations. Design rules are postulated and applications to aerodynamic flow control and propulsion are discussed.

  13. Advanced waveforms and frequency with spinal cord stimulation: burst and high-frequency energy delivery.

    PubMed

    Pope, Jason E; Falowski, Steven; Deer, Tim R

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, software development has been key to the next generation of neuromodulation devices. In this review, we will describe the new strategies for electrical waveform delivery for spinal cord stimulation. A systematic literature review was performed using bibliographic databases, limited to the English language and human data, between 2010 and 2014. The literature search yielded three articles on burst stimulation and four articles on high-frequency stimulation. High-frequency and burst stimulation may offer advantages over tonic stimulation, as data suggest improved patient tolerance, comparable increase in function and possible success with a subset of patients refractory to tonic spinal cord stimulation. High-frequency and burst stimulation are new ways to deliver energy to the spinal cord that may offer advantages over tonic stimulation. These may offer new salvage strategies to mitigate spinal cord stimulation failure and improve cost-effectiveness by reducing explant rate. PMID:25846152

  14. Inhibition of cell wall turnover and autolysis by vancomycin in a highly vancomycin-resistant mutant of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Sieradzki, K; Tomasz, A

    1997-01-01

    A highly vancomycin-resistant mutant (MIC = 100 microg/ml) of Staphylococcus aureus, mutant VM, which was isolated in the laboratory by a step-pressure procedure, continued to grow and synthesize peptidoglycan in the presence of vancomycin (50 microg/ml) in the medium, but the antibiotic completely inhibited cell wall turnover and autolysis, resulting in the accumulation of cell wall material at the cell surface and inhibition of daughter cell separation. Cultures of mutant VM removed vancomycin from the growth medium through binding the antibiotic to the cell walls, from which the antibiotic could be quantitatively recovered in biologically active form. Vancomycin blocked the in vitro hydrolysis of cell walls by autolytic enzyme extracts, lysostaphin and mutanolysin. Analysis of UDP-linked peptidoglycan precursors showed no evidence for the presence of D-lactate-terminating muropeptides. While there was no significant difference in the composition of muropeptide units of mutant and parental cell walls, the peptidoglycan of VM had a significantly lower degree of cross-linkage. These observations and the results of vancomycin-binding studies suggest alterations in the structural organization of the mutant cell walls such that access of the vancomycin molecules to the sites of wall biosynthesis is blocked. PMID:9098053

  15. Inhibition of cell wall turnover and autolysis by vancomycin in a highly vancomycin-resistant mutant of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sieradzki, K; Tomasz, A

    1997-04-01

    A highly vancomycin-resistant mutant (MIC = 100 microg/ml) of Staphylococcus aureus, mutant VM, which was isolated in the laboratory by a step-pressure procedure, continued to grow and synthesize peptidoglycan in the presence of vancomycin (50 microg/ml) in the medium, but the antibiotic completely inhibited cell wall turnover and autolysis, resulting in the accumulation of cell wall material at the cell surface and inhibition of daughter cell separation. Cultures of mutant VM removed vancomycin from the growth medium through binding the antibiotic to the cell walls, from which the antibiotic could be quantitatively recovered in biologically active form. Vancomycin blocked the in vitro hydrolysis of cell walls by autolytic enzyme extracts, lysostaphin and mutanolysin. Analysis of UDP-linked peptidoglycan precursors showed no evidence for the presence of D-lactate-terminating muropeptides. While there was no significant difference in the composition of muropeptide units of mutant and parental cell walls, the peptidoglycan of VM had a significantly lower degree of cross-linkage. These observations and the results of vancomycin-binding studies suggest alterations in the structural organization of the mutant cell walls such that access of the vancomycin molecules to the sites of wall biosynthesis is blocked. PMID:9098053

  16. Dynamic high-resolution spectroscopic frequency referencing for frequency sweeping interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prellinger, Günther; Meiners-Hagen, Karl; Pollinger, Florian

    2016-06-01

    A spectroscopic reference for the intrinsic frequency calibration of a ranging system based on frequency-sweeping interferometry (FSI) is presented. Saturation spectroscopy of iodine transitions at 636.8 nm is used to generate well-defined frequency markers. The experimental and analytic implementation is shown to enable in principle a frequency determination with an uncertainty of 0.17 MHz for a coverage factor k = 1. This corresponds to a relative standard uncertainty of 1.5× {10}-7 as contribution to the combined measurement uncertainty of the FSI-based length measurement. But the analysis also reveals the high sensitivity of the actually achievable measurement uncertainty to the quality of the spectroscopic reference data.

  17. A semi-automated high-throughput approach to the generation of transposon insertion mutants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Yohann; Belougne, Jérôme; Scaglione, Sarah; Brandli, Dominique; Beclin, Christophe; Ewbank, Jonathan J

    2007-01-01

    The generation of a large collection of defined transposon insertion mutants is of general interest to the Caenorhabditis elegans research community and has been supported by the European Union. We describe here a semi-automated high-throughput method for mutant production and screening, using the heterologous transposon Mos1. The procedure allows routine culture of several thousand independent nematode strains in parallel for multiple generations before stereotyped molecular analyses. Using this method, we have already generated >17 500 individual strains carrying Mos1 insertions. It could be easily adapted to forward and reverse genetic screens and may influence researchers faced with making a choice of model organism. PMID:17164286

  18. Proteomic analysis of Spirogyra varians mutant with high starch content and growth rate induced by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Minchul; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Gwang Hoon; Kim, Dong-Ho; Park, Don-Hee

    2013-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a high-efficiency strain of Spirogyra varians for the production of biomass by radiation breeding. The characteristics of wild-type and mutant S. varians were analyzed through phenomenological and proteomic observations. The results of our phenomenological observations of the S. varians mutant demonstrated increases in growth rate and content of chlorophyll a, b, and a + b; in particular, a significant threefold increase was observed in starch accumulation. Proteomic analysis to investigate the differences in expression between wild-type and mutant proteins identified 18 proteins with significantly different expressions. From the literature review, it was confirmed that the up-regulated proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate biosynthesis, and energy metabolism. These results suggest the possibility of algae development by radiation breeding for the production of biofuel. PMID:23370702

  19. Prognostic significance of L1CAM expression and its association with mutant p53 expression in high-risk endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Gool, Inge C; Stelloo, Ellen; Nout, Remi A; Nijman, Hans W; Edmondson, Richard J; Church, David N; MacKay, Helen J; Leary, Alexandra; Powell, Melanie E; Mileshkin, Linda; Creutzberg, Carien L; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Bosse, Tjalling

    2016-02-01

    Studies in early-stage, predominantly low- and intermediate-risk endometrial cancer have demonstrated that L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) overexpression identifies patients at increased risk of recurrence, yet its prognostic significance in high-risk endometrial cancer is unclear. To evaluate this, its frequency, and the relationship of L1CAM with the established endometrial cancer biomarker p53, we analyzed the expression of both markers by immunohistochemistry in a pilot series of 116 endometrial cancers (86 endometrioid, 30 non-endometrioid subtype) with high-risk features (such as high tumor grade and deep myometrial invasion) and correlated results with clinical outcome. We used The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) endometrial cancer series to validate our findings. Using the previously reported cutoff of 10% positive staining, 51/116 (44%) tumors were classified as L1CAM-positive, with no significant association between L1CAM positivity and the rate of distant metastasis (P=0.195). However, increasing the threshold for L1CAM positivity to 50% resulted in a reduction of the frequency of L1CAM-positive tumors to 24% (28/116), and a significant association with the rate of distant metastasis (P=0.018). L1CAM expression was strongly associated with mutant p53 in the high-risk and TCGA series (P<0.001), although a substantial fraction (36% of endometrioid, 10% of non-endometrioid morphology) of p53-mutant endometrial cancers displayed <10% L1CAM positivity. Moreover, 30% of p53-wild-type non-endometrioid endometrial cancers demonstrated diffuse L1CAM staining, suggesting p53-independent mechanisms of L1CAM overexpression. In conclusion, the previously proposed threshold for L1CAM positivity of >10% does not predict prognosis in high-risk endometrial cancer, whereas an alternative threshold (>50%) does. L1CAM expression is strongly, but not universally, associated with mutant p53, and may be strong enough for clinical implementation as prognostic marker in combination

  20. Broadband high-resolution X-ray frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaletto, Stefano M.; Harman, Zoltán; Ott, Christian; Buth, Christian; Pfeifer, Thomas; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2014-07-01

    Optical frequency combs have had a remarkable impact on precision spectroscopy. Enabling this technology in the X-ray domain is expected to result in wide-ranging applications, such as stringent tests of astrophysical models and quantum electrodynamics, a more sensitive search for the variability of fundamental constants, and precision studies of nuclear structure. Ultraprecise X-ray atomic clocks may also be envisaged. In this work, an X-ray pulse-shaping method is proposed to generate a comb in the absorption spectrum of an ultrashort high-frequency pulse. The method employs an optical-frequency-comb laser, manipulating the system's dipole response to imprint a comb on an excited transition with a high photon energy. The described scheme provides higher comb frequencies and requires lower optical-comb peak intensities than currently explored methods, preserves the overall width of the optical comb, and may be implemented using currently available X-ray technology.

  1. Combination frequencies in high-amplitude δ Scuti stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balona, L. A.

    2016-06-01

    Short-cadence observations of δ Scuti stars in the Kepler field are used to investigate the physical nature of high-amplitude δ Scuti stars (HADS). Although it is often mentioned that HADS are transition objects between classical Cepheids and δ Scuti stars, neither ground-based or space-based observations support this view. It is found that HADS occur randomly within the instability strip. The possibility that HADS may be defined by the presence of combination frequencies is discussed. There is a weak tendency for the number of combination frequencies to increase with increasing amplitude of the parent frequencies. However, even stars with very low amplitudes may have detectable combination frequencies. Very few parent modes have a period ratio appropriate to first-overtone and fundamental radial modes. It appears that a high amplitude, in itself, is not useful as a distinguishing feature of δ Scuti stars.

  2. A high frequency transformer model for the EMTP

    SciTech Connect

    Morched, A.; Marti, L.; Ottevangers, J. )

    1993-07-01

    A model to simulate the high frequency behavior of a power transformer is presented. This model is based on the frequency characteristics of the transformer admittance matrix between its terminals over a given range of frequencies. The transformer admittance characteristics can be obtained from measurements or from detailed internal models based on the physical layout of the transformer. The elements of the nodal admittance matrix are approximated with rational functions consisting of real as well as complex conjugate poles and zeros. These approximations are realized in the form of an RLC network in a format suitable for direct use with EMTP. The high frequency transformer model can be used as a stand-alone linear model or as an add-on module of a more comprehensive model where iron core nonlinearities are represented in detail.

  3. Gravitational wave detection with high frequency phonon trapping acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Tobar, Michael E.

    2014-11-01

    There are a number of theoretical predictions for astrophysical and cosmological objects, which emit high frequency (1 06-1 09 Hz ) gravitation waves (GW) or contribute somehow to the stochastic high frequency GW background. Here we propose a new sensitive detector in this frequency band, which is based on existing cryogenic ultrahigh quality factor quartz bulk acoustic wave cavity technology, coupled to near-quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers at 20 mK. We show that spectral strain sensitivities reaching 1 0-22 per √{Hz } per mode is possible, which in principle can cover the frequency range with multiple (>100 ) modes with quality factors varying between 1 06 and 1 010 allowing wide bandwidth detection. Due to its compactness and well-established manufacturing process, the system is easily scalable into arrays and distributed networks that can also impact the overall sensitivity and introduce coincidence analysis to ensure no false detections.

  4. Frequency and time domain modeling of high speed amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalska, Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the lumped model of high speed amplifier useful for frequency and time domain (also large signal) simulation. Model is constructed on the basis of two-domain device measurements, namely small signal frequency parameters and time response to the input step of varying amplitude. Rational approximation of frequency domain data leads to small signal model composed of RLC subcircuits and controlled sources. Next, the model is complimented with the nonlinearities identified from time-domain measurements, including those taken for large input signals. Final amplifier model implemented in SPICE simulator is shown to correctly render the behavior of the device over the wide variety of operating conditions.

  5. High-power radio-frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.; Miller, H.W.

    1981-12-30

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  6. External high-frequency control of combustion instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Mitrofanov, G. A.; Kozar, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of combustion instability in the pulse combustor. Propane-air mixture is burned in the chamber with the flame holder. It was experimentally found that feeding high-frequency sound vibrations into the combustion chamber causes the suppression of pulsating combustion. The oscillation frequency ranges in 870 to 1400 Hz. This corresponds to 9-12 resonance frequencies of oscillations in the combustor. The physical mechanism of the observed phenomenon consists in changing the conditions of formation and destruction of fuel jets in the vortex zone behind the flame holder.

  7. Engineering Graphene Conductivity for Flexible and High-Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Alexander J; Carey, J David

    2015-10-14

    Advances in lightweight, flexible, and conformal electronic devices depend on materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity coupled with high mechanical strength. Defect-free graphene is one such material that satisfies both these requirements and which offers a range of attractive and tunable electrical, optoelectronic, and plasmonic characteristics for devices that operate at microwave, terahertz, infrared, or optical frequencies. Essential to the future success of such devices is therefore the ability to control the frequency-dependent conductivity of graphene. Looking to accelerate the development of high-frequency applications of graphene, here we demonstrate how readily accessible and processable organic and organometallic molecules can efficiently dope graphene to carrier densities in excess of 10(13) cm(-2) with conductivities at gigahertz frequencies in excess of 60 mS. In using the molecule 3,6-difluoro-2,5,7,7,8,8-hexacyanoquinodimethane (F2-HCNQ), a high charge transfer (CT) of 0.5 electrons per adsorbed molecule is calculated, resulting in p-type doping of graphene. n-Type doping is achieved using cobaltocene and the sulfur-containing molecule tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) with a CT of 0.41 and 0.24 electrons donated per adsorbed molecule, respectively. Efficient CT is associated with the interaction between the π electrons present in the molecule and in graphene. Calculation of the high-frequency conductivity shows dispersion-less behavior of the real component of the conductivity over a wide range of gigahertz frequencies. Potential high-frequency applications in graphene antennas and communications that can exploit these properties and the broader impacts of using molecular doping to modify functional materials that possess a low-energy Dirac cone are also discussed. PMID:26387636

  8. Search for a high frequency stochastic background of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampanis, Stefanos

    Over the past decades significant efforts have been made worldwide in the search for gravitational waves. Ground-based interferometry, primarily with the LIGO detectors, has reached a crucial point and it is believed that over the next few years a detection will take place. LIGO interferometers have recently completed collecting data from the longest science run that has been attempted so far. This thesis describes the search for a stochastic gravitational wave background radiation at high frequencies using data from the LIGO detectors located in Hanford, Washington USA. This is the first ever search for a stochastic signal at high frequencies by using data from two co-located interferometers. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to gravitational radiation as predicted by the general theory of relativity and the expected sources of gravitational waves with an emphasis on the stochastic background. Chapter 2 discusses the basic principles of laser interferometry and the experimental techniques used in modern ground-based interferometers such as the LIGO interferometers. Chapter 3 discusses in more detail the configuration, validation and characterization of the set of channels, "Fast Channels", that are used in the search for a high frequency stochastic background radiation. Chapter 4 is an introduction to the LIGO calibration and a more formal discussion on the calibration of the "Fast Channels". Chapter 5 introduces the cross-correlation analysis technique used in the search for a stochastic background and gives a thorough description of the data selection and analysis in searching for a high frequency stochastic signal with data from LIGO's fifth science run (S5). Chapter 6 concludes with the results obtained from the stochastic high frequency S5 analysis, discusses upper limits set at low and high frequencies from other searches and makes connection with Chapter 1 and the theoretical predictions and experimental bounds set within LIGO's frequency band of

  9. Quantitative insertion-site sequencing (QIseq) for high throughput phenotyping of transposon mutants.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Iraad F; Otto, Thomas D; Zhang, Min; Udenze, Kenneth; Wang, Chengqi; Quail, Michael A; Jiang, Rays H Y; Adams, John H; Rayner, Julian C

    2016-07-01

    Genetic screening using random transposon insertions has been a powerful tool for uncovering biology in prokaryotes, where whole-genome saturating screens have been performed in multiple organisms. In eukaryotes, such screens have proven more problematic, in part because of the lack of a sensitive and robust system for identifying transposon insertion sites. We here describe quantitative insertion-site sequencing, or QIseq, which uses custom library preparation and Illumina sequencing technology and is able to identify insertion sites from both the 5' and 3' ends of the transposon, providing an inbuilt level of validation. The approach was developed using piggyBac mutants in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum but should be applicable to many other eukaryotic genomes. QIseq proved accurate, confirming known sites in >100 mutants, and sensitive, identifying and monitoring sites over a >10,000-fold dynamic range of sequence counts. Applying QIseq to uncloned parasites shortly after transfections revealed multiple insertions in mixed populations and suggests that >4000 independent mutants could be generated from relatively modest scales of transfection, providing a clear pathway to genome-scale screens in P. falciparum QIseq was also used to monitor the growth of pools of previously cloned mutants and reproducibly differentiated between deleterious and neutral mutations in competitive growth. Among the mutants with fitness defects was a mutant with a piggyBac insertion immediately upstream of the kelch protein K13 gene associated with artemisinin resistance, implying mutants in this gene may have competitive fitness costs. QIseq has the potential to enable the scale-up of piggyBac-mediated genetics across multiple eukaryotic systems. PMID:27197223

  10. Quantitative insertion-site sequencing (QIseq) for high throughput phenotyping of transposon mutants

    PubMed Central

    Bronner, Iraad F.; Otto, Thomas D.; Zhang, Min; Udenze, Kenneth; Wang, Chengqi; Quail, Michael A.; Jiang, Rays H.Y.; Adams, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic screening using random transposon insertions has been a powerful tool for uncovering biology in prokaryotes, where whole-genome saturating screens have been performed in multiple organisms. In eukaryotes, such screens have proven more problematic, in part because of the lack of a sensitive and robust system for identifying transposon insertion sites. We here describe quantitative insertion-site sequencing, or QIseq, which uses custom library preparation and Illumina sequencing technology and is able to identify insertion sites from both the 5′ and 3′ ends of the transposon, providing an inbuilt level of validation. The approach was developed using piggyBac mutants in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum but should be applicable to many other eukaryotic genomes. QIseq proved accurate, confirming known sites in >100 mutants, and sensitive, identifying and monitoring sites over a >10,000-fold dynamic range of sequence counts. Applying QIseq to uncloned parasites shortly after transfections revealed multiple insertions in mixed populations and suggests that >4000 independent mutants could be generated from relatively modest scales of transfection, providing a clear pathway to genome-scale screens in P. falciparum. QIseq was also used to monitor the growth of pools of previously cloned mutants and reproducibly differentiated between deleterious and neutral mutations in competitive growth. Among the mutants with fitness defects was a mutant with a piggyBac insertion immediately upstream of the kelch protein K13 gene associated with artemisinin resistance, implying mutants in this gene may have competitive fitness costs. QIseq has the potential to enable the scale-up of piggyBac-mediated genetics across multiple eukaryotic systems. PMID:27197223

  11. Design of matching layers for high-frequency ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Chunlong; Ma, Jianguo; Chiu, Chi Tat; Williams, Jay A.; Fong, Wayne; Chen, Zeyu; Zhu, BenPeng; Xiong, Rui; Shi, Jing; Hsiai, Tzung K.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-09-01

    Matching the acoustic impedance of high-frequency (≥100 MHz) ultrasound transducers to an aqueous loading medium remains a challenge for fabricating high-frequency transducers. The traditional matching layer design has been problematic to establish high matching performance given requirements on both specific acoustic impedance and precise thickness. Based on both mass-spring scheme and microwave matching network analysis, we interfaced metal-polymer layers for the matching effects. Both methods hold promises for guiding the metal-polymer matching layer design. A 100 MHz LiNbO3 transducer was fabricated to validate the performance of the both matching layer designs. In the pulse-echo experiment, the transducer echo amplitude increased by 84.4% and its -6dB bandwidth increased from 30.2% to 58.3% comparing to the non-matched condition, demonstrating that the matching layer design method is effective for developing high-frequency ultrasonic transducers.

  12. Optimization of electric pulse amplitude and frequency in vitro for low voltage and high frequency electrochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shankayi, Zeinab; Firoozabadi, S M P; Hassan, Zohair Saraf

    2014-02-01

    During standard electrochemotherapy (ECT), using a train of 1,000 V/cm amplitude rectangular pulses with 1 Hz frequency, patients experience an unpleasant sensation and slight edema. According to the patients, muscle contractions provoked by high amplitude (about 1,000 V/cm) and low repetition frequency (1 Hz) pulses are the most unpleasant and painful sensations. Recently, ECT using low voltage and higher repetition frequency (LVHF) has been shown to be an effective tool for inhibiting tumor growth. The aim of the present study was to optimize electric pulse amplitude and repetition frequency for LVHF ECT by sampling the different sets of pulse parameters on cell viability and permeabilization. In ECT, a reversible effect based on high permeabilization is desirable. For this purpose, we used bleomycin to evaluate the permeabilization of K562 and MIA-PACA2 cells caused by low voltage (50-150 V/cm) and higher repetition frequency (4-6 kHz) electric pulses. We show that the reversible effect with electropermeabilization of the cells caused by LVHF ECT is accessible; this interaction is more effective for electric pulses with 70 V/cm amplitude. PMID:24271721

  13. Frequency and amplitude transitioned waveforms mitigate the onset response in high frequency nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Gerges, Meana; Foldes, Emily L.; Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Narendra; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    High frequency alternating currents (HFAC) have proven to be a reversible and rapid method of blocking peripheral nerve conduction, holding promise for treatment of disorders associated with undesirable neuronal activity. The delivery of HFAC is characterized by a transient period of neural firing at its inception, termed the “onset response”. The onset response is minimized for higher frequencies and higher amplitudes, but requires larger currents. However, complete block can be maintained at lower frequencies and amplitudes, using lower currents. In this in-vivo study on whole mammalian peripheral nerves, we demonstrate a method to minimize the onset response by initiating the block using a stimulation paradigm with a high frequency and large amplitude, and then transitioning to a low frequency and low amplitude waveform, reducing the currents required to maintain the conduction block. In five of six animals it was possible to transition from a 30 kHz to a 10 kHz waveform without inducing any transient neural firing. The minimum transition time was 0.03 sec. Transition activity was minimized or eliminated with longer transition times. The results of this study show that this method is feasible for achieving a nerve block with minimal onset responses and current amplitude requirements. PMID:20966536

  14. Frequency Division Multiplexed Multichannel High-Speed Fluorescence Confocal Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fei; Zhang, Xueqian; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Shi, Kebin; Liu, Zhiwen; Luo, Claire; Yin, Stuart; Ruffin, Paul

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we report a new type of fluorescence confocal microscope: frequency division multiplexed multichannel fluorescence confocal microscope, in which we encode the spatial location information into the frequency domain. In this microscope, the exciting laser beam is first split into multiple beams and each beam is modulated at a different frequency. These multiple beams are focused at different locations of the target to form multiple focal points, which further generate multiple fluorescent emission spots. The fluorescent emissions from different focal points are also modulated at different frequencies, because the exciting beams are modulated at different frequencies (or difference carrier frequency). Then, all the fluorescent emissions (modulated at different frequencies) are collected together and detected by a highly sensitive, large-dynamic-range photomultiplier tube. By demodulating the detected signal (i.e., via the Fourier transform), we can distinguish the fluorescent light emitted from the different locations by the corresponding carrier frequencies. The major advantage of this unique fluorescence confocal microscope is that it not only has a high sensitivity because of the use of photomultiplier tube but also can get multiple-point data simultaneously, which is crucial to study the dynamic behavior of many biological process. As an initial step, to verify the feasibility of the proposed multichannel confocal microscope, we have developed a two-channel confocal fluorescence microscope and applied it to study the dynamic behavior of the changes of the calcium ion concentration during the single cardiac myocyte contraction. Our preliminary experimental results demonstrated that we could indeed realize multichannel confocal fluorescence microscopy by utilizing the frequency division multiplexed microscope, which could become an effective tool to study the dynamic behavior of many biological processes. PMID:16815894

  15. Screening, purification, and identification of annexin B1 mutants with high phosphatidylserine-binding activity and reduced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Luo, Quan-Yong; He, Ying; Sun, Shu-Han

    2007-06-01

    Annexin B1 has many potential biomedical applications based on its high affinity for negatively charged phospholipid (phosphatidylserine, PS) in the presence of physiological concentrations of calcium. Low immunogenicity is prerequisite for the in vivo application of a nonhuman protein as a novel-imaging agent. In the present study, three sequence-deleted mutants with different numbers of functional domains were designed and expressed according to the predicted three-dimensional structure of annexin B1. The mutants of annexin B1, as well as the wild-type annexin B1, were expressed as Glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fusion proteins. Two mutants with their purity above 80% could be obtained after one-step primary purification procedure on basis of the PS-binding activity. The immunogenicity of the two mutants was evaluated in mice by detecting the titers of elicited antigen-specific IgG. A member of three mutants of annexin B1, M12, which involved N-terminal amino-acid sequence and double functional domain I and II of annexin B1, was finally selected to detect apoptosis that is due to its lowest immunogenicity among the candidate mutants. Flourescein isothiocyanate-labeled M12 could bind the outer membranes of apoptotic cells and discriminate apoptotic cells in the early stage from necrotic cells when used with propidium iodide. (99m)Tc-labeled M12 could recognize the apoptotic hepatocytes induced by anti-Fas antibody treatment. Our data in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that M12 could be applied as a promising agent for the detection of apoptosis. PMID:17384946

  16. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics.

  17. Investigation of iron cobalt nanocomposites for high frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kelsy J.

    FeCo-based nanocomposite soft magnetic materials were developed in collaboration with Magnetics, Division of Spang and Co., for high frequency and high temperature application. Excellent soft magnetic properties include: low coercivity, high permeability, low energy losses, etc. These and large saturation inductions make these alloys attractive for fundamental studies and industrial applications. In this thesis, nanocrystalline composites will be developed from amorphous precursors for applications in two frequency regimes: 1) High frequency (0.01-30 MHz) such as high temperature power inductors, pulsed power transformers, and radio frequency (rf) magnetic heating; and 2) Ultra high frequency (30 MHz - 30 GHz) for radio frequency materials and electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI) absorption. New nanocomposites with higher saturation induction and high-temperature stability were developed with reduced glass forming elements such as Zr, Nb, Si and B. The amounts of the magnetic transition metals and early transition metal growth inhibitors were varied to determine trade-offs between higher inductions and fine microstructures and consequently low magnetic losses. Alloys having (Fe1-xCox)80+y+zNb4-y B13-zSi2Cu1 (25 ≤ x ≤ 50 and y = 0-4 and z = 0-3) nominal compositions were cast using planar flow casting (PFC) at Magnetics. Technical magnetic properties: permeability, maximum induction, remanence ratio, coercive field and high frequency magnetic losses as a function of composition and annealing temperature are reported after primary crystallization for 1 hr in a transverse magnetic field (TMF). Of note is the development of inductor cores with maximum inductions in excess of 1.76 T and 1.67 T in cores that exhibit power losses comparable with state of the art commercial soft magnetic alloys. For application in EMI/RFI absorption, FeCo-based alloys have the largest saturation induction and a tunable magnetic anisotropy which may

  18. High frequency optical pulse generation by frequency doubling using polarization rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we propose and experimentally characterize a stable 40 GHz optical pulse generation by frequency doubling using polarization rotation in a phase modulator (PM). Only half the electrical driving frequency is required (i.e. 20 GHz); hence the deployment cost can be reduced. Besides, precise control of the bias of the PM is not required. The generated optical pulses have a high center-mode-suppression-ratio (CMSR) of  >  28 dB. The single sideband (SSB) noise spectrum is also measured, and the time-domain waveforms under different CMSRs are also analyzed and discussed.

  19. High-throughput genotyping of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants using fluorescent PCR-capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Yan, Tingdong; Cheung, Alice M S; Chuah, Charles T H; Li, Shang

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the engineering of sequence-specific synthetic nucleases provide enormous opportunities for genetic manipulation of gene expression in order to study their cellular function in vivo. However, current genotyping methods to detect these programmable nuclease-induced insertion/deletion (indel) mutations in targeted human cells are not compatible for high-throughput screening of knockout clones due to inherent limitations and high cost. Here, we describe an efficient method of genotyping clonal CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants in a high-throughput manner involving the use of a direct lysis buffer to extract crude genomic DNA straight from cells in culture, and fluorescent PCR coupled with capillary gel electrophoresis. This technique also allows for genotyping of multiplexed gene targeting in a single clone. Overall, this time- and cost-saving technique is able to circumvent the limitations of current genotyping methods and support high-throughput screening of nuclease-induced mutants. PMID:26498861

  20. High-throughput genotyping of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants using fluorescent PCR-capillary gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Yan, Tingdong; Cheung, Alice M. S.; Chuah, Charles T. H.; Li, Shang

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the engineering of sequence-specific synthetic nucleases provide enormous opportunities for genetic manipulation of gene expression in order to study their cellular function in vivo. However, current genotyping methods to detect these programmable nuclease-induced insertion/deletion (indel) mutations in targeted human cells are not compatible for high-throughput screening of knockout clones due to inherent limitations and high cost. Here, we describe an efficient method of genotyping clonal CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutants in a high-throughput manner involving the use of a direct lysis buffer to extract crude genomic DNA straight from cells in culture, and fluorescent PCR coupled with capillary gel electrophoresis. This technique also allows for genotyping of multiplexed gene targeting in a single clone. Overall, this time- and cost-saving technique is able to circumvent the limitations of current genotyping methods and support high-throughput screening of nuclease-induced mutants. PMID:26498861

  1. High Frequency Amplitude Detector for GMI Magnetic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Asfour, Aktham; Zidi, Manel; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    A new concept of a high-frequency amplitude detector and demodulator for Giant-Magneto-Impedance (GMI) sensors is presented. This concept combines a half wave rectifier, with outstanding capabilities and high speed, and a feedback approach that ensures the amplitude detection with easily adjustable gain. The developed detector is capable of measuring high-frequency and very low amplitude signals without the use of diode-based active rectifiers or analog multipliers. The performances of this detector are addressed throughout the paper. The full circuitry of the design is given, together with a comprehensive theoretical study of the concept and experimental validation. The detector has been used for the amplitude measurement of both single frequency and pulsed signals and for the demodulation of amplitude-modulated signals. It has also been successfully integrated in a GMI sensor prototype. Magnetic field and electrical current measurements in open- and closed-loop of this sensor have also been conducted. PMID:25536003

  2. High frequency ultrasound imaging in pupillary block glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Aslanides, I M; Libre, P E; Silverman, R H; Reinstein, D Z; Lazzaro, D R; Rondeau, M J; Harmon, G K; Coleman, D J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The diagnosis of pupillary block glaucoma requires sufficient clarity of the ocular media. This is particularly important for assessment of both the presence and patency of an iridotomy, and the determination of central anterior chamber depth. METHODS--High frequency ultrasonography was used in three patients with suspected pupillary block to determine iris configuration, posterior chamber volume, and ciliary body conformation. RESULTS--All patients demonstrated high frequency ultrasonographic findings consistent with pupillary block: iris bombé, a formed posterior chamber, and a lack of anterior rotation of the ciliary processes. CONCLUSION--High frequency ultrasound imaging appears to be a valuable adjunct in making or corroborating the diagnosis of pupillary block glaucoma. Images PMID:8534666

  3. A digital multigate Doppler method for high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Ye, Zongying; Yu, Yanyan; Chen, Yan; Chi, Liyang; Mu, Peitian; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive visualization of blood flow with high frequency Doppler ultrasound has been extensively used to assess the morphology and hemodynamics of the microcirculation. A completely digital implementation of multigate pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler method was proposed in this paper for high frequency ultrasound applications. Analog mixer was eliminated by a digital demodulator and the same data acquisition path was shared with traditional B-mode imaging which made the design compact and flexible. Hilbert transform based quadrature demodulation scheme was employed to achieve the multigate Doppler acquisition. A programmable high frequency ultrasound platform was also proposed to facilitate the multigate flow visualization. Experimental results showed good performance of the proposed method. Parabolic velocity gradient inside the vessel and velocity profile with different time slots were acquired to demonstrate the functionality of the multigate Doppler. Slow wall motion was also recorded by the proposed method. PMID:25061836

  4. A Digital Multigate Doppler Method for High Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Weibao; Ye, Zongying; Yu, Yanyan; Chen, Yan; Chi, Liyang; Mu, Peitian; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive visualization of blood flow with high frequency Doppler ultrasound has been extensively used to assess the morphology and hemodynamics of the microcirculation. A completely digital implementation of multigate pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler method was proposed in this paper for high frequency ultrasound applications. Analog mixer was eliminated by a digital demodulator and the same data acquisition path was shared with traditional B-mode imaging which made the design compact and flexible. Hilbert transform based quadrature demodulation scheme was employed to achieve the multigate Doppler acquisition. A programmable high frequency ultrasound platform was also proposed to facilitate the multigate flow visualization. Experimental results showed good performance of the proposed method. Parabolic velocity gradient inside the vessel and velocity profile with different time slots were acquired to demonstrate the functionality of the multigate Doppler. Slow wall motion was also recorded by the proposed method. PMID:25061836

  5. Control of high frequency microactuators using active structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, P. A.; Alvi, F. S.; Reese, B. M.; Oates, W. S.

    2015-02-01

    A fluidically driven microactuator that generates supersonic, pulsed microjets has been implemented with smart materials to actively and precisely control the frequency of the microjets in a closed-loop manner. Since this actuator relies on a number of microscale flow and acoustic phenomena to produce the pulsed microjets, its resonant frequency is determined by its geometry and other flow parameters. The design discussed in this paper integrates piezoelectric stacks by connecting them to movable sidewalls within the actuator such that the microactuator's internal geometry can be controlled by varying the voltage across the piezo-stacks. An open-loop control scheme demonstrates the frequency modulation capabilities that are enabled with this design: very large frequency deviations (up to +/- 500 Hz) around the actuator design frequency are attained at very high rates (up to 1 kHz). Closed-loop control of the microactuator's frequency was also demonstrated, and the results indicate that (combined with appropriate sensors) this actuator could be used effectively for active, feedback control in high-speed, resonance-dominated flowfields. This proof of concept study clearly illustrates the ability of this robust and compact actuator to produce perturbations that can be modulated and controlled based on the desired control objective.

  6. High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekpewu, M.; Mensah, S. Y.; Musah, R.; Mensah, N. G.; Abukari, S. S.; Dompreh, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in undoped single walled achiral Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) under the influence of ac-dc driven fields was considered. We investigated semi-classically Boltzmann's transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons' source by deriving the current densities in CNTs. Plots of the normalized current density versus frequency of ac-field revealed an increase in both the minimum and maximum peaks of normalized current density at lower frequencies as a result of a strong injection of hot electrons. The applied ac-field plays a twofold role of suppressing the space-charge instability in CNTs and simultaneously pumping an energy for lower frequency generation and amplification of THz radiations. These have enormous promising applications in very different areas of science and technology.

  7. Motor monitoring method and apparatus using high frequency current components

    DOEpatents

    Casada, Donald A.

    1996-01-01

    A motor current analysis method and apparatus for monitoring electrical-motor-driven devices. The method and apparatus utilize high frequency portions of the motor current spectra to evaluate the condition of the electric motor and the device driven by the electric motor. The motor current signal produced as a result of an electric motor is monitored and the low frequency components of the signal are removed by a high-pass filter. The signal is then analyzed to determine the condition of the electrical motor and the driven device.

  8. Motor monitoring method and apparatus using high frequency current components

    DOEpatents

    Casada, D.A.

    1996-05-21

    A motor current analysis method and apparatus for monitoring electrical-motor-driven devices are disclosed. The method and apparatus utilize high frequency portions of the motor current spectra to evaluate the condition of the electric motor and the device driven by the electric motor. The motor current signal produced as a result of an electric motor is monitored and the low frequency components of the signal are removed by a high-pass filter. The signal is then analyzed to determine the condition of the electrical motor and the driven device. 16 figs.

  9. Carrier Tunneling in High-Frequency Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ganichev, S.D.; Ziemann, E.; Gleim, T.; Prettl, W.; Ganichev, S.D.; Yassievich, I.N.; Perel, V.I.; Wilke, I.; Haller, E.E.

    1998-03-01

    An enhancement of tunnel ionization of deep impurities in semiconductors in an alternating field as compared to static fields has been observed. The transition between the quasistatic and the high-frequency regime is determined by the tunneling time. For the case of deep impurities this is the time of redistribution of the defect vibrational system which depends strongly on temperature and the impurity structure. A theory of tunnel ionization of deep impurities by high-frequency fields has been developed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. High-frequency nonreciprocal reflection from magnetic films with overlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Nie, Yan; Camley, R. E.

