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Sample records for high neutron fluences

  1. HIGH FLUENCE NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to research the basic plasma physics necessary to develop a high fluence neutron source based on the inertial electrostatically confined (IEC) plasma. An intense neutron source directly addresses the capability to characterize nuclear materials under difficult measurem...

  2. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  3. Fluence measurement of fast neutron fields with a highly efficient recoil proton telescope using active pixel sensors.

    PubMed

    Taforeau, J; Higueret, S; Husson, D; Kachel, M; Lebreton, L

    2014-10-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High-Energy Neutron metrology Applications) is being developed at the LNE-IRSN and aims at characterising energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a recoil proton telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50-µm-thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for proton tracking and a 3-mm-thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode, owing to a large detection solid angle, increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of 10 compared with conventional designs. The ability of the spectrometer to determine the neutron energy was demonstrated and reported elsewhere. This paper focuses on the fluence measurement of monoenergetic neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. Experimental investigations, performed at the AMANDE facility, indicate a good estimation of neutron fluence at various energies. In addition, a complete description of uncertainties budget is presented in this paper and a Monte Carlo propagation of uncertainty sources leads to a fluence measurement with a precision ∼3-5 % depending on the neutron energy. PMID:24243312

  4. Stability of SiC and its Composites at High Neutron Fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Nozawa, Takashi; Snead, Lance Lewis; Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, H.

    2011-01-01

    High purity chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) and near-stoichiometric SiC fiber, chemically vapor-infiltrated (CVI) SiC matrix composite were evaluated following neutron irradiation to {approx}28 dpa at 300 and 650 C and to {approx}41 dpa at 800 C, respectively. The irradiated swelling, thermal conductivity, and elastic modulus indicated no additional changes in these properties at high fluences after saturation at low fluences. With a statistically meaningful sample population, no change in flexural strength of CVD SiC was observed after 300 C irradiation. A slight decrease in strength was observed after 650 C irradiation but was attributed to an experimental artifact; specifically, a reaction between samples and the capsule components. The Hi-Nicalon{trademark} Type-S, CVI SiC composite retained the pre-irradiation strength and the non-linear fracture mode. The electrical resistivity measurement revealed a relatively minor effect of irradiation. Overall, irradiation-insensitivity of the high purity SiC ceramics and composite to neutron irradiation to doses 30-40 dpa at temperatures 300-800 C was demonstrated.

  5. Mechanical Behaviour of Cyanate Ester/epoxy Blends after Reactor Irradiation to High Neutron Fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical strength of conventional epoxy resins drops dramatically after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). Recent results demonstrated that cyanate ester/epoxy blends were not affected at this fluence level. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance potential of these blends at higher fluence levels without significant degradation of their mechanical properties. Short-beam shear as well as static tensile tests were carried out at 77 K prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of up to 4×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) in the TRIGA reactor at ambient temperature (340 K). In addition, load controlled tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed, in order to simulate the pulsed operation conditions of a tokamak. Initial results show that only a small reduction of the mechanical strength under static and dynamic load is observed at a fast neutron fluence of 2×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). After exposure to 4×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) the interlaminar shear strength of materials with a cyanate ester content of 40% or more is only reduced by 20% to 30%.

  6. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF CYANATE ESTER/EPOXY BLENDS AFTER REACTOR IRRADIATION TO HIGH NEUTRON FLUENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-03

    The mechanical strength of conventional epoxy resins drops dramatically after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). Recent results demonstrated that cyanate ester/epoxy blends were not affected at this fluence level. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance potential of these blends at higher fluence levels without significant degradation of their mechanical properties. Short-beam shear as well as static tensile tests were carried out at 77 K prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of up to 4x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV) in the TRIGA reactor at ambient temperature (340 K). In addition, load controlled tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed, in order to simulate the pulsed operation conditions of a tokamak. Initial results show that only a small reduction of the mechanical strength under static and dynamic load is observed at a fast neutron fluence of 2x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). After exposure to 4x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV) the interlaminar shear strength of materials with a cyanate ester content of 40% or more is only reduced by 20% to 30%.

  7. High Neutron Fluence Survivability Testing of Advanced Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Fielder, Robert S.; Klemer, Daniel; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.

    2004-02-04

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. The purpose of the high-neutron fluence testing was to demonstrate the survivability of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in a fission reactor environment. 520 FBGs were installed in the Ford reactor at the University of Michigan. The reactor was operated for 1012 effective full power hours resulting in a maximum neutron fluence of approximately 5x1019 n/cm2, and a maximum gamma dose of 2x103 MGy gamma. This work is significant in that, to the knowledge of the authors, the exposure levels obtained are approximately 1000 times higher than for any previously published experiment. Four different fiber compositions were evaluated. An 87% survival rate was observed for fiber Bragg gratings located at the fuel centerline. Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), originally developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, can be used to interrogate several thousand low-reflectivity FBG strain and/or temperature sensors along a single optical fiber. A key advantage of the OFDR sensor technology for space nuclear power is the extremely low mass of the sensor, which consists of only a silica fiber 125{mu}m in diameter. The sensors produced using this technology will fill applications in nuclear power for current reactor plants, emerging Generation-IV reactors, and for space nuclear power. The reported research was conducted by Luna Innovations and was funded through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  8. High Neutron Fluence Survivability Testing of Advanced Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielder, Robert S.; Klemer, Daniel; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.

    2004-02-01

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. The purpose of the high-neutron fluence testing was to demonstrate the survivability of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in a fission reactor environment. 520 FBGs were installed in the Ford reactor at the University of Michigan. The reactor was operated for 1012 effective full power hours resulting in a maximum neutron fluence of approximately 5×1019 n/cm2, and a maximum gamma dose of 2×103 MGy gamma. This work is significant in that, to the knowledge of the authors, the exposure levels obtained are approximately 1000 times higher than for any previously published experiment. Four different fiber compositions were evaluated. An 87% survival rate was observed for fiber Bragg gratings located at the fuel centerline. Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), originally developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, can be used to interrogate several thousand low-reflectivity FBG strain and/or temperature sensors along a single optical fiber. A key advantage of the OFDR sensor technology for space nuclear power is the extremely low mass of the sensor, which consists of only a silica fiber 125μm in diameter. The sensors produced using this technology will fill applications in nuclear power for current reactor plants, emerging Generation-IV reactors, and for space nuclear power. The reported research was conducted by Luna Innovations and was funded through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  9. Practical considerations for TLD-400/700-based gamma ray dosimetry for BNCT applications in a high thermal neutron fluence.

    PubMed

    Martsolf, S W; Johnson, J E; Vostmyer, C E; Albertson, B D; Binney, S E

    1995-12-01

    Operating experience with thermoluminescent dosimeters used in a boron neutron capture therapy research project is reported. In particular, certain facets of the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters for gamma ray dose measurements in the presence of a high thermal neutron fluence are discussed, including a comparison of TLD-400 and TLD-700 for gamma ray dosimetry, annealing procedures, and the effects of neutrons (56Mn activation) on TLD-400. The TLD-400 were observed to have a thermal neutron sensitivity (due to 56Mn beta decay) of 1.5 x 10(-13) Gy per n cm-2. An algorithm was developed to correct for the 56Mn beta decay thermal neutron-induced effects on TLD-400 by using a two-stage thermoluminescent readout for the thermoluminescent dosimeter chips. PMID:7493815

  10. Low-level measuring techniques for neutrons: High accuracy neutron source strength determination and fluence rate measurement at an underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbal, Andreas; Reginatto, Marcel; Schuhmacher, Helmut; Wiegel, Burkhard; Degering, Detlev; Zuber, Kai

    2013-08-08

    We report on measuring techniques for neutrons that have been developed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German National Metrology Institute. PTB has characterized radioactive sources used in the BOREXINO and XENON100 experiments. For the BOREXINO experiment, a {sup 228}Th gamma radiation source was required which would not emit more than 10 neutrons per second. The determination of the neutron emission rate of this specially designed {sup 228}Th source was challenging due to the low neutron emission rate and because the ratio of neutron to gamma radiation was expected to be extremely low, of the order of 10{sup −6}. For the XENON100 detector, PTB carried out a high accuracy measurement of the neutron emission rate of an AmBe source. PTB has also done measurements in underground laboratories. A two month measurement campaign with a set of {sup 3}He-filled proportional counters was carried out in PTB's former UDO underground laboratory at the Asse salt mine. The aim of the campaign was to determine the intrinsic background of detectors, which is needed for the analysis of data taken in lowintensity neutron fields. At a later time, PTB did a preliminary measurement of the neutron fluence rate at the underground laboratory Felsenkeller operated by VKTA. By taking into account data from UDO, Felsenkeller, and detector calibrations made at the PTB facility, it was possible to estimate the neutron fluence rate at the Felsenkeller underground laboratory.

  11. Annealing studies of silicon microstrip detectors irradiated at high neutron fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñano, M.; Balbuena, J. P.; García, C.; González, S.; Lacasta, C.; Lacuesta, V.; Lozano, M.; Martí i Garcia, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.

    2008-06-01

    Silicon p-type detectors are being investigated for the development of radiation-tolerant detectors for the luminosity upgrade of the CERN large hadron collider (Super-LHC (sLHC)). Microstrip detectors have been fabricated by CNM-IMB with an n-side read-out on p-type high-resistivity float zone substrates. They have been irradiated with neutrons at the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor in Ljubljana. The irradiation fluxes match with the expected doses for the inner tracker at the sLHC (up to 10 16 equivalent 1 MeV neutrons cm -2). The macroscopic properties of the irradiated prototypes after irradiation were characterized at the IFIC-Valencia laboratory. The charge collection studies were carried out by means of a radioactive source setup as well as by an infrared laser illumination. The annealing behavior was studied in detail on a microstrip detector irradiated with a flux of 10 15 equivalent 1 MeV neutrons cm -2. Collected charge measurements were made after accelerated annealing times at 80 °C up to an equivalent annealing time of several years at room temperature. This note reports on the recorded results from the annealing of the irradiated p-type microstrip sensor.

  12. Determination of uranium and thorium in semiconductor memory materials by high fluence neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Northcutt, K.J.; Scott, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and thorium were measured by absolute neutron activation analysis in high-purity materials used to manufacture semiconductor memories. The main thrust of the study concerned aluminum and aluminum alloys used as sources for thin film preparation, evaporated metal films, and samples from the Czochralski silicon crystal process. Average levels of U and Th were found for the source alloys to be approx. 65 and approx. 45 ppB, respectively. Levels of U and Th in silicon samples fell in the range of a few parts per trillion. Evaporated metal films contained about 1 ppB U and Th, but there is some question about these results due to the possibility of contamination.

  13. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10/sup 23/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650/sup 0/C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys.

  14. Radiation hardening of V C, V O, V N alloys neutron-irradiated to high fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuto, Toshinori; Satou, Manabu; Abe, Katsunori

    1998-10-01

    Vanadium has a large affinity for interstitial impurities such as C, N and O. Mechanical properties and irradiation performance of vanadium alloys are affected by the impurities. Radiation hardening and defect microstructures of vanadium alloys doped with relatively large amounts of these interstitial elements were studied. Neutron irradiation was conducted in the Materials Open Test Assembly of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF/MOTA-1F) to 47.9 dpa at temperatures of 679, 793 and 873 K. Irradiation hardening decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Increase in hardness for the V-C alloy was relatively greater after irradiation at the low temperatures. Decorated dislocations and voids were observed depending on the alloying elements. The factors for irradiation hardening were different for each interstitial element in the alloys irradiated at 873 K to 47.9 dpa.

  15. Response of dynamically compacted tungsten to high fluence neutron irradiation at 423?600$deg;C in FFTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megusar, J.; Garner, F. A.

    1998-10-01

    When pure tungsten produced by dynamic compaction at 95.3% theoretical density was irradiated in FFTF at temperatures of 423-600°C and neutron doses as high as 14.4 × 10 22 n cm -2 ( E > 0.1 MeV), it densified 2-3% and became very brittle. The brittle behavior resulted in failure at grain surfaces and appears not to be related to neutron-induced transmutation or segregation of transmutants. Based on density change measurements, it can be concluded that significant cavity formation did not occur at these high neutron exposures.

  16. Neutron fluence and energy reproducibility of a 2-dollar TRIGA reactor Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Rosara F.; Drader, Jessica A.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hines, Corey C.; Metz, Lori A.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; King, Matthew D.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Smith, Jeremy D.; Wall, Donald E.

    2009-10-01

    Washington State University’s 1 MW TRIGA reactor has a long history of utilization for neutron activation analysis (NAA). TRIGA reactors have the ability to pulse, reach supercritical (k>1) for short bursts of time. At this high power and fast time the energy spectrum and neutron fluence are largely uncharacterized. The pulse neutron energy spectrum and fluence were determined by the activation of Cu, Au, Co, Fe, and Ti. These analyses were completed with and without Cd shielding to determine reproducibility between pulses. The applications and implications of the neutron energy and fluence reproducibility to the use of pulsed NAA will be discussed.

  17. Anisotropy of the neutron fluence from a plasma focus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Shomo, L. P.; Kim, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fluence of neutrons from a plasma focus was measured by gamma spectrometry of an activated silver target. This method results in a significant increase in accuracy over the beta-counting method. Multiple detectors were used in order to measure the anisotropy of the fluence of neutrons. The fluence was found to be concentrated in a cone with a half-angle of 30 deg about the axis, and to drop off rapidly outside of this cone; the anisotropy was found to depend upon the total yield of neutrons. This dependence was strongest on the axis. Neither the axial concentration of the fluence of neutrons nor its dependence on the total yield of neutrons is explained by any of the currently proposed models. Some other explanations, including the possibility of an axially distributed source, are considered.

  18. Neutron detector simultaneously measures fluence and dose equivalent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, R. F.; Dyer, N. C.

    1967-01-01

    Neutron detector acts as both an area monitoring instrument and a criticality dosimeter by simultaneously measuring dose equivalent and fluence. The fluence is determined by activation of six foils one inch below the surface of the moderator. Dose equivalent is determined from activation of three interlocked foils at the center of the moderator.

  19. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klupák, Vít; Viererbl, Ladislav; Lahodová, Zdena; Šoltés, Jaroslav; Tomandl, Ivo; Kudějová, Petra

    2016-02-01

    Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  20. The effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on the properties of a fine-grained isotropic nuclear graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, S.; Burchell, T. D.; Strizak, J. P.; Eto, M.

    1996-05-01

    A fine-grained isotropic nuclear graphite (IG-110), manufactured from a petroleum coke, was irradiated to a total neutron dose of 3.8 × 10 26 n/m 2 or 25 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600°C in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge: National Laboratory (ORNL). The effect of irradiation and the influence of post-irradiation thermal annealing on the properties of the graphite were evaluated. Volume change turnaround was clearly observed at 15—20 dpa and the return to original volume ( {ΔV}/{V 0} = 0 ) can be estimated to occur at ˜ 30 dpa. Strength and elastic moduli of the irradiated graphite increased by a factor of 2-3, and maximums in the {δ}/{δ 0}, and {E}/{E o} curves were at ˜20 dpa at 600°C. Recovery of volume, fracture strength and thermal conductivity by thermal annealing were found., and thermal conductivity returned to better than about 30% of the unirradiated value after 1200°C thermal annealing.

  1. Determination of mixed proton/neutron fluences in the LANSCE irradiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.; Fowler, M.M.; Corzine, K.

    1998-12-31

    In support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program, several materials were exposed to a high-energy proton and spallation neutron environments. Large differences in mechanical property changes in this environment are expected compared to the typical fusion or fission systems. To make proper dose correlations, it is important to accurately quantify the fluences. Activation foils consisting of a stack of disks of Co, Ni, Fe, Al, Nb and Cu were irradiated concurrent with mechanical testing samples in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility. The irradiation consisted of an 800 MeV, 1 mA proton beam and a W target in the beam provided a source of spallation neutrons. The maximum proton fluence was around 3 {times} 10{sup 21} p/cm{sup 2} and the maximum neutron fluence approximately 3 {times} 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. After irradiation, the foils were withdrawn and the radioactive isotopes analyzed using gamma spectroscopy. From initial estimates for the fluences and spectra derived from the Los Alamos High-Energy Transport (LAHET) Code System (LCS), comparisons to the measured levels of activation products were made. The Na-22 activation products in the Al foils were measured from different regions of the target in order to profile the spatial levels of the fluences. These tests gave empirical confirmation of the proton and neutron fluences of the irradiated samples throughout the target region.

  2. Sensitivity Analysis and Neutron Fluence Adjustment for VVER-1000 Rpv

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, S.; Ilieva, Kr.; Kirilova, D.

    2003-06-01

    Adjustment of the neutron fluence at the VVER-1000 RPV inner wall has been carried out. For the purpose of this adjustment the neutron flux response sensitivity to the main parameters of calculation uncertainty has been calculated. The obtained sensitivities, the parameters uncertainty and activity measurement data of iron, copper and niobium detectors positioned behind the RPV of Kozloduy NPP Unit 5 have been used in this adjustment.

  3. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  4. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and fetus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Meyerhof, Dorothy; Vlahovich, Slavica

    2004-01-01

    A problem of concern in radiation protection is the exposure of pregnant women to ionising radiation, because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. External neutron exposure is of concern when pregnant women travel by aeroplane. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications and International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study undertakes Monte Carlo calculations to determine the mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A new set of mathematical models for the embryo and fetus has been developed at Health Canada and is used together with mathematical phantoms of a pregnant female developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Monoenergetic neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV are considered in this study. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO) geometries. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated; for the embryo at 8 weeks and the fetus at 3, 6 or 9 months. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four age groups. Neutron fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given for the AP irradiations which yield the highest radiation dose to the fetal body in the neutron energy range considered here. The results indicate that for neutrons <10 MeV more protection should be given to pregnant women in the first trimester due to the higher absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence to the fetus. PMID:15353732

  5. Absolute Neutron Fluence Measurements at the NIST Center for Neutron Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, A.; Dewey, M.; Gilliam, D.; Nico, J.; Anderson, E.; Snow, M.; Greene, G.; Laptev, A.

    2015-10-01

    Precise, absolute fluence measurements of cold and thermal neutron beams are of primary importance to beam-type determinations of the neutron lifetime, measurements of standard neutron cross sections, and the development of standards for neutron dosimetry. At the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), a totally absorbing neutron detector based on absolute counting of the 10B(n,α1)7Li reaction 478 keV gamma ray has been used to perform fluence measurements with a precision of 0.06%. This detector has been used to improve the neutron fluence determination in the 2000 NIST beam neutron lifetime by a factor of five, significantly reducing the uncertainty in the lifetime result. Ongoing and possible future uses of the Alpha-Gamma device include 1) Calibration of the neutron fluence monitors that will be used in the upcoming NIST beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2; 2) The first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t)4He neutron cross section at sub-thermal neutron energy; 3) Measurements of the 10B(n, γ)11B and 235U(n,f) neutron cross sections; 4) A re-calibration of the national neutron standard NBS-1. The apparatus, measurement technique, and applications will be discussed.

  6. Radial fast-neutron fluence gradients during rotating 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation recorded with metallic fluence monitors and geological age standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutte, Daniel; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Koleška, Michal; Jonckheere, Raymond; Unterricker, Sepp

    2015-01-01

    the neutron-irradiation parameter J is one of the major uncertainties in 40Ar/39Ar dating. The associated uncertainty of the individual J-value for a sample of unknown age depends on the accuracy of the age of the geological standards, the fast-neutron fluence distribution in the reactor, and the distances between standards and samples during irradiation. While it is generally assumed that rotating irradiation evens out radial neutron fluence gradients, we observed axial and radial variations of the J-values in sample irradiations in the rotating channels of two reactors. To quantify them, we included three-dimensionally distributed metallic fast (Ni) and thermal- (Co) neutron fluence monitors in three irradiations and geological age standards in three more. Two irradiations were carried out under Cd shielding in the FRG1 reactor in Geesthacht, Germany, and four without Cd shielding in the LVR-15 reactor in Řež, Czech Republic. The 58Ni(nf,p)58Co activation reaction and γ-spectrometry of the 811 keV peak associated with the subsequent decay of 58Co to 58Fe allow one to calculate the fast-neutron fluence. The fast-neutron fluences at known positions in the irradiation container correlate with the J-values determined by mass-spectrometric 40Ar/39Ar measurements of the geological age standards. Radial neutron fluence gradients are up to 1.8 %/cm in FRG1 and up to 2.2 %/cm in LVR-15; the corresponding axial gradients are up to 5.9 and 2.1 %/cm. We conclude that sample rotation might not always suffice to meet the needs of high-precision dating and gradient monitoring can be crucial.

  7. Neutron fluences and dose equivalents measured with passive detectors on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron fluences were measured on LDEF in the low energy (< 1 MeV) and high energy (> 1 MeV) ranges. The low energy detectors used the 6Li(n,alpha)T reaction with Gd foil absorbers to separate thermal (< 0.2 eV) and resonance (0.2 eV-1 MeV) neutron response. High energy detectors contained sets of fission foils (181Ta, 209Bi, 232Th, 238U) with different neutron energy thresholds. The measured neutron fluences together with predicted spectral shapes were used to estimate neutron dose equivalents. The detectors were located in the A0015 and P0006 experiments at the west and Earth sides of LDEF under shielding varying from 1 to 19 g/cm2. Dose equivalent rates varied from 0.8 to 3.3 microSv/d for the low energy neutrons and from 160 to 390 microSv/d for the high energy neutrons. This compares with TLD measured absorbed dose rates in the range of 1000-3000 microGy/d near these locations and demonstrates that high energy neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total dose equivalent in LEO. Comparisons between measurements and calculations were made for high energy neutrons based on fission fragment tracks generated by fission foils at different shielding depths. A simple 1-D slab geometry was used in the calculations. Agreement between measurements and calculations depended on both shielding depth and threshold energy of the fission foils. Differences increased as both shielding and threshold energy increased. The modeled proton/neutron spectra appeared deficient at high energies. A 3-D model of the experiments is needed to help resolve the differences.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent for use in shielding a proton therapy vault

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Newhauser, Wayne; Klein, Eric; Low, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Neutron production is of principal concern when designing proton therapy vault shielding. Conventionally, neutron calculations are based on analytical methods, which do not accurately consider beam shaping components and nozzle shielding. The goal of this study was to calculate, using Monte Carlo modeling, the neutron spectral fluence and neutron dose equivalent generated by a realistic proton therapy nozzle and evaluate how these data could be used in shielding calculations. We modeled a contemporary passive scattering proton therapy nozzle in detail with the MCNPX simulation code. The neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent at various locations in the treatment room were calculated and compared to those obtained from a thick iron target bombarded by parallel proton beams, the simplified geometry on which analytical methods are based. The neutron spectral fluence distributions were similar for both methods, with deeply penetrating high-energy neutrons (E > 10 MeV) being most prevalent along the beam central axis, and low-energy neutrons predominating the neutron spectral fluence in the lateral region. However, unlike the inverse square falloff used in conventional analytical methods, this study shows that the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose in the treatment room decreased with distance approximately following a power law, with an exponent of about −1.63 in the lateral region and −1.73 in the downstream region. Based on the simulated data according to the detailed nozzle modeling, we developed an empirical equation to estimate the neutron dose equivalent at any location and distance in the treatment vault, e.g. for cases in which detailed Monte Carlo modeling is not feasible. We applied the simulated neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent to a shielding calculation as an example. PMID:19887713

  9. Neutron fluence vessel assessment in the 1300 MWe NPP French fleet: the FLUOLE program in EOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise, P.; Thiollay, N.; Fougeras, P.; Destouches, C.; Beretz, D.; Pont, T.; Garnier, D.

    2006-07-01

    The Vessel Neutron fluence assessment is a key parameter for vessel embrittlement determination and plant lifetime estimation To validate this parameters, the CEA and its Industrial Partner EdF have decided to launch a devoted experimental program in the EOLE facility of the Cadarache Research Centre The aim of this proposed FLUOLE experimental program (acronym of Fluence in EOLE) is to provide the most accurate neutron propagation measurements in representative PWR neutron spectrum material and geometry in order to enable a reduction of uncertainties on calculated vessel fluence with Monte-Carlo codes such as MCNP or TRIPOLI. (authors)

  10. Effect of neutron energy and fluence on deuterium retention behaviour in neutron irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hiroe; Yuyama, Kenta; Li, Xiaochun; Hatano, Yuji; Toyama, Takeshi; Ohta, Masayuki; Ochiai, Kentaro; Yoshida, Naoaki; Chikada, Takumi; Oya, Yasuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium (D) retention behaviours for 14 MeV neutron irradiated tungsten (W) and fission neutron irradiated W were evaluated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) to elucidate the correlation between D retention and defect formation by different energy distributions of neutrons in W at the initial stage of fusion reactor operation. These results were compared with that for Fe2+ irradiated W with various damage concentrations. Although dense vacancies and voids within the shallow region near the surface were introduced by Fe2+ irradiation, single vacancies with low concentration were distributed throughout the sample for 14 MeV neutron irradiated W. Only the dislocation loops were introduced by fission neutron irradiation at low neutron fluence. The desorption peak of D for fission neutron irradiated W was concentrated at low temperature region less than 550 K, but that for 14 MeV neutron irradiated W was extended toward the higher temperature side due to D trapping by vacancies. It can be said that the neutron energy distribution could have a large impact on irradiation defect formation and the D retention behaviour.

  11. Reference Materials for Reactor Neutron Fluence Rate and Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingelbrecht, C.

    2003-06-01

    Certified reference materials are distributed by the European Commission through the BCR® programme (over 500 CRMs) including a series of activation and fission monitor materials originally proposed by the Euratom Working Group on Reactor Dosimetry. The current range (18 CRMs) includes materials to cover the complete energy spectrum, and suitable for different irradiation times. Fission monitors are 238UO2 or 237NpO2 in the form of microspheres. Activation monitors are high purity metals (Ni, Cu, Al, Fe, Nb, Rh, or Ti), certified for interfering trace impurities, or dilute aluminium-based alloys. Reference materials newly certified are IRMM-530R A1-0.1%Au, replacing the exhausted IRMM-530 material, used as comparator for k0- standardisation, and three new Al-Co alloys (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0%Co). Others in the process of certification are A1-0.1%Ag and A1-2%Sc for thermal and epithermal fluence rate measurements and two uranium-doped glass materials intended for dosimetry by the fission-track technique. Various alloy compositions have been prepared for use as melt-wire temperature monitors with melting points ranging from 198 to 327ºC.

  12. A Technique for Determining Neutron Beam Fluence to 0.01% Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, A. T.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Nico, J. S.; Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Snow, W. M.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    2014-01-01

    The achievable uncertainty in neutron lifetime measurements using the beam technique has been limited by the uncertainty in the determination of the neutron density in the decay volume. In the Sussex-ILL-NIST series of beam lifetime experiments, the density was determined with a neutron fluence mon itor that detected the charged particle products from neutron absorption in a thin layer of 6Li or lOB. In each of the experiments, the absolute detection efficiency of the neutron monitor was determined from the measured density of the neutron absorber, the thermal neutron cross section for the absorbing ma terial, and the solid angle of the charged particle detectors. The efficiency of the neutron monitor used in the most recent beam lifetime experiment has since been measured directly by operating it on a monochromatic neutron beam in which the total neutron rate is determined with a totally absorbing neutron detector. The absolute nature of this technique does not rely on any knowl edge of neutron absorption cross sections or a measurement of the density of the neutron absorbing deposit. This technique has been used to measure the neutron monitor efficiency to 0.06% uncertainty. VVe show that a new monitor and absolute neutron detector employing the same technique would be capable of achieving determining neutron fluence to an uncertainty of 0.01%.

  13. Heat-to-heat variability of irradiation creep and swelling of HT9 irradiated to high neutron fluence at 400-600{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation creep data on ferritic/martensitic steels are difficult and expensive to obtain, and are not available for fusion-relevant neutron spectra and displacement rates. Therefore, an extensive creep data rescue and analysis effort is in progress to characterize irradiation creep of ferritic/martensitic alloys in other reactors and to develop a methodology for applying it to fusion applications. In the current study, four tube sets constructed from three nominally similar heats of HT9 subjected to one of two heat treatments were constructed as helium-pressurized creep tubes and irradiated in FFTF-MOTA at four temperatures between 400 and 600{degrees}C. Each of the four heats exhibited a different stress-free swelling behavior at 400{degrees}C, with the creep rate following the swelling according to the familiar B{sub o} + DS creep law. No stress-free swelling was observed at the other three irradiation temperatures. Using a stress exponent of n = 1.0 as the defining criterion, {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} irradiation creep was found at all temperatures, but, only over limited stress ranges that decreased with increasing temperature. The creep coefficient B{sub o} is a little lower ({approx}50%) than that observed for austenitic steel, but the swelling-creep coupling coefficient D is comparable to that of austenitic steels. Primary transient creep behavior was also observed at all temperatures except 400{degrees}C, and thermal creep behavior was found to dominate the deformation at high stress levels at 550 and 600{degrees}C.

  14. Accelerator-based Neutron Fluence Standard of the National Metrology Institute of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harano, Hideki; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Nishiyama, Jun; Uritani, Akira; Kudo, Katsuhisa

    2009-03-01

    We report the present status of the national standard on accelerator-based fast neutron fluences in Japan. Monoenergetic neutron fluence standards have been established at 144 keV, 565 keV, 5.0 MeV and 8.0 MeV by using a Van de Graaff accelerator and at 2.5 MeV and 14.8 MeV by using a Cockcroft Walton accelerator. These standards are prepared to measure the detection efficiency and the energy response of neutron sensitive devices, such as personal dosimeters and survey meters. Neutron production and absolute fluence measurement for these energies are described. We are developing a new standard in the energy region of a few tens of keV, which is also introduced here as well as our future plans.

  15. DS02 fluence spectra for neutrons and gamma rays at Hiroshima and Nagasaki with fluence-to-kerma coefficients and transmission factors for sample measurements.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D; Cullings, Harry M

    2007-11-01

    Fluence spectra at several ground distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are provided along with associated fluence-to-kerma coefficients from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). Also included are transmission factors for calculating expected responses of in situ sample measurements of neutron activation products such as (32)P,(36)Cl,(39)Ar,(41)Ca, (60)Co,(63)Ni,(152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The free-in-air (FIA) fluences calculated in 2002 are available for 240 angles, 69 energy groups, 101 ground distances, 5 heights, 4 radiation source components, 2 cities. The DS02 code uses these fluences partitioned to a prompt and delayed portion, collapsed to 58 energy groups and restricted to 97 ground distances. This is because the fluence spectra were required to be in the same format that was used in the older Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) computer code, of which the DS02 computer code is a modification. The 2002 calculation fluences and the collapsed DS02 code fluences are presented and briefly discussed. A report on DS02, which is available on the website at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, provides tables and figures of the A-bomb neutron and gamma-ray output used as the sources in the 2002 radiation transport calculations. While figures illustrating the fluence spectra at several ground ranges are presented in the DS02 Report, it does not include any tables of the calculated fluence spectra in the DS02 report. This paper provides, at several standard distances from the hypocenter, the numerical information which is required to translate the FIA neutron fluences given in DS02 to a neutron activation measurement or neutron and gamma-ray soft-tissue dose. PMID:17643260

  16. Fission foil measurements of neutron and proton fluences in the A0015 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1995-01-01

    Results are given from sets of fission foil detectors (FFD's) (Ta-181, Bi-209, Th-232, U-238) which were included in the A0015 experiment to measure combined proton/neutron fluences. Use has been made of recent FFD high energy proton calibrations for improved accuracy of response. Comparisons of track density measurements have been made with the predictions of environmental modeling based on simple 1-D (slab) geometry. At 1 g/cm(exp 2) (trailing edge) the calculations were approximately 25 percent lower than measurements; at 13 g/cm(exp 2) (Earthside) calculations were more than a factor of 2 lower. A future 3-D modeling of the experiment is needed for a more meaningful comparison. Approximate mission proton doses and neutron dose equivalents were found. At Earthside (13 g/cm(exp 2) the dose was 171 rad and dose equivalent was 82 rem. At the trailing edge (1 g/cm(exp 2) dose was 315 rad and dose equivalent was 33 rem. The proton doses are less than expected from TLD doses by 16 percent and 37 percent, respectively. These differences can be explained by uncertainties in the proton and neutron spectra and in the method used to separate proton and neutron contributions to the measurements.

  17. Absolute neutron fluence measurements between 0.5 and 3MeV and their intercomparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. W.; Guung, T. C.; Pei, C. C.; Yang, T. N.; Hwang, W. S.; Thomas, D. J.

    1999-02-01

    Primary standards of monoenergetic neutron fluences for 0.565, 1.5 and 2.5MeV neutrons produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction have been developed for the calibration of neutron dosimeters and spectrometers. The fluences for 0.565MeV neutrons were measured using both H2 and CH4 proton recoil proportional counters with the measured spectra fitted to the modified SPEC-4 Monte Carlo simulations for the subtraction of gamma and recoil carbons. The fluences for 1.5 and 2.5MeV neutrons were determined with vacuum-type proton recoil telescopes. Various uncertainties for each detector are analyzed and its overall uncertainty is 3.1% for gas counter and less than 3% for the telescope. These neutron fluence standards have been intercompared with those of the National Physical Laboratory of the United Kingdom by the use of two transfer instruments: a long counter and a 3He detector. The comparison results will be presented and discussed.

  18. A Multigroup Method for the Calculation of Neutron Fluence with a Source Term

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.; Clowdsley, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Current research on the Grant involves the development of a multigroup method for the calculation of low energy evaporation neutron fluences associated with the Boltzmann equation. This research will enable one to predict radiation exposure under a variety of circumstances. Knowledge of radiation exposure in a free-space environment is a necessity for space travel, high altitude space planes and satellite design. This is because certain radiation environments can cause damage to biological and electronic systems involving both short term and long term effects. By having apriori knowledge of the environment one can use prediction techniques to estimate radiation damage to such systems. Appropriate shielding can be designed to protect both humans and electronic systems that are exposed to a known radiation environment. This is the goal of the current research efforts involving the multi-group method and the Green's function approach.

  19. A Method to Estimate the Fast-Neutron Fluence for the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Tokushi; Imamura, Mineo; Shibata, Seiichi; Uwamino, Yoshitomo; Ohkubo, Tohru; Satoh, Shinngo; Nogawa, Norio; Hasai, Hiromi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hoshi, Masaharu; Oka, Takamitsu

    1994-10-01

    A new method to estimate the fast-neutron fluence of the Hiroshima atomic bomb is proposed. 63Ni produced by the 63Cu(n, p)63Ni reaction provides a unique measure by which to estimate the fast-neutron fluence of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki atomic bombs, because the half-life of 63Ni is 100 years and 70% of the 63Ni produced in a copper piece presently exists after 50 years. Using the neutron spectrum given in DS86 and the estimated cross section, we found that a piece of copper of about 10 g which was exposed at a point around 100 m from the hypocenter gives a measurable amount of 63Ni using a low-background liquid scintillation counter. For the measurement of 63Ni, accelerator mass spectrometry also seems to be applicable.

  20. Neutron fluence rate measurements in a PGNAA 208-liter drum assay system using silicon carbide detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulloo, A. R.; Ruddy, F. H.; Seidel, J. G.; Lee, S.; Petrović, B.; McIlwain, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    Pulsed prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is being implemented for the nondestructive assay (NDA) of mercury, cadmium and lead in containers of radioactive waste. A PGNAA prototype system capable of assaying 208-liter (55-gallon) drums has already been built and demonstrated. As part of the evaluation of this system, the thermal neutron fluence rate distribution in a drum containing a combustible waste surrogate was measured during PGNAA runs using a silicon carbide neutron detector. The fast charge-collection time of this detector type enabled the investigation of the neutron kinetics at various locations within the matrix during and between pulses of the system's 14-MeV neutron source. As expected, the response of a SiC detector equipped with a lithium-6 fluoride layer is dominated by thermal neutron-induced events between pulses. The measurement results showed that the thermal neutron fluence rate is relatively uniform over a radial depth of several centimeters in the matrix region that contributes a significant fraction of the prompt gamma radiation incident on the system's photon detector.

  1. Nodal weighting factor method for ex-core fast neutron fluence evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, R. T.

    2012-07-01

    The nodal weighting factor method is developed for evaluating ex-core fast neutron flux in a nuclear reactor by utilizing adjoint neutron flux, a fictitious unit detector cross section for neutron energy above 1 or 0.1 MeV, the unit fission source, and relative assembly nodal powers. The method determines each nodal weighting factor for ex-core neutron fast flux evaluation by solving the steady-state adjoint neutron transport equation with a fictitious unit detector cross section for neutron energy above 1 or 0.1 MeV as the adjoint source, by integrating the unit fission source with a typical fission spectrum to the solved adjoint flux over all energies, all angles and given nodal volume, and by dividing it with the sum of all nodal weighting factors, which is a normalization factor. Then, the fast neutron flux can be obtained by summing the various relative nodal powers times the corresponding nodal weighting factors of the adjacent significantly contributed peripheral assembly nodes and times a proper fast neutron attenuation coefficient over an operating period. A generic set of nodal weighting factors can be used to evaluate neutron fluence at the same location for similar core design and fuel cycles, but the set of nodal weighting factors needs to be re-calibrated for a transition-fuel-cycle. This newly developed nodal weighting factor method should be a useful and simplified tool for evaluating fast neutron fluence at selected locations of interest in ex-core components of contemporary nuclear power reactors. (authors)

  2. Analysis and comparison of monoenergetic fast neutron fluence determination using 238U samples at different positions with respect to the neutron source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guohui; Liu, Xiang; Gao, Zhiqi; Wu, Hao; Liu, Jiaming

    2012-05-01

    Using two (238)U samples placed in a gridded ionization chamber and a parallel-plate fission chamber, fluence of monoenergetic fast neutrons was determined. Four runs of measurements were performed. Analysis showed that although the neutron fluences for the two (238)U samples differ by 20-33 times in the present work, the fluences at the position of the sample in the gridded ionization chamber determined by the two ways are in agreement within experimental uncertainties. PMID:22398325

  3. Effects of low fluence neutron bombardment on material properties of aluminum 2024 t-3 and aluminum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Jesse Lee

    The purpose of this work was to explore the impact of neutron irradiation (1018 n/m2 to 1021 n/m 2) on the aluminum alloy 2024 T-3, and several corrosion resistant treatments commonly used. The irradiation was conducted in the Utah Nuclear Engineering Programs Reactor facility using the Fast Neutron Irradiation Facility (FNIF) with a 1 MeV equivalent beam and the Center Irradiator (CI) with average neutron energy of 0.58 MeV. Historically, materials tests have focused on mechanical failures occurring at very high fluence. These same tests have generally been conducted for pure materials: the limited research existing for alloyed materials focuses on power plant materials such as zircaloy and steel. This body of information is mainly used to avoid catastrophic performance failures. Small research and test reactors operating at low power will subject core materials to fluence from 1014 n/m2 to 1024 n/m2. Aluminum alloys are very common in these systems. Materials used in research reactors, such as aluminum, have been deemed adequate due to high radiation tolerance and low mechanical failure rates. While aluminum and its alloys are a well-defined set of materials in nonradiation environments, there are very little published data for them for low fluence neutron radiation. This work measured Al 2024's (T-3) thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, oxide layer thickness, oxide/metal interface and corrosion resistance (using passive current density) for Alodine, Anodize type II, Anodize type III and native oxide. These measurements were taken before and after irradiation and results were examined. Over the course of 30 to 50 years, property changes will likely impact thermal diffusion, corrosion properties and electrical properties. Defining these changes may give future engineers the tools needed to safely justify life extensions and build inspection methods to identify pre-failure conditions.

  4. Measurements of gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in phantoms exposed to a BNCT epithermal beam with TLD-700.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Magni, D; Regazzoni, V; Borroni, M; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Burian, J; Marek, M; Klupak, V; Viererbl, L

    2014-10-01

    Gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in a phantom exposed to an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be measured by means of a single thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD-700). The method exploits the shape of the glow curve (GC) and requires the gamma-calibration GC (to obtain gamma dose) and the thermal-neutron-calibration GC (to obtain neutron fluence). The method is applicable for BNCT dosimetry in case of epithermal neutron beams from a reactor because, in most irradiation configurations, thermal neutrons give a not negligible contribution to the TLD-700 GC. The thermal neutron calibration is not simple, because of the impossibility of having thermal neutron fields without gamma contamination, but a calibration method is here proposed, strictly bound to the method itself of dose separation. PMID:24435913

  5. Lifetime Neutron Fluence Analysis of the Ringhals Unit 1 Boiling Water Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulesza, Joel A.; Roudén, Jenny; Green, Eva-Lena

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a neutron fluence assessment considering the entire commercial operating history (35 cycles or ˜ 25 effective full power years) of the Ringhals Unit 1 reactor pressure vessel beltline region. In this assessment, neutron (E >1.0 MeV) fluence and iron atom displacement distributions were calculated on the moderator tank and reactor pressure vessel structures. To validate those calculations, five in-vessel surveillance chain dosimetry sets were evaluated as well as material samples taken from the upper core grid and wide range neutron monitor tubes to act as a form of retrospective dosimetry. During the analysis, it was recognized that delays in characterizing the retrospective dosimetry samples reduced the amount of reactions available to be counted and complicated the material composition determination. However, the comparisons between the surveillance chain dosimetry measurements (M) and calculated (C) results show similar and consistent results with the linear average M/C ratio of 1.13 which is in good agreement with the resultant least squares best estimate (BE)/C ratios of 1.10 for both neutron (E >1.0 MeV) flux and iron atom displacement rate.

  6. Dopant distribution in high fluence Fe implanted GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Jensen, J.; Hallen, A.; Aggerstam, T.

    2008-09-01

    Undoped wurtzite GaN epilayers implanted at room temperature with 50-325 keV Fe{sup +} ions in the fluence range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} are studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis. The results show an enhanced Fe concentration close to the surface for high ion fluences (>1x10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}), which increases with the ion fluence. Annealing at 800 deg. C for 30 min has a negligible effect on the Fe distribution in the material bulk, but further increases the Fe concentration near the surface. Our findings can be understood by radiation enhanced diffusion during ion implantation and an increased Fe diffusivity in the near surface region with distorted stoichiometry, or formation of secondary phases and precipitates for the highest doses. The simulation shows that, if enhanced diffusion is the reason for Fe buildup at the surface, both radiation enhanced diffusion and the thermal diffusion of Fe atoms near the surface, need to be at least five times larger than ordinary bulk diffusion to explain the increased Fe surface concentration.

  7. Use of glazes on porcelain from near ground zero to measure Hiroshima neutron fluence.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, J; Fleischer, R L; Fujita, S; Hoshi, M

    2003-10-01

    Several porcelain samples from almost directly beneath the atomic explosion at Hiroshima on 6 August 1945, have been scanned for induced fission tracks, produced mostly by the thermal neutrons from the bomb due to interactions with trace uranium in their glass coatings. The ability to use porcelain opens a new and abundant material for retrospective dosimetry. Four different samples had thermal neutron fluences in 1945 of 1.0, 3.8, 4.1, and 8.9 x 10(12) cm(-2). The different values are not caused by track fading, but are likely to result from differing shielding at different nearby positions. Assuming that the three highest fluences, which have overlapping uncertainties, are at locations of minimum shielding, the statistically weighted thermal fluence in the air at ground level and ground zero was 4.8 x 10(12) cm(-2) with a statistical uncertainty of 15%. This value lies between the calculated value of 6.5 x 10(12) given in DS86 and the 3.7 x 10(12) inferred from induced radionuclides by Hoshi et al. (1998). PMID:13678283

  8. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Smith, G.W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M.C.

    1991-12-01

    The capability to measure bursts of neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes directly with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras while being able to distinguish between the video signals produced by these two types of radiation, even when they occur simultaneously, has been demonstrated. Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCDs) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (4--12 MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate {approx}.05 V/rad responsivity with {ge}1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or ``peaks`` binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} range indicate smearing over {approx}1 to 10% of CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels.

  9. Neutron Fluences and Radiation Damage Parameters for the HFIR-MFE-RB-17J Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Glasgow, David C.; Baldwin, Charles A.

    2010-08-23

    The HFIR-MFE-RB-17J experiment was conducted in the removable beryllium (RB) position of HFIR with a Eu2O2 shield. The irradiation was conducted from April 27, 2004, to May 18, 2005. The total exposure was for 353.6 FPD (full power days). Reactor dosimetry capsules were analyzed and the activation data were used to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluences and radiation damage parameters as a function of height relative to midplane of the reactor.

  10. Hiroshima neutron fluence on a glass button from near ground zero.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, R L; Fujita, S; Hoshi, M

    2001-12-01

    A decorative glass button that was uncovered at a location that is 190 +/- 15 m from directly beneath the atomic explosion at Hiroshima on 6 August 1945 has been scanned for induced fission tracks produced mostly by the thermal neutrons from the bomb due to interactions with the trace uranium that is normally present in silicate glasses. In surveying 4.14 cm2 at 500x magnification, 28 tracks were seen. From a calibration irradiation in a nuclear reactor we infer that the neutron fluence in 1945 was 5.7(+/-1.1) x 10(11) cm(-2); and, allowing for shielding by the structure in which the button was probably located, the free-air (i.e., outside) value is estimated as 1.5(+/-0.5) x 10(12) cm(-2). A limit has been placed on possible fading of the radiation-damage tracks that could increase the fluence by at most a factor of 1.27. The values bracket the calculated value of 9 x 10(11) given in DS86 but are higher than the 3.6 x 10(11) inferred from induced radionuclides for the distance given. The difference is, however, within the observed variability of the two types of results. PMID:11725892

  11. Advanced Models of LWR Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for Low Flux-HighFluence Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2013-06-17

    Neutron embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is an unresolved issue for light water reactor life extension, especially since transition temperature shifts (TTS) must be predicted for high 80-year fluence levels up to approximately 1,020 n/cm{sup 2}, far beyond the current surveillance database. Unfortunately, TTS may accelerate at high fluence, and may be further amplified by the formation of late blooming phases that result in severe embrittlement even in low-copper (Cu) steels. Embrittlement by this mechanism is a potentially significant degradation phenomenon that is not predicted by current regulatory models. This project will focus on accurately predicting transition temperature shifts at high fluence using advanced physically based, empirically validated and calibrated models. A major challenge is to develop models that can adjust test reactor data to account for flux effects. Since transition temperature shifts depend on synergistic combinations of many variables, flux-effects cannot be treated in isolation. The best current models systematically and significantly under-predict transition temperature at high fluence, although predominantly for irradiations at much higher flux than actual RPV service. This project will integrate surveillance, test reactor and mechanism data with advanced models to address a number of outstanding RPV embrittlement issues. The effort will include developing new databases and preliminary models of flux effects for irradiation conditions ranging from very low (e.g., boiling water reactor) to high (e.g., accelerated test reactor). The team will also develop a database and physical models to help predict the conditions for the formation of Mn-Ni-Si late blooming phases and to guide future efforts to fully resolve this issue. Researchers will carry out other tasks on a best-effort basis, including prediction of transition temperature shift attenuation through the vessel wall, remediation of embrittlement by annealing

  12. Final report on LDRD project 105967 : exploring the increase in GaAs photodiode responsivity with increased neutron fluence.

    SciTech Connect

    Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Cich, Michael Joseph; Wrobel, Theodore Frank; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Fleming, Robert M.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Wrobel, Diana L.

    2008-01-01

    A previous LDRD studying radiation hardened optoelectronic components for space-based applications led to the result that increased neutron irradiation from a fast-burst reactor caused increased responsivity in GaAs photodiodes up to a total fluence of 4.4 x 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (1 MeV Eq., Si). The silicon photodiodes experienced significant degradation. Scientific literature shows that neutrons can both cause defects as well as potentially remove defects in an annealing-like process in GaAs. Though there has been some modeling that suggests how fabrication and radiation-induced defects can migrate to surfaces and interfaces in GaAs and lead to an ordering effect, it is important to consider how these processes affect the performance of devices, such as the basic GaAs p-i-n photodiode. In this LDRD, we manufactured GaAs photodiodes at the MESA facility, irradiated them with electrons and neutrons at the White Sands Missile Range Linac and Fast Burst Reactor, and performed measurements to show the effect of irradiation on dark current, responsivity and high-speed bandwidth.

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program BWR High-Fluence Material Project: Assessment of the Role of High-Fluence on the Efficiency of HWC Mitigation on SCC Crack Growth Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastien Teysseyre

    2014-04-01

    As nuclear power plants age, the increasing neutron fluence experienced by stainless steels components affects the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness. The purpose of this report is to identify any new issues that are expected to rise as boiling water reactor power plants reach the end of their initial life and to propose a path forward to study such issues. It has been identified that the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report summarizes the data available to support this hypothesis and describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. This program plan includes acquisition of irradiated materials, generation of material via irradiation in a test reactor, and description of the test plan. This plan offers three approaches, each with an estimated timetable and budget.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of neutron spectral fluence, radiation weighting factor and ambient dose equivalent for a passively scattered proton therapy unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Fontenot, Jonas; Taddei, Phil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Stray neutron exposures pose a potential risk for the development of secondary cancer in patients receiving proton therapy. However, the behavior of the ambient dose equivalent is not fully understood, including dependences on neutron spectral fluence, radiation weighting factor and proton treatment beam characteristics. The objective of this work, therefore, was to estimate neutron exposures resulting from the use of a passively scattered proton treatment unit. In particular, we studied the characteristics of the neutron spectral fluence, radiation weighting factor and ambient dose equivalent with Monte Carlo simulations. The neutron spectral fluence contained two pronounced peaks, one a low-energy peak with a mode around 1 MeV and one a high-energy peak that ranged from about 10 MeV up to the proton energy. The mean radiation weighting factors varied only slightly, from 8.8 to 10.3, with proton energy and location for a closed-aperture configuration. For unmodulated proton beams stopped in a closed aperture, the ambient dose equivalent from neutrons per therapeutic absorbed dose (H*(10)/D) calculated free-in-air ranged from about 0.3 mSv/Gy for a small scattered field of 100 MeV proton energy to 19 mSv/Gy for a large scattered field of 250 MeV proton energy, revealing strong dependences on proton energy and field size. Comparisons of in-air calculations with in-phantom calculations indicated that the in-air method yielded a conservative estimation of stray neutron radiation exposure for a prostate cancer patient.