    2013-11-14

    We perform a theoretical study of the nonreciprocal reflection of high-frequency microwave radiation from ferromagnetic films with thin overlayers. Reflection from metallic ferromagnetic films is always near unity and shows no nonreciprocity. In contrast, reflection from a structure which has a dielectric overlayer on top of a film composed of insulated ferromagnetic nanoparticles or nanostructures can show significant nonreciprocity in the 75–80 GHz frequency range, a very high value. This can be important for devices such as isolators or circulators.

  11. High-resolution optical frequency metrology with stabilized femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ronald Jason

    The merging of such seemingly disparate fields as optical frequency metrology and ultrafast physics over the past few years has had a revolutionary impact on both fields. Extensive research over the past several decades has focused on stabilizing cw lasers to atomic and molecular transitions. These transitions in the optical and near-infrared regimes provide some of the highest Q's accessible in spectroscopy due to their high resonant frequencies (Q ≡ nu o/deltanu). Modern experiments have enjoyed increasing levels of precision and accuracy due to such stabilized laser systems. A long standing problem in optical frequency metrology, however, is the difficulty to perform direct frequency measurements in the optical spectrum. Traditional optical frequency chains are complex, costly, and lack flexibility. Recent experiments based on mode-locked femtosecond (fs) lasers promise to eliminate this problem and make optical frequency measurements accessible as a general laboratory tool. The use of fs lasers now enables the direct measurement of optical transitions by simply linking these frequencies to the repetition rate of the fs laser. The ability of the femtosecond laser to link the optical and radio frequency regimes is ultimately limited by its stability. In this dissertation, we present a novel stabilization scheme in which the frequency, phase, and repetition rate of a Kerr-lens mode-locked (KLM) ti:sapphire laser are locked to that of an ultra-stable Fabry-Perot reference cavity. The large signal to noise ratio of the recovered cavity resonance allows the superb short term stability (tau < 1 second) of the passive reference cavity to be transferred to the femtosecond laser. This technique may find future application in any experiment involving the use of femtosecond pulses in which a resonant cavity is employed, such as intracavity studies of light-matter interactions with ultra-short pulses. The short term instability of the cavity stabilized femtosecond laser

  12. High frequency fatigue testing of Udimet 700 at 1400 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conn, A. F.; Rudy, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation pertaining to the development of life prediction methods for materials subjected to high temperature creep/fatigue conditions is presented. High frequency (13.4 kHz) fatigue data were measured at 1400 F on specimens of the nickel-based alloy Udimet 700. Tests were conducted on the virgin material, as well as on specimens which had received prior exposures to high temperature, fatigue, and creep.

  13. High-Frequency Normal Mode Propagation in Aluminum Cylinders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic measurements made using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) transducers in aluminum cylinders reveal waveform features with high amplitudes and with velocities that depend on the feature's dominant frequency. In a given waveform, high-frequency features generally arrive earlier than low-frequency features, typical for normal mode propagation. To analyze these waveforms, the elastic equation is solved in a cylindrical coordinate system for the high-frequency case in which the acoustic wavelength is small compared to the cylinder geometry, and the surrounding medium is air. Dispersive P- and S-wave normal mode propagations are predicted to exist, but owing to complex interference patterns inside a cylinder, the phase and group velocities are not smooth functions of frequency. To assess the normal mode group velocities and relative amplitudes, approximate dispersion relations are derived using Bessel functions. The utility of the normal mode theory and approximations from a theoretical and experimental standpoint are demonstrated by showing how the sequence of P- and S-wave normal mode arrivals can vary between samples of different size, and how fundamental normal modes can be mistaken for the faster, but significantly smaller amplitude, P- and S-body waves from which P- and S-wave speeds are calculated.

  14. High frequency dielectrophoretic response of microalgae over time

    PubMed Central

    Hadady, Hanieh; Wong, Johnson J.; Hiibel, Sage R.; Redelman, Doug; Geiger, Emil J.

    2015-01-01

    The high frequency dielectrophoresis (>20 MHz) response of microalgae cells with different lipid content was monitored over time. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was cultured in regular medium and under nitrogen-depleted conditions in order to produce populations of cells with low and high lipid content, respectively. The electrical conductivity (EC) of the culture media was also monitored over the same time. The upper crossover frequency (UCOF) decreased for high-lipid cells over time. The single-shell model predicts that the upper crossover frequency is dictated primarily by the dielectric properties of the cytoplasm. The high frequency DEP response of the high-lipid cells’ cytoplasm was changed by lipid accumulation. DEP response of the low-lipid cells also varied with the conductivity of the culture media due to nutrient consumption. Relative lipid content was estimated with BODIPY 505/515 dye by calculating the area-weighted intensity average of fluorescent images. Finally, microalgae cells were successfully separated based on lipid content at 41 MHz and DEP media conductivity 106 ± 1 µS/cm. PMID:25229637

  15. A quantitative method for defining high-arched palate using the Tcof1(+/-) mutant mouse as a model.

    PubMed

    Conley, Zachary R; Hague, Molly; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Dixon, Jill; Dixon, Michael J; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-15

    The palate functions as the roof of the mouth in mammals, separating the oral and nasal cavities. Its complex embryonic development and assembly poses unique susceptibilities to intrinsic and extrinsic disruptions. Such disruptions may cause failure of the developing palatal shelves to fuse along the midline resulting in a cleft. In other cases the palate may fuse at an arch, resulting in a vaulted oral cavity, termed high-arched palate. There are many models available for studying the pathogenesis of cleft palate but a relative paucity for high-arched palate. One condition exhibiting either cleft palate or high-arched palate is Treacher Collins syndrome, a congenital disorder characterized by numerous craniofacial anomalies. We quantitatively analyzed palatal perturbations in the Tcof1(+/-) mouse model of Treacher Collins syndrome, which phenocopies the condition in humans. We discovered that 46% of Tcof1(+/-) mutant embryos and new born pups exhibit either soft clefts or full clefts. In addition, 17% of Tcof1(+/-) mutants were found to exhibit high-arched palate, defined as two sigma above the corresponding wild-type population mean for height and angular based arch measurements. Furthermore, palatal shelf length and shelf width were decreased in all Tcof1(+/-) mutant embryos and pups compared to controls. Interestingly, these phenotypes were subsequently ameliorated through genetic inhibition of p53. The results of our study therefore provide a simple, reproducible and quantitative method for investigating models of high-arched palate. PMID:26772999

  16. Activation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae filamentation/invasion pathway by osmotic stress in high-osmolarity glycogen pathway mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, K. D.; Williams, K. E.; Ullmann, B. D.; Gustin, M. C.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are frequently used signal transduction mechanisms in eukaryotes. Of the five MAPK cascades in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the high-osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway functions to sense and respond to hypertonic stress. We utilized a partial loss-of-function mutant in the HOG pathway, pbs2-3, in a high-copy suppressor screen to identify proteins that modulate growth on high-osmolarity media. Three high-copy suppressors of pbs2-3 osmosensitivity were identified: MSG5, CAK1, and TRX1. Msg5p is a dual-specificity phosphatase that was previously demonstrated to dephosphorylate MAPKs in yeast. Deletions of the putative MAPK targets of Msg5p revealed that kss1delta could suppress the osmosensitivity of pbs2-3. Kss1p is phosphorylated in response to hyperosmotic shock in a pbs2-3 strain, but not in a wild-type strain nor in a pbs2-3 strain overexpressing MSG5. Both TEC1 and FRE::lacZ expressions are activated in strains lacking a functional HOG pathway during osmotic stress in a filamentation/invasion-pathway-dependent manner. Additionally, the cellular projections formed by a pbs2-3 mutant on high osmolarity are absent in strains lacking KSS1 or STE7. These data suggest that the loss of filamentation/invasion pathway repression contributes to the HOG mutant phenotype.

  17. Clustered Desynchronization from High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    While high-frequency deep brain stimulation is a well established treatment for Parkinson’s disease, its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that two competing hypotheses, desynchronization and entrainment in a population of model neurons, may not be mutually exclusive. We find that in a noisy group of phase oscillators, high frequency perturbations can separate the population into multiple clusters, each with a nearly identical proportion of the overall population. This phenomenon can be understood by studying maps of the underlying deterministic system and is guaranteed to be observed for small noise strengths. When we apply this framework to populations of Type I and Type II neurons, we observe clustered desynchronization at many pulsing frequencies. PMID:26713619

  18. Clustered Desynchronization from High-Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2015-12-01

    While high-frequency deep brain stimulation is a well established treatment for Parkinson's disease, its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that two competing hypotheses, desynchronization and entrainment in a population of model neurons, may not be mutually exclusive. We find that in a noisy group of phase oscillators, high frequency perturbations can separate the population into multiple clusters, each with a nearly identical proportion of the overall population. This phenomenon can be understood by studying maps of the underlying deterministic system and is guaranteed to be observed for small noise strengths. When we apply this framework to populations of Type I and Type II neurons, we observe clustered desynchronization at many pulsing frequencies. PMID:26713619

  19. Newly identified natural high oleate mutant from Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. hypogaea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural genetic variation exists in animals and plants. Mining and utilizing this variation may provide benefits for new breed/cultivar development. From screening over 4,000 cultivated peanut germplasm accessions, we identified two natural mutant lines with 80% oleic acid by gas chromatography anal...

  20. Single cell protein production from yacon extract using a highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant of the marine yeast Cryptococcus aureus G7a and its nutritive analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Hai; Zhang, Tong; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Chi, Zhe; Li, Jing; Wang, Xiang-Hong

    2010-06-01

    The intracellular protein in the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant can be easily released when they are incubated both in the low-osmolarity water and at the non-permissive temperature (usually 37 degrees C). After the mutant was grown in the yacon extract for 45 h, the crude protein content in the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant Z114 was 59.1% and over 61% of the total protein could be released from the cells treated at 37 degrees C. The mutant cells grown in the yacon extract still contained high level of essential amino acids and other nutrients. This means that the yacon extract could be used as the medium for growth of the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant which contained high content of crude protein. PMID:19727833

  1. Automated Screening for High-Frequency Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, Robert C.; Jansen, Marije; Moore, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hearing loss at high frequencies produces perceptual difficulties and is often an early sign of a more general hearing loss. This study reports the development and validation of two new speech-based hearing screening tests in English that focus on detecting hearing loss at frequencies above 2000 Hz. Design: The Internet-delivered, speech-in noise tests used closed target-word sets of digit triplets or consonant–vowel–consonant (CVC) words presented against a speech-shaped noise masker. The digit triplet test uses the digits 0 to 9 (excluding the disyllabic 7), grouped in quasi-random triplets. The CVC test uses simple words (e.g., “cat”) selected for the high-frequency spectral content of the consonants. During testing, triplets or CVC words were identified in an adaptive procedure to obtain the speech reception threshold (SRT) in noise. For these new, high-frequency (HF) tests, the noise was low-pass filtered to produce greater masking of the low-frequency speech components, increasing the sensitivity of the test for HF hearing loss. Individual test tokens (digits, CVCs) were first homogenized using a group of 10 normal-hearing (NH) listeners by equalizing intelligibility across tokens at several speech-in-noise levels. Both tests were then validated and standardized using groups of 24 NH listeners and 50 listeners with hearing impairment. Performance on the new high frequency digit triplet (HF-triplet) and CVC (HF-CVC) tests was compared with audiometric hearing loss, and with that on the unfiltered, broadband digit triplet test (BB-triplet) test, and the ASL (Adaptive Sentence Lists) speech-in-noise test. Results: The HF-triplet and HF-CVC test results (SRT) both correlated positively and highly with high-frequency audiometric hearing loss and with the ASL test. SRT for both tests as a function of high-frequency hearing loss increased at nearly three times the rate as that of the BB-triplet test. The intraindividual variability (SD) on the

  2. High frequency alternating current chip nano calorimeter with laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Shoifet, E.; Schick, C.; Chua, Y. Z.; Huth, H.

    2013-07-15

    Heat capacity spectroscopy at frequencies up to 100 kHz is commonly performed by thermal effusivity measurements applying the 3ω-technique. Here we show that AC-calorimetry using a thin film chip sensor allows for the measurement of frequency dependent heat capacity in the thin film limit up to about 1 MHz. Using films thinner than the thermal length of the thermal wave (∼1 μm) at such frequencies is advantageous because it provides heat capacity alone and not in combination with other quantities like thermal conductivity, at least on a qualitative basis. The used calorimetric sensor and the sample are each less than 1 μm thick. For high frequency AC-calorimetry, high cooling rates at very small temperature differences are required. This is realized by minimizing the heated spot to the size of the on chip thermocouple (3 × 6 μm{sup 2}). A modulated laser beam shaped and positioned by a glass fiber is used as the heat source. The device was used to measure the complex heat capacity in the vicinity of the dynamic glass transition (structural relaxation) of poly(methyl methacrylate). Combining different calorimeters finally provides data between 10{sup −3} Hz and 10{sup 6} Hz. In this frequency range the dynamic glass transition shifts about 120 K.

  3. Extremely high-frequency micro-Doppler measurements of humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Silvious, Jerry L.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Green, Jeremy A.; Wikner, David A.

    2014-05-01

    The development of sensors that are capable of penetrating smoke, dust, fog, clouds, and rain is critical for maintaining situational awareness in degraded visual environments and for providing support to the Warfighter. Atmospheric penetration properties, the ability to form high-resolution imagery with modest apertures, and available source power make the extremely high-frequency (EHF) portion of the spectrum promising for the development of radio frequency (RF) sensors capable of penetrating visual obscurants. Comprehensive phenomenology studies including polarization and backscatter properties of relevant targets are lacking at these frequencies. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing a fully-polarimetric frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) instrumentation radar to explore polarization and backscatter properties of in-situ rain, scattering from natural and man-made surfaces, and the radar cross section and micro-Doppler signatures of humans at EHF frequencies, specifically, around the 220 GHz atmospheric window. This work presents an overview of the design and construction of the radar system, hardware performance, data acquisition software, and initial results including an analysis of human micro-Doppler signatures.

  4. High frequency electrical conduction block of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, Narendra; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin; Gustafson, Kenneth J.

    2006-06-01

    A reversible electrical block of the pudendal nerves may provide a valuable method for restoration of urinary voiding in individuals with bladder-sphincter dyssynergia. This study quantified the stimulus parameters and effectiveness of high frequency (HFAC) sinusoidal waveforms on the pudendal nerves to produce block of the external urethral sphincter (EUS). A proximal electrode on the pudendal nerve after its exit from the sciatic notch was used to apply low frequency stimuli to evoke EUS contractions. HFAC at frequencies from 1 to 30 kHz with amplitudes from 1 to 10 V were applied through a conforming tripolar nerve cuff electrode implanted distally. Sphincter responses were recorded with a catheter mounted micro-transducer. A fast onset and reversible motor block was obtained over this range of frequencies. The HFAC block showed three phases: a high onset response, often a period of repetitive firing and usually a steady state of complete or partial block. A complete EUS block was obtained in all animals. The block thresholds showed a linear relationship with frequency. HFAC pudendal nerve stimulation effectively produced a quickly reversible block of evoked urethral sphincter contractions. The HFAC pudendal block could be a valuable tool in the rehabilitation of bladder-sphincter dyssynergia.

  5. High-frequency dynamics of heterogeneous slender structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Éric

    2013-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of the theoretical modeling of high-frequency linear dynamics of built-up structures including the influence of uncertainties by a probabilistic approach. Its analytical developments are enlightened by a preliminary discussion on the vibrational responses of such systems as observed from some experiments conducted in a broad frequency range of excitation. The paper first reviews the main engineering approaches used so far to address the higher frequency domain, namely the statistical energy analysis and the vibrational conductivity analogy. Both methods establish heuristic steady diffusion equations to describe the spatial distribution of the vibrational energy. It is then argued that several limitations and assumptions which restrict their range of validity may be released if a wave transport model is invoked. The latter describes the multiple reflections of high-frequency elastic waves in heterogeneous (possibly random) media adopting a kinetic point of view pertaining to the associated energy density. Transient transport equations evolve into unsteady diffusion equations after long times, supporting in this respect the engineering approaches. Thus the second part of the paper is devoted to a generic presentation of some recent works on kinetic transport models for application to structural dynamics. This objective requires the extension of the existing results of that theory to include dissipation and boundary effects. The proposed models are illustrated by a numerical example showing their consistency with an SEA computation, and the concurrence of a time domain simulation with a frequency domain result.

  6. Osteogenic Effect of High-frequency Acceleration on Alveolar Bone

    PubMed Central

    Alikhani, M.; Khoo, E.; Alyami, B.; Raptis, M.; Salgueiro, J.M.; Oliveira, S.M.; Boskey, A.; Teixeira, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation contributes to the health of alveolar bone, but no therapy using the osteogenic effects of these stimuli to increase alveolar bone formation has been developed. We propose that the application of high-frequency acceleration to teeth in the absence of significant loading is osteogenic. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided among control, sham, and experimental groups. The experimental group underwent localized accelerations at different frequencies for 5 min/day on the occlusal surface of the maxillary right first molar at a very low magnitude of loading (4 µε). Sham rats received a similar load in the absence of acceleration or frequency. The alveolar bone of the maxilla was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (µCT), histology, fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR imaging), and RT-PCR for osteogenic genes. Results demonstrate that application of high-frequency acceleration significantly increased alveolar bone formation. These effects were not restricted to the area of application, and loading could be replaced by frequency and acceleration. These studies propose a simple mechanical therapy that may play a significant role in alveolar bone formation and maintenance. PMID:22337699

  7. MUTANT FREQUENCIES AND LOSS OF HETEROZYGOSITY INDUCED BY N-ETHYL-N-NITROSOUREA (ENU) IN THE THYMIDINE KINASE (TK) GENE OF L5178YTK+/-3.7.2C MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MUTANT FREQUENCIES AND LOSS HETEROZYGOSITY INDUCED BY N-ETHYK-N-NITROSOUREA (ENU) IN THE THYMIDINE KINASE (tk) GENE IF l5178Y/TK+/-3.7.2C MOUSE LYMPHOMA CELLS

    N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) is a potent monofunctional-ethylating agent that has been found to be mutagenic in a w...

  8. Piezoelectric films for high frequency ultrasonic transducers in biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qifa; Lau, Sienting; Wu, Dawei; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric films have recently attracted considerable attention in the development of various sensor and actuator devices such as nonvolatile memories, tunable microwave circuits and ultrasound transducers. In this paper, an overview of the state of art in piezoelectric films for high frequency transducer applications is presented. Firstly, the basic principles of piezoelectric materials and design considerations for ultrasound transducers will be introduced. Following the review, the current status of the piezoelectric films and recent progress in the development of high frequency ultrasonic transducers will be discussed. Then details for preparation and structure of the materials derived from piezoelectric thick film technologies will be described. Both chemical and physical methods are included in the discussion, namely, the sol–gel approach, aerosol technology and hydrothermal method. The electric and piezoelectric properties of the piezoelectric films, which are very important for transducer applications, such as permittivity and electromechanical coupling factor, are also addressed. Finally, the recent developments in the high frequency transducers and arrays with piezoelectric ZnO and PZT thick film using MEMS technology are presented. In addition, current problems and further direction of the piezoelectric films for very high frequency ultrasound application (up to GHz) are also discussed. PMID:21720451

  9. The Origin of High-Frequency Hearing in Whales.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Morgan; Martinez-Caceres, Manuel; de Muizon, Christian; Mnieckowski, Jessica; Geisler, Jonathan H

    2016-08-22

    Odontocetes (toothed whales) rely upon echoes of their own vocalizations to navigate and find prey underwater [1]. This sensory adaptation, known as echolocation, operates most effectively when using high frequencies, and odontocetes are rivaled only by bats in their ability to perceive ultrasonic sound greater than 100 kHz [2]. Although features indicative of ultrasonic hearing are present in the oldest known odontocetes [3], the significance of this finding is limited by the methods employed and taxa sampled. In this report, we describe a new xenorophid whale (Echovenator sandersi, gen. et sp. nov.) from the Oligocene of South Carolina that, as a member of the most basal clade of odontocetes, sheds considerable light on the evolution of ultrasonic hearing. By placing high-resolution CT data from Echovenator sandersi, 2 hippos, and 23 fossil and extant whales in a phylogenetic context, we conclude that ultrasonic hearing, albeit in a less specialized form, evolved at the base of the odontocete radiation. Contrary to the hypothesis that odontocetes evolved from low-frequency specialists [4], we find evidence that stem cetaceans, the archaeocetes, were more sensitive to high-frequency sound than their terrestrial ancestors. This indicates that selection for high-frequency hearing predates the emergence of Odontoceti and the evolution of echolocation. PMID:27498568

  10. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks.

  11. High-Frequency Oscillations and Seizure Generation in Neocortical Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Greg A.; Parish, Landi; Cranstoun, Stephen D.; Jonas, Rachel; Baltuch, Gordon; Litt, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Neocortical seizures are often poorly localized, explosive and widespread at onset, making them poorly amenable to epilepsy surgery in the absence of associated focal brain lesions. We describe, for the first time in an unselected group of patients with neocortical epilepsy, the finding that high-frequency (60--100 Hz) epileptiform oscillations…

  12. Collocations of High Frequency Noun Keywords in Prescribed Science Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Sujatha; Mukundan, Jayakaran

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the discourse of science through the study of collocational patterns of high frequency noun keywords in science textbooks used by upper secondary students in Malaysia. Research has shown that one of the areas of difficulty in science discourse concerns lexis, especially that of collocations. This paper describes a corpus-based…

  13. High Efficiency Mode Converter for Low-Frequency Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Ryutaro; Kariya, Tsuyoshi; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Mitsunaka, Yoshika; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2011-03-01

    A high efficiency quasi-optical (QO) mode converter for high-power, low-frequency gyrotron have been designed and tested. For low-frequency gyrotrons, the scales of the mode converter are comparatively small on the wavelength scale, thus causing significant diffraction losses. Over-1 MW power gyrotron with TE8,3 cavity at 28 GHz have been developed, which has a high efficiency mode converter designed by the use of numerical methods for launcher optimization. This calculation is sufficiently optimized to maximize the fractional Gaussian content of the far field. The total transmission efficiency from the mode converter to output window is 94.7%. For the experimental result of first tube, the output power of more than 1 MW has been obtained with about 40% efficiency and output burn pattern agrees fairly with the calculated profiles, which imply the design appropriateness. Besides, the frequency dependence for diffraction loss is discussed, and these results give the guiding design principle of the mode converter for high-power, low-frequency and long-pulse gyrotrons.

  14. Note: High precision measurements using high frequency gigahertz signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Aohan; Fu, Siyuan; Sakurai, Atsunori; Liu, Liang; Edman, Fredrik; Pullerits, Tõnu; Öwall, Viktor; Karki, Khadga Jung

    2014-12-01

    Generalized lock-in amplifiers use digital cavities with Q-factors as high as 5 × 108 to measure signals with very high precision. In this Note, we show that generalized lock-in amplifiers can be used to analyze microwave (giga-hertz) signals with a precision of few tens of hertz. We propose that the physical changes in the medium of propagation can be measured precisely by the ultra-high precision measurement of the signal. We provide evidence to our proposition by verifying the Newton's law of cooling by measuring the effect of change in temperature on the phase and amplitude of the signals propagating through two calibrated cables. The technique could be used to precisely measure different physical properties of the propagation medium, for example, the change in length, resistance, etc. Real time implementation of the technique can open up new methodologies of in situ virtual metrology in material design.

  15. An Arabidopsis Mutant with High Cyclic Electron Flow around Photosystem I (hcef) Involving the NADPH Dehydrogenase Complex[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Aaron K.; Cruz, Jeffrey A.; Kohzuma, Kaori; Dhingra, Amit; Kramer, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEFI) has been proposed to balance the chloroplast energy budget, but the pathway, mechanism, and physiological role remain unclear. We isolated a new class of mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana, hcef for high CEF1, which shows constitutively elevated CEF1. The first of these, hcef1, was mapped to chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. Crossing hcef1 with pgr5, which is deficient in the antimycin A–sensitive pathway for plastoquinone reduction, resulted in a double mutant that maintained the high CEF1 phenotype, implying that the PGR5-dependent pathway is not involved. By contrast, crossing hcef1 with crr2-2, deficient in thylakoid NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH) complex, results in a double mutant that is highly light sensitive and lacks elevated CEF1, suggesting that NDH plays a direct role in catalyzing or regulating CEF1. Additionally, the NdhI component of the NDH complex was highly expressed in hcef1, whereas other photosynthetic complexes, as well as PGR5, decreased. We propose that (1) NDH is specifically upregulated in hcef1, allowing for increased CEF1; (2) the hcef1 mutation imposes an elevated ATP demand that may trigger CEF1; and (3) alternative mechanisms for augmenting ATP cannot compensate for the loss of CEF1 through NDH. PMID:20081115

  16. Masking of low-frequency signals by high-frequency, high-level narrow bands of noisea

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Harisadhan; Roup, Christina M.; Feth, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Low-frequency masking by intense high-frequency noise bands, referred to as remote masking (RM), was the first evidence to challenge energy-detection models of signal detection. Its underlying mechanisms remain unknown. RM was measured in five normal-hearing young-adults at 250, 350, 500, and 700 Hz using equal-power, spectrally matched random-phase noise (RPN) and low-noise noise (LNN) narrowband maskers. RM was also measured using equal-power, two-tone complex (TC2) and eight-tone complex (TC8). Maskers were centered at 3000 Hz with one or two equivalent rectangular bandwidths (ERBs). Masker levels varied from 80 to 95 dB sound pressure level in 5 dB steps. LNN produced negligible masking for all conditions. An increase in bandwidth in RPN yielded greater masking over a wider frequency region. Masking for TC2 was limited to 350 and 700 Hz for one ERB but shifted to only 700 Hz for two ERBs. A spread of masking to 500 and 700 Hz was observed for TC8 when the bandwidth was increased from one to two ERBs. Results suggest that high-frequency noise bands at high levels could generate significant low-frequency masking. It is possible that listeners experience significant RM due to the amplification of various competing noises that might have significant implications for speech perception in noise. PMID:21361445

  17. Instantaneous high-resolution multiple-frequency measurement system based on frequency-to-time mapping technique.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan A; Chan, Erwin H W; Minasian, Robert A

    2014-04-15

    A new microwave photonic instantaneous frequency measurement system that can simultaneously measure multiple-frequency signals while achieving very high resolution and wide frequency measurement range is presented. It is based on the frequency-to-time mapping technique implemented using a frequency shifting recirculating delay line loop and a narrowband optical filter realized by the in-fiber stimulated Brillouin scattering effect. Experimental results demonstrate the realization of a multiple-frequency measurement capability over a frequency range of 0.1-20 GHz that can be extended to 90 GHz, and with a measurement resolution of 250 MHz. PMID:24979008

  18. High-speed optical frequency-domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.; Iftimia, N.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate high-speed, high-sensitivity, high-resolution optical imaging based on optical frequency-domain interferometry using a rapidly-tuned wavelength-swept laser. We derive and show experimentally that frequency-domain ranging provides a superior signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional time-domain ranging as used in optical coherence tomography. A high sensitivity of −110 dB was obtained with a 6 mW source at an axial resolution of 13.5 µm and an A-line rate of 15.7 kHz, representing more than an order-of-magnitude improvement compared with previous OCT and interferometric imaging methods. PMID:19471415

  19. Black phosphorus nanoelectromechanical resonators vibrating at very high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenghui; Jia, Hao; Zheng, Xuqian; Yang, Rui; Wang, Zefang; Ye, G J; Chen, X H; Shan, Jie; Feng, Philip X-L

    2015-01-21

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a new type of nanoelectromechanical resonator based on black phosphorus crystals. Facilitated by a highly efficient dry transfer technique, crystalline black phosphorus flakes are harnessed to enable drumhead resonators vibrating at high and very high frequencies (HF and VHF bands, up to ∼100 MHz). We investigate the resonant vibrational responses from the black phosphorus crystals by devising both electrical and optical excitation schemes, in addition to measuring the undriven thermomechanical motions in these suspended nanostructures. Flakes with thicknesses from ∼200 nm down to ∼20 nm clearly exhibit elastic characteristics transitioning from the plate to the membrane regime. Both frequency- and time-domain measurements of the nanomechanical resonances show that very thin black phosphorus crystals hold interesting potential for moveable and vibratory devices and for semiconductor transducers where high-speed mechanical motions could be coupled to the attractive electronic and optoelectronic properties of black phosphorus. PMID:25385657

  20. Testing the high turbulence level breakdown of low-frequency gyrokinetics against high-frequency cyclokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhao; Waltz, R. E.

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents numerical simulations of the nonlinear cyclokinetic equations in the cyclotron harmonic representation [R. E. Waltz and Zhao Deng, Phys. Plasmas 20, 012507 (2013)]. Simulations are done with a local flux-tube geometry and with the parallel motion and variation suppressed using a newly developed rCYCLO code. Cyclokinetic simulations dynamically follow the high-frequency ion gyro-phase motion which is nonlinearly coupled into the low-frequency drift-waves possibly interrupting and suppressing gyro-averaging and increasing the transport over gyrokinetic levels. By comparing the more fundamental cyclokinetic simulations with the corresponding gyrokinetic simulations, the breakdown of gyrokinetics at high turbulence levels is quantitatively tested over a range of relative ion cyclotron frequency 10 < Ω*{sup  }< 100 where Ω*{sup  }= 1/ρ*, and ρ* is the relative ion gyroradius. The gyrokinetic linear mode rates closely match the cyclokinetic low-frequency rates for Ω*{sup  }> 5. Gyrokinetic transport recovers cyclokinetic transport at high relative ion cyclotron frequency (Ω*{sup  }≥ 50) and low turbulence level as required. Cyclokinetic transport is found to be lower than gyrokinetic transport at high turbulence levels and low-Ω* values with stable ion cyclotron (IC) modes. The gyrokinetic approximation is found to break down when the density perturbations exceed 20%. For cyclokinetic simulations with sufficiently unstable IC modes and sufficiently low Ω*{sup  }∼ 10, the high-frequency component of cyclokinetic transport level can exceed the gyrokinetic transport level. However, the low-frequency component of the cyclokinetic transport and turbulence level does not exceed that of gyrokinetics. At higher and more physically relevant Ω*{sup  }≥ 50 values and physically realistic IC driving rates, the low-frequency component of the cyclokinetic transport and turbulence level is still smaller than that of

  1. Feasibility of using frequency offset on very high frequency air/ground voice channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badinelli, Martin; Cushman, Arthur; Randazzo, Philip

    1990-03-01

    In some large Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control sectors, the controller manually switches between multiple ground transmitters to communicate with aircraft at opposite ends of the sector. This puts an additional burden on the controller. Aeronautical Radio, Inc. (ARINC) uses a frequency offset system which produces five frequencies from one channel assignment. ARINC provides this service to commercial air carriers who use receivers designed to ARINC specifications. These receivers are capable of eliminating the audio heterodyne generated by the offsetting process. The commercial air carriers use this system for airline business. The testing performed at the FAA Technical Center to evaluate this system as a means of controlling the air traffic in large sectors is described. The tests indicate that a frequency offset system cannot be used with general aviation aircraft receivers because many cannot filter out the audio heterodyne. Use of frequency offset may be possible in high altitude sectors where commercial aviation receivers, which meet ARINC specifications, are used if some additional concerns are resolved.

  2. High Frequency Ultrasound of Armor-Grade Alumina Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottiglieri, S.; Haber, R. A.

    2009-03-01

    Different lots of high density, commercial, armor-grade alumina (Al2O3) were tested using high frequency ultrasound in order to determine any correlation between measured properties and ballistic performance. C-scan images were taken using a 15 MHz ultrasonic transducer in order to form attenuation coefficient and elastic property maps. These samples were further characterized by using quantitative analysis. The results indicate that attenuation coefficient values appear to have the strongest correlation, of every property measured, to ballistic classifications.

  3. Dynamics and sensitivity analysis of high-frequency conduction block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Niloy; Gerges, Meana; Thomas, Peter J.

    2011-10-01

    The local delivery of extracellular high-frequency stimulation (HFS) has been shown to be a fast acting and quickly reversible method of blocking neural conduction and is currently being pursued for several clinical indications. However, the mechanism for this type of nerve block remains unclear. In this study, we investigate two hypotheses: (1) depolarizing currents promote conduction block via inactivation of sodium channels and (2) the gating dynamics of the fast sodium channel are the primary determinate of minimal blocking frequency. Hypothesis 1 was investigated using a combined modeling and experimental study to investigate the effect of depolarizing and hyperpolarizing currents on high-frequency block. The results of the modeling study show that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing currents play an important role in conduction block and that the conductance to each of three ionic currents increases relative to resting values during HFS. However, depolarizing currents were found to promote the blocking effect, and hyperpolarizing currents were found to diminish the blocking effect. Inward sodium currents were larger than the sum of the outward currents, resulting in a net depolarization of the nodal membrane. Our experimental results support these findings and closely match results from the equivalent modeling scenario: intra-peritoneal administration of the persistent sodium channel blocker ranolazine resulted in an increase in the amplitude of HFS required to produce conduction block in rats, confirming that depolarizing currents promote the conduction block phenomenon. Hypothesis 2 was investigated using a spectral analysis of the channel gating variables in a single-fiber axon model. The results of this study suggested a relationship between the dynamical properties of specific ion channel gating elements and the contributions of corresponding conductances to block onset. Specifically, we show that the dynamics of the fast sodium inactivation gate are

  4. Dynamics and sensitivity analysis of high frequency conduction block

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Niloy; Gerges, Meana; Thomas, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The local delivery of extracellular high frequency stimulation (HFS) has been shown to be a fast acting and quickly reversible method of blocking neural conduction, and is currently being pursued for several clinical indications. However, the mechanism for this type of nerve block remains unclear. In this study, we investigate two hypotheses: 1) That depolarizing currents promote conduction block via inactivation of sodium channels, and 2) that the gating dynamics of the fast sodium channel are the primary determinate of minimal blocking frequency. Hypothesis 1 was investigated using a combined modeling and experimental study to investigate the effect of depolarizing and hyperpolarizing currents on high frequency block. The results of the modeling study show that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing currents play an important role in conduction block and that the conductance to each of three ionic currents increases relative to resting values during HFS. However, depolarizing currents were found to promote the blocking effect, and hyperpolarizing currents were found to diminish the blocking effect. Inward sodium currents were larger than the sum of the outward currents, resulting in a net depolarization of the nodal membrane. Our experimental results support these findings and closely match results from the equivalent modeling scenario: intra-peritoneal administration of the persistent sodium channel blocker ranolazine resulted in an increase in the amplitude of HFS required to produce conduction block in rats, confirming that depolarizing currents promote the conduction block phenomenon. Hypothesis 2 was investigated using a spectral analysis of the channel gating variables in a single fiber axon model. The results of this study suggested a relationship between the dynamical properties of specific ion channel gating elements and the contributions of corresponding conductances to block onset. Specifically, we show that the dynamics of the fast sodium inactivation

  5. High-frequency multi-wavelength acoustic power maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Frank; Ladenkov, Oleg; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic power maps have been constructed using SOHO/MDI velocity and intensity data in Ni I 6768; NSO High-L Helioseismometer (HLH) Ca K intensity; and Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON) intensity in Ca K. The HLH data provides maps up to a frequency of 11.9 mHz, substantially higher than the usual 8.33 mHz. The Ca K observations show a surprising strong enhancement of power within a sunspot at all temporal frequencies, while the Ni I data show the well-known suppression of power. Tests suggest that this apparent acoustic enhancement is the result of strong intensity gradients observed through terrestrial seeing.