  15. Assessment of neutron fluence to organ dose conversion coefficients in the ORNL analytical adult phantom.

    PubMed

    Miri Hakimabad, H; Rafat Motavalli, L; Karimi Shahri, K

    2009-03-01

    Neutron fluence to absorbed dose conversion coefficients have been evaluated for the analytical ORNL modified adult phantom in 21 body organs using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. The calculation used 20 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10(-9)-20 MeV, under four irradiation conditions: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), left-lateral (LLAT) and right-lateral (RLAT). Then the conversion coefficients are compared with the data reported in ICRP publication 74 for mathematical MIRD type phantoms and by Bozkurt et al for the VIPMAN voxel model. Although the ORNL results show fewer differences with the ICRP results than the Bozkurt et al data, one can deduce neither complete agreement nor disparity between this study and other data sets. This comparison shows that in some cases any differences in applied Monte Carlo codes or simulated body models could significantly change the organ dose conversion factors. This sensitivity should be considered for radiological protection programmes. For certain organs, the results of two models with major differences can be in a satisfactory agreement because of the similarity in those organ models. PMID:19225185

  16. High-energy neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Michele Rhea

    2001-12-01

    Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for the radiation protection quantity effective dose were calculated for neutrons, photons and protons with energies up to 2 GeV using the MCNPX code. The calculations were performed using the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory versions of the MIRD-V male and female anthropomorphic phantoms modified to include the skin and esophagus. The latest high-energy neutron evaluated cross-section libraries and the recommendations given in ICRP Publication 60 and ICRP Publication 74 were utilized to perform the calculations. Sets of fluence-to- effective dose conversion coefficients are given for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left-lateral, right-lateral and rotational irradiation geometries. This is the first set of dose conversion coefficients over this energy range calculated for the L-LAT irradiation geometry. A unique set of high-energy neutron depth-dose benchmark experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center/Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE/WNR) complex. The experiments consisted of filtered neutron beams with energies up to 800 MeV impinging on a 30 x 30 x 30 cm3 tissue-equivalent phantom. The absorbed dose was measured in the phantom at various depths with tissue-equivalent ion chambers. The phantom and the experimental set-up were modeled using MCNPX. Comparisons of the experimental and computational depth- dose distributions indicate that the absorbed dose calculated by MCNPX is within 13% for neutrons with energies up to 750 MeV. This experiment will serve as a benchmark experiment for the testing of high-energy radiation transport codes for the international radiation protection community.

  17. Modeling of radiation damage effects in silicon detectors at high fluences HL-LHC with Sentaurus TCAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passeri, D.; Moscatelli, F.; Morozzi, A.; Bilei, G. M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we propose the application of an enhanced radiation damage model based on the introduction of deep level traps/recombination centers suitable for device level numerical simulation of silicon detectors at very high fluences (e.g. 2.0 ×1016 1 MeV equivalent neutrons/cm2). We present the comparison between simulation results and experimental data for p-type substrate structures in different operating conditions (temperature and biasing voltages) for fluences up to 2.2 ×1016 neutrons/cm2. The good agreement between simulation findings and experimental measurements fosters the application of this modeling scheme to the optimization of the next silicon detectors to be used at HL-LHC.

  18. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  19. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  20. The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function

    SciTech Connect

    Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV

  1. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron and. gamma. -ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement and comparisons with measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.; Kolibal, J.G.

    1985-10-01

    Realistic calculations of the neutron and ..gamma..-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement have been carried out with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models. Comparisons with measurements show that the results are well within the experimental uncertainties.

  2. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, M J; Séguin, F H; Waugh, C J; Rinderknecht, H G; Orozco, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Sio, H; Zylstra, A B; Sinenian, N; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Stoeckl, C; Hohenberger, M; Sangster, T C; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Bionta, R M; Landen, O L; Zacharias, R A; Kim, Y; Herrmann, H W; Kilkenny, J D

    2014-04-01

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ∼0.5-8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7-4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 × 10(6) cm(-2). A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ∼50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount. PMID:24784597

  3. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-04-14

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, the overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5h etch in 6N NaOH at 80°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 ×106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  4. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; et al

    2014-04-14

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, the overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5h etch in 6N NaOH at 80°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detectionmore » of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 ×106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.« less

  5. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients from monoenergetic neutrons below 20 MeV based on the VIP-Man anatomical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, A.; Chao, T. C.; Xu, X. G.; Bozkurt, A.; Chao, T. C.

    2000-10-01

    A new set of fluence-to-absorbed dose and fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for neutrons below 20 MeV using a whole-body anatomical model, VIP-Man, developed from the high-resolution transverse colour photographic images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project®. Organ dose calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP for 20 monoenergetic neutron beams between 1×10-9 MeV and 20 MeV under six different irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational and isotropic. The absorbed dose for 24 major organs and effective dose results based on the realistic VIP-Man are presented and compared with those based on the simplified MIRD-based phantoms reported in the literature. Effective doses from VIP-Man are not significantly different from earlier results for neutrons in the energy range studied. There are, however, remarkable deviations in organ doses due to the anatomical differences between the image-based and the earlier mathematical models.

  6. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 63Ni at the Munich Tandem Laboratory for estimating fast neutron fluences from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Knie, K; Rugel, G; Marchetti, A A; Faestermann, T; Wallner, C; McAninch, J E; Straume, T; Korschinek, G

    2000-10-01

    After the release of the present dosimetry system DS86 in 1987, measurements have shown that DS86 may substantially underestimate thermal neutron fluences at large distances (>1,000 m) from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. This discrepancy casts doubts on the DS86 neutron source term and, consequently, the survivors' estimated neutron doses. However, the doses were caused mainly by fast neutrons. To determine retrospectively fast neutron fluences in Hiroshima, the reaction 63Cu(n, p)63Ni can be used, if adequate copper samples can be found. Measuring 63Ni (half life 100 y) in Hiroshima samples requires a very sensitive technique, such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), because of the relatively small amounts of 63Ni expected (approximately 10(5)-10(6) atoms per gram of copper). Experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated in 1996 that AMS can be used to measure 63Ni in Hiroshima copper samples. Subsequently, a collaboration was established with the Technical University of Munich in view of its potential to perform more sensitive measurements of 63Ni than the Livermore facility and in the interest of interlaboratory validation. This paper presents the progress made at the Munich facility in the measurement of 63Ni by AMS. The Munich accelerator mass spectrometry facility is a combination of a high energy tandem accelerator and a detection system featuring a gas-filled magnet. It is designed for high sensitivity measurements of long-lived radioisotopes. Optimization of the ion source setup has further improved the sensitivity for 63Ni by reducing the background level of the 63Cu isobar interference by about two orders of magnitude. Current background levels correspond to a ratio of 63Ni/Ni<2x10(-14) and suggest that, with adequate copper samples, the assessment of fast neutron fluences in Hiroshima and Nagasaki is possible for ground distances of up to 1500 m, and--under favorable conditions--even beyond. To demonstrate this

  7. Approaches to Accounting and Prediction of Fast Neutron Fluence on VVER Pressure Vessels for Estimation of RPV Residual Lifetime in Compliance with Russian Utility's Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, Gennady; Borodkin, Pavel; Khrennikov, Nikolay; Ryabinin, Yuriy; Adeev, Valeriy

    2016-02-01

    The Paper describes a new Russian Utility's regulatory document (RD EO) which has been recently developed and implemented since the beginning of 2013. This RD EO includes the procedure of RPV FNF monitoring and provides recommendations on how to predict fluence over the design lifetime taking into account results of FNF monitoring. The basic method of RPV neutron fluence monitoring is neutron transport calculations of FR in the vicinity of the RPV. Reliability of the calculation results should be validated by ex-vessel neutron-activation measurements, which were performed during different fuel cycles with different core loadings including new types of fuel.

  8. A method to detect low-level 63Ni activity for estimating fast neutron fluence from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Shibata, T; Imamura, M; Shibata, S; Nogawa, N; Uwamino, Y; Shizuma, K

    1999-06-01

    The Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs resulted in the worst reported exposure of radiation to the human body. The data of survivors have provided the basis for the risk estimation for ionizing radiation, and thus are widely used as the basis of radiation safety. In this report we have studied a new method to detect the low-level 63Ni activity in copper samples in order to estimate the fast neutron fluence from the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Only 0.8 x 10(-3) Bq g(-1) of 63Ni is expected to be produced by the atomic bomb in a copper sample with the 63Cu(n, p)63Ni reaction at a distance of 500 m from the hypocenter. Our method has the required level of sensitivity for determination of the fast neutron fluence out to distances of at least 500 m, and perhaps as far as 1,000 m. We have already investigated and collected some bomb-irradiated copper samples for further study. PMID:10334579

  9. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20 to 250 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Thomas D; Justus, Alan L; Gadd, S Milan; Olsher, Richard H; Devine, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  10. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20-250 MeV.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Justus, A L; Devine, R T; Gadd, M S

    2010-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom. PMID:19887515

  11. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhães, L.A.G.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  12. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Barboza, L L; Campos, V M A; Magalhães, L A G; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm2) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26445339

  13. Neutron fluences and energy spectra in the Cosmos-2044 biosatellite orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    Joint Soviet-American measurements of the neutron component of space radiation (SR) were carried out during the flight of the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos-2044. Neutron flux densities and differential energy spectra were measured inside and on the external surface of the spacecraft. Three energy intervals were employed: thermal (En < or = 0.2 eV), resonance (0.2 eV < En < 1.0 MeV) and fast (En > or = 1.0 MeV) neutrons. The first two groups were measured with U.S. 6LiF detectors, while fast neutrons were recorded both by U.S. fission foils and Soviet nuclear emulsions. Estimations were made of the contributions to absorbed and equivalent doses from each neutron energy interval and a correlation was presented between fast neutron fluxes, measured outside the satellite, and the phase of solar activity (SA). Average dose equivalent rates of 0.018 and 0.14 mrem d-1 were measured for thermal and resonance neutrons, respectively, outside the spacecraft. The corresponding values for fast neutrons were 3.3 (U.S.) and 1.8 (U.S.S.R.) mrem d-1. Inside the spacecraft, a value of 3.5 mrem d-1 was found.

  14. Nova laser system at ultra high fluence levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Nova experimental facility consists of a ten arm laser system and five experimental stations and was completed in December 1984. Two of these stations are used for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments and the other three are dedicated to doing large aperture (30 to 74 cm) laser experiments. The laser system is deployed in a master oscillator-power amplifier architecture and uses Nd: phosphate glass for the active medium. The fundamental wavelength of the system is 1.05 microns. Frequency converters constructed from potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are located at the end of each of the ten arms and are used to produce high power frequency doubled (0.53 microns) and tripled (0.35 microns) beams for either ICF or laser experiments. Thus, the Nova laser system can produce high power beams with wavelengths ranging from the infrared to the ultraviolet.

  15. Fast neutron fluence of yonggwang nuclear unit 1 reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.; Km, B.; Chang, K.; Leeand, S.; Park, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50, Appendix H, requires that the neutron dosimetry be present to monitor the reactor vessel throughout plant life. The Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry System has been installed for Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 1 after complete withdrawal of all six in-vessel surveillance capsules. This system has been installed in the reactor cavity annulus in order to measure the fast neutron spectrum coming out through the reactor pressure vessel. Cycle specific neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain the energy dependent neutron flux throughout the reactor geometry including dosimetry positions. Comparisons between calculations and measurements were performed for the reaction rates of each dosimetry sensors and results show good agreements. (authors)

  16. Generation of multiple stress waves in silica glass in high fluence femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Haofeng; Wang Xiaolei; Zhai Hongchen; Zhang Nan; Wang Pan

    2010-08-09

    Shadowgraphs of dynamic processes outside and inside transparent target during the intense femtosecond laser ablation of silica glass are recorded. Two material ejections outside the target and two corresponding stress waves inside the target are observed at different energy fluences. In particular, a third stress wave can be observed at energy fluence as high as 40 J/cm{sup 2}. The first wave is a thermoelastic wave, while the second and the third may be generated subsequently by the mechanical expansions. In addition, the magnitudes of the three stress waves decrease sequentially based on our analysis.

  17. Comparison of Calculated and Measured Neutron Fluence in Fuel/Cladding Irradiation Experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ronald James

    2011-01-01

    A recently-designed thermal neutron irradiation facility has been used for a first series of irradiations of PWR fuel pellets in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Since June 2010, irradiations of PWR fuel pellets made of UN or UO{sub 2}, clad in SiC, have been ongoing in the outer small VXF sites in the beryllium reflector region of the HFIR, as seen in Fig. 1. HFIR is a versatile, 85 MW isotope production and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light-water-cooled and -moderated, flux-trap type reactor that uses highly enriched (in {sup 235}U) uranium (HEU) as the fuel. The reactor core consists of a series of concentric annular regions, each about 2 ft (0.61 m) high. A 5-in. (12.70-cm)-diam hole, referred to as the flux trap, forms the center of the core. The fuel region is composed of two concentric fuel elements made up of many involute-shaped fuel plates: an inner element that contains 171 fuel plates, and an outer element that contains 369 fuel plates. The fuel plates are curved in the shape of an involute, which provides constant coolant channel width between plates. The fuel (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermet) is nonuniformly distributed along the arc of the involute to minimize the radial peak-to-average power density ratio. A burnable poison (B{sub 4}C) is included in the inner fuel element primarily to reduce the negative reactivity requirements of the reactor control plates. A typical HEU core loading in HFIR is 9.4 kg of {sup 235}U and 2.8 g of {sup 10}B. The thermal neutron flux in the flux trap region can exceed 2.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s while the fast flux in this region exceeds 1 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The inner and outer fuel elements are in turn surrounded by a concentric ring of beryllium reflector approximately 1 ft (0.30 m) thick. The beryllium reflector consists of three regions

  18. Qualification of materials for applications in high fluence lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryatel, James A.; Gourdin, William H.; Hampton, George J.; Behne, Daniel M.; Meissner, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    High power laser systems require nearly contamination free optics to maintain desired transport efficiency and to minimize optic damage. The required cleanliness is generally achieved through practices that preclude or remove foreign particle contamination. However, laser optic systems may also be contaminated by vapor-borne contaminants from material outgassing, by particles ablated from surfaces exposed to amplifier or laser light, or by contact with items used in the production and cleaning of optics and components. To minimize such contamination on the optics of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), a rigorous screening test program was introduced. This test program replicates conditions in the beam path as well as conditions during production and cleaning. The former is represented by sol-gel exposure tests and by subjecting materials to amplifier flashlamp light and 1ω laser light. The latter is represented by organic solvent extraction tests and surface contact tests for items that could contact optic surfaces. This paper will discuss the methodology for, and administration of, these tests and present results for selected materials.

  19. Irradiation creep of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide at low neutron fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, T.; Shimoda, K.; Kondo, S.; Hinoki, T.; Ozawa, K.; Katoh, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The irradiation creep behavior of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide was investigated using the bend stress relaxation method under neutron irradiation up to 1.9 dpa. The creep deformation was observed at all temperatures ranging from 380 to 1180 °C mainly from the irradiation creep but with the increasing contributions from the thermal creep at higher temperatures. The apparent stress exponent of the irradiation creep slightly exceeded unity, and instantaneous creep coefficient at 380-790 °C was estimated to be ∼1 × 10-5 [MPa-1 dpa-1] at ∼0.1 dpa and 1 × 10-7 to 1 × 10-6 [MPa-1 dpa-1] at ∼1 dpa. The irradiation creep strain appeared greater than that for the high purity SiC. Microstructural observation and data analysis indicated that the grain-boundary sliding associated with the secondary phases contributes to the irradiation creep at 380-790 °C to 0.01-0.11 dpa.

  20. Estimation of Covariances on Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra and Impact of the PFNS Model on the Vessel Fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Léonie; Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Archier, Pascal; De Saint Jean, Cyrille; Pénéliau, Yannick; Regnier, David

    2016-02-01

    As the need for precise handling of nuclear data covariances grows ever stronger, no information about covariances of prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) are available in the evaluated library JEFF-3.2, although present in ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries for the main fissile isotopes. The aim of this work is to provide an estimation of covariance matrices related to PFNS, in the frame of some commonly used models for the evaluated files, such as the Maxwellian spectrum, the Watt spectrum, or the Madland-Nix spectrum. The evaluation of PFNS through these models involves an adjustment of model parameters to available experimental data, and the calculation of the spectrum variance-covariance matrix arising from experimental uncertainties. We present the results for thermal neutron induced fission of 235U. The systematic experimental uncertainties are propagated via the marginalization technique available in the CONRAD code. They are of great influence on the final covariance matrix, and therefore, on the spectrum uncertainty band width. In addition to this covariance estimation work, we have also investigated the importance on a reactor calculation of the fission spectrum model choice. A study of the vessel fluence depending on the PFNS model is presented. This is done through the propagation of neutrons emitted from a fission source in a simplified PWR using the TRIPOLI-4® code. This last study includes thermal fission spectra from the FIFRELIN Monte-Carlo code dedicated to the simulation of prompt particles emission during fission.

  1. Thermal neutron fluence in a treatment room with a Varian linear accelerator at a medical university hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Shan; Changlai, Sheng-Pin; Pan, Lung-Kwang; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The indium foil activation technique has been employed to measure thermal neutron fluences ( Φth) among various locations in the treatment room with a 20×20 cm 2 field size and a 15 and 10 MV X-ray beam. Spatial Φth are visualized using colored three-dimensional graphical representations; intensities are up to (1.97±0.13)×10 5 and (1.46±0.13)×10 4 n cm -2/Gy-X at isocenter, respectively. The Φth is found to increase with the X-ray energy of the LINAC and decreases as it moves away from the beam center. However, thermal neutron exposure is not assessed in routine dosimetry planning and radiation assessment of patients since neutron dose contributes <1% of the given therapy dose. However, unlike the accelerated beam limited within the gantry window, photoneutrons are widely spread in the treatment room. Distributions of Φth were measured in water phantom irradiated with 15 MV X-ray beams. The shielding effect of the maze was also evaluated. The experimentally estimated Φth along the maze distance was fitted explicate and the tenth-value layer (TVL) was calculated and discussed. Use of a 10 cm-thick polyethylene door placed at the maze was suitable for radiation shielding.

  2. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  3. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    SciTech Connect

    Teysseyre, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  4. Gamma-Ray Measurement of 152Eu Produced by Neutrons from the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb and Evaluation of Neutron Fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kazuo; Habara, Minoru; Aoyama, Tetsuhisa; Sakata, Hidefumi; Yoshizawa, Yasukazu

    1990-08-01

    The 152Eu/Eu ratios were measured in a tombstone exposed to neutrons of the Hiroshima atomic bomb near the hypocenter. Measurements of 152Eu gamma rays were performed for europium samples chemically isolated from numerous rock specimens taken from the tombstone. A reliable attenuation curve of the 152Eu/Eu ratios was obtained. The curve suggests that the thermal neutron component was relatively small and the average incident angle of neutrons to the tombstone was roughly 45° from the perpendicular downward direction. It revealed to us several important pieces of information concerning the energy and angular distributions near the Hiroshima bomb hypocenter.

  5. Noble Gases in the Monahans Chondrite and Halite: Ar-39 - Ar-40 Age, Space Exposure Age, Trapped Solar Gases, and Neutron Fluence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Daniel H.; Bogard, Donald D.

    2000-01-01

    For the Monahans chondrite and halite, we determined Ar-39 - Ar-40 ages of silicate = 4.53 Ga, halite > 4.3 Ga; a space exposure age of approx. 5 Ma; a regolith pre-irradiation; solar gas concentrations in the dark phase; and a regolith thermal neutron fluence.

  6. Validation of 3D Code KATRIN For Fast Neutron Fluence Calculation of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel by Ex-Vessel Measurements and Surveillance Specimens Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhalandinov, A.; Tsofin, V.; Kochkin, V.; Panferov, P.; Timofeev, A.; Reshetnikov, A.; Makhotin, D.; Erak, D.; Voloschenko, A.

    2016-02-01

    Usually the synthesis of two-dimensional and one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations is used to evaluate neutron fluence on VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) for prognosis of radiation embrittlement. But there are some cases when this approach is not applicable. For example the latest projects of VVER-1000 have upgraded surveillance program. Containers with surveillance specimens are located on the inner surface of RPV with fast neutron flux maximum. Therefore, the synthesis approach is not suitable enough for calculation of local disturbance of neutron field in RPV inner surface behind the surveillance specimens because of their complicated and heterogeneous structure. In some cases the VVER-1000 core loading consists of fuel assemblies with different fuel height and the applicability of synthesis approach is also ambiguous for these fuel cycles. Also, the synthesis approach is not enough correct for the neutron fluence estimation at the RPV area above core top. Because of these reasons only the 3D neutron transport codes seem to be satisfactory for calculation of neutron fluence on the VVER-1000 RPV. The direct 3D calculations are also recommended by modern regulations.

  7. Irradiation creep of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide at low neutron fluences

    SciTech Connect

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Shimoda, Kazuya; Kondo, Sosuke; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Ozawa, Kazumi; Katoh, Yutai

    2014-12-01

    The irradiation creep behavior of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide was investigated using the bend stress relaxation method under neutron irradiation up to 1.9 dpa. The creep deformation was observed at all temperatures ranging from 380 to 1180 °C mainly from the irradiation creep but with the increasing contributions from the thermal creep at higher temperatures. Microstructural observation and data analysis were performed.

  8. Fractal hydrodynamic model of high-fluence laser ablation plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Agop, M.; Nica, P.; Gurlui, S.; Focsa, C.

    2010-10-08

    Optical/electrical characterization of transient plasmas generated by high-fluence (up to 1 kJ/cm{sup 2}) laser ablation of various targets revealed as a general feature the splitting of the plume in two structures. In order to account for this behavior, a new fractal hydrodynamic model has been developed in a non-differentiable space-time. The model successfully retrieves the kinetics of the two structures.

  9. High fluence ion beam modification of polymer surfaces: EPR and XPS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popok, V. N.; Azarko, I. I.; Odzhaev, V. B.; Tóth, A.; Khaibullin, R. I.

    2001-05-01

    Polyethylene, polyamide-6 and polyimide foils implanted with 100 keV B+, P+ and Sb + ions to a fluence range of 10 15-10 17 cm-2 have been studied using the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) methods. The experimental data allow the comparison of the implantation-induced changes both in a given polymer foil under different ion beam regimes and in different polymers under similar ion-bombardment conditions. The high fluence implantation of boron ions, depositing energy mainly via electronic stopping, was found to be accompanied with the effective formation of π-bonded carbon-rich clusters. By contrast, heavier (phosphorus and antimony) ions, which deposit energy predominantly in nuclear collisions, produced a lower concentration of π-radicals and a less carbonised top surface layer. The peculiarities and main trends of the alterations of the polymer structure and composition induced via electronic and nuclear stopping have also been discussed.

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of high-energy and high fluence rate photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartol, Laura J.

    High-energy, high fluence rate photon sources are used in radiation oncology for the treatment of a variety of disease sites. Common dosimetry methods for characterizing these sources use energy-integrating devices; however, the most descriptive characterization of these sources are performed with devices that preserve the energy-specific information in the source output. This work used Monte-Carlo- (MC-) and measurement-based spectroscopic methods to characterize two therapeutic-level megavoltage photon sources. MC simulations were performed using the MCNP5 transport code and measurements were performed with a Compton-scattering (CS) technique. Because MC was used extensively in this work, some general MCNP5 investigations were performed to benchmark the techniques used. Limitations in the advanced variance reduction techniques, Doppler-broadening model, and use of phase space files were investigated. Based on the results of these investigations, recommendations were made for using each technique. The validity of the CS technique for use with megavoltage systems was demonstrated using MC simulations of a 6 MV linear accelerator field and measurements of a high dose rate 192Ir source. Following these initial demonstrations, the spectrum of a 60Co teletherapy unit was characterized. Simulations were performed to determine the spectrum's sensitivity to the source model. Multiple measurements were completed using a reverse-electrode germanium (REGe) detector with the CS spectrometry technique. The CS spectra were corrected for detector response and the CS geometry using a novel detector response function that was calculated using MCNP5. The detector response was unfolded using the Gold deconvolution method. Comparisons of the simulated and measured spectra showed agreement in terms of the peak positions, mean spectrum energy, and relative fluences under specific portions of the spectra. The spectrum of a 6 MV photon field from a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator was

  11. Epithermal Neutron Source for Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy (NRS) using High Intensity, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D P; McNaney, J M; Swift, D C; Bartal, T; Hey, D S; Pape, S L; Mackinnon, A; Mariscal, D; Nakamura, H; Nakanii, N; Beg, F N

    2010-04-22

    A neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy (NRS) has been developed using high intensity, short pulse lasers. This measurement technique will allow for robust measurements of interior ion temperature of laser-shocked materials and provide insight into equation of state (EOS) measurements. The neutron generation technique uses protons accelerated by lasers off of Cu foils to create neutrons in LiF, through (p,n) reactions with {sup 7}Li and {sup 19}F. The distribution of the incident proton beam has been diagnosed using radiochromic film (RCF). This distribution is used as the input for a (p,n) neturon prediction code which is compared to experimentally measured neutron yields. From this calculation, a total fluence of 1.8 x 10{sup 9} neutrons is infered, which is shown to be a reasonable amount for NRS temperature measurement.

  12. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sengbusch, E.; Pérez-Andújar, A.; DeLuca, P. M.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    energy from 250 to 200 MeV decreases the total neutron energy fluence produced by stopping a monoenergetic pencil beam in a water phantom by a factor of 2.3. It is possible to significantly lower the requirements on the maximum kinetic energy of a compact proton accelerator if the ability to treat a small percentage of patients with rotational therapy is sacrificed. This decrease in maximum kinetic energy, along with the corresponding decrease in neutron production, could lower the cost and ease the engineering constraints on a compact proton accelerator treatment facility. PMID:19291975

  13. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sengbusch, E; Pérez-Andújar, A; DeLuca, P M; Mackie, T R

    2009-02-01

    proton kinetic energy from 250 to 200 MeV decreases the total neutron energy fluence produced by stopping a monoenergetic pencil beam in a water phantom by a factor of 2.3. It is possible to significantly lower the requirements on the maximum kinetic energy of a compact proton accelerator if the ability to treat a small percentage of patients with rotational therapy is sacrificed. This decrease in maximum kinetic energy, along with the corresponding decrease in neutron production, could lower the cost and ease the engineering constraints on a compact proton accelerator treatment facility. PMID:19291975

  14. Atom probe tomography characterizations of high nickel, low copper surveillance RPV welds irradiated to high fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.; Efsing, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Ringhals Units 3 and 4 reactors in Sweden are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) designed and supplied by Westinghouse Electric Company, with commercial operation in 1981 and 1983, respectively. The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) for both reactors were fabricated with ring forgings of SA 508 class 2 steel. Surveillance blocks for both units were fabricated using the same weld wire heat, welding procedures, and base metals used for the RPVs. The primary interest in these weld metals is because they have very high nickel contents, with 1.58 and 1.66 wt.% for Unit 3 and Unit 4, respectively. The nickel content in Unit 4 is the highest reported nickel content for any Westinghouse PWR. Although both welds contain less than 0.10 wt.% copper, the weld metals have exhibited high irradiation-induced Charpy 41-J transition temperature shifts in surveillance testing. The Charpy impact 41-J shifts and corresponding fluences are 192 °C at 5.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 3 and 162 °C at 6.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 4. These relatively low-copper, high-nickel, radiation-sensitive welds relate to the issue of so-called late-blooming nickel-manganese-silicon phases. Atom probe tomography measurements have revealed ˜2 nm-diameter irradiation-induced precipitates containing manganese, nickel, and silicon, with phosphorus evident in some of the precipitates. However, only a relatively few number of copper atoms are contained within the precipitates. The larger increase in the transition temperature shift in the higher copper weld metal from the Ringhals R3 Unit is associated with copper-enriched regions within the manganese-nickel-silicon-enriched precipitates rather than changes in their size or number density.

  15. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Sheu, R J

    2015-04-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with (252)Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing (252)Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6_8 extended-range sphere versus the 6″ standard sphere). PMID:25280480

  16. Propensity and Risk Assessment for Solar Particle Events: Consideration of Integral Fluence at High Proton Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For future space missions with longer duration, exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is the major concern during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. The expected SPE propensity for large proton fluence was estimated from a non-homogeneous Poisson model using the historical database for measurements of protons with energy > 30 MeV, Phi(sub 30). The database includes a continuous data set for the past 5 solar cycles. The resultant SPE risk analysis for a specific mission period was made including the 95% confidence level. In addition to total particle intensity of SPE, the detailed energy spectra of protons especially at high energy levels were recognized as extremely important parameter for the risk assessment, since there remains a significant cancer risks from those energetic particles for large events. Using all the recorded proton fluence of SPEs for energies >60 and >100 MeV, Phi(sub 60) and Phi(sub 100), respectively, the expected propensities of SPEs abundant with high energy protons were estimated from the same non-homogeneous Poisson model and the representative cancer risk was analyzed. The dependencies of risk with different energy spectra, for e.g. between soft and hard SPEs, were evaluated. Finally, we describe approaches to improve radiation protection of astronauts and optimize mission planning for future space missions.

  17. Neutron production from flattening filter free high energy medical linac: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najem, M. A.; Abolaban, F. A.; Podolyák, Z.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the problems arising from using a conventional linac at high energy (>8 MV) is the production of neutrons. One way to reduce neutron production is to remove the flattening filter (FF). The main purpose of this work was to study the effect of FF removal on neutron fluence and neutron dose equivalent inside the treatment room at different photon beam energies. Several simulations based on Monte Carlo techniques were carried out in order to calculate the neutron fluence at different locations in the treatment room from different linac energies with and without a FF. In addition, a step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) for prostate cancer was modelled using the 15 MV photon beam with and without a FF on a water phantom to calculate the neutron dose received in a full treatment. The results obtained show a significant drop-off in neutrons fluence and dose equivalent when the FF was removed. For example, the neutron fluence was decreased by 54%, 76% and 75% for 10, 15 and 18 MV, respectively. This can decrease the neutron dose to the patient as well as reduce the shielding cost of the treatment room. The neutron dose equivalent of the SnS IMRT for prostate cancer was reduced significantly by 71.3% when the FF was removed. It can be concluded that the flattening filter removal from the head of the linac could reduce the risk of causing secondary cancers and the shielding cost of radiotherapy treatment rooms.

  18. KEY COMPARISON: International key comparison of 24 keV neutron fluence measurements (1993-2009): CCRI(III)-K1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. J.; Lewis, V. E.; Klein, H.; Allisy-Roberts, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of 24.5 keV neutron fluence standards was organized by Section III (Neutron Measurements) of the Comité Consultatif des Rayonnements Ionisants, (CCRI). The exercise involved the circulation of a set of three different-diameter Bonner spheres for calibration in fields with energies around 24.5 keV. The fields were produced using four different methods of neutron production. The responses (counts per unit neutron fluence) of the individual spheres were initially determined for the neutron energy of the production method, or methods, employed. To derive the 24.5 keV responses, it was necessary to make corrections for spectral effects, and these were achieved by using response functions for the spheres calculated using the code MCNP. The results demonstrate good consistency within the estimated uncertainties (ranging from about 5% to 10% at the 95% confidence level) between the results reported by all the participants. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section III, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  19. A Programmable Beam Shaping System for Tailoring the Profile of High Fluence Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Henesian, M; Haynam, C; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Scanlan, M; Budge, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J

    2010-11-10

    Customized spatial light modulators have been designed and fabricated for use as precision beam shaping devices in fusion class laser systems. By inserting this device in a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain, 'blocker' obscurations can be programmed into the beam profile to shadow small isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. In this two stage system, 1920 x 1080 bitmap images are first imprinted on incoherent, 470 nm address beams via pixilated liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) modulators. To realize defined masking functions with smooth apodized shapes and no pixelization artifacts, address beam images are projected onto custom fabricated optically-addressable light valves. Each valve consists of a large, single pixel liquid cell in series with a photoconductive Bismuth silicon Oxide (BSO) crystal. The BSO crystal enables bright and dark regions of the address image to locally control the voltage supplied to the liquid crystal layer which in turn modulates the amplitude of the coherent beams at 1053 nm. Valves as large as 24 mm x 36 mm have been fabricated with low wavefront distortion (<0.5 waves) and antireflection coatings for high transmission (>90%) and etalon suppression to avoid spectral and temporal ripple. This device in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy represents a new approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics.

  20. Improvement of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Kenta; Iwai, Takeo; Abe, Hiroaki; Sekimura, Naoto

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the modification of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo (HIT). The HIT facility was severely damaged during the 2011 earthquake, which occurred off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. A damaged 1.0 MV tandem Cockcroft-Walton accelerator was replaced with a 1.7 MV accelerator, which was formerly used in another campus of the university. A decision was made to maintain dual-beam irradiation capability by repairing the 3.75 MV single-ended Van de Graaff accelerator and reconstructing the related beamlines. A new beamline was connected with a 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) to perform in-situ TEM observation under ion irradiation.

  1. Retention of nanocrystalline WNx layers exposed to high-fluence deuterium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassallo, E.; Caniello, R.; Angella, G.; Dellasega, D.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pedroni, M.; Ricci, D.; Rigato, V.; Passoni, M.

    2015-11-01

    For high-power plasma operation regimes in tokamak fusion devices the power load onto W divertor plates must be kept below acceptable limits for materials. N2 gas is likely to be used to reduce the power load. However, because of erosion phenomena, WNx compounds will be produced in the divertor and tritium retention is issue of concern. We report recent experiments using the GYM linear plasma device that examined D retention in WNx compounds exposed to D plasma at divertor relevant fluence (∼1024 m-2). It is shown that WNx compounds with different nitrogen concentration have very similar D retention, lower than the case of the tungsten without nitrogen and in any case lower than the acceptable limit for operation in ITER.

  2. Fast Neutron Irradiation of the Highly Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Diane Louise

    Fast neutron dose survival curves were generated for the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is renowned for its unusually high resistance to gamma, x-ray, and ultraviolet radiation, but for which fast neutron response was unknown. The fast neutrons were produced by the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5-MV, type CN Van de Graaff accelerator through the ^7Li(p,n)^7 Be reaction by bombarding a thick metallic lithium target with a 4-MeV proton beam. The bacteria were uniformly distributed on 150-mm agar plates and were exposed to the fast neutron beam under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. The plates were subdivided into concentric rings of increasing diameter from the center to the periphery of the plate, within which the average neutron dose was calculated as the product of the precisely known neutron fluence at the average radius of the ring and the neutron energy dependent kerma factor. The neutron fluence and dose ranged from approximately 3 times 1013 n cm^ {-2} to 1 times 1012 n cm^ {-2}, and 200 kilorad to 5 kilorad, respectively, from the center to the periphery of the plate. Percent survival for Deinococcus radiodurans as a function of fast neutron dose was derived from the ability of the irradiated cells to produce visible colonies within each ring compared to that of a nonirradiated control population. The bacterium Escherichia coli B/r (CSH) was irradiated under identical conditions for comparative purposes. The survival response of Deinococcus radiodurans as a result of cumulative fast neutron exposures was also investigated. The quantification of the ability of Deinococcus radiodurans to survive cellular insult from secondary charged particles, which are produced by fast neutron interactions in biological materials, will provide valuable information about damage and repair mechanisms under extreme cellular stress, and may provide new insight into the origin of this bacterium's unprecedented radiation resistance.

  3. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Rai, K.S.F.

    1994-01-11

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields is described. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning. 2 figures.

  4. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Rai Ko S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning.

  5. Resveratrol Prevents High Fluence Red Light-Emitting Diode Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Photoinhibition of Human Skin Fibroblast Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mamalis, Andrew; Koo, Eugene; Isseroff, R. Rivkah; Murphy, William; Jagdeo, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin fibrosis is a significant medical problem that leads to a functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial impact on quality-of-life. Light-emitting diode-generated 633-nm red light (LED-RL) is part of the visible light spectrum that is not known to cause DNA damage and is considered a safe, non-invasive, inexpensive, and portable potential alternative to ultraviolet phototherapy that may change the treatment paradigm of fibrotic skin disease. Objective The goal of our study was to investigate the how reactive oxygen species (ROS) free radicals generated by high fluence LED-RL inhibit the migration of skin fibroblasts, the main cell type involved in skin fibrosis. Fibroblast migration speed is increased in skin fibrosis, and we studied cellular migration speed of cultured human skin fibroblasts as a surrogate measure of high fluence LED-RL effect on fibroblast function. To ascertain the inhibitory role of LED-RL generated ROS on migration speed, we hypothesized that resveratrol, a potent antioxidant, could prevent the photoinhibitory effects of high fluence LED-RL on fibroblast migration speed. Methods High fluence LED-RL generated ROS were measured by flow cytometry analysis using dihydrorhodamine (DHR). For purposes of comparison, we assessed the effects of ROS generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on fibroblast migration speed and the ability of resveratrol, a well known antioxidant, to prevent LED-RL and H2O2 generated ROS-associated changes in fibroblast migration speed. To determine whether resveratrol could prevent the high fluence LED-RL ROS-mediated photoinhibition of human skin fibroblast migration, treated cells were incubated with resveratrol at concentrations of 0.0001% and 0.001% for 24 hours, irradiated with high fluences LED-RL of 480, 640, and 800 J/cm2. Results High fluence LED-RL increases intracellular fibroblast ROS and decreases fibroblast migration speed. LED-RL at 480, 640 and 800 J/cm2 increased ROS levels to 132.8%, 151.0%, and 158

  6. Cation disorder in high-dose, neutron-irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Larson, A.C.; Yu, N.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to determine whether MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is a suitable ceramic for fusion applications. The crystal structures of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel single crystals irradiated to high neutron fluences [>5{times}10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (E{sub n}>0.1 MeV)] were examined by neutron diffraction. Crystal structure refinement of the highese dose sample indicated that the average scattering strength of the tetrahedral crystal sites decreased by {approx}20% while increasing by {approx}8% on octahedral sites.

  7. High Conduction Neutron Absorber to Simulate Fast Reactor Environment in an Existing Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, Donna; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Parry, James

    2014-06-22

    A need was determined for a thermal neutron absorbing material that could be cooled in a gas reactor environment without using large amounts of a coolant that would thermalize the neutron flux. A new neutron absorbing material was developed that provided high conduction so a small amount of water would be sufficient for cooling thereby thermalizing the flux as little as possible. An irradiation experiment was performed to assess the effects of radiation and the performance of a new neutron absorbing material. Neutron fluence monitors were placed inside specially fabricated holders within a set of drop-in capsules and irradiated for up to four cycles in the Advanced Test Reactor. Following irradiation, the neutron fluence monitor wires were analyzed by gamma and x-ray spectrometry to determine the activities of the activation products. The adjusted neutron fluences were calculated and grouped into three bins – thermal, epithermal and fast to evaluate the spectral shift created by the new material. Fluence monitors were evaluated after four different irradiation periods to evaluate the effects of burn-up in the absorbing material. Additionally, activities of the three highest activity isotopes present in the specimens are given.

  8. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  9. Using high-energy proton fluence to improve risk prediction for consequences of solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-12-01

    The potential for exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is a major concern during interplanetary transfer and extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. Previously, we have used data from the last 5 solar cycles to estimate percentiles of dose to a typical blood-forming organ (BFO) for a hypothetical astronaut in a nominally shielded spacecraft during a 120-d lunar mission. As part of this process, we made use of complete energy spectra for 34 large historical SPEs to calculate what the BFO mGy-Eq dose would have been in the above lunar scenario for each SPE. From these calculated doses, we then developed a prediction model for BFO dose based solely on an assumed value of integrated fluence above 30 MeV ( Φ30) for an otherwise unspecified future SPE. In this study, we reasoned that since BFO dose is determined more by protons with higher energies than by those with lower energies, more accurate BFO dose prediction models could be developed using integrated fluence above 60 ( Φ60) and above 100 MeV ( Φ100) as predictors instead of Φ30. However to calculate the unconditional probability of a BFO dose exceeding a pre-specified limit ("BFO dose risk"), one must also take into account the distribution of the predictor ( Φ30,Φ60, or Φ100), as estimated from historical SPEs. But Φ60 and Φ100 have more variability, and less available historical information on which to estimate their distributions over many SPE occurrences, than does Φ30. Therefore, when estimating BFO dose risk there is a tradeoff between increased BFO dose prediction at a given energy threshold and decreased accuracy of models for describing the distribution of that threshold over future SPEs as the threshold increases. Even when taking the second of these two factors into account, we still arrived at the conclusion that overall prediction improves as the energy level threshold increases from 30 to 60 to 100 MeV. These results can be applied

  10. Effects of faceted surface topography on high-fluence sputtering of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Effects of ion-induced faceted surface relief on high-fluence sputtering of graphite under 30-keV Ar and 15-keV N ion bombardment have been studied by means of binary-collision computer simulation. Taking into account experimental observations of surface topography, the relief was modeled by an α-dependent ridge-like periodic function (α = the ion incidence angle measured from the normal to macroscopic surface plane). It was shown that for normal incidence the sputter yield S represents a non-monotonic function of the relief aspect ratio and is saturated at x ∼ 100-200 nm (x = the half-period of the relief). The simulations stressed the importance of the relationship between the dimensions of surface roughness and atomic collision cascades and allowed to explain the S(α)-dependences found experimentally. It was shown that a strong (about 2 times) decrease of S at α = 60-80° is due to a shadowing mechanism which is also clearly revealed in the angular distribution of sputtered atoms.

  11. High-fluence Ga-implanted silicon—The effect of annealing and cover layers

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedler, J. Heera, V.; Hübner, R.; Voelskow, M.; Germer, S.; Schmidt, B.; Skorupa, W.

    2014-07-14

    The influence of SiO{sub 2} and SiN{sub x} cover layers on the dopant distribution as well as microstructure of high fluence Ga implanted Si after thermal processing is investigated. The annealing temperature determines the layer microstructure and the cover layers influence the obtained Ga profile. Rapid thermal annealing at temperatures up to 750 °C leads to a polycrystalline layer structure containing amorphous Ga-rich precipitates. Already after a short 20 ms flash lamp annealing, a Ga-rich interface layer is observed for implantation through the cover layers. This effect can partly be suppressed by annealing temperatures of at least 900 °C. However, in this case, Ga accumulates in larger, cone-like precipitates without disturbing the surrounding Si lattice parameters. Such a Ga-rich crystalline Si phase does not exist in the equilibrium phase diagram according to which the Ga solubility in Si is less than 0.1 at. %. The Ga-rich areas are capped with SiO{sub x} grown during annealing which only can be avoided by the usage of SiN{sub x} cover layers.

  12. Coincidence of a high-fluence blazar outburst with a PeV-energy neutrino event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadler, M.; Krauß, F.; Mannheim, K.; Ojha, R.; Müller, C.; Schulz, R.; Anton, G.; Baumgartner, W.; Beuchert, T.; Buson, S.; Carpenter, B.; Eberl, T.; Edwards, P. G.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsässer, D.; Gehrels, N.; Gräfe, C.; Gulyaev, S.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; James, C. W.; Kappes, A.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Langejahn, M.; Leiter, K.; Litzinger, E.; Longo, F.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McEnery, J.; Natusch, T.; Phillips, C.; Plötz, C.; Quick, J.; Ros, E.; Stecker, F. W.; Steinbring, T.; Stevens, J.; Thompson, D. J.; Trüstedt, J.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Weston, S.; Wilms, J.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The astrophysical sources of the extraterrestrial, very high-energy neutrinos detected by the IceCube collaboration remain to be identified. Gamma-ray (γ-ray) blazars have been predicted to yield a cumulative neutrino signal exceeding the atmospheric background above energies of 100 TeV, assuming that both the neutrinos and the γ-ray photons are produced by accelerated protons in relativistic jets. As the background spectrum falls steeply with increasing energy, the individual events with the clearest signature of being of extraterrestrial origin are those at petaelectronvolt energies. Inside the large positional-uncertainty fields of the first two petaelectronvolt neutrinos detected by IceCube, the integrated emission of the blazar population has a sufficiently high electromagnetic flux to explain the detected IceCube events, but fluences of individual objects are too low to make an unambiguous source association. Here, we report that a major outburst of the blazar PKS B1424-418 occurred in temporal and positional coincidence with a third petaelectronvolt-energy neutrino event (HESE-35) detected by IceCube. On the basis of an analysis of the full sample of γ-ray blazars in the HESE-35 field, we show that the long-term average γ-ray emission of blazars as a class is in agreement with both the measured all-sky flux of petaelectronvolt neutrinos and the spectral slope of the IceCube signal. The outburst of PKS B1424-418 provides an energy output high enough to explain the observed petaelectronvolt event, suggestive of a direct physical association.

  13. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  14. Neutron spectra and dose equivalents calculated in tissue for high-energy radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Followill, David S.

    2009-04-15

    Neutrons are by-products of high-energy radiation therapy and a source of dose to normal tissues. Thus, the presence of neutrons increases a patient's risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer. Although neutrons have been thoroughly studied in air, little research has been focused on neutrons at depths in the patient where radiosensitive structures may exist, resulting in wide variations in neutron dose equivalents between studies. In this study, we characterized properties of neutrons produced during high-energy radiation therapy as a function of their depth in tissue and for different field sizes and different source-to-surface distances (SSD). We used a previously developed Monte Carlo model of an accelerator operated at 18 MV to calculate the neutron fluences, energy spectra, quality factors, and dose equivalents in air and in tissue at depths ranging from 0.1 to 25 cm. In conjunction with the sharply decreasing dose equivalent with increased depth in tissue, the authors found that the neutron energy spectrum changed drastically as a function of depth in tissue. The neutron fluence decreased gradually as the depth increased, while the average neutron energy decreased sharply with increasing depth until a depth of approximately 7.5 cm in tissue, after which it remained nearly constant. There was minimal variation in the quality factor as a function of depth. At a given depth in tissue, the neutron dose equivalent increased slightly with increasing field size and decreasing SSD; however, the percentage depth-dose equivalent curve remained constant outside the primary photon field. Because the neutron dose equivalent, fluence, and energy spectrum changed substantially with depth in tissue, we concluded that when the neutron dose equivalent is being determined at a depth within a patient, the spectrum and quality factor used should be appropriate for depth rather than for in-air conditions. Alternately, an appropriate percent depth-dose equivalent curve should be

  15. Noble Gases in the Monahans Chondrite and Halite: Ar-39 - Ar-40 Age, Space Exposure Age, Trapped Solar Gases, and Neutron Fluence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2000-01-01

    In the Monahans H5 chondrite, Zolensky et al. report the first occurrence of grains of halite (NaCl), which contain minor sylvite (KCl) and tiny inclusions of liquid water. Here we report Ar-39 - Ar-40 ages of Monahans light (4.53 Ga) and dark phases and of the halite (>4.33 Ga). We report the presence of trapped solar gases in the dark phase, demonstrating that it represents a prior regolith on the Monahans parent body, We also report the cosmic-ray exposure age of Monahans and the neutron fluence experienced by the regolith component. Because the halite grains are apparently located only in the regolith phase, they may have formed by early hydrous activity within the Monahans parent body regolith, or they may have been introduced from outside.

  16. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, M. T. Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Dávila, J.

    2015-07-23

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (∼1.6 10{sup 4} neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  17. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, M. T.; Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Dávila, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2015-07-01

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e'n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction 10B(n,α)7Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (˜1.6 104 neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  18. High flux compact neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-06-15

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of {approximately}10{sup 11} n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation.

  19. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  20. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  1. In situ auger analysis of surface composition during high fluence ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, D. A.; Sartwell, B. D.; Singer, I. L.

    1985-03-01

    A multi-technique ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) target chamber has been used to perform in situ Auger electron spectroscopic (AES) analysis during ion implantation and AES sputter depth profiling of the substrate within 1-2 min after implantation. Iron was implanted with 150 keV Ti + at a 45° angle of incidence in a target chamber with pressures ranging from 8 × 10 -9 Torr of residual gases up to 1 × 10 -5 Torr of intentionally admitted CO gas. A fluence of ∼1.0 × 10 16cm -2 was needed to sputter away the C-covered air-formed oxide. The implanted Ti reached the surface at the 1 at.% level by ∼1.5 × 10 16cm -2. With increasing fluence, the Ti surface concentration increased to ∼15 at.% at steady-state with a curve shape that was concave downward at all fluences. The surface C concentration was found to be proportional to that of Ti for implants in CO, supporting a vacuum carburization model. Substantial O surface concentration (15-20 at.%) was detected for these runs but depth profiles showed only carburization, not oxidation, of the implanted layer. Even in the best vacuum available (8 × 10 -9Torr), some carburization was observed and was attributed to residual gas absorption. An increase in Ti retained dose with increasing CO pressure has been observed but not yet independently confirmed. The Ti/Fe surface concentration ratio is higher for implants done in CO, and this is discussed in terms of modification of the sputter yield for Ti.

  2. Variability in fluence and spectrum of high-energy photon bursts produced by lightning leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Xu, Wei; Pasko, Victor P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we model the production and acceleration of thermal runaway electrons during negative corona flash stages of stepping lightning leaders and the corresponding terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) or negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning-produced X-ray bursts in a unified fashion. We show how the source photon spectrum and fluence depend on the potential drop formed in the lightning leader tip region during corona flash and how the X-ray burst spectrum progressively converges toward typical TGF spectrum as the potential drop increases. Additionally, we show that the number of streamers produced in a negative corona flash, the source electron energy distribution function, the corresponding number of photons, and the photon energy distribution and transport through the atmosphere up to low-orbit satellite altitudes exhibit a very strong dependence on this potential drop. This leads to a threshold effect causing X-rays produced by leaders with potentials lower than those producing typical TGFs extremely unlikely to be detected by low-orbit satellites. Moreover, from the number of photons in X-ray bursts produced by -CGs estimated from ground observations, we show that the proportionality between the number of thermal runaway electrons and the square of the potential drop in the leader tip region during negative corona flash proposed earlier leads to typical photon fluences on the order of 1 ph/cm2 at an altitude of 500 km and a radial distance of 200 km for intracloud lightning discharges producing 300 MV potential drops, which is consistent with observations of TGF fluences and spectra from satellites.

  3. Properties of polyimide, polyetheretherketone and polyethyleneterephthalate implanted by Ni ions to high fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinsky, P.; Mackova, A.; Hnatowicz, V.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Valeev, V. F.; Slepicka, P.; Svorcik, V.; Slouf, M.; Perina, V.