  6. State-of-the-art graphene high-frequency electronics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanqing; Jenkins, Keith A; Valdes-Garcia, Alberto; Farmer, Damon B; Zhu, Yu; Bol, Ageeth A; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Zhu, Wenjuan; Xia, Fengnian; Avouris, Phaedon; Lin, Yu-Ming

    2012-06-13

    High-performance graphene transistors for radio frequency applications have received much attention and significant progress has been achieved. However, devices based on large-area synthetic graphene, which have direct technological relevance, are still typically outperformed by those based on mechanically exfoliated graphene. Here, we report devices with intrinsic cutoff frequency above 300 GHz, based on both wafer-scale CVD grown graphene and epitaxial graphene on SiC, thus surpassing previous records on any graphene material. We also demonstrate devices with optimized architecture exhibiting voltage and power gains reaching 20 dB and a wafer-scale integrated graphene amplifier circuit with voltage amplification. PMID:22563820

  7. Phenotypic Switching in Mycoplasma gallisepticum Hemadsorption Is Governed by a High-Frequency, Reversible Point Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Winner, Florian; Markovà, Ivana; Much, Peter; Lugmair, Albin; Siebert-Gulle, Karin; Vogl, Gunther; Rosengarten, Renate; Citti, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a flask-shaped organism that commonly induces chronic respiratory disease in chickens and infectious sinusitis in turkeys. Phenotypic switching in M. gallisepticum hemadsorption (HA) was found to correlate with phase variation of the GapA cytadhesin concurrently with that of the CrmA protein, which exhibits cytadhesin-related features and is encoded by a gene located downstream of the gapA gene as part of the same transcription unit. In clones derived from strain Rlow, detailed genetic analyses further revealed that on-off switching in GapA expression is governed by a reversible base substitution occurring at the beginning of the gapA structural gene. In HA− variants, this event generates a stop codon that results in the premature termination of GapA translation and consequently affects the expression of CrmA. Sequences flanking the mutation spot do not feature any repeated motifs that could account for error-prone mutation via DNA slippage and the exact mechanism underlying this high-frequency mutational event remains to be elucidated. An HA− mutant deficient in producing CrmA, mHAD3, was obtained by disrupting the crmA gene by using transposition mutagenesis. Despite a fully functional gapA gene, the amount of GapA detected in this mutant was considerably lower than in HA+ clonal variants, suggesting that, in absence of CrmA, GapA might be subjected to a higher turnover. PMID:12595441

  8. High frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy

    2013-12-01

    A new method for the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is developed based on the characteristic matrix method. This method is useful for studying planar samples or stack of planar samples. The terahertz radiation was generated by optical rectification in a ZnTe crystal and detected by another ZnTe crystal via electro-optic sampling method. In this new characteristic matrix based method, the spectra of the sample and reference waveforms will be modeled by using characteristic matrices. We applied this new method to measure the optical constants of air. The terahertz transmission through the layered systems air-Teflon-air-Quartz-air and Nitrogen gas-Teflon-Nitrogen gas-Quartz-Nitrogen gas was modeled by the characteristic matrix method. A transmission coefficient is derived from these models which was optimized to fit the experimental transmission coefficient to extract the optical constants of air. The optimization of an error function involving the experimental complex transmission coefficient and the theoretical transmission coefficient was performed using patternsearch algorithm of MATLAB. Since this method takes account of the echo waveforms due to reflections in the layered samples, this method allows analysis of longer time-domain waveforms giving rise to very high frequency resolution in the frequency-domain. We have presented the high frequency resolution terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of air and compared the results with the literature values. We have also fitted the complex susceptibility of air to the Lorentzian and Gaussian functions to extract the linewidths.

  9. High-power single-frequency fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Weihua

    Single frequency laser sources are desired in many applications. Various architectures for achieving high power single frequency fiber laser outputs have been investigated and demonstrated. Axial gain apodization can affect the lasing threshold and spectral modal discrimination of DFB lasers. Modeling results show that if properly tailored, the lasing threshold can be reduced by 21% without sacrificing modal discrimination, while simultaneously increasing the differential output power between both ends of the laser. A dual-frequency 2 cm silica fiber laser with a wavelength spacing of 0.3 nm was demonstrated using a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber Bragg grating (FBG) reflector. The output power reached 43 mW with the optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) greater than 60 dB. By thermally tuning the overlap between the spectra of PM FBG and SM FBG, a single polarisation, single frequency fibre laser was also demonstrated with an output power of 35 mW. From the dual frequency fiber laser, dual frequency switching was achieved by tuning the pump power of the laser. The dual frequency switching was generated by the thermal effects of the absorbed pump in the ytterbium doped fiber. Suppression and elimination of self pulsing in a watt level, dual clad ytterbium doped fiber laser was demonstrated. Self pulsations are caused by the dynamic interaction between the photon population and the population inversion. The addition of a long section of passive fiber in the laser cavity makes the gain recovery faster than the self pulsation dynamics, allowing only stable continuous wave lasing. A single frequency, hybrid Brillouin/ytterbium fiber laser was demonstrated in a 12 m ring cavity The output power reached 40 mW with an OSNR greater than 50 dB. To scale up the output power, a dual clad hybrid Brillouin/ytterbium fiber laser was studied. A numerical model including third order SBS was used to calculate the laser power performance. Simulation shows that 5 W single

  10. Isolation of a highly active photosystem II preparation from Synechocystis 6803 using a histidine-tagged mutant of CP 47.

    PubMed

    Bricker, T M; Morvant, J; Masri, N; Sutton, H M; Frankel, L K

    1998-11-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis was used to produce a Synechocystis mutant containing a histidine tag at the C terminus of the CP 47 protein of Photosystem II. This mutant cell line, designated HT-3, exhibited slightly above normal rates of oxygen evolution and appeared to accumulate somewhat more Photosystem II reaction centers than a control strain. A rapidly isolatable (<7 h) oxygen-evolving Photosystem II preparation was prepared from HT-3 using dodecyl-beta-d-maltoside solubilization and Co2+ metal affinity chromatography. This histidine-tagged Photosystem II preparation stably evolved oxygen at a high rate (2440 micromol O2 (mg chl)-1 h-1), exhibited an alpha-band absorption maximum at 674 nm, and was highly enriched in a number of Photosystem II components including cytochrome c550. Fluorescence yield analysis using water or hydroxylamine as an electron donor to the Photosystem II preparation indicated that virtually all of the Photosystem II reaction centers were capable of evolving oxygen. Proteins associated with Photosystem II were highly enriched in this preparation. 3,3',5, 5'-Tetramethylbenzidine staining indicated that the histidine-tagged preparation was enriched in cytochromes c550 and b559 and depleted of cytochrome f. This result was confirmed by optical difference spectroscopy. This histidine-tagged Photosystem II preparation may be very useful for the isolation of Photosystem II preparations from mutants containing lesions in other Photosystem II proteins. PMID:9804889

  11. Highly flexible distributions to fit multiple frequency financial returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenSaïda, Ahmed; Slim, Skander

    2016-01-01

    Financial data are usually studied via low flexible distributions, independently of the frequency of the data, due to their simplicity and analytical tractability. In this paper we analyze two highly flexible five-parameter distributions into fitting financial returns, these are the skewed generalized t (SGT) and the generalized hyperbolic (GH). Applications carried on two exchange rates (Euro-Dollar and Dollar-Yen), and two indexes (S&P 500 and Nikkei 225) over four frequencies: weekly, daily, 30-min and 5-min, confirm the superiority of the SGT and GH in approximating the distribution of a given data at a remarkable precision. Moreover, as we move from higher to lower frequency, the distribution's overall shape does indeed change radically, and the estimated parameters refute the tendency to normality, which calls into question the aggregational Gaussianity's stylized fact.

  12. A high-performance Hg(+) trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    A high-performance frequency standard based on (199)Hg(+) ions confined in a hybrid radio frequency (RF)/dc linear ion trap is demonstrated. This trap permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. A 160-mHz-wide atomic resonance line for the 40.5-GHz clock transition is used to steer the output of a 5-mHz crystal oscillator to obtain a stability of 2 x 10(exp -15) for 24,000-second averaging times. Measurements with a 37-mHz line width for the Hg(+) clock transition demonstrate that the inherent stability for this frequency standard is better than 1 x 10(exp -15) at 10,000-second averaging times.

  13. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha

    2002-01-01

    A simple and compact method and apparatus for detecting high frequency electric fields, particularly in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 100 MHz, uses a compact toroidal antenna. For typical geophysical applications the sensor will be used to detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from about 1 MHz, in particular in the frequency range between 1 to 100 MHz, to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Time-varying magnetic fields associated with time-varying electric fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroidal coil. The electric field at the center of (and perpendicular to the plane of) the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroidal coil one can easily and accurately determine the electric field.

  14. Graphene Quantum Capacitors for High Frequency Tunable Analog Applications.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Clara F; Vitale, Wolfgang A; Sharma, Pankaj; Tamagnone, Michele; Mosig, Juan R; Ionescu, Adrian M

    2016-08-10

    Graphene quantum capacitors (GQC) are demonstrated to be enablers of radio-frequency (RF) functions through voltage-tuning of their capacitance. We show that GQC complements MEMS and MOSFETs in terms of performance for high frequency analog applications and tunability. We propose a CMOS compatible fabrication process and report the first experimental assessment of their performance at microwaves frequencies (up to 10 GHz), demonstrating experimental GQCs in the pF range with a tuning ratio of 1.34:1 within 1.25 V, and Q-factors up to 12 at 1 GHz. The figures of merit of graphene variable capacitors are studied in detail from 150 to 350 K. Furthermore, we describe a systematic, graphene specific approach to optimize their performance and predict the figures of merit achieved if such a methodology is applied. PMID:27387370

  15. Compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for converter type modulator applications.

    PubMed

    Reghu, T; Mandloi, V; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-04-01

    The design and development of a compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for a converter type modulator of klystron amplifiers is presented. The transformer has been designed to operate at a frequency of 20 kHz and at a flux swing of ±0.6 T. Iron (Fe) based nanocrystalline material has been selected as a core for the construction of the transformer. The transformer employs a specially designed solid Teflon bobbin having 120 kV insulation for winding the high voltage secondary windings. The flux swing of the core has been experimentally found by plotting the hysteresis loop at actual operating conditions. Based on the design, a prototype transformer has been built which is per se a unique combination of high voltage, high frequency, and peak power specifications. The transformer was able to provide 58 kV (pk-pk) at the secondary with a peak power handling capability of 700 kVA. The transformation ratio was 1:17. The performance of the transformer is also presented and discussed. PMID:27131709

  16. Compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for converter type modulator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reghu, T.; Mandloi, V.; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-04-01

    The design and development of a compact high voltage, high peak power, high frequency transformer for a converter type modulator of klystron amplifiers is presented. The transformer has been designed to operate at a frequency of 20 kHz and at a flux swing of ±0.6 T. Iron (Fe) based nanocrystalline material has been selected as a core for the construction of the transformer. The transformer employs a specially designed solid Teflon bobbin having 120 kV insulation for winding the high voltage secondary windings. The flux swing of the core has been experimentally found by plotting the hysteresis loop at actual operating conditions. Based on the design, a prototype transformer has been built which is per se a unique combination of high voltage, high frequency, and peak power specifications. The transformer was able to provide 58 kV (pk-pk) at the secondary with a peak power handling capability of 700 kVA. The transformation ratio was 1:17. The performance of the transformer is also presented and discussed.

  17. Studies on radiosensitive lines of Drosophila. IX. Analysis of fertility and frequency of dominant lethal mutations in the gamma-irradiated females of the mutant line rad(2)201/sup G1/

    SciTech Connect

    Varentsova, E.R.; Sharygin, V.I.; Khromykh, Yu.M.

    1986-03-01

    Fertility and frequency of dominant lethal mutations (DLM) induced by gamma rays in females at the age of 0-5 h and 5-7 days were studied in the radiosensitive mutant rad(2)201/sup G1/ of Drosophila. It has been found that the oocytes of mutant lines are more radiosensitive as compared to those of the wild type flies when compared on the basis of DLM frequency obtained through the entire maturation period. The early oocytes of stages 2-7, i.e., at the stages corresponding to the recombination-defective properties of mutation rad(2)201/sup g1/ are the most sensitive. It has also been demonstrated that the gamma-ray doses exceeding 10 Gy cause a strong sterilizing effect in the mutant females as a result of destruction and resorption of the egg chamber, irradiated at the stages of previtellogenic growth of oocytes. In the radiosensitive mutant females, the sensitivity of the oocytes for DLM induction does not correlate with the sensitivity of the ovarian follicles toward the resorbing effect of gamma rays. The possible involvement of the mutant locus in the genetic processes in different specialized cells of the sexual pathway in Drosophila is discussed.

  18. 77 FR 8222 - Notice Requesting Nominations for the Subcommittee on Automated and High Frequency Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... COMMISSION Notice Requesting Nominations for the Subcommittee on Automated and High Frequency Trading AGENCY... Automated and High Frequency Trading within the Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Commodity... Automated and High Frequency Trading (Subcommittee) under the auspices of the Technology Advisory...

  19. The diageotropica mutant of tomato lacks high specific activity auxin binding sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rayle, D. L.; Lomax, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tomato plants homozygous for the diageotropica (dgt) mutation exhibit morphological and physiological abnormalities which suggest that they are unable to respond to the plant growth hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid). The photoaffinity auxin analog [3H]5N3-IAA specifically labels a polypeptide doublet of 40 and 42 kilodaltons in membrane preparations from stems of the parental variety, VFN8, but not from stems of plants containing the dgt mutation. In roots of the mutant plants, however, labeling is indistinguishable from that in VFN8. These data suggest that the two polypeptides are part of a physiologically important auxin receptor system, which is altered in a tissue-specific manner in the mutant.

  20. High-speed frequency-domain terahertz coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yahng, Ji Sang; Park, Choon-Su; Lee, Hwi Don; Kim, Chang-Seok; Yee, Dae-Su

    2016-01-25

    High-speed frequency-domain terahertz (THz) coherence tomography is demonstrated using frequency sweeping of continuous-wave THz radiation and beam steering. For axial scanning, THz frequency sweeping with a kHz sweep rate and a THz sweep range is executed using THz photomixing with an optical beat source consisting of a wavelength-swept laser and a distributed feedback laser diode. During the frequency sweep, frequency-domain THz interferograms are measured using coherent homodyne detection employing signal averaging for noise reduction and used as axial-scan data via fast Fourier transform. Axial-scan data are acquired while scanning a transverse range of 100 × 100 mm(2) by use of a THz beam scanner with moving neither sample nor THz transmitter/receiver unit. It takes 100 s to acquire axial-scan data for 100 × 100 points with 5 averaged traces at a sweep rate of 1 kHz. THz tomographic images of a glass fiber reinforced polymer sample with artificial internal defects are presented, acquired using the tomography system. PMID:26832489

  1. Software for Displaying High-Frequency Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, Jason L.

    2003-01-01

    An easy-to-use, intuitive computer program was written to satisfy a need of test operators and data requestors to quickly view and manipulate high-frequency test data recorded at the East and West Test Areas at Marshall Space Flight Center. By enabling rapid analysis, this program makes it possible to reduce times between test runs, thereby potentially reducing the overall cost of test operations. The program can be used to perform quick frequency analysis, using multiple fast- Fourier-transform windowing and amplitude options. The program can generate amplitude-versus-time plots with full zoom capabilities, frequency-component plots at specified time intervals, and waterfall plots (plots of spectral intensity versus frequency at successive small time intervals, showing the changing frequency components over time). There are options for printing of the plots and saving plot data as text files that can be imported into other application programs. The program can perform all of the aforementioned plotting and plot-data-handling functions on a relatively inexpensive computer; other software that performs the same functions requires computers with large amounts of power and memory.

  2. High-resolution signal synthesis for time-frequency distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, G.S.; Williams, W.J.

    1993-03-01

    Bilinear time-frequency distributions (TFDs) offer improved resolution over linear nine-frequency representations (TFRs), but many TFDs are costly to evaluate and are not associated with signal synthesis algorithms. Recently, the spectrogram (SP) decomposition and weighted reversal correlator decomposition have been used to define low-cost, high-resolution TFDs. In this paper, we show that the vector-valued ``square-root`` of a TFD (VVTFR) provides a representational underpinning for the TFD. By synthesizing signals from modified VVTFRs, we define high-resolution signal synthesis algorithms associated with TFDs. The signal analysis and synthesis packages can be implemented as weighted sums of SP/short-time Fourier Transform signal analysis and synthesis packages, which are widely available, allowing the interested non-specialist easy access to high-resolution methods.

  3. High-resolution signal synthesis for time-frequency distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, G.S. ); Williams, W.J. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1993-01-01

    Bilinear time-frequency distributions (TFDs) offer improved resolution over linear nine-frequency representations (TFRs), but many TFDs are costly to evaluate and are not associated with signal synthesis algorithms. Recently, the spectrogram (SP) decomposition and weighted reversal correlator decomposition have been used to define low-cost, high-resolution TFDs. In this paper, we show that the vector-valued square-root'' of a TFD (VVTFR) provides a representational underpinning for the TFD. By synthesizing signals from modified VVTFRs, we define high-resolution signal synthesis algorithms associated with TFDs. The signal analysis and synthesis packages can be implemented as weighted sums of SP/short-time Fourier Transform signal analysis and synthesis packages, which are widely available, allowing the interested non-specialist easy access to high-resolution methods.

  4. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approximately 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  5. Toward a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the continued development of an actuator, energized by pulsed detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant tube and the products exit the tube as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. Pulsed detonations have been demonstrated in the lambda/4 mode of an 8 inch long tube at approx. 600 Hz. The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using shadowgraph and an infrared camera.

  6. Vocal fold vibrations at high soprano fundamental frequencies.

    PubMed

    Echternach, Matthias; Döllinger, Michael; Sundberg, Johan; Traser, Louisa; Richter, Bernhard

    2013-02-01

    Human voice production at very high fundamental frequencies is not yet understood in detail. It was hypothesized that these frequencies are produced by turbulences, vocal tract/vocal fold interactions, or vocal fold oscillations without closure. Hitherto it has been impossible to visually analyze the vocal mechanism due to technical limitations. Latest high-speed technology, which captures 20,000 frames/s, using transnasal endoscopy was applied. Up to 1568 Hz human vocal folds do exhibit oscillations with complete closure. Therefore, the recent results suggest that human voice production at very high F0s up to 1568 Hz is not caused by turbulence, but rather by airflow modulation from vocal fold oscillations. PMID:23363198

  7. A Mutant of Bacillus Subtilis with High-Producing Surfactin by Ion Beam Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingmei; Yuan, Hang; Wang, Jun; Gong, Guohong; Zhou, Wei; Fan, Yonghong; Wang, Li; Yao, Jianming; Yu, Zengliang

    2006-07-01

    In order to generate a mutant of Bacillus subtilis with enhanced surface activity through low energy nitrogen ion beam implantation, the effects of energy and dose of ions implanted were studied. The morphological changes in the bacteria were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The optimum condition of ions implantation, 20 keV of energy and 2.6×1015N+/cm2 in dose, was determined. A mutant, B.s-E-8 was obtained, whose surface activity of 50-fold and 100-fold diluted cell-free Landy medium was as 5.6-fold and 17.4-fold as the wild strain. The microbial growth and biosurfactant production of both the mutant and the wild strain were compared. After purified by ultrafiltration and SOURCE 15PHE, the biosurfactant was determined to be a complex of surfactin family through analysis of electrospray ionization mass spectrum (ESI/MS) and there was an interesting finding that after the ion beam implantation the intensities of the components were different from the wild type strain.

  8. High temporal frequency measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, K.; Phillips, R.; Davidson, E.

    2014-05-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs). Variation in soil moisture can be very dynamic, and it is one of the dominant factors controlling the net exchange of these three GHGs. Although technologies for high-frequency, precise measurements of CO2 have been available for years, methods for measuring soil fluxes of CH4 and N2O at high temporal frequency have been hampered by lack of appropriate technology for in situ real-time measurements. A previously developed automated chamber system for measuring CO2 flux from soils was configured to run in line with a new quantum cascade laser (QCLAS) instrument that measures N2O and CH4. Here we present data from a forested wetland in Maine and an agricultural field in North Dakota, which provided examples of both net uptake and production for N2O and CH4. The objective was to provide a range of conditions in which to run the new system and to compare results to a traditional manual static-chamber method. The high-precision and more-than-10-times-lower minimum detectable flux of the QCLAS system, compared to the manual system, provided confidence in measurements of small N2O uptake in the forested wetland. At the agricultural field, the greatest difference between the automated and manual sampling systems came from the effect of the relatively infrequent manual sampling of the high spatial variation, or "hot spots", in GHG fluxes. Hot spots greatly influenced the seasonal estimates, particularly for N2O, over one 74-day alfalfa crop cycle. The high temporal frequency of the automated system clearly characterized the transient response of all three GHGs to precipitation and demonstrated a clear diel pattern related to temperature for GHGs. A combination of high-frequency automated and spatially distributed chambers would be ideal for characterizing hot spots and "hot moments" of GHG fluxes.

  9. Very High Frequency (Beyond 100 MHz) PZT Kerfless Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Da-Wei; Zhou, Qifa; Geng, Xuecang; Liu, Chang-Geng; Djuth, Frank; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and measurements of very high frequency kerfless linear arrays prepared from PZT film and PZT bulk material. A 12-µm PZT thick film fabricated from PZT-5H powder/solution composite and a piece of 15-µm PZT-5H sheet were used to fabricate 32-element kerfless high-frequency linear arrays with photolithography. The PZT thick film was prepared by spin-coating of PZT sol-gel composite solution. The thin PZT-5H sheet sample was prepared by lapping a PZT-5H ceramic with a precision lapping machine. The measured results of the 2 arrays were compared. The PZT film array had a center frequency of 120 MHz, a bandwidth of 60% with a parylene matching layer, and an insertion loss of 41 dB. The PZT ceramic sheet array was found to have a center frequency of 128 MHz with a poorer bandwidth (40% with a parylene matching layer) but a better sensitivity (28 dB insertion loss). PMID:19942516

  10. High-frequency wave normals in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, F.; Smith, L.D.; Sonett, C.P.

    1984-05-01

    High-frequency (0.01--0.04 Hz) magnetic fluctuations in 506 ten-minute intervals of contemporaneous Explorer 35 and Apollo 12 measurements made in the solar wind near the morning side of the Earth's bow shock show the presence of a large population of disturbances resembling Alfven waves. Each wavefront normal n is systematically aligned (median deviation = 35/sup 0/) with , the associated ten-minute average of the magnetic field. Because of variability in the direction of from one interval to another, the coupled distribution of n is nearly isotropic in solar ecliptic coordinates, in contrast with the results of other studies of waves at much lower frequency indicating outward propagation from the sun. Presumably the high frequency waves discussed here are stirred into isotropy (in solar ecliptic coordinates) by following the low frequency fluctuations. As these waves maintain their alignement of n with despite the great variation of , a strong physical alignment constraint is inferred.

  11. A high-frequency electrospray driven by gas volume charges

    SciTech Connect

    Lastochkin, Dmitri; Chang, H.-C.

    2005-06-15

    High-frequency (>10 kHz) ac electrospray is shown to eject volatile dielectric liquid drops by an entirely different mechanism from dc sprays. The steady dc Taylor conic tip is absent and continuous spraying of submicron drops is replaced by individual dynamic pinchoff events involving the entire drop. We attribute this spraying mechanism to a normal Maxwell force produced by an undispersed plasma cloud in front of the meniscus that produces a visible glow at the spherical tip. The volume charge within the cloud is formed by electron-induced gas ionization of the evaporated liquid and produces a large normal field that is much higher than the nominal applied field such that drop ejection occurs at a voltage (at high frequencies) that is as much as ten times lower than that for dc sprays. The ejection force is sensitive to the liquid properties (but not its electrolyte composition), the ac frequency and trace amounts of inert gases, which are believed to catalyze the ionization reactions. As electroneutral drops are ejected, due to the large (>100) ratio between individual drop ejection time and the ac frequency, this mechanism can produce large (microns) electroneutral drops at relatively low voltages.

  12. High-Frequency Shear Viscosity of Low-Viscosity Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatze, U.; Behrends, R.

    2014-11-01

    A thickness shear quartz resonator technique is described to measure the shear viscosity of low-viscosity liquids in the frequency range from 6 MHz to 130 MHz. Examples of shear-viscosity spectra in that frequency range are presented to show that various molecular processes are accompanied by shear-viscosity relaxation. Among these processes are conformational variations of alkyl chains, with relaxation times of about 0.3 ns for -pentadecane and -hexadecane at 25 C. These variations can be well represented in terms of a torsional oscillator model. Also featured briefly are shear-viscosity relaxations associated with fluctuations of hydrogen-bonded clusters in alcohols, for which values between 0.3 ns (-hexanol) and 1.5 ns (-dodecanol) have been found at 25 C. In addition, the special suitability of high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy to the study of critically demixing mixtures is demonstrated by some illustrative examples. Due to slowing, critical fluctuations do not contribute to the shear viscosity at sufficiently high frequencies of measurements so that the non-critical background viscosity of critical systems can be directly determined from high-frequency shear-viscosity spectroscopy. Relaxations in appear also in the shear-viscosity spectra with, for example, 2 ns for the critical triethylamine-water binary mixture at temperatures between 10 C and 18 C. Such relaxations noticeably influence the relaxation rate of order parameter fluctuations. They may be also the reason for the need of a special mesoscopic viscosity when mutual diffusion coefficients of critical polymer solutions are discussed in terms of mode-coupling theory.

  13. Structural variability between starch granules in wild type and in ae high-amylose mutant maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongli; Parker, Mary L; Wellner, Nikolaus; Kirby, Andrew R; Cross, Kathryn; Morris, Victor J; Cheng, Fang

    2013-09-12

    Starch granule structure within wild-type and ae high-amylose mutant maize kernels has been mapped in situ using light, electron and atomic force microscopy, and both Raman and infra-red spectroscopy. The population of wild-type starch granules is found to be homogenous. The ae mutant granule population is heterogeneous. Heterogeneity in chemical and physical structure is observed within individual granules, between granules within cells, and spatially within the kernel. The highest level of heterogeneity is observed in the region where starch is first deposited during kernel development. Light microscopy demonstrates structural diversity through use of potassium iodide/iodine staining and polarised microscopy. Electron and atomic force microscopy, and infra-red and Raman spectroscopy defined the nature of the structural changes within granules. The methodology provides novel information on the changes in starch structure resulting from kernel development. PMID:23911471

  14. High levels of plasma cortisol and impaired hypoosmoregulation in a mutant medaka deficient in P450c17I.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideya; Sato, Tadashi; Ikeuchi, Toshitaka; Saito, Kazuhiro; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Tatsuya

    2016-07-15

    scl is a spontaneous medaka mutant deficient in P450c17I, which is required for production of sex steroids, but not of cortisol, the major role of which is osmoregulation in teleost fish. The scl mutant provides a new model to study the functions of these hormones. We first found that fish homozygous for this mutation have plasma cortisol constitutively at a high physiological level (1000 nM). Since we previously showed that this level reversed the seawater-type differentiation of the medaka gastrointestinal tract, hypoosmoregulation of the scl mutant was analyzed. Muscle water contents in freshwater were normal in scl homozygotes, but the contents were lower than those of the wild type (WT) after seawater transfer. There were no differences in gill mRNA levels of corticosteroid receptors or ion transporters between scl homozygotes and WT. In the intestine, expression of glucocorticoid receptors and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter were induced in WT during seawater acclimation, but not in scl homozygotes. The high plasma cortisol may prevent hypoosmoregulation by inhibition of increased intestinal water absorption, essentially by the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter, in seawater. PMID:27107936

  15. Improvement of L-lactic acid production by osmotic-tolerant mutant of Lactobacillus casei at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang-Yang; Yuan, Jian; Qin, Hao; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2011-01-01

    L-Lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei was used as a model to study the mechanism of substrate inhibition and the strategy for enhancing L-lactic acid production. It was found that the concentration of cell growth and L-lactate decreased with the increase of glucose concentration and fermentation temperature. To enhance the osmotic stress resistance of the strain at high temperature, a mutant G-03 was screened and selected with 360 g/L glucose at 45°C as the selective criterion. To further increase the cell growth for lactic acid production, 3 g/L of biotin was supplemented to the medium. As a result, L: -lactate concentration by the mutant G-03 reached 198.2 g/L (productivity of 5.5 g L(-1) h(-1)) at 41°C in a 7-L fermentor with 210 g/L glucose as carbon source. L: -Lactate concentration and productivity of mutant G-03 were 115.2% and 97.8% higher than those of the parent strain, respectively. The strategy for enhancing L: -lactic acid production by increasing osmotic stress resistance at high temperature may provide an alternative approach to enhance organic acid production with other strains. PMID:20857288

  16. High Throughput Screening for Small Molecule Therapy for Gaucher Disease Using Patient Tissue as the Source of Mutant Glucocerebrosidase

    PubMed Central

    Goldin, Ehud; Zheng, Wei; Motabar, Omid; Southall, Noel; Choi, Jae Hyuk; Marugan, Juan; Austin, Christopher P.; Sidransky, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), the most common lysosomal storage disorder, results from the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase). Previously, wildtype GCase was used for high throughput screening (HTS) of large collections of compounds to identify small molecule chaperones that could be developed as new therapies for GD. However, the compounds identified from HTS usually showed reduced potency later in confirmatory cell-based assays. An alternate strategy is to perform HTS on mutant enzyme to identify different lead compounds, including those enhancing mutant enzyme activities. We developed a new screening assay using enzyme extract prepared from the spleen of a patient with Gaucher disease with genotype N370S/N370S. In tissue extracts, GCase is in a more native physiological environment, and is present with the native activator saposin C and other potential cofactors. Using this assay, we screened a library of 250,000 compounds and identified novel modulators of mutant GCase including 14 new lead inhibitors and 30 lead activators. The activities of some of the primary hits were confirmed in subsequent cell-based assays using patient-derived fibroblasts. These results suggest that primary screening assays using enzyme extracted from tissues is an alternative approach to identify high quality, physiologically relevant lead compounds for drug development. PMID:22272254

  17. Soft Magnetic Materials in High-Frequency, High-Power Conversion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, Alex M.; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; McHenry, Michael E.

    2012-07-01

    Advanced soft magnetic materials are needed to match high-power density and switching frequencies made possible by advances in wide band-gap semiconductors. Magnetics capable of operating at higher operating frequencies have the potential to greatly reduce the size of megawatt level power electronics. In this article, we examine the role of soft magnetic materials in high-frequency power applications and we discuss current material's limitations and highlight emerging trends in soft magnetic material design for high-frequency and power applications using the materials paradigm of synthesis → structure → property → performance relationships.

  18. Soft Magnetic Materials in High-Frequency, High-Power Conversion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, AM; Ohodnicki, PR; McHenry, ME

    2012-07-04

    Advanced soft magnetic materials are needed to match high-power density and switching frequencies made possible by advances in wide band-gap semiconductors. Magnetics capable of operating at higher operating frequencies have the potential to greatly reduce the size of megawatt level power electronics. In this article, we examine the role of soft magnetic materials in high-frequency power applications and we discuss current material's limitations and highlight emerging trends in soft magnetic material design for high-frequency and power applications using the materials paradigm of synthesis -> structure -> property -> performance relationships.

  19. Print protection using high-frequency fractal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Khaled W.; Blackledge, Jonathon M.; Datta, Sekharjit; Flint, James A.

    2004-06-01

    All digital images are band-limited to a degree that is determined by a spatial extent of the point spread function; the bandwidth of the image being determined by the optical transfer function. In the printing industry, the limit is determined by the resolution of the printed material. By band limiting the digital image in such away that the printed document maintains its fidelity, it is possible to use the out-of-band frequency space to introduce low amplitude coded data that remains hidden in the image. In this way, a covert signature can be embedded into an image to provide a digital watermark, which is sensitive to reproduction. In this paper a high frequency fractal noise is used as a low amplitude signal. A statistically robust solution to the authentication of printed material using high-fractal noise is proposed here which is based on cross-entropy metrics to provide a statistical confidence test. The fractal watermark is based on application of self-affine fields, which is suitable for documents containing high degree of texture. In principle, this new approach will allow batch tracking to be performed using coded data that has been embedded into the high frequency components of the image whose statistical characteristics are dependent on the printer/scanner technology. The details of this method as well as experimental results are presented.

  20. Development of a highly sensitive bioluminescent enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B virus surface antigen capable of detecting divergent mutants.

    PubMed

    Minekawa, Takayuki; Takehara, Shizuka; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are sometimes overlooked when using commercial kits to measure hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) due to their low sensitivities and reactivities to mutant strains of various genotypes. We developed an ultrasensitive bioluminescent enzyme immunoassay (BLEIA) for HBsAg using firefly luciferase, which is adaptable to a variety of HBsAg mutants, by combining four monoclonal antibodies with a polyclonal antibody against HBsAg. The measurement of seroconversion panels showed trace amounts of HBsAg during the early infection phase by the BLEIA because of its high sensitivity of 5 mIU/ml. The BLEIA detected HBsAg as early as did PCR in five of seven series and from 2.1 to 9.4 days earlier than commercial immunoassay methods. During the late infection phase, the BLEIA successfully detected HBsAg even 40 days after the disappearance of HBV DNA and the emergence of antibodies against HBsAg. The HBsAg BLEIA successfully detected all 13 recombinant HBsAg and 45 types of HBsAg mutants with various mutations within amino acids 90 to 164 in the S gene product. Some specimens had higher values determined by the BLEIA than those by a commercial chemiluminescent immunoassay; this suggests that such discrepancies were caused by the dissociation of preS1/preS2 peptides from the particle surface. With its highly sensitive detection of low-titer HBsAg, including various mutants, the HBsAg BLEIA is considered to be useful for the early diagnosis and prevention of HBV infection because of the shorter window of infection prior to detection, which facilitates early prediction of recurrence in HBV-infected individuals. PMID:23761660

  1. High frequency seismic waves and slab structures beneath Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Daoyuan; Miller, Meghan S.; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola; Asimow, Paul D.; Li, Dunzhu

    2014-04-01

    Tomographic images indicate a complicated subducted slab structure beneath the central Mediterranean where gaps in fast velocity anomalies in the upper mantle are interpreted as slab tears. The detailed shape and location of these tears are important for kinematic reconstructions and understanding the evolution of the subduction system. However, tomographic images, which are produced by smoothed, damped inversions, will underestimate the sharpness of the structures. Here, we use the records from the Italian National Seismic Network (IV) to study the detailed slab structure. The waveform records for stations in Calabria show large amplitude, high frequency (f>5 Hz) late arrivals with long coda after a relatively low-frequency onset for both P and S waves. In contrast, the stations in the southern and central Apennines lack such high frequency arrivals, which correlate spatially with the central Apennines slab window inferred from tomography and receiver function studies. Thus, studying the high frequency arrivals provides an effective way to investigate the structure of slab and detect possible slab tears. The observed high frequency arrivals in the southern Italy are the strongest for events from 300 km depth and greater whose hypocenters are located within the slab inferred from fast P-wave velocity perturbations. This characteristic behavior agrees with previous studies from other tectonic regions, suggesting the high frequency energy is generated by small scale heterogeneities within the slab which act as scatterers. Furthermore, using a 2-D finite difference (FD) code, we calculate synthetic seismograms to search for the scale, shape and velocity perturbations of the heterogeneities that may explain features observed in the data. Our preferred model of the slab heterogeneities beneath the Tyrrhenian Sea has laminar structure parallel to the slab dip and can be described by a von Kármán function with a down-dip correlation length of 10 km and 0.5 km in

  2. Piezoelectric Shaker Development for High Frequency Calibration of Accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Bev; Harper, Kari K.; Vogl, Gregory W.

    2010-05-28

    Calibration of vibration transducers requires sinusoidal motion over a wide frequency range with low distortion and low cross-axial motion. Piezoelectric shakers are well suited to generate such motion and are suitable for use with laser interferometric methods at frequencies of 3 kHz and above. An advantage of piezoelectric shakers is the higher achievable accelerations and displacement amplitudes as compared to electro-dynamic (ED) shakers. Typical commercial ED calibration shakers produce maximum accelerations from 100 m/s{sup 2} to 500 m/s{sup 2}. Very large ED shakers may produce somewhat higher accelerations but require large amplifiers and expensive cooling systems to dissipate heat. Due to the limitations in maximum accelerations by ED shakers at frequencies above 5 kHz, the amplitudes of the generated sinusoidal displacement are frequently below the resolution of laser interferometers used in primary calibration methods. This limits the usefulness of ED shakers in interferometric based calibrations at higher frequencies.Small piezoelectric shakers provide much higher acceleration and displacement amplitudes for frequencies above 5 kHz, making these shakers very useful for accelerometer calibrations employing laser interferometric measurements, as will be shown in this paper. These piezoelectric shakers have been developed and used at NIST for many years for high frequency calibration of accelerometers. This paper documents the construction and performance of a new version of these shakers developed at NIST for the calibration of accelerometers over the range of 3 kHz to 30 kHz and possibly higher. Examples of typical calibration results are also given.

  3. On applications of high-frequency asymptotics in aeroacoustics.

    PubMed

    Peake, N

    2004-03-15

    The aim of this paper is to survey a range of applications of high-frequency asymptotic methods in aeroacoustics. Specifically, we are concerned with problems associated with noise generation, propagation and scattering as found in large modern aeroengines. With regard to noise generation, we consider the interaction between high-frequency vortical waves and thin aerofoils, with particular emphasis being placed on the way in which the vortical waves act on the non-uniform mean flow around the aerofoil. A ray-theoretic description of the resulting sound as it propagates along the engine intake is then presented, followed by consideration of the diffraction of these rays by the (possibly asymmetric) intake lip to produce sound in the far field. A range of more detailed possible extensions is also presented. PMID:15306513

  4. Extracting Cardiac Myofiber Orientations from High Frequency Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B; Kishbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-29

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts. PMID:24392208

  5. Extracting cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B.; Kirshbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (<20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts.