    2012-02-01

    Polyimide (PI), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) were implanted with 40 keV Ni + ions at RT to the fluences (0.25-1.5) × 10 17 cm -2 at ion current density of 4 μA cm -2. Then some of the samples were annealed at the temperatures close to the polymer glassy transition temperature. Depth profiles of the Ni atoms in the as implanted and annealed samples were determined by RBS method. The profiles in the as implanted samples agree reasonably with those simulated using TRYDIN code. The implanted Ni atoms tend to aggregate into nano-particles, the size and distribution of which was determined from TEM images. The nano-particle size increases with increasing ion fluence. Subsequent annealing leads to a reduction in the nanoparticle size. The surface morphology of the implanted and annealed samples was studied using AFM. The changes in the polymer sheet resistance of the implanted and annealed samples were measured by standard two-point technique. The sheet resistance decreases with increasing temperature of annealing.

  4. Application of ex-vessel neutron dosimetry combined with in-core measurements for correction of neutron source used for RPV fluence calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Borodkin, P.G.; Borodkin, G.I.; Khrennikov, N.N.

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with calculated and semi-analytical evaluations of VVER-1000 reactor core neutron source distributions and their influence on measurements and calculations of the integral through-vessel neutron leakage. Neutron activation measurements analyzed in the paper were carried out in an ex-vessel air cavity at different nuclear power plant units with VVER-1000 during different fuel cycles. The time-integrated neutron source distributions used for DORT calculations were prepared via two different approaches based on (a) calculated fuel burnup (standard routine procedure) and (b) in-core measurements by means of self-powered detectors (SPDs) and thermocouples (TCs) (new approach). Considering that fuel burnup distributions in operating VVER may be evaluated now by the use of analytical methods (calculations) only, it is necessary to develop new approaches for the testing and correction of calculated evaluations of a neutron source. The results presented in this paper allow one to consider the reverse task of the alternative estimation of fuel burnup distributions. The proposed approach is based on the adjustment (fitting) of time-integrated neutron source distributions, and thus fuel burnup patterns, in some part of the reactor core, taking into account neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations, and in-core SPD and TC measurement data. (authors)

  5. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Lei; Miller, Don

    2015-01-23

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  6. Methodology of Fuel Burn Up Fitting in VVER-1000 Reactor Core by Using New Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry and In-Core Measurements and its Application for Routine Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady; Khrennikov, Nikolay

    2016-02-01

    Paper describes the new approach of fitting axial fuel burn-up patterns in peripheral fuel assemblies of VVER-1000 type reactors, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations and in-core SPND measured data. The developed approach uses results of new ex-vessel measurements on different power units through different reactor cycles and their uncertainties to clear the influence of a fitted fuel burn-up profile to the RPV neutron fluence calculations. The new methodology may be recommended to be included in the routine fluence calculations used in RPV lifetime management and may be taken into account during VVER-1000 core burn-up pattern correction.

  7. Retention behavior in tungsten and molybdenum exposed to high fluences of deuterium ions in TPE

    SciTech Connect

    J.P. Sharpe; R.D. Kolasinski; M. Shimada; P. Calderoni; R.A. Causey

    2009-06-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) has been used to investigate deuterium fuel retention behavior in tungsten and molybdenum– materials utilized for plasma-facing surfaces in some existing tokamak plasma devices and under consideration for future devices. Although several studies have been performed over the past several years on these metals, many issues remain unresolved, including for example blister formation mechanisms and correlation to surface conditions. In this study we expose several metal samples to deuterium ion fluences up to 1026 ions/m2 and measure retention behavior with thermal desportion spectroscopy. Fractional retention of up to 2.0×10-5 is found for W at 600 K, and Mo similarly retains deuterium at a fraction of 1.5×10-5 at 600 K. Blistering was found for W samples exposed at temperatures above 453 K, whereas blistering was not observed for Mo samples at any experiment temperature.

  8. Applicability of self-activation of an NaI scintillator for measurement of photo-neutrons around a high-energy X-ray radiotherapy machine.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Yahiro, Eriko; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Fukunaga, Junichi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Hosono, Makoto; Itoh, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of the activation of an NaI scintillator for neutron monitoring at a clinical linac was investigated experimentally. Thermal neutron fluence rates are derived by measurement of the I-128 activity generated in an NaI scintillator irradiated by neutrons; β-rays from I-128 are detected efficiently by the NaI scintillator. In order to verify the validity of this method for neutron measurement, we irradiated an NaI scintillator at a research reactor, and the neutron fluence rate was estimated. The method was then applied to neutron measurement at a 10-MV linac (Varian Clinac 21EX), and the neutron fluence rate was estimated at the isocenter and at 30 cm from the isocenter. When the scintillator was irradiated directly by high-energy X-rays, the production of I-126 was observed due to photo-nuclear reactions, in addition to the generation of I-128 and Na-24. From the results obtained by these measurements, it was found that the neutron measurement by activation of an NaI scintillator has a great advantage in estimates of a low neutron fluence rate by use of a quick measurement following a short-time irradiation. Also, the future application of this method to quasi real-time monitoring of neutrons during patient treatments at a radiotherapy facility is discussed, as well as the method of evaluation of the neutron dose. PMID:25404493

  9. Correlating Fast Fluence to dpa in Atypical Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Thomas H.

    2016-02-01

    Damage to a nuclear reactor's materials by high-energy neutrons causes changes in the ductility and fracture toughness of the materials. The reactor vessel and its associated piping's ability to withstand stress without brittle fracture are paramount to safety. Theoretically, the material damage is directly related to the displacements per atom (dpa) via the residual defects from induced displacements. However in practice, the material damage is based on a correlation to the high-energy (E > 1.0 MeV) neutron fluence. While the correlated approach is applicable when the material in question has experienced the same neutron spectrum as test specimens which were the basis of the correlation, this approach is not generically acceptable. Using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes, the energy dependent neutron flux is determined throughout the reactor structures and the reactor vessel. Results from the models provide the dpa response in addition to the high-energy neutron flux. Ratios of dpa to fast fluence are calculated throughout the models. The comparisons show a constant ratio in the areas of historical concern and thus the validity of the correlated approach to these areas. In regions above and below the fuel however, the flux spectrum has changed significantly. The correlated relationship of material damage to fluence is not valid in these regions without adjustment. An adjustment mechanism is proposed.

  10. Elastic stability of high dose neutron irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Chan, S.K.; Garner, F.A.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to identify ceramic materials that are suitable for fusion reactor applications. Elastic constants (C{sub 11}, C{sub 12}, and C{sub 44}) of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) single crystals irradiated to very high neutron fluences have geen measured by an ultrasonic technique. Although results of a neutron diffraction study show that cation occupation sites are significantly changed in the irradiated samples, no measurable differences occurred in their elastic properties. In order to understand such behavior, the elastic properties of a variety of materials with either normal or inverse spinel structures were studied. The cation valence and cation distribution appear to have little influence on the elastic properties of spinel materials.

  11. Short-wavelength ablation of polymers in the high-fluence regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberatore, Chiara; Mann, Klaus; Müller, Matthias; Pina, Ladislav; Juha, Libor; Vyšín, Ludek; Rocca, Jorge J.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Short-wavelength ablation of poly(1,4-phenylene ether-ether-sulfone) (PPEES) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was investigated using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) radiation from plasma-based sources. The initial experiment was performed with a 10 Hz desktop capillary-discharge XUV laser lasing at 46.9 nm. The XUV laser beam was focused onto the sample by a spherical mirror coated with a Si/Sc multilayer. The same materials were irradiated with 13.5 nm radiation emitted by plasmas produced by focusing an optical laser beam onto a xenon gas-puff target. A Schwarzschild focusing optics coated with a Mo/Si multilayer was installed at the source to achieve energy densities exceeding 0.1 J cm-2 in the tight focus. The existing experimental system at the Laser Laboratorium Göttingen was upgraded by implementing a 1.2 J driving laser. An increase of the SXR fluence was secured by improving the alignment technique.

  12. Multi-Billion Shot, High-Fluence Exposure of Cr(4+): YAG Passive Q-Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Dallas, Joseph L.; Afzal, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is developing the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) employing a diode pumped, Q-Switched, ND:YAG laser operating at 40 Hz repetition rate. To meet the five-year mission lifetime goal, a single transmitter would accumulate over 6.3 billion shots. Cr(4+):YAG is a promising candidate material for passively Q-switching the laser. Historically, the performance of saturable absorbers has degraded over long-duration usage. To measure the multi-billion shot performance of Cr(4+):YAG, a passively Q-switched GLAS-like oscillator was tested at an accelerated repetition rate of 500 Hz. The intracavity fluence was calculated to be approximately 2.5 J/cm(exp 2). The laser was monitored autonomously for 165 days. There was no evidence of change in the material optical properties during the 7.2 billion shot test.. All observed changes in laser operation could be attributed to pump laser diode aging. This is the first demonstration of multi-billion shot exposure testing of Cr(4+):YAG in this pulse energy regime

  13. Morphology And Microstructure in Fused Silica Induced By High Fluence Ultraviolet 3omega (355 Nm) Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.; Ferriera, J.L.; Lindsey, E.F.; Haupt, D.L.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Kinney, J.H.

    2007-08-08

    The morphology and microstructure induced in high quality fused silica by UV (355 nm) laser pulses at high fluence (10-45 J/cm{sup 2}) have been investigated using a suite of microscopic and spectroscopic tools. The laser beam has a near-Gaussian profile with a 1/e{sup 2} diameter of 0.98 mm at the sample plane and a pulse length FWHM (full width at half maximum) of 7.5 ns. The damage craters consist of a molten core region (thermal explosion), surrounded by a near concentric region of fractured material. The latter arises from propagation of lateral cracks induced by the laser-generated shock waves, which also compact the crater wall, {approx} 10 {micro}m thick and {approx} 20% higher in density. The size of the damage crater varies with laser fluence, number of pulses, and laser irradiation history. In the compaction layer, there is no detectable change in the Si/O stoichiometry to within {+-} 1.6% and no crystalline nano-particles of Si were observed. Micro- (1-10 {micro}m) and nano- (20-200 nm) cracks are found, however. A lower valence Si{sup 3+} species on the top 2-3 nm of the compaction layer is evident from the Si 2p XPS. The results are used to construct a physical model of the damage crater and to gain critical insight into laser damage process.

  14. High precision thermal neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Radeka, V.; Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.C.; Yu, B.

    1994-12-31

    Two-dimensional position sensitive detectors are indispensable in neutron diffraction experiments for determination of molecular and crystal structures in biology, solid-state physics and polymer chemistry. Some performance characteristics of these detectors are elementary and obvious, such as the position resolution, number of resolution elements, neutron detection efficiency, counting rate and sensitivity to gamma-ray background. High performance detectors are distinguished by more subtle characteristics such as the stability of the response (efficiency) versus position, stability of the recorded neutron positions, dynamic range, blooming or halo effects. While relatively few of them are needed around the world, these high performance devices are sophisticated and fairly complex, their development requires very specialized efforts. In this context, we describe here a program of detector development, based on {sup 3}He filled proportional chambers, which has been underway for some years at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fundamental approaches and practical considerations are outlined that have resulted in a series of high performance detectors with the best known position resolution, position stability, uniformity of response and reliability over time, for devices of this type.

  15. Characterization of n-GaN dilute magnetic semiconductors by cobalt ions implantation at high-fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husnain, G.; Shu-De, Yao; Ahmad, Ishaq; Rafique, H. M.; Mahmood, Arshad

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we present the structural and magnetic characteristics of cobalt ions implantation at a high-fluence (5×1016 cm-2) into n-GaN epilayer of thickness about 1.6 μm. The n-GaN was grown on sapphire by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Rutherford backscattering channeling was used for the structural study. After implantation, samples were annealed at 700, 800 and 900 °C by rapid thermal annealing in ambient N2. XRD measurements did not show any secondary phase or metal related-peaks. High resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) was performed as well to characterize structures. Well-defined hysteresis loops were observed at 5 K and room temperature using alternating gradient magnetometer AGM and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer. Temperature-dependent magnetization indicated magnetic moment at the lowest temperatures and retained magnetization up to 380 K for cobalt-ion-implanted samples.

  16. Swelling and dislocation evolution in simple ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence in FFTF/MOTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira; Gelles, David S.

    1995-08-01

    Microstructures of a series of Fe sbnd Cr binary ferritic alloys were examined following neutron irradiation to 140 dpa at 698 K in FFTF/MOTA. The chromium concentration ranged from 3 to 18% in 3% increments and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. The swelling varied from 0.4 to 2.9% depending on chromium concentration, and the highest swelling was found in the Fe sbnd 9Cr alloy. The cavity microstructures corresponded to transient to early steady-state swelling regime. Dislocations were composed of networks with both a<100> and ( a/2)<111> Burgers vector and a<100> type interstitial loops. The dislocation density was negatively correlated with swelling. Explanation for the observed chromium concentration dependence of microstructural development and low swelling in the ferritic alloys will be studied in connection with the dislocation bias efficiency and the theory of sink strength ratio.

  17. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Neutronic Core Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan; Holcomb, David Eugene; Varma, Venugopal Koikal

    2012-01-01

    The AHTR is a 3400 MW(t) FHR class reactor design concept intended to serve as a central generating station type power plant. While significant technology development and demonstration remains, the basic design concept appears sound and tolerant of much of the remaining performance uncertainty. No fundamental impediments have been identified that would prevent widespread deployment of the concept. This paper focuses on the preliminary neutronic design studies performed at ORNL during the fiscal year 2011. After a brief presentation of the AHTR design concept, the paper summarizes several neutronic studies performed at ORNL during 2011. An optimization study for the AHTR core is first presented. The temperature and void coefficients of reactivity are then analyzed for a few configurations of interest. A discussion of the limiting factors due to the fast neutron fluence follows. The neutronic studies conclude with a discussion of the control and shutdown options. The studies presented confirm that sound neutronic alternatives exist for the design of the AHTR to maintain full passive safety features and reasonable operation conditions.

  18. High fluence 1.05 {mu}m performance tests using 20 ns shaped pulses on the Beamlet prototype laser

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Murray, J.E.; Burkhart, S.C.; Penko, F.; Henesian, M.A.; Auerbach, J.A.; Wegner, P.J.; Caird, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    Beamlet is a single beamline, nearly full scale physics prototype of the 192 beam Nd:Glass laser driver of the National Ignition Facility. It is used to demonstrate laser performance of the NIF multipass amplifier architecture. Initial system characterization tests have all been performed at pulse durations less than 10 ns. Pinhole closure and modulation at the end of long pulses are a significant concern for the operation of NIF. We recently demonstrated the generation, amplification and propagation of high energy pulses temporally shaped to mimic 20 ns long ignition pulse shapes at fluence levels exceeding the nominal NIF design requirements for Inertial Confinement Fusion by Indirect Drive. We also demonstrated the effectiveness of a new conical pinhole design used in the transport spatial filter to mitigate plasma closure effects and increase closure time to exceed the duration of the 20 ns long pulse.

  19. Mechanism study on mitochondrial fragmentation under oxidative stress caused by high-fluence low-power laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shengnan; Zhou, Feifan; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo continual fusion and fission to maintain their morphology and functions, but the mechanism involved is still not clear. Here, we investigated the effect of mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by high-fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) on mitochondrial dynamics in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1). Upon HF-LPLI-triggered oxidative stress, mitochondria displayed a fragmented structure, which was abolished by exposure to dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), a reactive oxygen species scavenger, indicating that oxidative stress can induce mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondrial translocation of the profission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) was observed following HF-LPLI, demonstrating apoptosis-related activation of Drp1. Notably, DHA pre-treatment prevented HF-LPLI-induced Drp1 activation. We conclude that mitochondrial oxidative stress through activation of Drp1 causes mitochondrial fragmentation.

  20. Extracting the distribution of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces for 351 nm, 3 ns laser pulses at high fluences (20-150 J/cm2).

    PubMed

    Laurence, Ted A; Bude, Jeff D; Ly, Sonny; Shen, Nan; Feit, Michael D

    2012-05-01

    Surface laser damage limits the lifetime of optics for systems guiding high fluence pulses, particularly damage in silica optics used for inertial confinement fusion-class lasers (nanosecond-scale high energy pulses at 355 nm/3.5 eV). The density of damage precursors at low fluence has been measured using large beams (1-3 cm); higher fluences cannot be measured easily since the high density of resulting damage initiation sites results in clustering. We developed automated experiments and analysis that allow us to damage test thousands of sites with small beams (10-30 µm), and automatically image the test sites to determine if laser damage occurred. We developed an analysis method that provides a rigorous connection between these small beam damage test results of damage probability versus laser pulse energy and the large beam damage results of damage precursor densities versus fluence. We find that for uncoated and coated fused silica samples, the distribution of precursors nearly flattens at very high fluences, up to 150 J/cm2, providing important constraints on the physical distribution and nature of these precursors. PMID:22565775

  1. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitates that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.

  2. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitatesmore » that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.« less

  3. The role of lithium thin-film coatings on W surface morphology evolution under high-fluence and high temperature He irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, A. L.; Allain, J. P.; Bystrov, K.; Morgan, T. W.

    2015-11-01

    Tungsten is the candidate plasma-facing component material for the ITER divertor due to its high sputter threshold, high melting temperature, and excellent thermal conductivity. However, when exposed to He ions with E = 0.01-1.0 keV and high fluences >1026 m-2, as those expected in a burning plasma fusion tokamak divertor, the damage to the surface can include the creation of bubbles, holes and tendril-like fuzz morphology. Recent studies show that adding low-Z impurities (C and Be) to a He plasma can inhibit the growth of fuzz. In other applications, lithium (Li) as a PFC coating in multiple tokamaks has improved plasma performance, yet its interaction with high-Z materials (i.e. W) and its role inhibiting fuzz formation is not well understood. We investigated the effect of a thin ~1000 nm Li coating on formation of W surface defect morphology under high fluence and temperature conditions. Samples were exposed with fluxes of ~1024 m-2s-1 and Tsurf ~ 1100 °C. After irradiation, the surfaces of the samples were characterized with SEM. These results are presented along with XPS and SIMS results elucidating the persistence of Li coatings under these conditions. Work supported by US DOE Contract Nos. DC-SC0010717 and DC-SC0010719.

  4. Generation of high-energy (>15 MeV) neutrons using short pulse high intensity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Petrova, Tz. B.; Higginson, D. P.; McNaney, J. M.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.

    2012-09-15

    A roadmap is suggested and demonstrated experimentally for the production of high-energy (>15 MeV) neutrons using short pulse lasers. Investigation with a 3D Monte Carlo model has been employed to quantify the production of energetic neutrons. Numerical simulations have been performed for three nuclear reactions, d(d,n){sup 3}He, {sup 7}Li(d,n){sup 8}Be, and {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be, driven by monoenergetic ion beams. Quantitative estimates for the driver ion beam energy and number have been made and the neutron spectra and yield in the ion propagation direction have been evaluated for various incident ion energies. In order to generate neutron fluence above a detection limit of 10{sup 6} neutrons/sr, either {approx}10{sup 10} protons with energy 20-30 MeV or comparable amount of deuterons with energy 5-10 MeV are required. Experimental verification of the concept with deuterons driven by the Titan laser (peak intensity 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration of 9 ps, wavelength 1.05 {mu}m, and energy of 360 J) is provided with the generation of neutrons with energy of up to 18 MeV from {sup 7}Li(d,n){sup 8}Be reactions. Future research will focus on optimized schemes for ion acceleration for production of high-energy neutrons, which will involve efficient target design, laser parameter optimization, and converter material.

  5. Nano-Crystal Formation and Growth from High-Fluence Ion Implantation of Au, Ag or Cu in Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ila, D.; Baglin, J. E. E.; Zimmerman, R. L.

    The linear and non-linear optical properties of silica may be tailored by the introduction of a random distribution of nanocrystallites of an immiscible metal within a near-surface region. The size, size distribution, and spatial distribution of these crystallites must be controllable in order to optimize the functional properties for device applications. In this paper, we present a novel fabrication technique that offers such control. Energetic metal ions are implanted in silica at room temperature. Subsequent heat treatment leads to diffusion of the implanted atoms, nucleation and growth of metal crystallites, and Ostwald ripening of the resulting clusters. We have observed the kinetics and effective activation energies describing the multiple processes involved, for the cases of Au, Ag or Cu implanted at MeV energies, at various fluences, and then annealed at fixed temperatures in the range 500 °C-1000 °C. Effective activation energies found for nanocrystal nucleation and growth at temperatures below 800 °C (e.g. 64 meV for Ag) are replaced above this temperature range by much higher activation energies (e.g. 400 meV for Ag). We may attribute this to the depletion of un-attached mobile metal atoms (so that ripening of clusters will be limited by energy barriers for escape of such mobile atoms from small crystallites), and/or the annealing of implant-caused stress in the silica structure at high temperatures, that creates new channels for thermal diffusion of metal atoms within the silica host.

  6. Protons in High Density Neutron Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsian, Misak M.

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the possible implication of the recent predictions of two new properties of high momentum distribution of nucleons in asymmetric nuclei for neutron star dynamics. The first property is about the approximate scaling relation between proton and neutron high momentum distributions weighted by their relative fractions (xp and xn) in the nucleus. The second is the existence of inverse proportionality of the high momentum distribution strength of protons and neutrons to xp/n. Based on these predictions we model the high momentum distribution functions for asymmetric nuclei and demonstrate that it describes reasonably well the high momentum characteristics of light nuclei. We also extrapolate our results to heavy nuclei as well as infinite nuclear matter and calculate the relative fractions of protons and neutrons with momenta above kF. Our results indicate that for neutron stars starting at three nuclear saturation densities the protons with xp = 1/9 will populate mostly the high momentum tail of the momentum distribution while only 2% of the neutrons will do so. Such a situation may have many implications for different observations of neutron stars which we discuss.

  7. Computational Transport Modeling of High-Energy Neutrons Found in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brad; Theriot, Corey A.; Rohde, Larry H.; Wu, Honglu

    2012-01-01

    The high charge and high energy (HZE) particle radiation environment in space interacts with spacecraft materials and the human body to create a population of neutrons encompassing a broad kinetic energy spectrum. As an HZE ion penetrates matter, there is an increasing chance of fragmentation as penetration depth increases. When an ion fragments, secondary neutrons are released with velocities up to that of the primary ion, giving some neutrons very long penetration ranges. These secondary neutrons have a high relative biological effectiveness, are difficult to effectively shield, and can cause more biological damage than the primary ions in some scenarios. Ground-based irradiation experiments that simulate the space radiation environment must account for this spectrum of neutrons. Using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS), it is possible to simulate a neutron environment that is characteristic of that found in spaceflight. Considering neutron dosimetry, the focus lies on the broad spectrum of recoil protons that are produced in biological targets. In a biological target, dose at a certain penetration depth is primarily dependent upon recoil proton tracks. The PHITS code can be used to simulate a broad-energy neutron spectrum traversing biological targets, and it account for the recoil particle population. This project focuses on modeling a neutron beamline irradiation scenario for determining dose at increasing depth in water targets. Energy-deposition events and particle fluence can be simulated by establishing cross-sectional scoring routines at different depths in a target. This type of model is useful for correlating theoretical data with actual beamline radiobiology experiments. Other work exposed human fibroblast cells to a high-energy neutron source to study micronuclei induction in cells at increasing depth behind water shielding. Those findings provide supporting data describing dose vs. depth across a water-equivalent medium. This

  8. Managing NIF safety equipment in a high neutron and gamma radiation environment.

    PubMed

    Datte, Philip; Eckart, Mark; Jackson, Mark; Khater, Hesham; Manuel, Stacie; Newton, Mark

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility that supports the Inertial Confinement Fusion program. During the ignition experimental campaign, the NIF is expected to perform shots with varying fusion yield producing 14 MeV neutrons up to 20 MJ or 7.1 × 10(18) neutrons per shot and a maximum annual yield of 1,200 MJ. Several infrastructure support systems will be exposed to varying high yield shots over the facility's 30-y life span. In response to this potential exposure, analysis and testing of several facility safety systems have been conducted. A detailed MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) model has been developed for the NIF facility, and it includes most of the major structures inside the Target Bay. The model has been used in the simulation of expected neutron and gamma fluences throughout the Target Bay. Radiation susceptible components were identified and tested to fluences greater than 10(13) (n cm(-2)) for 14 MeV neutrons and γ-ray equivalent. The testing includes component irradiation using a 60Co gamma source and accelerator-based irradiation using 4- and 14- MeV neutron sources. The subsystem implementation in the facility is based on the fluence estimates after shielding and survivability guidelines derived from the dose maps and component tests results. This paper reports on the evaluation and implementation of mitigations for several infrastructure safety support systems, including video, oxygen monitoring, pressure monitors, water sensing systems, and access control interfaces found at the NIF. PMID:23629064

  9. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR HAVING LOCALIZED AREAS OF HIGH THERMAL NEUTRON DENSITIES

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1958-06-01

    A nuclear reactor for the irradiation of materials designed to provide a localized area of high thermal neutron flux density in which the materials to be irradiated are inserted is described. The active portion of the reactor is comprised of a cubicle graphite moderator of about 25 feet in length along each axis which has a plurality of cylindrical channels for accommodatirg elongated tubular-shaped fuel elements. The fuel elements have radial fins for spacing the fuel elements from the channel walls, thereby providing spaces through which a coolant may be passed, and also to serve as a heatconductirg means. Ducts for accommnodating the sample material to be irradiated extend through the moderator material perpendicular to and between parallel rows of fuel channels. The improvement is in the provision of additional fuel element channels spaced midway between 2 rows of the regular fuel channels in the localized area surrounding the duct where the high thermal neutron flux density is desired. The fuel elements normally disposed in the channels directly adjacent the duct are placed in the additional channels, and the channels directly adjacent the duct are plugged with moderator material. This design provides localized areas of high thermal neutron flux density without the necessity of providing additional fuel material.

  11. Ultrafine tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion devices: effect of high flux, high fluence low energy helium irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atwani, O.; Gonderman, Sean; Efe, Mert; De Temmerman, Gregory; Morgan, Thomas; Bystrov, Kirill; Klenosky, Daniel; Qiu, Tian; Allain, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    This work discusses the response of ultrafine-grained tungsten materials to high-flux, high-fluence, low energy pure He irradiation. Ultrafine-grained tungsten samples were exposed in the Pilot-PSI (Westerhout et al 2007 Phys. Scr. T128 18) linear plasma device at the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER) in Nieuwegein, the Netherlands. The He flux on the tungsten samples ranged from 1.0 × 1023-2.0 × 1024 ions m-2 s-1, the sample bias ranged from a negative (20-65) V, and the sample temperatures ranged from 600-1500 °C. SEM analysis of the exposed samples clearly shows that ultrafine-grained tungsten materials have a greater fluence threshold to the formation of fuzz by an order or magnitude or more, supporting the conjecture that grain boundaries play a major role in the mechanisms of radiation damage. Pre-fuzz damage analysis is addressed, as in the role of grain orientation on structure formation. Grains of (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) orientation showed only pore formation, while (0 0 1) oriented grains showed ripples (higher structures) decorated with pores. Blistering at the grain boundaries is also observed in this case. In situ TEM analysis during irradiation revealed facetted bubble formation at the grain boundaries likely responsible for blistering at this location. The results could have significant implications for future plasma-burning fusion devices given the He-induced damage could lead to macroscopic dust emission into the fusion plasma.

  12. Neutron measurements around storage casks containing spent fuel and vitrified high-level radioactive waste at ZWILAG.

    PubMed

    Buchillier, T; Aroua, A; Bochud, F O

    2007-01-01

    Spectrometric and dosimetric measurements were made around a cask containing spent fuel and a cask containing high-level radioactive waste at the Swiss intermediate waste and spent fuel storage facility. A Bonner sphere spectrometer, an LB 6411 neutron monitor and an Automess Szintomat 6134A were used to characterise the n-gamma fields at several locations around the two casks. The results of these measurements show that the neutron fluence spectra around the cask containing radioactive waste are harder and higher in intensity than those measured in the vicinity of the spent fuel cask. The ambient dose equivalents measured with the LB 6411 neutron monitor are in good agreement with those obtained using the Bonner spheres, except for locations with soft neutron spectra where the monitor overestimates the neutron ambient dose equivalent by almost 50%. PMID:17494980

  13. Comparison of MCNP calculation and measurement of neutron fluence in a channel for short-time irradiation in the LVR-15 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lahodova, Z.; Flibor, S.; Klupak, V.; Kucera, J.; Marek, M.; Viererbl, L.

    2006-07-01

    The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the neutron energy distribution in a channel of the LVR-15 reactor used mostly for short-time neutron activation analysis. Twenty types of activation monitors were irradiated in this channel equipped with a pneumatic facility with a transport time of 3.5 s. The activities measured and the corresponding reaction rates were used to determinate the neutron spectrum. The reaction rates were compared with MCNP calculations to confirm the results. The second purpose of this work was to verify our nuclear data library used for the reaction rate calculations. The experiment results were also incorporated into our database system of neutron energy distribution at the reactor core. (authors)

  14. Measurements of the absolute neutron fluence spectrum emitted at 0/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/ from the Little-Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear research emulsions (NRE) have been used to characterize the neutron spectrum emitted by the Little-Boy replica. NRE were irradiated at the Little-Boy surface as well as approximately 2m from the center of the Little-Boy replica using polar angles of 0/sup 0/, 30/sup 0/, 60/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/. For the NRE exposed at 2m, neutron background was determined using shadow shields of borated polyethylene. Emulsion scanning to date has concentrated exclusively on the 2m, 0/sup 0/ and 2m, 90/sup 0/ locations. Approximately 5000 proton-recoil tracks have been measured in NRE irradiated at each of these locations. At the 2m, 90/sup 0/ location the NRE neutron spectrum extends from 0.37 up to 8.2 MeV, whereas the NRE neutron spectrum at the 2m, 0/sup 0/ location is much softer and extends only up to 2.7 MeV. NRE neutron spectrometry results at these two locations are compared with both liquid scintillator neutron spectrometry and Monte Carlo calculations. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Neutron and high speed photogrammetric arcjet diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, P. A. E.; Rogers, J. D.; Fowler, P. H.; Deininger, W. D.; Taylor, A. D.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods for real time internal diagnostics of arcjet engines are described. One method uses cold, thermal, or epithermal neutrons. Cold neutrons are used to detect the presence and location of hydrogenous propellants. Thermal neutrons are used to delineate the edge contours of anode and cathode surfaces and to measure stress/strain. Epithermal neutrons are used to measure temperatures on arcjet surfaces, bulk material temperatures, and point temperatures in bulk materials. It is found that this method, with an exposure time of 10 min, produces at temperature accuracy for W or Re of + or - 2.5 C. The other method uses visible-light high-speed photogrammetry to obtain images of the transient behavior of the arc during start-up and to relate this behavior to electrial supply characteristics such as voltage, current, and ripple.

  16. First result of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed to high flux plasma in TPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hatano, Y.; Calderoni, P.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Sokolov, M.; Zhang, K.; Cao, G.; Kolasinski, R.; Sharpe, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    With the Japan-US joint research project Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), an initial set of tungsten samples (99.99% purity, A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by high flux neutrons at 323 K to 0.025 dpa in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, one of the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples was exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 5 × 1021 m-2 s-1, ion fluence: 4 × 1025 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The deuterium retention in the neutron-irradiated tungsten was 40% higher in comparison to the unirradiated tungsten. The observed broad desorption spectrum from neutron-irradiated tungsten and associated TMAP modeling of the deuterium release suggest that trapping occurs in the bulk material at more than three different energy sites.

  17. Charge and fluence lifetime measurements of a dc high voltage GaAs photogun at high average current

    SciTech Connect

    J. Grames, R. Suleiman, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, J. Hansknecht, D. Machie, M. Poelker, M.L. Stutzman

    2011-04-01

    GaAs-based dc high voltage photoguns used at accelerators with extensive user programs must exhibit long photocathode operating lifetime. Achieving this goal represents a significant challenge for proposed high average current facilities that must operate at tens of milliamperes or more. This paper describes techniques to maintain good vacuum while delivering beam, and techniques that minimize the ill effects of ion bombardment, the dominant mechanism that reduces photocathode yield of a GaAs-based dc high voltage photogun. Experimental results presented here demonstrate enhanced lifetime at high beam currents by: (a) operating with the drive laser beam positioned away from the electrostatic center of the photocathode, (b) limiting the photocathode active area to eliminate photoemission from regions of the photocathode that do not support efficient beam delivery, (c) using a large drive laser beam to distribute ion damage over a larger area, and (d) by applying a relatively low bias voltage to the anode to repel ions created within the downstream beam line. A combination of these techniques provided the best total charge extracted lifetimes in excess of 1000 C at dc beam currents up to 9.5 mA, using green light illumination of bulk GaAs inside a 100 kV photogun.

  18. s-process studies in the light of new experimental cross sections - Distribution of neutron fluences and r-process residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaeppeler, F.; Beer, H.; Wisshak, K.; Clayton, D. D.; Macklin, R. L.; Ward, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    A best set of neutron-capture cross sections has been evaluated for the most important s-process isotopes. With this data base, s-process studies have been carried out using the traditional model which assumes a steady neutron flux and an exponential distribution of neutron irradiations. The calculated sigma-N curve is in excellent agreement with the empirical sigma-N-values of pure s-process nuclei. Simultaneously, good agreement is found between the difference of solar and s-process abundances and the abundances of pure r-process nuclei. The abundance pattern of the iron group elements where s-process results complement the abundances obtained from explosive nuclear burning is discussed. The results obtained from the traditional s-process model such as seed abundances, mean neutron irradiations, or neutron densities are compared to recent stellar model calculations which assume the He-burning shells of red giant stars as the site for the s-process.

  19. Neutron-induced electronic failures around a high-energy linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; White, R. Allen; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Gillin, Michael T.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: After a new in-vault CT-on-rails system repeatedly malfunctioned following use of a high-energy radiotherapy beam, we investigated the presence and impact of neutron radiation on this electronic system, as well as neutron shielding options. Methods: We first determined the CT scanner's failure rate as a function of the number of 18 MV monitor units (MUs) delivered. We then re-examined the failure rate with both 2.7-cm-thick and 7.6-cm-thick borated polyethylene (BPE) covering the linac head for neutron shielding. To further examine shielding options, as well as to explore which neutrons were relevant to the scanner failure, Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the neutron fluence and spectrum in the bore of the CT scanner. Simulations included BPE covering the CT scanner itself as well as covering the linac head. Results: We found that the CT scanner had a 57% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MUs. While the addition of neutron shielding to the accelerator head reduced this risk of failure, the benefit was minimal and even 7.6 cm of BPE was still associated with a 29% chance of failure after the delivery of 200 MU. This shielding benefit was achieved regardless of whether the linac head or CT scanner was shielded. Additionally, it was determined that fast neutrons were primarily responsible for the electronic failures. Conclusions: As illustrated by the CT-on-rails system in the current study, physicists should be aware that electronic systems may be highly sensitive to neutron radiation. Medical physicists should therefore monitor electronic systems that have not been evaluated for potential neutron sensitivity. This is particularly relevant as electronics are increasingly common in the therapy vault and newer electronic systems may exhibit increased sensitivity.

  20. Atmospheric ionization by high-fluence, hard-spectrum solar proton events and their probable appearance in the ice core archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C.; Laird, Claude M.; Neuenswander, Ben; Atri, Dimitra

    2016-03-01

    Solar energetic particles ionize the atmosphere, leading to production of nitrogen oxides. It has been suggested that some such events are visible as layers of nitrate in ice cores, yielding archives of energetic, high-fluence solar proton events (SPEs). This has been controversial, due to slowness of transport for these species down from the upper stratosphere; past numerical simulations based on an analytic calculation have shown very little ionization below the midstratosphere. These simulations suffer from deficiencies: they consider only soft SPEs and narrow energy ranges; spectral fits are poorly chosen; and with few exceptions secondary particles in air showers are ignored. Using improved simulations that follow development of the proton-induced air shower, we find consistency with recent experiments showing substantial excess ionization down to 5 km. We compute nitrate available from the 23 February 1956 SPE, which had a high-fluence, hard-spectrum, and well-resolved associated nitrate peak in a Greenland ice core. For the first time, we find that this event can account for ice core data with timely (~2 months) transport downward between 46 km and the surface, thus indicating an archive of high-fluence, hard-spectrum SPEs covering the last several millennia. We discuss interpretations of this result, as well as the lack of a clearly defined nitrate spike associated with the soft-spectrum 3-4 August 1972 SPE. We suggest that hard-spectrum SPEs, especially in the 6 months of polar winter, are detectable in ice cores and that more work needs to be done to investigate this.

  1. A high temperature high pressure cell for quasielastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F.; Meyer, A.; Kaplonski, J.; Unruh, T.; Mamontov, E.

    2011-08-15

    We present our recent development of a high temperature high pressure cell for neutron scattering. Combining a water cooled Nb1Zr pressure cell body with an internal heating furnace, the sample environment can reach temperatures of up to 1500 K at a pressure of up to 200 MPa at the sample position, with an available sample volume of about 700 mm{sup 3}. The cell material Nb1Zr is specifically chosen due to its reasonable mechanical strength at elevated temperatures and fairly small neutron absorption and incoherent scattering cross sections. With this design, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio of about 10:1 can be achieved. This opens new possibilities for quasielastic neutron scattering studies on different types of neutron spectrometers under high temperature high pressure conditions, which is particularly interesting for geological research on, e.g., water dynamics in silicate melts.

  2. A high temperature high pressure cell for quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Kaplonski, J; Unruh, T; Mamontov, E; Meyer, A

    2011-08-01

    We present our recent development of a high temperature high pressure cell for neutron scattering. Combining a water cooled Nb1Zr pressure cell body with an internal heating furnace, the sample environment can reach temperatures of up to 1500 K at a pressure of up to 200 MPa at the sample position, with an available sample volume of about 700 mm(3). The cell material Nb1Zr is specifically chosen due to its reasonable mechanical strength at elevated temperatures and fairly small neutron absorption and incoherent scattering cross sections. With this design, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio of about 10:1 can be achieved. This opens new possibilities for quasielastic neutron scattering studies on different types of neutron spectrometers under high temperature high pressure conditions, which is particularly interesting for geological research on, e.g., water dynamics in silicate melts. PMID:21895254

  3. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, I D

    2006-05-25

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on {sup 6}LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, {alpha}) reactions with fast neutrons in {sup 6}Li and {sup 10}B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies k{sub B}T on the order of {mu}eV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution {Delta}E {approx} (k{sub B}T{sup 2}C){sup 1/2}, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB{sub 2} absorber using thermal neutrons from a {sup 252}Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in {sup 7}Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a {sup 6}Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the {sup 6}Li(n, {alpha}){sup 3}H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  4. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma- and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of (14)C by LSC.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, B; Kučera, J; Světlík, I; Viererbl, L; Lahodová, Z; Tomášková, L; Cabalka, M

    2014-11-01

    Gamma- and neutron doses in an experimental reactor were measured using alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. The absorbed dose in alanine was decomposed into contributions caused by gamma and neutron radiation using neutron kerma factors. To overcome a low sensitivity of the alanine/ESR response to thermal neutrons, a novel method has been proposed for the assessment of a thermal neutron flux using the (14)N(n,p) (14)C reaction on nitrogen present in alanine and subsequent measurement of (14)C by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). PMID:24581599

  5. Thermal neutron calibration channel at LNMRI/IRD.

    PubMed

    Astuto, A; Salgado, A P; Leite, S P; Patrão, K C S; Fonseca, E S; Pereira, W W; Lopes, R T

    2014-10-01

    The Brazilian Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations (LNMRI) standard thermal neutron flux facility was designed to provide uniform neutron fluence for calibration of small neutron detectors and individual dosemeters. This fluence is obtained by neutron moderation from four (241)Am-Be sources, each with 596 GBq, in a facility built with blocks of graphite/paraffin compound and high-purity carbon graphite. This study was carried out in two steps. In the first step, simulations using the MCNPX code on different geometric arrangements of moderator materials and neutron sources were performed. The quality of the resulting neutron fluence in terms of spectrum, cadmium ratio and gamma-neutron ratio was evaluated. In the second step, the system was assembled based on the results obtained on the simulations, and new measurements are being made. These measurements will validate the system, and other intercomparisons will ensure traceability to the International System of Units. PMID:24625545

  6. Portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source provides increased experimental accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, W. C.; Stewart, D. C.; Wahlgren, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Small portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source combines twelve curium-americium beryllium sources. This high intensity of neutrons, with a flux which slowly decreases at a known rate, provides for increased experimental accuracy.

  7. High-flux source of fusion neutrons for material and component testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D. E.; Hooper, E. B.; Ryutov, D. D.; Thomassen, K. I.

    1999-01-07

    The inner part of a fusion reactor will have to operate at very high neutron loads. In steady-state reactors the minimum fluence before the scheduled replacement of the reactor core should be at least l0-15 Mw.yr/m2. A more frequent replacement of the core is hardly compatible with economic constraints. A most recent summary of the discussions of these issues is presented in Ref. [l]. If and when times come to build a commercial fusion reactor, the availability of information on the behavior of materials and components at such fluences will become mandatory for making a final decision. This makes it necessary an early development and construction of a neutron source for fusion material and component testing. In this paper, we present information on one very attractive concept of such a source: a source based on a so called Gas Dynamic Trap. This neutron source was proposed in the mid 1980s (Ref. [2]; see also a survey [3] with discussion of the early stage of the project). Since then, gradual accumulation of the relevant experimental information on a modest-scale experimental facility GDT at Novosibirsk, together with a continuing design activity, have made initial theoretical considerations much more credible. We believe that such a source can be built within 4 or 5 years. Of course, one should remember that there is a chance for developing steady-state reactors with a liquid (and therefore continuously renewable) first wall [4], which would also serve as a tritium breeder. In this case, the need in the neutron testing will become less pressing. However, it is not clear yet that the concept of the flowing wall will be compatible with all types of steady-state reactors. It seems therefore prudent to be prepared to the need of a quick construction of a neutron source. It should also be mentioned that there exist projects of the accelerator-based neutron sources (e.g., [5]). However, they generally have two major disadvantages: a wrong neutron spectrum

  8. A high yield neutron target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Steinberg, R.; Weisenbach, P.

    1974-01-01

    Target, in cylinder form, rotates rapidly in front of beam. Titanium tritide film is much thicker than range of accelerated deutron. Sputtering electrode permits full use of thick film. Stream of high-velocity coolant provides efficient transfer of heat from target.

  9. High momentum protons in superdense neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsian, Misak M.

    2013-10-01

    Recent observations of strong dominance of pn as compared to pp and nn short range correlations (SRCs) in nuclei indicate on possibility of unique new condition for asymmetric high density nuclear matter, in which the pp and nn interactions are suppressed while the pn interactions are enhanced due to tensor interaction. We demonstrate that, due to this enhancement, in high density neutron matter containing small portion of proton component the momentum distribution of protons is strongly deformed towards the high momentum states. This result is obtained by extracting the probabilities of two-nucleon (2N) SRCs from the analysis of the experimental data on high momentum transfer A(e,'e)X reactions and fitting them as a function of nuclear density and asymmetry. Using this fit we estimated that starting at three nuclear saturation densities the protons with fractional densities xp = 1/9 will populate mostly the high momentum tail of the momentum distribution while only few% of the neutrons will do so. We discuss the possible implications of this result for neutron stars.

  10. High conduction neutron absorber to simulate fast reactor environment in an existing test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Larry R. Greenwood; James R. Parry

    2014-06-22

    A new metal matrix composite material has been developed to serve as a thermal neutron absorber for testing fast reactor fuels and materials in an existing pressurized water reactor. The performance of this material was evaluated by placing neutron fluence monitors within shrouded and unshrouded holders and irradiating for up to four cycles. The monitor wires were analyzed by gamma and X-ray spectrometry to determine the activities of the activation products. Adjusted neutron fluences were calculated and grouped into three bins—thermal, epithermal, and fast—to evaluate the spectral shift created by the new material. A comparison of shrouded and unshrouded fluence monitors shows a thermal fluence decrease of ~11 % for the shielded monitors. Radioisotope activity and mass for each of the major activation products is given to provide insight into the evolution of thermal absorption cross-section during irradiation. The thermal neutron absorption capability of the composite material appears to diminish at total neutron fluence levels of ~8 × 1025 n/m2. Calculated values for dpa in excess of 2.0 were obtained for two common structural materials (iron and nickel) of interest for future fast flux experiments.

  11. High Intensity, Pulsed, D-D Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. L.; Vainionpaa, J. H.; Jones, G.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Harris, J. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Cremer, J. T.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Kwan, J. W.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.; Gough, R. A.

    2009-03-01

    Single ion-beam RF-plasma neutron generators are presented as a laboratory source of intense neutrons. The continuous and pulsed operations of such a neutron generator using the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction are reported. The neutron beam can be pulsed by switching the RF plasma and/or a gate electrode. These generators are actively vacuum pumped so that a continuous supply of deuterium gas is present for the production of ions and neutrons. This contributes to the generator's long life. These single-beam generators are capable of producing up to 1010 n/s. Previously, Adelphi and LBNL have demonstrated these generators' applications in fast neutron radiography, Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Together with an inexpensive compact moderator, these high-output neutron generators extend useful applications to home laboratory operations.

  12. High Intensity, Pulsed, D-D Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D. L.; Vainionpaa, J. H.; Jones, G.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Harris, J. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Cremer, J. T.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Kwan, J. W.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.; Gough, R. A.

    2008-08-01

    Single ion-beam RF-plasma neutron generators are presented as a laboratory source of intense neutrons. The continuous and pulsed operations of such a neutron generator using the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction are reported. The neutron beam can be pulsed by switching the RF plasma and/or a gate electrode. These generators are actively vacuum pumped so that a continuous supply of deuterium gas is present for the production of ions and neutrons. This contributes to the generator's long life. These single-beam generators are capable of producing up to 1E10 n/s. Previously, Adelphi and LBNL have demonstrated these generators' applications in fast neutron radiography, Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Together with an inexpensive compact moderator, these high-output neutron generators extend useful applications to home laboratory operations.

  13. Nontargeted Stressful Effects in Normal Human Fibroblast Cultures Exposed to Low Fluences of High Charge, High Energy (HZE) Particles: Kinetics of Biologic Responses and Significance of Secondary Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Gonon, Géraldine; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Howell, Roger W.; Fromm, Michel; Azzam, Edouard I.

    2014-01-01

    The induction of nontargeted stressful effects in cell populations exposed to low fluences of high charge (Z) and high energy (E) particles is relevant to estimates of the health risks of space radiation. We investigated the up-regulation of stress markers in confluent normal human fibroblast cultures exposed to 1,000 MeV/u iron ions [linear energy transfer (LET) ~151 keV/μm] or 600 MeV/u silicon ions (LET ~50 keV/μm) at mean absorbed doses as low as 0.2 cGy, wherein 1–3% of the cells were targeted through the nucleus by a primary particle. Within 24 h postirradiation, significant increases in the levels of phospho-TP53 (serine 15), p21Waf1 (CDKN1A), HDM2, phospho-ERK1/2, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation were detected, which suggested participation in the stress response of cells not targeted by primary particles. This was supported by in situ studies that indicated greater increases in 53BP1 foci formation, a marker of DNA damage. than expected from the number of primary particle traversals. The effect was expressed as early as 15 min after exposure, peaked at 1 h and decreased by 24 h. A similar tendency occurred after exposure of the cell cultures to 0.2 cGy of 3.7 MeV α particles (LET ~109 keV/μm) that targets ~1.6% of nuclei, but not after 0.2 cGy from 290 MeV/u carbon ions (LET ~13 keV/μm) by which, on average, ~13% of the nuclei were hit, which highlights the importance of radiation quality in the induced effect. Simulations with the FLUKA multi-particle transport code revealed that fragmentation products, other than electrons, in cell cultures exposed to HZE particles comprise <1% of the absorbed dose. Further, the radial spread of dose due to secondary heavy ion fragments is confined to approximately 10–20 μm. Thus, the latter are unlikely to significantly contribute to stressful effects in cells not targeted by primary HZE particles. PMID:23465079

  14. High resolution neutron imaging of water in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L; Davey, John R; Spendelow, Jacob S

    2008-01-01

    Optimal water management in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells is critical to improving the performance and durability of fuel cell systems especially during transient, start-up and shut-down operations. For example, while a high water content is desirable for improved membrane and catalyst ionomer conductivity, high water content can also block gas access to the triple-phase boundary resulting in lowered performance due to catalyst and gas diffusion layer (GDL) flooding. Visualizing liquid water by neutron imaging has been used over the past decade to study the water distribution inside operating fuel cells. In this paper, the results from our imaging at NIST using their recently installed higher resolution ({approx} 25 mm) Microchannel Plate (MCP) detector with a pixel pitch of 14.7 mm are presented. This detector is capable of quantitatively imaging the water inside the MEA (Membrane Electrode Assembly)/GDL (Gas Diffusion Layer) of working fuel cells and can provide the water profiles within these various components in addition to the channel water. Specially designed fuel cells (active area = 2.25 cm{sup 2}) have been used in order to take advantage of the full detector resolution. The cell design is illustrated in a figure where one of the current collector/end plates is shown. The serpentine pattern was machined into a block of aluminum and plated with nickel and then gold to form the flow field. The measurements were performed using beam no. 1 and aperture no. 2 with a fluence rate of 1.9 x 10{sup 6} neutrons cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. The cells were assembled with Gore{sup TM} Primea{sup R} MEAs and SGL Sigracet {sup R} 24 series GDLs (PRIMEA, GORE-SELECT and GORE are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc). All the cells were tested at 80 {sup o}C with 1.2 stoichiometry H{sub 2} and 2.0 stoichiometry air flows.

  15. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  16. Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; McNaney, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Frenje, J. A.; Jarrott, L. C.; Tynan, G.; Beg, F. N.; Kodama, R.; Nakamura, H.; Lancaster, K. L.