  6. Recording and analysis techniques for high-frequency oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Worrell, G.A.; Jerbi, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Lina, J.M.; Zelmann, R.; Le Van Quyen, M.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, new recording technologies have advanced such that, at high temporal and spatial resolutions, high-frequency oscillations (HFO) can be recorded in human partial epilepsy. However, because of the deluge of multichannel data generated by these experiments, achieving the full potential of parallel neuronal recordings depends on the development of new data mining techniques to extract meaningful information relating to time, frequency and space. Here, we aim to bridge this gap by focusing on up-to-date recording techniques for measurement of HFO and new analysis tools for their quantitative assessment. In particular, we emphasize how these methods can be applied, what property might be inferred from neuronal signals, and potentially productive future directions. PMID:22420981

  7. High-frequency oscillation of the airway and chest wall.

    PubMed

    Fink, James B; Mahlmeister, Michael J

    2002-07-01

    High-frequency oscillation (HFO), applied to either the airway or chest wall, has been associated with changes in sputum attributes and clearance. The evolution of evidence, both in vitro and in vivo, supporting the use of HFO is reviewed. Devices that apply HFO to the airway range from the relatively simple mechanical Flutter and Acapella devices to the more complex Percussionaire Intrapercussive Ventilators. and the Hayek Oscillator are designed to provide high-frequency chest wall compression. Operation and use of these devices are described with examples of differentiation of device types by characterization of flows, and airway and esophageal pressures. Although HFO devices span a broad range of costs, they provide a reasonable therapeutic option to support secretion clearance for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:12088550

  8. How High Frequency Trading Affects a Market Index

    PubMed Central

    Kenett, Dror Y.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Stanley, H. Eugene; gur-Gershgoren, Gitit

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between a market index and its constituent stocks is complicated. While an index is a weighted average of its constituent stocks, when the investigated time scale is one day or longer the index has been found to have a stronger effect on the stocks than vice versa. We explore how this interaction changes in short time scales using high frequency data. Using a correlation-based analysis approach, we find that in short time scales stocks have a stronger influence on the index. These findings have implications for high frequency trading and suggest that the price of an index should be published on shorter time scales, as close as possible to those of the actual transaction time scale. PMID:23817553

  9. High frequency impedance spectra on the chromium dioxide thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C. M.; Lai, C. J.; Wu, J. S.; Huang, J. C. A.; Wu, C.-C.; Shyu, S.-G.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the study of high frequency magnetotransport properties of the chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) thin films, grown on Si substrate using chemical vapor deposition. The film exhibits a ferromagnetic transition with a Curie temperature near 390 K. The temperature dependent spontaneous magnetization follows Bloch{close_quote}s law. The impedance spectra, being analyzed based on the fundamental electrodynamics, are demonstrated to be in a low-loss dielectric limit along with the occurrence of dielectric relaxation and magnetization response. The specific features of impedance spectra, distinct from the usual metallic ferromagnet, are attributed to the half metallic nature of CrO{sub 2}. The results explore the possibility for high frequency device applications.

  10. Specimen Design for Fatigue Testing at Very High Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MATIKAS, T. E.

    2001-11-01

    Components in rotational machinery such as turbine blades used in military aircraft engines are subjected to low-amplitude, high-frequency loads in the kHz range. Under high cycle fatigue (HCF), the initiation state of a crack consumes most of the life of the component. Vibratory stresses may therefore result in unexpected failures of the material. Hence, there is a need for HCF studies to address HCF-related failures of turbine engines and to develop a life prediction methodology. Ultrasonic fatigue provides accelerated HCF testing enabling the simulation of realistic loading conditions for testing materials used in structural components subjected to vibratory stresses. Specimen design is critical for optimum ultrasonic fatigue testing. The objective of this study is therefore to develop analytical modelling necessary for the design of test coupons to be fatigue tested at ultrasonic frequencies.

  11. Transformation ray method: controlling high frequency elastic waves (L).

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai; Hu, Jin

    2012-10-01

    Elastic ray theory is a high frequency asymptotic approximation of solution of elastodynamic equation, and is widely used in seismology. In this paper, the form invariance under a general spatial mapping and high frequency wave control have been examined by transformation method. It is showed that with the constraint of major and minor symmetry of the transformed elastic tensor, the eikonal equation keeps its form under a general mapping, however, the transport equation loses its form except for conformal mapping. Therefore, the elastic ray path can be controlled in an exact manner by a transformation method, whereas energy distribution along the ray is only approximately controlled. An elastic rotator based on ray tracing method is also provided to illustrate the method and to access the approximation. PMID:23039561

  12. Robust Optimization Design Algorithm for High-Frequency TWTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2010-01-01

    Traveling-wave tubes (TWTs), such as the Ka-band (26-GHz) model recently developed for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, are essential as communication amplifiers in spacecraft for virtually all near- and deep-space missions. This innovation is a computational design algorithm that, for the first time, optimizes the efficiency and output power of a TWT while taking into account the effects of dimensional tolerance variations. Because they are primary power consumers and power generation is very expensive in space, much effort has been exerted over the last 30 years to increase the power efficiency of TWTs. However, at frequencies higher than about 60 GHz, efficiencies of TWTs are still quite low. A major reason is that at higher frequencies, dimensional tolerance variations from conventional micromachining techniques become relatively large with respect to the circuit dimensions. When this is the case, conventional design- optimization procedures, which ignore dimensional variations, provide inaccurate designs for which the actual amplifier performance substantially under-performs that of the design. Thus, this new, robust TWT optimization design algorithm was created to take account of and ameliorate the deleterious effects of dimensional variations and to increase efficiency, power, and yield of high-frequency TWTs. This design algorithm can help extend the use of TWTs into the terahertz frequency regime of 300-3000 GHz. Currently, these frequencies are under-utilized because of the lack of efficient amplifiers, thus this regime is known as the "terahertz gap." The development of an efficient terahertz TWT amplifier could enable breakthrough applications in space science molecular spectroscopy, remote sensing, nondestructive testing, high-resolution "through-the-wall" imaging, biomedical imaging, and detection of explosives and toxic biochemical agents.

  13. Study of switching transients in high frequency converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinger, Donald S.; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Lee, Tony

    1993-01-01

    As the semiconductor technologies progress rapidly, the power densities and switching frequencies of many power devices are improved. With the existing technology, high frequency power systems become possible. Use of such a system is advantageous in many aspects. A high frequency ac source is used as the direct input to an ac/ac pulse-density-modulation (PDM) converter. This converter is a new concept which employs zero voltage switching techniques. However, the development of this converter is still in its infancy stage. There are problems associated with this converter such as a high on-voltage drop, switching transients, and zero-crossing detecting. Considering these problems, the switching speed and power handling capabilities of the MOS-Controlled Thyristor (MCT) makes the device the most promising candidate for this application. A complete insight of component considerations for building an ac/ac PDM converter for a high frequency power system is addressed. A power device review is first presented. The ac/ac PDM converter requires switches that can conduct bi-directional current and block bi-directional voltage. These bi-directional switches can be constructed using existing power devices. Different bi-directional switches for the converter are investigated. Detailed experimental studies of the characteristics of the MCT under hard switching and zero-voltage switching are also presented. One disadvantage of an ac/ac converter is that turn-on and turn-off of the switches has to be completed instantaneously when the ac source is at zero voltage. Otherwise shoot-through current or voltage spikes can occur which can be hazardous to the devices. In order for the devices to switch softly in the safe operating area even under non-ideal cases, a unique snubber circuit is used in each bi-directional switch. Detailed theory and experimental results for circuits using these snubbers are presented. A current regulated ac/ac PDM converter built using MCT's and IGBT's is

  14. Microstrip antenna modeling and measurement at high frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Bevensee, R.M.

    1986-04-30

    This report addresses the task C(i) of the Proposal for Microstrip Antenna Modeling and Measurement at High Frequencies by the writer, July 1985. The task is: Assess the advantages and disadvantages of the three computational approaches outlined in the Proposal, including any difficulties to be resolved and an estimate of the time required to implement each approach. The three approaches are (1) Finite Difference, (2) Sommerfeld-GTD-MOM, and (3) Surface Intergral Equations - MOM. These are discussed in turn.

  15. Automated composite ellipsoid modelling for high frequency GTD analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sze, K. Y.; Rojas, R. G.; Klevenow, F. T.; Scheick, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary results of a scheme currently being developed to fit a composite ellipsoid to the fuselage of a helicopter in the vicinity of the antenna location are discussed under the assumption that the antenna is mounted on the fuselage. The parameters of the close-fit composite ellipsoid would then be utilized as inputs into NEWAIR3, a code programmed in FORTRAN 77 for high frequency Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) Analysis of the radiation of airborne antennas.

  16. Should High-Frequency Ventilation in the Adult Be Abandoned?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Albert P; Schmidt, Ulrich H; MacIntyre, Neil R

    2016-06-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) can improve ventilation-perfusion matching without excessive alveolar tidal stretching or collapse-reopening phenomenon. This is an attractive feature in the ventilation of patients with ARDS. However, two recent large multi-center trials of HFOV failed to show benefits in this patient population. The following review addresses whether, in view of these trails, HFOV should be abandoned in the adult population? PMID:27235314

  17. High-frequency oscillations and the neurobiology of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Uhlhaas, Peter J.; Singer, Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Neural oscillations at low- and high-frequency ranges are a fundamental feature of large-scale networks. Recent evidence has indicated that schizophrenia is associated with abnormal amplitude and synchrony of oscillatory activity, in particular, at high (beta/gamma) frequencies. These abnormalities are observed during task-related and spontaneous neuronal activity which may be important for understanding the pathophysiology of the syndrome. In this paper, we shall review the current evidence for impaired beta/gamma-band oscillations and their involvement in cognitive functions and certain symptoms of the disorder. In the first part, we will provide an update on neural oscillations during normal brain functions and discuss underlying mechanisms. This will be followed by a review of studies that have examined high-frequency oscillatory activity in schizophrenia and discuss evidence that relates abnormalities of oscillatory activity to disturbed excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) balance. Finally, we shall identify critical issues for future research in this area. PMID:24174902

  18. High frequency volume coils for clinical NMR imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, J T; Hetherington, H P; Otu, J O; Pan, J W; Pohost, G M

    1994-08-01

    A tuned transmission line resonator has been developed in theory and in practical design for the clinical NMR volume coil application at 4.1 tesla. The distributed circuit transmission line resonator was designed for high frequency, large conductive volume applications where conventional lumped element coil designs perform less efficiently. The resonator design has made use of a resonant coaxial cavity, which could be variably tuned to the Larmor frequency of interest by tunable transmission line elements. Large head- and body-sized volumes, high efficiencies, and broad tuning ranges have been shown to be characteristic of the transmission line resonator to frequencies of 500 MHz. The B1 homogeneity of the resonator has been demonstrated to be a function of the electromagnetic properties of the load itself. By numerically solving Maxwell's equations for the fully time-dependent B1 field, coil homogeneity was predicted with finite-element models of anatomic structure, and inhomogeneities corrected for. A how-to exposition of coil design and construction has been included. Simple methods of quadrature driving and double tuning the transmission line resonator have also been presented. Human head images obtained with a tuned transmission line resonator at 175 MHz have clearly demonstrated uncompromised high field advantages of signal-to-noise and spatial resolution. PMID:7968443

  19. Planck 2013 results. VI. High Frequency Instrument data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herent, O.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melot, F.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Techene, S.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    Wedescribe the processing of the 531 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (HFI), which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 473 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.´7 to 4.´6. The detector noise per (effective) beam solid angle is respectively, 10, 6 , 12, and 39 μK in the four lowest HFI frequency channels (100-353GHz) and 13 and 14 kJy sr-1 in the 545 and 857 GHz channels. Relative to the 143 GHz channel, these two high frequency channels are calibrated to within 5% and the 353 GHz channel to the percent level. The 100 and 217 GHz channels, which together with the 143 GHz channel determine the high-multipole part of the CMB power spectrum (50 <ℓ < 2500), are calibrated relative to 143 GHz to better than 0.2%.

  20. High-frequency ultrasound in parotid gland disease.

    PubMed

    Onkar, Prashant Madhukar; Ratnaparkhi, Chetana; Mitra, Kajal

    2013-12-01

    Parotid gland is involved in many inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. Many a times, it is difficult to ascertain the type of swelling by clinical examination. The anatomy and various abnormalities of the glands are very easily visualized by high-frequency ultrasound. Ultrasound can confirm the presence of the mass with sensitivity up to 100%. It can demonstrate whether a lesion is located in the parotid gland or outside. It can help in differentiating benign from malignant neoplasms and local staging of the mass in malignant lesions. In addition, ultrasound can identify those entities that may not need surgical intervention. The glands appear enlarged and show altered echopattern in acute inflammation and may be normal or reduce in size in chronic inflammation. Other pathologies that involve salivary glands are sialolithiasis and various benign and malignant neoplasms. Ultrasound many times suggests final diagnosis or supplies important differential diagnosis. In this article, the use of high-frequency ultrasound in parotid disease is discussed, and sonographic features of different parotid pathologies are reviewed with examples illustrated. High-frequency ultrasound is the first and many a times the only imaging investigation done for evaluation of parotid glands. PMID:24263755

  1. Interictal high-frequency oscillations in focal human epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Cimbalnik, Jan; Kucewicz, Michal T.; Worrell, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Localization of focal epileptic brain is critical for successful epilepsy surgery and focal brain stimulation. Despite significant progress, roughly half of all patients undergoing focal surgical resection, and most patients receiving focal electrical stimulation, are not seizure free. There is intense interest in high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) recorded with intracranial electroencephalography as potential biomarkers to improve epileptogenic brain localization, resective surgery, and focal electrical stimulation. The present review examines the evidence that HFOs are clinically useful biomarkers. Recent findings Performing the PubMed search ‘High-Frequency Oscillations and Epilepsy’ for 2013–2015 identifies 308 articles exploring HFO characteristics, physiological significance, and potential clinical applications. Summary There is strong evidence that HFOs are spatially associated with epileptic brain. There remain, however, significant challenges for clinical translation of HFOs as epileptogenic brain biomarkers: Differentiating true HFO from the high-frequency power changes associated with increased neuronal firing and bandpass filtering sharp transients. Distinguishing pathological HFO from normal physiological HFO. Classifying tissue under individual electrodes as normal or pathological. Sharing data and algorithms so research results can be reproduced across laboratories. Multicenter prospective trials to provide definitive evidence of clinical utility. PMID:26953850

  2. High throughput gene complementation screening permits identification of a mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis (ρ(-)) mutant.

    PubMed

    Potluri, Prasanth; Procaccio, Vincent; Scheffler, Immo E; Wallace, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    To identify nuclear DNA (nDNA) oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) gene mutations using cultured cells, we have developed a complementation system based on retroviral transduction with a full length cDNA expression library and selection for OXHOS function by growth in galactose. We have used this system to transduce the Chinese hamster V79-G7 OXPHOS mutant cell line with a defect in mitochondrial protein synthesis. The complemented cells were found to have acquired the cDNA for the bS6m polypeptide of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome. bS6m is a 14 kDa polypeptide located on the outside of the mitochondrial 28S ribosomal subunit and interacts with the rRNA. The V79-G7 mutant protein was found to harbor a methionine to threonine missense mutation at codon 13. The hamster bS6m null mutant could also be complemented by its orthologs from either mouse or human. bS6m protein tagged at its C-terminus by HA, His or GFP localized to the mitochondrion and was fully functional. Through site-directed mutagenesis we identified the probable RNA interacting residues of the bS6m peptide and tested the functional significance of mammalian specific C-terminal region. The N-terminus of the bS6m polypeptide functionally corresponds to that of the prokaryotic small ribosomal subunit, but deletion of C-terminal residues along with the zinc ion coordinating cysteine had no functional effect. Since mitochondrial diseases can result from hundreds to thousands of different nDNA gene mutations, this one step viral complementation cloning may facilitate the molecular diagnosis of a range of nDNA mitochondrial disease mutations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26946086

  3. High-frequency instability of the sheath-plasma resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    Coherent high frequency oscillations near the electron plasma frequency (omega approx. less than omega sub p) are generated by electrodes with positive dc bias immersed in a uniform Maxwellian afterglow plasma. The instability occurs at the sheath-plasma resonance and is driven by a negative RF sheath resistance associated with the electron inertia in the diode-like electron-rich sheath. With increasing dc bias, i.e., electron transit time, the instability exhibits a hard threshold, downward frequency pulling, line broadening and copious harmonics. The fundamental instability is a bounded oscillation due to wave evanescence, but the harmonics are radiated as electromagnetic waves from the electrodes acting like antennas. Wavelength and polarization measurements confirm the emission process. Electromagnetic waves are excited by electrodes of various geometries (planes, cylinders, spheres) which excludes other radiation mechanisms such as orbitrons or beam-plasma instabilities. The line broadening mechanism was identified as a frequency modulation via the electron transit time by dynamic ions. Ion oscillations at the sheath edge give rise to burst-like RF emissions. These laboratory observations of a new instability are important for antennas in space plasmas, generation of coherent beams with diodes, and plasma diagnostics.

  4. High-Performance Optical Frequency References for Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuldt, Thilo; Döringshoff, Klaus; Milke, Alexander; Sanjuan, Josep; Gohlke, Martin; Kovalchuk, Evgeny V.; Gürlebeck, Norman; Peters, Achim; Braxmaier, Claus

    2016-06-01

    A variety of future space missions rely on the availability of high-performance optical clocks with applications in fundamental physics, geoscience, Earth observation and navigation and ranging. Examples are the gravitational wave detector eLISA (evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna), the Earth gravity mission NGGM (Next Generation Gravity Mission) and missions, dedicated to tests of Special Relativity, e.g. by performing a Kennedy- Thorndike experiment testing the boost dependence of the speed of light. In this context we developed optical frequency references based on Doppler-free spectroscopy of molecular iodine; compactness and mechanical and thermal stability are main design criteria. With a setup on engineering model (EM) level we demonstrated a frequency stability of about 2·10-14 at an integration time of 1 s and below 6·10-15 at integration times between 100s and 1000s, determined from a beat-note measurement with a cavity stabilized laser where a linear drift was removed from the data. A cavity-based frequency reference with focus on improved long-term frequency stability is currently under development. A specific sixfold thermal shield design based on analytical methods and numerical calculations is presented.

  5. Dosage effect of high-amylose modifier gene(s) on the starch structure of maize amylose-extender mutant.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongxin; Campbell, Mark; Wu, Yusheng; Du, Shuangkui; Srichuwong, Sathaporn; Jane, Jay-Lin

    2015-01-21

    The objective of this study was to investigate how dosages of high-amylose modifier (HAM) gene(s) affected the structure of maize amylose extender (ae) mutant starch. GEMS-0067 (G), a homozygous mutant of ae and the HAM gene(s), and H99ae (H), an ae single mutant, were self-pollinated or inter-crossed to produce maize endosperms of G/G, G/H, H/G, and H/H with 3, 2, 1, and 0 doses of HAM gene(s), respectively. Endosperm starch was fractionated into amylopectin, amylose, and intermediate component (IC) of large and small molecular weights using 1-butanol precipitation of amylose followed by gel-permeation chromatography. Increases in the dosage of HAM gene(s) from 0 to 3 decreased the amylopectin content. The HAM-gene dosage significantly changed the branch chain-length of small-molecular-weight IC, but had little effect on the branch chain-length distributions of amylopectin and large-molecular-weight IC and the molecular structure of amylose. PMID:25495144

  6. Use of a highly transparent zebrafish mutant for investigations in the development of the vertebrate auditory system (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniowiecki, Anna M.; Mattison, Scott P.; Kim, Sangmin; Riley, Bruce; Applegate, Brian E.

    2016-03-01

    Zebrafish, an auditory specialist among fish, offer analogous auditory structures to vertebrates and is a model for hearing and deafness in vertebrates, including humans. Nevertheless, many questions remain on the basic mechanics of the auditory pathway. Phase-sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography has been proven as valuable technique for functional vibrometric measurements in the murine ear. Such measurements are key to building a complete understanding of auditory mechanics. The application of such techniques in the zebrafish is impeded by the high level of pigmentation, which develops superior to the transverse plane and envelops the auditory system superficially. A zebrafish double mutant for nacre and roy (mitfa-/- ;roya-/- [casper]), which exhibits defects for neural-crest derived melanocytes and iridophores, at all stages of development, is pursued to improve image quality and sensitivity for functional imaging. So far our investigations with the casper mutants have enabled the identification of the specialized hearing organs, fluid-filled canal connecting the ears, and sub-structures of the semicircular canals. In our previous work with wild-type zebrafish, we were only able to identify and observe stimulated vibration of the largest structures, specifically the anterior swim bladder and tripus ossicle, even among small, larval specimen, with fully developed inner ears. In conclusion, this genetic mutant will enable the study of the dynamics of the zebrafish ear from the early larval stages all the way into adulthood.

  7. Spirogyra varians mutant generated by high dose gamma-irradiation shows increased antioxidant properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hak-Jyung; Yoon, Minchul; Sung, Nak-Yun; Choi, Jong-il

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of a Spirogyra varians mutant (Mut) produced by gamma irradiation. Methanol extracts were prepared from Spirogyra varians wild-type and Mut plants, and their antioxidant activities and total phenolic content (TPC) were determined. Antioxidant parameters, including the 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity and ferric-reducing/antioxidant power, were higher in the Mut extract. Moreover, the TPC level was higher (P<0.05) in the Mut methanol extract. Therefore, these results suggest that gamma irradiation-induced S. varians Mut has superior antioxidant properties.

  8. Facile Alkaline Lysis of Escherichia coli Cells in High-Throughput Mode for Screening Enzyme Mutants: Arylsulfatase as an Example.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Mei; Yang, Xiaolan; Li, Yuwei; Liu, Hongbo; Pu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Liao, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Facile alkaline lysis of Escherichia coli cells in high-throughput (HTP) mode for screening enzyme mutants was tested with Pseudomonas aeruginosa arylsulfatase (PAAS). The alkaline lysis buffer was 1.0 M Tris-HCl at pH 9.0 plus 0.1 % Tween-20 and 2.0 mM 4-aminobenzamidine, mixed with cell suspension at 8:1 to 12:1 ratio for continuous agitation of mixtures in 96-well plates under room temperature; enzymatic activity in lysates was measured with 96-well microplate. PAAS activity tolerated final 0.1 % Tween-20. Individual clones were amplified for 12 h in 0.50 mL TB medium with 48-well plates to enhance the repeatability of induced expression. During continuous agitation of the mixture of cells and the lysis buffer, PAAS activities in lysates were steady from 3 to 9 h and comparable to sonication treatment but better than freezing-thawing. Coefficients of variation of activities of PAAS/mutants in lysates after treatment for 7 h reached ∼22 %. The mutant M72Q had specific activity 2-fold of G138S. By HTP lysis of cells, M72Q was recognized as a positive mutant over G138S with the area under the curve of 0.873. Therefore, for enzymes tolerating concentrated alkaline buffers, the proposed alkaline lysis approach may be generally applicable for HTP lysis of host cells during directed evolution. PMID:26899233

  9. Harnessing high-dimensional hyperentanglement through a biphoton frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhenda; Zhong, Tian; Shrestha, Sajan; Xu, Xinan; Liang, Junlin; Gong, Yan-Xiao; Bienfang, Joshua C.; Restelli, Alessandro; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Wong, Franco N. C.; Wei Wong, Chee

    2015-08-01

    Quantum entanglement is a fundamental resource for secure information processing and communications, and hyperentanglement or high-dimensional entanglement has been separately proposed for its high data capacity and error resilience. The continuous-variable nature of the energy-time entanglement makes it an ideal candidate for efficient high-dimensional coding with minimal limitations. Here, we demonstrate the first simultaneous high-dimensional hyperentanglement using a biphoton frequency comb to harness the full potential in both the energy and time domain. Long-postulated Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum revival is exhibited, with up to 19 time-bins and 96.5% visibilities. We further witness the high-dimensional energy-time entanglement through Franson revivals, observed periodically at integer time-bins, with 97.8% visibility. This qudit state is observed to simultaneously violate the generalized Bell inequality by up to 10.95 standard deviations while observing recurrent Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt S-parameters up to 2.76. Our biphoton frequency comb provides a platform for photon-efficient quantum communications towards the ultimate channel capacity through energy-time-polarization high-dimensional encoding.

  10. Attenuation of high sucrose diet–induced insulin resistance in tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase deficient Drosophila melanogaster vermilion mutants

    PubMed Central

    Navrotskaya, Valeriya; Oxenkrug, Gregory; Vorobyova, Lyudmila; Summergrad, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high sugar diet (HSD) serves as an experimental model of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in mammals and insects. Peripheral IR induced by HSD delays emergence of pupae from larvae and decreases body weight of Drosophila imago. Understanding of mechanisms of IR/T2D is essential for refining T2D prevention and treatment strategies. Dysregulation of tryptophan (TRP) – kynurenine (KYN) pathway was suggested as one of the mechanisms of IR development. Rate-limiting enzyme of TRP – KYN pathway in Drosophila is TRP 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), an evolutionary conserved ortholog of human TDO. In insects TDO is encoded by vermilion gene. TDO is not active in vermilion mutants. In order to evaluate the possible impact of deficient formation of KYN from TRP on the inducement of IR by HSD, we compared the effect of HSD in wild type (Oregon) and vermilion mutants of Drosophila melanogaster by assessing the time of white pupae emergence from larva and body weight of imago. Delay of emergence of pupae from larvae induced by high sucrose diet was less pronounced in vermilion (1.4 days) than in Oregon flies (3.3 days) in comparison with flies maintained on standard diet. Exposure to high sucrose diet decreased body weight of Oregon (but not vermilion) imago. Attenuation of high sucrose diet–induced IR/T2D in vermilion flies might depend on deficiency of TRP – KYN pathway. Besides IR/T2D, HSD induces obesity in Drosophila. Future studies of HSD-induced obesity and IR/T2D in TDO deficient vermilion mutants of Drosophila might help to understand the mechanisms of high association between IR/T2D and obesity. Modulation of TRP – KYN metabolism might be utilized for prevention and treatment of IR/T2D. PMID:26191458

  11. Inaudible high-frequency sounds affect brain activity: hypersonic effect.

    PubMed

    Oohashi, T; Nishina, E; Honda, M; Yonekura, Y; Fuwamoto, Y; Kawai, N; Maekawa, T; Nakamura, S; Fukuyama, H; Shibasaki, H

    2000-06-01

    Although it is generally accepted that humans cannot perceive sounds in the frequency range above 20 kHz, the question of whether the existence of such "inaudible" high-frequency components may affect the acoustic perception of audible sounds remains unanswered. In this study, we used noninvasive physiological measurements of brain responses to provide evidence that sounds containing high-frequency components (HFCs) above the audible range significantly affect the brain activity of listeners. We used the gamelan music of Bali, which is extremely rich in HFCs with a nonstationary structure, as a natural sound source, dividing it into two components: an audible low-frequency component (LFC) below 22 kHz and an HFC above 22 kHz. Brain electrical activity and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured as markers of neuronal activity while subjects were exposed to sounds with various combinations of LFCs and HFCs. None of the subjects recognized the HFC as sound when it was presented alone. Nevertheless, the power spectra of the alpha frequency range of the spontaneous electroencephalogram (alpha-EEG) recorded from the occipital region increased with statistical significance when the subjects were exposed to sound containing both an HFC and an LFC, compared with an otherwise identical sound from which the HFC was removed (i.e., LFC alone). In contrast, compared with the baseline, no enhancement of alpha-EEG was evident when either an HFC or an LFC was presented separately. Positron emission tomography measurements revealed that, when an HFC and an LFC were presented together, the rCBF in the brain stem and the left thalamus increased significantly compared with a sound lacking the HFC above 22 kHz but that was otherwise identical. Simultaneous EEG measurements showed that the power of occipital alpha-EEGs correlated significantly with the rCBF in the left thalamus. Psychological evaluation indicated that the subjects felt the sound containing an HFC to be more

  12. Novel high frequency devices with graphene and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pei

    This work focuses on exploring new materials and new device structures to develop novel devices that can operate at very high speed. In chapter 2, the high frequency performance limitations of graphene transistor with channel length less than 100 nm are explored. The simulated results predict that intrinsic cutoff frequency fT of graphene transistor can be close to 2 THz at 15 nm channel length. In chapter 3, we explored the possibility of developing a 2D materials based vertical tunneling device. An analytical model to calculate the channel potentials and current-voltage characteristics in a Symmetric tunneling Field-Effect-Transistor (SymFET) is presented. The symmetric resonant peak in SymFET is a good candidate for high-speed analog applications. Rest of the work focuses on Gallium Nitride (GaN), several novel device concepts based on GaN heterostructure have been proposed for high frequency and high power applications. In chapter 4, we compared the performance of GaN Schottky diodes on bulk GaN substrates and GaN-on-sapphire substrates. In addition, we also discussed the lateral GaN Schottky diode between metal/2DEGs. The advantage of lateral GaN Schottky diodes is the intrinsic cutoff frequency is in the THz range. In chapter 5, a GaN Heterostructure barrier diode (HBD) is designed using the polarization charge and band offset at the AlGaN/GaN heterojunction. The polarization charge at AlGaN/GaN interface behaves as a delta-doping which induces a barrier without any chemical doping. The IV characteristics can be explained by the barrier controlled thermionic emission current. GaN HBDs can be directly integrated with GaN HEMTs, and serve as frequency multipliers or mixers for RF applications. In chapter 6, a GaN based negative effective mass oscillator (NEMO) is proposed. The current in NEMO is estimated under the ballistic limits. Negative differential resistances (NDRs) can be observed with more than 50% of the injected electrons occupied the negative

  13. Black phosphorus nanoelectromechanical resonators vibrating at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenghui; Jia, Hao; Zheng, Xuqian; Yang, Rui; Wang, Zefang; Ye, G. J.; Chen, X. H.; Shan, Jie; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a new type of nanoelectromechanical resonator based on black phosphorus crystals. Facilitated by a highly efficient dry transfer technique, crystalline black phosphorus flakes are harnessed to enable drumhead resonators vibrating at high and very high frequencies (HF and VHF bands, up to ~100 MHz). We investigate the resonant vibrational responses from the black phosphorus crystals by devising both electrical and optical excitation schemes, in addition to measuring the undriven thermomechanical motions in these suspended nanostructures. Flakes with thicknesses from ~200 nm down to ~20 nm clearly exhibit elastic characteristics transitioning from the plate to the membrane regime. Both frequency- and time-domain measurements of the nanomechanical resonances show that very thin black phosphorus crystals hold interesting potential for moveable and vibratory devices and for semiconductor transducers where high-speed mechanical motions could be coupled to the attractive electronic and optoelectronic properties of black phosphorus.We report on the experimental demonstration of a new type of nanoelectromechanical resonator based on black phosphorus crystals. Facilitated by a highly efficient dry transfer technique, crystalline black phosphorus flakes are harnessed to enable drumhead resonators vibrating at high and very high frequencies (HF and VHF bands, up to ~100 MHz). We investigate the resonant vibrational responses from the black phosphorus crystals by devising both electrical and optical excitation schemes, in addition to measuring the undriven thermomechanical motions in these suspended nanostructures. Flakes with thicknesses from ~200 nm down to ~20 nm clearly exhibit elastic characteristics transitioning from the plate to the membrane regime. Both frequency- and time-domain measurements of the nanomechanical resonances show that very thin black phosphorus crystals hold interesting potential for moveable and vibratory

  14. HIGH FREQUENCY ULTRASOUND OF ARMOR-GRADE ALUMINA CERAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bottiglieri, S.; Haber, R. A.

    2009-03-03

    Different lots of high density, commercial, armor-grade alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were tested using high frequency ultrasound in order to determine any correlation between measured properties and ballistic performance. C-scan images were taken using a 15 MHz ultrasonic transducer in order to form attenuation coefficient and elastic property maps. These samples were further characterized by using quantitative analysis. The results indicate that attenuation coefficient values appear to have the strongest correlation, of every property measured, to ballistic classifications.

  15. Sublinear response in lacZ mutant frequency of Muta™ Mouse spermatogonial stem cells after low dose subchronic exposure to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jason M; Walker, Mike; Sivathayalan, Ahalya; Douglas, George R; Yauk, Carole L; Marchetti, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The transgenic rodent mutation assay was used to compare the dose-response relationship of lacZ mutant frequency (MF) in spermatogonial stem cells exposed acutely or subchronically to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). Muta(™) Mouse males were exposed orally to 0, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg ENU for acute exposures and 0, 1, 2, or 5 mg/(kg day) for 28-day subchronic exposures. LacZ MF was measured in sperm collected 70 days post-exposure to target spermatogonial stem cells. Dose-response data were fit to linear, quadratic, exponential, or power models. Acute exposure resulted in a dose-dependent increase in MF that was significant (P < 0.05) at all doses tested and was best described by a quadratic dose-response model that was linear in the low dose range. In contrast, similar total doses fragmented over a 28-day subchronic exposure only resulted in a significant increase in lacZ MF at the highest dose tested. Therefore, the subchronic no observable genotoxic effect level (NOGEL) was 2 mg/(kg day) (or 56 mg/kg total dose). The subchronic dose-response was best described by the exponential and power models, which were sublinear in the low dose range. Benchmark dose lower confidence limits (BMDLs) for acute and subchronic exposure were 3.0 and 1.0 mg/(kg day) (or 27.4 mg/kg total dose), respectively. These findings are supportive of a saturable DNA repair mechanism as the mutagenic mode of action for ENU in spermatogonia and imply that sufficiently low exposures would not cause appreciable genotoxic effects over background. This may have important implications for the quantitative risk assessment of germ cell mutagens. PMID:25598316

  16. High frequency noise studies at the Hartousov mofette area (CZE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Andreas; Flores-Estrella, Hortencia; Pommerencke, Julia; Umlauft, Josefine

    2014-05-01

    Ambient noise analysis has been used as a reliable tool to investigate sub-surface structures at seismological quiet regions with none or less specific seismic events. Here, we consider the acoustic signals from a single mofette at the Hartoušov area (CZE) as a noise-like high frequency source caused by multiple near surface degassing processes in a restricted location. From this assumption we have used different array geometries for recording at least one hour of continuous noise. We installed triangular arrays with 3 component geophones: the first deployment consisted on two co-centric triangles with side length of 30 and 50 m with the mofette in the center; the second deployment consisted on two triangular arrays, both with side length of 30 m, co-directional to the mofette. Furthermore, we also installed profiles with 24 channels and vertical geophones locating them in different positions with respect to the mofette. In this work, we present preliminary results from the data analysis dependent on the geometry, to show the characteristics of the noise wave-field referring to frequency content and propagation features, such as directionality and surface wave velocity. The spectral analysis shows that the energy is concentrated in a frequency band among 10 and 40 Hz. However, in this interval there is no evidence of any exclusive fundamental frequencies. From this, man-induced influences can be identified as intermittent signal peaks in narrow frequency bands and can be separated to receive the revised mofette wave-field record. The inversion of dispersive surface waves, that were detected by interferometric methods, provides a velocity model down to 12 m with an S-wave velocity between 160 and 180 m/s on the uppermost layer. Furthermore, the interferometric signal properties indicate that it is not possible to characterize the mofette as a punctual source, but rather as a conglomerate of multiple sources with time and location variations.

  17. High-resolution time-frequency distributions for fall detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.; Boashash, Boualem

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we examine the role of high-resolution time-frequency distributions (TFDs) of radar micro-Doppler signatures for fall detection. The work supports the recent and rising interest in using emerging radar technology for elderly care and assisted living. Spectrograms have been the de facto joint-variable signal representation, depicting the signal power in both time and frequency. Although there have been major advances in designing quadratic TFDs which are superior to spectrograms in terms of detailing the local signal behavior, the contributions of these distributions in the area of human motion classifications and their offerings in enhanced feature extractions have not yet been properly evaluated. The main purpose of this paper is to show the effect of using high-resolution TFD kernels, in lieu of spectrogram, on fall detection. We focus on the extended modified B-distribution (EMBD) and exploit the level of details it provides as compared with the coarse and smoothed time-frequency signatures offered by spectrograms.

  18. High Frequency Elastic Wave Propagation in Media with a Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, B.; Aubry, D.; Mouronval, A.-S.; Solas, D.; Thébault, J.; Tian, B.-Y.

    2010-05-01

    This contribution deals with the theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of elastic wave propagation in media with a microstructure. Two kinds of media are considered: polycrystalline material and honeycomb core sandwich shells, in which elastic waves are triggered by transient signals that result in large frequency ranges including high frequencies. Our theoretical and numerical investigations aim at understanding and simulating the interactions between the microstructure of those media and the wave propagation phenomena, when the characteristic lengths of the microstructure and the involved shortest wavelengths have roughly the same scale. In this paper, some key mechanisms of interaction between the considered microstructures and the elastic waves are highlighted. In polycrystalline superalloys, the misorientation distribution and the average grain size are considered, as they can alter pressure/shear wave propagation and also the permeability to ultrasonic waves monitored to perform non-destructive testing. For the flexure behavior of honeycomb core sandwich shells, the fundamental role played by the honeycomb cells, especially in high frequency domain, is analyzed. Relevant numerical modeling that provides a promising way to quantify micro-structure/wave interactions is presented. The important issue of how to take into account these micro-scale interactions in a homogenized macro-scale modeling is also discussed.

  19. High Frequency PIN-Diode Switches for Radiometer Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas E.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Reising, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Internally calibrated radiometers are needed for ocean topography and other missions. Typically internal calibration is achieved with Dicke switching as one of the techniques. We have developed high frequency single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switches in the form of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) that can be easily integrated into Dicke switched radiometers that utilize microstrip technology. In particular, the switches we developed can be used for a radiometer such as the one proposed for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Satellite Mission whose three channels at 92, 130, and 166 GHz would allow for wet-tropospheric path delay correction near coastal zones and over land. This feat is not possible with the current Jason-class radiometers due to their lower frequency signal measurement and thus lower resolution. The MMIC chips were fabricated at NGST using their InP PIN diode process and measured at JPL using high frequency test equipment. Measurement and simulation results will be presented.

  20. A perspective on high-frequency ultrasound for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Aristizába, Orlando; Silverman, Ronald H.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >15 MHz) is a rapidly developing field. HFU is currently used and investigated for ophthalmologic, dermatologic, intravascular, and small-animal imaging. HFU offers a non-invasive means to investigate tissue at the microscopic level with resolutions often better than 100 μm. However, fine resolution is only obtained over the limited depth-of-field (˜1 mm) of single-element spherically-focused transducers typically used for HFU applications. Another limitation is penetration depth because most biological tissues have large attenuation at high frequencies. In this study, two 5-element annular arrays with center frequencies of 17 and 34 MHz were fabricated and methods were developed to obtain images with increased penetration depth and depth-of-field. These methods were used in ophthalmologic and small-animal imaging studies. Improved blood sensitivity was obtained when a phantom mimicking a vitreous hemorrhage was imaged. Central-nervous systems of 12.5-day-old mouse embryos were imaged in utero and in three dimensions for the first time.

  1. High-frequency vibrations of sandwich plates and delamination detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Alf E.; Irgens, Fridtjov

    1998-06-01

    In multi-hull marine vehicles assembled by FRP sandwich composite materials problems with delamination and skin/core debonding are reported. High frequency vibrations in foam core sandwich materials are investigated to see if it was possible to apply them, together with bending vibrations, in an early damage warning system for delamination detection in marine vessels. This manuscript presents a theory for high frequency vibration in sandwich plates and beams. The core is modeled as a two parameter foundation with shearing interaction effects as well as normal stress effects in the core included. The skins are modeled as ordinary plates or beams on a foundation. Expressions for both anti-symmetric and symmetric modes are given. In addition to the theoretical development, experiments with a simply supported sandwich beam, using a TV-Holography technic, were performed and good accordance between theory and experiments were achieved. The results indicates that disappearance of symmetric modes may be used a parameter for delamination detection. The anti-symmetric modes may be interchangeable with higher bending modes by an early damage warning system. To avoid this, the theory presented may be applied to determine the anti-symmetric frequency values in forehand.

  2. High-frequency-link based power electronics in power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree, Hari

    Power quality has become a serious concern to many utility customers in recent times. Among the many power quality problems, voltage sags are one of the most common and most mischievous, affecting industrial and commercial customers. They are primarily caused by power system faults at the transmission and distribution level, and thus, are mostly unavoidable. Their effect depends on the equipment sensitivities to the magnitude and duration of these sags and each can cost an industry up to few million dollars. To counter these limitations, many solutions at the customer end have been proposed which include Constant Voltage Transformers (CVT's), UPS and line frequency transformer based Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR). These approaches have their respective limitations with regard to capabilities, size and cost. This research proposes a new approach to mitigating these voltage sags involving the use of high frequency transformer link. Suitable switching logic and control strategies have been implemented. The proposed approach in a one-phase application is verified with computer simulations and by a hardware proof-of-concept prototype. Application to three-phase system is verified through simulations. Application of high frequency transformers in other utility applications such as active filters and static compensators is also looked at.

  3. High-frequency synthetic ultrasound array incorporating an actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Timothy A.; Shrout, Thomas R.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasound imaging at frequencies above 20 MHz relies almost exclusively on single-element transducers. IN order to apply array technology at these frequencies, several practical problems must be solved, including spatial scale and fabrication limitations, low device capacitance, and lack of a hardware beamformer. One method of circumventing these problems is to combine an array, an actuator, and a synthetic aperture software beamformer. The array can use relatively wide elements spaced on a coarse pitch. The actuator is used to move the array in short steps (less than the element pitch), and pulse-echo data is acquired at intermediate sample positions. The synthetic aperture beamformer reconstructs the image from the pulse-echo data. A 50 MHz example is analyzed in detail. Estimates of signal-to-noise reveal performance comparable to a standard phased array; furthermore, the actuated array requires half the number of elements, the elements are 8x wider, and only one channel is required. Simulated three-dimensional point spread functions demonstrate side lobe levels approaching - 40dB and main beam widths of 50 to 100 microns. A 50 MHz piezo-composite array design has been tested which displays experimental bandwidth of 70% while maintaining high sensitivity. Individual composite sub-elements are 18 microns wide. Once this array is integrated with a suitable actuator, it is anticipated that a tractable method of imaging with high frequency arrays will result.

  4. High-frequency waves generated by auroral electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, J. P.; Carlson, C. W.; Boehm, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of marginally unstable electron distribution functions and high-frequency plasma waves were made on a sounding rocket flight through a quiet auroral arc. The waves appeared near the electron plasma frequency and had a large parallel electric field component such that k-parallel is greater than k-perpendicular. The appearance of these waves was correlated with the presence of marginally unstable parallel electron distributions. Analysis has shown that the waves were produced by parallel electron distribution function greater than 0 rather than the small perpendicular electron distribution function greater than 0 features. Wave levels and growth rates inside the arc were small, and nonlinear wave-wave and wave-particle interactions appear to have been minimal.

  5. Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. T.; Wang, L.; Long, L. X.; Dong, J. Q.; He, Zhixiong; Liu, Y.; Tang, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks is developed. It is found that the breakdown of the invariants by perturbed electromagnetic fields drives microinstability. The obtained diamagnetic frequency, ω∗, is proportional to only the toroidal mode number rather than transverse mode numbers. Therefore, there is no nonadiabatic drive for axisymmetrical modes in gyrokinetics. Meanwhile, the conventional eikonal Ansatz breaks down for the axisymmetrical modes. The ion drift-cyclotron instability discovered in a mirror machine is found for the first time in the toroidal system. The growth rates are proportional to ρi/Ln, and the slope changes with magnetic curvature. In spherical torus, where magnetic curvature is greater than that of traditional tokamaks, instability poses a potential danger to such devices.

  6. Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z. T.; Long, L. X.; Dong, J. Q.; He, Zhixiong; Wang, L.; Liu, Y.; Tang, C. J.

    2012-07-15

    Gyrokinetics for high-frequency modes in tokamaks is developed. It is found that the breakdown of the invariants by perturbed electromagnetic fields drives microinstability. The obtained diamagnetic frequency, {omega}{sup *}, is proportional to only the toroidal mode number rather than transverse mode numbers. Therefore, there is no nonadiabatic drive for axisymmetrical modes in gyrokinetics. Meanwhile, the conventional eikonal Ansatz breaks down for the axisymmetrical modes. The ion drift-cyclotron instability discovered in a mirror machine is found for the first time in the toroidal system. The growth rates are proportional to {rho}{sub i}/L{sub n}, and the slope changes with magnetic curvature. In spherical torus, where magnetic curvature is greater than that of traditional tokamaks, instability poses a potential danger to such devices.

  7. Parallel quantum-point-contacts as high-frequency-mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubrich, A. G. C.; Wharam, D. A.; Kriegelstein, H.; Manus, S.; Lorke, A.; Kotthaus, J. P.; Gossard, A. C.

    1997-06-01

    The results of high-frequency mixing experiments performed upon parallel quantum point contacts defined in the two-dimensional electron gas of an AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs heterostructure are presented. The parallel geometry, fabricated using a novel double-resist technology, enables the point-contact device to be impedance matched over a wide frequency range and, in addition, increases the power levels of the mixing signal while simultaneously reducing the parasitic source-drain capacitance. Here, we consider two parallel quantum point-contact devices with 155 and 110 point contacts, respectively; both devices operated successfully at liquid helium and liquid nitrogen temperatures with a minimal conversion loss of 13 dB.

  8. High-frequency extensions of magnetorotational instability in astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Lominadze, J. G.; Churikov, A. P.; Pustovitov, V. D.; Erokhin, N. N.; Tsypin, V. S.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2008-08-15

    High-frequency extensions of magnetorotational instability driven by the Velikhov effect beyond the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regime are studied. The existence of the well-known Hall regime and a new electron inertia regime is demonstrated. The electron inertia regime is realized for a lesser plasma magnetization of rotating plasma than that in the Hall regime. It includes the subregime of nonmagnetized electrons. It is shown that, in contrast to the standard MHD regime and the Hall regime, magnetorotational instability in this subregime can be driven only at positive values of dln{Omega}/dlnr, where {Omega} is the plasma rotation frequency and r is the radial coordinate. The permittivity of rotating plasma beyond the standard MHD regime, including both the Hall regime and the electron inertia regime, is calculated.

  9. ICD lead failure detection through high frequency impedance.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, Daniel T; Swerdlow, Charles D; Kroll, Mark W; Seifert, Gregory J; Lichter, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    Abrasion-induced insulation breach is a common failure mode of silicone-body, transvenous, implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. It is caused either by external compression or internal motion of conducting cables. The present method of monitoring lead integrity measures low frequency conductor impedance. It cannot detect insulation failures until both the silicone lead body and inner fluoropolymer insulation have been breached completely, exposing conductors directly to blood or tissue. Thus the first clinical presentation may be either failure to deliver a life-saving shock or painful, inappropriate shocks in normal rhythm. We present a new method for identifying lead failure based on high frequency impedance measurements. This method was evaluated in 3D electromagnetic simulation and bench testing to identify insulation defects in the St. Jude Medical Riata® lead, which is prone to insulation breach. PMID:25571482

  10. An experimental investigation of helicopter rotor high frequency broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A.; Aravamudan, K. S.; Bauer, P.; Harris, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes experiments involving a 4.17 foot diameter model rotor operating in a 5 times 7.5 ft open jet wind tunnel enclosed in an anechoic chamber. The effects of rotor thrust, advance ratio, and the number of blades on the intensity and spectrum of high frequency broadband noise (HFBN) have been investigated. The effects of each parameter were determined by keeping the other two constant. The directivities of the two- and three-bladed rotors were measured in a direction perpendicular to the plane of the rotor disk. The effects of heading edge, pressure side, and suction side serrations on HFBN were measured under several operating conditions, and the effects of the serrations on the mean thrust generated by the rotor were studied. A scaling law is proposed to determine the location of the peak frequency and intensity of HFBN.

  11. The Influence of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves Upon Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Lawrence S.; Baker, Robert M. L.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a theory for the possible influence of high-frequency gravitational waves or HFGWs and pulsed micro-current electromagnetic waves or EMs on biological matter specifically on muscle cells and myofibroblasts. The theory involves consideration of the natural frequency of contractions and relaxations of muscles, especially underlying facial skin, and the possible influence of HFGWs on that process. GWs pass without attenuation through all material thus conventional wisdom would dictate that GWs would have no influence on biological matter. On the other hand, GWs can temporarily modify a gravitational field in some locality if they are of high frequency and such a modification might have an influence in changing the skin muscles' natural frequency. Prior to the actual laboratory generation of HFGWs their influence can be emulated by micro-current EM pulses to the skin and some evidence presented here on that effect may predict the influence of HFGWs. We believe that the HFGW pulsations lead to increased muscle activity and may serve to reverse the aging process. A novel theoretical framework concerning these relaxation phenomena is one result of the paper. Another result is the analysis of the possible delivery system of the FBAR-generated HFGWs, the actual power of the generated HFGWs, and the system's application to nanostructural modification of the skin or muscle cells. It is concluded that a series of non-evasive experiments, which are identified, will have the potential to test theory by detecting and analyzing the possible HFGWs change in polarization, refraction, etc. after their interaction with the muscle cells.

  12. The Influence of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves Upon Muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, Lawrence S.; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr

    2007-01-30

    The objective of this paper is to present a theory for the possible influence of high-frequency gravitational waves or HFGWs and pulsed micro-current electromagnetic waves or EMs on biological matter specifically on muscle cells and myofibroblasts. The theory involves consideration of the natural frequency of contractions and relaxations of muscles, especially underlying facial skin, and the possible influence of HFGWs on that process. GWs pass without attenuation through all material thus conventional wisdom would dictate that GWs would have no influence on biological matter. On the other hand, GWs can temporarily modify a gravitational field in some locality if they are of high frequency and such a modification might have an influence in changing the skin muscles' natural frequency. Prior to the actual laboratory generation of HFGWs their influence can be emulated by micro-current EM pulses to the skin and some evidence presented here on that effect may predict the influence of HFGWs. We believe that the HFGW pulsations lead to increased muscle activity and may serve to reverse the aging process. A novel theoretical framework concerning these relaxation phenomena is one result of the paper. Another result is the analysis of the possible delivery system of the FBAR-generated HFGWs, the actual power of the generated HFGWs, and the system's application to nanostructural modification of the skin or muscle cells. It is concluded that a series of non-evasive experiments, which are identified, will have the potential to test theory by detecting and analyzing the possible HFGWs change in polarization, refraction, etc. after their interaction with the muscle cells.

  13. High power narrowband 589 nm frequency doubled fibre laser source.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Luke; Feng, Yan; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini

    2009-08-17

    We demonstrate high-power high-efficiency cavity-enhanced second harmonic generation of an in-house built ultra-high spectral density (SBS-suppressed) 1178 nm narrowband Raman fibre amplifier. Up to 14.5 W 589 nm CW emission is achieved with linewidth Delta nu(589) < 7 MHz in a diffraction-limited beam, with peak external conversion efficiency of 86%. The inherently high spectral and spatial qualities of the 589 nm source are particularly suited to both spectroscopic and Laser Guide Star applications, given the seed laser can be easily frequency-locked to the Na D(2a) emission line. Further, we expect the technology to be extendable, at similar or higher powers, to wavelengths limited only by the seed-pump-pair availability. PMID:19687946

  14. High precision spectroscopy and imaging in THz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, Vladimir L.

    2014-03-01

    Application of microwave methods for development of the THz frequency range has resulted in elaboration of high precision THz spectrometers based on nonstationary effects. The spectrometers characteristics (spectral resolution and sensitivity) meet the requirements for high precision analysis. The gas analyzers, based on the high precision spectrometers, have been successfully applied for analytical investigations of gas impurities in high pure substances. These investigations can be carried out both in absorption cell and in reactor. The devices can be used for ecological monitoring, detecting the components of chemical weapons and explosive in the atmosphere. The great field of THz investigations is the medicine application. Using the THz spectrometers developed one can detect markers for some diseases in exhaled air.

  15. Studies on radiosensitive lines of Drosophila. X. Effect of 0. 8 MeV neutrons from reactor on the survival and frequency of dominant lethals in mutant line rad(2)201/sup G1/

    SciTech Connect

    Varentsova, E.R.; Sharygin, V.I.; Postnikov, L.N.; Efremov, O.A.

    1986-04-01

    The frequency of dominant lethal mutations (DLM) was studied in the females of the radiosensitive mutant line rad(2)201/sup G1/ following exposure to different doses of neutrons at various stages of oogenesis. Survival of pupae after irradiation of larvae was also studied. It has been demonstrated that in respect of DLM induction, the differential sensitivity of oocytes to the action of neutrons in the control (nonmutated) line is similar to that of gamma-ray treatment. The sensitivity of oocytes at the 7th and earlier stages is higher in the mutant females than in control line. The analysis of relative biological efficiency (RBE) of the neutrons showed that they are more effective in the control line as compared to the mutant line, in respect of survival as well as frequency of DLM induction. The RBE of neutrons depended on the stage of oocyte development: the highest RBE was observed in immature sex cells of females. The possible mechanisms of higher sensitivity of mutant line rad(2)201/sup G1/ to the action of ionizing radiation are discussed.

  16. High frequency planar accelerating structures for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.; Ben-Menahem, S.; Wilson, P.; Miller, R.; Ruth, R.; Nassiri, A.

    1994-12-31

    Modern microfabrication techniques based on deep etch x-ray lithography, e.g., LIGA, can be used to produce large-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric, planar structures suitable for high-frequency RF acceleration of charged particle beams. Specifically, these techniques offer significant advantages over conventional manufacturing methods for future linear colliders (beyond NLC, the Next Linear Collider) because of several unique systems requirements. First, to have the required ac wall plug power within reasonable limits, such future linear colliders (5 TeV) must operate at high frequency (30 GHz). Secondly, luminosity requirements suggest the use of multi-bunch acceleration of electrons and positrons in the linear collider. Thirdly, in order to clearly discriminate physics events in the final interaction point at which electrons and positrons collide, it is required that secondary particle production from beamstrahlung be minimized. Flat electron and positron beams with a large aspect ratio will be beneficial in reducing beamstrahlung in the final focus region, but cause the beam to be more sensitive to wakefields in the vertical dimension. In principle, a flat beam can be accelerated in a planar structure with reduced wakefield in the vertical direction for the entire length of the accelerator. The LIGA process is particularly suitable for manufacturing miniaturized, planar, asymmetric cavities at high frequency. The main advantages of the LIGA process are fabrication of structures with high aspect ratio, small dimensional tolerances, and arbitrary mask shape (cross-section). Other advantages include mass-production with excellent repeatability and precision of up to an entire section of an accelerating structure consisting of a number of cells. It eliminates the need of tedious machining and brazing, for example, of individual disks and cups in conventional disk-loaded structures. Also, planar input/output couplers for the accelerating structure can be easily

  17. Molecular determinants for the high constitutive activity of the human histamine H4 receptor: functional studies on orthologues and mutants

    PubMed Central

    Wifling, D; Löffel, K; Nordemann, U; Strasser, A; Bernhardt, G; Dove, S; Seifert, R; Buschauer, A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Some histamine H4 receptor ligands act as inverse agonists at the human H4 receptor (hH4R), a receptor with exceptionally high constitutive activity, but as neutral antagonists or partial agonists at the constitutively inactive mouse H4 receptor (mH4R) and rat H4 receptor (rH4R). To study molecular determinants of constitutive activity, H4 receptor reciprocal mutants were constructed: single mutants: hH4R-F169V, mH4R-V171F, hH4R-S179A, hH4R-S179M; double mutants: hH4R-F169V+S179A, hH4R-F169V+S179M and mH4R-V171F+M181S. Experimental Approach Site-directed mutagenesis with pVL1392 plasmids containing hH4 or mH4 receptors were performed. Wild-type or mutant receptors were co-expressed with Gαi2 and Gβ1γ2 in Sf9 cells. Membranes were studied in saturation and competition binding assays ([3H]-histamine), and in functional [35S]-GTPγS assays with inverse, partial and full agonists of the hH4 receptor. Key Results Constitutive activity decreased from the hH4 receptor via the hH4R-F169V mutant to the hH4R-F169V+S179A and hH4R-F169V+S179M double mutants. F169 alone or in concert with S179 plays a major role in stabilizing a ligand-free active state of the hH4 receptor. Partial inverse hH4 receptor agonists like JNJ7777120 behaved as neutral antagonists or partial agonists at species orthologues with lower or no constitutive activity. Some partial and full hH4 receptor agonists showed decreased maximal effects and potencies at hH4R-F169V and double mutants. However, the mutation of S179 in the hH4 receptor to M as in mH4 receptor or A as in rH4 receptor did not significantly reduce constitutive activity. Conclusions and Implications F169 and S179 are key amino acids for the high constitutive activity of hH4 receptors and may also be of relevance for other constitutively active GPCRs. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update published in volume 170 issue 1. To view the other articles in this issue visit

  18. Screening of lipid high producing mutant from rhodotorula glutinis by low ion implantation and study on optimization of fermentation medium.

    PubMed

    Shichang, Li; Pengpeng, Zhang; Shaobin, Gu; Hongxia, Liu; Ya, Liu; Shengnan, Liu

    2013-09-01

    In order to obtain lipid producing strain with high-yield, the wild type stain Rhodotorula glutinis was treated by low ion implantation, and optimization of fermentation medium for higher lipid yield was carried out using mutant strain. It was found that the strain had a higher positive mutation rate when the output power was 10 keV and the dose of N(+) implantation was 80 × 2.6 × 10(13) ions/cm(2). Then a high-yield mutant strain D30 was obtained through cid-heating coupling ultrasonic method and lipid yield was 3.10 g/L. Additionally, the surface response method was used to optimize fermentation medium. The three significant factors (glucose, peptone, KH2PO4) were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM), and the optimized parameters of fermentation medium were as follows: glucose 73.40 g/L, peptone 1.06 g/L and KH2PO4 3.56 g/L. Finally the fermentation characteristic of high-yield mutation strain D30 was studied, when fermentation time was 10 days, which lipid yield increased to 7.81 g/L. Fatty acid composition of the lipid was determined by GC, and the most represented fatty acids of mutant D30 were C16:0 (11.4 %), C16:1 (5.66 %), C18:1 (49.3 %), and C18:2 (27.0 %). PMID:24426135

  19. Measurements of relative binding of cohesin and dockerin mutants using an advanced ELISA technique for high-affinity interactions.

    PubMed

    Slutzki, Michal; Barak, Yoav; Reshef, Dan; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    The cellulosome is a large bacterial extracellular multienzyme complex able to degrade crystalline cellulosic substrates. The complex contains catalytic and noncatalytic subunits, interconnected by high-affinity cohesin-dockerin interactions. In this chapter, we introduce an optimized method for comparative binding among different cohesins or cohesin mutants to the dockerin partner. This assay offers advantages over other methods (such as ELISA, cELIA, SPR, and ITC) for particularly high-affinity binding interactions. In this approach, the high-affinity interaction of interest occurs in the liquid phase during the equilibrated binding step, whereas the interaction with the immobilized phase is used only for detection of the unbound dockerins that remain in the solution phase. Once equilibrium conditions are reached, the change in free energy of binding (ΔΔG(binding)), as well as the affinity constant of mutants, can be estimated against the known affinity constant of the wild-type interaction. In light of the above, we propose this method as a preferred alternative for the relative quantification of high-affinity protein interactions. PMID:22608739

  20. Development of high-precision high-frequency phase-shifting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shuliang; Song, Jiaying; Zhang, Baowu; Qiu, Jian

    2010-08-01

    Phase-locked frequency multiplying technology is utilized to amplify 10MHz signal to 640MHz. Pulse inhibition method is then exploited to make high-frequency signal have a phase shift of 2π. 20MHz signal with 2π / 32 phase shift is output after 5 times flip frequency division. In order to optimize electromagnetic compatibility, signal integrity and power integrity of a high-speed circuit, system simulation is performed using HyperLynx, a specially EDA simulation software. A whole printed circuit board (PCB) was made under the guide of optimized simulation results. Phase-shift experiments show that the output of high-frequency phase-shifting circuit system is two-way signals with a frequency of 20.0001 MHz with 1.8ns time difference, i.e. two signals with 12.96°phase difference are obtained.

  1. The diageotropica mutant of tomato lacks high specific activity auxin sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, G.R.; Lomax, T.L. ); Rayle, D.L. )

    1989-04-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum, Mill) plants homozygous for the single gene diageotropica (dgt) mutation have reduced shoot growth, abnormal vascular tissue, altered leaf morphology, and lack of lateral root branching. These and other morphological and physiological abnormalities suggest that dgt plants are unable to respond to the plant growth hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA). The photoaffinity auxin analogue {sup 3}H-5N{sub 3}-IAA specifically labels a polypeptide doublet of 40 ad 42 kD in membrane preparations from stems of the parental variety VFN8, but not from stems of dgt. In elongation tests, excised dgt roots respond in the same manner to IAA an VFN8 roots. These data suggest that the two polypeptides are part of a physiologically important auxin receptor system which is altered in a tissue-specific manner in the mutant.

  2. Maximization of the effective impulse delivered by a high-frequency/low-frequency planetary drill tool.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Patrick; Lucas, Margaret; Cardoni, Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Ultrasonic tools are used for a variety of cutting applications in surgery and the food industry, but when they are applied to harder materials, such as rock, their cutting performance declines because of the low effective impulse delivered by each vibration cycle. To overcome this problem, a technique known as high-frequency/low-frequency (or alternatively, ultrasonic/sonic) drilling is employed. In this approach, an ultrasonic step-horn is used to deliver an impulse to a free mass which subsequently moves toward a drilling bit, delivering the impulse on contact. The free mass then rebounds to complete the cycle. The horn has time between impacts to build significant vibration amplitude and thus delivers a much larger impulse to the free mass than could be delivered if it were applied directly to the target. To maximize the impulse delivered to the target by the cutting bit, both the momentum transfer from the ultrasonic horn to the free mass and the dynamics of the horn/free mass/cutting bit stack must be optimized. This paper uses finite element techniques to optimize the ultrasonic horns and numerical propagation of the stack dynamics to maximize the delivered effective impulse, validated in both cases by extensive experimental analysis. PMID:22083772

  3. High-speed polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging with frequency multiplexing

    PubMed Central

    Yun, S.H.; Vakoc, B.J.; Shishkov, M.; Desjardins, A.E.; Park, B.H.; de Boer, J.F.; Tearney, G.J.; Bouma, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) provides a cross-sectional image of birefringence in biological samples that is complementary in many applications to the standard reflectance-based image. Recent ex vivo studies have demonstrated that birefringence mapping enables the characterization of collagen and smooth muscle concentration and distribution in vascular tissues. Instruments capable of applying these measurements percutaneously in vivo may provide new insights into coronary atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. We have developed a polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) system that enables high-speed intravascular birefringence imaging through a fiber-optic catheter. The novel design of this system utilizes frequency multiplexing to simultaneously measure reflectance of two incident polarization states, overcoming concerns regarding temporal variations of the catheter fiber birefringence and spatial variations in the birefringence of the sample. We demonstrate circular cross-sectional birefringence imaging of a human coronary artery ex vivo through a flexible fiber-optic catheter with an A-line rate of 62 kHz and a ranging depth of 6.2 mm. PMID:18542183

  4. Low Frequency Turbulence as the Source of High Frequency Waves in Multi-Component Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Krivorutsky, Emmanuel N.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Space plasmas support a wide variety of waves, and wave-particle interactions as well as wavewave interactions are of crucial importance to magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma behavior. High frequency wave turbulence generation by the low frequency (LF) turbulence is restricted by two interconnected requirements: the turbulence should be strong enough and/or the coherent wave trains should have the appropriate length. These requirements are strongly relaxed in the multi-component plasmas, due to the heavy ions large drift velocity in the field of LF wave. The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs), in particular, is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. It is demonstrated that large-amplitude Alfven waves, in particular those associated with LF turbulence, may generate LHW s in the auroral zone and ring current region and in some cases (particularly in the inner magnetosphere) this serves as the Alfven wave saturation mechanism. We also argue that the described scenario can playa vital role in various parts of the outer magnetosphere featuring strong LF turbulence accompanied by LHW activity. Using the data from THEMIS spacecraft, we validate the conditions for such cross-scale coupling in the near-Earth "flow-braking" magnetotail region during the passage of sharp injection/dipolarization fronts, as well as in the turbulent outflow region of the midtail reconnection site.

  5. Insights into the conformational equilibria of maltose-binding protein by analysis of high affinity mutants.

    PubMed

    Telmer, Patrick G; Shilton, Brian H

    2003-09-01

    The affinity of maltose-binding protein (MBP) for maltose and related carbohydrates was greatly increased by removal of groups in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft. The wild-type protein has a KD of 1200 nM for maltose; mutation of residues Met-321 and Gln-325, both to alanine, resulted in a KD for maltose of 70 nM; deletion of 4 residues, Glu-172, Asn-173, Lys-175, and Tyr-176, which are part of a poorly ordered loop, results in a KD for maltose of 110 nM. Combining the mutations yields an increased affinity for maltodextrins and a KD of 6 nM for maltotriose. Comparison of ligand binding by the mutants, using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, indicates that decreases in the off-rate are responsible for the increased affinity. Small-angle x-ray scattering was used to demonstrate that the mutations do not significantly affect the solution conformation of MBP in either the presence or absence of maltose. The crystal structures of selected mutants showed that the mutations do not cause significant structural changes in either the closed or open conformation of MBP. These studies show that interactions in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft, which we term the "balancing interface," are responsible for modulating the affinity of MBP for its ligand. Our results are consistent with a model in which the ligand-bound protein alternates between the closed and open conformations, and removal of interactions in the balancing interface decreases the stability of the open conformation, without affecting the closed conformation. PMID:12794084

  6. High frequency MoS2 nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaesung; Wang, Zenghui; He, Keliang; Shan, Jie; Feng, Philip X-L

    2013-07-23

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a layered semiconducting material in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), as thin as a monolayer (consisting of a hexagonal plane of Mo atoms covalently bonded and sandwiched between two planes of S atoms, in a trigonal prismatic structure), has demonstrated unique properties and strong promises for emerging two-dimensional (2D) nanodevices. Here we report on the demonstration of movable and vibrating MoS2 nanodevices, where MoS2 diaphragms as thin as 6 nm (a stack of 9 monolayers) exhibit fundamental-mode nanomechanical resonances up to f0 ~ 60 MHz in the very high frequency (VHF) band, and frequency-quality (Q) factor products up to f0 × Q ~ 2 × 10(10)Hz, all at room temperature. The experimental results from many devices with a wide range of thicknesses and lateral sizes, in combination with theoretical analysis, quantitatively elucidate the elastic transition regimes in these ultrathin MoS2 nanomechanical resonators. We further delineate a roadmap for scaling MoS2 2D resonators and transducers toward microwave frequencies. This study also opens up possibilities for new classes of vibratory devices to exploit strain- and dynamics-engineered ultrathin semiconducting 2D crystals. PMID:23738924

  7. High Frequency Supercapacitors for Piezo-based Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervin, Matthew; Pereira, Carlos; Miller, John; Outlaw, Ronald; Rastegar, Jay; Murray, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Energy harvesting is being investigated as an alternative to batteries for powering munition guidance and fuzing functions during flight. A piezoelectric system that generates energy from the oscillation of a mass on a spring (set in motion by the launch acceleration) is being developed. Original designs stored this energy in an electrolytic capacitor for use during flight. Here we replace the electrolytic capacitor with a smaller, lighter, and potentially more reliable electrochemical double layer capacitor (aka, supercapacitor). The potential problems with using supercapacitors in this application are that the piezoelectric output greatly exceeds the supercapacitor electrolyte breakdown voltage, and the frequency greatly exceeds the operating frequency of commercial supercapacitors. Here we have investigated the use of ultrafast vertically oriented graphene array-based supercapacitors for storing the energy in this application. We find that the electrolyte breakdown is not a serious limitation as it is either kinetically limited by the relatively high frequency of the piezoelectric output, or it is overcome by the self-healing nature of supercapacitors. We also find that these supercapacitors have sufficient dynamic response to efficiently store the generated energy.

  8. Sustainable high capacitance at high frequencies: metallic aluminum-polypropylene nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Fredin, Lisa A; Li, Zhong; Lanagan, Michael T; Ratner, Mark A; Marks, Tobin J

    2013-01-22

    The high-frequency dielectric response of 0-3 polypropylene nanocomposites prepared with the activated metallocene polymerization catalyst [rac-ethylenebisindenyl]zirconium dichlororide absorbed on the native Al(2)O(3) surfaces of metallic aluminum nanoparticles is characterized. The nanocomposites produced are randomly dispersed in the polyolefin matrix with no visible defects that might degrade film dielectric properties. Electrical measurements show that as the volume fraction of Al nanoparticles is increased, the effective permittivity of the nanocomposites increases, with ε(r) values reaching ~10 at relatively low frequency (1 MHz). Because of the high permittivity and conductivity contrast between the metal nanoparticles and the polypropylene matrix, Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars theory can be applied to model the loss at high frequencies and provide insight into how the nanocomposite high frequency response scales with Al volume fraction. At higher Al nanoparticle volume fractions, mixing theories predict greater densities of nanoparticle aggregates, consistent with the experimentally observed shift of the dielectric relaxation to lower frequencies. Although these nanocomposites undergo the predicted initial dielectric relaxation with increasing frequency, the metallic nanoparticle complex permittivity imbues the higher Al volume fraction materials with relatively high, sustainable permittivities, 6, at frequencies as high as 7 GHz. PMID:23259679

  9. High frequency fast wave current drive for DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.; Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.

    2011-12-23

    A steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) requires a high efficiency current drive system, from plug to driven mega-amps. RF systems working in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have high efficiency from plug to antenna but a limited current drive (CD) efficiency and centrally peaked CD profiles. The latter feature is not adequate for a SSTR where the current should be sufficiently broad to keep the central safety factor (possibly significantly) above 1. In addition, the fact that the fast wave (FW) is evanescent at the edge limits coupling, requiring high voltage operation, which makes the system dependent on plasma edge properties and prone to arcing, reducing its reliability. A possible way to overcome these weaknesses is to operate at higher frequency (10 times or more the cyclotron frequency). The advantages are: (1) The coupling can be much better (waves propagate in vacuum) if the parallel refractive index n{sub ||} is kept below one, (2) The FW group velocity tends to align to the magnetic field, so the power circumnavigates the magnetic axis and can drive off-axis current, (3) Due to the latter property, n{sub ||} can be upshifted along the wave propagation path, allowing low n{sub ||} launch (hence good coupling, large CD efficiency) with ultimately good electron absorption (which requires higher n{sub ||}. Note however that the n{sub ||} upshift is a self-organized feature, that electron absorption is in competition with {alpha}-particle absorption and that uncoupling of the FW from the lower hybrid resonance at the edge requires n{sub ||} slightly above one. The latter possibly counterproductive features might complicate the picture. The different aspects of this potentially attractive off-axis FWCD scheme are discussed.

  10. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the author describes an innovative method of measuring high-frequency electric fields using a toroid. For typical geophysical applications the new sensor will detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from 1.0 MHz. This window, in particular the lower frequency range between 1.0 to 100 MHz, has not been used for existing electromagnetic or radar systems to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) can be used successfully in this depth range if the ground is resistive but most soils are, in fact, conductive (0.01 to 1.0 S/m) rendering GPR inefficient. Other factors controlling the resolution of GPR system for small objects is the spatial averaging inherent in the electric dipole antenna and the scattering caused by soil inhomogeneities of dimensions comparable to the wavelength (and antenna size). For maximum resolution it is desirable to use the highest frequencies but the scattering is large and target identification is poor. Time-varying magnetic fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroid. The electric field at the center of the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroid one can easily and accurately determine the electric field. The new sensor will greatly simplify the cumbersome procedure involved with GPR measurements with its center frequency less than 100 MHz. The overall size of the toroidal sensor can be as small as a few inches. It is this size advantage that will not only allow easy fabrication and deployment of multi-component devices either on the surface or in a borehole, but it will render greatly improved resolution over conventional systems.

  11. Observations of High Frequency Harmonics of the Ionospheric Alfven Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Usanova, Maria; Bortnik, Jacob; Milling, David; Kale, Andy; Shao, Leo; Miles, David; Rae, I. Jonathan

    We present observations of high frequency harmonics of the ionospheric Alfven Resonator (IAR). These are seen in the form of spectral resonance structures (SRS) recorded by a ground-based search coil magnetometer sampling at 100 samples/s at the Ministik Lake station at L=4.2 within the expanded CARISMA magnetometer array. Previous observational studies have indicated that such SRS are typically confined to frequencies <~5 Hz with only several SRS harmonics being observed. We report the first observations of clear and discrete SRS, which we believe are harmonics of the IAR, and which extend to around 20 Hz in at least 10-12 clear SRS harmonics. We additionally demonstrate the utility of the Bortnik et al. (2007) auto-detection algorithm, designed for Pc1 wavepackets, for characterising the properties of the IAR. Our results also indicate that the cavity supporting SRS in the IAR at this time must be structured to support and trap much higher frequency IAR harmonics than previously assumed. This impacts the potential importance of the IAR for magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, especially in relation to the impacts of incident Alfven waves on the ionosphere including Alfvenic aurora. Our observations also highlight the potential value of IAR observations for diagnosing the structure of the topside ionosphere, not least using the observed structure of the SRS. These are the first mid-latitude observations demonstrating that the IAR can extend to frequencies beyond those of the lowest few harmonics of the Schumann resonances - significantly suggesting the possibility that the Schumann resonance modes and the IAR may be coupled. The in-situ structure of the IAR is also examined by combining satellite data with conjugate measurements from the ground, and the impacts of the IAR for magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling examined.