    2011-10-15

    The generation of high-energy neutrons using laser-accelerated ions is demonstrated experimentally using the Titan laser with 360 J of laser energy in a 9 ps pulse. In this technique, a short-pulse, high-energy laser accelerates deuterons from a CD{sub 2} foil. These are incident on a LiF foil and subsequently create high energy neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(d,xn) nuclear reaction (Q = 15 MeV). Radiochromic film and a Thomson parabola ion-spectrometer were used to diagnose the laser accelerated deuterons and protons. Conversion efficiency into protons was 0.5%, an order of magnitude greater than into deuterons. Maximum neutron energy was shown to be angularly dependent with up to 18 MeV neutrons observed in the forward direction using neutron time-of-flight spectrometry. Absolutely calibrated CR-39 detected spectrally integrated neutron fluence of up to 8 x 10{sup 8} n sr{sup -1} in the forward direction.

  17. The neutron component of two high-energy photon reference fields.

    PubMed

    Röttger, S; Schäler, K; Behrens, R; Nolte, R; Wissmann, F

    2007-01-01

    The 4.4 MeV photon reference field described in ISO 4037 is produced by the (12)C(p,p')(12)C (E(x) = 4.4389 MeV) reaction using a thick elemental carbon target and a proton beam with an energy of 5.7 MeV. The relative abundance of the isotope (13)C in elemental carbon is 1.10%. Therefore, the 4.4 MeV photon field is contaminated by neutrons produced by the (13)C(p,n) (13)N reaction (Q = -3.003 MeV). The ambient dose equivalent H*(10) produced by these neutrons is of the same order of magnitude as the ambient dose equivalent produced by the 4.4 MeV photons. For the calibration of dosemeters, especially those also sensitive to neutrons, the spectral fluence distribution of these neutrons has to be known in detail. On the other hand, a mixed photon/neutron field is very useful for the calibration of tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC), if this field combines a high-linear energy transfer (LET) component produced by low-energy neutrons and a low-LET component resulting from photons with about the same ambient dose equivalent and energies up to 7 MeV. Such a mixed field was produced at the PTB accelerator facility using a thin CaF(2) + (nat)C target and a 5.7 MeV proton beam. PMID:17675300

  18. Algorithms for optimizing CT fluence control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to customize the incident x-ray fluence in CT via beam-shaping filters or mA modulation is known to improve image quality and/or reduce radiation dose. Previous work has shown that complete control of x-ray fluence (ray-by-ray fluence modulation) would further improve dose efficiency. While complete control of fluence is not currently possible, emerging concepts such as dynamic attenuators and inverse-geometry CT allow nearly complete control to be realized. Optimally using ray-by-ray fluence modulation requires solving a very high-dimensional optimization problem. Most optimization techniques fail or only provide approximate solutions. We present efficient algorithms for minimizing mean or peak variance given a fixed dose limit. The reductions in variance can easily be translated to reduction in dose, if the original variance met image quality requirements. For mean variance, a closed form solution is derived. The peak variance problem is recast as iterated, weighted mean variance minimization, and at each iteration it is possible to bound the distance to the optimal solution. We apply our algorithms in simulations of scans of the thorax and abdomen. Peak variance reductions of 45% and 65% are demonstrated in the abdomen and thorax, respectively, compared to a bowtie filter alone. Mean variance shows smaller gains (about 15%).

  19. High efficiency proportional neutron detector with solid liner internal structures

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger Allen; Holcomb, David Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2014-08-05

    A tube-style neutron detector, a panel-style neutron detector incorporating a plurality of tube-style neutron detectors, and a panel-style neutron detector including a plurality of anode wires are provided. A plurality of channels is provided in a neutron detector such that each channel has an inner surface of a coating layer including a neutron-absorbing material. A wire anode is provided at end of each channel so that electrons generated by a charged daughter particle generated by a neutron are collected to detect a neutron-matter interaction. Moderator units can be incorporated into a neutron detector to provide improved detection efficiencies and/or to determine neutron energy spectrum. Gas-based proportional response from the neutron detectors can be employed for special nuclear material (SNM) detection. This neutron detector can provide similar performance to .sup.3He-based detectors without requiring .sup.3He and without containing toxic, flammable, or high-pressure materials.

  20. On the growth of segregated C layers on top of Fe films on pyrolytic graphite samples during high-fluence D + irradiation at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santaniello, A.; Möller, W.; Roth, J.

    1989-05-01

    On Fe films evaporated on pyrolytic graphite, thick C layers segregate during high-temperature (above about 800 K) light ion irradiation if the penetrating ions are energetic enough to reach the Fe-graphite interface. The thickness of the C segregated layer and the C depth distribution in the Fe film have been determined with 2-MeV 4He+ Rutherford backscattering. A steady-state carbon overlayer is reached at high fluences (above about 1019 particles/cm2), the thickness of which depends on the energy of the irradiating beam for a given thickness of the Fe evaporated film. The anisotropic structure of the pyrolytic graphite substrate influences the thickness of the steady-state C overlayer, thicker C layers being measured for edge-oriented C substrates. Using the Monte Carlo code trim, the production of defects in the graphite substrate has been calculated for different thicknesses of the C overlayer. The total amount of defects produced in the graphite substrate has been identified as the parameter regulating the growth and the steady-state value of the C overlayer. With the depth distributions of defect production generated by trim as source functions, the diffusion of C interstitials in graphite under the influence of recombination with vacancies has been modeled. The segregating C fluxes are identified with the fluxes of interstitials arriving at the Fe/graphite substrate interface for a suitable choice of the parameters in the diffusion equation.

  1. High spatial resolution fast-neutron imaging detectors for Pulsed Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Bar, D.; Feldman, G.; Goldberg, M. B.; Katz, D.; Sayag, E.; Shmueli, I.; Cohen, Y.; Tal, A.; Vagish, Z.; Bromberger, B.; Dangendorf, V.; Mugai, D.; Tittelmeier, K.; Weierganz, M.

    2009-05-01

    Two generations of a novel detector for high-resolution transmission imaging and spectrometry of fast-neutrons are presented. These devices are based on a hydrogenous fiber scintillator screen and single- or multiple-gated intensified camera systems (ICCD). This detector is designed for energy-selective neutron radiography with nanosecond-pulsed broad-energy (1-10 MeV) neutron beams. Utilizing the Time-of-Flight (TOF) method, such a detector is capable of simultaneously capturing several images, each at a different neutron energy (TOF). In addition, a gamma-ray image can also be simultaneously registered, allowing combined neutron/gamma inspection of objects. This permits combining the sensitivity of the fast-neutron resonance method to low-Z elements with that of gamma radiography to high-Z materials.

  2. Laser generated neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; Bartal, T.; McNaney, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Hey, D. S.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Kodama, R.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mariscal, D.; Beg, F. N.; Nakamura, H.; Nakanii, N.

    2010-10-15

    A neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy has been developed using high-intensity, short-pulse lasers. This technique will allow robust measurement of interior ion temperature of laser-shocked materials and provide insight into material equation of state. The neutron generation technique uses laser-accelerated protons to create neutrons in LiF through (p,n) reactions. The incident proton beam has been diagnosed using radiochromic film. This distribution is used as the input for a (p,n) neutron prediction code which is validated with experimentally measured neutron yields. The calculation infers a total fluence of 1.8x10{sup 9} neutrons, which are expected to be sufficient for neutron resonance spectroscopy temperature measurements.

  3. The Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Geoffrey; Cianciolo, Vince; Koehler, Paul; Allen, Richard; Snow, William Michael; Huffman, Paul; Gould, Chris; Bowman, David; Cooper, Martin; Doyle, John

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), currently under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with an anticipated start-up in early 2006, will provide the most intense pulsed beams of cold neutrons in the world. At a projected power of 1.4 MW, the time averaged fluxes and fluences of the SNS will approach those of high flux reactors. One of the flight paths on the cold, coupled moderator will be devoted to fundamental neutron physics. The fundamental neutron physics beamline is anticipated to include two beam-lines; a broad band cold beam, and a monochromatic beam of 0.89 nm neutrons for ultracold neutron (UCN) experiments. The fundamental neutron physics beamline will be operated as a user facility with experiment selection based on a peer reviewed proposal process. An initial program of five experiments in neutron decay, hadronic weak interaction and time reversal symmetry violation have been proposed. PMID:27308112

  4. High-energy neutron spectroscopy with thick silicon detectors.

    PubMed

    Kinnison, James D; Maurer, Richard H; Roth, David R; Haight, Robert C

    2003-02-01

    The high-energy neutron component of the space radiation environment in thick structures such as the International Space Station contributes to the total radiation dose received by an astronaut. Detector design constraints such as size and mass have limited the energy range of neutron spectrum measurements in orbit to about 12 MeV in Space Shuttle studies. We present a new method for high-energy neutron spectroscopy using small silicon detectors that can extend these measurements to more than 500 MeV. The methodology is based on measurement of the detector response function for high-energy neutrons and inversion of this response function with measured deposition data to deduce neutron energy spectra. We also present the results of an initial shielding study performed with the thick silicon detector system for high-energy neutrons incident on polyethylene. PMID:12537520

  5. High-energy neutron spectroscopy with thick silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinnison, James D.; Maurer, Richard H.; Roth, David R.; Haight, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The high-energy neutron component of the space radiation environment in thick structures such as the International Space Station contributes to the total radiation dose received by an astronaut. Detector design constraints such as size and mass have limited the energy range of neutron spectrum measurements in orbit to about 12 MeV in Space Shuttle studies. We present a new method for high-energy neutron spectroscopy using small silicon detectors that can extend these measurements to more than 500 MeV. The methodology is based on measurement of the detector response function for high-energy neutrons and inversion of this response function with measured deposition data to deduce neutron energy spectra. We also present the results of an initial shielding study performed with the thick silicon detector system for high-energy neutrons incident on polyethylene.

  6. The Jülich high-brilliance neutron source project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rücker, U.; Cronert, T.; Voigt, J.; Dabruck, J. P.; Doege, P.-E.; Ulrich, J.; Nabbi, R.; Beßler, Y.; Butzek, M.; Büscher, M.; Lange, C.; Klaus, M.; Gutberlet, T.; Brückel, T.

    2016-01-01

    With the construction of the European Spallation Source ESS, the European neutron user community is looking forward to the brightest source worldwide. At the same time there is an ongoing concentration of research with neutrons to only a few but very powerful neutron facilities. Responding to this situation the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science has initiated a project for a compact accelerator driven high-brilliance neutron source, optimized for neutron scattering on small samples and to be realized at reasonable costs. The project deals with the optimization of potential projectiles, target and moderator concepts, versatile accelerator systems, cold sources, beam extraction systems and optimized instrumentation. A brief outline of the project, the achievements already reached, will be presented, as well as a vision for the future neutron landscape in Europe.

  7. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-23 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment JP-23, which was conducted in target position G6 of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 4.4E+22 n/cm{sup 2} resulting in about 9.0 dpa in type 316 stainless steel.

  8. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-23 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1997-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S. Japanese experiment JP-23, which was conducted in target position G6 of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplanes was 4.4E+22 n/cm{sup 2} resulting in about 9.0 dpa in type 316 stainless steel.

  9. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  10. Comparison of Epidermal/Dermal Damage Between the Long-Pulsed 1064 nm Nd:YAG and 755 nm Alexandrite Lasers Under Relatively High Fluence Conditions: Quantitative and Histological Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hwan; Park, So Ra; Jo, Jeong Ho; Park, Sung Yun; Seo, Young Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare degrees of epidermal/dermal tissue damage quantitatively and histologically after laser irradiation, to find ideal treatment conditions with relatively high fluence for skin rejuvenation. Background data: A number of recent studies have evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of therapeutic lasers under relatively low fluence conditions. Methods: We transmitted the long-pulsed 1064 nm Nd:YAG and 755 nm Alexandrite lasers into pig skin according to different fluences and spot diameters, and estimated epidermal/dermal temperatures. Pig skin specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological assessments. The fluence conditions comprised 26, 30, and 36 J/cm2, and the spot diameter conditions were 5, 8, and 10 mm. Pulse duration was 30 ms for all experiments. Results: Both lasers produced reliable thermal damage on the dermis without any serious epidermal injuries, under relatively high fluence conditions. The 1064 nm laser provided more active fibrous formations than the 755 nm laser, while higher risks for tissue damages simultaneously occurred. Conclusions: The ideal treatment conditions for skin rejuvenation were 8 mm diameter with 30 J/cm2 and 10 mm diameter with 26 J/cm2 for the 1064 nm laser, and 8 mm diameter with 36 J/cm2 and 10 mm diameter with 26 J/cm2 for the 755 nm laser. PMID:24992273

  11. Polarized neutron reflectometry in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    2005-11-15

    A simple method is described to maintain the polarization of a neutron beam on its way through the large magnetic stray fields produced by a vertical field of a cryomagnet with a split-coil geometry. The two key issues are the proper shielding of the neutron spin flippers and an additional radial field component in order to guide the neutron spin through the region of the null point (i.e., point of reversal for the vertical field component). Calculations of the neutron's spin rotation as well as polarized neutron reflectometry experiments on an ErFe{sub 2}/DyFe{sub 2} multilayer show the perfect performance of the used setup. The recently commissioned cryomagnet M5 with a maximum vertical field of up to 7.2 T in asymmetric mode for polarized neutrons and 9 T in symmetric mode for unpolarized neutrons was used on the C5 spectrometer in reflectometry mode, at the NRU reactor in Chalk River, Canada.

  12. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Dazeley, S.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M. D.; Vetter, K.

    2016-08-01

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. The multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  13. Effects of high neutron doses and duration of the chemical etching on the optical properties of CR-39.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, G S; Tripathy, S P; Paul, S; Sharma, S C; Joshi, D S; Gupta, A K; Bandyopadhyay, T

    2015-07-01

    Effects of the duration of chemical etching on the transmittance, absorbance and optical band gap width of the CR-39 (Polyallyl diglycol carbonate) detectors irradiated to high neutron doses (12.7, 22.1, 36.0 and 43.5 Sv) were studied. The neutrons were produced by bombardment of a thick Be target with 12 MeV protons of different fluences. The unirradiated and neutron-irradiated CR-39 detectors were subjected to a stepwise chemical etching at 1h intervals. After each step, the transmission spectra of the detectors were recorded in the range from 200 to 900 nm, and the absorbances and optical band gap widths were determined. The effect of the etching on the light transmittance of unirradiated detectors was insignificant, whereas it was very significant in the case of the irradiated detectors. The dependence of the optical absorbance on the neutron dose is linear at short etching periods, but exponential at longer ones. The optical band gap narrows with increasing etching time. It is more significant for the irradiated dosimeters than for the unirradiated ones. The rate of the narrowing of the optical band gap with increasing neutron dose increases with increasing duration of the etching. PMID:25889876

  14. Neutron-induced single event burnout in high voltage electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E.; Wert, J.L.; Oberg, D.L.; Majewski, P.P.; Voss, P.; Wender, S.A.

    1997-12-01

    Energetic neutrons with an atmospheric neutron spectrum, which were demonstrated to induce single event burnout in power MOSFETs, have been shown to induce burnout in high voltage (>3,000V) electronics when operated at voltages as low as 50% of rated voltage. The laboratory failure rates correlate well with field failure rates measured in Europe.

  15. Test of radiation hardness of CMOS transistors under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Rowe, W.A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Hoffman, C.M.; Holtkamp, D.; Kinnison, W.W.; Sommer, W.F. Jr.; Ziock, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    We have tested 2 micron CMOS test structures from various foundries in the LAMPF Beam stop for radiation damage under prolongued neutron irradiation. The fluxes employed covered the region expected to be encountered at the SSC and led to fluences of up to 10/sup 14/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ in about 500 hrs of running. We show that test structures which have been measured to survive ionizing radiation of the order MRad also survive these high neutron fluences. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Sidorov, A.; Maslennikova, A.; Volovecky, A.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.

    2014-12-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D-D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm2 is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·1010 cm-2/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  17. Quantitative comparison of terahertz emission from (100) InAs surfaces and a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch at high fluences.

    PubMed

    Reid, Matthew; Fedosejevs, Robert

    2005-01-01

    InAs has previously been reported to be an efficient emitter of terahertz radiation at low excitation fluences by use of femtosecond laser pulses. The scaling and saturation of terahertz emission from a (100) InAs surface as a function of excitation fluence is measured and quantitatively compared with the emission from a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch. We find that, although the instantaneous peak radiated terahertz field from (100) InAs exceeds the peak radiated signals from a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch biased at 1.6 kV/cm, the pulse duration is shorter. For the InAs source the total energy radiated is less than can be obtained from a GaAs large-aperture photoconductive switch. PMID:15662896

  18. A U.S. high-flux neutron facility for fusion materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Rei, Donald J

    2010-01-01

    Materials for a fusion reactor first wall and blanket structure must be able to reliably function in an extreme environment that includes 10-15 MW-year/m{sup 2} neutron and heat fluences. The various materials and structural challenges are as difficult and important as achieving a burning plasma. Overcoming radiation damage degradation is the rate-controlling step in fusion materials development. Recent advances with oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels show promise in meeting reactor requirements, while multi-timescale atomistic simulations of defect-grain boundary interactions in model copper systems reveal surprising self-annealing phenomenon. While these results are promising, simultaneous evaluation of radiation effects displacement damage ({le} 200 dpa) and in-situ He generation ({le} 2000 appm) at prototypical reactor temperatures and chemical environments is still required. There is currently no experimental facility in the U.S. that can meet these requirements for macroscopic samples. The E.U. and U.S. fusion communities have recently concluded that a fusion-relevant, high-flux neutron source for accelerated characterization of the effects of radiation damage to materials is a top priority for the next decade. Data from this source will be needed to validate designs for the multi-$B next-generation fusion facilities such as the CTF, ETF, and DEMO, that are envisioned to follow ITER and NIF.

  19. Characterization of neutron yield and x-ray spectra of a High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnamani, Nnaemeka; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG) is a DD plasma-based source, with a self-loading target intended for fundamental science and engineering applications, including 40 Ar/39 Ar geochronology, neutron cross section measurements, and radiation hardness testing of electronics. Our first estimate of the neutron yield, based on the population of the 4.486 hour 115 In isomer gave a neutron yield of the order 108 n/sec; optimization is ongoing to achieve the design target of 1011 n/sec. Preliminary x-ray spectra showed prominent energy peaks which are likely due to atomic line-emission from back-streaming electrons accelerated up to 100 keV impinging on various components of the HFNG chamber. Our x-ray and neutron diagnostics will aid us as we continue to evolve the design to suppress back-streaming electrons, necessary to achieve higher plasma beam currents, and thus higher neutron flux. This talk will focus on the characterization of the neutron yield and x-ray spectra during our tests. A collimation system is being installed near one of the chamber ports for improved observation of the x-ray spectra. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  20. First observations of power MOSFET burnout with high energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Normand, E.; Majewski, P.P.; Wender, S.A.

    1996-12-01

    Single event burnout was seen in power MOSFETs exposed to high energy neutrons. Devices with rated voltage {ge}400 volts exhibited burnout at substantially less than the rated voltage. Tests with high energy protons gave similar results. Burnout was also seen in limited tests with lower energy protons and neutrons. Correlations with heavy-ion data are discussed. Accelerator proton data gave favorable comparisons with burnout rates measured on the APEX spacecraft. Implications for burnout at lower altitudes are also discussed.

  1. Diamond detector for high rate monitors of fast neutrons beams

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Fazzi, A.; Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Frost, C. D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Gorini, G.

    2012-06-19

    A fast neutron detection system suitable for high rate measurements is presented. The detector is based on a commercial high purity single crystal diamond (SDD) coupled to a fast digital data acquisition system. The detector was tested at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source. The SDD event signal was digitized at 1 GHz to reconstruct the deposited energy (pulse amplitude) and neutron arrival time; the event time of flight (ToF) was obtained relative to the recorded proton beam signal t{sub 0}. Fast acquisition is needed since the peak count rate is very high ({approx}800 kHz) due to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam. Measurements at ISIS indicate that three characteristics regions exist in the biparametric spectrum: i) background gamma events of low pulse amplitudes; ii) low pulse amplitude neutron events in the energy range E{sub dep}= 1.5-7 MeV ascribed to neutron elastic scattering on {sup 12}C; iii) large pulse amplitude neutron events with E{sub n} < 7 MeV ascribed to {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be and 12C(n,n')3{alpha}.

  2. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes} of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards.

  3. New interplanetary proton fluence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with above 10 MeV and above 30 MeV is described. The data set used is a combination of observations made from the earth's surface and from above the atmosphere between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of earth between 1963 and 1985. The data cover a time period three times as long as the period used in earlier models. With the use of this data set the distinction between 'ordinary proton events' and 'anomalously large events' made in earlier work disappears. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for 'ordinary events' on the entire data set. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. At energies above 30 MeV, the old and new models agree. In contrast to earlier models, the results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event and are independent of sunspot number. Mission probability curves derived from the fluence distribution are presented.

  4. Characterization of extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometers in the CERF high-energy broad neutron field at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Charitonidis, N.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Severino, C.; Silari, M.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate determination of the ambient dose equivalent in the mixed neutron-photon fields encountered around high-energy particle accelerators still represents a challenging task. The main complexity arises from the extreme variability of the neutron energy, which spans over 10 orders of magnitude or more. Operational survey instruments, which response function attempts to mimic the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient up to GeV neutrons, are available on the market, but their response is not fully reliable over the entire energy range. Extended range rem counters (ERRC) do not require the exact knowledge of the energy distribution of the neutron field and the calibration can be done with a source spectrum. If the actual neutron field has an energy distribution different from the calibration spectrum, the measurement is affected by an added uncertainty related to the partial overlap of the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion curve and the response function. For this reason their operational use should always be preceded by an "in-field" calibration, i.e. a calibration made against a reference instrument exposed in the same field where the survey-meter will be employed. In practice the extended-range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS) is the only device which can serve as reference instrument in these fields, because of its wide energy range and the possibility to assess the neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) values with the appropriate accuracy. Nevertheless, the experience gained by a number of experimental groups suggests that mandatory conditions for obtaining accurate results in workplaces are: (1) the use of a well-established response matrix, thus implying validation campaigns in reference monochromatic neutrons fields, (2) the expert and critical use of suitable unfolding codes, and (3) the performance test of the whole system (experimental set-up, elaboration and unfolding procedures) in a well

  5. High sensitivity, solid state neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stradins, Pauls; Branz, Howard M; Wang, Qi; McHugh, Harold R

    2015-05-12

    An apparatus (200) for detecting slow or thermal neutrons (160). The apparatus (200) includes an alpha particle-detecting layer (240) that is a hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diode structure. The apparatus includes a bottom metal contact (220) and a top metal contact (250) with the diode structure (240) positioned between the two contacts (220, 250) to facilitate detection of alpha particles (170). The apparatus (200) includes a neutron conversion layer (230) formed of a material containing boron-10 isotopes. The top contact (250) is pixilated with each contact pixel extending to or proximate to an edge of the apparatus to facilitate electrical contacting. The contact pixels have elongated bodies to allow them to extend across the apparatus surface (242) with each pixel having a small surface area to match capacitance based upon a current spike detecting circuit or amplifier connected to each pixel. The neutron conversion layer (860) may be deposited on the contact pixels (830) such as with use of inkjet printing of nanoparticle ink.

  6. High sensitivity, solid state neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stradins, Pauls; Branz, Howard M.; Wang, Qi; McHugh, Harold R.

    2013-10-29

    An apparatus (200) for detecting slow or thermal neutrons (160) including an alpha particle-detecting layer (240) that is a hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diode structure. The apparatus includes a bottom metal contact (220) and a top metal contact (250) with the diode structure (240) positioned between the two contacts (220, 250) to facilitate detection of alpha particles (170). The apparatus (200) includes a neutron conversion layer (230) formed of a material containing boron-10 isotopes. The top contact (250) is pixilated with each contact pixel extending to or proximate to an edge of the apparatus to facilitate electrical contacting. The contact pixels have elongated bodies to allow them to extend across the apparatus surface (242) with each pixel having a small surface area to match capacitance based upon a current spike detecting circuit or amplifier connected to each pixel. The neutron conversion layer (860) may be deposited on the contact pixels (830) such as with use of inkjet printing of nanoparticle ink.

  7. High-Yield D-T Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Wells, R.P.; Reijonen, J.

    2006-11-15

    A high-yield D-T neutron generator has been developed for neutron interrogation in homeland security applications such as cargo screening. The generator has been designed as a sealed tube with a performance goal of producing 5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} n/s over a long lifetime. The key generator components developed are a radio-frequency (RF) driven ion source and a beam-loaded neutron production target that can handle a beam power of 10 kW. The ion source can provide a 100 mA D{sup +}/T{sup +} beam current with a high fraction of atomic species and can be pulsed up to frequencies of several kHz for pulsed neutron generator operation. Testing in D-D operation has been started.

  8. High yield neutron generators using the DD reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, J. H.; Harris, J. L.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Williams, D. L.; Apodaca, M. D.; Cremer, J. T.; Ji, Qing; Ludewigt, B. A.; Jones, G.

    2013-04-01

    A product line of high yield neutron generators has been developed at Adelphi technology inc. The generators use the D-D fusion reaction and are driven by an ion beam supplied by a microwave ion source. Yields of up to 5 × 109 n/s have been achieved, which are comparable to those obtained using the more efficient D-T reaction. The microwave-driven plasma uses the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) to produce a high plasma density for high current and high atomic ion species. These generators have an actively pumped vacuum system that allows operation at reduced pressure in the target chamber, increasing the overall system reliability. Since no radioactive tritium is used, the generators can be easily serviced, and components can be easily replaced, providing essentially an unlimited lifetime. Fast neutron source size can be adjusted by selecting the aperture and target geometries according to customer specifications. Pulsed and continuous operation has been demonstrated. Minimum pulse lengths of 50 μs have been achieved. Since the generators are easily serviceable, they offer a long lifetime neutron generator for laboratories and commercial systems requiring continuous operation. Several of the generators have been enclosed in radiation shielding/moderator structures designed for customer specifications. These generators have been proven to be useful for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and fast neutron radiography. Thus these generators make excellent fast, epithermal and thermal neutron sources for laboratories and industrial applications that require neutrons with safe operation, small footprint, low cost and small regulatory burden.

  9. High yield neutron generators using the DD reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vainionpaa, J. H.; Harris, J. L.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Williams, D. L.; Apodaca, M. D.; Cremer, J. T.; Ji, Qing; Ludewigt, B. A.; Jones, G.

    2013-04-19

    A product line of high yield neutron generators has been developed at Adelphi technology inc. The generators use the D-D fusion reaction and are driven by an ion beam supplied by a microwave ion source. Yields of up to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} n/s have been achieved, which are comparable to those obtained using the more efficient D-T reaction. The microwave-driven plasma uses the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) to produce a high plasma density for high current and high atomic ion species. These generators have an actively pumped vacuum system that allows operation at reduced pressure in the target chamber, increasing the overall system reliability. Since no radioactive tritium is used, the generators can be easily serviced, and components can be easily replaced, providing essentially an unlimited lifetime. Fast neutron source size can be adjusted by selecting the aperture and target geometries according to customer specifications. Pulsed and continuous operation has been demonstrated. Minimum pulse lengths of 50 {mu}s have been achieved. Since the generators are easily serviceable, they offer a long lifetime neutron generator for laboratories and commercial systems requiring continuous operation. Several of the generators have been enclosed in radiation shielding/moderator structures designed for customer specifications. These generators have been proven to be useful for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and fast neutron radiography. Thus these generators make excellent fast, epithermal and thermal neutron sources for laboratories and industrial applications that require neutrons with safe operation, small footprint, low cost and small regulatory burden.

  10. Future directions in high-pressure neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, M.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to manipulate structure and properties using pressure has been well known for many centuries. Diffraction provides the unique ability to observe these structural changes in fine detail on lengthscales spanning atomic to nanometre dimensions. Amongst the broad suite of diffraction tools available today, neutrons provide unique capabilities of fundamental importance. However, to date, the growth of neutron diffraction under extremes of pressure has been limited by the weakness of available sources. In recent years, substantial government investments have led to the construction of a new generation of neutron sources while existing facilities have been revitalized by upgrades. The timely convergence of these bright facilities with new pressure-cell technologies suggests that the field of high-pressure (HP) neutron science is on the cusp of substantial growth. Here, the history of HP neutron research is examined with the hope of gleaning an accurate prediction of where some of these revolutionary capabilities will lead in the near future. In particular, a dramatic expansion of current pressure-temperature range is likely, with corresponding increased scope for extreme-conditions science with neutron diffraction. This increase in coverage will be matched with improvements in data quality. Furthermore, we can also expect broad new capabilities beyond diffraction, including in neutron imaging, small angle scattering and inelastic spectroscopy.

  11. A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rebai, M.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Cavenago, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Croci, G.; Gervasini, G.; Ghezzi, F.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Murtas, F.; Gorini, G.

    2012-02-15

    A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams is proposed for installation on the spectral shear interferometry for direct electric field reconstruction (SPIDER, Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) test beam facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission on the beam dump surface by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses gas electron multiplier detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. The cathode is made of a thin polythene film and an aluminium film; it is designed for detection of neutrons of energy >2.2 MeV with an incidence angle < 45 deg. CNESM was designed on the basis of simulations of the different steps from the deuteron beam interaction with the beam dump to the neutron detection in the nGEM. Neutron scattering was simulated with the MCNPX code. CNESM on SPIDER is a first step towards the application of this diagnostic technique to the MITICA beam test facility, where it will be used to resolve the horizontal profile of the beam intensity.

  12. Future directions in high-pressure neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, M

    2015-04-22

    The ability to manipulate structure and properties using pressure has been well known for many centuries. Diffraction provides the unique ability to observe these structural changes in fine detail on lengthscales spanning atomic to nanometre dimensions. Amongst the broad suite of diffraction tools available today, neutrons provide unique capabilities of fundamental importance. However, to date, the growth of neutron diffraction under extremes of pressure has been limited by the weakness of available sources. In recent years, substantial government investments have led to the construction of a new generation of neutron sources while existing facilities have been revitalized by upgrades. The timely convergence of these bright facilities with new pressure-cell technologies suggests that the field of high-pressure (HP) neutron science is on the cusp of substantial growth. Here, the history of HP neutron research is examined with the hope of gleaning an accurate prediction of where some of these revolutionary capabilities will lead in the near future. In particular, a dramatic expansion of current pressure-temperature range is likely, with corresponding increased scope for extreme-conditions science with neutron diffraction. This increase in coverage will be matched with improvements in data quality. Furthermore, we can also expect broad new capabilities beyond diffraction, including in neutron imaging, small angle scattering and inelastic spectroscopy. PMID:25789450

  13. Neutronics Modeling of the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Primm, Trent; Freels, James D; Maldonado, G Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a versatile 85 MWth research reactor with cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, isotope production, and neutron activation analysis capabilities. HFIR staff members are currently in the process of updating the thermal hydraulic and reactor transient modeling methodologies. COMSOL Multiphysics has been adopted for the thermal hydraulic analyses and has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Modeling reactor transients is a challenging task because of the coupling of neutronics, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. This paper presents a preliminary COMSOL-based neutronics study performed by creating a two-dimensional, two-group, diffusion neutronics model of HFIR to study the spatially-dependent, beginning-of-cycle fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The 238-group ENDF/B-VII neutron cross section library and NEWT, a two-dimensional, discrete-ordinates neutron transport code within the SCALE 6 code package, were used to calculate the two-group neutron cross sections required to solve the diffusion equations. The two-group diffusion equations were implemented in the COMSOL coefficient form PDE application mode and were solved via eigenvalue analysis using a direct (PARDISO) linear system solver. A COMSOL-provided adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was used to increase the number of elements in areas of largest numerical error to increase the accuracy of the solution. The flux distributions calculated by means of COMSOL/SCALE compare well with those calculated with benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP and KENO models, a necessary first step along the path to implementing two- and three-dimensional models of HFIR in COMSOL for the purpose of studying the spatial dependence of transient-induced behavior in the reactor core.

  14. Thermal and structural properties of low-fluence irradiated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexa, Dusan; Dauke, Michael

    2009-02-01

    The release of Wigner energy from graphite irradiated by fast neutrons at a TRIGA Mark II research reactor has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry / synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction between 25 and 725 °C at a heating rate of 10 °C min -1. The graphite, having been subject to a fast-neutron fluence from 5.67 × 10 20 to 1.13 × 10 22 n m -2 at a fast-neutron flux ( E > 0.1 MeV) of 7.88 × 10 16 n m -2 s -1 and at temperatures not exceeding 100 °C, exhibits Wigner energies ranging from 1.2 to 21.8 J g -1 and a Wigner energy accumulation rate of 1.9 × 10 -21 J g -1 n -1 m 2. The differential-scanning-calorimeter curves exhibit, in addition to the well known peak at ˜200 °C, a pronounced fine structure consisting of additional peaks at ˜150, ˜230, and ˜280 °C. These peaks correspond to activation energies of 1.31, 1.47, 1.57, and 1.72 eV, respectively. Crystal structure of the samples is intact. The dependence of the c lattice parameter on temperature between 25 and 725 °C as determined by Rietveld refinement leads to the expected microscopic thermal expansion coefficient along the c axis of ˜26 × 10 -6 °C -1. At 200 °C, coinciding with the maximum in the differential-scanning-calorimeter curves, no measurable changes in the rate of thermal expansion have been detected - unlike its decrease previously seen in more highly irradiated graphite.

  15. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D A; Johnson, M; Navratil, P

    2007-09-28

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved.

  16. Calculates Neutron Production in Canisters of High-level Waste

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-01-15

    ALPHN calculates the (alpha,n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the (alpha,n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The (alpha,n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass andmore » do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister.« less

  17. Reactor vessel fluence evaluation and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lois, L. )

    1992-01-01

    The methodology currently in use for the estimation of the fast neutron fluence to the pressure vessel (inside surface and reactor cavity) is based on discrete ordinates two-dimensional codes such as DOT or its updated version DORT. This methodology assumes a P[sub 3] scattering, an S[sub 8] quadrature approximation, and cross sections based on the ENDF/B-IV file. Associated one-dimensional codes are often used for the cross-section collapsing portion of the calculation. The neutron spectrum at the pressure vessel location of interest is estimated assuming a [sup 235]U, [sup 239]Pu, or [sup 241]Pu source spectrum or an appropriate combination thereof. The two-dimensional codes and associated methodologies were benchmarked in the early eighties using the results of the PCA and PSF Oak Ridge National Laboratory reactor experiments. The benchmarking experiments were estimated to provide an uncertainty of [approx]10%. The results of the calculations applied to a reactor were estimated to have an uncertainty of [approx]20%. This level of uncertainty was assumed in the estimation of the margin term defined in 10CFR50.61

  18. High Intensity Accelerator and Neutron Source in China

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Xialing; Wei, J.; Loong Chun

    2011-06-28

    High intensity Accelerator is being studied all over world for numerous applications, which includes the waste transmutation, spallation neutron source and material irradiation facilities. The R/D activities of the technology of High intensity accelerator are also developed in China for some year, and have some good facilities around China. This paper will reports the status of some high intensity accelerators and neutron source in China, which including ADS/RFQ; CARR; CSNS; PKUNIFTY and CPHS. This paper will emphatically report the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) led by the Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

  19. Particle Test Fluence: What's the Right Number?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    While we have been utilizing standard fluence levels such as those listed in the JESD57 document, we have begun revisiting what an appropriate test fluence is when it comes to qualifying a device for single events. Instead of a fixed fluence level or until a specific number of events occurs, a different thought process is required.

  20. Material issues relating to high power spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futakawa, M.

    2015-02-01

    Innovative researches using neutrons are being performed at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), in which a mercury target system is installed for MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. In order to produce neutrons by the spallation reaction, proton beams are injected into the mercury target. At the moment, when the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel, leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall, i.e. on the interface between liquid and solid metals. On the other hand, the structural materials are subjected to irradiation damage due to protons and neutrons, very high cycle fatigue damages and so-called "liquid metal embrittlement". That is, the structural materials must be said to be exposed to the extremely severe environments. In the paper, research and development relating to the material issues in the high power spallation neutron sources that has been performed so far at J-PARC is summarized.

  1. Ultra high resolution neutron scattering: Neutron Resonance Spin-Echo and Larmor Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Andrew; Keller, Thomas; Keimer, Bernhard

    2012-02-01

    The TRISP spectrometer at the FRM II neutron source near Munich, Germany, is a unique world-leading neutron scattering instrument which employs the Neutron Resonance Spin-Echo technique (NRSE). Linewidths of dispersive excitations with energy transfers up to 50 meV can be measured with an energy resolution in the μeV range without the restrictive flux limitations that normally apply to high resolution neutron triple-axis spectrometers. Pioneering studies on the electron-phonon interaction in elemental superconductorsootnotetextP. Aynajian et al., Science 319 1509 (2008) and the lifetimes of magnetic excitations in archetypal magnetic systems will be reviewed.ootnotetextS. Bayrakci et al., Science 312 1928 (2006) The instrument can also be used as a Larmor diffractometer, enabling d-spacings to be measured with a resolution of δdd ˜10-6, i.e. more than one order of magnitude more sensitive than conventional diffraction techniques.ootnotetextC. Pfleiderer et al., Science 316 1871 (2007) Ongoing and future NRSE and Larmor diffraction projects will be outlined, especially in regard to prospective studies which will take full advantage of the new low temperature and high pressure sample environment capabilities now available at TRISP.

  2. Correlated Observations of Epithermal Neutrons and Polar Illumination for Orbital Neutron Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Droege, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J.; Harshman, K.; Malakhov, A.; Livengood, T.; Milikh, G. M.; Namkung, M.; Nandikotkur, G.; Neumann, G.; Smith, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sanin, A. G.; Starr, R. D.; Trombka, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    We correlate Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) and the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer's (LPNS) orbital epithermal neutron maps of the Lunar high-latitudes with co-registered illumination maps derived from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography. Epithermal neutron count rate maps were derived from the LEND: 1) Collimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons, CSETNI-4 2) Uncollimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons, SETN and the Uncollimated Lunar Prospector: 3) Low-altitude and 4) High-altitude mapping phases. In this abstract we illustrate 1) and 3) and include 2) and 4) in our presentation. The correlative study provides unique perspectives on the regional epithermal neutron fluences from the Lunar polar regions under different detector and altitude configurations.

  3. Neutron Damage in Mechanically-Cooled High-Purity Germanium Detectors for Field-Portable Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey; J.B. McCabe; C. DeW. Van Siclen

    2013-10-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNAA) systems require the use of a gamma-ray spectrometer to record the gamma-ray spectrum of an object under test and allow the determination of the object’s composition. Field-portable systems, such as Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS system, have used standard liquid-nitrogen-cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to perform this function. These detectors have performed very well in the past, but the requirement of liquid-nitrogen cooling limits their use to areas where liquid nitrogen is readily available or produced on-site. Also, having a relatively large volume of liquid nitrogen close to the detector can impact some assessments, possibly leading to a false detection of explosives or other nitrogen-containing chemical. Use of a mechanically-cooled HPGe detector is therefore very attractive for PGNAA applications where nitrogen detection is critical or where liquid-nitrogen logistics are problematic. Mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors constructed from p-type germanium, such as Ortec’s trans-SPEC, have been commercially available for several years. In order to assess whether these detectors would be suitable for use in a fielded PGNAA system, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been performing a number of tests of the resistance of mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors to neutron damage. These detectors have been standard commercially-available p-type HPGe detectors as well as prototype n-type HPGe detectors. These tests compare the performance of these different detector types as a function of crystal temperature and incident neutron fluence on the crystal.

  4. Pressure-vessel-damage fluence reduction by low-leakage fuel management. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Cokinos, D.; Aronson, A.L.; Carew, J.F.; Kohut, P.; Todosow, M.; Lois, L.

    1983-01-01

    As a result of neutron-induced radiation damage to the pressure vessel and of an increased concern that in a PWR transient the pressure vessel may be subjected to pressurized thermal shock (PTS), detailed analyses have been undertaken to determine the levels of neutron fluence accumulation at the pressure vessels of selected PWR's. In addition, various methods intended to limit vessel damage by reducing the vessel fluence have been investigated. This paper presents results of the fluence analysis and the evaluation of the low-leakage fuel management fluence reduction method. The calculations were performed with DOT-3.5 in an octant of the core/shield/vessel configuration using a 120 x 43 (r, theta) mesh structure.

  5. Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Jeffrey L

    2009-05-22

    Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically

  6. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  7. High voltage supply for neutron tubes in well logging applications

    DOEpatents

    Humphreys, D. Russell

    1989-01-01

    A high voltage supply is provided for a neutron tube used in well logging. The "biased pulse" supply of the invention combines DC and "full pulse" techniques and produces a target voltage comprising a substantial negative DC bias component on which is superimposed a pulse whose negative peak provides the desired negative voltage level for the neutron tube. The target voltage is preferably generated using voltage doubling techniques and employing a voltage source which generates bipolar pulse pairs having an amplitude corresponding to the DC bias level.

  8. High-pressure /sup 3/He gas scintillation neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.S.; Slaughter, D.R.; Prussin, S.G.

    1985-10-01

    A high-pressure, /sup 3/He-Xe gas scintillation spectrometer has been developed for neutron spectroscopy on D-D fusion plasmas. The spectrometer exhibits an energy resolution of (121 +- 20 keV) keV (FWHM) at 2.5 MeV and an efficiency of (1.9 +- 0.4) x 10/sup -3/ (n/cm/sup 2/)/sup -1/. The contribution to the resolution (FWHM) from counting statistics is only (22 +- 3 keV) and the remainder is due predominantly to the variation of light collection efficiency with location of neutron events within the active volume of the detector.

  9. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Sokolov, D A; Huxley, A D; Kamenev, K V

    2011-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm(3). The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe(2). PMID:21806195

  10. Compact spherical neutron polarimeter using high-Tc YBCO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Parnell, S. R.; Hamilton, W. A.; Li, F.; Washington, A. L.; Baxter, D. V.; Pynn, R.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a simple, compact device for spherical neutron polarimetry measurements at small neutron scattering angles. The device consists of a sample chamber with very low (<0.01 G) magnetic field flanked by regions within which the neutron polarization can be manipulated in a controlled manner. This allows any selected initial and final polarization direction of the neutrons to be obtained. We have constructed a prototype device using high-Tc superconducting films and mu-metal to isolate regions with different magnetic fields and tested device performance in transmission geometry. Finite-element methods were used to simulate the device's field profile and these have been verified by experiment using a small solenoid as a test sample. Measurements are reported using both monochromatic and polychromatic neutron sources. The results show that the device is capable of extracting sample information and distinguishing small angular variations of the sample magnetic field. As a more realistic test, we present results on the characterization of a 10 μm thick Permalloy film in zero magnetic field, as well as its response to an external magnetic field.

  11. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  12. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently.

  13. State of beryllium after irradiation at low temperature up to extremely high neutron doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakin, V. P.; Kupryanov, I. B.; Melder, R. R.

    2004-08-01

    A study was made for four beryllium grades manufactured in Russia by hot extrusion (HE) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) methods. Irradiation of specimens in the SM-3 reactor at a temperature of 70 °C up to a neutron fluence of (0.6-11.1) × 10 22 cm -2 ( E>0.1 eV) was performed and followed by post irradiation examination. The obtained results do not provide evidence of the advantage of one beryllium grade over another in terms of resistance to radiation damage in the fission reactor. In particular, neutron irradiation leads to absolutely brittle failure of all investigated beryllium specimens, according to the results of mechanical tensile and compression tests. Swelling of all grades at the maximum neutron dose does not exceed 1-2%. Some difference among the irradiated beryllium grades becomes apparent only in the brittle strength level.

  14. Electron Scattering From High-Momentum Neutrons in Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    A.V. Klimenko; S.E. Kuhn

    2005-10-12

    We report results from an experiment measuring the semi-inclusive reaction D(e,e'p{sub s}) where the proton p{sub s} is moving at a large angle relative to the momentum transfer. If we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred. This method, known as spectator tagging, can be used to study electron scattering from high-momentum (off-shell) neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. A reduced cross section was extracted for different values of final-state missing mass W*, backward proton momentum {rvec p}{sub s} and momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The data are compared to a simple PWIA spectator model. A strong enhancement in the data observed at transverse kinematics is not reproduced by the PWIA model. This enhancement can likely be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that were not incorporated into the model. A ''bound neutron structure function'' F{sub 2n}{sup eff} was extracted as a function of W* and the scaling variable x* at extreme backward kinematics, where effects of FSI appear to be smaller. For p{sub s} > 400 MeV/c, where the neutron is far off-shell, the model overestimates the value of F{sub 2n}{sup eff} in the region of x* between 0.25 and 0.6. A modification of the bound neutron structure function is one of possible effects that can cause the observed deviation.

  15. High-x structure function of the virtually free neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosyn, Wim; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2016-05-01

    The pole extrapolation method is applied to the semi-inclusive inelastic electron scattering off the deuteron with tagged spectator protons to extract the high-x structure function of the neutron. This approach is based on the extrapolation of the measured cross sections at different momenta of the spectator proton to the nonphysical pole of the bound neutron in the deuteron. The advantage of the method is in the possibility of suppression of the nuclear effects in a maximally model-independent way. The neutron structure functions obtained in this way demonstrate a surprising x dependence at x ≥0.6 and 1.6 ≤Q2≤3.38 GeV2 , indicating a possible rise of the neutron-to-proton structure functions ratio. If the observed rise is valid in the true deep inelastic region then it may indicate new dynamics in the generation of high-x quarks in the nucleon. One such mechanism we discuss is the possible dominance of short-range isosinglet quark-quark correlations that can enhance the d -quark distribution in the proton.

  16. Neutron flux spectra and radiation damage parameters for the Russian Bor-60 and SM-2 reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Karasiov, A.V.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to compare neutron irradiation conditions in Russian reactors and similar US facilities. Neutron fluence and spectral information and calculated radiation damage parameters are presented for the BOR-60 (Fast Experimental Reactor - 60 MW) and SM-2 reactors in Russia. Their neutron exposure characteristics are comparable with those of the Experimental Breeder Reactor (ERB-II), the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States.

  17. Using anisotropies in prompt fission neutron coincidences to assess the neutron multiplication of highly multiplying subcritical plutonium assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, J. M.; Mattingly, J.

    2016-07-01

    There is a significant and well-known anisotropy between the prompt neutrons emitted from a single fission event; these neutrons are most likely to be observed at angles near 0° or 180° relative to each other. However, the propagation of this anisotropy through different generations of a fission chain reaction has not been previously studied. We have measured this anisotropy in neutron-neutron coincidences from a subcritical highly-multiplying assembly of plutonium metal. The assembly was a 4.5 kg α-phase plutonium metal sphere composed of 94% 239Pu and 6% 240Pu by mass. Data were collected using two EJ-309 liquid scintillators and two EJ-299 plastic scintillators. The angular distribution of neutron-neutron coincidences was measured at 90° and 180° and found to be largely isotropic. Simulations were performed using MCNPX-PoliMi of similar plutonium metal spheres of varying sizes and a correlation between the neutron multiplication of the assembly and the anisotropy of neutron-neutron coincidences was observed. In principle, this correlation could be used to assess the neutron multiplication of an unknown assembly.

  18. HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

    1961-07-11

    Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

  19. Isotopic Dependence of GCR Fluence behind Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross-sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (+/-100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (approx.170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past, however less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  20. Electron Scattering From a High-Momentum Neutron in Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Alexei Klimenko

    2004-05-01

    The deuterium nucleus is a system of two nucleons (proton and neutron) bound together. The configuration of the system is described by a quantum-mechanical wave function and the state of the nucleons at a given time is not know a priori. However, by detecting a backward going proton of moderate momentum in coincidence with a reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred if we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction. This method, known as spectator tagging, was used to study the electron scattering from high-momentum neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV polarized electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. The accumulated data cover a wide kinematic range, reaching values of the invariant mass of the unobserved final state W* up to 3 GeV. A data sample of approximately 5 - 10{sup 5} events, with protons detected at large scattering angles (as high as 136 degrees) in coincidence with the forward electrons, was selected. The product of the neutron structure function with the initial nucleon momentum distribution F{sub 2n}. S was extracted for different values of W*, backward proton momenta p{sub s} and momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The data were compared to a calculation based on the spectator approximation and using the free nucleon form factors and structure functions. A strong enhancement in the data, not reproduced by the model, was observed at cos(theta{sub pq}) > -0.3 (where theta{sub pq} is the proton scattering angle relative to the direction of the momentum transfer) and can be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that were not incorporated into the model. The bound nucleon structure function F{sub 2n} was studied in the region cos(theta{sub pq}) < -0.3 as a function of W* and scaling variable x*. At high spectator proton momenta the struck neutron is far off its mass shell. At p{sub s

  1. Concurrent Monte Carlo transport and fluence optimization with fluence adjusting scalable transport Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Svatos, M.; Zankowski, C.; Bednarz, B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The future of radiation therapy will require advanced inverse planning solutions to support single-arc, multiple-arc, and “4π” delivery modes, which present unique challenges in finding an optimal treatment plan over a vast search space, while still preserving dosimetric accuracy. The successful clinical implementation of such methods would benefit from Monte Carlo (MC) based dose calculation methods, which can offer improvements in dosimetric accuracy when compared to deterministic methods. The standard method for MC based treatment planning optimization leverages the accuracy of the MC dose calculation and efficiency of well-developed optimization methods, by precalculating the fluence to dose relationship within a patient with MC methods and subsequently optimizing the fluence weights. However, the sequential nature of this implementation is computationally time consuming and memory intensive. Methods to reduce the overhead of the MC precalculation have been explored in the past, demonstrating promising reductions of computational time overhead, but with limited impact on the memory overhead due to the sequential nature of the dose calculation and fluence optimization. The authors propose an entirely new form of “concurrent” Monte Carlo treat plan optimization: a platform which optimizes the fluence during the dose calculation, reduces wasted computation time being spent on beamlets that weakly contribute to the final dose distribution, and requires only a low memory footprint to function. In this initial investigation, the authors explore the key theoretical and practical considerations of optimizing fluence in such a manner. Methods: The authors present a novel derivation and implementation of a gradient descent algorithm that allows for optimization during MC particle transport, based on highly stochastic information generated through particle transport of very few histories. A gradient rescaling and renormalization algorithm, and the

  2. Preliminary Analysis of the Multisphere Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhagen, P.; Kniss, T.; Wilson, J. W.; Singleterry, R. C.; Jones, I. W.; VanSteveninck, W.

    2003-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) Project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to greater than 10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron effective dose and dose equivalent rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff. The measured cosmic-ray neutron spectra have almost no thermal neutrons, a large "evaporation" peak near 1 MeV and a second broad peak near 100 MeV which contributes about 69% of the neutron effective dose. At high altitude, geomagnetic latitude has very little effect on the shape of the spectrum, but it is the dominant variable affecting neutron fluence rate, which was 8 times higher at the northernmost measurement location than it was at the southernmost. The shape of the spectrum varied only slightly with altitude from 21 km down to 12 km (56 - 201 grams per square centimeter atmospheric depth), but was significantly different on the ground. In all cases, ambient dose equivalent was greater than effective dose for cosmic-ray neutrons.

  3. Feasibility studies for high pressure neutron powder diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Von Dreele, R.B. ); Parise, J. )

    1990-01-01

    We recently performed two neutron powder diffraction experiments on very small samples on the High Intensity Powder Diffractometer (HIPD). These were done to determine the feasibility of performing in situ high pressure/high temperature neutron diffraction experiments on HIPD at pressures which would exceed the previous limit of {approximately}50 kbar achievable in a neutron diffraction experiment. The first experiment consisted of examining the product from a high pressure preparation done at Stony Brook. The sample, which had been prepared at 65 kbar and 1000{degree}C, consisted of a small platinum capsule filled with CaGeO{sub 3} perovskite. The weights of the capsule included 225 mg of platinum and 49 mg of the germanate. A diffraction experiment taking {approximately}8.6 hrs at a LANSCE proton beam current of {approximately}53 {mu}A gave peaks of good intensity from both Pt and CaGeO{sub 3}; we could begin to see them after only 20 min of beam time. The second experiment was to test the possibility of diffraction from a high pressure apparatus. We placed in the HIPD sample position the central assembly from a 100 kbar octahedral press. Four tungsten carbide anvils and a copper block previously pressed to 65 kbar were held in an aluminum frame. The sample consisted of a small bit of nickel foil (175 mg) placed in a 3 mm hole in the copper block. The active sample volume is defined by the gap between the anvils and the length of the sample. A small portion of the copper block is also seen in this arrangement. This is viewed at 90{degree} 2{Theta} through a similar gap between the anvils by 4 1/2 in. {times} 12 in. {sup 3}He counter tubes. This arrangement simulates the operating conditions of a high pressure run at 100 kbar and takes advantage of the fixed instrument geometry possible in time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiments.

  4. High-energy neutron dosimetry with superheated drop detectors.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, F; Agosteo, S; Sannikov, A V; Silari, M

    2002-01-01

    A systematic analysis of the response of dichlorodifluoromethane superheated drop detectors was performed in the 46-133 MeV energy range. Experiments with quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were performed at the Université Catholique de Leuvain-la-Neuve, Belgium and the Svedberg Laboratory, Sweden, while tests in a broad field were performed at CERN. To determine the response of the detectors to the high-energy beams, the spectra of incident neutrons were folded over functions modelled after the cross sections for the production of heavy ions from the detector elements. The cross sections for fluorine and chlorine were produced in this work by means of the Monte Carlo high-energy transport code HADRON based on the cascade exciton model of nuclear interactions. The new response data permit the interpretation of measurements at high-energy accelerators and on high-altitude commercial flights, where a 30-50% under-response had been consistently recorded with respect to neutron dose equivalent. The introduction of a 1 cm lead shell around the detectors effectively compensates most of the response defect. PMID:12382936

  5. Fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients for neutron beams from 0.001 eV to 100 GeV calculated for a set of pregnant female and fetus models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X. George

    2008-03-01

    Protection of fetuses against external neutron exposure is an important task. This paper reports a set of absorbed dose conversion coefficients for fetal and maternal organs for external neutron beams using the RPI-P pregnant female models and the MCNPX code. The newly developed pregnant female models represent an adult female with a fetus including its brain and skeleton at the end of each trimester. The organ masses were adjusted to match the reference values within 1%. For the 3 mm cubic voxel size, the models consist of 10-15 million voxels for 35 organs. External monoenergetic neutron beams of six standard configurations (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO) and source energies 0.001 eV-100 GeV were considered. The results are compared with previous data that are based on simplified anatomical models. The differences in dose depend on source geometry, energy and gestation periods: from 20% up to 140% for the whole fetus, and up to 100% for the fetal brain. Anatomical differences are primarily responsible for the discrepancies in the organ doses. For the first time, the dependence of mother organ doses upon anatomical changes during pregnancy was studied. A maximum of 220% increase in dose was observed for the placenta in the nine months model compared to three months, whereas dose to the pancreas, small and large intestines decreases by 60% for the AP source for the same models. Tabulated dose conversion coefficients for the fetus and 27 maternal organs are provided.

  6. Thermal conductivity changes upon neutron transmutation of {sup 10}B doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannadham, K.; Verghese, K.; Butler, J. E.

    2014-08-28

    {sup 10}B doped p-type diamond samples were subjected to neutron transmutation reaction using thermal neutron flux of 0.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} and fast neutron flux of 0.09 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. Another sample of epilayer grown on type IIa (110) single crystal diamond substrate was subjected to equal thermal and fast neutron flux of 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. The defects in the diamond samples were previously characterized by different methods. In the present work, thermal conductivity of these diamond samples was determined at room temperature by transient thermoreflectance method. The thermal conductivity change in the samples as a function of neutron fluence is explained by the phonon scattering from the point defects and disordered regions. The thermal conductivity of the diamond samples decreased more rapidly initially and less rapidly for larger neutron fluence. In addition, the thermal conductivity in type IIb diamond decreased less rapidly with thermal neutron fluence compared to the decrease in type IIa diamond subjected to fast neutron fluence. It is concluded that the rate of production of defects during transmutation reaction is slower when thermal neutrons are used. The thermal conductivity of epilayer of diamond subjected to high thermal and fast neutron fluence is associated with the covalent carbon network in the composite structure consisting of disordered carbon and sp{sup 2} bonded nanocrystalline regions.

  7. Small angle neutron scattering from high impact polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, O.A.

    1981-01-01

    High impact polystyrene (HIPS) is a toughened plastic composed of a polystyrene matrix containing a few percent rubber in the form of dispersed 0.1 to 10 micron diameter rubber particles. Some commercial formulations of HIPS include the addition of a few percent mineral oil, which improves the toughness of the plastic. Little is known about the mechanism by which the mineral oil helps toughen the plastic. It is hypothesized that the oil is distributed only in the rubber particles, but whether this hypothesis is correct was not known prior to this work. The size of the rubber particles in HIPS and their neutron scattering length density contrast with the polystyrene matrix cause HIPS samples to scatter neutrons at small angles. The variation of this small angle neutron scattering (SANS) signal with mineral oil content has been used to determine the location of the oil in HIPS. The SANS spectrometer at the University of Missouri Research Reactor Facility (MURR) was used to study plastic samples similar in composition to commercial HIPS. The MURR SANS spectrometer is used to study the small angle scattering of a vertical beam of 4.75 A neutrons from solid and liquid samples. The scattered neutrons are detected in a 54 x 60 cm/sup 2/ position sensitive detector designed and built at MURR. A series of plastic samples of varying rubber and oil content and different rubber domain sizes and shapes were examined on the MURR SANS spectrometer. Analysis of the scattering patterns showed that the mineral oil is about eight to ten times more likely to be found in the rubber particles than in the polystyrene matrix. This result confirmed the hypothesis that the mineral oil is distributed primarily in the rubber particles.

  8. Designing CNR, a very high thermal neutron flux facility

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    According to a recent study (Eastman-Seitz Committee, National Academy of Science) there is a need for a new generation of steady neutron sources with a thermal neutron flux peak between 5 to 10 times 10/sup 15//cm/sup 2/ sec. Ideally the neutron source would have to operate continuously for several days (two weeks at least) with minimum time (2 to 3 days) for refueling and/or maintenance and it would also be used to irradiate materials and produce isotopes. This paper describes the preliminary design of the nuclear reactor for the proposed Center for Neutron Research (CNR). A duplication of existing designs (HFIR, (ORNL), ILL (Grenoble, France)) would imply high total power and small core life; the necessity of higher efficiencies (in terms of peak-flux-per-unit source or power) then becomes apparent. We have found analytical expressions for the efficiency in terms of a few parameters such as the volume of the source and the Fermi age and diffusion length of thermal neutrons in both the source and reflector regions. A single analytical expression can then be used for scoping the design and to intercompare radically different designs. Higher efficiencies can be achieved by reducing the volume and the moderation of a core immersed in a very low absorbing reflector; on the contrary a very long core life has a negative effect on the efficiency at beginning of life. Consequently, and after detailed calculations, we have found a candidate design with the following characteristics: core, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, 93% enriched, 18.1-kg /sup 235/U, metal fraction 50%, Al cladding, and 35-L volume; reflector and moderator, D/sub 2/O; efficiency at end of life (EOL) with respect to the ILL reactor, 1.29; flux at EOL, 10 x 10/sup 15//cm/sup 2/ sec (power in core 270. MW); core life, 14 days; burnup 28.4%.

  9. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R.

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  10. Development of a high-count-rate neutron detector with position sensitivity and high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.; Sandoval, J.

    1996-10-01

    While the neutron scattering community is bombarded with hints of new technologies that may deliver detectors with high-count-rate capability, high efficiency, gamma-ray insensitivity, and high resolution across large areas, only the time-tested, gas-filled {sup 3}He and scintillation detectors are in widespread use. Future spallation sources with higher fluxes simply must exploit some of the advanced detector schemes that are as yet unproved as production systems. Technologies indicating promise as neutron detectors include pixel arrays of amorphous silicon, silicon microstrips, microstrips with gas, and new scintillation materials. This project sought to study the competing neutron detector technologies and determine which or what combination will lead to a production detector system well suited for use at a high-intensity neutron scattering source.

  11. Spallation neutron source and other high intensity froton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2003-02-06

    This lecture is an introduction to the design of a spallation neutron source and other high intensity proton sources. It discusses two different approaches: linac-based and synchrotron-based. The requirements and design concepts of each approach are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are compared. A brief review of existing machines and those under construction and proposed is also given. An R&D program is included in an appendix.

  12. High efficiency neutron sensitive amorphous silicon pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mireshghi, A.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1993-11-01

    A multi-layer a-Si:H based thermal neutron detector was designed, fabricated and simulated by Monte Carlo method. The detector consists of two PECVD deposited a-Si:H pin detectors interfaced with coated layers of Gd, as a thermal neutron converter. Simulation results indicate that a detector consisting of 2 Gd films with thicknesses of 2 and 4 {mu}m, sandwiched properly with two layers of sufficiently thick ({approximately}30{mu}m) amorphous silicon diodes, has the optimum parameters. The detectors have an intrinsic efficiency of about 42% at a threshold setting of 7000 electrons, with an expected average signal size of {approximately}12000 electrons which is well above the noise. This efficiency will be further increased to nearly 63%, if we use Gd with 50% enrichment in {sup 157}Gd. We can fabricate position sensitive detectors with spatial resolution of 300 {mu}m with gamma sensitivity of {approximately}1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}. These detectors are highly radiation resistant and are good candidates for use in various application, where high efficiency, high resolution, gamma insensitive position sensitive neutron detectors are needed.

  13. High yield neutron generator based on a high-current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Sidorov, A.; Razin, S.; Strelkov, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.

    2015-09-01

    In present paper, an approach for high yield compact D-D neutron generator based on a high current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source is suggested. Results on dense pulsed deuteron beam production with current up to 500 mA and current density up to 750 mA/cm2 are demonstrated. Neutron yield from D2O and TiD2 targets was measured in case of its bombardment by pulsed 300 mA D+ beam with 45 keV energy. Neutron yield density at target surface of 109 s-1 cm-2 was detected with a system of two 3He proportional counters. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron yield from a high quality TiD2 target bombarded by D+ beam demonstrated in present work accelerated to 100 keV could reach 6 × 1010 s-1 cm-2. It is discussed that compact neutron generator with such characteristics could be perspective for a number of applications like boron neutron capture therapy, security systems based on neutron scanning, and neutronography.

  14. High yield neutron generator based on a high-current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V.; Sidorov, A.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Strelkov, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.

    2015-09-07

    In present paper, an approach for high yield compact D-D neutron generator based on a high current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source is suggested. Results on dense pulsed deuteron beam production with current up to 500 mA and current density up to 750 mA/cm{sup 2} are demonstrated. Neutron yield from D{sub 2}O and TiD{sub 2} targets was measured in case of its bombardment by pulsed 300 mA D{sup +} beam with 45 keV energy. Neutron yield density at target surface of 10{sup 9} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} was detected with a system of two {sup 3}He proportional counters. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron yield from a high quality TiD{sub 2} target bombarded by D{sup +} beam demonstrated in present work accelerated to 100 keV could reach 6 × 10{sup 10} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. It is discussed that compact neutron generator with such characteristics could be perspective for a number of applications like boron neutron capture therapy, security systems based on neutron scanning, and neutronography.

  15. Measurements of high energy neutrons penetrated through iron shields using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Nakao, N.; Nunomiya, T.; Nakamura, T.; Fukumura, A.; Takada, M.

    2002-11-01

    Neutron energy spectra penetrated through iron shields were measured using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator which have been newly developed by our group at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. Neutrons were generated by bombarding 400 MeV/nucleon C ion on a thick (stopping-length) copper target. The neutron spectra in the energy range from 20 to 800 MeV were obtained through the FORIST unfolding code with their response functions and compared with the MCNPX calculations combined with the LA150 cross section library. The neutron fluence measured by the NE213 detector was simulated by the track length estimator in the MCNPX, and evaluated the contribution of the room-scattered neutrons. The calculations are in fairly good agreement with the measurements. Neutron fluence attenuation lengths were obtained from the experimental results and the calculation.

  16. Neutron energy determination with a high-purity germanium detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Gene A.

    1992-01-01

    Two areas that are related to planetary gamma-ray spectrometry are investigated. The first task was the investigation of gamma rays produced by high-energy charged particles and their secondaries in planetary surfaces by means of thick target bombardments. The second task was the investigation of the effects of high-energy neutrons on gamma-ray spectral features obtained with high-purity Ge-detectors. For both tasks, as a function of the funding level, the experimental work was predominantly tied to that of other researchers, whenever there was an opportunity to participate in bombardment experiments at large or small accelerators for charged particles.

  17. Possible high-energy neutrino and photon signals from gravitational wave bursts due to double neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2013-08-01

    As the technology of gravitational-wave and neutrino detectors becomes increasingly mature, a multimessenger era of astronomy is ushered in. Advanced gravitational-wave detectors are close to making a ground-breaking discovery of gravitational-wave bursts (GWBs) associated with mergers of double neutron stars (NS-NS). It is essential to study the possible electromagnetic and neutrino emission counterparts of these GWBs. Recent observations and numerical simulations suggest that at least a fraction of NS-NS mergers may leave behind a massive millisecond magnetar as the merger product. Here we show that protons accelerated in the forward shock powered by a magnetar wind pushing the ejecta launched during the merger process would interact with photons generated in the dissipating magnetar wind and emit high-energy neutrinos and photons. We estimate the typical energy and fluence of the neutrinos from such a scenario. We find that ˜PeV neutrinos could be emitted from the shock front as long as the ejecta could be accelerated to a relativistic speed. The diffuse neutrino flux from these events, even under the most optimistic scenarios, is too low to account for the two events announced by the IceCube Collaboration, but it is only slightly lower than the diffuse flux of GRBs, making it an important candidate for the diffuse background of ˜PeV neutrinos. The neutron-pion decay of these events make them a moderate contributor to the sub-TeV gamma-ray diffuse background.

  18. X-ray Polarisation in highly-magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turolla, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Radiation emitted in the vicinity of an isolated neutron star is expected to be intrinsically polarized because the high magnetic field (B˜10^{12}-10^{15} G) strongly affects the plasma opacity. The polarization fraction and polarization angle measured by an instrument, however, do not necessary coincide with the intrinsic ones, due to the effects of both quantum electrodynamics in the highly magnetized vacuum around the star (the vacuum polarization) and rotation of the Stokes parameters in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight induced by the non-uniform magnetic field. I'll review theoretical estimates for the polarization observables in the case of thermal surface emission from neutron stars and of the (soft) X-ray emission from magnetars, where magnetospheric reprocessing of radiation by resonant cyclotron scattering is important. The potentials of X-ray polarimetry to probe the physical conditions in neutron star sources and to test, for the first time, vacuum polarization are discussed in connection with the recently proposed polarimetric missions, like XIPE.

  19. Preliminary studies for a high energy neutron area monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, R.T.; Hsu, H.H.

    1998-12-01

    Track etch detectors were exposed to neutrons produced by a spallation target struck by a beam of 800 MeV protons. The fields were filtered by 0, 10, and 40 centimeters of polyethylene. The track etch dosimeters were exposed on a polyethylene phantom. The dosimeters were exposed bare and behind lead filters of 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.25 and 1.50 cm of lead with the face of the dosimeter perpendicular to the beam and bare and behind lead filters of 0.50, 1.0, and 1.5 cm of lead with angle of incidence 45{degree} and 75{degree}. Monte Carlo calculations of these experimental configurations were done using MCNP and LAHET with input from the calculated spectra. These results are compared with the experimental results to understand the basic processes involved in the production of tracks with high energy neutrons and develop a high energy neutron area monitor.

  20. High-pressure neutron scattering of Prussian blue analogue magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajerowski, Daniel

    Pressure sensitive magnetism is known to be useful in sensors, and while applications tend to use metallic alloys, molecule based magnets (MBMs) have been shown to have large inverse magnetostrictive (IMS) response. A promising group of MBMs are the Prussian blue analogues (PBAs), in which magnetic ordering can be tuned by external stimuli such as light, electric field, and pressure. Previously, high pressure neutron scattering of nickel hexacyanochromate hydrate has shown direct evidence for isomerization of the cyanide linkage with applied pressure. Other probes have suggested a similar effect in iron hexacyanochromate hydrate, although there has yet to be direct crystallographic evidence. Neutron diffraction is sensitive to organic elements, even while in the presence of metals, and we have performed experiments above 1 GPa to look for linkage isomerism in iron hexacyanochromate. These results are supported by bulk probes and calculations.

  1. Neutron diffraction facilities at the high flux reactor, Petten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohms, C.; Youtsos, A. G.; Bontenbal, A.; Mulder, F. M.

    2000-03-01

    The High Flux Reactor in Petten is equipped with twelve beam tubes for the extraction of thermal neutrons for applications in materials and medical science. Beam tubes HB4 and HB5 are equipped with diffractometers for residual stress and powder investigations. Recently at HB4 the Large Component Neutron Diffraction Facility has been installed. It is a unique facility with respect to its capability of handling heavy components up to 1000 kg in residual stress testing. Its basic features are described and the first applications on thick piping welds are shown. The diffractometer at HB5 can be set up for powder and stress measurements. Recent applications include temperature dependent measurements on phase transitions in intermetallic compounds and on Li ion energy storage materials.

  2. Modeling of High Precision Neutron Nonelastic Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F S; Anderson, J D; Bauer, R W; Grimes, S M; McNabb, D P

    2007-02-05

    A new method has been applied to the determination of neutron nonelastic cross sections for iron {sup 56}Fe and lead {sup 208}Pb for energies between 5 and 26 MeV. These data have estimated errors of only a few percent and do not suffer from the ambiguities encountered in earlier nonelastic data. We attempt to fit these high precision data using both a semiclassical single phase shift model (nuclear Ramsauer model) as well as a recent global optical model that well reproduces a wide body of neutron scattering observables. At the 5% uncertainty level, both models produce satisfactory fits. However, neither model gives satisfactory fits to these new precise data. We conclude that fitting precise data, i.e., data with errors of approximately 2% or less, may require a nuclear mass dependence of radii that reflects structure effects such as shell closures.

  3. Nonspecular neutron scattering from highly aligned phospholipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münster, C.; Salditt, T.; Vogel, M.; Siebrecht, R.; Peisl, J.

    1999-05-01

    We report a neutron scattering study of multilamellar membranes supported on solid substrates. In contrast to previous work, the high degree of orientational alignment allows for a clear distinction between specular and nonspecular reflectivity contributions. In particular, we demonstrate that by using the specific advantages of neutron optics the nonspecular scattering can be mapped over a wide range of reciprocal space. Several orders of magnitude in scattering signal and parallel momentum transfer can easily be recorded in multilamellar stacks of lipid membranes. This opens up the possibility to study fluctuations, and more generally lateral structure parameters of membrane on length scales between a few Å up to several μm. The first results obtained for a system of partially hydrated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) indicate strong deviations from the predictions of the standard Caillé model.

  4. Neutron Flux Characterization of Irradiation Holes for Irradiation Test at HANARO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Park, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    The High flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO) is a unique research reactor in the Republic of Korea, and has been used for irradiation testing since 1998. To conduct irradiation tests for nuclear materials, the irradiation holes of CT and OR5 have been used due to a high fast-neutron flux. Because the neutron flux must be accurately calculated to evaluate the neutron fluence of irradiated material, it was conducted using MCNP. The neutron flux was measured using fluence monitor wires to verify the calculated result. Some evaluations have been conducted, however, more than 20% errors have frequently occurred at the OR irradiation hole, while a good agreement between the calculated and measured data was shown at the CT irradiation hole.

  5. Neutron productions in the fragmentation of relativistic heavy nuclei and formation of a beam of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    The production of quasimonoenergetic high-energy neutrons at zero angle (0°) in the spallation of relativistic heavy nuclei is discussed by considering the example of the interaction of lead nuclei with light target nuclei. It is shown that this process can be used to generate a beam of high-energy neutrons at existing heavy ion accelerators. At the same time, itmay lead to the appearance of a parasitic neutron beam because of the interaction of the heavy-ion beam used with beam line and experimental setup materials.

  6. High pressure gas spheres for neutron and photon experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, G.; Petrich, D.; Käppeler, F.; Kaltenbaek, J.; Leugers, B.; Reifarth, R.

    2009-09-01

    High pressure gas spheres have been designed and successfully used in several nuclear physics experiments on noble gases. The pros and cons of this solution are the simple design and the high reliability versus the fact that the density is limited to 40-60% of liquid or solid gas samples. Originally produced for neutron capture studies at keV energies, the comparably small mass of the gas spheres were an important advantage, which turned out to be of relevance for other applications as well. The construction, performance, and operation of the spheres are described and examples for their use are presented.

  7. Progress on the realization of a new GEM based neutron diagnostic concept for high flux neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Croci, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Gorini, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Grosso, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2014-08-21

    Fusion reactors will need high flux neutron detectors to diagnose the deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium. A candidate detection technique is the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). New GEM based detectors are being developed for application to a neutral deuterium beam test facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission due to interaction of the deuterium beam with the deuterons implanted in the beam dump surface. This is done by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses nGEM detectors, i.e. GEM detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. After the realization and test of several small area prototypes, a full size prototype has been realized and tested with laboratory sources. Test on neutron beams are foreseen for the next months.

  8. Progress on the realization of a new GEM based neutron diagnostic concept for high flux neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, G.; Rebai, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Grosso, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Pasqualotto, R.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Tollin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Gorini, G.

    2014-08-01

    Fusion reactors will need high flux neutron detectors to diagnose the deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium. A candidate detection technique is the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). New GEM based detectors are being developed for application to a neutral deuterium beam test facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission due to interaction of the deuterium beam with the deuterons implanted in the beam dump surface. This is done by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses nGEM detectors, i.e. GEM detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. After the realization and test of several small area prototypes, a full size prototype has been realized and tested with laboratory sources. Test on neutron beams are foreseen for the next months.

  9. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-01

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  10. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-15

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  11. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-17

    In high material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. Our paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 degrees C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. Our work covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  12. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; et al

    2015-12-17

    In high material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. Our paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 degrees C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition,more » examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. Our work covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.« less

  13. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Małgorzata G; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N; Lauridsen, Erik M; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Molaison, Jamie J; Santodonato, Louis J; Tremsin, Anton S; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-01

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components. PMID:26724075

  14. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  15. High sensitivity, low profile neutron detector for safeguards measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, H.S.; Abraham, J.R.; Thompson, R.C.; Sunberg, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A neutron detector has been constructed and tested at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the purpose of making fast, high sensitivity measurements of neutron emitters in portal applications. The system is based upon glass fiber optic scintillators loaded with lithium-6 and operated to detect thermal neutrons. Due to their compact size. physical flexibility, freedom from microphonic pickup, and complete lack of environmental and safety concerns, these fibers are very suitable for some applications. The electronics needed for these fibers is somewhat more complex than for helium-3 proportional counters, but the entire electronics package (including the controlling computer) has been shrunk into a space of 20 {times} 25 {times} 2 cm. The prototype sensor is about 180 {times} 60 {times} 7 cm, but a final design now under construction measures 200 {times} 28 {times} 2.54 cm. The new, smaller detectors will be capable of ganging to achieve any needed sensitivity and will each weigh about 16 kg. The principles of operation of the fiber will be discussed as will the operational mode of the detector.

  16. High Rate Measurements of the Neutron Camera and Broadband Neutron Spectrometer at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Gorini, G.; Joffrin, E.; Kiptily, V.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Plyusnin, V. V.; Popovichev, S.; Reux, C.; Riva, M.; Syme, D. B.

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). At JET, the neutron emission profile of Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system (DAQ) based on Field Programmable Gated Array (FPGA). According to specifications, the DAQ is capable of high rate measurements up to 0.5 MCps. A new compact broadband spectrometer (KM12) based on BC501A organic liquid scintillating material was also installed in the same year and implements a similar DAQ as for KN3. This article illustrates the observations on the DAQ high count rate performance of both KN3 and KM12 in the latest JET D plasma experiments related to hybrid scenario and runaway electrons. For the latter, >1 MCps event rate was achieved with consequences on the behavior of the FPGA and on the reliability of the measurements.

  17. High resolution neutron imaging capabilities at BOA beamline at Paul Scherrer Institut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Morgano, M.; Panzner, T.; Lehmann, E.; Filgers, U.; Vallerga, J. V.; McPhate, J. B.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-06-01

    The cold neutron spectrum of the Beamline for neutron Optics and other Applications (BOA) at Paul Scherrer Institut enables high contrast neutron imaging because neutron cross sections for many materials increase with neutron wavelength. However, for many neutron imaging applications, spatial resolution can be as important as contrast. In this paper the neutron transmission imaging capabilities of an MCP/Timepix detector installed at the BOA beamline are presented, demonstrating the possibilities for studying sub-20 μm features in various samples. In addition to conventional neutron radiography and microtomography, the high degree of neutron polarization at the BOA beamline can be very attractive for imaging of magnetic fields, as demonstrated by our measurements. We also show that a collimated cold neutron beamline combined with a high resolution detector can produce image artifacts, (e.g. edge enhancements) due to neutron refraction and scattering. The results of our experiments indicate that the BOA beamline is a valuable addition to neutron imaging facilities, providing improved and sometimes unique capabilities for non-destructive studies with cold neutrons.

  18. Characterization of the IRSN neutron multisphere spectrometer (HERMEIS) at European standard calibration fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheminet, A.; Lacoste, V.; Gressier, V.; Hubert, G.; Martin, A.; Pépino, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed a new spectrometry system for neutron energies from 10-9 MeV to 10 GeV. This high energy range multisphere extended IRSN system (HERMEIS) is a high gas pressure3He-based Bonner spheres set. It is adapted to low neutron fluence rate measurements and one of its main application concerns the determination of cosmic-ray-induced neutron spectra at ground level and mountain altitudes. The neutron fluence response matrix of the set of 13 Bonner spheres, including three extended ones with tungsten and lead shells, was calculated with the radiation transport code MCNPX-2.6f. Reliable fluence responses being mandatory for a correct evaluation of the atmospheric neutron spectra, HERMEIS was characterized at standard monoenergetic, quasi-monoenergetic and realistic neutron fields facilities. Measurements with monoenergetic neutron beams of 144 keV, 565 keV, 5 MeV and 17 MeV were performed at the NPL standard Van de Graaff facility. For the characterization of the response functions at higher energies, measurements were done at the Svedberg Laboratory, with 46 MeV and 144 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. Finally, to demonstrate the suitability of the system for broad cosmic-ray neutron spectra, measurements were performed at the TSL Atmospheric-like Neutrons from thIck TArget (ANITA) and also at the CERN European Realistic Field (CERF) facilities. Data from the realistic spectra were unfolded with the GRAVEL unfolding code and as a whole, a good agreement was found between the experimental and Monte-Carlo calculated neutron fluence energy distributions.

  19. Fluence field optimization for noise and dose objectives in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolac, Steven; Graham, Sean; Siewerdsen, Jeff; Jaffray, David

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Selecting the appropriate imaging technique in computed tomography (CT) inherently involves balancing the tradeoff between image quality and imaging dose. Modulation of the x-ray fluence field, laterally across the beam, and independently for each projection, may potentially meet user-prescribed, regional image quality objectives, while reducing radiation to the patient. The proposed approach, called fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT), parallels the approach commonly used in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), except ''image quality plans'' replace the ''dose plans'' of IMRT. This work studies the potential noise and dose benefits of FFMCT via objective driven optimization of fluence fields. Methods: Experiments were carried out in simulation. Image quality plans were defined by specifying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) criteria for regions of interest (ROIs) in simulated cylindrical and oblong water phantoms, and an anthropomorphic phantom with bone, air, and water equivalent regions. X-ray fluence field patterns were generated using a simulated annealing optimization method that attempts to achieve the spatially-dependent prescribed SNR criteria in the phantoms while limiting dose (to the volume or subvolumes). The resulting SNR and dose distributions were analyzed and compared to results using a bowtie filtered fluence field. Results: Compared to using a fixed bowtie filtered fluence, FFMCT achieved superior agreement with the target image quality objectives, and resulted in integral dose reductions ranging from 39 to 52%. Prioritizing dose constraints for specific regions of interest resulted in a preferential reduction of dose to those regions with some tradeoff in SNR, particularly where the target low dose regions overlapped with regions where high SNR was prescribed. The method appeared fairly robust under increased complexity and heterogeneity of the object structure. Conclusions: These results support that FFMCT has the potential to meet

  20. Conceptual design of a high-frame-rate fast neutron radiography detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fa-qiang; Li, Zheng-hong; Yang, Jian-lun; Guo, Cun; Yang, Hong-qiong; Ye, Fan; Wang, Zhen; Ying, Chun-tong; Liu, Guang-jun

    2007-01-01

    Fast neutron radiography offers means to inspect thick hydrogenous materials because of high penetration depth of fast neutrons. Further more, quasi monoenergetic neutrons is relatively easy to obtain by neutron generators and it is helpful for density inversion of targets, which has many difficulties in flash radiography. In order to investigate dynamic processes, an intense repetitive pulsed neutron source will be used. Efficient detection of fast neutrons is one of the hardest problems for fast neutron imaging detectors. In the system, a scintillating fiber array is employed to obtain a detection efficiency of about 20% for DT neutrons. High-performance ICCDs and large aperture lens are taken into account to increase the conversion efficiency and the collective efficiency. The properties of the detector are charaterized in this paper.

  1. Neutron field characteristics of Ciemat's Neutron Standards Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Garcia, Karen A; Mendez-Villafañe, Roberto; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to characterize the neutron field produced by the calibration neutron sources of the Neutron Standards Laboratory at the Research Center for Energy, Environment, and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain. For (241)AmBe and (252)Cf neutron sources, the neutron spectra, the ambient dose equivalent rates and the total neutron fluence rates were estimated. In the calibration hall, there are several items that modify the neutron field. To evaluate their effects different cases were used, from point-like source in vacuum up to the full model. Additionally, using the full model, the neutron spectra were estimated to different distances along the bench; with these spectra, the total neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent rates were calculated. The hall walls induce the largest changes in the neutron spectra and the respective integral quantities. The free-field neutron spectrum is modified due the room return effect. PMID:25468287

  2. Neutron reflectometry on highly absorbing films and its application to 10B4C-based neutron detectors

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, F.; Khaplanov, A.; Devishvili, A.; Schmidt, S.; Höglund, C.; Birch, J.; Dennison, A. J. C.; Gutfreund, P.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Van Esch, P.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool used for studies of surfaces and interfaces. The absorption in the typical studied materials is neglected and this technique is limited only to the reflectivity measurement. For strongly absorbing nuclei, the absorption can be directly measured by using the neutron-induced fluorescence technique which exploits the prompt particle emission of absorbing isotopes. This technique is emerging from soft matter and biology where highly absorbing nuclei, in very small quantities, are used as a label for buried layers. Nowadays, the importance of absorbing layers is rapidly increasing, partially because of their application in neutron detection; a field that has become more active also due to the 3He-shortage. We extend the neutron-induced fluorescence technique to the study of layers of highly absorbing materials, in particular 10B4C. The theory of neutron reflectometry is a commonly studied topic; however, when a strong absorption is present the subtle relationship between the reflection and the absorption of neutrons is not widely known. The theory for a general stack of absorbing layers has been developed and compared to measurements. We also report on the requirements that a 10B4C layer must fulfil in order to be employed as a converter in neutron detection. PMID:26997902

  3. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-MFE-200J-1 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment MFE-200-J-, which was conducted in the removable beryllium (RB) position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 4.1 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (1.9 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 12 dpa and 28 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  4. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-20 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiment JP-20, which was conducted in a target position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The maximum total neutron fluence at midplane was 4.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (1.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 8.4 dpa and 388 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  5. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the HFIR-JP-9, -12, and -15 irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiments JP-9, -12, and -15. These experiments were conducted in target positions of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for a period of nearly four years. The maximum neutron fluence at midplane was 2.6 {times} 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2} (7.1 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 60 dpa and 3900 appm helium in type 316 stainless steel.

  6. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculation for the JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S./Japanese experiments JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for 238.5 EFPD. The maximum fast neutron fluence >0.1 MeV was about 2.1E + 22 n/cm{sup 2} for all of the experiments resulting in about 17.3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  7. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the JP-17, 18 and 19 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiments JP-17, 18, and 19 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for two cycles resulting in 43.55 EFPD for JP-17 and 42.06 EFPD for JP-18 and 19. The maximum fast neutron fluence > 0.1 MeV was about 3.7E + 21 n/cm{sup 2} for all three irradiations, resulting in about 3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  8. High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

    1983-05-01

    High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included.

  9. Investigation of Acrylic Acid at High Pressure Using Neutron Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article details the exploration of perdeuterated acrylic acid at high pressure using neutron diffraction. The structural changes that occur in acrylic acid-d4 are followed via diffraction and rationalized using the Pixel method. Acrylic acid undergoes a reconstructive phase transition to a new phase at ∼0.8 GPa and remains molecular to 7.2 GPa before polymerizing on decompression to ambient pressure. The resulting product is analyzed via Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry and found to possess a different molecular structure compared with polymers produced via traditional routes. PMID:24650085

  10. Defect clusters formed from large collision cascades in fcc metals irradiated with spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Yoshiie, T.; Kawai, M.; Matsumura, H.; Iwase, H.; Abe, H.; Kim, S. W.; Matsunaga, T.

    2013-11-01

    Fcc pure metals were irradiated with spallation neutrons (energies up to 500 MeV) at room temperature to a neutron fluence of 1 × 1018 n m-2 at KENS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). Defect clusters induced by large collision cascades were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In Au, large groups of defects included more than 10 clusters, and the damage zone extended over 50 nm, which was larger than that induced by fusion neutron irradiation (<20 nm). Although small stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) are formed in subcascades by fission and fusion neutron irradiation, dislocation loops were also observed in the present experiments. Large dislocation loops (>10 nm) were identified as vacancy type by the conventional inside-outside contrast method. Because of the low neutron fluence, spatial overlapping of collision cascades was ignored. Large vacancy loops are formed through cooperative reactions among subcascades in a single collision cascade with large recoil energy.

  11. Improving the neutron-to-photon discrimination capability of detectors used for neutron dosimetry in high energy photon beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Terrón, J A; Bedogni, R; Pola, A; Lorenzoli, M; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Gómez, F; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-09-01

    The increasing interest of the medical community to radioinduced second malignancies due to photoneutrons in patients undergoing high-energy radiotherapy, has stimulated in recent years the study of peripheral doses, including the development of some dedicated active detectors. Although these devices are designed to respond to neutrons only, their parasitic photon response is usually not identically zero and anisotropic. The impact of these facts on measurement accuracy can be important, especially in points close to the photon field-edge. A simple method to estimate the photon contribution to detector readings is to cover it with a thermal neutron absorber with reduced secondary photon emission, such as a borated rubber. This technique was applied to the TNRD (Thermal Neutron Rate Detector), recently validated for thermal neutron measurements in high-energy photon radiotherapy. The positive results, together with the accessibility of the method, encourage its application to other detectors and different clinical scenarios. PMID:27337649

  12. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H.; Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Jones, Glenn; Pantell, Richard H.

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3-5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  13. A Highly Efficient Neutron Veto Using Boron-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.; Mosteiro, P.; Loer, B.; Calaprice, F.

    2011-04-27

    By surrounding a dark matter detector with a layer of boron-loaded liquid scintillator, a highly efficient neutron veto can be produced. In Monte Carlo studies, a one meter thick layer of scintillator has a veto efficiency greater than 99.5% for nuclear recoil events induced by radiogenic neutrons, and a veto efficiency of more than 95% for nuclear recoil events produced by cosmogenic neutrons. The use of boron-loaded scintillator both reduces the veto-induced dead time by decreasing the neutron capture time and allows high neutron detection efficiency to be achieved in a relatively compact geometry.

  14. High-energy in-beam neutron measurements of metal-based shielding for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Björgvinsdóttir, H.; Kokai, Z.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-based shielding plays an important role in the attenuation of harmful and unwanted radiation at an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source. At the European Spallation Source, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, metal-based materials are planned to be used extensively as neutron guide substrates in addition to other shielding structures around neutron guides. The usage of metal-based materials in the vicinity of neutron guides however requires careful consideration in order to minimize potential background effects in a neutron instrument at the facility. Therefore, we have carried out a combined study involving high-energy neutron measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of metal-based shielding, both to validate the simulation methodology and also to investigate the benefits and drawbacks of different metal-based solutions. The measurements were carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden, using a 174.1 MeV neutron beam and various thicknesses of aluminum-, iron-, and copper-based shielding blocks. The results were compared to geant4 simulations and revealed excellent agreement. Our combined study highlights the particular situations where one type of metal-based solution may be preferred over another.

  15. New PTB thermal neutron calibration facility: first results.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Reginatto, M; Wershofen, H; Wiegel, B; Zimbal, A

    2014-10-01

    A new thermal neutron calibration facility based on a moderator assembly has been set up at PTB. It consists of 16 (241)Am-Be radionuclide sources mounted in a graphite block, 1.5 m wide, 1.5 m high and 1.8 m deep. The sources are distributed to eight different positions, at a mean distance of ∼1.25 m from the front face of the moderator. The neutron field at the reference position, 30 cm in front of the moderator device and 75 cm above the floor, has been characterised using calculations, Bonner sphere measurements and gold foil activation. First results are shown. The field is highly thermalised: 99 % in terms of fluence. It is quite homogenous within a 20 cm×20 cm area, but the absolute value of the thermal neutron fluence rate is small and yields an ambient dose equivalent rate of 3 µSv h(-1). PMID:24403346

  16. Scintillating Fiber Technology for a High Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Adams, James, Jr.; Christl, Mark; Norwood, Joseph; Watts, John

    2014-01-01

    Develop a compact low-power neutron spectrometer that uniquely identifies neutrons in the mixed radiation field expected on crewed deep-space missions. Secondary neutrons are generated by cosmic rays striking heavy crewed spacecraft as well as lunar and planetary surfaces1,2. It has been shown that secondary neutrons can account for up to 50% if the total dose-equivalent received by the crew.

  17. Liquid lithium target as a high intensity, high energy neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Parkin, Don M.; Dudey, Norman D.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a target jet for charged particles. In one embodiment the charged particles are high energy deuterons that bombard the target jet to produce high intensity, high energy neutrons. To this end, deuterons in a vacuum container bombard an endlessly circulating, free-falling, sheet-shaped, copiously flowing, liquid lithium jet that gushes by gravity from a rectangular cross-section vent on the inside of the container means to form a moving web in contact with the inside wall of the vacuum container. The neutrons are produced via break-up of the beam in the target by stripping, spallation and compound nuclear reactions in which the projectiles (deuterons) interact with the target (Li) to produce excited nuclei, which then "boil off" or evaporate a neutron.

  18. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Curzio, G.; d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in 10B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  19. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  20. Roadmap for High Efficiency Solid-State Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R; Cheung, C; Reinhardt, C; Wang, T

    2005-07-12

    Solid-state thermal neutron detectors are generally fabricated in a planar configuration by coating a layer of neutron-to-alpha converter material onto a semiconductor. The as-created alpha particles in the material are expected to impinge the semiconductor and create electron-hole pairs which provide the electrical signal. These devices are limited in efficiency to a range near (2-5%)/cm{sup 2} due to the conflicting thickness requirements of the converter layer. In this case, the layer is required to be thick enough to capture the incoming neutron flux while at the same time adequately thin to allow the alpha particles to reach the semiconductor. A three dimensional matrix structure has great potential to satisfy these two requirements in one device. Such structures can be realized by using PIN diode pillar elements to extend in the third dimension with the converter material filling the rest of the matrix. Our strategy to fabricate this structure is based on both ''top-down'' and ''bottom-up'' approaches. The ''top down'' approach employs high-density plasma etching techniques, while the ''bottom up'' approach draws on the growth of nanowires by chemical vapor deposition. From our simulations for structures with pillar diameters from 2 {micro}m down to 100 nm, the detector efficiency is expected to increase with a decrease in pillar size. Moreover, in the optimized configuration, the detector efficiency could be higher than 75%/cm{sup 2}. Finally, the road map for the relationship between detector diameter and efficiency will be outlined.

  1. Method for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>1.0E4)

    DOEpatents

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Heineck, Daniel; Voss, Lars F.; Wang, Tzu Fang; Shao, Qinghui

    2013-10-15

    Methods for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>10.sup.4) are provided. A structure is provided that includes a p+ region on a first side of an intrinsic region and an n+ region on a second side of the intrinsic region. The thickness of the intrinsic region is minimized to achieve a desired gamma discrimination factor of at least 1.0E+04. Material is removed from one of the p+ region or the n+ region and into the intrinsic layer to produce pillars with open space between each pillar. The open space is filed with a neutron sensitive material. An electrode is placed in contact with the pillars and another electrode is placed in contact with the side that is opposite of the intrinsic layer with respect to the first electrode.

  2. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy Study of Neutron Irradiated High Temperature Superconductors YBa2Cu3O7-δ for Application in Fusion Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veterníková, J.; Chudý, M.; Slugeň, V.; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H. W.; Sojak, S.; Petriska, M.; Hinca, R.; Degmová, J.; Sabelová, V.

    2012-02-01

    This study focuses on the crystallographic defects introduced by neutron irradiation and the resulting changes of the superconducting properties in the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ. This material is considered to be most promising for magnet systems in future fusion reactors. Two different bulk samples, pure non-doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) and multi-seed YBa2Cu3O7-δ doped by platinum (MS2F) were studied prior to and after irradiation in the TRIGA MARK II reactor in Vienna. Neutron irradiation is responsible for a significant enhancement of the critical current densities as well as for a reduction in critical temperature. The accumulation of small open volume defects (<0.5 nm) partially causes those changes. These defects were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at room temperature. A high concentration of Cu-O di-vacancies was found in both samples, which increased with neutron fluence. The defect concentration was significantly reduced after a heat treatment.

  3. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE HIGH-POWER PROTECTION MODULE TEST STAND

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Crofford, Mark T; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Jones, Stacey L; Hardek, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) High-Power Protection Module (HPM) provides interlocks and fast shutdown for the radio frequency (RF) system to protect the accelerating structures and high power RF (HPRF) Distribution System. The HPM has required some functional upgrades since the start of beam operations and an upgrade to the HPM test stand was required to support these added features. The HPM test stand currently verifies functionality, RF channel calibration, and measurement of the speed of shutdown to ensure the specifications are met. The upgraded test stand was implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to allow for future growth and flexibility. Work is currently progressing on automation of the test stand to better perform the required module calibration schedule.

  4. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  5. Unexpected Windy Weather Around a Highly Magnetized Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, George A.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Gill, Ramandeep; Granot, Jonathan; Watts, Anna; Gelfand, Joseph; Baring, Matthew G.; Kust Harding, Alice; Pavlov, George G.; van der Horst, Alexander; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Gögüs, Ersin; Lin, Lin; Roberts, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Magnetars and rotation-powered pulsars (RPPs) historically represented two distinct subclasses of neutron stars. Magnetars are slowly-rotating (~2-12 s), isolated neutron stars (NSs) with super-strong magnetic fields, B~10^13-10^15 G. RPPs, on the other hand, are rapidly-rotating (~0.01-0.3~s), isolated NSs with surface dipole magnetic field in the range ~10^11-10^13 G. Most pulsars possess a large rotational energy loss rate that powers a relativistic magnetized particle wind, often seen as a pulsar wind nebula (PWN; the Crab PWN being the most famous). There has not yet been convincing evidence for a wind nebula around magnetars, most likely due to their low rotational energy loss rate. Here, we report the study of new deep X-ray observations of the peculiar extended emission around the magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846. Our new results strongly support a wind nebula as the nature of the extended emission, thus, establishing Swift J1834.9-0846 as the first magnetar to possess a surrounding nebula. This implies that wind nebulae are no longer exclusive to RPPs and, along with recent discoveries in the field, further narrow the gaps between these two sub-populations of isolated NSs. The physical properties of this wind nebula, however, show peculiarities, especially its high radiative efficiency of about 10%, only shared with two other known very young RPPs, the Crab and its twin.

  6. Depth profile investigation of β-FeSi2 formed in Si(1 0 0) by high fluence implantation of 50 keV Fe ion and post-thermal vacuum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Reinert, Tilo; McDaniel, Floyd D.; Rout, Bibhudutta

    2014-08-01

    A single phase polycrystalline β-FeSi2 layer has been synthesized at the near surface region by implantation in Si(1 0 0) of a high fluence (∼1017 atoms/cm2) of 50 keV Fe ions and subsequent thermal annealing in vacuum at 800 °C. The depth profile of the implanted Fe atoms in Si(1 0 0) were simulated by the widely used transportation of ions in matter (TRIM) computer code as well as by the dynamic transportation of ions in matter code (T-DYN). The simulated depth profile predictions for this heavy ion implantation process were experimentally verified using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) in combination with Ar-ion etching. The formation of the β-FeSi2 phase was monitored by X-ray diffraction measurements. The T-DYN simulations show better agreement with the experimental Fe depth profile results than the static TRIM simulations. The experimental and T-DYN simulated results show an asymmetric distribution of Fe concentrated more toward the surface region of the Si substrate.

  7. Dependence of the phototropic response of Arabidopsis thaliana on fluence rate and wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Konjević, Radomir; Steinitz, Benjamin; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    In the phototropic response of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, the shape of the fluence-response relation depends on fluence rate and wavelength. At low fluence rates, the response to 450-nm light is characterized by a single maximum at about 0.3 μmol·m-2. At higher fluence rates, the response shows two distinct maxima, I and II, at 0.3 and 3.5 μmol·m-2, respectively. The response to 500-nm light shows a single maximum at 2 μmol·m-2, and the response to 510-nm light shows a single maximum at 4.5 μmol·m-2, independent of fluence rate. The response to 490-nm light shows a maximal at 4.5 μmol·m-2 and a shoulder at about 0.6 μmol·m-2. Preirradiation with high-fluence 510-nm light from above, immediately followed by unilateral 450-nm light, eliminates maximum II but not maximum I. Preirradiation with high-fluence 450-nm light from above eliminates the response to subsequent unilateral irradiation with either 450-nm or 510-nm light. The recovery of the response following high-fluence 450-nm light is considerably slower than the recovery following high-fluence 510-nm light. Unilateral irradiation with low-fluence 510-nm light followed by 450-nm light results in curvature that is approximately the sum of those produced by either irradiation alone. Based on these results, it is proposed that phototropism in A. thaliana seedlings is mediated by at least two blue-light photoreceptor pigments. PMID:16594094

  8. Neutron beam optimization for boron neutron capture therapy using the D-D and D-T high-energy neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Vujic, J.L.; Leung, K.N.

    2000-02-01

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of boron neutron capture therapy. Two figures-of-merit--the absorbed skin dose and the absorbed tumor dose at a given depth in the brain--are used to measure the neutron beam quality. Based on the results of this study, moderators, reflectors, and delimiters are designed and optimized to moderate the high-energy neutrons from the fusion reactions {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He and {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He down to a suitable energy spectrum. Two different computational models (MCNP and BNCT-RTPE) have been used to study the dose distribution in the brain. With the optimal beam-shaping assembly, a 1-A mixed deuteron/triton beam of energy 150 keV accelerated onto a titanium target leads to a treatment time of 1 h. The dose near the center of the brain obtained with this configuration is > 65% higher than the dose from a typical spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-produced neutron beams.

  9. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; et al

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elasticmore » and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).« less

  10. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).

  11. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (˜100 mg).

  12. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Vogt, A J; Derendorf, K S; Johnson, M L; Rustan, G E; Quirinale, D G; Kreyssig, A; Lokshin, K A; Neuefeind, J C; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A I; Egami, T; Kelton, K F

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg). PMID:26827330

  13. Use of prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyada, P.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of using measured prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent is explored theoretically. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of a high density polyethylene cylinder to emit prompt gammas from interaction of neutrons with the nuclei of hydrogen and carbon present in polyethylene. The neutron energy dependent responses of hydrogen and carbon nuclei are combined appropriately to match the energy dependent neutron fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. The proposed method is tested initially with simulated spectra and then validated using experimental measurements with an Am-Be neutron source. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations have established the feasibility of estimating neutron ambient dose equivalent using measured neutron induced prompt gammas emitted from polyethylene with an overestimation of neutron dose at very low energies.

  14. A multi-DSP system for the neutron high resolution Fourier diffractometer

    SciTech Connect

    Drozdov, V.A.; Butenko, V.A.; Prikhodko, V.I.

    1998-08-01

    The multi-DSP data acquisition system for neutron time-of-flight spectrum measurements requiring fast real-time data processing is designed and is operated at the neutron High Resolution Fourier Diffractometer (HRFD). The use of high performance DSPs and front-end electronics based on flexible PLDs allows increasing of the efficiency of neutron diffractometers with a Fourier chopper and a multi-element detector system by the method of electronic time-focusing.