  12. Attenuation of High-Frequency Seismic Waves in Eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, M.

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the frequency-dependent attenuation of the crust in Eastern Iran by analysis data from 132 local earthquakes having focal depths in the range of 5-25 km. We estimated the quality factor of coda waves ( Q c) and body waves ( Q p and Q s) in the frequency band of 1.5-24 Hz by applying the single backscattering theory of S-coda envelopes and the extended coda-normalization method, respectively. Considering records from recent earthquakes (Rigan M w 6.5, 2010/12/20, Goharan M w 6.2, 2013/5/11 and Sirch M w 5.5, 2013/1/21), the estimated values of Q c, Q p and Q s vary from 151 ± 49, 63 ± 6, and 93 ± 14 at 1.5 Hz to 1,994 ± 124, 945 ± 84 and 1,520 ± 123 at 24 Hz, respectively. The average frequency-dependent relationships ( Q = Q o f n ) estimated for the region are Q c = (108 ± 10) f (0.96±0.01), Q p = (50 ± 5) f (1.01±0.04), and Q s = (75 ± 6) f (1.03±0.06). These results evidenced a frequency dependence of the quality factors Q c, Q p, and Q s, as commonly observed in tectonically active zones characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity, and the low value of Q indicated an attenuative crust beneath the entire region.

  13. A new simplified high radio frequency power amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Okutsu, H.; Kobayashi, N.; Hayakawa, A.

    2004-10-01

    In order to simplify a present standard high rf power amplifier of ion cyclotron range of frequency plasma heating system, a new amplifier arrangement composed of a tetrode with a grounded cathode and a field effect transistor (FET) switching circuit providing an input rf power is proposed. The FET switching circuit is so small that it can be installed close to the tetrode in one cubicle. It might be called a single tube high rf power amplifier. A test amplifier composed of the tetrode (8F76R) and the FET (2SK-1310) switching circuit is constructed. The maximum output rf power of 8.5 kW was stably obtained at 70 MHz. The feasibility of the single tube high rf power amplifier was experimentally proved.

  14. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  15. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  16. Gaussian beam decomposition of high frequency wave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tanushev, Nicolay M. Engquist, Bjoern; Tsai, Richard

    2009-12-10

    In this paper, we present a method of decomposing a highly oscillatory wave field into a sparse superposition of Gaussian beams. The goal is to extract the necessary parameters for a Gaussian beam superposition from this wave field, so that further evolution of the high frequency waves can be computed by the method of Gaussian beams. The methodology is described for R{sup d} with numerical examples for d=2. In the first example, a field generated by an interface reflection of Gaussian beams is decomposed into a superposition of Gaussian beams. The beam parameters are reconstructed to a very high accuracy. The data in the second example is not a superposition of a finite number of Gaussian beams. The wave field to be approximated is generated by a finite difference method for a geometry with two slits. The accuracy in the decomposition increases monotonically with the number of beams.

  17. Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency plasma in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, T.; Mukasa, S.; Takemori, T.; Watanabe, T.; Kurokawa, K.; Toyota, H.; Nomura, S.; Kawashima, A.; Iwamae, A.

    2009-03-15

    Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency (hf) plasma were performed under high pressure conditions (5 and 7 MPa) and supercritical (sc) CO{sub 2} conditions (8-20 MPa). Temperature evaluated from C{sub 2} Swan bands (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) increased from 3600 to 4600 K with an increase in pressure. The first observation of broadening and shifting of the O I line profile (3p {sup 5} P{sub 3,2,1}{yields}3s {sup 5} S{sub 2}{sup 0}) of hf plasma under sc CO{sub 2} conditions was carried out. However, the origin of broadening and the shifting cannot be understood because the present theory explaining them is not valid for such high pressure conditions.

  18. Multi-frequency metal detector in high mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatescu, Laurence; Harmer, Gregory; Nesper, Oliver; Bordean, Dorin; Tkachenko, Yuri

    2009-05-01

    The successful detection and discrimination of mines is very difficult in areas of high soil mineralization. In these areas, the soil can make a significant contribution to the received signal that causes false detections or masks the true mine response. To address this problem, Minelab has developed a continuous wave (CW) multi-frequency digital detector (MFDD). It transmits four frequencies (between 1 kHz and 45 kHz) and each has a high dynamic range that approaches 120 dB. The mineralized soil with high magnetic susceptibility affects the characteristics of the sensor-head, in particular the inductance of the transmitting and receiving windings. These in turn affect the front-end electronics and measuring circuits and can lead to excessive ground noise that makes detection difficult. Minelab has modeled the effect that the soil has on the sensor-head and developed methods to monitor these effects. By having a well calibrated detector, which is demonstrated by the tight agreement of raw ground signals with theoretical ground models, the tasks of ground balance and discrimination become much more reliable and robust.

  19. BBO sapphire compound for high-power frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothhardt, Carolin; Rothhardt, Jan; Klenke, Arno; Peschel, Thomas; Eberhardt, Ramona; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Lasers used for diverse applications from industry to fundamental science tend to increasing output powers. Some applications require frequency conversion via nonlinear optical crystals, which suffer from the formation of temperature gradients at high power operation which causes thermal lensing or destruction of the crystal due to tensile stresses. To avoid these unwanted effects we joined a beta barium borate (BBO) crystal with sapphire disks serving as effective heat spreaders due to their high thermal conductivity (thermal conductivity κ = 42 W/Km). Therefore, smooth and flat crystal surfaces were joined by plasma-activated bonding. The joining relies on covalent bonds, which are formed via a condensation reaction of the surfaces which are first connected by Van der Waals forces. The cleaned surfaces are activated by plasma and brought into contact, pressed together and heat treated at a temperature of about 100°C. Special attention has been paid to the cleaning of the surfaces. Therefor the surfaces have been evaluated before and after treatment by means of atomic force microscopy. A stable connection has been formed successfully, which has been tested in a proof of principle experiment and demonstrated efficient second harmonic generation at up to 253 W of input power. Compared to a bare single BBO crystal it could be shown that the temperature within the crystal compound is significantly reduced. Such hybrid structures pave the way for frequency conversion at kilowatts of average power for future high power lasers.

  20. Saltating Snow Mechanics: High Frequency Particle Response to Mountain Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksamit, N. O.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Blowing snow transport theory is currently limited by its dependency on the coupling of time-averaged measurements of particle saltation and suspension and wind speed. Details of the stochastic process of particle transport and complex bed interactions in the saltation layer, along with the influence of boundary-layer turbulence are unobservable with classic measurement techniques. In contrast, recent advances in two-phase sand transport understanding have been spurred by development of high-frequency wind and particle velocity measurement techniques. To advance the understanding of blowing snow, laser illuminated high-speed videography and ultrasonic anemometry were deployed in a mountain environment to examine saltation of snow over a natural snowpack in detail. A saltating snow measurement site was established at the Fortress Mountain Snow Laboratory, Alberta, Canada and instrumented with two Campbell CSAT3 ultrasonic anemometers, four Campbell SR50 ultrasonic snow depth sounders and a two dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) system. Measurements were collected during nighttime blowing snow events, quantifying snow particle response to high frequency wind gusts. This novel approach permits PTV to step beyond mean statistics of snow transport by identifying sub-species of saltation motion in the first 20 mm above the surface, as well as previously overlooked initiation processes, such as tumbling aggregate snow crystals ejecting smaller grains, then eventually disintegrating and bouncing into entrainment. Spectral characteristics of snow particle ejection and saltation dynamics were also investigated. These unique observations are starting to inform novel conceptualizations of saltating snow transport mechanisms.

  1. Identifying High Frequency Peakers using the Korean VLBI Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Y.; Sohn, B. W.; Chung, A.; Park, S.; Park, P.

    2016-02-01

    High Frequency Peakers (HFPs) are known to be promising targets to study the AGN properties at their very early evolutionary stage. To date, HFP classification has been usually relied on the spectral shape with the relatively sparse or short time range monitoring. However, HFP samples are often contaminated by blazars which are compact and highly variable, and hence may behave in similar ways to HFPs. In this work, we challenge to identify genuine young AGNs by long-term monitoring of HFP candidates at high radio frequencies. We performed single-dish monitoring of 19 candidates in 18 epochs over 2.5 years at 22 and 43 GHz simultaneously, using the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). Also, using the KVN and VERA array (KaVA), we carried out 22 and 43 GHz VLBI observations of seven candidates from our sample, and investigated their parsec-scale (milli-arcsecond scale) morphology. We discuss the results of the source classification from our long-term single dish monitoring observation and the preliminary results of follow-up VLBI observation.

  2. A fast directional algorithm for high-frequency electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Paul; Ying Lexing

    2011-06-20

    This paper is concerned with the fast solution of high-frequency electromagnetic scattering problems using the boundary integral formulation. We extend the O(N log N) directional multilevel algorithm previously proposed for the acoustic scattering case to the vector electromagnetic case. We also detail how to incorporate the curl operator of the magnetic field integral equation into the algorithm. When combined with a standard iterative method, this results in an almost linear complexity solver for the combined field integral equations. In addition, the butterfly algorithm is utilized to compute the far field pattern and radar cross section with O(N log N) complexity.

  3. Generation of sheet currents by high frequency fast MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of fast magnetosonic waves of high frequency propagating into an axisymmetric equilibrium plasma is studied. By using the methods of weakly nonlinear geometrical optics, it is shown that the perturbation travels in the equatorial plane while satisfying a transport equation which enables us to predict the time and location of formation of shock waves. For plasmas of large magnetic Prandtl number, this would result into the creation of sheet currents which may give rise to magnetic reconnection and destruction of the original equilibrium.

  4. Highly sensitive passive radio frequency identification based sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissenwasser, J.; Vellekoop, M.; Heer, R.

    2010-02-01

    A novel platform for sensor applications based on radio frequency (rf) identification technology, where passive tags are powered by the rf-field of a reader, is presented. The sophisticated energy harvesting system of the tag enables a blanking of the rf-field for a defined period, while supplying the tag electronics with a highly stable voltage and a power of 25 mW for 100 ms. During this time, span measurements can be performed without interferences of the rf-field. The presented tags work without batteries and are designed for impedance measurements on microbiological cell cultures under physiological relevant conditions as well as in harsh environments.

  5. Highly sensitive passive radio frequency identification based sensor systems.

    PubMed

    Wissenwasser, J; Vellekoop, M; Heer, R

    2010-02-01

    A novel platform for sensor applications based on radio frequency (rf) identification technology, where passive tags are powered by the rf-field of a reader, is presented. The sophisticated energy harvesting system of the tag enables a blanking of the rf-field for a defined period, while supplying the tag electronics with a highly stable voltage and a power of 25 mW for 100 ms. During this time, span measurements can be performed without interferences of the rf-field. The presented tags work without batteries and are designed for impedance measurements on microbiological cell cultures under physiological relevant conditions as well as in harsh environments. PMID:20192517

  6. Novel vortex-transform for high frequency modulated patterns.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Sosa, Daniel; Angel-Toro, Luciano; Bolognini, Nestor; Tebaldi, Myrian

    2013-10-01

    A novel vortex-transform is proposed. This transform allows for generating complex-valued functions from modulated intensity patterns, including high frequency components from modulation, without the generation of unstable phase singularities. From these complex-valued functions it is possible to obtain intensity and pseudo-phase maps to analyze the intensity recordings without the necessity of phase retrieval techniques. The intensity and pseudo-phase maps obtained by using this transform preserve the modulation structure onto the intensity and phase modulo 2π maps, including stable phase singularities. PMID:24104283

  7. A detector for high frequency modulation in auroral particle fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiger, R. J.; Oehme, D.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Murphree, J.; Anderson, H. R.; Anderson, R.

    1974-01-01

    A high time resolution electron detector has been developed for use in sounding rocket studies of the aurora. The detector is used to look for particle bunching in the range 50 kHz-10 MHz. The design uses an electron multiplier and an onboard frequency spectrum analyzer. By using the onboard analyzer, the data can be transmitted back to ground on a single 93-kHz voltage-controlled oscillator. The detector covers the 50 kHz-10 MHz range six times per second and detects modulation on the order of a new percent of the total electron flux. Spectra are presented for a flight over an auroral arc.

  8. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-11-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  9. Diffractive Model of the high-frequency impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Heifets

    1989-06-12

    High frequency diffraction can be described by iterations based on an approximate formulation of the boundary conditions. The method formulated is analogous to the Born series of scattering theory. It is used to study the interaction of short bunches with the beam environment in terms of the impedances. The impedances of typical elements of an accelerator structure are obtained. The cross-talk between elements, the impedance of a periodic array, and the effect of a taper are discussed. The method can be applied to a cavity of an arbitrary shape.

  10. Kapitza thermal resistance studied by high-frequency photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horny, Nicolas; Chirtoc, Mihai; Fleming, Austin; Hamaoui, Georges; Ban, Heng

    2016-07-01

    Kapitza thermal resistance is determined using high-frequency photothermal radiometry (PTR) extended for modulation up to 10 MHz. Interfaces between 50 nm thick titanium coatings and silicon or stainless steel substrates are studied. In the used configuration, the PTR signal is not sensitive to the thermal conductivity of the film nor to its optical absorption coefficient, thus the Kapitza resistance is directly determined from single thermal parameter fits. Results of thermal resistances show the significant influence of the nature of the substrate, as well as of the presence of free electrons at the interface.

  11. A dynamical structure of high frequency currency exchange market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazuka, Naoya; Ohira, Toru; Marumo, Kouhei; Shimizu, Tokiko; Takayasu, Misako; Takayasu, Hideki

    2003-06-01

    We analyze tick-by-tick data, the most high frequency data available, of yen-dollar currency exchange rates. We show that a dynamical structure can be observed in binarized data indicating the direction of up and down movement of prices, which is not apparently seen from the price change itself. This result is consistent with our previous study that there exists a conditional probabilistic structure in binarized data. The dynamical and probabilistic structure which we found could indicate that dealers’ decision making is based on a binary strategy, even if they are unconscious of this fact.

  12. High frequency drift instabilities in a dusty plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Krall, N. A.

    1994-01-01

    High frequency drift instabilities with omega(sub ce) much greater than omega which is greater than omega(sub ci) are investigated in a dusty magnetized plasma in which locally there is an electron density gradient which is opposite in sign to a dust density gradient. Two different equilibria are considered, characterized by rho(sub d) greater than L(sub d) and less than L(sub d), where rho(sub d) is the dust gyroradius and L(sub nd) is the dust density scale length. Possible application to Saturn's F-ring is discussed.

  13. Explanation of persistent high frequency density structure in coalesced bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Gerald P.

    1988-07-01

    It has been observed that after the Main Ring rf manipulation of coalescing (where 5 to 13 primary bunches are transferred into a single rf bucket) the new secondary bunch displays evidence of high frequency density structure superimposed on the approximately Gaussian longitudinal bunch length distribution. This structure is persistent over a period of many seconds (hundreds of synchrotron oscillation periods). With the help of multiparticle simulation programs, an explanation of this phenomenon is given in terms of single particle longitudinal phase space dynamics. No coherent effects need be taken into account. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Comparative structure and physicochemical properties of Ilpumbyeo, a high-quality japonica rice, and its mutant, Suweon 464.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee-Jin; Hwang, In-Kyeong; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Choi, Hae-Chune

    2003-10-22

    A new rice mutant Suweon 464 (S-464) derived from a high-quality rice, Ilpumbyeo (IP), revealed a striking difference in cooking quality from IP. The physicochemical properties of S-464 and IP were compared. S-464 was unusually high in amylose and fiber contents, had B-type crystallinity of starch, and had a markedly lower proportion of short chains in the distribution of glucan-chain fractions of debranched starch as compared with IP. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that starch granules of S-464 were much smaller in size than those of IP and that many of them were not separated from amyloplasts. The physicochemical properties of S-464 would contribute to poor gelatinization, lower swelling power, higher hardness, and less stickiness when cooked. Although S-464 may not be desirable for cooked rice, the mutant could be an excellent candidate for other processed food products on the basis of its unusual properties of starch and high fiber, protein, and lipid contents. PMID:14558783

  15. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal low temperature plasmas are widely used for technological applications. Increased demands on plasma technology have resulted in the development of various discharge concepts based on different power coupling mechanisms. Despite this, power dissipation mechanisms in these discharges are not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are low pressure radio-frequency (rf) discharges. The limited understanding of these discharges is predominantly due to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and difficult diagnostic access to important parameters. Optical measurements are a powerful diagnostic tool offering high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) provides non-intrusive access, to the physics of the plasma, with comparatively simple experimental requirements. Improved advances in technology and modern diagnostics now allow deeper insight into fundamental mechanisms. In low pressure rf discharges insight into the electron dynamics within the rf cycle can yield vital information. This requires high temporal resolution on a nano-second time scale. The optical emission from rf discharges exhibits temporal variations within the rf cycle. These variations are particularly strong, in for example capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), but also easily observable in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), and can be exploited for insight into power dissipation. Interesting kinetic and non-linear coupling effects are revealed in capacitive systems. The electron dynamics exhibits a complex spatio-temporal structure. Excitation and ionisation, and, therefore, plasma sustainment is dominated through directed energetic electrons created through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. In the relatively simple case of an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf plasma the complexity of the power dissipation is exposed and various mode transitions can be clearly observed and investigated. At higher pressure secondary electrons dominate the

  16. Electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud; Schnitzer, Ory

    2013-01-01

    We provide a macroscale description of electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies, where chemical reactions at the electrodes are negligible. Using a thin-double-layer approximation, our starting point is the set of macroscale equations governing the “bounded” configuration comprising of a particle suspended between two electrodes, wherein the electrodes are governed by a capacitive charging condition and the imposed voltage is expressed as an integral constraint. In the large-cell limit the bounded model is transformed into an effectively equivalent “unbounded” model describing the interaction between the particle and a single electrode, where the imposed-voltage condition is manifested in a uniform field at infinity together with a Robin-type condition applying at the electrode. This condition, together with the standard no-flux condition applying at the particle surface, leads to a linear problem governing the electric potential in the fluid domain in which the dimensionless frequency ω of the applied voltage appears as a governing parameter. In the high-frequency limit ω≫1 the flow is dominated by electro-osmotic slip at the particle surface, the contribution of electrode electro-osmosis being O(ω-2) small. That simplification allows for a convenient analytical investigation of the prevailing case where the clearance between the particle and the adjacent electrode is small. Use of tangent-sphere coordinates allows to calculate the electric and flows fields as integral Hankel transforms. At large distances from the particle, along the electrode, both fields decay with the fourth power of distance.

  17. Experimental laboratory system to generate high frequency test environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Paez, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    This is an extension of two previous analytical studies to investigate a technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. These analytical studies predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHz could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 40 kHz. Results for sinusoidal shaker inputs tuned to create chaotic impact response are shown along with the responses due to random vibration shaker inputs. The experiments and results are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion develops due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced by consecutive milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath and the damage severity monitored. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference the wall thickness reduction was monitored. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  19. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, P.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion can develop due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were selectively generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted for wall thickness reduction due to milling of the steel structure. From the measured signal changes due to the wave mode interference the reduced wall thickness was monitored. Good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  20. 10 K high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sixue; Chen, Liubiao; Wu, Xianlin; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    A high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling (HPTCP) has been developed and tested to meet the requirement of weak magnetic signals measurement, and the performance characteristics are presented in this article. The HPTCP is a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler with the precooling-stage replaced by liquid nitrogen. Two regenerators completely filled with stainless steel (SS) meshes are used in the cooler. Together with cold inertance tubes and cold gas reservoir, a cold double-inlet configuration is used to control the phase relationship of the HPTCP. The experimental result shows that the cold double-inlet configuration has improved the performance of the cooler obviously. The effects of operation parameters on the performance of the cooler are also studied. With a precooling temperature of 78.5 K, the maximum refrigeration capacity is 0.26 W at 15 K and 0.92 W at 20 K when the input electric power are 174 W and 248 W respectively, and the minimum no-load temperature obtained is 10.3 K, which is a new record on refrigeration temperature for high frequency pulse tube cryocooler reported with SS completely used as regenerative matrix.

  1. Novel tissue mimicking materials for high frequency breast ultrasound phantoms.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Louise M; Fagan, Andrew J; Browne, Jacinta E

    2011-01-01

    The development and acoustical characterisation of a range of novel agar-based tissue mimicking material (TMMs) for use in clinically relevant, quality assurance (QA) and anthropomorphic breast phantoms are presented. The novel agar-based TMMs described in this study are based on a comprehensive, systematic variation of the ingredients in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) TMM. A novel, solid fat-mimicking material was also developed and acoustically characterised. Acoustical characterisation was carried out using an in-house scanning acoustic macroscope at low (7.5 MHz) and high frequencies (20 MHz), using the pulse-echo insertion technique. The speeds of sound range from 1490 to 1570 m. s(-1), attenuation coefficients range from 0.1 to 0.9 dB. cm(‑1). MHz(-1) and relative backscatter ranges from 0 to -20 dB. It was determined that tissues can be mimicked in terms of independently controllable speeds of sound and attenuation coefficients. These properties make these novel TMMs suitable for use in clinically relevant QA and anthropomorphic phantoms and would potentially be useful for other high frequency applications such as intravascular and small animal imaging. PMID:21084158

  2. Assessing mutant p53 in primary high-grade serous ovarian cancer using immunohistochemistry and massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Alexander J.; Dwight, Trisha; Gill, Anthony J.; Dickson, Kristie-Ann; Zhu, Ying; Clarkson, Adele; Gard, Gregory B.; Maidens, Jayne; Valmadre, Susan; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick; Marsh, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 is mutated in cancer, including over 96% of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Mutations cause loss of wild-type p53 function due to either gain of abnormal function of mutant p53 (mutp53), or absent to low mutp53. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) enables increased accuracy of detection of somatic variants in heterogeneous tumours. We used MPS and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to characterise HGSOCs for TP53 mutation and p53 expression. TP53 mutation was identified in 94% (68/72) of HGSOCs, 62% of which were missense. Missense mutations demonstrated high p53 by IHC, as did 35% (9/26) of non-missense mutations. Low p53 was seen by IHC in 62% of HGSOC associated with non-missense mutations. Most wild-type TP53 tumours (75%, 6/8) displayed intermediate p53 levels. The overall sensitivity of detecting a TP53 mutation based on classification as ‘Low’, ‘Intermediate’ or ‘High’ for p53 IHC was 99%, with a specificity of 75%. We suggest p53 IHC can be used as a surrogate marker of TP53 mutation in HGSOC; however, this will result in misclassification of a proportion of TP53 wild-type and mutant tumours. Therapeutic targeting of mutp53 will require knowledge of both TP53 mutations and mutp53 expression. PMID:27189670

  3. Mechanisms and Factors that Influence High Frequency Retroviral Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista; Galli, Andrea; Nikolaitchik, Olga; Mens, Helene; Pathak, Vinay K.; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2011-01-01

    With constantly changing environmental selection pressures, retroviruses rely upon recombination to reassort polymorphisms in their genomes and increase genetic diversity, which improves the chances for the survival of their population. Recombination occurs during DNA synthesis, whereby reverse transcriptase undergoes template switching events between the two copackaged RNAs, resulting in a viral recombinant with portions of the genetic information from each parental RNA. This review summarizes our current understanding of the factors and mechanisms influencing retroviral recombination, fidelity of the recombination process, and evaluates the subsequent viral diversity and fitness of the progeny recombinant. Specifically, the high mutation rates and high recombination frequencies of HIV-1 will be analyzed for their roles in influencing HIV-1 global diversity, as well as HIV-1 diagnosis, drug treatment, and vaccine development. PMID:21994801

  4. Development of high frequency and wide bandwidth Johnson noise thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crossno, Jesse; Liu, Xiaomeng; Kim, Philip; Ohki, Thomas A.; Fong, Kin Chung

    2015-01-12

    We develop a high frequency, wide bandwidth radiometer operating at room temperature, which augments the traditional technique of Johnson noise thermometry for nanoscale thermal transport studies. Employing low noise amplifiers and an analog multiplier operating at 2 GHz, auto- and cross-correlated Johnson noise measurements are performed in the temperature range of 3 to 300 K, achieving a sensitivity of 5.5 mK (110 ppm) in 1 s of integration time. This setup allows us to measure the thermal conductance of a boron nitride encapsulated monolayer graphene device over a wide temperature range. Our data show a high power law (T ∼ 4) deviation from the Wiedemann-Franz law above T ∼ 100 K.

  5. Design and development of mode launcher for high frequency Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Sinha, A. K.; Khatun, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and development of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher for high frequency and high power Gyrotron. A Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for converting TE22,6 mode to a Gaussian mode has been designed for 120 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron. The initial design of mode launcher has been optimized using LOT/SURF-3D software. The mode launcher diameter and length are optimized considering the minimum return loss and the minimum insertion loss by using CST microwave studio. The return loss (S11) and insertion loss (S21) performance of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher have been obtained using CST-Microwave Studio. The fabrication of Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for 120 GHz Gyrotron has also been carried out.

  6. Active Control of High-Frequency Combustor Instability Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    To reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities-high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the combustor and turbine safe operating life. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Propulsion and Power Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center in partnership with Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Center, and Georgia Institute of Technology is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities.

  7. High efficiency coupling of radio frequency beams from the dual frequency gyrotron with a corrugated waveguide transmission system.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Mitsunaka, Yoshika; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2013-01-01

    High efficiency coupling of the millimeter-wave output of the dual-frequency gyrotron with the transmission line was demonstrated. The dual-frequency gyrotron was design to produce similar beam profiles for two operation frequencies (170 GHz and 137 GHz). Using two RF beam reflecting mirrors in a matching optics unit (MOU), which are designed to transform the beam profile of the gyrotron output to the fundamental waveguide mode (HE(11) mode) at 170 GHz, high efficiency coupling was demonstrated for two frequencies. The measured mode purity of HE(11) mode was 96% at 170 GHz and 94% at 137 GHz operations with the identical mirrors at the fixed mirror position and angle. The results indicate that the significantly simple dual frequency system is realized by the gyrotron designed to output the similar beam profiles at different frequency operation. PMID:23387644

  8. TATA-Binding Protein Mutants That Are Lethal in the Absence of the Nhp6 High-Mobility-Group Protein

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Peter; Biswas, Debabrata; Yu, Yaxin; Stewart, James M.; Stillman, David J.

    2004-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nhp6 protein is related to the high-mobility-group B family of architectural DNA-binding proteins that bind DNA nonspecifically but bend DNA sharply. Nhp6 is involved in transcriptional activation by both RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and Pol III. Our previous genetic studies have implicated Nhp6 in facilitating TATA-binding protein (TBP) binding to some Pol II promoters in vivo, and we have used a novel genetic screen to isolate 32 new mutations in TBP that are viable in wild-type cells but lethal in the absence of Nhp6. The TBP mutations that are lethal in the absence of Nhp6 cluster in three regions: on the upper surface of TBP that may have a regulatory role, near residues that contact Spt3, or near residues known to contact either TFIIA or Brf1 (in TFIIIB). The latter set of mutations suggests that Nhp6 becomes essential when a TBP mutant compromises its ability to interact with either TFIIA or Brf1. Importantly, the synthetic lethality for some of the TBP mutations is suppressed by a multicopy plasmid with SNR6 or by an spt3 mutation. It has been previously shown that nhp6ab mutants are defective in expressing SNR6, a Pol III-transcribed gene encoding the U6 splicing RNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that TBP binding to SNR6 is reduced in an nhp6ab mutant. Nhp6 interacts with Spt16/Pob3, the yeast equivalent of the FACT elongation complex, consistent with nhp6ab cells being extremely sensitive to 6-azauracil (6-AU). However, this 6-AU sensitivity can be suppressed by multicopy SNR6 or BRF1. Additionally, strains with SNR6 promoter mutations are sensitive to 6-AU, suggesting that decreased SNR6 RNA levels contribute to 6-AU sensitivity. These results challenge the widely held belief that 6-AU sensitivity results from a defect in transcriptional elongation. PMID:15226442

  9. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Using High Papaverine Mutant of Papaver somniferum Reveals Pathway and Uncharacterized Steps of Papaverine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Sumya; Lakhwani, Deepika; Gupta, Parul; Mishra, Brij Kishore; Shukla, Sudhir; Asif, Mehar Hasan; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The benzylisoquinoline alkaloid papaverine, synthesized in low amount in most of the opium poppy varieties of Papaver somniferum, is used as a vasodilator muscle relaxant and antispasmodic. Papaverine biosynthesis remains controversial as two different routes utilizing either (S)-coclaurine or (S)-reticuline have been proposed with uncharacterized intermediate steps. In an attempt to elucidate papaverine biosynthesis and identify putative genes involved in uncharacterized steps, we carried out comparative transcriptome analysis of high papaverine mutant (pap1) and normal cultivar (BR086) of P. somniferum. This natural mutant synthesizes more than 12-fold papaverine in comparison to BR086. We established more than 238 Mb transcriptome data separately for pap1 and BR086. Assembly of reads generated 127,342 and 106,128 unigenes in pap1 and BR086, respectively. Digital gene expression analysis of transcriptomes revealed 3,336 differentially expressing unigenes. Enhanced expression of (S)-norcoclaurine-6-O-methyltransferase (6OMT), (S)-3′-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4′-O-methyltransferase (4′OMT), norreticuline 7-O-methyltransferase (N7OMT) and down-regulation of reticuline 7-O-methyltransferase (7OMT) in pap1 in comparison to BR086 suggest (S)-coclaurine as the route for papaverine biosynthesis. We also identified several methyltransferases and dehydrogenases with enhanced expression in pap1 in comparison to BR086. Our analysis using natural mutant, pap1, concludes that (S)-coclaurine is the branch-point intermediate and preferred route for papaverine biosynthesis. Differentially expressing methyltransferases and dehydrogenases identified in this study will help in elucidating complete biosynthetic pathway of papaverine. The information generated will be helpful in developing strategies for enhanced biosynthesis of papaverine through biotechnological approaches. PMID:23738019

  10. Low-frequency and high-frequency distortion product otoacoustic emission suppression in humans

    PubMed Central

    Gorga, Michael P.; Neely, Stephen T.; Dierking, Darcia M.; Kopun, Judy; Jolkowski, Kristin; Groenenboom, Kristin; Tan, Hongyang; Stiegemann, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emission suppression (quantified as decrements) was measured for f2=500 and 4000 Hz, for a range of primary levels (L2), suppressor frequencies (f3), and suppressor levels (L3) in 19 normal-hearing subjects. Slopes of decrement-versus-L3 functions were similar at both f2 frequencies, and decreased as f3 increased. Suppression tuning curves, constructed from decrement functions, were used to estimate (1) suppression for on- and low-frequency suppressors, (2) tip-to-tail differences, (3) QERB, and (4) best frequency. Compression, estimated from the slope of functions relating suppression “threshold” to L2 for off-frequency suppressors, was similar for 500 and 4000 Hz. Tip-to-tail differences, QERB, and best frequency decreased as L2 increased for both frequencies. However, tip-to-tail difference (an estimate of cochlear-amplifier gain) was 20 dB greater at 4000 Hz, compared to 500 Hz. QERB decreased to a greater extent with L2 when f2=4000 Hz, but, on an octave scale, best frequency shifted more with level when f2=500 Hz. These data indicate that, at both frequencies, cochlear processing is nonlinear. Response growth and compression are similar at the two frequencies, but gain is greater at 4000 Hz and spread of excitation is greater at 500 Hz. PMID:18397024

  11. Fabrication of carbon nanotube high-frequency nanoelectronic biosensor for sensing in high ionic strength solutions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Girish S; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2013-01-01

    The unique electronic properties and high surface-to-volume ratios of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and semiconductor nanowires (NW) make them good candidates for high sensitivity biosensors. When a charged molecule binds to such a sensor surface, it alters the carrier density in the sensor, resulting in changes in its DC conductance. However, in an ionic solution a charged surface also attracts counter-ions from the solution, forming an electrical double layer (EDL). This EDL effectively screens off the charge, and in physiologically relevant conditions ~100 millimolar (mM), the characteristic charge screening length (Debye length) is less than a nanometer (nm). Thus, in high ionic strength solutions, charge based (DC) detection is fundamentally impeded. We overcome charge screening effects by detecting molecular dipoles rather than charges at high frequency, by operating carbon nanotube field effect transistors as high frequency mixers. At high frequencies, the AC drive force can no longer overcome the solution drag and the ions in solution do not have sufficient time to form the EDL. Further, frequency mixing technique allows us to operate at frequencies high enough to overcome ionic screening, and yet detect the sensing signals at lower frequencies. Also, the high transconductance of SWNT transistors provides an internal gain for the sensing signal, which obviates the need for external signal amplifier. Here, we describe the protocol to (a) fabricate SWNT transistors, (b) functionalize biomolecules to the nanotube, (c) design and stamp a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-fluidic chamber onto the device, and (d) carry out high frequency sensing in different ionic strength solutions. PMID:23912795

  12. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube High-Frequency Nanoelectronic Biosensor for Sensing in High Ionic Strength Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish S.; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2013-01-01

    The unique electronic properties and high surface-to-volume ratios of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and semiconductor nanowires (NW) 1-4 make them good candidates for high sensitivity biosensors. When a charged molecule binds to such a sensor surface, it alters the carrier density5 in the sensor, resulting in changes in its DC conductance. However, in an ionic solution a charged surface also attracts counter-ions from the solution, forming an electrical double layer (EDL). This EDL effectively screens off the charge, and in physiologically relevant conditions ~100 millimolar (mM), the characteristic charge screening length (Debye length) is less than a nanometer (nm). Thus, in high ionic strength solutions, charge based (DC) detection is fundamentally impeded6-8. We overcome charge screening effects by detecting molecular dipoles rather than charges at high frequency, by operating carbon nanotube field effect transistors as high frequency mixers9-11. At high frequencies, the AC drive force can no longer overcome the solution drag and the ions in solution do not have sufficient time to form the EDL. Further, frequency mixing technique allows us to operate at frequencies high enough to overcome ionic screening, and yet detect the sensing signals at lower frequencies11-12. Also, the high transconductance of SWNT transistors provides an internal gain for the sensing signal, which obviates the need for external signal amplifier. Here, we describe the protocol to (a) fabricate SWNT transistors, (b) functionalize biomolecules to the nanotube13, (c) design and stamp a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-fluidic chamber14 onto the device, and (d) carry out high frequency sensing in different ionic strength solutions11. PMID:23912795

  13. Multitaper spectral analysis of high-frequency seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeffrey; Lindberg, Craig R.; Vernon, Frank L., III

    1987-11-01

    Spectral estimation procedures which employ several prolate spheroidal sequences as tapers have been shown to yield better results than standard single-taper spectral analysis when used on a variety of engineering data. We apply the adaptive multitaper spectral estimation method of Thomson (1982) to a number of high-resolution digital seismic records and compare the results to those obtained using standard single-taper spectral estimates. Single-taper smoothed-spectrum estimates are plagued by a trade-off between the variance of the estimate and the bias caused by spectral leakage. Applying a taper to reduce bias discards data, increasing the variance of the estimate. Using a taper also unevenly samples the record. Throwing out data from the ends of the record can result in a spectral estimate which does not adequately represent the character of the spectrum of nonstationary processes like seismic waveforms. For example, a discrete Fourier transform of an untapered record (i.e., using a boxcar taper) produces a reasonable spectral estimate of the large-amplitude portion of the seismic source spectrum but cannot be trusted to provide a good estimate of the high-frequency roll-off. A discrete Fourier transform of the record multiplied by a more severe taper (like the Hann taper) which is resistant to spectral leakage leads to a reliable estimate of high-frequency spectral roll-off, but this estimate weights the analyzed data unequally. Therefore single-taper estimators which are less affected by leakage not only have increased variance but also can misrepresent the spectra of nonstationary data. The adaptive multitaper algorithm automatically adjusts between these extremes. We demonstrate its advantages using 16-bit seismic data recorded by instruments in the Anza Telemetered Seismic Network. We also present an analysis demonstrating the superiority of the multitaper algorithm in providing low-variance spectral estimates with good leakage resistance which do not

  14. Prediction of high frequency gust response with airfoil thickness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysak, Peter D.; Capone, Dean E.; Jonson, Michael L.