  15. High electric field deuterium ion sources for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk

    Active interrogation systems for highly enriched uranium require improved fieldable neutron sources. The target technology for deuterium-tritium neutron generators is well understood and the most significant improvement can be achieved by improving the deuterium ion source through increased output and, in some cases, lifetime of the ion source. We are developing a new approach to a deuterium ion sources based upon the field desorption/evaporation of deuterium from the surfaces of metal tips. Electrostatic field desorption (EFD) desorbs previously adsorbed deuterium as ions under the influence of high electric fields (several V/A), without removing tip material. Single etched wire tip experiments have been performed and have shown that this is difficult but can be achieved with molybdenum and tungsten tips. Electrostatic field evaporation (EFE) evaporates ultra thin deuterated titanium films as ions. It has been shown that several 10s of atomic layers can be removed within a few nanoseconds from etched tungsten tips. In the course of these studies titanium deposition and deuteration methods were studied and new detection methods developed. Space charge effects resulting from the large ion currents were identified to be the most likely cause of some unusual ion emission characteristics. In addition, on W < 110 > oriented substrates a surprising body-centered cubic crystal structure of the titanium film was found and studied. The ion currents required for neutron generator applications can be achieved by microfabrication of metal tip arrays. Field desorption studies of microfabricated field emitter tip arrays have been conducted for the first time. Maximum fields of 3 V/A have been applied to the array tip surfaces to date, although fields of ˜ 2 V/A to ˜ 2.5 V/A are more typical. Desorption of atomic deuterium ions has been observed at fields of roughly 2 V/A at room temperature. The desorption of common surface adsorbates, such as hydrogen, carbon, water, and

  16. Neutron techniques. [for study of high-energy particles produced in large solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Glenn M., Jr.; Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.; Evenson, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Three experimental methods are described which hold the most promise for improved energy resolution, time resolution and sensitivity in the detection of solar neutrons on satellites and/or long duration balloon flights: the neutron calorimeter, the solar neutron track chamber, and the solar neutron decay proton detector. The characteristics of the three methods as to energy range, energy resolution, time resolution, detection efficiency, and physical properties are delineated. Earlier techniques to measure the intensity of high-energy cosmic-ray neutrons at the top of the atmosphere and to search for solar neutrons are described. The past three decades of detector development has now reached the point where it is possible to make comprehensive and detailed measurements of solar neutrons on future space missions.

  17. Investigation of Methacrylic Acid at High Pressure Using Neutron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Marshall, William G; Urquhart, Andrew J; Oswald, Iain D H

    2015-09-10

    This article shows that pressure can be a low-intensity route to the synthesis of polymethacrylic acid. The exploration of perdeuterated methacrylic acid at high pressure using neutron diffraction reveals that methacrylic acid exhibits two polymorphic phase transformations at relatively low pressures. The first is observed at 0.39 GPa, where both phases were observed simultaneously and confirm our previous observations. This transition is followed by a second transition at 1.2 GPa to a new polymorph that is characterized for the first time. On increasing pressure, the diffraction pattern of phase III deteriorates significantly. On decompression phase III persists to 0.54 GPa before transformation to the ambient pressure phase. There is significant loss of signal after decompression, signifying that there has been a loss of material through polymerization. The orientation of the molecules in phase III provides insight into the possible polymerization reaction. PMID:26289930

  18. Characterization of the high-energy neutron beam of the PRISMA beamline using a diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Frost, C. D.; Minniti, T.; Schooneveld, E.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-energy neutron component (En > 10 MeV) of the neutron spectrum of PRISMA, a beam-line at the ISIS spallation source, has been characterized for the first time. Neutron measurements using a Single-crystal Diamond Detector at a short-pulse source are obtained by a combination of pulse height and time of flight analysis. An XY scan provides a 2D map of the high-energy neutron beam which has a diameter of about 40 mm. The high neutron flux, that has been found to be (3.8 ± 0.7) · 105 cm‑2s‑1 for En > 10 MeV in the centre, opens up for a possible application of the beam-line as a high-energy neutron irradiation position. Results are of interest for the development of the ChipIR beam-line, which will feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for chip irradiation experiment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that diamond detectors can be used at spallation sources to investigate the transport of high-energy neutrons down instruments which is of interest in general to designers as high-energy neutrons are a source of background in thermal beamlines.

  19. Neutron-induced defects in the lithium tetraborate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burak, Y. V.; Padlyak, B. V.; Shevel, V. M.

    The X-band (nucongruent to9.4 GHz) electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of the un-doped isotopically enriched lithium tetraborate (LTB) Li2B4O7 single crystals, irradiated by thermal neutrons (fluences Phi(n) =2.74x 10(15) divided by 1.79 x 10(18) cm(-2) ) were investigated at 300 and 77 K. The LTB crystals of high chemical purity and optical quality with different isotope compositions (Li-6(2) (B4O7)-B-10 , Li-6(2) (B4O7)-B-11 , Li-7(2) (B4O7)-B-10 and Li-7(2) (B4O7)-B-11) were grown by Czochralski technique. The thermal neutrons (the total quantity >90%) with fluence near 10(18) cm(-2) induce at least 4 different types of stable paramagnetic centers in the Li and B isotopically enriched LTB crystals. The ESR spectra, electron structure and efficiency of generation for centers, induced by thermal neutrons, essentially depend on neutron fluence and isotope composition of the LTB crystals. The local symmetry and the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the observed paramagnetic centers were determined and their electron structure were established. The possible models and formation mechanism of the radiation defects, induced by thermal neutrons in the LTB lattice, are proposed.

  20. High-Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometry for Arms Control and Treaty Verification

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-07-01

    Many nondestructive nuclear analysis techniques have been developed to support the measurement needs of arms control and treaty verification, including gross photon and neutron counting, low- and high-resolution gamma spectrometry, time-correlated neutron measurements, and photon and neutron imaging. One notable measurement technique that has not been extensively studied to date for these applications is high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry (HRFNS). Applied for arms control and treaty verification, HRFNS has the potential to serve as a complimentary measurement approach to these other techniques by providing a means to either qualitatively or quantitatively determine the composition and thickness of non-nuclear materials surrounding neutron-emitting materials. The technique uses the normally-occurring neutrons present in arms control and treaty verification objects of interest as an internal source of neutrons for performing active-interrogation transmission measurements. Most low-Z nuclei of interest for arms control and treaty verification, including 9Be, 12C, 14N, and 16O, possess fast-neutron resonance features in their absorption cross sections in the 0.5- to 5-MeV energy range. Measuring the selective removal of source neutrons over this energy range, assuming for example a fission-spectrum starting distribution, may be used to estimate the stoichiometric composition of intervening materials between the neutron source and detector. At a simpler level, determination of the emitted fast-neutron spectrum may be used for fingerprinting 'known' assemblies for later use in template-matching tests. As with photon spectrometry, automated analysis of fast-neutron spectra may be performed to support decision making and reporting systems protected behind information barriers. This paper will report recent work at Idaho National Laboratory to explore the feasibility of using HRFNS for arms control and treaty verification applications, including simulations and

  1. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  2. Determination of TFTR far-field neutron detector efficiencies by local neutron flux spectrum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, D. L.; Ascione, G.; Kugel, H. W.; Roquemore, A. L.; Barcelo, T. W.; Kumar, A.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron detectors have often been located on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) test cell floor 3 m or more from the vacuum vessel for ease of detector access, to reduce radiation damage, minimize count saturation problems, and to avoid high magnetic fields. These detectors include Si surface-barrier diodes, fission chambers, natural diamond detectors, and T2 production in a moderated 3He cell. To evaluate the performance of these detectors during deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation, we determined the neutron flux spectrum incident on the principal detector enclosure using nuclide sample sets containing Al, Ti, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni, Zr, Nb, In, and Au activation foils. Foils were installed and then removed after ample exposure to TFTR D-T neutrons. High efficiency, high purity Ge detectors were used for gamma spectroscopy of the irradiated foils. The incident neutron fluence and spectral distribution were unfolded from the measured results, and used to derive absolute detector efficiencies.

  3. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  4. High aspect ratio composite structures with 48.5% thermal neutron detection efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Q.; Voss, L. F.; Conway, A. M.; Nikolic, R. J.; Dar, M. A.; Cheung, C. L.

    2013-02-11

    The pillar structured thermal neutron detector is based on the combination of high aspect ratio silicon p-i-n pillars surrounded by the neutron converter material {sup 10}B. By etching high aspect ratio pillar structures into silicon, the result is a device that efficiently absorbs the thermal neutron flux by accommodating a large volume fraction of {sup 10}B within the silicon pillar array. Here, we report a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 48.5% using a 50 {mu}m pillar array with an aspect ratio of 25:1.

  5. Dosimetry and fast neutron energies characterization of photoneutrons produced in some medical linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, N. E.; Attalla, E. M.; Ammar, H.; Khalil, W.

    2011-12-01

    This work focusses on the estimation of induced photoneutrons energy, fluence, and strength using nuclear track detector (NTD) (CR-39). Photoneutron energy was estimated for three different linear accelerators, LINACs as an example for the commonly used accelerators. For high-energy linear accelerators, neutrons are produced as a consequence of photonuclear reactions in the target nuclei, accelerator head, field-flattening filters and beam collimators, and other irradiated objects. NTD (CR-39) is used to evaluate energy and fluence of the fast neutron. Track length is used to estimate fast photoneutrons energy for linear accelerators (Elekta 10 MV, Elekta 15 MV, and Varian 15 MV). Results show that the estimated neutron energies for the three chosen examples of LINACs reveals neutron energies in the range of 1-2 MeV for 10 and 15 MV X-ray beams. The fluence of neutrons at the isocenter (Φtotal) is found to be (4×106 n cm2 Gy-1) for Elekta machine 10 MV. The neutron source strengths Q are calculated. It was found to be 0.2×1012 n Gy-1 X-ray at the isocenter. This work represents simple, low cost, and accurate methods of measuring fast neutrons dose and energies.

  6. High energy neutron and gamma-radiation generated during the solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocharov, G. E.; Mandzhavidze, N. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of high energy neutrons and gamma rays generation in the solar conditions is considered. It is shown that due to a peculiarity of generation and propagation of neutrons corresponding solar flares should be localized at high helio-longitudes.

  7. Prospects for High Resolution Neutron Spectroscopy on high power fusion devices in view of the recent diagnostic developments at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Ericsson, Goeran; Sunden, E. Andersson; Conroy, S.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Giacomelli, L.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ronchi, E.; Sjsoetrand, H.; Weiszflog, M.; Kaellne, J.; Gorini, G.; Ognissanto, F.; Tardocchi, M.; Angelone, M.; Popovichev, S.

    2008-03-12

    An evaluation of three different candidate techniques for a 14-MeV High Resolution Neutron Spectrometer for a high power fusion device is presented. The performance is estimated for a modelled neutron emission for ITER plasma scenario 4. As performance indicators we use the estimated time-resolution achieved in measurements of three plasma parameters, namely, the ion temperature, the intensity of neutron emission due to neutral beam--thermal plasma interactions and the intensity of the so-called alpha knock-on neutron tail. It is found that only the MPR technique can deliver results on all three parameters with reasonable time resolution.

  8. Calibration of the reactor neutron spectrum for the ko-NAA standardization using several approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučera, J.; Frána, J.; Horák, Z.; Marek, M.; Tomášek, F.; Viereibl, L.

    1999-01-01

    The parameters f and α ( f-thermal/epithermal neutron fluence rate, α—a parameter accounting for the non-ideality of the 1/E epithermal neutron fluence rate distribution) were determined using the following approaches: “Cd-covered multi-monitor” and “Cd-ratio for multimonitor” methods, two versions of the “bare multi-monitor” method, and two neutron dosimetry approaches, namely two-group formalism and reactor spectrum unfolding using the SAND II computer code. It has been found that the determination of α values close to zero is associated with a relatively high uncertainty. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that under these circumstances the uncertainty of α has only a little effect on the accuracy of results obtained by k0-NAA, especially for elements whose nuclides have a low resonance integral to thermal neutron cross section ratio.

  9. Effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of weld overlay cladding for reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobita, Tohru; Udagawa, Makoto; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Onizawa, Kunio

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of high fluence neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of two types of cladding materials fabricated using the submerged-arc welding and electroslag welding methods. The tensile tests, Charpy impact tests, and fracture toughness tests were conducted before and after the neutron irradiation with a fluence of 1 × 1024 n/m2 at 290 °C. With neutron irradiation, we could observe an increase in the yield strength and ultimate strength, and a decrease in the total elongation. All cladding materials exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during the Charpy impact tests. A reduction in the Charpy upper-shelf energy and an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was observed with neutron irradiation. There was no obvious decrease in the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (JIc) of the cladding materials upon irradiation with high neutron fluence. The tearing modulus was found to decrease with neutron irradiation; the submerged-arc-welded cladding materials exhibited low JIc values at high temperatures.

  10. Multidiagnostics analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K.; Polek, M. P.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.

    2015-02-28

    The ions dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over a fluence range spanning from the ablation threshold up to ~75 J/cm2 by means of three established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup and spectrally resolved ICCD imaging simultaneously monitor the laser-produced plasma ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a copper target. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed observing the occurrence of three different regimes. Moreover, the specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4-5 J/cm2, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ~50 J/cm2. The fluence variation of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase of forward peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ~10 J/cm2. Then, a broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ~10 J/cm2. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ions angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ~66 J/cm2. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals show a narrow forward peaked distribution and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ion angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  11. Neutron and deuteron activation calculations for IFMIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, R. A.; Loughlin, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    The materials for future fusion devices such as DEMO require testing to high neutron fluence. Such testing is planned to be carried out in IFMIF, an accelerator based facility where the neutrons will have maximum energy of about 55 MeV, but with a broad peak near 14 MeV. In order that activation calculations for IFMIF can be carried out, the nuclear data must contain cross sections covering a similar energy range. A description of the EASY-2005 system is given and it is noted that a new library has been added to EASY to cover another significant source of activation from deuteron-induced reactions. Calculations of the neutron activation of materials in many regions of IFMIF have been carried out. These calculations are reported, and the contribution of neutrons above 20 MeV to the activation is discussed. Preliminary calculations using the deuteron library have been made and the activation from deuterons is discussed.

  12. Phytochrome-like responses in Euglena: A low fluence response that reorganizes the spectral dependence of the high irradiance response in long-day photoperiodic induction of cell division.

    PubMed

    Bolige, Aoen; Goto, Ken

    2007-02-01

    Irradiance spectra change spatiotemporally, and angiosperms adapt accordingly, mainly through phytochromes. This study challenges the long-held belief that the flagellated alga Euglena gracilis lacks phytochromes and is therefore unaffected by spectral changes. We photoautotrophically cultured the alga under continuous light (LL), then transferred it to darkness. After about 26h in darkness, different irradiations for 3h enabled cell division in dark-arrested G2 cells evoking a high-irradiance response (HIR). The spectral characteristics of the irradiation during the LL period (pre-irradiation) defined the spectral sensitivity in the subsequent dark period. LL with light rich in the red spectrum led to a HIR to the red spectrum (R-HIR), whereas light rich in the far-red spectrum (FR) led to a FR-HIR. Finishing the period of pre-irradiation consisting of continuous cool-white fluorescent light (rich in R) by a FR pulse enhanced the characteristics of the FR-HIR 26h later. By contrast, a R pulse given at the end of the pre-irradiation rich in FR potentiated the R-HIR. The effects were completely photoreversible between R and FR with critical fluences of about 2mmolm(-2), satisfying the classic diagnostic feature of phytochromes. The action spectrum of the FR effect at the end of pre-irradiation consisting of continuous cool-white fluorescent light (rich in R) had a main peak at 740nm and a minor peak at 380nm, whereas antagonization of the FR effect had a main peak at 640nm and a minor peak at 480nm. Wavelengths of 610 and 670nm appeared in both spectra. We also demonstrated the photoreversibility of 380/640, 480/740, and (610 and 670)/(640 and 740) nm. We conclude that Euglena displays phytochrome-like responses similar to the 'shade avoidance' and 'end-of-day FR' effects reported in angiosperms. PMID:17029970

  13. Compensator models for fluence field modulated computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolac, Steven; Jaffray, David

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Fluence field modulated computed tomography (FFMCT) presents a novel approach for acquiring CT images, whereby a patient model guides dynamically changing fluence patterns in an attempt to achieve task-based, user-prescribed, regional variations in image quality, while also controlling dose to the patient. This work aims to compare the relative effectiveness of FFMCT applied to different thoracic imaging tasks (routine diagnostic CT, lung cancer screening, and cardiac CT) when the modulator is subject to limiting constraints, such as might be present in realistic implementations.Methods: An image quality plan was defined for a simulated anthropomorphic chest slice, including regions of high and low image quality, for each of the thoracic imaging tasks. Modulated fluence patterns were generated using a simulated annealing optimization script, which attempts to achieve the image quality plan under a global dosimetric constraint. Optimization was repeated under different types of modulation constraints (e.g., fixed or gantry angle dependent patterns, continuous or comprised of discrete apertures) with the most limiting case being a fixed conventional bowtie filter. For each thoracic imaging task, an image quality map (IQM{sub sd}) representing the regionally varying standard deviation is predicted for each modulation method and compared to the prescribed image quality plan as well as against results from uniform fluence fields. Relative integral dose measures were also compared.Results: Each IQM{sub sd} resulting from FFMCT showed improved agreement with planned objectives compared to those from uniform fluence fields for all cases. Dynamically changing modulation patterns yielded better uniformity, improved image quality, and lower dose compared to fixed filter patterns with optimized tube current. For the latter fixed filter cases, the optimal choice of tube current modulation was found to depend heavily on the task. Average integral dose reduction compared

  14. Neutronic calculations for a new high flux reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C.; Worley, B.A.; Vondy, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has begun the design of a new high flux reactor to be used for basic research, isotope production, and material irradiation. One of the principal goals of the design is the production of a thermal flux peak in the reflector larger than 5 x 10/sup 15//cm/sup 2/sec. A theoretical analysis of the slowing-down and diffusion of neutrons produced by a spherical fission source immersed in a moderator shows that the flux per unit power is maximized by combining a very undermoderated core with a very low absorbing reflector. The theoretical model interrelates total power, power density and transport properties with the thermal flux allowing very inexpensive scoping calculations. Full scale and detailed calculations were made with a numerical model which uses the Bold Venture code system. Calculations show that a highly enriched /sup 235/U reactor with D/sub 2/O as moderator and reflector would produce the desired peak flux, and the reactor would have a reasonable core life.

  15. Torsional oscillations of neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime

    2015-11-01

    To determine the frequencies of magnetic oscillations in neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields, we derive the perturbation equations. We assume that the field strength of the global magnetic structure is so small that such fields are negligible compared with tangled fields, which may still be far from a realistic configuration. Then, we systematically examine the spectra of the magnetic oscillations, as varying the magnetic field strength and stellar mass. The frequencies without crust elasticity are completely proportional to the strength of the magnetic field, whose proportionality constant depends strongly on the stellar mass. On the other hand, the oscillation spectra with crust elasticity become more complicated, where the frequencies even for weak magnetic fields are different from the crustal torsional oscillations without magnetic fields. For discussing spectra, the critical field strength can play an important role, and it is determined in such a way that the shear velocity is equivalent to the Alfvén velocity at the crust basis. Additionally, we find that the effect of the crust elasticity can be seen strongly in the fundamental oscillations with a lower harmonic index, ℓ. Unlike the stellar models with a pure dipole magnetic field, we also find that the spectra with highly tangled magnetic fields become discrete, where one can expect many of the eigenfrequencies. Maybe these frequencies could be detected after the violent phenomena breaking the global magnetic field structure.

  16. First PGAA and NAA experimental results from a compact high intensity D-D neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.; Firestone, R.B.; English, J.A.; Perry, D.L.; Smith, A.; Gicquel, F.; Sun, M.; Bandong, B.; Garabedian, G.; Revay, Zs.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Molnar, G.

    2003-05-13

    Various types of neutron generator systems have been designed and tested at the Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. These generators are based on a D-D fusion reaction. These high power D-D neutron generators can provide neutron fluxes in excess of the current state of the art D-T neutron generators, without the use of pre-loaded targets or radioactive tritium gas. Safe and reliable long-life operations are the typical features of these D-D generators. All of the neutron generators developed in the Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group are utilizing powerful RF-induction discharge to generate the deuterium plasma. One of the advantages of using the RF-induction discharge is it's ability to generate high fraction of atomic ions from molecular gases, and the ability to generate high plasma densities for high extractable ion current from relatively small discharge volume.

  17. Secondary neutron spectrum from 250-MeV passively scattered proton therapy: Measurement with an extended-range Bonner sphere system

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Burgett, E. A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are an unavoidable consequence of proton therapy. While the neutron dose is low compared to the primary proton dose, its presence and contribution to the patient dose is nonetheless important. The most detailed information on neutrons includes an evaluation of the neutron spectrum. However, the vast majority of the literature that has reported secondary neutron spectra in proton therapy is based on computational methods rather than measurements. This is largely due to the inherent limitations in the majority of neutron detectors, which are either not suitable for spectral measurements or have limited response at energies greater than 20 MeV. Therefore, the primary objective of the present study was to measure a secondary neutron spectrum from a proton therapy beam using a spectrometer that is sensitive to neutron energies over the entire neutron energy spectrum. Methods: The authors measured the secondary neutron spectrum from a 250-MeV passively scattered proton beam in air at a distance of 100 cm laterally from isocenter using an extended-range Bonner sphere (ERBS) measurement system. Ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was calculated using measured fluence and fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. Results: The neutron fluence spectrum had a high-energy direct neutron peak, an evaporation peak, a thermal peak, and an intermediate energy continuum between the thermal and evaporation peaks. The H*(10) was dominated by the neutrons in the evaporation peak because of both their high abundance and the large quality conversion coefficients in that energy interval. The H*(10) 100 cm laterally from isocenter was 1.6 mSv per proton Gy (to isocenter). Approximately 35% of the dose equivalent was from neutrons with energies ≥20 MeV. Conclusions: The authors measured a neutron spectrum for external neutrons generated by a 250-MeV proton beam using an ERBS measurement system that was sensitive to neutrons over the entire

  18. Single event upset and charge collection measurements using high energy protons and neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E.; Oberg, D.L.; Wert, J.L.; Ness, J.D.; Majewski, P.P. ); Wender, S.; Gavron, A. )

    1994-12-01

    RAMs, microcontrollers and surface barrier detectors were exposed to beams of high energy protons and neutrons to measure the induced number of upsets as well as energy deposition. The WNR facility at Los Alamos provided a neutron spectrum similar to that of the atmospheric neutrons. Its effect on devices was compared to that of protons with energies of 200, 400, 500, and 800 MeV. Measurements indicate that SEU cross sections for 400 MeV protons are similar to those induced by the atmospheric neutron spectrum.

  19. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  20. Interaction of High-Energy Proton Beam with a Thin Target and Multiplicities of Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Demirkol, I.; Tatar, M.; Safak, M. S.; Arasoglu, A.; Tel, E.

    2007-04-23

    An important ingredient in the performance of accelerator driven systems for energy production, waste transmutation and other applications are the number of spallation neutrons produced per incident proton. The neutron multiplicities, angular and energy distributions are usually calculated using simulation codes. We have presented multiplicities of the neutrons emitted in the interaction of a high-energy proton (1500 MeV) with a thin target Pb, Bi. In this study we have used the code ISABEL to calculate multiplicities of the neutron emitted. The results obtained have been compared with the available data.

  1. Microstructural interpretation of the fluence and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of irradiated AISI 316

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.; Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.; Fish, R.L.

    1980-04-17

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of annealed and 20% cold-worked AISI 316 irradiated in EBR-II were determined for the temperature regime of 370 to 760/sup 0/C for fluences up to 8.4 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV). At irradiation temperatures below about 500/sup 0/C, both annealed and cold-worked material exhibit a substantial increase in the flow stress with increasing fluence. Furthermore, both materials eventually exhibit the same flow stress, which is independent of fluence. At temperatures in the range of 538 to 650/sup 0/C, the cold-worked material exhibits a softening with increasing fluence. Annealed AISI 316 in this temperature regime exhibits hardening and at a fluence of 2 to 3 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) reaches the same value of flow stress as the cold-worked material.

  2. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1987-01-01

    A device for detecting neutrons comprises a layer of conductive polymer sandwiched between electrodes, which may be covered on each face with a neutron transmissive insulating material layer. Conventional electrodes are used for a non-imaging integrating total neutron fluence-measuring embodiment, while wire grids are used in an imaging version of the device. The change in conductivity of the polymer after exposure to a neutron flux is determined in either case to provide the desired data. Alternatively, the exposed conductive polymer layer may be treated with a chemical reagent which selectively binds to the sites altered by neutrons to produce an image of the flux detected.

  3. High-efficiency neutron detectors and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Klann, Raymond

    2007-01-16

    Neutron detectors, advanced detector process techniques and advanced compound film designs have greatly increased neutron-detection efficiency. One embodiment of the detectors utilizes a semiconductor wafer with a matrix of spaced cavities filled with one or more types of neutron reactive material such as 10B or 6LiF. The cavities are etched into both the front and back surfaces of the device such that the cavities from one side surround the cavities from the other side. The cavities may be etched via holes or etched slots or trenches. In another embodiment, the cavities are different-sized and the smaller cavities extend into the wafer from the lower surfaces of the larger cavities. In a third embodiment, multiple layers of different neutron-responsive material are formed on one or more sides of the wafer. The new devices operate at room temperature, are compact, rugged, and reliable in design.

  4. A High Intensity Multi-Purpose D-D Neutron Generator for Nuclear Engineering Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ka-Ngo Leung; Jasmina L. Vujic; Edward C. Morse; Per F. Peterson

    2005-11-29

    This NEER project involves the design, construction and testing of a low-cost high intensity D-D neutron generator for teaching nuclear engineering students in a laboratory environment without radioisotopes or a nuclear reactor. The neutron generator was designed, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  5. Workshop: Research and development plans for high power spallation neutron testing at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-05

    This report consists of vugraphs from presentations at the meeting. The papers covered the following topics: (1) APS as a proton source; (2) target status for NSNS (National Spallation Neutron Source); (3) spallation neutron source in Japan; (4) liquid LiBi flow loop; and (5) research and development plans for high power tests at the AGS.

  6. High-dose neutron irradiation performance of dielectric mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Nimishakavi Anantha Phani Kiran Kumar; Leonard, Keith J.; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-05-01

    The study presents the high-dose behavior of dielectric mirrors specifically engineered for radiation-tolerance: alternating layers of Al2O3/SiO2 and HfO2/SiO2 were grown on sapphire substrates and exposed to neutron doses of 1 and 4 dpa at 458 10K in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In comparison to previously reported results, these higher doses of 1 and 4 dpa results in a drastic drop in optical reflectance, caused by a failure of the multilayer coating. HfO2/SiO2 mirrors failed completely when exposed to 1 dpa, whereas the reflectance of Al2O3/SiO2 mirrors reduced to 44%, eventually failing at 4 dpa. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of the Al2O3/SiO2 specimens showed SiO2 layer defects which increases size with irradiation dose. The typical size of each defect was 8 nm in 1 dpa and 42 nm in 4 dpa specimens. Buckling type delamination of the interface between the substrate and first layer was typically observed in both 1 and 4 dpa HfO2/SiO2 specimens. Composition changes across the layers were measured in high resolution scanning-TEM mode using energy dispersive spectroscopy. A significant interdiffusion between the film layers was observed in Al2O3/SiO2 mirror, though less evident in HfO2/SiO2 system. Lastly, the ultimate goal of this work is the provide insight into the radiation-induced failure mechanisms of these mirrors.

  7. High-dose neutron irradiation performance of dielectric mirrors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nimishakavi Anantha Phani Kiran Kumar; Leonard, Keith J.; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-05-01

    The study presents the high-dose behavior of dielectric mirrors specifically engineered for radiation-tolerance: alternating layers of Al2O3/SiO2 and HfO2/SiO2 were grown on sapphire substrates and exposed to neutron doses of 1 and 4 dpa at 458 10K in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In comparison to previously reported results, these higher doses of 1 and 4 dpa results in a drastic drop in optical reflectance, caused by a failure of the multilayer coating. HfO2/SiO2 mirrors failed completely when exposed to 1 dpa, whereas the reflectance of Al2O3/SiO2 mirrors reduced to 44%, eventually failing at 4 dpa. Transmission electron microscopymore » (TEM) observation of the Al2O3/SiO2 specimens showed SiO2 layer defects which increases size with irradiation dose. The typical size of each defect was 8 nm in 1 dpa and 42 nm in 4 dpa specimens. Buckling type delamination of the interface between the substrate and first layer was typically observed in both 1 and 4 dpa HfO2/SiO2 specimens. Composition changes across the layers were measured in high resolution scanning-TEM mode using energy dispersive spectroscopy. A significant interdiffusion between the film layers was observed in Al2O3/SiO2 mirror, though less evident in HfO2/SiO2 system. Lastly, the ultimate goal of this work is the provide insight into the radiation-induced failure mechanisms of these mirrors.« less

  8. Microstructures of deformed VTiCrSi type alloys after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Manabu; Abe, Katsunori; Kayano, Hideo

    1996-10-01

    The alloy of V5Ti5Cr1SiAl,Y (nominal composition, weight percentage) was developed to improve oxidation properties and high temperature strength, and has been studied as one of the candidates for fusion applications. This alloy showed low swelling properties and enough tensile ductility after neutron irradiation to high fluence levels. The dislocation microstructures after tensile deformation and defect microstructures in the neutron-irradiated alloy to high fluences were studied. Irradiation was conducted in the Materials Open Test Assembly of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF/MOTA-2A) at 406°C to 46 dpa and the deformation microstructures were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Slip dislocations were developed inhomogeneously in the specimen deformed at ambient temperature after neutron irradiation. Dislocation loops contributed mainly to hardening of the alloy after irradiation; however, cavities and radiation-induced precipitates did not so much.

  9. The effect of local fluence on the micropatterning of poly(ethylene terephthalate) foils through proton beam writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, C. T.; Stori, E. M.; Boufleur, L. A.; Papaléo, R. M.; Dias, J. F.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of ion fluence on the development of microstructures produced by 2.2 MeV H+ impinging on 12-μm-thick poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET, Mylar®) foils. Several lines of 1 × 100 pixels corresponding to approximately 2.5 × 101.5 µm2 were patterned on PET foils using different ion fluences (from 1012 to 1017 H+/cm2) and etching times (from 1 to 60 min). We observe the presence of three different behaviors according to the ion fluence. Long etching times are necessary to open the structure in the low fluence regime, while moderate fluences require shorter etching times. In the high fluence regime, a more complex scenario emerges where short etching times lead to structures either fully or partially developed.

  10. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  11. Efficient neutron generation from solid-nanoparticle explosions driven by DPSSL-pumped high-repetition rate femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, T.; Matsukado, K.; Sekine, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Hatano, Y.; Yoshimura, R.; Satoh, N.; Nishihara, K.; Takagi, M.; Kawashima, T.

    2016-03-01

    We propose novel neutron source using high-intensity laser based on the cluster fusion scheme. We developed DPSSL-pumped high-repetition-rate 20-TW laser system and solid nanoparticle target for neutron generation demonstration. In our neutron generation experiment, high-energy deuterons were generated from coulomb explosion of CD solid- nanoparticles and neutrons were generated by DD fusion reaction. Efficient and stable neutron generation was obtained by irradiating an intense femtosecond laser pulse of >2×1018 W/cm2. A yield of ∼105 neutrons per shot was stably observed during 0.1-1 Hz continuous operation.

  12. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosko, Andrey

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular among nuclear pharmacies and clinics in many countries; it is compact and reliable; it produces protons with energies high enough to produce neutrons with appropriate energy and fluence rate for BNCT and it does not require significant changes in design to provide neutrons. In particular, the standard PETtrace 18O target is considered. The cyclotron efficiency may be significantly increased if unused neutrons produced during radioisotopes production could be utilized for other medical modalities such as BNCT at the same time. The resulting dose from the radiation emitted from the target is evaluated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP at several depths in a brain phantom for different scattering geometries. Four different moderating materials of various thicknesses were considered: light water, carbon, heavy water, arid Fluental(TM). The fluence rate tally was used to calculate photon and neutron dose, by applying fluence rate-to-dose conversion factors. Fifteen different geometries were considered and a 30-cm thick heavy water moderator was chosen as the most suitable for BNCT with the GE PETtrace cyclotron. According to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) protocol, the maximum dose to the normal brain is set to 12.5 RBEGy, which for the conditions of using a heavy water moderator, assuming a 60 muA beam current, would be reached with a treatment time of 258 min. Results showed that using a PETtrace cyclotron in this configuration provides a therapeutic ratio of about 2.4 for depths up to 4 cm inside a brain phantom. Further increase of beam current proposed by GE should significantly improve the beam quality or the treatment time and allow treating tumors at greater depths.

  13. Earthquake effects in thermal neutron variations at the high-altitude station of Northern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, Valentina; Chubenko, Alexandr; Kryukov, Sergey; Lutsenko, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Results of study of thermal neutron variations under various space and geophysical conditions on the basis of measurements on stationary installations with high statistical accuracy are presented. Installations are located close to the fault of the earth's crust at the high-altitude station of cosmic rays (3340 m above sea level, 43.02 N, 76.56 E, 20 km from Almaty) in the mountains of Northern Tien-Shan. Responses of the most effective gelio- and geophysical events (variations of atmospheric pressure, coronal mass ejections, earthquakes) has consistently considered in the variations of the thermal neutron flux and compared with variations of high-energy neutrons (standard monitor 18NM64) of galactic origin during these periods. Coefficients of correlation were calculated between data of thermal neutron detectors and data of the neutron monitor, recording the intensity of high-energy particles. High correlation coefficients and similarity of responses to changes of space and geophysical conditions are obtained, that confirms the conclusion of the genetic connection of thermal neutrons with high-energy neutrons of galactic origin and suggests same sources of disturbances in the absence of seismic activity. Observations and analysis of experimental data during the activation of seismic activity in the vicinity of Almaty showed the frequent breakdown of the correlation between the intensity of thermal and high-energy neutrons and the absence of similarity between variations during these periods. We suppose that the additional thermal neutron flux of the lithospheric origin appears under these conditions. Method of separating of thermal neutron flux variations of the lithospheric origin from neutrons variations generated in the atmosphere by subtracting the normalized data is proposed, taking into account the conclusion that variations caused with the atmospheric and interplanetary origins in thermal neutron detectors are similar to variations of high-energy neutrons

  14. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Senhou, N

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses. PMID:22257567

  15. Simulated workplace neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, V.; Taylor, G.; Röttger, S.

    2011-12-01

    The use of simulated workplace neutron fields, which aim at replicating radiation fields at practical workplaces, is an alternative solution for the calibration of neutron dosemeters. They offer more appropriate calibration coefficients when the mean fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients of the simulated and practical fields are comparable. Intensive Monte Carlo modelling work has become quite indispensable for the design and/or the characterization of the produced mixed neutron/photon fields, and the use of Bonner sphere systems and proton recoil spectrometers is also mandatory for a reliable experimental determination of the neutron fluence energy distribution over the whole energy range. The establishment of a calibration capability with a simulated workplace neutron field is not an easy task; to date only few facilities are available as standard calibration fields.

  16. Fricke-gel dosimetry in epithermal or thermal neutron beams of a research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambarini, G.; Artuso, E.; Giove, D.; Volpe, L.; Agosteo, S.; Barcaglioni, L.; Campi, F.; Garlati, L.; Pola, A.; Durisi, E.; Borroni, M.; Carrara, M.; Klupak, V.; Marek, M.; Viererbl, L.; Vins, M.; d'Errico, F.

    2015-11-01

    Fricke-xylenol-orange gel has shown noticeable potentiality for in-phantom dosimetry in epithermal or thermal neutron fields with very high fluence rate, as those characteristic of nuclear research reactors. Fricke gels in form of layers give the possibility of achieving spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and dose due to charged particles generated by thermal neutron reactions. The thermal neutron fluence has been deduced from the dose coming from the charge particles emitted by neutron reactions with the isotope 10B. Some measurements have been performed for improving the information on the relative sensitivity of Fricke gel dosimeters to the particles produced by 10B reactions, because at present the precision of dose evaluations is limited by the scanty knowledge about the dependence of the dosimeter sensitivity on the radiation LET. For in-air measurements, the dosimeter material can produce an enhancement of thermal neutron fluence. Measurements and Monte Carlo calculations have been developed to investigate the importance of this effect.

  17. High neutronic efficiency, low current targets for accelerator-based BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1998-08-01

    The neutronic efficiency of target/filters for accelerator-based BNCT applications is measured by the proton current required to achieve a desirable neutron current at the treatment port (10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}/s). In this paper the authors describe two possible targeyt/filter concepts wihch minimize the required current. Both concepts are based on the Li-7 (p,n)Be-7 reaction. Targets that operate near the threshold energy generate neutrons that are close tothe desired energy for BNCT treatment. Thus, the filter can be extremely thin ({approximately} 5 cm iron). However, this approach has an extremely low neutron yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}6)), thus requiring a high proton current. The proposed solutino is to design a target consisting of multiple extremely thin targets (proton energy loss per target {approximately} 10 keV), and re-accelerate the protons between each target. Targets operating at ihgher proton energies ({approximately} 2.5 MeV) have a much higher yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}4)). However, at these energies the maximum neutron energy is approximately 800 keV, and thus a neutron filter is required to degrade the average neutron energy to the range of interest for BNCT (10--20 keV). A neutron filter consisting of fluorine compounds and iron has been investigated for this case. Typically a proton current of approximately 5 mA is required to generate the desired neutron current at the treatment port. The efficiency of these filter designs can be further increased by incorporating neutron reflectors that are co-axial with the neutron source. These reflectors are made of materials which have high scattering cross sections in the range 0.1--1.0 MeV.

  18. Study on High Speed Lithium Jet For Neutron Source of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tooru; Zhang, Mingguang; Mák, Michael; Štefanica, Jirí; Dostál, Václav; Zhao, Wei

    The feasibility study of a liquid lithium type proton beam target was performed for the neutron source of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). As the candidates of the liquid lithium target, a thin sheet jet and a thin film flow on a concave wall were chosen, and a lithium flow experiment was conducted to investigate the hydrodynamic stability of the targets. The surfaces of the jets and film flows with a thickness of 0.5 mm and a width of 50 mm were observed by means of photography. It has been found that a stable sheet jet and a stable film flow on a concave wall can be formed up to certain velocities by using a straight nozzle and a curved nozzle with the concave wall, respectively.

  19. High-Precision Determination of the Neutron Coherent Scattering Length

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Apoorva G.; Abbas, Sohrab

    2005-01-01

    The neutron coherent scattering length bc has been determined interferometrically to an uncertainty of about 5 × 10−5 by measuring the nondispersive phase. We propose improving the uncertainty to about 10−6 by optimizing various parameters of the interferometric experiment. Any uncertainty in the bc determination arising from possible variations in the constitution of the ambient air can be eliminated by performing the experiment in vacuum. When such uncertainty is attained, it becomes necessary to account for the neutron beam refraction at the sample-ambient interfaces, to infer the correct bc from the observed phase. The formula for the phase used hitherto is approximate and would significantly overestimate bc. The refractive index for neutrons can thus be determined to a phenomenal uncertainty of about 10−12. PMID:27308128

  20. Characterisation of the TRIUMF neutron facility using a Monte Carlo simulation code.

    PubMed

    Monk, S D; Abram, T; Joyce, M J

    2015-04-01

    Here, the characterisation of the high-energy neutron field at TRIUMF (The Tri Universities Meson Facility, Vancouver, British Columbia) with Monte Carlo simulation software is described. The package used is MCNPX version 2.6.0, with the neutron fluence rate determined at three locations within the TRIUMF Thermal Neutron Facility (TNF), including the exit of the neutron channel where users of the facility can test devices that may be susceptible to the effects of this form of radiation. The facility is often used to roughly emulate the field likely to be encountered at high altitudes due to radiation of galactic origin and thus the simulated information is compared with the energy spectrum calculated to be due to neutron radiation of cosmic origin at typical aircraft altitudes. The calculated values were also compared with neutron flux measurements that were estimated using the activation of various foils by the staff of the facility, showing agreement within an order of magnitude. PMID:25342608

  1. Development of high-energy neutron imaging for use in NDE applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F; Hall, J; Logan, C; Schmid, G

    1999-06-01

    We are currently developing a high-energy (10 - 15 MeV) neutron imaging system for use in NDE applications. Our goal is to develop an imaging system capable of detecting cubic-mm-scale voids or other structural defects in heavily-shielded low-Z materials within thick sealed objects. The system will be relatively compact (suitable for use in a small laboratory) and capable of acquiring tomographic image data sets. The design of a prototype imaging detector and multi-axis staging system will be discussed and selected results from recent imaging experiments will be presented. The development of an intense, accelerator-driven neutron source suitable for use with the imaging system will also be discussed. Keywords: neutron imaging, neutron radiography, computed tomography, non-destructive inspection, neutron sources

  2. Estimation of neutron-equivalent dose in organs of patients undergoing radiotherapy by the use of a novel online digital detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Doblado, F.; Domingo, C.; Gómez, F.; Sánchez-Nieto, B.; Muñiz, J. L.; García-Fusté, M. J.; Expósito, M. R.; Barquero, R.; Hartmann, G.; Terrón, J. A.; Pena, J.; Méndez, R.; Gutiérrez, F.; Guerre, F. X.; Roselló, J.; Núñez, L.; Brualla-González, L.; Manchado, F.; Lorente, A.; Gallego, E.; Capote, R.; Planes, D.; Lagares, J. I.; González-Soto, X.; Sansaloni, F.; Colmenares, R.; Amgarou, K.; Morales, E.; Bedogni, R.; Cano, J. P.; Fernández, F.

    2012-10-01

    Neutron peripheral contamination in patients undergoing high-energy photon radiotherapy is considered as a risk factor for secondary cancer induction. Organ-specific neutron-equivalent dose estimation is therefore essential for a reasonable assessment of these associated risks. This work aimed to develop a method to estimate neutron-equivalent doses in multiple organs of radiotherapy patients. The method involved the convolution, at 16 reference points in an anthropomorphic phantom, of the normalized Monte Carlo neutron fluence energy spectra with the kerma and energy-dependent radiation weighting factor. This was then scaled with the total neutron fluence measured with passive detectors, at the same reference points, in order to obtain the equivalent doses in organs. The latter were correlated with the readings of a neutron digital detector located inside the treatment room during phantom irradiation. This digital detector, designed and developed by our group, integrates the thermal neutron fluence. The correlation model, applied to the digital detector readings during patient irradiation, enables the online estimation of neutron-equivalent doses in organs. The model takes into account the specific irradiation site, the field parameters (energy, field size, angle incidence, etc) and the installation (linac and bunker geometry). This method, which is suitable for routine clinical use, will help to systematically generate the dosimetric data essential for the improvement of current risk-estimation models.

  3. Light fluence normalization in turbid tissues via temporally unmixed multispectral optoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Deán-Ben, X Luís; Stiel, Andre C; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-10-15

    Discerning the accurate distribution of chromophores and biomarkers by means of optoacoustic imaging is commonly challenged by the highly heterogeneous excitation light patterns resulting from strong spatial variations of tissue scattering and absorption. Here we used the light-fluence dependent switching kinetics of reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs), in combination with real-time acquisition of volumetric multi-spectral optoacoustic data to correct for the light fluence distribution deep in scattering media. The new approach allows for dynamic fluence correction in time-resolved imaging, e.g., of moving organs, and can be extended to work with a large palette of available synthetic and genetically encoded photochromic substances for multiplexed wavelength-specific fluence normalization. PMID:26469596

  4. A direct measurement of the 6Li(n,t)4He cross section at sub-thermal neutron energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, A.; Dewey, M.; Gilliam, D.; Nico, J.; Greene, G.; Laptev, A.

    2014-09-01

    The thermal neutron capture cross section for the 6Li(n,t)4He reaction is an important neutron cross section standard. Yet few measurements of it have been performed and the ENDF/B-VII recommended value of (938 . 5 +/- 1 . 3) b is based heavily on measurements performed at higher energies. The first absolute, direct measurement of the 6Li(n,t)4He cross section at sub-thermal neutron energy has been performed at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. An alpha-gamma counter was used to measure the absolute neutron fluence of a monoenergetic neutron beam to sub-0.1% precision. The alpha-gamma counter used a thick, totally absorbing target of 10B-enriched boron carbide. The rate of absorbed neutrons was determined by counting the 478 keV 10B(n, γ)7Li gamma rays with calibrated high-purity germanium detectors. Simultaneously, the absolute rate of neutron-induced charged particles was measured for three thin 6Li targets of known density with a defined solid-angle counter. Using the known density of the 6Li targets and measurements of the rate of charged particles from the 6Li targets, the fluence of the neutron beam, and the energy of the neutron beam, we determine the 6Li(n,t)4He cross section at En = 3 . 3 meV to 0.3% uncertainty.

  5. Micronuclei induction in human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to Los Alamos high-energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersey, Brad; Sodolak, John; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Prem; Wilkins, Richard; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's ICE House 30L beamline is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectra of earth's atmosphere. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human fibroblasts in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams without degrader at an entrance dose rate of 25 mGy/h and analyzed the micronuclei (MN) induction. The cells were also placed behind a 9.9 cm water column to study the effect of shielding in the protection of neutron induced damages. It was found that the dose response in the MN frequency was linear for the samples with and without shielding and the slope of the MN yield behind the shielding was reduced by a factor of 3.5. Compared to the MN induction in human fibroblasts exposed to a γ source at a similar low dose rate, the RBE was found to be 16.7 and 10.0 for the neutrons without and with the 9.9 cm water shielding, respectively.

  6. Micronuclei Induction in Human Fibroblasts Exposed In Vitro to Los Alamos High-Energy Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersey, Brad; Sodolak, John; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Prem; Wilkins, Richard; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility#s ICE House 30L beamline is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectra of earth#s atmosphere. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human fibroblasts in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams without degrader at an entrance dose rate of 25 mGy/hr and analyzed the micronuclei (MN) induction. The cells were also placed behind a 9.9 cm water column to study effect of shielding in the protection of neutron induced damages. It was found that the dose response in the MN frequency was linear for the samples with and without shielding and the slope of the MN yield behind the shielding was reduced by a factor of 3.5. Compared to the MN induction in human fibroblasts exposed to a gamma source at a low dose rate, the RBE was found to be 16.7 and 10.0 for the neutrons without and with 9.9 cm water shielding, respectively.

  7. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  8. Optical absorption of neutron-irradiated silica fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.W.; Farnum, E.H.; Bennett, B.L.

    1996-10-01

    Induced-loss spectra of silica-based optical fibers exposed to high (10{sup 23} n-m{sup {minus}2}) and low (10{sup 21} n-m{sup {minus}2}) fluences of neutrons at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) have been measured. Two types of fibers consisting of a pure fused silica core with fluorine-doped ({approximately}4 mole %) cladding were obtained from Fiberguide Industries and used in the as-received condition. Anhydroguide{trademark} and superguide{trademark} fibers contained less than 1 ppm, and 600 to 800 ppm of OH, respectively. The data suggest that presently available silica fibers can be used in plasma diagnostics, but the choice and suitability depends upon the spectral region of interest. Low-OH content fibers can be used for diagnostic purposes in the interval {approximately}800 to 1400 mn if the exposure is to high-fluence neutrons. For low-fluence neutron exposures, the low-OH content fibers are best suited for use in the interval {approximately}800 to 2000 nm, and the high-OH content fibers are the choice for the interval {approximately}400 to 800 nm.

  9. Measurement of high energy neutrons via Lu(n,xn) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, E.A.; Becker, J.A.; Archer, D.E.; Younes, W.; Stoyer, M.A.; Slaughter, D.

    1997-07-01

    High energy neutrons can be assayed by the use of the nuclear diagnostic material lutetium. We are measuring the (n,xn) cross sections for natural lutetium in order to develop it as a detector material. We are applying lutetium to diagnose the high energy neutrons produced in test target/blanket systems appropriate for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Proton Particle Test Fluence: What's the Right Number?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    While we have been utilizing standard fluence levels such as those listed in the JESD57 document, we have begun revisiting what an appropriate test fluence is when it comes to qualifying a device for single events. Instead of a fixed fluence level or until a specific number of events occurs, a different thought process is required.