    2013-05-01

    The unsteady lift forces that act on an airfoil in turbulent flow are an undesirable source of vibration and noise in many industrial applications. Methods to predict these forces have traditionally treated the airfoil as a flat plate. At higher frequencies, where the relevant turbulent length scales are comparable to the airfoil thickness, the flat plate approximation becomes invalid and results in overprediction of the unsteady force spectrum. This work provides an improved methodology for the prediction of the unsteady lift forces that accounts for the thickness of the airfoil. An analytical model was developed to calculate the response of the airfoil to high frequency gusts. The approach is based on a time-domain calculation with a sharp-edged gust and accounts for the distortion of the gust by the mean flow around the airfoil leading edge. The unsteady lift is calculated from a weighted integration of the gust vorticity, which makes the model relatively straightforward to implement and verify. For routine design calculations of turbulence-induced forces, a closed-form gust response thickness correction factor was developed for NACA 65 series airfoils.

  15. High Frequency Scattering from Arbitrarily Oriented Dielectric Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Meneghini, R.; Lang, R. H.; Seker, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations have been made of electromagnetic wave scattering from dielectric disks of arbitrary shape and orientation in the high frequency (physical optics) regime. The solution is obtained by approximating the fields inside the disk with the fields induced inside an identically oriented slab (i.e. infinite parallel planes) with the same thickness and dielectric properties. The fields inside the disk excite conduction and polarization currents which are used to calculate the scattered fields by integrating the radiation from these sources over the volume of the disk. This computation has been executed for observers in the far field of the disk in the case of disks with arbitrary orientation and for arbitrary polarization of the incident radiation. The results have been expressed in the form of a dyadic scattering amplitude for the disk. The results apply to disks whose diameter is large compared to wavelength and whose thickness is small compared to diameter, but the thickness need not be small compared to wavelength. Examples of the dependence of the scattering amplitude on frequency, dielectric properties of the disk and disk orientation are presented for disks of circular cross section.

  16. Ultra High-Speed Radio Frequency Switch Based on Photonics.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jia; Fok, Mable P

    2015-01-01

    Microwave switches, or Radio Frequency (RF) switches have been intensively used in microwave systems for signal routing. Compared with the fast development of microwave and wireless systems, RF switches have been underdeveloped particularly in terms of switching speed and operating bandwidth. In this paper, we propose a photonics based RF switch that is capable of switching at tens of picoseconds speed, which is hundreds of times faster than any existing RF switch technologies. The high-speed switching property is achieved with the use of a rapidly tunable microwave photonic filter with tens of gigahertz frequency tuning speed, where the tuning mechanism is based on the ultra-fast electro-optics Pockels effect. The RF switch has a wide operation bandwidth of 12 GHz and can go up to 40 GHz, depending on the bandwidth of the modulator used in the scheme. The proposed RF switch can either work as an ON/OFF switch or a two-channel switch, tens of picoseconds switching speed is experimentally observed for both type of switches. PMID:26608349

  17. Ultra High-Speed Radio Frequency Switch Based on Photonics

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jia; Fok, Mable P.

    2015-01-01

    Microwave switches, or Radio Frequency (RF) switches have been intensively used in microwave systems for signal routing. Compared with the fast development of microwave and wireless systems, RF switches have been underdeveloped particularly in terms of switching speed and operating bandwidth. In this paper, we propose a photonics based RF switch that is capable of switching at tens of picoseconds speed, which is hundreds of times faster than any existing RF switch technologies. The high-speed switching property is achieved with the use of a rapidly tunable microwave photonic filter with tens of gigahertz frequency tuning speed, where the tuning mechanism is based on the ultra-fast electro-optics Pockels effect. The RF switch has a wide operation bandwidth of 12 GHz and can go up to 40 GHz, depending on the bandwidth of the modulator used in the scheme. The proposed RF switch can either work as an ON/OFF switch or a two-channel switch, tens of picoseconds switching speed is experimentally observed for both type of switches. PMID:26608349

  18. Ultra High-Speed Radio Frequency Switch Based on Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jia; Fok, Mable P.

    2015-11-01

    Microwave switches, or Radio Frequency (RF) switches have been intensively used in microwave systems for signal routing. Compared with the fast development of microwave and wireless systems, RF switches have been underdeveloped particularly in terms of switching speed and operating bandwidth. In this paper, we propose a photonics based RF switch that is capable of switching at tens of picoseconds speed, which is hundreds of times faster than any existing RF switch technologies. The high-speed switching property is achieved with the use of a rapidly tunable microwave photonic filter with tens of gigahertz frequency tuning speed, where the tuning mechanism is based on the ultra-fast electro-optics Pockels effect. The RF switch has a wide operation bandwidth of 12 GHz and can go up to 40 GHz, depending on the bandwidth of the modulator used in the scheme. The proposed RF switch can either work as an ON/OFF switch or a two-channel switch, tens of picoseconds switching speed is experimentally observed for both type of switches.

  19. Digital avionics susceptibility to high energy radio frequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, William E.

    Generally, noncritical avionic systems for transport category aircraft have been designed to meet radio frequency (RF) susceptibility requirements set forth in RTCA DO 160B, environmental conditions and test procedures for airborne equipment. Section 20 of this document controls the electromagnetic interference (EMI) hardening for avionics equipment to levels of 1 and 2 V/m. Currently, US equipment manufacturers are designing flight-critical fly-by-wire avionics to a much higher level. The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has requested that the RTCA SC-135 high-energy radio frequency (HERF) working group develop appropriate testing procedures for section 20 of RTCA DO 160B for radiated and conducted susceptibility at the box and systems level. The FAA has also requested the SAE AE4R committee to address installed systems testing, airframe shielding effects and RF environment monitoring. Emitters of interest include radar (ground, ship, and aircraft) commercial broadcast and TV station, mobile communication, and other transmitters that could possibly affect commercial aircraft.

  20. High frequency radar software reference manual for Product Two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden, D. C.; Winkelman, J. R.; Matheson, L. D.; Grubb, R. N.

    1984-03-01

    The Space Environment Laboratory (SEL) of NOAA developed a general purpose High Frequency (HF) Radar system capable of making most of the measurements of the ionosphere that can be made by coherent monostatic or bistatic radio wave sounding. This capability is provided by combining a very flexible, frequency-agile transmitter and receiver system with a digital control and signal processing system containing a general purpose 16-bit minicomputer for operator interaction and control. A manual is given which describes the software operating system written by the SEL staff to permit the Radar to be used for quite a wide range of standard measurements under simple operator control. The control language enables the user to exploit most of the capabilities of the instrument without having to program the system in detail. The manual is primarily directed at the user who needs to understand and use this capability. Secondarily, if used in conjunction with the computer manufacturer's system and language manuals, the SEL HF Radar Hardware manuals and the SEL source code listings, it should enable an experienced user to customize the software for special purposes or to produce new operating software.

  1. Compact microwave cavity for high performance rubidium frequency standards.

    PubMed

    Stefanucci, Camillo; Bandi, Thejesh; Merli, Francesco; Pellaton, Matthieu; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano; Skrivervik, Anja K

    2012-10-01

    The design, realization, and characterization of a compact magnetron-type microwave cavity operating with a TE(011)-like mode are presented. The resonator works at the rubidium hyperfine ground-state frequency (i.e., 6.835 GHz) by accommodating a glass cell of 25 mm diameter containing rubidium vapor. Its design analysis demonstrates the limitation of the loop-gap resonator lumped model when targeting such a large cell, thus numerical optimization was done to obtain the required performances. Microwave characterization of the realized prototype confirmed the expected working behavior. Double-resonance and Zeeman spectroscopy performed with this cavity indicated an excellent microwave magnetic field homogeneity: the performance validation of the cavity was done by achieving an excellent short-term clock stability as low as 2.4 × 10(-13) τ(-1/2). The achieved experimental results and the compact design make this resonator suitable for applications in portable atomic high-performance frequency standards for both terrestrial and space applications. PMID:23126789

  2. High-frequency modes of a magnetic antivortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmat-Uceda, Martin; Riley, Grant; Haldar, Arabinda; Buchanan, Kristen

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic vortices have attracted considerable attention in recent years not only because of their interesting physical properties but also due to their potential for applications. The magnetic antivortex (AV), the topological counterpart of the magnetic vortex, possesses similarly rich dynamics and its spin configuration may prove advantageous for spin-wave-based devices, however, it has not been studied as intensely. Recent experiments show that AV's will form naturally at the intersections of patterned pound-key-like nanostructures that are magnetically soft. Here we present micromagnetic simulations of the dynamics of AV's in these structures. The simulations show that pound-key-like structures made of 30-nm thick Permalloy exhibit a complex dynamic profile that includes a number of discrete high-frequency modes (>1 GHz). Spatial maps of the dynamic modes that were constructed using Fourier analysis of the simulation results show modes that are in similar in character to the radial and azimuthal modes observed for magnetic vortices but the spin dynamics also differ from those of a vortex due to the presence of the elongated nanowires in the pound-key-like structure. The frequencies of the observed modes tend to decrease with increasing sample size, however, the general features of the modes remains relatively unaffected by the structure size. The simulations will be compared to Brillouin Light Scattering (BLS) experimental results. This work was supported by the US DOE-BES Award #ER 46854.

  3. High frequency dynamic engine simulation. [TF-30 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerman, J. A.; Fischer, K. E.; Mclaughlin, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    A digital computer simulation of a mixed flow, twin spool turbofan engine was assembled to evaluate and improve the dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation to disturbance frequencies of at least 100 Hz. One dimensional forms of the dynamic mass, momentum and energy equations were used to model the engine. A TF30 engine was simulated so that dynamic characteristics could be evaluated against results obtained from testing of the TF30 engine at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation were improved by modifying the compression system model. Modifications to the compression system model were established by investigating the influence of size and number of finite dynamic elements. Based on the results of this program, high frequency engine simulations using finite dynamic elements can be assembled so that the engine dynamic configuration is optimum with respect to dynamic characteristics and computer execution time. Resizing of the compression systems finite elements improved the dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation but showed that additional refinements are required to obtain close agreement simulation and actual engine dynamic characteristics.

  4. Applications of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.

    2005-02-01

    Applications to space technology of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves, (HFGWs), defined as having frequencies in excess of 100 kHz, are discussed. The applications to be specifically addressed include: providing (1) multi-channel communications (both point to point and point to multipoint through all normal material things - the ultimate wireless system) (2) a remote means for causing perturbations to the motion of objects such as missiles (bullets to ICBMs), spacecraft, land or water vehicles or craft; (3) remote coalescing of clouds of hazardous vapors, radioactive dust, etc. by changing the gravitational field in their vicinity; (4) the potential for through-earth or through-water ``X-rays'' in order to observe subterranean structures, geological formations, create a transparent ocean, view three-dimensional building interiors, buried devices, etc.; and (5) the potential for remotely disrupting the gravitational field in a specific region of space. The utilization of a possible HFGW telescope as a navigational aid by viewing the anisotropic or patterned HFGW relic cosmic background above, on, or under the ground without reliance on GPS satellite signals is also noted. Many of the applications are discussed in the context of space technology and several approaches to the generation and possible focusing of HFGWs are referenced. A derivation of the ``jerk'' formulation of the quadrupole approximation for HFGW power is included in an appendix.

  5. Fault-zone attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeslee, S.; Malin, P.; Alvarez, M. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors have developed a technique to measure seismic attenuation within an active fault-zone at seismogenic depths. Utilizing a pair of stations and pairs of earthquakes, spectral ratios are performed to isolate attenuation produced by wave-propagation within the fault-zone. The empirical approach eliminates common source, propagation, instrument and near-surface site effects. The technique was applied to a cluster of 19 earthquakes recorded by a pair of downhole instruments located within the San Andreas fault-zone, at instruments located within the San Andreas fault-zone, at Parkfield, California. Over the 1-40 Hz bandwidth used in this analysis, amplitudes are found to decrease exponentially with frequency. Furthermore, the fault-zone propagation distance correlates with severity of attenuation. Assuming a constant Q attenuation operator, the S-wave quality factor within the fault-zone at a depth of 5-6 kilometers is 31 (+7,{minus}5). If fault-zones are low-Q environments, then near-source attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves may help to explain phenomenon such as f{sub max}. Fault-zone Q may prove to be a valuable indicator of the mechanical behavior and rheology of fault-zones. Specific asperities can be monitored for precursory changes associated with the evolving stress-field within the fault-zone. The spatial and temporal resolution of the technique is fundamentally limited by the uncertainty in earthquake location and the interval time between earthquakes.

  6. HIGH FREQUENCY POWER TRANSMISSION LINE FOR CYCLOTRONS AND THE LIKE

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, W.J.

    1954-04-20

    High-frequency power transmission systems, particularly a stacked capacitance alternating power current transmission line wherein maximum utilization of the effective conductios skin of the line conductors is achieved while enabling a low impedance to be obtained are reported. The transmission line consists of a number of flat metal strips with interleaved dielectric strips. The metal dielectric strips are coiled spirally with the axis of the spiral extending along the length of the strips, and the alternating metal strips at the output end have outwardly extending aligned lugs which are directly strapped together and connected to the respective terminals on the load. At the input end of the transmission line, similarly, the alternate metal strips are directly strapped together and connected to an altereating current source. With the arrangement described each metal strip conducts on both sides, so that the metal strips are designed to have a thickness corresponding to twice the depth of the "skin effect" conducting lamina of each conductor at the source frequency.

  7. Design, analysis, and testing of high frequency passively damped struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yiu, Y. C.; Davis, L. Porter; Napolitano, Kevin; Ninneman, R. Rory

    1993-01-01

    Objectives of the research are: (1) to develop design requirements for damped struts to stabilize control system in the high frequency cross-over and spill-over range; (2) to design, fabricate and test viscously damped strut and viscoelastically damped strut; (3) to verify accuracy of design and analysis methodology of damped struts; and (4) to design and build test apparatus, and develop data reduction algorithm to measure strut complex stiffness. In order to meet the stringent performance requirements of the SPICE experiment, the active control system is used to suppress the dynamic responses of the low order structural modes. However, the control system also inadvertently drives some of the higher order modes unstable in the cross-over and spill-over frequency range. Passive damping is a reliable and effective way to provide damping to stabilize the control system. It also improves the robustness of the control system. Damping is designed into the SPICE testbed as an integral part of the control-structure technology.

  8. Digital avionics susceptibility to high energy radio frequency fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, William E.

    1988-01-01

    Generally, noncritical avionic systems for transport category aircraft have been designed to meet radio frequency (RF) susceptibility requirements set forth in RTCA DO 160B, environmental conditions and test procedures for airborne equipment. Section 20 of this document controls the electromagnetic interference (EMI) hardening for avionics equipment to levels of 1 and 2 V/m. Currently, US equipment manufacturers are designing flight-critical fly-by-wire avionics to a much higher level. The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has requested that the RTCA SC-135 high-energy radio frequency (HERF) working group develop appropriate testing procedures for section 20 of RTCA DO 160B for radiated and conducted susceptibility at the box and systems level. The FAA has also requested the SAE AE4R committee to address installed systems testing, airframe shielding effects and RF environment monitoring. Emitters of interest include radar (ground, ship, and aircraft) commercial broadcast and TV station, mobile communication, and other transmitters that could possibly affect commercial aircraft.

  9. Why high-frequency pulse tubes can be tipped

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Gregory W092710; Backhaus, Scott N

    2010-01-01

    The typical low-frequency pulse-tube refrigerator loses significant cooling power when it is tipped with the pulse tube's cold end above its hot end, because natural convection in the pulse tube loads the cold heat exchanger. Yet most high-frequency pulse-tube refrigerators work well in any orientation with respect to gravity. In such a refrigerator, natural convection is suppressed by sufficiently fast velocity oscil1ations, via a nonlinear hydrodynamic effect that tends to align the density gradients in the pulse tube parallel to the oscillation direction. Since gravity's tendency to cause convection is only linear in the pulse tube's end-to-end temperature difference while the oscillation's tendency to align density gradients with oscillating velocity is nonlinear, it is easiest to suppress convection when the end-to-end temperature difference is largest. Simple experiments demonstrate this temperature dependence, the strong dependence on the oscillating velocity, and little dependence on the magnitude or phase of the oscillating pressure. In some circumstances in this apparatus, the suppression of convection is a hysteretic function of oscillating velocity. In some other circumstances, a time-dependent convective state seems more difficult to suppress.

  10. High-Frequency Stimulation of Excitable Cells and Networks

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Seth H.

    2013-01-01

    High-frequency (HF) stimulation has been shown to block conduction in excitable cells including neurons and cardiac myocytes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying conduction block are unclear. Using a multi-scale method, the influence of HF stimulation is investigated in the simplified FitzhHugh-Nagumo and biophysically-detailed Hodgkin-Huxley models. In both models, HF stimulation alters the amplitude and frequency of repetitive firing in response to a constant applied current and increases the threshold to evoke a single action potential in response to a brief applied current pulse. Further, the excitable cells cannot evoke a single action potential or fire repetitively above critical values for the HF stimulation amplitude. Analytical expressions for the critical values and thresholds are determined in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model. In the Hodgkin-Huxley model, it is shown that HF stimulation alters the dynamics of ionic current gating, shifting the steady-state activation, inactivation, and time constant curves, suggesting several possible mechanisms for conduction block. Finally, we demonstrate that HF stimulation of a network of neurons reduces the electrical activity firing rate, increases network synchronization, and for a sufficiently large HF stimulation, leads to complete electrical quiescence. In this study, we demonstrate a novel approach to investigate HF stimulation in biophysically-detailed ionic models of excitable cells, demonstrate possible mechanisms for HF stimulation conduction block in neurons, and provide insight into the influence of HF stimulation on neural networks. PMID:24278435

  11. The nature of high frequency sister chromatid exchange cells (HFCs).

    PubMed

    Ponzanelli, I; Landi, S; Bernacchi, F; Barale, R

    1997-09-01

    We employed the three-way differential staining technique (TWD), which allows SCEs to be distinguished on a per generation basis by scoring third metaphases (M3), in order to study the spontaneous levels of SCEs in normal and high frequency cells (HFCs) that occurred in the first (S1), second (S2) and third (S3) S phases. Fifty one of 900 lymphocytes from 37 healthy donors were defined as HFCs by calculating the 95th percentile of the distribution of SCEs in S1 + S2. 'Normal' cells presented almost the same number of SCEs after the first, second and third cell cycles (SCE averages of 2.43, 2.04 and 3.53 respectively). In contrast, HFCs showed a higher SCE count in S1, which decreased rapidly through the cycles and reached baseline level at S3 (SCE averages of 7.18, 4.29 and 3.45 respectively). This would suggest that the lesions responsible for the higher SCE frequency in HFCs were effectively removed after two cell cycles and strongly support the hypothesis that HFCs are lymphocytes which accumulate higher levels of DNA lesions through time. PMID:9379910

  12. Feasibility of High Frequency Acoustic Imaging for Inspection of Containments

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Corrado; J.E. Bondaryk; V. Godino

    1998-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and Ieaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containment in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify a technique(s) for inspection of inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary. Acoustic imaging has been identified as one of these potential techniques. A numerical feasibility study investigated the use of high-frequency bistatic acoustic imaging techniques for inspection of inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary of nuclear power plant containment. The range-dependent version of the OASES Code developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was utilized to perform a series of numerical simulations. OASES is a well developed and extensively tested code for evaluation of the acoustic field in a system of stratified fluid and/or elastic layers. Using the code, an arbitrary number of fluid or solid elastic layers are interleaved, with the outer layers modeled as halfspaces. High frequency vibrational sources were modeled to simulate elastic waves in the steel. The received field due to an arbitrary source array can be calculated at arbitrary depth and range positions. In this numerical study, waves that reflect and scatter from surface roughness caused by modeled degradations (e.g., corrosion) are detected and used to identify and map the steel degradation. Variables in the numerical study included frequency, flaw size, interrogation distance, and sensor incident angle.Based on these analytical simulations, it is considered unlikely that acoustic imaging technology can be used to investigate embedded steel liners of reinforced concrete containment. The thin steel liner and high signal losses to the concrete make this application difficult. Results for portions of steel containment

  13. Directed breeding of an Arthrobacter mutant for high-yield production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate by N + ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, He; Chen, Xiaochun; Cao, Jiaming; Fang, Ting; Bai, Jianxin; Xiong, Jian; Ying, Hanjie

    2010-08-01

    To obtain a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) high-yield production strain, Arthrobacter NG-1 was mutated by N + ion implantation with an energy level of 10 keV and dose of 7×10 15 ions/cm 2. Combined with directed screening methods, a xanthine-defective and 8-azaguanine (8-AG)-resistant mutant Arthrobacter A302 was selected. The concentration of cAMP produced by this mutant was 41.7% higher than that of the original strain and reached 9.78 g/L. Through ten-generation investigation, the capability of cAMP production of A302 was found to be stable. Compared with the original strain, the special activities of key enzymes in A302, which influenced the cAMP biosynthesis, was analyzed. IMP dehydrogenase activity was defective, whereas PRPP amidotransferase, sAMP synthetase and adenylate cyclase activities were increased by 61.5%, 147% and 21.7%, respecitively, which might explain the mutagenesis mechanism by N + ions implantation under the enzymatic level.

  14. High-yield production of hydrogen by Enterobacter aerogenes mutants with decreased alpha-acetolactate synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takeshi; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Kakizono, Toshihide; Nishio, Naomichi

    2004-01-01

    To enhance hydrogen (H2) production from glucose by Enterobacter aerogenes HU-101, two mutants, strains VP-1 and VP-2, with decreased alpha-acetolactate synthase activity, were isolated using the Voges-Proskauer (VP) test. In pH-uncontrolled batch culture, both mutants showed a lower 2,3-butanediol yield for the glucose consumed than that shown by the wild-type strain, although glucose remained in the medium after 12 h of culture. In the same cultures, compared to the H2 yield of 0.80 mol/mol-glucose of the wild-type strain, strain VP-1 showed a high H2 yield of 1.8 mol/mol-glucose with decreased lactate and increased succinate yields, while strain VP-2 showed an H2 yield of 1.0 mol/mol-glucose with an increased lactate yield. Increasing the phosphate buffer concentration, which contributes to maintaining the pH in the medium, increased the glucose consumption by both strains. However, in a pH-controlled batch culture at neutral pH, the H2 yield of strain VP-1 was decreased to 1.2 mol/mol-glucose due to the accumulation of formate, an intermediate of the H2-producing pathway, with the yield of H2 plus formate being 1.7 mol/mol-glucose. PMID:16233620

  15. Water mobility in the endosperm of high beta-glucan barley mutants as studied by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fast Seefeldt, Helene; van den Berg, Frans; Köckenberger, Walter; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Wollenweber, Bernd

    2007-04-01

    (1)H NMR imaging (MRI) was used as a noninvasive technique to study water distribution and mobility in hydrated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seeds of accessions with varying content of beta glucan (BG), a highly hygroscopic cell wall component. High contents of BG in barley are unfavorable in malting where it leads to clotting of filters and hazing of beer as well as in animal feed where it hinders the rapid uptake of energy. However, a high content of BG has a positive nutritional effect, as it lowers the cholesterol and the glycaemic index. It was studied whether water distribution and mobility were related to content and location of BG. Water mobility was investigated by following the rate and mode of desiccation in hydrated single seeds. In order to determine the different water components, a multispin echo experiment was set up to reveal the T(2) transverse relaxation rates of water within the seeds. A principal component analysis (PCA) discriminated control seeds from the high-BG mutant seeds. MRI proved efficient in tracing the differences in water-holding capacity of contrasting barley seeds. All accessions showed nonuniform distribution of water at full hydration as well as during desiccation. The embryo retained water even after 36 h of drying, whereas the endosperm showed low and heterogeneous mobility of the water after drying. The relaxation time constants indicated that the BG mutants had regions of much higher water mobility around the ventral crease compared to the control. It is concluded that MRI can be applied to investigate temporal and spatial differences in the location of specific chemical compounds in single seeds. PMID:17371735

  16. High-Frequency Wave Propagation by the Segment Projection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engquist, Björn; Runborg, Olof; Tornberg, Anna-Karin

    2002-05-01

    Geometrical optics is a standard technique used for the approximation of high-frequency wave propagation. Computational methods based on partial differential equations instead of the traditional ray tracing have recently been applied to geometrical optics. These new methods have a number of advantages but typically exhibit difficulties with linear superposition of waves. In this paper we introduce a new partial differential technique based on the segment projection method in phase space. The superposition problem is perfectly resolved and so is the problem of computing amplitudes in the neighborhood of caustics. The computational complexity is of the same order as that of ray tracing. The new algorithm is described and a number of computational examples are given, including a simulation of waveguides.

  17. High-frequency techniques for RCS prediction of plate geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.

    1991-01-01

    Several different high-frequency methods for modeling the radar cross sections (RCSs) of plate geometries are examined. The Method of Equivalent Currents and a numerically derived corner diffraction coefficient are used to model the RCS of a rectangular, perfectly conducting plate in nonprincipal planes. The Uniform Theory of Diffraction is used to model the RCS of a rectangular, perfectly conducting plate in principal planes. For the soft polarization case, first-order and slope-diffraction terms are included. For the hard polarization case, up to four orders of diffraction are included. Finally, the Uniform Theory of Diffraction for impedance wedges and the Impedance Boundary Condition are used to model the RCS of a coated, rectangular plate in principal planes. In most of the cases considered, comparisons are made between theoretical and experimental results.

  18. Influence of pore roughness on high-frequency permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortis, Andrea; Smeulders, David M. J.; Guermond, Jean Luc; Lafarge, Denis

    2003-06-01

    The high-frequency behavior of the fluid velocity patterns for smooth and corrugated pore channels is studied. The classical approach of Johnson et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 176, 379 (1987)] for smooth geometries is obtained in different manners, thus clarifying differences with Sheng and Zhou [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 1591 (1988)] and Avellaneda and Torquato [Phys. Fluids A 3, 2529 (1991)]. For wedge-shaped pore geometries, the classical approach is modified by a nonanalytic extension proposed by Achdou and Avellaneda [Phys. Fluids A 4, 2561 (1992)]. The dependency of the nonanalytic extension on the apex angle of the wedge was derived. Precise numerical computations for various apex angles in two-dimensional channels confirmed this theoretical dependency, which is somewhat different from the original Achdou and Avellaneda predictions. Moreover, it was found that the contribution of the singularities does not alter the parameters of the classical theory by Johnson et al..

  19. High-Frequency Cutoff in Type III Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.; Koval, A. A.

    In this article we report about a group of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff, observed on 19 August of 2012 near 8:23 UT, simultaneously by three different radio telescopes: the Ukrainian decameter radio telescope (8-33 MHz), the French Nancay Decametric Array (10-70 MHz) and the Italian San Vito Solar Observatory of RSTN (25-180 MHz). Morphologically the bursts are very similar to the type III bursts. The solar activity is connected with the emergency of a new group of solar spots on the far side of the Sun with respect to observers on Earth. The solar bursts accompany many moderate flares over eastern limb. The refraction of the behind-limb radio bursts towards the Earth is favorable, if CMEs generate low-density cavities in solar corona.

  20. High-frequency characterization and modeling of single metallic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chuan-Lun; Ardila, Gustavo; Benech, Philippe

    2013-07-01

    The transmission line characteristics of an individual aluminum metallic nanowire up to 100 GHz are presented in this paper. We have built a reliable framework for characterizing such nanowires using a specially designed coplanar waveguide platform. We systematically estimate the pad parasitics, contact impedance and transmission line parameters based on an equivalent circuit model and cascade-based de-embedding theory. This is the first time that such external parasitic elements have been successfully removed from a nanoscale transmission line. The extracted frequency-dependent electrical responses show good signal levels and a high degree of reproducibility. Contribution to the Topical Issue “International Semiconductor Conference Dresden-Grenoble - ISCDG 2012”, Edited by Gérard Ghibaudo, Francis Balestra and Simon Deleonibus.

  1. High Frequency QPOs due to Black Hole Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos; Fukumura, K.

    2009-01-01

    We present detailed computations of photon orbits emitted by flares at the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) of accretion disks around rotating black holes. We show that for sufficiently large spin parameter, i.e. a > 0.94 M, flare a sufficient number of photons arrive at an observer after multiple orbits around the black hole, to produce an "photon echo" of constant lag, i.e. independent of the relative phase between the black hole and the observer, of T approximates 14 M. This constant time delay, then, leads to a power spectrum with a QPO at a frequency nu approximates 1/14M, even for a totally random ensemble of such flares. Observation of such a QPO will provide incontrovertible evidence for the high spin of the black hole and a very accurate, independent, measurement of its mass.

  2. High frequency ultrasonic characterization of sintered SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Generazio, Edward R.; Kiser, James D.

    1987-01-01

    High frequency (60 to 160 MHz) ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation was used to characterize variations in density and microstructural constituents of sintered SiC bars. Ultrasonic characterization methods included longitudinal velocity, reflection coefficient, and precise attenuation measurements. The SiC bars were tailored to provide bulk densities ranging from 90 to 98 percent of theoretical, average grain sizes ranging from 3.0 to 12.0 microns, and average pore sizes ranging from 1.5 to 4.0 microns. Velocity correlated with specimen bulk density irrespective of specimen average grain size, average pore size, and average pore orientation. Attenuation coefficient was found to be sensitive to both density and average pore size variations, but was not affected by large differences in average grain size.

  3. A high-throughput method for screening of Aspergillus niger mutants with high transglycosylation activity by detecting non-fermentable reducing sugar.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui-Guang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Qin, Yong-Ling; Wu, Kong-Yang; Liang, Zhi-Qun

    2011-06-01

    A novel high-throughput method was established for rapid screening of large numbers of Aspergillus niger mutants with high transglucosylation activity by exploiting that yeast can hardly hydrolyze isomaltooligosaccharides (IMO). Supernatants of A. niger fermentation were incubated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae to remove glucose and maltose, and the remaining non-reducing sugars, which is positively correlated with the amount of IMO, the products of transglucosylation reaction, were used as indicator of transglucosidase activity of A. niger and examined by dinitrosalicylic acid assay. Using this method, 15 stains that could convert liquefied cassava starch to IMO more efficiently were selected from 8721 A. niger mutants. Among them, mutant C-6181 strain had transglycosidase activity of 4.61 U/ml (increased by 122% compared to its parental strain) and IMO yield of 83.7%. Taking together, the method is easy, simple, efficient and cheap, and has great application potential in selection of transglucosidase-producing strains used in industrial IMO fermentation. PMID:25187152

  4. Development of a Multi-Channel, High Frequency QRS Electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DePalma, Jude L.

    2003-01-01

    With the advent of the ISS era and the potential requirement for increased cardiovascular monitoring of crewmembers during extended EVAs, NASA flight surgeons would stand to benefit from an evolving technology that allows for a more rapid diagnosis of myocardial ischemia compared to standard electrocardiography. Similarly, during the astronaut selection process, NASA flight surgeons and other physicians would also stand to benefit from a completely noninvasive technology that, either at rest or during maximal exercise tests, is more sensitive than standard ECG in identifying the presence of ischemia. Perhaps most importantly, practicing cardiologists and emergency medicine physicians could greatly benefit from such a device as it could augment (or even replace) standard electrocardiography in settings where the rapid diagnosis of myocardial ischemia (or the lack thereof) is required for proper clinical decision-making. A multi-channel, high-frequency QRS electrocardiograph is currently under development in the Life Sciences Research Laboratories at JSC. Specifically the project consisted of writing software code, some of which contained specially-designed digital filters, which will be incorporated into an existing commercial software program that is already designed to collect, plot and analyze conventional 12-lead ECG signals on a desktop, portable or palm PC. The software will derive the high-frequency QRS signals, which will be analyzed (in numerous ways) and plotted alongside of the conventional ECG signals, giving the PC-viewing clinician advanced diagnostic information that has never been available previously in all 12 ECG leads simultaneously. After the hardware and software for the advanced digital ECG monitor have been fully integrated, plans are to use the monitor to begin clinical studies both on healthy subjects and on patients with known coronary artery disease in both the outpatient and hospital settings. The ultimate goal is to get the technology

  5. High Frequency Dynamics in Hemoglobin Measured by Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Ken; Van-Quynh, Alexandra; Bryant, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles for formate, acetate, and water protons are reported for aqueous solutions of hemoglobin singly and doubly labeled with a nitroxide and mercury(II) ion at cysteines at β-93. Using two spin labels, one nuclear and one electron spin, a long intramolecular vector is defined between the two β-93 positions in the protein. The paramagnetic contributions to the observed 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate constant are isolated from the magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles obtained on a dual-magnet apparatus that provides spectral density functions characterizing fluctuations sensed by intermoment dipolar interactions in the time range from the tens of microseconds to ∼1 ps. Both formate and acetate ions are found to bind specifically within 5 Å of the β-93 spin-label position and the relaxation dispersion has inflection points corresponding to correlation times of 30 ps and 4 ns for both ions. The 4-ns motion is identified with exchange of the anions from the site, whereas the 30-ps correlation time is identified with relative motions of the spin label and the bound anion in the protein environment close to β-93. The magnetic field dependence of the paramagnetic contributions in both cases is well described by a simple Lorentzian spectral density function; no peaks in the spectral density function are observed. Therefore, the high frequency motions of the protein monitored by the intramolecular vector defined by the electron and nuclear spin are well characterized by a stationary random function of time. Attempts to examine long vector fluctuations by employing electron spin and nuclear spin double-labeling techniques did not yield unambiguous characterization of the high frequency motions of the vector between β-93 positions on different chains. PMID:15475581

  6. High-frequency dynamics of hybrid oxide Josephson heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissinskiy, P.; Ovsyannikov, G. A.; Constantinian, K. Y.; Kislinski, Y. V.; Borisenko, I. V.; Soloviev, I. I.; Kornev, V. K.; Goldobin, E.; Winkler, D.

    2008-07-01

    We summarize our results on Josephson heterostructures Nb/Au/YBa2Cu3Ox that combine conventional (S) and oxide high- Tc superconductors with a dominant d -wave symmetry of the superconducting order parameter (D). The heterostructures were fabricated on (001) and (1 1 20) YBa2Cu3Ox films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The structural and surface studies of the (1 1 20) YBa2Cu3Ox thin films reveal nanofaceted surface structure with two facet domain orientations, which are attributed as (001) and (110)-oriented surfaces of YBa2Cu3Ox and result in S/D(001) and S/D(110) nanojunctions formed on the facets. Electrophysical properties of the Nb/Au/YBa2Cu3Ox heterostructures are investigated by the electrical and magnetic measurements at low temperatures and analyzed within the faceting scenario. The superconducting current-phase relation (CPR) of the heterostructures with finite first and second harmonics is derived from the Shapiro steps, which appear in the I-V curves of the heterostructures irradiated at frequencies up to 100 GHz. The experimental positions and amplitudes of the Shapiro steps are explained within the modified resistive Josephson junction model, where the second harmonic of the CPR and capacitance of the Josephson junctions are taken into account. We experimentally observe a crossover from a lumped to a distributed Josephson junction limit for the size of the heterostructures smaller than Josephson penetration depth. The effect is attributed to the variations of the harmonics of the superconducting CPR across the heterojunction, which may give rise to splintered vortices of magnetic flux quantum. Our investigations of parameters and phenomena that are specific for superconductors having d -wave symmetry of the superconducting order parameter may be of importance for applications such as high-frequency detectors and novel elements of a possible quantum computer.

  7. [Technological characteristics of endoscopic high frequency current and laser interventions].

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, H D

    1993-01-01

    High frequency current and laser radiation perform two possibilities to generate therapeutic and surgical heat. The integration of these two technologies into endoscopy resulted in important ancillary techniques in the hands of a surgeon. Starting from the principal methods for coagulation and dissection of tissue the respective technological aspects at the interaction of high frequency currents and intensive laser radiation with different wavelengths on biological tissue are illustrated. Mono- and bipolar HF-techniques as well as the light-guide assisted laser method in the contact and non-contact mode are explained. The special problems in endoscopy arising from the reduction in visibility by haemorrhages and the development of smoke at the thermally induced coagulation may be overcome successfully by the simultaneous instillation of a nearly isolating liquid during the HF-treatment. The so-called electrohydrothermosation (EHT) method is presented and several probes and instruments for endoscopic hemostasis and microsurgery are explained. For an increase in safety at the endoscopic application of HF-current the use of the bipolar technique is recommended and several technological developments used in this mode are pointed out. It is shown that the absorption of radiation through the water-content of the tissue is mainly responsible for the reactions which may be produced with laser-light. Furthermore it is mentioned that the range of lasers which might be used has a large spectrum of medical applications which had been even increased especially by the new erbium and holmium solid state lasers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8147152

  8. Rapid Mutation of Spirulina platensis by a New Mutagenesis System of Atmospheric and Room Temperature Plasmas (ARTP) and Generation of a Mutant Library with Diverse Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9th subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae. PMID:24319517

  9. Rapid mutation of Spirulina platensis by a new mutagenesis system of atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP) and generation of a mutant library with diverse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingyue; Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9(th) subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae. PMID:24319517

  10. Frequency conversion of high-intensity, femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S

    1997-06-01

    Almost since the invention of the laser, frequency conversion of optical pulses via non- linear processes has been an area of active interest. However, third harmonic generation using ~(~1 (THG) in solids is an area that has not received much attention because of ma- terial damage limits. Recently, the short, high-intensity pulses possible with chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems allow the use of intensities on the order of 1 TW/cm2 in thin solids without damage. As a light source to examine single-crystal THG in solids and other high field inter- actions, the design and construction of a Ti:sapphire-based CPA laser system capable of ultimately producing peak powers of 100 TW is presented. Of special interest is a novel, all-reflective pulse stretcher design which can stretch a pulse temporally by a factor of 20,000. The stretcher design can also compensate for the added material dispersion due to propagation through the amplifier chain and produce transform-limited 45 fs pulses upon compression. A series of laser-pumped amplifiers brings the peak power up to the terawatt level at 10 Hz, and the design calls for additional amplifiers to bring the power level to the 100 TW level for single shot operation. The theory for frequency conversion of these short pulses is presented, focusing on conversion to the third harmonic in single crystals of BBO, KD*P, and d-LAP (deuterated I-arginine phosphate). Conversion efficiencies of up to 6% are obtained with 500 fs pulses at 1053 nm in a 3 mm thick BBO crystal at 200 GW/cm 2. Contributions to this process by unphasematched, cascaded second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are shown to be very significant. The angular relationship between the two orders is used to measure the tensor elements of C = xt3)/4 with Crs = -1.8 x 1O-23 m2/V2 and .15Cri + .54Crs = 4.0 x 1O-23 m2/V2. Conversion efficiency in d-LAP is about 20% that in BBO and conversion efficiency in KD*P is 1% that of BBO. It is calculated

  11. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  12. Analysis of high frequency geostationary ocean colour data using DINEOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvera-Azcárate, Aida; Vanhellemont, Quinten; Ruddick, Kevin; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions), a technique to reconstruct missing data, is applied to turbidity data obtained through the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board Meteosat Second Generation 2. The aim of this work is to assess if the tidal variability of the southern North Sea in 2008 can be accurately reproduced in the reconstructed dataset. Such high frequency data have not previously been analysed with DINEOF and present new challenges, like a strong tidal signal and long night-time gaps. An outlier detection approach that exploits the high temporal resolution (15 min) of the SEVIRI dataset is developed. After removal of outliers, the turbidity dataset is reconstructed with DINEOF. In situ Smartbuoy data are used to assess the accuracy of the reconstruction. Then, a series of tidal cycles are examined at various positions over the southern North Sea. These examples demonstrate the capability of DINEOF to reproduce tidal variability in the reconstructed dataset, and show the high temporal and spatial variability of turbidity in the southern North Sea. An analysis of the main harmonic constituents (annual cycle, daily cycle, M2 and S2 tidal components) is performed, to assess the contribution of each of these modes to the total variability of turbidity. The variability not explained by the harmonic fit, due to the natural processes and satellite processing errors as noise, is also assessed.

  13. High frequency strain measurements with fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J.; Angelmahr, M.; Schade, W.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years fiber Bragg grating sensors gained interest in structural health monitoring and concepts for smart structures. They are small, lightweight, and immune to electromagnetic interference. Using multiplexing techniques, several sensors can be addressed by a single fiber. Therefore, well-established structures and materials in industrial applications can be easily equipped with fiber optical sensors with marginal influence on their mechanical properties. In return, critical components can be monitored in real-time, leading to reduced maintenance intervals and a great reduction of costs. Beside of generally condition monitoring, the localization of failures in a structure is a desired feature of the condition monitoring system. Detecting the acoustic emission of a sudden event, its place of origin can be determined by analyzing the delay time of distributed sensor signals. To achieve high localization accuracies for the detection of cracks, breaks, and impacts high sampling rates combined with the simultaneous interrogation of several fiber Bragg grating sensors are required. In this article a fiber Bragg grating interrogator for high frequency measurements up to the megahertz range is presented. The interrogator is based on a passive wavelength to intensity conversion applying arrayed waveguide gratings. Light power fluctuations are suppressed by a differential data evaluation, leading to a reduced signal-to-noise ratio and a low strain detection limit. The measurement system is used to detect, inter alia, wire breaks in steel wire ropes for dockside cranes.

  14. High incidence of lung, bone, and lymphoid tumors in transgenic mice overexpressing mutant alleles of the p53 oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Lavigueur, A; Maltby, V; Mock, D; Rossant, J; Pawson, T; Bernstein, A

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the p53 gene in oncogenesis in vivo by generating transgenic mice carrying murine p53 genomic fragments isolated from a mouse Friend erythroleukemia cell line or BALB/c mouse liver DNA. Elevated levels of p53 mRNA were detected in several tissues of two transgenic lines tested. Increased levels of p53 protein were also detected in most of the tissues analyzed by Western blotting (immunoblotting). Because both transgenes encoded p53 proteins that were antigenically distinct from wild-type p53, it was possible to demonstrate that overexpression of the p53 protein was mostly, if not entirely, due to the expression of the transgenes. Neoplasms developed in 20% of the transgenic mice, with a high incidence of lung adenocarcinomas, osteosarcomas, and lymphomas. Tissues such as ovaries that expressed the transgene at high levels were not at higher risk of malignant transformation than tissues expressing p53 protein at much lower levels. The long latent period and low penetrance suggest that overexpression of p53 alone is not sufficient to induce malignancies and that additional events are required. These observations provide direct evidence that mutant alleles of the p53 oncogene have oncogenic potential in vivo and that different cell types show intrinsic differences in susceptibility to malignant transformation by p53. Since recent data suggest that p53 may be a recessive oncogene, it is possible that the elevated tumor incidence results from functional inactivation of endogenous p53 by overexpression of the mutant transgene. The high incidence of lung and bone tumors suggests that p53 transgenic mice may provide a useful model to investigate the molecular events that underlie these malignancies in humans. Images PMID:2476668

  15. High-frequency electrostatic modes in non-neutral plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, David L.

    1995-05-01

    A fluid description is employed to derive the dispersion relation for cyclotron modes in a cylindrical non-neutral plasma of radius R confined by a uniform magnetic field B=B0ez inside a chamber with conducting walls of radius R0. In contrast to the theory of Gould and LaPointe [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 3685 (1991); Phys. Fluids B 4, 2038 (1992)] the model includes the diamagnetic drift but omits finite Larmor radius effects. The density and the temperature of the unperturbed state are taken to be n(r)=n0(1-r2/R2) and T(r)=T0(1-r2/R2)γ-1, where γ is the adiabatic index, so that the r-dependent slow rotation frequency is ωr≊-[δ(1-r2/2R2)+ɛ(1-r2/R2)γ-2]Ω/2, where Ω=qB0/Mc is the ion gyrofrequency, δ=4πn0q2/MΩ2, and ɛ=4γT0/MΩ2R2. For the linearized fluid equations together with the Poisson equation the eigenvalue problem is solved in the limit δ≪1, ɛ≪1. The eigenfrequencies for high-frequency electrostatic modes with wave vectors satisfying kṡB=0 (Bernstein modes) are found in the form ω=-Ω+Δω, where Δω/Ω contains terms proportional to δ and ɛ. Solutions are obtained and compared with experiment and the theory of Gould and LaPointe. The present theory predicts that at a given T0 modes with m≳1 propagate only when the density is less than a critical value that increases with m, and that Δω normalized by the diocotron frequency depends only on the ratio of the Debye length to the plasma radius and hence is independent of B and M. The predictions of the two theories differ in several other respects; future observations may serve to decide between them.

  16. High Frequency VLBI Studies of Sagittarius A* and NRAO 530

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ru-Sen

    2010-10-01

    Compact radio sources (Kellermann & Pauliny-Toth 1981) are widely accepted to be associated with supermassive black holes at the centers of active galaxies. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations at short millimeter wavelengths offer the unique advantage to look "deeper" into the central core regions. In this thesis we study two com pact radio sources (Sagittarius A* and NRAO 530) with high frequency VLBI techniques. As a starting point, we give in Chapter 1 a general introduction to observational properties of Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and a theoretical basis. In Chapter 2, the compact radio source at the center of the Milky Way, Sagittarius A*, is reviewed. In Chapter 3, the technical basis of VLBI is outlined and then the difficulties of VLBI (and therefore the ways to improve) at short millimeter wavelengths are discussed. Due to its proximity, Sagittarius A* has the largest apparent event horizon of any black hole candidate and therefore it provides a unique opportunity for testing the SMBH paradigm. However, direct imaging of the nucleus is only accessible at short millimeter wavelengths due to the scatter broadening. In Chapter 4, we present results of an inter-day VLBI monitoring of Sagittarius A* at wavelengths of 13, 7, and 3 mm during a global observing campaign in 2007. We measure the flux density and source structure and study their variability on daily time scales. In addition to the VLBI monitoring of the Galactic Center, we present in Chapter 5 results of multi-epoch multi-frequency VLBI observations of the blazar nrao 530. NRAO 530 is an optically violent variable (OVV) source and was observed as a VLBI calibrator in our observations of Sagittarius A*. We investigate the spectral properties of jet components, their frequency-dependent position shifts, and variability of flux density and structure on daily time scales. Analysis of archival data over the last ten years allows us to study the detailed jet kinematics. Finally, a

  17. High-frequency voltage oscillations in cultured astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Wiebke; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Holland, Christine; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2015-01-01

    Because of their close interaction with neuronal physiology, astrocytes can modulate brain function in multiple ways. Here, we demonstrate a yet unknown astrocytic phenomenon: Astrocytes cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) exhibited extracellular voltage fluctuations in a broad frequency spectrum (100–600 Hz) after electrical stimulation. These aperiodic high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) could last several seconds and did not spread across the MEA. The voltage-gated calcium channel antagonist cilnidipine dose-dependently decreased the power of the oscillations. While intracellular calcium was pivotal, incubation with bafilomycin A1 showed that vesicular release of transmitters played only a minor role in the emergence of HFOs. Gap junctions and volume-regulated anionic channels had just as little functional impact, which was demonstrated by the addition of carbenoxolone (100 μmol/L) and NPPB (100 μmol/L). Hyperpolarization with low potassium in the extracellular solution (2 mmol/L) dramatically raised oscillation power. A similar effect was seen when we added extra sodium (+50 mmol/L) or if we replaced it with NMDG+ (50 mmol/L). The purinergic receptor antagonist PPADS suppressed the oscillation power, while the agonist ATP (100 μmol/L) had only an increasing effect when the bath solution pH was slightly lowered to pH 7.2. From these observations, we conclude that astrocytic voltage oscillations are triggered by activation of voltage-gated calcium channels and driven by a downstream influx of cations through channels that are permeable for large ions such as NMDG+. Most likely candidates are subtypes of pore-forming P2X channels with a low affinity for ATP. PMID:25969464

  18. Gravitational Wave Astronomy:The High Frequency Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Nils; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    As several large scale interferometers are beginning to take data at sensitivities where astrophysical sources are predicted, the direct detection of gravitational waves may well be imminent. This would (finally) open the long anticipated gravitational-wave window to our Universe, and should lead to a much improved understanding of the most violent processes imaginable; the formation of black holes and neutron stars following core collapse supernovae and the merger of compact objects at the end of binary inspiral. Over the next decade we can hope to learn much about the extreme physics associated with, in particular, neutron stars. This contribution is divided in two parts. The first part provides a text-book level introduction to gravitational radiation. The key concepts required for a discussion of gravitational-wave physics are introduced. In particular, the quadrupole formula is applied to the anticipated bread-and-butter source for detectors like LIGO, GEO600, EGO and TAMA300: inspiralling compact binaries. The second part provides a brief review of high frequency gravitational waves. In the frequency range above (say) 100 Hz, gravitational collapse, rotational instabilities and oscillations of the remnant compact objects are potentially important sources of gravitational waves. Significant and unique information concerning the various stages of collapse, the evolution of protoneutron stars and the details of the supranuclear equation of state of such objects can be drawn from careful study of the gravitational-wave signal. As the amount of exciting physics one may be able to study via the detections of gravitational waves from these sources is truly inspiring, there is strong motivation for the development of future generations of ground based detectors sensitive in the range from hundreds of Hz to several kHz.

  19. High-frequency TRNS reduces BOLD activity during visuomotor learning.

    PubMed

    Saiote, Catarina; Polanía, Rafael; Rosenberger, Konstantin; Paulus, Walter; Antal, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) consist in the application of electrical current of small intensity through the scalp, able to modulate perceptual and motor learning, probably by changing brain excitability. We investigated the effects of these transcranial electrical stimulation techniques in the early and later stages of visuomotor learning, as well as associated brain activity changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We applied anodal and cathodal tDCS, low-frequency and high-frequency tRNS (lf-tRNS, 0.1-100 Hz; hf-tRNS 101-640 Hz, respectively) and sham stimulation over the primary motor cortex (M1) during the first 10 minutes of a visuomotor learning paradigm and measured performance changes for 20 minutes after stimulation ceased. Functional imaging scans were acquired throughout the whole experiment. Cathodal tDCS and hf-tRNS showed a tendency to improve and lf-tRNS to hinder early learning during stimulation, an effect that remained for 20 minutes after cessation of stimulation in the late learning phase. Motor learning-related activity decreased in several regions as reported previously, however, there was no significant modulation of brain activity by tDCS. In opposition to this, hf-tRNS was associated with reduced motor task-related-activity bilaterally in the frontal cortex and precuneous, probably due to interaction with ongoing neuronal oscillations. This result highlights the potential of lf-tRNS and hf-tRNS to differentially modulate visuomotor learning and advances our knowledge on neuroplasticity induction approaches combined with functional imaging methods. PMID:23527247

  20. High Frequency Monitoring of the Aigion Fault Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Francois; Bourouis, Seid

    2013-04-01

    In 2007, a high frequency monitoring system was deployed in the 1000 m deep AIG10 well that intersects the Aigion fault at a depth of 760 m. This active 15 km long fault is located on the south shore of the Corinth rift, some 40 km east from Patras, in western central Greece. The borehole intersects quaternary sediments down to 495 m, then cretaceous and tertiary heavily tectonized deposits from the Pindos nappe. Below the fault encountered at 760 m, the borehole remains within karstic limestone of the Gavrovo Tripolitza nappe. The monitoring system involved two geophones located some 15 m above the fault, and two hydrophones located respectively at depths equal to 500 m and 250 m. The frequency domain for the data acquisition system ranged from a few Hz to 2500 Hz. The seismic velocity structure close to the borehole was determined through both sonic logs and vertical seismic profiles. This monitoring system has been active during slightly over six months and has recorded signals from microseismic events that occurred in the rift, the location of which was determined thanks to the local 11 stations, three components, short period (2 Hz), monitoring system. In addition, the borehole monitoring system has recorded more than 1000 events not identified with the regional network. Events were precisely correlated with pressure variations associated with two human interventions. These extremely low magnitude events occurred at distances that reached at least up to 1500 m from the well. They were associated, some ten days later, with some local rift activity. A tentative model is proposed that associates local short slip instabilities in the upper part of the fault close to the well, with a longer duration pore pressure diffusion process. Results demonstrate that the Aigion fault is continuously creeping down to a depth at least equal to 5 km but probably deeper.

  1. High frequency of a single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) of the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene associated with phenobarbital-resistant idiopathic epilepsy in Border Collie dogs.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Yabuki, Akira; Chang, Hye-Sook; Uddin, Mohammad Mejbah; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Kohyama, Moeko; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    A single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) associated with resistance to phenobarbital therapy has been found in the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene in Border Collies with idiopathic epilepsy. In the present study, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was developed for genotyping this mutation, and a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of 472 Border Collies in Japan to determine the current allele frequency. The survey demonstrated the frequencies of the T/T wild type, T/G heterozygote, and G/G mutant homozygote to be 60.0%, 30.3%, and 9.8%, respectively, indicating that the frequency of the mutant G allele is extremely high (24.9%) in Border Collies. The results suggest that this high mutation frequency of the mutation is likely to cause a high prevalence of phenobarbital-resistant epilepsy in Border Collies. PMID:24302812

  2. Highly-efficient colony PCR method for red yeasts and its application to identify mutations within two leucine auxotroph mutants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xinping; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Yongjin; Zhu, Zhiwei; Jin, Guojie; Zhang, Sufang; Zhao, Zongbao Kent

    2012-11-01

    Red yeasts hold great promise in the production of microbial lipids and carotenoids. Genetic study of red yeasts has attracted much attention; however, rapid amplification of genes from red yeast samples remains technically challenging. Here a highly efficient method for the preparation of genomic DNA (gDNA) template, which could be directly used for PCR, was developed. Cells from colonies or liquid cultures were collected and sequentially treated by microwave, plMAN5C, proteinase K and boiling (MMPB) in a single tube to give cell lysates that were qualified as PCR templates. Single-copied gDNA fragments o up to 2.8 kb were successfully amplified. We also demonstrated successful application of this method for species in the Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes and identification of two leucine auxotroph mutants of Rhodotorula glutinis. This method could be widely employed for the screening and genetic engineering of various yeasts. PMID:23065821

  3. Development and evaluation of rice giant embryo mutants for high oil content originated from a high-yielding cultivar ‘Mizuhochikara’

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Mitsukazu; Seno, Mari; Matsusaka, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Kiyomi; Nakamura, Yuki; Yamagata, Yoshiyuki; Angeles, Enrique R.; Mochizuki, Toshihiro; Kumamaru, Toshihiro; Sato, Masao; Enomoto, Akiko; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Satoh, Hikaru; Yoshimura, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rice bran oil is a byproduct of the milling of rice (Oryza sativa L.). It offers various health benefits and has a beneficial fatty acid composition. To increase the amount of rice bran as a sink for triacylglycerol (TAG), we developed and characterized new breeding materials with giant embryos. To induce mutants, we treated fertilized egg cells of the high-yielding cultivar ‘Mizuhochikara’ with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU). By screening M2 seeds, we isolated four giant embryo mutant lines. Genetic analysis revealed that the causative loci in lines MGE12 and MGE13 were allelic to giant embryo (ge) on chromosome 7, and had base changes in the causal gene Os07g0603700. On the other hand, the causative loci in lines MGE8 and MGE14 were not allelic to ge, and both were newly mapped on chromosome 3. The TAG contents of all four mutant lines increased relative to their wild type, ‘Mizuhochikara’. MGE13 was agronomically similar to ‘Mizuhochikara’ and would be useful for breeding for improved oil content. PMID:27436953

  4. FPGA implementation of high-frequency multiple PWM for variable voltage variable frequency controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumaaraf, Abdelâali; Mohamadi, Tayeb; Gourmat, Laïd

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the FPGA implementation of the multiple pulse width modulation (MPWM) signal generation with repetition of data segments, applied to the variable frequency variable voltage systems and specially at to the photovoltaic water pumping system, in order to generate a signal command very easily between 10hz to 60 hz with a small frequency and reduce the cost of the control system.

  5. High-resolution frequency measurement method with a wide-frequency range based on a quantized phase step law.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoqiang; Dong, Shaofeng; Wang, Yanfeng; Guo, Shuting; Cao, Lingzhi; Zhou, Wei; Zuo, Yandi; Liu, Dan

    2013-11-01

    A wide-frequency and high-resolution frequency measurement method based on the quantized phase step law is presented in this paper. Utilizing a variation law of the phase differences, the direct different frequency phase processing, and the phase group synchronization phenomenon, combining an A/D converter and the adaptive phase shifting principle, a counter gate is established in the phase coincidences at one-group intervals, which eliminates the ±1 counter error in the traditional frequency measurement method. More importantly, the direct phase comparison, the measurement, and the control between any periodic signals have been realized without frequency normalization in this method. Experimental results show that sub-picosecond resolution can be easily obtained in the frequency measurement, the frequency standard comparison, and the phase-locked control based on the phase quantization processing technique. The method may be widely used in navigation positioning, space techniques, communication, radar, astronomy, atomic frequency standards, and other high-tech fields. PMID:24158281

  6. Velocity field measurements on high-frequency, supersonic microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, Phillip A.; Ali, Mohd Y.; Fernandez, Erik J.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    The resonance-enhanced microjet actuator which was developed at the Advanced Aero-Propulsion Laboratory at Florida State University is a fluidic-based device that produces pulsed, supersonic microjets by utilizing a number of microscale, flow-acoustic resonance phenomena. The microactuator used in this study consists of an underexpanded source jet that flows into a cylindrical cavity with a single, 1-mm-diameter exhaust orifice through which an unsteady, supersonic jet issues at a resonant frequency of 7 kHz. The flowfields of a 1-mm underexpanded free jet and the microactuator are studied in detail using high-magnification, phase-locked flow visualizations (microschlieren) and two-component particle image velocimetry. These are the first direct measurements of the velocity fields produced by such actuators. Comparisons are made between the flow visualizations and the velocity field measurements. The results clearly show that the microactuator produces pulsed, supersonic jets with velocities exceeding 400 m/s for roughly 60 % of their cycles. With high unsteady momentum output, this type of microactuator has potential in a range of ow control applications.

  7. Detection of high frequency oscillations from space experiments and eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Dipankar; Singh, Jagdev; Hasan, Siraj; Gupta, Girjesh R.; Nagaraju, K.

    We performed high resolution spectroscopy of the solar corona during the total solar eclipse of July 22, 2009 in two emission lines, namely the red line at 530.3 nm due to [Fe xiv] and the green line at 637.4 nm due to [Fex] simultaneously from Anji, China. Two mirror coelostat with 100 cm focal length lens made 9.2 mm image of the sun. The spectrograph using 140 cm focal length lens in Littrow mode and a grating with 600 lines per mm blazed at 2 micron provided a dispersion of 30 mA and 42 mA per pixel in the 4th order around green line and 3rd order red emission line, respectively. Two Peltier cooled 1K x 1K CCD cameras with pixel size of 13 micron square and 14-bit read out at 10 MHz operated in frame transfer mode, were used to obtain the time sequence spectra in each emission lines simultaneously. We detected presence of high frequency oscillations in intensity, velocity and line widths. We also studied the variation of line widths with height. The results will be discussed in terms of different MHD waves. Possibility of detecting these oscillations from space based experiments will be addressed. India is going to launch a emission line coronagraph on a small satellite platform called Aditya. The scientific goals of Aditya in pursuit to wave detection will be presented.

  8. High Frequency Mechanical Pyroshock Simulations for Payload Systems

    SciTech Connect

    BATEMAN,VESTA I.; BROWN,FREDERICK A.; CAP,JEROME S.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.

    1999-12-15

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with components that must survive high frequency shock environments including pyrotechnic shock. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past at the payload system level because of weight limitations of traditional pyroshock mechanical simulations using resonant beams and plates. A new concept utilizing tuned resonators attached to the payload system and driven with the impact of an airgun projectile allow these simulations to be performed in the laboratory with high precision and repeatability without the use of explosives. A tuned resonator has been designed and constructed for a particular payload system. Comparison of laboratory responses with measurements made at the component locations during actual pyrotechnic events show excellent agreement for a bandwidth of DC to 4 kHz. The bases of comparison are shock spectra. This simple concept applies the mechanical pyroshock simulation simultaneously to all components with the correct boundary conditions in the payload system and is a considerable improvement over previous experimental techniques and simulations.

  9. Low temperature high frequency coaxial pulse tube for space application

    SciTech Connect

    Charrier, Aurelia; Charles, Ivan; Rousset, Bernard; Duval, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-29

    The 4K stage is a critical step for space missions. The Hershel mission is using a helium bath, which is consumed day by day (after depletion, the space mission is over) while the Plank mission is equipped with one He4 Joule-Thomson cooler. Cryogenic chain without helium bath is a challenge for space missions and 4.2K Pulse-Tube working at high frequency (around 30Hz) is one option to take it up. A low temperature Pulse-Tube would be suitable for the ESA space mission EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory, expected launch in 2022), which requires around 30mW cooling power at 6K; and for the ESA space mission ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics), to pre-cool the sub-kelvin cooler (few hundreds of mW at 15K). The test bench described in this paper combines a Gifford-McMahon with a coaxial Pulse-Tube. A thermal link is joining the intercept of the Pulse-Tube and the second stage of the Gifford-McMahon. This intercept is a separator between the hot and the cold regenerators of the Pulse-Tube. The work has been focused on the cold part of this cold finger. Coupled with an active phase shifter, this Pulse-Tube has been tested and optimized and temperatures as low as 6K have been obtained at 30Hz with an intercept temperature at 20K.

  10. Clinical applications of very high frequency ultrasound in ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Ronald H.; Coleman, D. Jackson; Reinstein, Dan Z.; Lizzi, Frederic L.

    2001-05-01

    The eye is ideally suited for diagnostic imaging with very high frequency (>35 MHz) ultrasound (VHFU) because of its peripheral location and cystic structure. VHFU allows high resolution visualization of pathologies affecting the anterior segment of the eye, including tumors, cysts, foreign bodies, and corneal pathologies. We developed a series of prototype instruments suitable for ophthalmic studies using both polymer and lithium niobate transducers, with digitization of radiofrequency echo data at up to 500 MHz. While initially using linear scan geometries, we subsequently developed an arc-shaped scan matched to the curvature of the 0.5-mm-thick cornea to circumvent the effect of specular deflection of the ultrasound beam produced by the corneas curved surface. This technique allowed us to obtain data across the entire cornea and determination of the thickness of each corneal layer, including the epithelium (approximately 50 microns in thickness) and the surgically induced interface produced in LASIK, the most common form of refractive surgery. By scanning in a series of meridians, and applying optimized signal processing strategies (deconvolution, analytic signal envelope determination), corneal pachymetric maps representing the local thickness of each layer can be generated and aid in diagnosis of surgically induced defects or refractive abnormalities.

  11. High-frequency electrostatic waves in the magnetosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, T. S. T.

    1973-01-01

    High-frequency electrostatic microinstabilities in magnetospheric plasmas are considered in detail. Rather special plasma parameters are found to be required to match the theoretical wave spectrum with satellite observations in the magnetosphere. In particular, it is necessary to have a cold and a warm species of electrons such that (1) the warm component has an anomalous velocity distribution function that is nonmonotonic in the perpendicular component of velocity and is the source of free energy driving the instabilities, (2) the density ratio of the cold component to the hot component is greater than about 0.01, and (3) the temperature ratio of the two components for cases of high particle density is no less than 0.1. These requirements and the corresponding instability criteria are satisfied only in the trapping region; this is also the region in which the waves are most frequently observed. The range of unstable wavelengths and an estimate of the diffusion coefficient are also obtained. The wave are found to induce strong diffusion in velocity space for low-energy electrons during periods of moderate wave amplitude.

  12. Theory of High Frequency Rectification by Silicon Crystals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bethe, H. A.

    1942-10-29

    The excellent performance of British "red dot" crystals is explained as due to the knife edge contact against a polished surface. High frequency rectification depends critically on the capacity of the rectifying boundary layer of the crystal, C. For high conversion efficiency, the product of this capacity and of the "forward" (bulk) resistance R {sub b} of the crystal must be small. For a knife edge, this product depends primarily on the breadth of the knife edge and very little upon its length. The contact can therefore have a rather large area which prevents burn-out. For a wavelength of 10 cm. the computations show that the breadth of the knife edge should be less than about 10 {sup -3} cm. For a point contact the radius must be less than 1.5 x 10 {sup -3} cm. and the resulting small area is conducive to burn-out. The effect of "tapping" is probably to reduce the area of contact. (auth)

  13. High Frequency of Imprinted Methylation Errors in Human Preimplantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    White, Carlee R.; Denomme, Michelle M.; Tekpetey, Francis R.; Feyles, Valter; Power, Stephen G. A.; Mann, Mellissa R. W.

    2015-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) represent the best chance for infertile couples to conceive, although increased risks for morbidities exist, including imprinting disorders. This increased risk could arise from ARTs disrupting genomic imprints during gametogenesis or preimplantation. The few studies examining ART effects on genomic imprinting primarily assessed poor quality human embryos. Here, we examined day 3 and blastocyst stage, good to high quality, donated human embryos for imprinted SNRPN, KCNQ1OT1 and H19 methylation. Seventy-six percent day 3 embryos and 50% blastocysts exhibited perturbed imprinted methylation, demonstrating that extended culture did not pose greater risk for imprinting errors than short culture. Comparison of embryos with normal and abnormal methylation didn’t reveal any confounding factors. Notably, two embryos from male factor infertility patients using donor sperm harboured aberrant methylation, suggesting errors in these embryos cannot be explained by infertility alone. Overall, these results indicate that ART human preimplantation embryos possess a high frequency of imprinted methylation errors. PMID:26626153

  14. High-frequency nano-optomechanical disk resonators in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Santos, E.; Baker, C.; Nguyen, D. T.; Hease, W.; Gomez, C.; Lemaître, A.; Ducci, S.; Leo, G.; Favero, I.

    2015-09-01

    Nano- and micromechanical resonators are the subject of research that aims to develop ultrasensitive mass sensors for spectrometry, chemical analysis and biomedical diagnosis. Unfortunately, their merits generally diminish in liquids because of an increased dissipation. The development of faster and lighter miniaturized devices would enable improved performances, provided the dissipation was controlled and novel techniques were available to drive and readout their minute displacement. Here we report a nano-optomechanical approach to this problem using miniature semiconductor disks. These devices combine a mechanical motion at high frequencies (gigahertz and above) with an ultralow mass (picograms) and a moderate dissipation in liquids. We show that high-sensitivity optical measurements allow their Brownian vibrations to be resolved directly, even in the most-dissipative liquids. We investigate their interaction with liquids of arbitrary properties, and analyse measurements in light of new models. Nano-optomechanical disks emerge as probes of rheological information of unprecedented sensitivity and speed, which opens up applications in sensing and fundamental science.

  15. Protection Circuits for Very High Frequency Ultrasound Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of protection circuits in ultrasound applications is to block noise signals from the transmitter from reaching the transducer and also to prevent unwanted high voltage signals from reaching the receiver. The protection circuit using a resistor and diode pair is widely used due to its simple architecture, however, it may not be suitable for very high frequency (VHF) ultrasound transducer applications (>100 MHz) because of its limited bandwidth. Therefore, a protection circuit using MOSFET devices with unique structure is proposed in this paper. The performance of the designed protection circuit was compared with that of other traditional protection schemes. The performance characteristics measured were the insertion loss (IL), total harmonic distortion (THD) and transient response time (TRT). The new protection scheme offers the lowest IL (−1.0 dB), THD (−69.8 dB) and TRT (78 ns) at 120 MHz. The pulse-echo response using a 120 MHz LiNbO3 transducer with each protection circuit was measured to validate the feasibility of the protection circuits in VHF ultrasound applications. The sensitivity and bandwidth of the transducer using the new protection circuit improved by 252.1 and 50.9 %, respectively with respect to the protection circuit using a resistor and diode pair. These results demonstrated that the new protection circuit design minimizes the IL, THD and TRT for VHF ultrasound transducer applications. PMID:24682684

  16. Photodetachment of H- from intense, short, high-frequency pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Robicheaux, F.

    2016-05-01

    We study the photodetachment of an electron from the hydrogen anion due to short, high-frequency laser pulses by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Simulations are performed to investigate the dependence of the photoelectron spectra on the duration, chirp, and intensity of the pulses. Specifically, we concentrate on the low-energy distributions in the spectra that result from the Raman transitions of the broadband pulses. Contrary to the one-photon ionization, the low-energy distribution maintains a similar width as the laser bandwidth is expanded by chirping the pulses. In addition, we study the transitions of the ionization dynamics from the perturbative to strong-field regime. At high intensities, the positions of the net one- and two-photon absorption peaks in the spectrum shifts and the peaks split to multiple subpeaks because of the multiphoton effects. Moreover, although the one- and two-photon peaks and low-energy distribution exhibit saturation of the ionization yields, the latter shows relatively mild saturation. This work has been supported by DOE under Award No. DE-SC0012193.

  17. Experimental study of a high intensity radio-frequency cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaid, Ramzi; Ban, G.; Cam, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Within the framework of the DESIR/SPIRAL-2 project, a radio-frequency quadrupole cooler named SHIRaC has been studied. SHIRaC is a key device of SPIRAL-2, designed to enhance the beam quality required by DESIR. The preliminary study and development of this device has been carried out at Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de CAEN (LPC Caen), France. The goal of this paper is to present the experimental studies conducted on a SHIRaC prototype. The main peculiarity of this cooler is its efficient handling and cooling of ion beams with currents going up as high as 1 μ A which has never before been achieved in any of the previous coolers. Much effort has been made lately into these studies for development of appropriate optics, vacuum and rf systems which allow cooling of beams of large emittance (˜80 π mm mrad ) and high current. The dependencies of SHIRaC's transmission and the cooled beam parameters in terms of geometrical transverse emittance and the longitudinal energy spread have also been discussed. Investigation of beam purity at optimum cooling condition has also been done. Results from the experiments indicate that an emittance reduction of less than 2.5 π mm mrad and a longitudinal energy spread reduction of less than 4 eV are obtained with more than 70% of ion transmission. The emittance is at expected values whereas the energy spread is not.

  18. Photodetachment of H- from intense, short, high-frequency pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Robicheaux, F.

    2016-05-01

    We study the photodetachment of an electron from the hydrogen anion due to short, high-frequency laser pulses by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Simulations are performed to investigate the dependence of the photoelectron spectra on the duration, chirp, and intensity of the pulses. Specifically, we concentrate on the low-energy distributions in the spectra that result from the Raman transitions of the broadband pulses. Contrary to one-photon ionization, the low-energy distribution maintains an almost constant width as the laser bandwidth is expanded by chirping the pulses. In addition, we study the transitions of the ionization dynamics from the perturbative to the strong-field regime. At high intensities, the positions of the net one- and two-photon absorption peaks in the spectrum shift and the peaks split to multiple subpeaks due to multiphoton effects. Moreover, although the one- and two-photon peaks and low-energy distribution exhibit saturation of the ionization yields, the low-energy distribution shows relatively mild saturation.

  19. Remote Sensing: Radio Frequency Detection for High School Physics Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, Daniel; Jeandron, Michael; Maddox, Larry; Yoshida, Sanichiro

    2011-10-01

    In an effort to give high school students experience in real world science applications, we have partnered with Loranger High School in Loranger, LA to mentor 9 senior physics students in radio frequency electromagnetic detection. The effort consists of two projects: Mapping of 60 Hz noise around the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), and the construction of a 20 MHz radio telescope for observations of the Sun and Jupiter (Radio Jove, NASA). The results of the LIGO mapping will aid in strategies to reduce the 60 Hz line noise in the LIGO noise spectrum. The Radio Jove project will introduce students to the field of radio astronomy and give them better insight into the dynamic nature of large solar system objects. Both groups will work together in the early stages as they learn the basics of electromagnetic transmission and detection. The groups will document and report their progress regularly. The students will work under the supervision of three undergraduate mentors. Our program is designed to give them theoretical and practical knowledge in radiation and electronics. The students will learn how to design and test receiver in the lab and field settings.

  20. High-Efficiency Transduction of Fibroblasts and Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tyrosine-Mutant AAV2 Vectors for Their Potential Use in Cellular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengxin; Jayandharan, Giridhara R.; Li, Baozheng; Ling, Chen; Ma, Wenqin; Srivastava, Arun

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors transduce fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) inefficiently, which limits their potential widespread applicability in combinatorial gene and cell therapy. We have reported that AAV2 vectors fail to traffic efficiently to the nucleus in murine fibroblasts. We have also reported that site-directed mutagenesis of surface-exposed tyrosine residues on viral capsids leads to improved intracellular trafficking of the mutant vectors, and the transduction efficiency of the single tyrosine-mutant vectors is ∼10-fold higher in human cells. In the current studies, we evaluated the transduction efficiency of single as well as multiple tyrosine-mutant AAV2 vectors in murine fibroblasts. Our results indicate that the Y444F mutant vectors transduce these cells most efficiently among the seven single-mutant vectors, with >30-fold increase in transgene expression compared with the wild-type vectors. When the Y444F mutation is combined with additional mutations (Y500F and Y730F), the transduction efficiency of the triple-mutant vectors is increased by ∼130-fold and the viral intracellular trafficking is also significant improved. Similarly, the triple-mutant vectors are capable of transducing up to 80–90% of bone marrow-derived primary murine as well as human MSCs. Thus, high-efficiency transduction of fibroblasts with reprogramming genes to generate induced pluripotent stem cells, and the MSCs for delivering therapeutic genes, should now be feasible with the tyrosine-mutant AAV vectors. PMID:20507237