  11. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Casson, William H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.; Kleck, Jeffrey H.; Beverding, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  12. Scientific Advancements and Technological Developments of High P-T Neutron Diffraction at LANSCE, Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Daemen, L. L.; Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    In-situ high P-T neutron diffraction experiments provide unique opportunities to study the crystal structure, hydrogen bonding, magnetism, and thermal parameters of light elements (eg. H, Li, B) and heavy elements (eg. Ta, U, Pu,), that are virtually impossible to determine with x-ray diffraction techniques. For example, thermoelasticity and Debye-Waller factor as function of pressure and temperature can be derived using in-situ high P-T neutron diffraction techniques. These applications can also be extended to a much broader spectrum of scientific problems. For instance, puzzles in Earth science such as the carbon cycle and the role of hydrous minerals for water exchange between lithosphere and biosphere can be directly addressed. Moreover, by introducing in-situ shear, texture of metals and minerals accompanied with phase transitions at high P-T conditions can also be studied by high P-T neutron diffraction. We have successfully conducted high P-T neutron diffraction experiments at LANSCE and achieved simultaneous high pressures and temperatures of 10 GPa and 1500 K. With an average 3-6 hours of data collection, the diffraction data are of sufficiently high quality for the determination of structural parameters and thermal vibrations. We have studied hydrous mineral (MgOD), perovskite (K.15,Na.85)MgF3, clathrate hydrates (CH4-, CO2-, and H2-), metals (Mo, Al, Zr), and amorphous materials (carbon black, BMG). The aim of our research is to accurately map bond lengths, bond angles, neighboring atomic environments, and phase stability in P-T-X space. Studies based on high-pressure neutron diffraction are important for multi-disciplinary science and we welcome researchers from all fields to use this advanced technique. We have developed a 500-ton toroidal press, TAP-98, to conduct simultaneous high P-T neutron diffraction experiments inside of HIPPO (High-Pressure and Preferred-Orientation diffractometer). We have also developed a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP-01

  13. Secondary neutron spectra from modern Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linacs with multileaf collimators

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan E.; Followill, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrons are a by-product of high-energy x-ray radiation therapy (threshold for [γ,n] reactions in high-Z material ∼7 MeV). Neutron production varies depending on photon beam energy as well as on the manufacturer of the accelerator. Neutron production from modern linear accelerators (linacs) has not been extensively compared, particularly in terms of the differences in the strategies that various manufacturers have used to implement multileaf collimators (MLCs) into their linac designs. However, such information is necessary to determine neutron dose equivalents for different linacs and to calculate vault shielding requirements. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to measure the neutron spectra from the most up-to-date linacs from three manufacturers: Varian 21EX operating at 15, 18, and 20 MV, Siemens ONCOR operating at 15 and 18 MV, and Elekta Precise operating at 15 and 18 MV. Neutron production was measured by means of gold foil activation in Bonner spheres. Based on the measurements, the authors determined neutron spectra and calculated the average energy, total neutron fluence, ambient dose equivalent, and neutron source strength. The shapes of the neutron spectra did not change significantly between accelerators or even as a function of treatment energy. However, the neutron fluence, and therefore the ambient dose equivalent, did vary, increasing with increasing treatment energy. For a given nominal treatment energy, these values were always highest for the Varian linac. The current study thus offers medical physicists extensive information about the neutron production of MLC-equipped linacs currently in operation and provides them information vital for accurate comparison and prediction of neutron dose equivalents and calculation of vault shielding requirements. PMID:19810475

  14. A high repetition rate laser-heavy water based neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hah, Jungmoo; He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team

    2015-11-01

    Neutrons have numerous applications in diverse areas, such as medicine, security, and material science. For example, sources of MeV neutrons may be used for active interrogation for nuclear security applications. Recently, alternative ways to generate neutron flux have been studied. Among them, ultrashort laser pulse interactions with dense plasma have attracted significant attention as compact, pulse sources of neutrons. To generate neutrons using a laser through fusion reactions, thin solid density targets have been used in a pitcher-catcher arrangement, using deuterated plastic for example. However, the use of solid targets is limited for high-repetition rate operation due to the need to refresh the target for every laser shot. Here, we use a free flowing heavy water target with a high repetition rate (500 Hz) laser without a catcher. From the interaction between a 10 micron scale diameter heavy water stream with the Lambda-cubed laser system at the Univ. of Michigan (12mJ, 800nm, 35fs), deuterons collide with each other resulting in D-D fusion reactions generating 2.45 MeV neutrons. Under best conditions a time average of ~ 105 n/s of neutrons are generated.

  15. Design of a compact high-power neutron source—The EURISOL converter target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samec, K.; Milenković, R. Ž.; Dementjevs, S.; Ashrafi-Nik, M.; Kalt, A.

    2009-07-01

    The EURISOL project, a multi-lateral initiative supported by the EU, aims to develop a facility to achieve high yields of isotopes in radioactive beams and extend the variety of these isotopes towards more exotic types. The neutron source at the heart of the projected facility is designed to generate isotopes by fissioning uranium carbide (UC) targets arranged around a 4 MW neutron source. For reasons of efficiency, it is essential that the neutron source be as compact as possible, to avoid losing neutrons by absorption whilst maximising the escaping neutron flux, thus increasing the number of fissions in the UC targets. The resulting configuration presents a challenge in terms of absorbing heat deposition rates of up to 8 kW/cm3 in the neutron source; it has led to the selection of liquid metal for the target material. The current paper presents the design of a compact high-power liquid-metal neutron source comprising a specially optimised beam window concept. The design is based on two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations for thermal hydraulics and hydraulic aspects, as well as finite-element method (FEM) for assessing thermo-mechanical stability. The resulting optimised design was validated by a dedicated hydraulic test under realistic flow conditions. A full-scale mock-up was built at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and was tested at the Institute of Physics of the University of Latvia (IPUL).

  16. Monte Carlo calculations of thermal neutron capture in gadolinium: a comparison of GEANT4 and MCNP with measurements.

    PubMed

    Enger, Shirin A; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Rezaei, Arash; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-02-01

    GEANT4 is a Monte Carlo code originally implemented for high-energy physics applications and is well known for particle transport at high energies. The capacity of GEANT4 to simulate neutron transport in the thermal energy region is not equally well known. The aim of this article is to compare MCNP, a code commonly used in low energy neutron transport calculations and GEANT4 with experimental results and select the suitable code for gadolinium neutron capture applications. To account for the thermal neutron scattering from chemically bound atoms [S(alpha,beta)] in biological materials a comparison of thermal neutron fluence in tissue-like poly(methylmethacrylate) phantom is made with MCNP4B, GEANT4 6.0 patch1, and measurements from the neutron capture therapy (NCT) facility at the Studsvik, Sweden. The fluence measurements agreed with MCNP calculated results considering S(alpha,beta). The location of the thermal neutron peak calculated with MCNP without S(alpha,beta) and GEANT4 is shifted by about 0.5 cm towards a shallower depth and is 25%-30% lower in amplitude. Dose distribution from the gadolinium neutron capture reaction is then simulated by MCNP and compared with measured data. The simulations made by MCNP agree well with experimental results. As long as thermal neutron scattering from chemically bound atoms are not included in GEANT4 it is not suitable for NCT applications. PMID:16532938

  17. Monte Carlo calculations of thermal neutron capture in gadolinium: A comparison of GEANT4 and MCNP with measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Rezaei, Arash; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-02-15

    GEANT4 is a Monte Carlo code originally implemented for high-energy physics applications and is well known for particle transport at high energies. The capacity of GEANT4 to simulate neutron transport in the thermal energy region is not equally well known. The aim of this article is to compare MCNP, a code commonly used in low energy neutron transport calculations and GEANT4 with experimental results and select the suitable code for gadolinium neutron capture applications. To account for the thermal neutron scattering from chemically bound atoms [S({alpha},{beta})] in biological materials a comparison of thermal neutron fluence in tissue-like poly(methylmethacrylate) phantom is made with MCNP4B, GEANT4 6.0 patch1, and measurements from the neutron capture therapy (NCT) facility at the Studsvik, Sweden. The fluence measurements agreed with MCNP calculated results considering S({alpha},{beta}). The location of the thermal neutron peak calculated with MCNP without S({alpha},{beta}) and GEANT4 is shifted by about 0.5 cm towards a shallower depth and is 25%-30% lower in amplitude. Dose distribution from the gadolinium neutron capture reaction is then simulated by MCNP and compared with measured data. The simulations made by MCNP agree well with experimental results. As long as thermal neutron scattering from chemically bound atoms are not included in GEANT4 it is not suitable for NCT applications.

  18. Development of a High-performance Optical System and Fluorescent Converters for High-resolution Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, T.; Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T.; Matsubayashi, M.

    Two novel devices for use in neutron imaging technique are introduced. The first one is a high-performance optical lens for video camera systems. The lens system has a magnification of 1:1 and an F value of 3. The optical resolution is less than 5 μm. The second device is a high-resolution fluorescent plate that converts neutrons into visible light. The fluorescent converter material consists of a mixture of 6LiF and ZnS(Ag) fine powder, and the thickness of the converter is material is as little as 15 μm. The surface of the plate is coated with a 1 μm-thick gadolinium oxide layer. This layer is optically transparent and acts as an electron emitter for neutron detection. Our preliminary results show that the developed optical lens and fluorescent converter plates are very promising for high-resolution neutron imaging.

  19. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Maglieri, Robert Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John; Licea, Angel

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  20. Simulation of the Performance of a Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor.

    PubMed

    Mahurin, Rob; Greene, Geoffrey; Kohler, Paul; Cianciolo, Vince

    2005-01-01

    We study the expected performance of the proposed fundamental neutron physics beamline at the upgraded High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A curved neutron guide transmits the neutrons from the new cold source into a guide hall. A novel feature of the proposed guide is the use of vertical focussing to increase the flux for experiments that require relatively small cross-section beams. We use the simulation code IB to model straight, multi-channel curved, and tapered guides of various m values. Guide performance for the current NPDGamma and proposed abBA experiments is evaluated. PMID:27308114

  1. On the solar cycle variation in the barometer coefficients of high latitude neutron monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusunose, M.; Ogita, N.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of barometer coefficients of neutron monitors located at high latitudes has been performed by using the results of the spherical harmonic analysis based on the records from around twenty stations for twelve years from January 1966 to December 1977. The average of data at eight stations, where continuous records are available for twelve years, show that the absolute value of barometer coefficient is in positive correlation with the cosmic ray neutron intensity. The variation rate of the barometer coefficient to the cosmic ray neutron intensity is influenced by the changes in the cutoff rigidity and in the primary spectrum.

  2. Techniques for obtaining high vertical resolution formation capture cross sections from pulsed neutron logs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D. Jr.; Wyatt, D.F. Jr.; Smith, M.P.

    1991-02-05

    This patent describes a method for measuring high vertical resolution earth formation thermal neutron capture cross sections of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole. It comprises repetitively emitting in a well borehole relatively short duration bursts of fast neutrons; detecting, as a function of depth, in the borehole during time intervals between the repetitive bursts of fast neutrons; filtering count rate signals to reduce statistical fluctuations in subsequent computations; combining at least two filtered count rate signals; selecting at least one of the at least two filtered gate count rate signals.

  3. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons. PMID:21613268

  4. Simulation of the Performance of a Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, R.; Greene, Geoffrey L; Koehler, Paul Edward; Cianciolo, Vince

    2005-05-01

    We study the expected performance of the proposed fundamental neutron physics beamline at the upgraded High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A curved neutron guide transmits the neutrons from the new cold source into a guide hall. A novel feature of the proposed guide is the use of vertical focusing to increase the flux for experiments that require relatively small cross-section beams. We use the simulation code IB to model straight, multi-channel curved, and tapered guides of various m values. Guide performance for the current NPDGamma and proposed abBA experiments is evaluated.

  5. Simulation of the Performance of a Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Mahurin, Rob; Greene, Geoffrey; Kohler, Paul; Cianciolo, Vince

    2005-01-01

    We study the expected performance of the proposed fundamental neutron physics beamline at the upgraded High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A curved neutron guide transmits the neutrons from the new cold source into a guide hall. A novel feature of the proposed guide is the use of vertical focussing to increase the flux for experiments that require relatively small cross-section beams. We use the simulation code IB to model straight, multi-channel curved, and tapered guides of various m values. Guide performance for the current NPDGamma and proposed abBA experiments is evaluated. PMID:27308114

  6. A diamond 14 MeV neutron energy spectrometer with high energy resolution.

    PubMed

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H; Ochiai, Kentaro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Shimmyo, Hiroaki; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Shikata, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    A self-standing single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond was obtained using lift-off method. It was fabricated into a radiation detector and response function measurements for 14 MeV neutrons were taken at the fusion neutronics source. 1.5% of high energy resolution was obtained by using the (12)C(n, α)(9)Be reaction at an angle of 100° with the deuteron beam line. The intrinsic energy resolution, excluding energy spreading caused by neutron scattering, slowing in the target and circuit noises was 0.79%, which was also the best resolution of the diamond detector ever reported. PMID:26931845

  7. A diamond 14 MeV neutron energy spectrometer with high energy resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Ochiai, Kentaro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Shimmyo, Hiroaki; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Shikata, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    A self-standing single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond was obtained using lift-off method. It was fabricated into a radiation detector and response function measurements for 14 MeV neutrons were taken at the fusion neutronics source. 1.5% of high energy resolution was obtained by using the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction at an angle of 100° with the deuteron beam line. The intrinsic energy resolution, excluding energy spreading caused by neutron scattering, slowing in the target and circuit noises was 0.79%, which was also the best resolution of the diamond detector ever reported.

  8. A new compact, high sensitivity neutron imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P.

    2012-10-15

    We have developed a new small neutron imaging system (SNIS) diagnostic for the OMEGA laser facility. The SNIS uses a penumbral coded aperture and has been designed to record images from low yield (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} neutrons) implosions such as those using deuterium as the fuel. This camera was tested at OMEGA in 2009 on a rugby hohlraum energetics experiment where it recorded an image at a yield of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}. The resolution of this image was 54 {mu}m and the camera was located only 4 meters from target chamber centre. We recently improved the instrument by adding a cooled CCD camera. The sensitivity of the new camera has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. The calibration showed that the signal-to-noise ratio could be improved by using raw binning detection.

  9. A high yield neutron target for cancer therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Steinberg, R.

    1972-01-01

    A rotating target was developed that has the potential for providing an initial yield of 10 to the 13th power neutrons per second by the T(d,n)He-4 reaction, and a useable lifetime in excess of 600 hours. This yield and lifetime are indicated for a 300 Kv and 30 mA deuteron accelerator and a 30 microns thick titanium tritide film formed of the stoichiometric compound TiT2. The potential for extended lifetime is made possible by incorporating a sputtering electrode that permits use of titanium tritide thicknesses much greater than the deuteron range. The electrode is used to remove in situ depleted titanium layers to expose fresh tritide beneath. The utilization of the rotating target as a source of fast neutrons for cancer therapy is discussed.

  10. A high power accelerator driver system for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.; Blind, B.; Channell, P.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For several years, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have provided a successful driver for the nearly 100-kW Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) source. The authors have studied an upgrade to this system. The goal of this effort was to establish a credible design for the accelerator driver of a next-generation source providing 1-MW of beam power. They have explored a limited subset of the possible approaches to a driver and have considered only the low 1-MW beam power. The next-generation source must utilize the optimum technology and may require larger neutron intensities than they now envision.

  11. Dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma fields

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, I.

    1998-04-01

    The gamma field accompanying neutrons may, in certain circumstances, play an important role in the analysis of neutron dosimetry and even in the interpretation of radiation induced steel embrittlement. At the High Flux Isotope Reactor pressure vessel the gamma induced reactions dominate the responses of {sup 237}Np and {sup 238}U dosimeters, and {sup 9}Be helium accumulation fluence monitors. The gamma induced atom displacement rate in steel is higher than corresponding neutron rate, and is the cause of ``accelerated embrittlement`` of HFIR materials. In a large body of water, adjacent to a fission plate, photofissions contribute significantly to the responses of fission monitors and need to be taken into account if the measurements are used for the qualification of the transport codes and cross-section libraries.

  12. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance characteristics of high power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluence and gamma dose must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect the electrical and switching characteristics of solid state power switches is discussed. The experimental measurement system and radiation facilities are described. Experimental data showing the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the performance characteristics are given for power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), and Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). BJTs show a rapid decrease in gain, blocking voltage, and storage time for neutron irradiation, and MOSFETs show a rapid decrease in the gate threshold voltage for gamma irradiation.

  13. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance characteristics of high-power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluence and gamma dose must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect the electrical and switching characteristics of solid state power switches is discussed. The experimental measurement system and radiation facilities are described. Experimental data showing the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the performance characteristics are given for power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), and Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). BJTs show a rapid decrease in gain, blocking voltage, and storage time for neutron irradiation, and MOSFETs show a rapid decrease in the gate threshold voltage for gamma irradiation.

  14. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on power semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarze, G.E.; Frasca, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    The performance characteristics of high power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluence and gamma dose must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect the electrical and switching characteristics of solid state power switches is discussed. The experimental measurement system and radiation facilities are described. Experimental data showing the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the performance characteristics are given for power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), and Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). BJTs show a rapid decrease in gain, blocking voltage, and storage time for neutron irradiation, and MOSFETs show a rapid decrease in the gate threshold voltage for gamma irradiation.

  15. Neutron irradiation effects on high Nicalon silicon carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.C.; Steiner, D.; Snead, L.L.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties and microstructure of SiC and SiC-based fibers is a current focal point for the development of radiation damage resistant SiC/SiC composites. This report discusses the radiation effects on the Nippon Carbon Hi-Nicalon{trademark} fiber system and also discusses an erratum on earlier results published by the authors on this material. The radiation matrix currently under study is also summarized.

  16. Light fluence correction for quantitative determination of tissue absorption coefficient using multi-spectral optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Frederic M.; Joseph, James; Tomaszewski, Michal; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-07-01

    MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a fast developing imaging modality, combining the high resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound with the excellent contrast from optical imaging of tissue. Absorption and scattering of the near infrared excitation light modulates the spectral profile of light as it propagates deep into biological tissue, meaning the images obtained provide only qualitative insight into the distribution of tissue chromophores. The goal of this work is to accurately recover the spectral profile of excitation light by modelling light fluence in the data reconstruction, to enable quantitative imaging. We worked with a commercial small animal MSOT scanner and developed our light fluence correction for its' cylindrical geometry. Optoacoustic image reconstruction pinpoints the sources of acoustic waves detected by the transducers and returns the initial pressure amplitude at these points. This pressure is the product of the dimensionless Grüneisen parameter, the absorption coefficient and the light fluence. Under the condition of constant Grüneisen parameter and well modelled light fluence, there is a linear relationship between the initial pressure amplitude measured in the optoacoustic image and the absorption coefficient. We were able to reproduce this linear relationship in different physical regions of an agarose gel phantom containing targets of known optical absorption coefficient, demonstrating that our light fluence model was working. We also demonstrate promising results of light fluence correction effects on in vivo data.

  17. Radiation tolerance of a high quality synthetic single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond detector irradiated by 14.8 MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Aielli, G.; Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2008-09-01

    Diamond exhibits many properties such as an outstanding radiation hardness and fast response time both important to design detectors working in extremely radioactive environments. Among the many applications these devices can be used for, there is the development of a fast and radiation hard neutron detector for the next generation of fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project, under construction at Cadarache in France. A technology to routinely produce electronic grade synthetic single crystal diamond detectors was recently developed by our group. One of such detectors, with an energy resolution of 0.9% as measured using an {sup 241}Am{alpha} particle source, has been heavily irradiated with 14.8 MeV neutrons produced by the Frascati Neutron Generator. The modifications of its spectroscopic properties have been studied as a function of the neutron fluence up to 2.0x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}. In the early stage of the irradiation procedure an improvement in the spectroscopic performance of the detector was observed. Subsequently the detection performance remains stable for all the given neutron fluence up to the final one thus assessing a remarkable radiation hardness of the device. The neutron damage in materials has been calculated and compared with the experimental results. This comparison is discussed within the nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) hypothesis, which states that performance degradation is proportional to NIEL.

  18. Radiation tolerance of a high quality synthetic single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond detector irradiated by 14.8 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Aielli, G.; Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2008-09-01

    Diamond exhibits many properties such as an outstanding radiation hardness and fast response time both important to design detectors working in extremely radioactive environments. Among the many applications these devices can be used for, there is the development of a fast and radiation hard neutron detector for the next generation of fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project, under construction at Cadarache in France. A technology to routinely produce electronic grade synthetic single crystal diamond detectors was recently developed by our group. One of such detectors, with an energy resolution of 0.9% as measured using an A241m α particle source, has been heavily irradiated with 14.8 MeV neutrons produced by the Frascati Neutron Generator. The modifications of its spectroscopic properties have been studied as a function of the neutron fluence up to 2.0×1014 n/cm2. In the early stage of the irradiation procedure an improvement in the spectroscopic performance of the detector was observed. Subsequently the detection performance remains stable for all the given neutron fluence up to the final one thus assessing a remarkable radiation hardness of the device. The neutron damage in materials has been calculated and compared with the experimental results. This comparison is discussed within the nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) hypothesis, which states that performance degradation is proportional to NIEL.

  19. LOWTHRM: a thermal fluence code. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.R.

    1980-03-01

    A Fortran computer program LOWTERM is described for calculating nuclear thermal fluence incident upon a target area. Atmospheric transmissivity factors in the spectral region 0.25 to 28.5 microns are determined through use of the LOWTRAN5 computer code. The program provides a choice of six model atmospheres covering seasonal and latitudinal variations from sea level to 100 km, eight haze models, and accounts for molecular absorption, molecular scattering, and aerosol extinction. Atmospheric refraction, earth curvature effects, thermal scattering, and thermal ground reflection contributions are included.

  20. Development of A Self Biased High Efficiency Solid-State Neutron Detector for MPACT Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Danon, Yaron; Bhat, Ishwara; Jian-Qiang Lu, James

    2013-09-03

    Neutron detection is an important aspect of materials protection, accounting, and control for transmutation (MPACT). Currently He-3 filled thermal neutron detectors are utilized in many applications; these detectors require high-voltage bias for operation, which complicates the system when multiple detectors are used. In addition, due to recent increase in homeland security activity and the nuclear renaissance, there is a shortage of He-3, and these detectors become more expensive. Instead, cheap solid-state detectors that can be mass produced like any other computer chips will be developed. The new detector does not require a bias for operation, has low gamma sensitivity, and a fast response. The detection system is based on a honeycomb-like silicon device, which is filled with B-10 as the neutron converter; while a silicon p-n diode (i.e., solar cell type device) formed on the thin silicon wall of the honeycomb structure detects the energetic charged particles emitted from the B-10 conversion layer. Such a detector has ~40% calculated thermal neutron detection efficiency with an overall detector thickness of about 200 ?m. Stacking of these devices allows over 90% thermal neutron detection efficiency. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a high-efficiency, low-noise, self-powered solid-state neutron detector system based on the promising results of the existing research program. A prototype of this solid-state neutron detector system with sufficient detector size (up to 8-inch diam., but still portable and inexpensive) and integrated with interface electronics (e.g., preamplifier) will be designed, fabricated, and tested as a coincidence counter for MPACT applications. All fabrications proposed are based on silicon-compatible processing; thus, an extremely cheap detector system could be massively produced like any other silicon chips. Such detectors will revolutionize current neutron detection systems by providing a solid-state alternative to

  1. The possible use of a spallation neutron source for neutron capture therapy with epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Grusell, E.; Conde, H.; Larsson, B.; Roennqvist, T.; Sornsuntisook, O.; Crawford, J.; Reist, H.; Dahl, B.; Sjoestrand, N.G.; Russel, G. . Dept. of Radiation Sciences; Paul Scherrer Inst. , Villigen; Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg . Dept. of Reactor Physics; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    Spallation is induced in a heavy material by 72 MeV protons. The hereby produced neutrons with essentially an evaporation spectrum with a peak energy of less than 2 MeV are moderated in two steps, first in iron, and then in carbon. Results from neutron fluence measurements in a perspex phantom placed close to the moderator are presented. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron fluence in a water phantom are also presented under some chosen configurations of spallation source and moderator. The calculations and measurements show a good agreement and also show that useful thermal neutron fluences are attainable in the depth of the brain, at proton currents of less than 0.5 mA. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Neutron Emission Characteristics of a High-Current Plasma Focus: Initial Studies

    SciTech Connect

    L. H. Ziegler; B. L. Freeman; J. C. Boydston

    2002-06-01

    The Texas A and M University plasma focus machine is operational and is beginning to provide good experimental data. It has its origins in several earlier machines and is located in a former service station building with a shield wall that provides a good geometry for neutron measurements. We are operating in the high pressure mode for a plasma focus, similar to previous efforts in the US. Early neutron measurements are providing some insight for the machine's operation.

  3. Low-cost fabrication of high efficiency solid-state neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia-Woei; Huang, Kuan-Chih; Weltz, Adam; English, Erik; Hella, Mona M.; Dahal, Rajendra; Lu, James J.-Q.; Danon, Yaron; Bhat, Ishwara B.

    2016-05-01

    The development of high-efficiency solid state thermal neutron detectors at low cost is critical for a wide range of civilian and defense applications. The use of present neutron detector system for personal radiation detection is limited by the cost, size, weight and power requirements. Chip scale solid state neutron detectors based on silicon technology would provide significant benefits in terms of cost, volume, and allow for wafer level integration with charge preamplifiers and readout electronics. In this paper, anisotropic wet etching of (110) silicon wafers was used to replace deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) to produce microstructured neutron detectors with lower cost and compatibility with mass production. Deep trenches were etched by 30 wt% KOH at 85°C with a highest etch ratio of (110) to (111). A trench-microstructure thermal neutron detector described by the aforementioned processes was fabricated and characterized. The detector—which has a continuous p+-n junction diode—was filled with enriched boron (99% of 10B) as a neutron converter material. The device showed a leakage current of ~ 6.7 × 10-6 A/cm2 at -1V and thermal neutron detection efficiency of ~16.3%. The detector uses custom built charge pre-amplifier, a shaping amplifier, and an analogto- digital converter (ADC) for data acquisition.

  4. Neutron Monitoring Systems for NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquemore, A. L.; Darrow, D.; Kugel, H.; Nazikian, R.

    2000-10-01

    The national Spherical Tokamak is entering an operating phase where high power auxiliary heating will be employed. The high harmonic fast wave system will inject up to 6MW of RF power and a deuterium neutral beam will inject up to 5 MW into the deuterium plasma. The neutron emission will be measured by three different systems. To monitor the yield of D-D neutrons for each discharge, a fission chamber operating in the pulse-counting mode was installed at the midplane level of the vessel 50 cm outside the vessel. A preliminary 14-position calibration was made using a Cf-252 source. Three fast plastic hydrocarbon scintillator detectors are also being installed at the midplane with respective angular spacing around the vessel perimeter of 30* and 180*. These detectors will be operated in the current mode and measure neutron fluctuations from MHD. Their spacing was chosen to aid in the identification of toroidal mode numbers. The total neutron fluence will be determined from activation techniques using a selection of foils secured to the outside walls of the vessel. Available data from high power operation will be presented.

  5. SU-F-BRE-11: Neutron Measurements Around the Varian TrueBeam Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J; Kildea, J; Liang, L; DeBlois, F; Evans, M; Licea, A; Dubeau, J; Witharana, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: With the emergence of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams, several authors have noted many advantages to their use. One such advantage is the decrease in neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the linac head. In the present work we investigate the reduction in neutrons from a Varian TrueBeam linac using the Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS, Detec). The neutron spectrum, total fluence and source strength were measured and compared for 10 MV with and without flattening filter and the effect of moderation by the room and maze was studied for the 15 MV beam. Methods: The NNS, similar to traditional Bonner sphere detectors but operated in current mode, was used to measure the neutron fluence and spectrum. The NNS was validated for use in high dose rate environments using Monte Carlo simulations and calibrated at NIST and NRC Canada. Measurements were performed at several positions within the treatment room and maze with the linac jaws closed to maximize neutron production. Results: The measurements showed a total fluence reduction between 35-40% in the room and maze when the flattening filter was removed. The neutron source strength Qn was calculated from in-room fluence measurements and was found to be 0.042 × 10{sup 2} n/Gy, 0.026 × 10{sup 2} n/Gy and 0.59 × 101{sup 2} n/Gy for the 10 MV, the 10 MV FFF and 15 MV beams, respectively. We measured ambient equivalent doses of 11 mSv/hr, 7 mSv/hr and 218 mSv/hr for the 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 15 MV by the head. Conclusion: Our measurements revealed a decrease in total fluence, neutron source strength and equivalent dose of approximately 35-40% across the treatment room for the FFF compared to FF modes. This demonstrates, as expected, that the flattening filter is a major component of the neutron production for the TrueBeam. The authors greatly acknowledge support form the Canadian Nuclear Commission and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada through the CREATE program. Co

  6. Atmospheric transport of neutrons and gamma rays from near-horizon nuclear detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, R.C.; Heerema, B.D.

    1996-03-01

    This report continues a study of the transport of neutrons and rays from nuclear detonations at high altitudes to a set of detectors, with an emphasis on the limiting case of sources even beyond the horizon. To improve the calculational efficiency, the standard arrangement of a single source with multiple detectors is transformed to an equivalent one with a single detector and sources at multiple locations. Particular attention is paid to the critical problem of transport at near-horizon angles in an atmosphere whose density decreases exponentially with altitude. As a check, calculations for this region are made using both analytical and Monte Carlo approaches. For sources approaching the horizon, the fluence of gamma rays and neutrons reaching the detector drops gradually as the increasing column density attenuates the direct, unscattered fluence. Near the grazing angle, the direct fluence plummets, but the scattered component continues to decrease slowly and remains observable. Over this range, the timedependent flux of direct-plus-scattered gamma rays changes dramatically in both shape and magnitude, but it probably remains distinct from typical natural backgrounds. The neutron time-of-flight spectrum is dominated by scattering and reflects only the most important aspects of the original source spectrum; its most obvious features are a prominent low-energy tail and the resonance structure produced by nuclear interactions in the atmosphere. In some cases, the fluence of secondary gamma rays produced by these interactions may be larger than that from the source itself.

  7. Towards high efficiency solid-state thermal and fast neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danon, Y.; Clinton, J.; Huang, K. C.; LiCausi, N.; Dahal, R.; Lu, J. J. Q.; Bhat, I.

    2012-03-01

    Variety of applications of fast neutron detection utilize thermal neutron detectors and moderators. Examples include homeland security applications such as portal monitors and nuclear safeguards which employ passive systems for detection of fissile materials. These applications mostly rely on gas filled detectors such as 3He, BF3 or plastic scintillators and require high voltage for operation. Recently there was considerable progress in the development of solid-state neutron detectors. These operate by detection of charged particles emitted from neutron interactions with a converter material. In order to increase neutron detection efficiency to a usable level, the thickness of the converter material must exceed the range of the charged particles in the converter, which limits the efficiency of planar detectors to several percent. To overcome this limitation three dimensional structured solid-state devices are considered where the converter can be thicker but still allow the charged particles to escape into the semiconductor. In the research described here this was accomplished by a semiconductor device that resembles a honeycomb with hexagonal holes and thin silicon walls filled with the converter material. Such design can theoretically achieve about 45% thermal neutron detection efficiency, experimentally about 21% was observed with a partially filled detector. Such detectors can be fabricated in variety of sizes enabling designs of directional fast neutron detectors. Other converter materials that allow direct detection of fast neutrons were also considered by both simulation and experiments. Because the semiconductor thickness is less than a few hundred microns, the efficiency of these detectors to γ-ray(s) is very low. With further developments these new solid-state neutron detectors can replace gas ionization based detectors in most applications.

  8. Training Reactor VR-1 Neutron Spectrum Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vins, M.; Kolros, A.; Katovsky, K.

    2009-08-01

    The main objective of the investigations presented in the paper is to determine the neutron energy spectrum at the specified position in the reactor core used for neutron activation analysis. The methodology is based on irradiation of certified activation foils, measurements of their reaction rates, and consecutive deconvolution of the spectrum using various adjustments/unfolding computer codes. The activation detectors consist of foils of high purity elements (i.e. gold, nickel, indium, tungsten, scandium, manganese, vanadium, and copper were used). Some foils were irradiated also in cadmium cover for suppressing of thermal neutrons. All gamma measurements were performed on a HPGe detector. The measured reaction rates served as an input for computer deconvolution codes as SAND-II, STAY-SL, MAXED (from the UMG package) and GRAVEL (from the UMG package). Libraries of response functions (cross sections of observed reactions) for the all used codes were adopted from the IRDF-2002 library or generated from the ENDF/B-VII.0 using NJOY99. Monte Carlo calculation code MCNP5 was used for calculation of the first approximation of the neutron spectrum. The used codes solve the adjustment issue with a different mathematical approach and a comparison of different neutron adjustment/unfolding methods is a part of the result. Neutron capture and (n,p) reactions were produced during irradiation. The high ratio of thermal and epithermal neutrons in the spectra and low contribution of fast neutrons was expected and was also observed. The results will be used for evaluation of neutron activation analysis exercises on reactor VR-1 and for further innovation of experimental methods. The neutron fluence rates in thermal, epithermal and fast energy regions were also obtained and represent the important part of results.

  9. Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

    2007-12-01

    An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

  10. Decay studies of the highly neutron-deficient indium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    An extension of the experimentally known nuclidic mass surface to nuclei far from the region of beta-stability is of fundamental interest in providing a better determination of the input parameters for the various nuclear mass formulae, allowing a more accurate prediction of the ultimate limits of nuclear stability. In addition, a study of the shape of the mass surface in the vicinity of the doubly-closed nuclide /sup 100/Sn provides initial information on the behavior of the shell closure to be expected when Z = N = 50. Experiments measuring the decay energies of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In by ..beta..-endpoint measurements are described with special attention focused on the development of a plastic scintillator ..beta..-telescope coupled to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer). An attempt to measure the ..beta..-endpoint energy of /sup 102/In is also briefly described. The experimentally determined decay energies and derived masses for /sup 103/ /sup 105/In are compared with the predictions of different mass models to identify which models are more successful in this region. Furthermore, the inclusion in these comparisons of the available data on the neutron-rich indium nuclei permits a systematic study of their ground state mass behavior as a function of the neutron number between the shell closures at N = 50 and N = 82. These analyses indicate that the binding energy of /sup 103/In is 1 MeV larger than predicted by the majority of the mass models. An examination of the Q/sub EC/ surface and the single- and two-neutron separation energies in the vicinity of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In is also performed to investigate further the deviation and other possible systematic variations in the mass surface in a model-independent way.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations for high-rate fast neutron flux measurements made at the RAON neutron science facility by using MICROMEGAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi; Kim, Jae Cheon; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-10-01

    RAON is a Korean heavy-ion accelerator complex that is planned to be built by 2021. Deuterons (53 MeV) and protons (88 MeV) accelerated by using a low-energy driver linac (SCL1) are delivered to the neutron production target in the Neutron Science Facility (NSF) to produce high-energy neutrons in the interval from 1 to 88 MeV with high fluxes of the order of 1012 n/cm2-sec. The repetition rate of the neutron beam ranges from 1 kHz to 1 MHz, and the maximum beam current is ~12 μA at 1 MHz. The beam width is 1 ~ 2 ns. The high-energy and high-rate fast neutrons are used to estimate accurate neutron-induced cross sections for various nuclides at the NSF. A MICROMEGAS (MICRO Mesh Gaseous Structure), which is a gaseous detector initially developed for tracking in high-rate, high-energy physics experiments, is tentatively being considered as a neutron beam monitor. It can be used to measure both the energy distribution and the flux of the neutron beam. In this study, a MICROMEGAS detector for installation at the NSF was designed and investigated. 6Li, 10B, 235U and 238U targets are being considered as neutron/charged particle converters. For the low-energy region, 6Li(n,α)t and 10B(n,α)7Li are used in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. 235U(n,f) and 238U(n,f) reactions are used for high-energy region up to 90 MeV. All calculations are performed by using the GEANT4 toolkit.

  12. Multidiagnostic analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K. Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Polek, M. P.; Harilal, S. S.

    2015-02-28

    The dynamics of ions in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over fluences ranging from the ablation threshold up to ≈75 J/cm{sup 2} by means of three well-established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup, and spectrally resolved intensified charge coupled device imaging simultaneously monitored the ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a pure copper target with 800 nm, ≈50 fs, Ti: Sapphire laser pulses. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed, resulting in the observance of three different regimes. The specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4–5 J/cm{sup 2}, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ≈50 J/cm{sup 2}. The fluence dependence of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase in forward-peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. A broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ionic angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ≈66 J/cm{sup 2}. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals shows a narrow, forward-peaked distribution, and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ionic angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  13. Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, Norman R.

    2011-11-22

    In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

  14. First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Birch, J.; Etxegarai, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Llamas-Jansa, I.; Oliveri, E.; Oksanen, E.; Robinson, L.; Ropelewski, L.; Schmidt, S.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.

    2016-05-01

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer (NMX) require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The μTPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of 10B converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with a measured efficiency of 11.8% at a wavelength of 2 Åand a position resolution better than 250 μm.

  15. Induction of Micronuclei in Human Fibroblasts from the Los Alamos High Energy Neutron Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The space radiation field includes a broad spectrum of high energy neutrons. Interactions between these neutrons and a spacecraft, or other material, significantly contribute to the dose equivalent for astronauts. The 15 degree beam line in the Weapons Neutron Research beam at Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center generates a neutron spectrum relatively similar to that seen in space. Human foreskin fibroblast (AG1522) samples were irradiated behind 0 to 20 cm of water equivalent shielding. The cells were exposed to either a 0.05 or 0.2 Gy entrance dose. Following irradiation, micronuclei were counted to see how the water shield affects the beam and its damage to cell nuclei. Micronuclei induction was then compared with dose equivalent data provided from a tissue equivalent proportional counter.

  16. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexley, Allie

    2016-03-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600 torr gas composed of 87.5% helium-4 and 12.5% tetrafluoromethane for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. I describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of neon, as a replacement for helium-4, in the gas mixture. My discussion focuses on the advantages of neon as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events (100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. I show that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the neon mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to 20% with the helium-4 mixture.

  17. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexley, A.; Moulai, M. H.; Spitz, J.; Conrad, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600 torr gas composed of 87.5% 4He and 12.5% CF4 for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. We describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of Ne, as a replacement for 4He, in the gas mixture. Our discussion focuses on the advantages of Ne as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events (lesssim100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. We find that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the Ne mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to ~ 20% with the 4He mixture.

  18. High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction Studies for Materials Sciences and Energy Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Los Alamos High Pressure Materials Research Team

    2013-05-01

    The development of neutron diffraction under extreme pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions is highly valuable to condensed matter physics, crystal chemistry, materials sciences, as well as earth and planetary sciences. We have incorporated a 500-ton press TAP-98 into the HiPPO diffractometer at LANSCE to conduct in situ high P-T neutron diffraction experiments. We have worked out a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP, to conduct neutron diffraction experiments at high-P and low-T. The ZAP cell can be used to integrate multiple experimental techniques such as neutron diffraction, laser spectroscopy, and ultrasonic interferometery. Recently, we have developed high-P low-T gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments. These techniques enable in-situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes and allow high-resolution time-dependent determination of changes in crystal structure and related reaction kinetics. We have successfully used these techniques to study the equation of state, structural phase transition, and thermo-mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, and minerals. We have conducted researches on the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, and hydrogen adsorption of the inclusion compounds such as the recently discovered metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The aim of our research is to accurately map phase diagram, lattice parameters, thermal parameters, bond lengths, bond angles, neighboring atomic environments, and phase stability in P-T-X space. We are currently developing further high P-T technology with a new "true" triaxial loading press, TAP_6x, to compress cubic sample package to achieve pressures up to 20 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K in routine experiments. The implementation of TAP_6x300 with high-pressure neutron beamlines is underway for simultaneous high P-T neutron diffraction, ultrasonic, calorimetry, radiography, and tomography studies. Studies based on high

  19. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source. PMID:26302662

  20. Muon catalyzed fusion in plasma state and high intensity DT fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    dt/mu/ molecular formation rates in a plasma state of DT mixture by d and t ions are, respectively, 63 and 77 times higher than the ones by electrons. High plasma oscillation frequency in a high electron density plasma enhances the formation rate in the high temperature dt mixture. The DT muon catalyzed fusion has the ability to produce much higher intensity 14 MeV neutron source (in order of 5 /times/ 10/sup 16/n/cm/sup 2//sec) than other means of stripping and spallation approaches. Such neutrons can be used for testing of first wall material candidates for magnetic fusion reactors, for incinerating fission products (e.g., Cs/sup 137/) and for creating high thermal flux neutron sources, on the order of 10/sup 17/n/cm/sup 2//sec. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Neutron Radiation Shielding For The NIF Streaked X-Ray Detector (SXD) Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P; Holder, J; Young, B; Kalantar, D; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2006-11-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is preparing for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) scheduled in 2010. The NIC is comprised of several ''tuning'' physics subcampaigns leading up to a demonstration of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. In some of these experiments, time-resolved x-ray imaging of the imploding capsule may be required to measure capsule trajectory (shock timing) or x-ray ''bang-time''. A capsule fueled with pure tritium (T) instead of a deutriun-tritium (DT) mixture is thought to offer useful physics surrogacy, with reduced yields of up to 5e14 neutrons. These measurements will require the use of the NIF streak x-ray detector (SXD). The resulting prompt neutron fluence at the planned SXD location ({approx}1.7 m from the target) would be {approx}1.4e9/cm{sup 2}. Previous measurements suggest the onset of significant background at a neutron fluence of {approx} 1e8/cm{sup 2}. The radiation damage and operational upsets which starts at {approx}1e8 rad-Si/sec must be factored into an integrated experimental campaign plan. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to predict the neutron and gamma/x-ray fluences and radiation doses for the proposed diagnostic configuration. A possible shielding configuration is proposed to mitigate radiation effects. The primary component of this shielding is an 80 cm thickness of Polyethylene (PE) between target chamber center (TCC) and the SXD diagnostic. Additionally, 6-8 cm of PE around the detector provide from the large number of neutrons that scatter off the inside of the target chamber. This proposed shielding configuration reduces the high-energy neutron fluence at the SXD by approximately a factor {approx}50.

  2. Monte Carlo Simulations on Neutron Transport and Absorbed Dose in Tissue-Equivalent Phantoms Exposed to High-Flux Epithermal Neutron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartesaghi, G.; Gambarini, G.; Negri, A.; Carrara, M.; Burian, J.; Viererbl, L.

    2010-04-01

    Presently there are no standard protocols for dosimetry in neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments. Because of the high radiation intensity and of the presence at the same time of radiation components having different linear energy transfer and therefore different biological weighting factors, treatment planning in epithermal neutron fields for BNCT is usually performed by means of Monte Carlo calculations; experimental measurements are required in order to characterize the neutron source and to validate the treatment planning. In this work Monte Carlo simulations in two kinds of tissue-equivalent phantoms are described. The neutron transport has been studied, together with the distribution of the boron dose; simulation results are compared with data taken with Fricke gel dosimeters in form of layers, showing a good agreement.

  3. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-19

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  4. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-01

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  5. High-power liquid-lithium target prototype for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Bisyakoev, M; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kijel, D; Nagler, A; Silverman, I

    2011-12-01

    A prototype of a compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), which will possibly constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals, was built. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The liquid-lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated using a high-intensity proton beam (>10 kW), necessary for sufficient neutron flux. In off-line circulation tests, the liquid-lithium loop generated a stable lithium jet at high velocity, on a concave supporting wall; the concept will first be tested using a high-power electron beam impinging on the lithium jet. High intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 2-4 mA) will take place at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) superconducting linear accelerator currently in construction at SNRC. Radiological risks due to the (7)Be produced in the reaction were studied and will be handled through a proper design, including a cold trap and appropriate shielding. A moderator/reflector assembly is planned according to a Monte Carlo simulation, to create a neutron spectrum and intensity maximally effective to the treatment and to reduce prompt gamma radiation dose risks. PMID:21459008

  6. Monitor units are not predictive of neutron dose for high-energy IMRT

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the substantial increase in beam-on time of high energy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (>10 MV) techniques to deliver the same target dose compared to conventional treatment techniques, an increased dose of scatter radiation, including neutrons, is delivered to the patient. As a consequence, an increase in second malignancies may be expected in the future with the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. It is commonly assumed that the neutron dose equivalent scales with the number of monitor units. Methods Measurements of neutron dose equivalent were performed for an open and an intensity-modulated field at four positions: inside and outside of the treatment field at 0.2 cm and 15 cm depth, respectively. Results It was shown that the neutron dose equivalent, which a patient receives during an intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment, does not scale with the ratio of applied monitor units relative to an open field irradiation. Outside the treatment volume at larger depth 35% less neutron dose equivalent is delivered than expected. Conclusions The predicted increase of second cancer induction rates from intensity-modulated treatment techniques can be overestimated when the neutron dose is simply scaled with monitor units. PMID:22883384

  7. The Clatterbridge high-energy neutron therapy facility: specification and performance.

    PubMed

    Bonnett, D E; Blake, S W; Shaw, J E; Bewley, D K

    1988-01-01

    A new high-energy neutron therapy facility has been installed at the Douglas Cyclotron Centre, Clatterbridge Hospital, Merseyside, in order to extend the clinical trials of fast neutrons initiated by the Medical Research Council. The neutron beam is produced by bombarding a beryllium target with 62 MeV protons. The target is isocentrically mounted with the potential for 360 degrees rotation and has a fully variable collimator. This gives a range of rectilinear field sizes from 5 cm x 5 cm to 30 cm x 30 cm. Basic neutron beam data including output, field flatness, penumbra and depth-dose data have been measured. For a 10 cm x 10 cm field, the 50% depth dose occurs at 16.2 cm in water and the output is 1.63 cGy microA-1 min-1 at the depth of dose maximum. The effectiveness of the target shielding and the neutron-induced radioactivity in the treatment head have also been measured. It is concluded that the equipment meets both the design specifications and also fully satisfies criticisms of earlier neutron therapy equipment. A full radiation survey of the centre was also carried out and it was found that radiation levels are low and present no significant hazard to staff. PMID:3126848

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yushou; Conner, Joseph; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1 μm, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optical boundary behaviors are simulated. This simulation was first validated through measurements of neutron response from lithium glass cylinders. With good expected light collection, an algorithm based upon the features inherent to alpha and triton particle tracks is proposed to reconstruct the neutron reaction position in the glass fiber array. Given a 1 μm fiber diameter and 0.1mm detector thickness, the neutron spatial resolution is expected to reach σ∼1 μm with a Gaussian fit in each lateral dimension. The detection efficiency was estimated to be 3.7% for a glass fiber assembly with thickness of 0.1mm. When the detector thickness increases from 0.1mm to 1mm, the position resolution is not expected to vary much, while the detection efficiency is expected to increase by about a factor of ten. PMID:26708515

  9. Steady-state, high-dose neutron generation and concentration apparatus and method for deuterium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.; Lee, W.M.

    1991-01-01

    A steady-state source of neutrons is produced within an electrically grounded and temperature controlled chamber confining tritium or deuterium plasma at a predetermined density to effect implantation of ions in the surface of a palladium target rod coated with diffusion barrier material and immersed in such plasma. The rod is enriched with a high concentration of deuterium atoms after a prolonged plasma ion implantation. Collision of the deuterium atoms in the target by impinging ions of the plasma initiates fusion reactions causing emission of neutrons during negative voltage pulses applied to the rod through a high power modulator. The neutrons are so generated at a relatively high dose rate under optimized process conditions.

  10. Phase transitions and hydrogen bonding in deuterated calcium hydroxide: High-pressure and high-temperature neutron diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Riko; Komatsu, Kazuki; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Takaya; Sano-Furukawa, Asami; Hattori, Takanori; Gotou, Hirotada; Yagi, Takehiko

    2014-10-15

    In situ neutron diffraction measurements combined with the pulsed neutron source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) were conducted on high-pressure polymorphs of deuterated portlandite (Ca(OD){sub 2}) using a Paris–Edinburgh cell and a multi-anvil press. The atomic positions including hydrogen for the unquenchable high-pressure phase at room temperature (phase II′) were first clarified. The bent hydrogen bonds under high pressure were consistent with results from Raman spectroscopy. The structure of the high-pressure and high-temperature phase (Phase II) was concordant with that observed previously by another group for a recovered sample. The observations elucidate the phase transition mechanism among the polymorphs, which involves the sliding of CaO polyhedral layers, position modulations of Ca atoms, and recombination of Ca–O bonds accompanied by the reorientation of hydrogen to form more stable hydrogen bonds. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structures of high-pressure polymorphs of Ca(OD){sub 2}, (a) at room temperature (phase II′) and (b) at high temperature (phase II), were obtained from in situ neutron diffraction measurements. - Highlights: • We measured in situ neutron diffraction of high-pressure polymorphs of Ca(OD){sub 2}. • Hydrogen positions of the high-pressure phase are first determined. • The obtained hydrogen bonds reasonably explain Raman peaks of OH stretching modes. • A phase transition mechanism among the polymorphs is proposed.

  11. The effect of neutron irradiation and annealing temperature on the electrical properties and lattice constant of epitaxial gallium nitride layers

    SciTech Connect

    Boyko, V. M.; Verevkin, S. S.; Kolin, N. G. Korulin, A. V.; Merkurisov, D. I.; Polyakov, A. Y.; Chevychelov, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    Effect of irradiation with high reactor-neutron fluences ({Phi} = 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}) and subsequent heat treatments in the temperature range 100-1000 Degree-Sign C on the electrical properties and lattice constant of epitaxial GaN layers grown on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate is considered. It is shown that, with the neutron fluence increasing to (1-2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}, the resistivity of the material grows to values of about 10{sup 10} {Omega} cm because of the formation of radiation defects, and, with the fluence raised further, the resistivity passes through a maximum and then decreases to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} {Omega} cm at 300 K, which is accounted for by the appearance of a hopping conductivity via deep defects in the overlapping outer parts of disordered regions. With the neutron fluence raised to 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}, the lattice constant c increases by 0.38% at a nearly unchanged parameter a. Heat treatment of irradiated samples at temperatures as high as 1000 Degree-Sign C does not fully restore the lattice constant and the electrical parameters of the material.

  12. Biological Effects of High-Energy Neutrons Measured In Vivo Using a Vertebrate Model

    PubMed Central

    Kuhne, Wendy W.; Gersey, Brad B.; Wilkins, Richard; Wu, Honglu; Wender, Stephen A.; George, Varghese; Dynan, William S.

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of solar protons and galactic cosmic radiation with the atmosphere and other materials produces high-energy secondary neutrons from below 1 to 1000 MeV and higher. Although secondary neutrons may provide an appreciable component of the radiation dose equivalent received by space and high-altitude air travelers, the biological effects remain poorly defined, particularly in vivo in intact organisms. Here we describe the acute response of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos to a beam of high-energy spallation neutrons that mimics the energy spectrum of secondary neutrons encountered aboard spacecraft and high-altitude aircraft. To determine RBE, embryos were exposed to 0–0.5 Gy of high-energy neutron radiation or 0–15 Gy of reference γ radiation. The radiation response was measured by imaging apoptotic cells in situ in defined volumes of the embryo, an assay that provides a quantifiable, linear dose response. The slope of the dose response in the developing head, relative to reference γ radiation, indicates an RBE of 24.9 (95% CI 13.6–40.7). A higher RBE of 48.1 (95% CI 30.0–66.4) was obtained based on overall survival. A separate analysis of apoptosis in muscle showed an overall nonlinear response, with the greatest effects at doses of less than 0.3 Gy. Results of this experiment indicate that medaka are a useful model for investigating biological damage associated with high-energy neutron exposure. PMID:19772468

  13. Multiphase Flow Characterization Using Simultaneous High Resolution Neutron and X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaManna, J.; Anovitz, L. M.; Hussey, D. S.; Jacobson, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow in geologic materials is an important area of research for hydrology and oil recovery. A valuable tool for determining how liquid water and/or hydrocarbons transport through soils and rocks is neutron tomography due to its high sensitivity to hydrogen. This technique allows for the 3D reconstruction of the liquid phase in the sample. In order to resolve the solid phase structure of the sample it is necessary to perform x-ray tomography which often must be conducted at a separate facility from the neutron imaging. When imaging deformable samples or stochastic flow this delay in imaging modes ruins the analysis as the sample is no longer in an identical state. To address this issue and bring a unique capability to NIST, an instrument has been commissioned for the simultaneous imaging with neutrons and x-rays. The new system orients a micro-focus 90 kV x-ray beam 90° to the neutron beam which facilitates rapid dual-mode tomography of samples. Current highest spatial resolutions are 20 μm and 10 μm for the neutron and x-ray detectors, respectively, with upcoming improvements. This presentation will focus on introducing the new system and demonstrating its ability with several cases. Examples of high resolution water uptake and high speed imaging of uptake dynamics will be given.

  14. Neutron Environment Characterization of the Central Cavity in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parma, Edward J.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Lippert, Lance L.; Vehar, David W.

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of the neutron environment in the central cavity of the Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is important in order to provide experimenters with the most accurate spectral information and maintain a high degree of fidelity in performing reactor experiments. Characterization includes both modeling and experimental efforts. Building accurate neutronic models of the ACRR and the central cavity "bucket" environments that can be used by experimenters is important in planning and designing experiments, as well as assessing the experimental results and quantifying uncertainties. Neutron fluence characterizations of two bucket environments, LB44 and PLG, are presented. These two environments are used frequently and represent two extremes in the neutron spectrum. The LB44 bucket is designed to remove the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and significantly attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The PLG bucket is designed to enhance the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The neutron characterization for each bucket was performed by irradiating 20 different activation foil types, some of which were cadmium covered, resulting in 37 different reactions at the peak axial flux location in each bucket. The dosimetry results were used in the LSL-M2 spectrum adjustment code with a 640-energy group MCNP-generated trial spectrum, self-shielding correction factors, the SNLRML or IRDFF dosimetry cross-section library, trial spectrum uncertainty, and trial covariance matrix, to generate a least-squares adjusted neutron spectrum, spectrum uncertainty, and covariance matrix. Both environment character-izations are well documented and the environments are available for use by experimenters. Work supported by the United States Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned

  15. Study of the response of a lithium yttrium borate scintillator based neutron rem counter by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, C.; Tyagi, Mohit; Biju, K.; Shanbhag, A. A.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2015-12-01

    The scarcity and the high cost of 3He has spurred the use of various detectors for neutron monitoring. A new lithium yttrium borate scintillator developed in BARC has been studied for its use in a neutron rem counter. The scintillator is made of natural lithium and boron, and the yield of reaction products that will generate a signal in a real time detector has been studied by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. A 2 cm lead introduced to enhance the gamma rejection shows no appreciable change in the shape of the fluence response or in the yield of reaction products. The fluence response when normalized at the average energy of an Am-Be neutron source shows promise of being used as rem counter.

  16. Apollo 16 neutron stratigraphy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russ, G. P., III

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo 16 soils have the largest low-energy neutron fluences yet observed in lunar samples. Variations in the isotopic ratios Gd-158/Gd-157 and Sm-150/Sm-149 (up to 1.9 and 2.0%, respectively) indicate that the low-energy neutron fluence in the Apollo 16 drill stem increases with depth throughout the section sampled. Such a variation implies that accretion has been the dominant regolith 'gardening' process at this location. The data may be fit by a model of continuous accretion of pre-irradiated material or by models involving as few as two slabs of material in which the first slab could have been deposited as long as 1 b.y. ago. The ratio of the number of neutrons captured per atom by Sm to the number captured per atom by Gd is lower than in previously measured lunar samples, which implies a lower energy neutron spectrum at this site. The variation of this ratio with chemical composition is qualitatively similar to that predicted by Lingenfelter et al. (1972). Variations are observed in the ratio Gd-152/Gd-160 which are fluence-correlated and probably result from neutron capture by Eu-151.

  17. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fukuda, Makoto; Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M.; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-07-02

    We performed a neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In order to investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ~90–~800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02–9.00 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the hardness and microstructure changes exhibitedmore » a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Finally, irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten.« less

  18. Uncertainties in the Fluence Determination in the Surveillance Samples of VVER-440

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konheiser, Joerg; Grahn, Alexander; Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady

    2016-02-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) represents one of the most important safety components in a nuclear power plant. Therefore, surveillance specimen (SS) programs for the RPV material exist to deliver a reliable assessment of RPV residual lifetime. This report will present neutron fluence calculations for SS. These calculations were carried out by the codes TRAMO [1] and DORT [2]. This study was accompanied by ex-vessel neutron dosimetry experiments at Kola NPP. The main neutron activation monitoring reactions were 54Fe(n,p)54Mn and 58Ni(n,p)58Co. Good agreement was found between the deterministic and stochastic calculation results and between the calculations and the ex-vessel measurements. The different influences on the monitors were studied. In order to exclude the possible healing effects of the samples due to excessive temperatures, the heat release in the surveillance specimens was determined based on the calculated gamma fluences. Under comparatively realistic conditions, the heat increased by 6 K.

  19. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited).

    PubMed

    Forrest, C J; Radha, P B; Glebov, V Yu; Goncharov, V N; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Casey, D T; Gatu-Johnson, M; Gardner, S

    2012-10-01

    The areal density (ρR) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative ρR measurements and 1-D simulations. PMID:23126921

  20. High-energy neutron dosimetry at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, M.W.; Vasilik, D.G.; Littlejohn, G.J.; Cortez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility indicated potential areas for high energy neutron exposure to personnel. The low sensitivity of the Los Alamos thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) to high energy neutrons warranted issuing a NTA dosimeter in addition to the TLD badge to employees entering these areas. The dosimeter consists of a plastic holder surrounding NTA film that has been desiccated and sealed in a dry nitrogen environment. A study of the fading of latent images in NTA film demonstrated the success of this packaging method to control the phenomenon. The Los Alamos NTA dosimeter is characterized and the fading study discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Design studies for a high-resolution, transportable neutron radiography/radioscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, G.H.; Micklich, B.J.; McMichael, G.E.

    1996-09-30

    A preliminary design has been developed for a high-resolution, transportable neutron radiology system (TNRS) concept. The primary system requirement is taken to be a thermal neutron flux of 10[sup 6] n/(cm[sup 2]-sec) with a L/D ratio of 100. The approach is to use an accelerator-driven neutron source, with a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) as the primary accelerator component. Initial concepts for all of the major components of the system have been developed,and selected key parts have been examined further. An overview of the system design is presented, together with brief summaries of the concepts for the ion source, low energy beam transport (LEBT), RFQ, high energy beam transport (HEBT), target, moderator, collimator, image collection, power, cooling, vacuum, structure, robotics, control system, data analysis, transport vehicle, and site support. The use of trade studies for optimizing the TNRS concept are also described.

  2. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gardner, S.

    2012-10-15

    The areal density ({rho}R) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative {rho}R measurements and 1-D simulations.

  3. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Material and High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Wharton, C. J.; Caffrey, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory's PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a {sup 252}Cf isotopic neutron source, but recently a deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  4. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Materiel and High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; D.L. Chichester; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey

    2008-08-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a Cf-252 isotopic neutron source, but recently a Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Electronic Neutron Generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  5. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Materiel and High Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Wharton, C. J.; Caffrey, A. J.

    2009-03-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory's PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a 252Cf isotopic neutron source, but recently a deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  6. New high field magnet for neutron scattering at Hahn-Meitner Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, M.; Tennant, D. A.; Smeibidl, P.

    2006-11-01

    The Berlin Neutron Scattering Center BENSC at the Hahn-Meitner-Institute (HMI) is a user facility for the study of structure and dynamics of condensed matter with neutrons and synchrotron radiation with special emphasis on experiments under extreme conditions. Neutron scattering is uniquely suited to study magnetic properties on a microscopic length scale, because neutrons have comparable wavelengths and, due to their magnetic moment, they interact with the atomic magnetic moments. Magnetic interactions and magnetic phenomena depend on thermodynamic parameters like magnetic field, temperature and pressure. At HMI special efforts are being made to offer outstanding sample environments such as very low temperatures or high magnetic fields or combination of both. For the future a dedicated instrument for neutron scattering at extreme fields is under construction, the Extreme Environment Diffractometer ExED. For this instrument the existing superconducting magnets as well as a future hybrid system can be used. The highest fields, above 30 T will be produced by the planned series-connected hybrid magnet system, designed and constructed in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL.

  7. Effects of neutron irradiation of ultra-thin HfO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.-W.; Bian, S.; Shohet, J. L.; Ren, H.; Agasie, R. J.; Nishi, Y.

    2014-01-20

    Neutron irradiation at low fluence decreases the Pb-type and E′ defect levels in ultra-thin hafnium dioxide films because electrons can fill existing states. These electrons come from electron-hole pairs generated by neutron interactions with silicon and oxygen. Thus, a low fluence of neutrons “anneals” the sample. However, when neutron fluence increases, more neutrons collide with oxygen atoms and cause them to leave the lattice or to transmute into different atoms. This causes the E′ states to increase. As defect-state concentrations increase, leakage currents increase, but since the E′ is much lower than the Pb concentration, this is not a dominant factor.

  8. Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of the spectral variations of the cosmic-ray-induced neutrons at the Pic du Midi over a 2-y period.

    PubMed

    Cheminet, A; Hubert, G; Lacoste, V; Boscher, D

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer extended to high energies (HERMEIS) was employed to measure continuously the cosmic-ray-induced neutron spectra over a long-term period (2 y) at mountain altitude and medium geomagnetic latitude (Pic du Midi de Bigorre in the French Pyrenees, +2885 m, 5.6 GV). The results showed 1-y sinusoidal oscillations in the integrated fluence rates. The amplitude of these oscillations depends on the neutron energetic domain. The fluence rate of thermal neutrons was 53 % higher in August than that in February. Those of epithermal neutrons with energies between 0.4 eV and 0.1 MeV and evaporation neutrons (from 0.1 to 20 MeV) were ∼25 % higher in the summer than those in the winter. Finally, the cascade neutron fluence rate (>20 MeV) remained quite the same (<10 % variation). To understand the effects of local and seasonal changes in the measurement environment, GEANT4 simulations were performed. The nature of rock and thickness of the snow cover during the winter period (given by meteorological data) were investigated. A reasonable agreement between experiments and calculations was found. PMID:24345464

  9. Determination of boron in materials by cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rick L

    2005-01-01

    An instrument for cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), located at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR), has proven useful for the measurement of boron in a variety of materials. Neutrons, moderated by passage through liquid hydrogen at 20 K, pass through a (58)Ni coated guide to the PGAA station in the cold neutron guide hall of the NCNR. The thermal equivalent neutron fluence rate at the sample position is 9 x 10(8) cm(-2) s(-1). Prompt gamma rays are measured by a cadmium- and lead-shielded high-purity germanium detector. The instrument has been used to measure boron mass fractions in minerals, in NIST SRM 2175 (Refractory Alloy MP-35-N) for certification of boron, and most recently in semiconductor-grade silicon. The limit of detection for boron in many materials is <10 ng g(-1). PMID:15614360

  10. Feasibility analysis of a Plasma Focus neutron source for BNCT treatment of transplanted human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzi, V.; Mezzetti, F.; Rocchi, F.; Sumini, M.

    2004-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy preliminary treatments on transplanted human liver have been recently conducted at Pavia University. The need of high fluences of thermal neutrons imposed the use of the available thermal channel of a TRIGA reactor properly modified for this application. We analyse the possibility of using the Plasma Focus (PF) machine as a pulsed neutron source for this medical application instead of a nuclear reactor. Thermalization of the fast (2.45 MeV for D-D reactions) neutrons produced by the PF is gained with a paraffin or polyethylene moderator which contains both the neutron source and the irradiation chamber. The design parameters of a PF optimized for such an application are discussed, as well as other considerations on the advantages that this machine can bring to this kind of cancer therapy.

  11. WENDI: an improved neutron rem meter.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; Hsu, H H; Beverding, A; Kleck, J H; Casson, W H; Vasilik, D G; Devine, R T

    2000-08-01

    Neutron rem meters are routinely used for real-time field measurements of neutron dose equivalent where neutron spectra are unknown or poorly characterized. These meters are designed so that their response per unit fluence approximates an appropriate fluence-to-dose conversion function. Typically, a polyethylene moderator assembly surrounds a thermal neutron detector, such as a BF3 counter tube. Internal absorbers may also be used to further fine-tune the detector response to the shape of the desired fluence conversion function. Historical designs suffer from a number of limitations. Accuracy for some designs is poor at intermediate energies (50 keV-250 keV) critical for nuclear power plant dosimetry. The well-known Andersson-Braun design suffers from angular dependence because of its lack of spherical symmetry. Furthermore, all models using a pure polyethylene moderator have no useful high-energy response, which makes them inaccurate around high-energy accelerator facilities. This paper describes two new neutron rem meter designs with improved accuracy over the energy range from thermal to 5 GeV. The Wide Energy Neutron Detection Instrument (WENDI) makes use of both neutron generation and absorption to contour the detector response function. Tungsten or tungsten carbide (WC) powder is added to a polyethylene moderator with the expressed purpose of generating spallation neutrons in tungsten nuclei and thus enhance the high-energy response of the meter beyond 8 MeV. Tungsten's absorption resonance structure below several keV was also found to be useful in contouring the meter's response function. The WENDI rem meters were designed and optimized using the Los Alamos Monte Carlo codes MCNP, MCNPX, and LAHET. A first generation prototype (WENDI-I) was built in 1995 and its testing was completed in 1996. This design placed a BF3 counter in the center of a spherical moderator assembly, whose outer shell consisted of 30% by weight WC in a matrix of polyethylene. A borated

  12. Recent advances in high pressure neutron scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulk, C.; dos Santos, A.; Klug, D.; Guthrie, M.; Machida, S.; Molaison, J.

    2012-12-01

    There have been significant improvements in the operation of the high pressure diffractometer, SNAP, at the Spallation Neutron Source over the past two years. This talk will highlight the current capacities which include low temperature systems, high temperature systems, and the introduction of new pressure cell technology that is based on supported diamond anvils and, with advances in software, is particularly suited for powder diffraction. Specific examples of our recent research will focus on high pressure transitions in hydrogen bonded systems such as methane and CO2 hydrate. The high pressure hexagonal phase of methane hydrate is studied to determine the nature of the hydrate cage loading, this provides detailed experimental data that will lead to better intermolecular potentials for methane - methane interactions, particularly when methane molecules are in close contact and strongly repelling. The high pressure structural systematics of carbon dioxide hydrate is reported. While the structural transformation sequence of most hydrates progress from sI (or sII) to the hexagonal form then to a flied ice structure, CO2 hydrate is an example of a system that skips the hexagonal phase and transforms directly into the filled ice structure. Finally examples of using SNAP to study disorder in amorphous systems will be given. Particularly amorphous vapor co-deposits of water, known as amorphous solid water, and clathrate forming molecules such as CO2, and the structural response of these systems to increased pressure at low temperature.

  13. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Li, L H; Liu, H T; Yu, K M; Xu, Y; Zuo, X J; Zhu, P Z; Ma, Y F; Fu, Ricky K Y; Chu, Paul K

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering. PMID:24985818

  14. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H.; Liu, H. T.; Yu, K. M.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  15. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.; Li, L. H. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F.; Yu, K. M.; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-06-15

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  16. Basis for equivalent fluence concept in space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1982-01-01

    The equivalent fluence concept is defined, and its use and potential problems are noted. Silicon and GaAs solar cells are compared in a radiation environment. The analysis indicates that valid equivalent fluence values may be easier to obtain in GaAs than in silicon.

  17. Neutron conversion and cascaded cooling in paramagnetic systems for a high-flux source of very cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron-cooling mechanism is proposed with potential benefits for novel intense sources of very cold neutrons with wavelengths >2 nm, and for enhancing the production of ultracold neutrons. It employs inelastic magnetic scattering in weakly absorbing, cold paramagnetic systems. Kinetic energy is removed from the neutron stepwise in constant decrements determined by the Zeeman energy of paramagnetic atoms or ions in an external magnetic field, or by zero-field level splittings in magnetic molecules. The stationary neutron transport equation is analyzed for an infinite, homogeneous medium with Maxwellian neutron sources, using inelastic scattering cross sections derived in an appendix. Nonmagnetic inelastic scattering processes are neglected. The solution therefore still underestimates very cold neutron densities that should be achievable in a real medium. Molecular oxygen with its triplet ground state appears particularly promising, notably as a host in fully deuterated O2-clathrate hydrate. Other possibilities are dry O2-4He van der Waals clusters and O2 intercalated in fcc-C60. For conversion of cold to ultracold neutrons, where an incident neutron imparts only a single energy quantum to the medium, the paramagnetic scattering in the clathrate system is found to be stronger, by more than an order of magnitude, than the single-phonon emission in superfluid helium, when evaluated for an incident neutron spectrum with the optimum temperature for the respective medium. Moreover, the multistep paramagnetic cooling cascade leads to further strong enhancements of very cold neutron densities, e.g., by a factor 14 (57) for an initial neutron temperature of 30 K (100 K ), for the moderator held at about 1.3 K . Due to a favorable Bragg cutoff of the O2 clathrate, the cascade-cooling can take effect in a moderator with linear extensions smaller than a meter.

  18. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  19. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  20. High-voltage supply for neutron tubes in well-logging applications

    DOEpatents

    Humphreys, D.R.

    1982-09-15

    A high voltage supply is provided for a neutron tube used in well logging. The biased pulse supply of the invention combines DC and full pulse techniques and produces a target voltage comprising a substantial negative DC bias component on which is superimposed a pulse whose negative peak provides the desired negative voltage level for the neutron tube. The target voltage is preferably generated using voltage doubling techniques and employing a voltage source which generates bipolar pulse pairs having an amplitude corresponding to the DC bias level.

  1. Calculated Neutron and Gamma-ray Spectra across the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Sterbentz

    2008-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra are calculated using the MCNP5 computer code and a one-sixth core model of a prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor based on the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor. Spectra are calculated in the five inner reflector graphite block rings, three annular active core fuel rings, three outer graphite reflector block rings, and the core barrel. The neutron spectra are block and fuel pin averages and are calculated as a function of temperature and burnup. Also provided are the total, fast, and thermal radial profile fluxes and core barrel dpa rates.

  2. Operation Hardtack. Project 2. 6. Neutron flux from very-high-altitude bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Hanscome, T.D.; Alers, P.B.; Caldwell, P.A.; Drachman, R.J.; Gorbics, S.G.

    1985-09-01

    The primary objective of this project was to measure neutron flux and gamma-ray flux versus range and time from missile-borne, megaton nuclear detonations at high altitudes by means of instrumented pods that were to be ejected, during the missile thrust period, at times that were selected to position the pods at predetermined distances from the burst. Specific objectives were: (1) neutron flux versus time was to be measured at each of three pod positions during each shot and (2) a measurement of gamma-ray dose rate versus time was sought from each pod during each shot.

  3. NMDB: real-time database for high resolution neutron monitor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigies, Christian

    The worldwide network of standardized neutron monitors is, after 50 years, still the stateof-the-art instrumentation to measure variations of the primary cosmic rays in the energy range 500 MeV-60 GeV. These measurements are an ideal complement to space based cosmic ray measurements. Unlike data from satellite experiments, neutron monitor data has never been available in high time resolution from many neutron monitor stations in real-time. The data is often available only from the individual station's website, in varying formats, and not in real-time. To overcome this deficit, the European Commission is supporting the Neutron Monitor database (NMDB) since January 2008 as an e-Infrastructures project in the Seventh Framework Programme in the Capacities section. Neutron Monitor stations that do not yet have 1-minute resolution will be supported by software and the development of an affordable standard registration system to submit the measurements to the database via internet in realtime. This resolves the problem of different data formats and for the first time allows use of realtime cosmic ray measurements for space weather applications. Besides creating a database and developing applications that use this data, a part of the project is dedicated to create a public outreach website to inform about cosmic rays and possible effects on humans, technological systems, and the environment.

  4. Neutronic performance of the MEGAPIE spallation target under high power proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel-Sendis, F.; Chabod, S.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.; Zanini, L.

    2010-07-01

    The MEGAPIE project, aiming at the construction and operation of a megawatt liquid lead-bismuth spallation target, constitutes the first step in demonstrating the feasibility of liquid heavy metal target technologies as spallation neutron sources. In particular, MEGAPIE is meant to assess the coupling of a high power proton beam with a window-concept heavy liquid metal target. The experiment has been set at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland and, after a 4-month long irradiation, has provided unique data for a better understanding of the behavior of such a target under realistic irradiation conditions. A complex neutron detector has been developed to provide an on-line measurement of the neutron fluency inside the target and close to the proton beam. The detector is based on micrometric fission chambers and activation foils. These two complementary detection techniques have provided a characterization of the neutron flux inside the target for different positions along its axis. Measurements and simulation results presented in this paper aim to provide important recommendations for future accelerator driven systems (ADS) and neutron source developments.

  5. Compact spherical neutron polarimeter using high-T(c) YBCO films.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Parnell, S R; Hamilton, W A; Li, F; Washington, A L; Baxter, D V; Pynn, R

    2016-03-01

    We describe a simple, compact device for spherical neutron polarimetry measurements at small neutron scattering angles. The device consists of a sample chamber with very low (<0.01 G) magnetic field flanked by regions within which the neutron polarization can be manipulated in a controlled manner. This allows any selected initial and final polarization direction of the neutrons to be obtained. We have constructed a prototype device using high-T(c) superconducting films and mu-metal to isolate regions with different magnetic fields and tested device performance in transmission geometry. Finite-element methods were used to simulate the device's field profile and these have been verified by experiment using a small solenoid as a test sample. Measurements are reported using both monochromatic and polychromatic neutron sources. The results show that the device is capable of extracting sample information and distinguishing small angular variations of the sample magnetic field. As a more realistic test, we present results on the characterization of a 10 μm thick Permalloy film in zero magnetic field, as well as its response to an external magnetic field. PMID:27036785

  6. COMPTEL measurements of the omnidirectional high-energy neutron flux in near-earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Morris, D J; Aarts, H; Bennett, K; Lockwood, J A; McConnell, M L; Ryan, J M; Schonfelder, V; Steinle, H; Weidenspointner, G

    1998-01-01

    On four occasions, twice in 1991 (near solar maximum) and twice in 1994 (near solar minimum), one COMPTEL D1 detector module was used as an omnidirectional detector to measure the high-energy (> 12.8 MeV) neutron flux near an altitude of 450 km. The D1 modules are cylindrical, with radius 13.8 cm and depth 8 cm, and are filled with liquid scintillator (NE213A). The combined flux measurements can be fit reasonably well by a product of the Mt. Washington neutron monitor rate, a linear function in the spacecraft geocenter zenith angle, and an exponential function of the vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidity in which the coefficient of the rigidity is a linear function of the neutron monitor rate. When pointed at the nadir, the flux is consistent with that expected from the atmospheric neutron albedo alone. When pointed at the zenith the flux is reduced by a factor of about 0.54. Thus the production of secondary neutrons in the massive (16000 kg) Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory spacecraft is negligible. Rather, the mass of the spacecraft provides shielding from the earth albedo. PMID:11542901

  7. Effects of the quark-hadron phase transition on highly magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzon, B.; Gomes, R. O.; Schramm, S.

    2016-08-01

    The presence of quark-hadron phase transitions in neutron stars can be related to several interesting phenomena. In particular, previous calculations have shown that fast rotating neutron stars, when subjected to a quark-hadron phase transition in their interiors, could give rise to the backbending phenomenon characterized by a spin-up era. In this work, we use an equation of state composed of two phases, containing nucleons (and leptons) and quarks. The hadronic phase is described in a relativistic mean field formalism that takes many-body forces into account, and the quark phase is described by the MIT bag model with a vector interaction. Stationary and axi-symmetric stellar models are obtained in a self-consistent way by solving numerically the Einstein-Maxwell equations by means of a pseudo-spectral method. As a result, we obtain the interesting backbending phenomenon for fast spinning neutron stars. More importantly, we show that a magnetic field, which is assumed to be axi-symmetric and poloidal, can also be enhanced due to the phase transition from normal hadronic matter to quark matter on highly magnetized neutron stars. Therefore, in parallel to the spin-up era, classes of neutron stars endowed with strong magnetic fields may go through a "magnetic-up era" in their lives.

  8. Epithermal Neutron Evidence for a Diurnal Surface Hydration Process in the Moon's High Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Parsons, A.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Sanin, A.; Litvak, M.; Livengood, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report evidence from epithermal neutron flux observations that show that the Moon's high latitude surfaces are being actively hydrated, dehydrated and rehydrated in a diurnal cycle. The near-surface hydration is indicated by an enhanced suppression of the lunar epithermal neutron leakage flux on the dayside of the dawn terminator on poleward-facing slopes (PFS). At 0600 to 0800 local-time, hydrogen concentrations within the upper 1 meter of PFS are observed to be maximized relative to equivalent equator-facing slopes (EFS). During the lunar day surface hydrogen concentrations diminish towards dusk and then rebuild overnight. Surface hydration is determined by differential comparison of the averaged EFS to PFS epithermal neutron count rates above +/- 75 deg latitude. At dawn the contrast bias towards PFS is consistent with at least 15 to 25 parts-per-million (ppm) hydrogen that dissipates by dusk. We review several lines of evidence derived from temperature and epithermal neutron data by a correlated analysis of observations from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) that were mapped as a function of lunar local-time, Lunar Observing Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography and Diviner (DLRE) surface temperature.

  9. Simulation of neutron displacement damage in bipolar junction transistors using high-energy heavy ion beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Buller, Daniel L.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Fleming, Robert M; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2006-12-01

    Electronic components such as bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) are damaged when they are exposed to radiation and, as a result, their performance can significantly degrade. In certain environments the radiation consists of short, high flux pulses of neutrons. Electronics components have traditionally been tested against short neutron pulses in pulsed nuclear reactors. These reactors are becoming less and less available; many of them were shut down permanently in the past few years. Therefore, new methods using radiation sources other than pulsed nuclear reactors needed to be developed. Neutrons affect semiconductors such as Si by causing atomic displacements of Si atoms. The recoiled Si atom creates a collision cascade which leads to displacements in Si. Since heavy ions create similar cascades in Si we can use them to create similar damage to what neutrons create. This LDRD successfully developed a new technique using easily available particle accelerators to provide an alternative to pulsed nuclear reactors to study the displacement damage and subsequent transient annealing that occurs in various transistor devices and potentially qualify them against radiation effects caused by pulsed neutrons.

  10. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  11. Field test and calibration of neutron coincidence counters for high-mass plutonium samples

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Dickinson, R.J.; Douglas, I.; Orr, C.; Rogers, F.J.G.; Wells, G.; Schenkel, R.; Smith, G.; Fattgh, A.; Ramalho, A.

    1987-02-01

    Five different neutron coincidence systems were evaluated and calibrated for high-mass PuO/sub 2/ samples. The samples were from 2 to 7.2 kg of PuO/sub 2/ in mass, with a large range of burnup. This report compares the equipment and the results, with an evaluation of deadtime and multiplication corrections.

  12. Monte Carlo calibration of the SMM gamma ray spectrometer for high energy gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Reppin, C.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft was primarily designed and calibrated for nuclear gamma ray line measurements, but also has a high energy mode which allows the detection of gamma rays at energies above 10 MeV and solar neutrons above 20 MeV. The GRS response has been extrapolated until now for high energy gamma rays from an early design study employing Monte Carlo calculations. The response to 50 to 600 MeV solar neutrons was estimated from a simple model which did not consider secondary charged particles escaping into the veto shields. In view of numerous detections by the GRS of solar flares emitting high energy gamma rays, including at least two emitting directly detectable neutrons, the calibration of the high energy mode in the flight model has been recalculated by the use of more sophisticated Monte Carlo computer codes. New results presented show that the GRS response to gamma rays above 20 MeV and to neutrons above 100 MeV is significantly lower than the earlier estimates.

  13. Glass-fiber-based neutron detectors for high- and low-flux environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, Mary; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Craig, Richard A.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Knopf, Michael A.; Miley, Harry S.; Perkins, Richard W.; Reeder, Paul L.; Sunberg, Debra S.; Warner, Ray A.; Wogman, Ned A.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has fabricated cerium-activated lithium silicate scintillating fibers via a hot-downdraw process. These fibers typically have a operational transmission length (e(superscript -1) length) of greater than 2 meters. This permits the fabrication of devices which were not possible to consider. Scintillating fibers permit conformable devices, large-area devices, and extremely small devices; in addition, as the thermal-neutron sensitive elements in a fast neutron detection system, scintillating fibers can be dispersed within moderator, improving neutron economy, over that possible with commercially available (superscript 3)He or BF(subscript 3) proportional counters. These fibers can be used for national-security applications, in medical applications, in the nuclear-power industry, and for personnel protection at experimental facilities. Data are presented for devices based on single fibers and devices made up of ribbons containing many fibers under high-and low-flux conditions.

  14. Development of a moderator system for the High Brilliance Neutron Source project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabruck, J. P.; Cronert, T.; Rücker, U.; Bessler, Y.; Klaus, M.; Lange, C.; Butzek, M.; Hansen, W.; Nabbi, R.; Brückel, T.

    2016-11-01

    The project for an accelerator based high brilliance neutron source HBS driven by Forschungszentrum Jülich forsees the use of the nuclear Be(p,n) or Be(d,n) reaction with accelerated particles in the lower MeV energy range. The lower neutron production compared to spallation has to be compensated by improving the neutron extraction process and optimizing the brilliance. Design and optimiziation of the moderator system are conducted with MCNP and will be validated with measurements at the AKR-2 training reactor by means of a prototype assembly where, e.g., the effect of different liquid H2 ortho/para ratios will be investigated and controlled in realtime via online heat capacity measurements.

  15. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L

    2016-05-01

    Three high-resolution positioning methods based on the FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S. B. Andersson, Opt. Express 16, 18714 (2008)] are proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function, the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. After taking the super-Poissonian photon noise into account, the proposed algorithms give an average of 0.03-0.08 pixel position error much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. These improvements will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis. PMID:27250410

  16. A highly efficient neutron time-of-flight detector for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Yamaguchi, K.; Yamagajo, T.; Nakano, T.; Kasai, T.; Urano, T.; Azechi, H.; Nakai, S.; Iida, T.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed the highly efficient neutron detector system MANDALA for the inertial-confinement-fusion experiment. The MANDALA system consists of 842 elements plastic scintillation detectors and data acquisition electronics. The detection level is the yield of 1.2×105 for 2.5 MeV and 1×105 for 14.1 MeV neutrons (with 100 detected hits). We have calibrated the intrinsic detection efficiencies of the detector elements using a neutron generator facility. Timing calibration and integrity test of the system were also carried out with a 60Co γ ray source. MANDALA system was applied to the implosion experiments at the GEKKO XII laser facility. The integrity test was carried out by implosion experiments.

  17. A Segmented Neutron Detector with a High Position Resolution for the (p,pn) Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Yuki; Sasano, Masaki; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Dozono, Masanori; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kawase, Shoichiro; Kobayashi, Motoki; Lee, CheongSoo; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Miki, Kenjiro; Miya, Hiroyuki; Ota, Shinsuke; Sekiguchi, Kimiko; Shima, Tatsushi; Taguchi, Takahiro; Tamii, Atsushi; Tang, Tsz Leung; Tokieda, Hiroshi; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Wakui, Takashi; Yasuda, Jumpei; Zenihiro, Juzo

    We are developing a neutron detector with a high position resolution to study the single particle properties of nuclei by the knockout (p,pn) reaction at intermediate energies. We constructed a prototype detector consisting of plastic scintillating fibers and multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Test experiments using 200- and 70-MeV proton and 199-, 188-, 68-, and 50-MeV neutron were performed for characterizing its performance. Preliminary results show that a position resolution of about 3 mm at full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) is realized as designed. The resulting separation-energy resolution to be obtained for (p,pn) measurement would be 1 MeV in FWHM, when the detector is used at a distance of 2 m from the target for measuring the neutron momentum.

  18. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, C. L.

    2016-05-17

    On the basis of FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S.B. Andersson, Opt. Exp. 16, 18714 (2008)] three highly-resolved positioning methodswere proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function (LRF), the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. The proposed algorithms give an average 0.03-0.08 pixel position error, much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. Moreover,more » these characters will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis.« less

  19. Four-Quasiparticle High-K States in Neutron-Deficient Lead and Polonium Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yue; Xu, Furong

    2012-06-01

    Configuration-constrained potential energy surface calculations have been performed to investigate four-quasiparticle high-K configurations in neutron-deficient lead and polonium isotopes. A good agreement between the calculations and the experimental data has been found for the excitation energy of the observed Kπ = 19- state in 188Pb. Several lowly excited high-K states are predicted, and the large oblate deformation and low energy indicate high-K isomerism in these nuclei.

  20. High-energy and thermal-neutron imaging and modeling with an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Claytor, Thomas N; Taddeucci, Terry N; Hills, Charles R; Summa, Deborah A; Davis, Anthony W; McDonald, Thomas E; Schwab, Mark J

    2004-10-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) operates two spallation neutron sources dedicated to research in materials science, condensed-matter physics, and fundamental and applied nuclear physics. Prior to 1995, all thermal neutron radiography at Los Alamos was done on a beam port attached to the Omega West reactor, a small 8MW research reactor used primarily for radioisotope production and prompt and delayed neutron activation analysis. After the closure of this facility, two largely independent radiography development efforts were begun at LANSCE using moderated cold and thermal neutrons from the Target-1 source and high-energy neutrons from the Target-4 source. Investigations with cold and thermal neutrons employed a neutron converter and film, a scintillation screen and CCD camera system, and a new high-resolution amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat-panel detector system. Recent work with high-energy neutrons (En > 1 MeV) has involved storage-phosphor image plates. Some comparison high-energy images were obtained with both image plates and the a-Si panel and showed equivalent image quality for approximately equal exposure times. PMID:15246402

  1. High-Flux Neutron Generator Facility for Geochronology and Nuclear Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, Cory; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being commissioned at UC Berkeley. The generator is designed to produce monoenergetic 2.45 MeV neutrons at outputs exceeding 1011 n/s. The HFNG is designed around two RF-driven multi-cusp ion sources that straddle a titanium-coated copper target. D + ions, accelerated up to 150 keV from the ion sources, self-load the target and drive neutron generation through the d(d,n)3 He fusion reaction. A well-integrated cooling system is capable of handling beam power reaching 120 kW impinging on the target. The unique design of the HFNG target permits experimental samples to be placed inside the target volume, allowing the samples to receive the highest neutron flux (1011 cm-2 s-1) possible from the generator. In addition, external beams of neutrons will be available simultaneously, ranging from thermal to 2.45 MeV. Achieving the highest neutron yields required carefully designed schemes to mitigate back-streaming of high energy electrons liberated from the cathode target by deuteron bombardment. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40 Ar/39 Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science, and education. An end goal is to become a user facility for researchers. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  2. Production of charm mesons by high energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shipbaugh, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The charmed mesons D/sup /plus minus//, D/sup 0/, and D/sub s//sup /plus minus//, have been observed in neutron-nucleus collisions at the FNAL Tevatron. A sample of 134 /plus minus/ 19 events as investigated in the decay D/sup /plus minus// /yields/ D/sup 0//pi//sup /plus minus// with the subsequent decay mode D/sup 0/ /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup /minus//. The cross section per nucleon for D/sup /plus minus//, at most probable energy /radical/s = 35 GeV, was measured to be 2.11 /plus minus/ .43 (plusreverse arrowminus/.63)/mu/b/nucleon for 0.0 < x/sub f/ < 0.14 (/bar x//sub f/ = .07). The branching ratio (BR) is defined as: BR /identicalreverse arrowto/ Br(D /yields/ D/pi/) /times/ BR(D /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup /minus//). The dependence of the cross section per nucleus on number of nucleons in target was fit to a form A /sup /alpha// and it was found that /alpha/ = .96 /plusreverse arrowminus/ .17. A sample of 64 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 16 D/sub s//sup /plus minus// events was investigates for the decay D/sub s//sup /plus minus// /yields/ /phi//pi//sup /plus minus//. The differential cross section for D/sub s//sup /plus minus// production averaged over the particle and antiparticle states is: BR.(1/2)(d/sigma/(D/sub s//sup +/)/dx/sub f/ + d/sigma/(D/sub s//sup /minus//) = 2.85 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 0.80 /plusreverse arrowminus/ .86 /mu/b/nucleon at x/sub f/ = 0.175 where the first errors is statistical and the second error is systematic. The branching fraction is defined as BR /equivalentreverse arrowto/ BR(D/sub s/ /yields/ /phi//pi/), and a linear A dependence was assumed. An estimate of relative cross section is: 0.19 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 0.09 at x/sub f/ = 0. 36 refs., 43 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Production of charm mesons by high-energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shipbaugh, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The charmed mesons ED{sup *{plus minus}}, D{sup 0}, and D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} have been observed in neutron-nucleus collisions at the FNAL Tevatron. A sample of 134 {plus minus} 19 events was investigated in the decay mode D{sup *{plus minus}} {yields} D{sup 0} {pi}{sup {plus minus}} with the subsequent decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}. The cross section per nucleon for D{sup *}{plus minus}, at most probable energy {radical}s = 35 GeV, was measured to be: d{sigma}(xf)/dxf {center dot} BR = 2.11 {plus minus} .43({plus minus}63){mu}b/nucleon for 0.0 < x{sub f} < 0.14 (x{sub f} = .07). The branching ratio (BR) is defined as: BR {identical to} BR(D{sup *} {yields} D{sub {pi}}) {times} BR(D {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}). The dependence of the cross section per nucleus on number of nucleons in the target was fit to a form A{sup {alpha}} and it was found that {alpha} = .96 {plus minus} .17. A sample of 64 {plus minus} 16 D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} events was investigated for the decay D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup {plus minus}}. The differential cross section for D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} production averaged over the particle and antiparticle states is: BR {center dot} {1/2} d{sigma}D{sub s}{sup +}/dxf + d{sigma}(D{sub s}{sup {minus}}/dxf) = 2.8 {plus minus} 0.80 {plus minus} .86 {mu}b/nucleon at x{sub f} = 0.175 where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic. The branching fraction is defined as BR {identical to} BR(D{sub s} {yields} {phi}{pi}), and a linear A dependence was assumed.

  4. HEIMDAL: A thermal neutron powder diffractometer with high and flexible resolution combined with SANS and neutron imaging - Designed for materials science studies at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Sonja L.; Lefmann, Kim; Henry, Paul F.; Bertelsen, Mads; Schefer, Jürg; Christensen, Mogens

    2016-08-01

    HEIMDAL will be a multi length scale neutron scattering instrument for the study of structures covering almost nine orders of magnitude from 0.01 nm to 50 mm. The instrument is accepted for construction at the European Spallation Source (ESS) and features a variable resolution thermal neutron powder diffractometer (TNPD), combined with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron imaging (NI). The instrument uses a novel combination of a cold and a thermal guide to fulfill the diverse requirements for diffraction and SANS. With an instrument length of 170 m, HEIMDAL will take advantage of the high neutron flux of the long pulse at ESS, whilst maintaining a high q-resolution due to the long flight path. The q-range coverage is up to 20 Å-1 allowing low-resolution PDF analysis. With the addition of SANS, HEIMDAL will be able to cover a uniquely broad length scale within a single instrumental set-up. HEIMDAL will be able to accommodate modern materials research in a broad variety of fields, and the task of the instrument will be to study advanced functional materials in action, as in situ and in operandi at multiple length scales (0.01-100 nm) quasi simultaneously. The instrument combines state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques (TNPD, SANS, and NI) with the goal of studying real materials, in real time, under real conditions. This article describes the instrument design ideas, calculations and results of simulations and virtual experiments.

  5. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Rebecca; Kszos, Lynn A

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews

  6. NOTE: Comparison of sources of exit fluence variation for IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Joseph K.; Clews, Luke; Gordon, J. James; Wang, Song; Greer, Peter B.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2009-10-01

    The fluence exiting a patient during beam delivery can be used as treatment delivery quality assurance, either by direct comparison with expected exit fluences or by backprojection to reconstruct the patient dose. Multiple possible sources of measured exit fluence deviations exist, including changes in the beam delivery and changes in the patient anatomy. The purpose of this work is to compare the deviations caused by these sources. Machine delivery-related variability is measured by acquiring multiple dosimetric portal images (DPIs) of several test fields without a patient/phantom in the field over a time period of 2 months. Patient anatomy-related sources of fluence variability are simulated by computing transmission DPIs for a prostate patient using the same incident fluence for 11 different computed tomography (CT) images of the patient anatomy. The standard deviation (SD) and maximum deviation of the exit fluence, averaged over 5 mm × 5 mm square areas, is calculated for each test set. Machine delivery fluence SDs as large as 1% are observed for a sample patient field and as large as 2.5% for a picket-fence dMLC test field. Simulations indicate that day-to-day patient anatomy variations induce exit fluence SDs as large as 3.5%. The largest observed machine delivery deviations are 4% for the sample patient field and 7% for the picket-fence field, while the largest difference for the patient anatomy-related source is 8.5%. Since daily changes in patient anatomy can result in substantial exit fluence deviations, care should be taken when applying fluence back-projection to ensure that such deviations are properly attributed to their source.

  7. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ˜16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ˜200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ˜40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  8. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, III, M. J.; et al

    2016-05-10

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic DT implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ~16 m to a streak camera in amore » well-shielded location. An ~200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ~40±10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. Furthermore, the measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.« less

  9. Hexagonal boron nitride thin film thermal neutron detectors with high energy resolution of the reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, T. C.; Majety, S.; Grenadier, S.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2015-05-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is highly promising for solid-state thermal neutron detector applications due to its many outstanding physical properties, especially its very large thermal neutron capture cross-section (~3840 barns for 10B), which is several orders of magnitude larger than those of most other isotopes. The focus of the present work is to carry out studies on h-BN thin film and detector properties to lay the foundation for the development of a direct-conversion solid-state thermal neutron detector with high sensitivity. The measured carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product of h-BN thin films grown on sapphire substrates is 2.83×10-7 cm2/V for electrons and holes, which is comparable to the value of about 10-7 cm2/V for GaN thin films grown on sapphire. Detectors based on h-BN thin films were fabricated and the nuclear reaction product pulse height spectra were measured. Under a bias of 20 V, very narrow individual peaks corresponding to the reaction product energies of α and Li particles as well as the sum peaks have been clearly resolved in the pulse height spectrum for the first time by a B-based direct-conversion semiconductor neutron detector. Our results indicate that h-BN thin film detectors possess unique advantages including small size, low weight, portability, low voltage operation and high energy resolution of specific reaction products.

  10. High-resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin

    SciTech Connect

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax A.; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zöe; Hoffman, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-06-01

    High-resolution crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin have provided hydrogen-bond parameters of unprecedented accuracy for a biomacromolecule. The hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high-resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of 0.92 Å on the original D19 diffractometer with a prototype 4° × 64° detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute Laue–Langevin. The resulting structure provides hydrogen-bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for the efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending the resolution of this structure to ultrahigh resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data during commissioning of the TOPAZ diffractometer with a prototype array of 14 modular 2° × 21° detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  11. High resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of coenzyme cob(II)alamin

    SciTech Connect

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zoe; Hoffmann, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The hydration of coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for 0.92 on the original diffractometer D19 with a prototype 4o x 64o detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute Laue Langevin. The resulting structure provides H bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force-fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending the resolution of this structure to ultra high resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data on diffractometer TOPAZ with a prototype array of 14 modular 21o x 21o detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  12. Neutron detection in a high-gamma field using solution-grown stilbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. M.; Clarke, S. D.; Adamowicz, N.; Pozzi, S. A.; Zaitseva, N.; Carman, L.

    2016-01-01

    A solution-based technique for growing large-volume stilbene scintillators was developed in 2013; crystals up to diameters of 10 cm, or larger, have been grown while preserving excellent pulse shape discrimination (PSD) properties. The goal of this study is to evaluate the PSD capabilities of 5.08 by 5.08-cm stilbene crystals grown by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Inrad Optics when exposed to a 1000 to 1 gamma ray-neutron ratio and operating at a 100-kHz count rate. Results were compared to an equivalent EJ-309 liquid scintillation detector. 252Cf neutron pulses were recorded in two experiments where 60Co and 137Cs sources created the high-gamma field. The high count rate created numerous double pulses that were cleaned using fractional and template approaches designed to remove double pulses while preserving neutron counts. PSD was performed at a threshold of 42 keVee (440-keV proton) for stilbene and 60 keVee (610-keV proton) for EJ-309 liquid. The lower threshold in stilbene resulted in a neutron intrinsic efficiency of approximately 14.5%, 10% higher than EJ-309 liquid, for bare 252Cf and 13% for 252Cf in the high-gamma field. Despite the lower threshold, the gamma misclassification rate in stilbene was approximately 3×10-6, nearly a factor-of-five lower than what we found with the EJ-309 liquid.

  13. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Stoeckl, C; Boni, R; Ehrne, F; Forrest, C J; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Lonobile, D J; Magoon, J; Regan, S P; Shoup, M J; Sorce, A; Sorce, C; Sangster, T C; Weiner, D

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments-a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ∼16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ∼200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ∼40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera. PMID:27250417

  14. High-performance deuterium-lithium neutron source for fusion materials and technology testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.; Bhatia, T.S.; Blind, B.; Guy, F.W.; Krakowski, R.A.; Neuschaefer, G.H.; Schnurr, N.M.; Schriber, S.O.; Varsamis, G.L.; Wangler, T.P.

    1989-01-01

    Advances in high-current linear-accelerator technology since the design of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility have increased the attractiveness of a deuterium-lithium (D-Li) neutron source for fusion materials and technology testing. This paper discusses a new approach to such a source aimed at meeting the near-term requirements of a high-flux high-energy International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). The concept employs multiple accelerator modules providing deuteron beams to two liquid-lithium jet targets oriented at right angles. This beam/target geometry provides much larger test volumes than can be attained with a single beam and target and produces significant regions of low neutron-flux gradient. A preliminary beam-dynamics design has been obtained for a 250-mA reference accelerator module. Neutron-flux levels and irradiation volumes were calculated for a neutron source incorporating two such modules, and interaction of the beam with the lithium jet was studied using a thermal-hydraulic computer simulation. Cost estimates are provided for a range of beam currents and a possible facility staging sequence is suggested. 12 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Epoxy-paint stripping using TEA CO2 laser: Determination of threshold fluence and the process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhargava, P.; Biswas, A. K.; Sahu, Shasikiran; Mandloi, V.; Ittoop, M. O.; Khattak, B. Q.; Tiwari, M. K.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that the threshold fluence for laser paint stripping can be accurately estimated from the heat of gasification and the absorption coefficient of the epoxy-paint. The threshold fluence determined experimentally by stripping of the epoxy-paint on a substrate using a TEA CO2 laser matches closely with the calculated value. The calculated threshold fluence and the measured absorption coefficient of the paint allowed us to determine the epoxy paint thickness that would be removed per pulse at a given laser fluence even without experimental trials. This was used to predict the optimum scan speed required to strip the epoxy-paint of a given thickness using a high average power TEA CO2 laser. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) studies were also carried out on laser paint-stripped concrete substrate to show high efficacy of this modality.

  16. Single-Volume Neutron Scatter Camera for High-Efficiency Neutron Imaging and Source Characterization. Year 2 of 3 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik

    2015-10-01

    The neutron scatter camera (NSC), an imaging spectrometer for fission energy neutrons, is an established and proven detector for nuclear security applications such as weak source detection of special nuclear material (SNM), arms control treaty verification, and emergency response. Relative to competing technologies such as coded aperture imaging, time-encoded imaging, neutron time projection chamber, and various thermal neutron imagers, the NSC provides excellent event-by-event directional information for signal/background discrimination, reasonable imaging resolution, and good energy resolution. Its primary drawback is very low detection efficiency due to the requirement for neutron elastic scatters in two detector cells. We will develop a singlevolume double-scatter neutron imager, in which both neutron scatters can occur in the same large active volume. If successful, the efficiency will be dramatically increased over the current NSC cell-based geometry. If the detection efficiency approaches that of e.g. coded aperture imaging, the other inherent advantages of double-scatter imaging would make it the most attractive fast neutron detector for a wide range of security applications.

  17. High-temperature structural phase transitions in neighborite: a high-resolution neutron powder diffraction investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Kevin S.; Price, G. David; Stuart, John A.; Wood, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the apparently continuous structural phase transition at 1,049 K in the perovskite-structured, MgSiO3 isomorph, neighborite (NaMgF3), from the orthorhombic ( Pbnm) hettotype phase to the cubic () aristotype structure, has been re-investigated using high-resolution, time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction. Using data collected at 1 K intervals close to the nominal phase transition temperature, the temperature dependence of the intensities of superlattice reflections at the M point and the R point of the pseudocubic Brillouin zone indicate the existence of a new intermediate tetragonal phase in space group P4/ mbm, with a narrow phase field extending from ~1,046.5 to ~1,048.5 K, at ambient pressure. Group theoretical analysis shows that the structural transitions identified in this study, Pbnm- P4/ mbm, and P4/ mbm-, are permitted to be second order. The observation of the tetragonal phase resolves the longstanding issue of why the high-temperature phase transition, previously identified as Pbnm-, and which would be expected to be first order under Landau theory, is in fact found to be continuous. Analysis of the pseudocubic shear strain shows it to vary with a critical exponent of 0.5 implying that the phase transition from Pbnm to P4/ mbm is tricritical in character. The large librational modes that exist in the MgF6 octahedron at high temperature, and the use of Gaussian probability density functions to describe atomic displacements, result in apparent bond shortening in the Mg-F distances, making mode amplitude determination an unreliable method for determination of the critical exponent from internal coordinates. Crystal structures are reported for the three phases of NaMgF3 at 1,033 K ( Pbnm), 1,047 K ( P4/ mbm) and 1,049 K ().

  18. Coupled Neutron Transport for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircrafts exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETC-HEDS, FLUKA, and MCNPX, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light particle transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  19. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-02-07

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  20. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-01-01

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.