Science.gov

Sample records for high performance mcfc

  1. High performance MCFC using Li/Na electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Donado, R.A.; Ong, E.T.; Sishtla, C.I.

    1995-08-01

    The substitution of a lithium/ sodium carbonate (Li/Na) mixture for the lithium/potassium carbonate (Li/K) electrolyte used in MCFCs holds the promise of higher ionic conductivity, higher exchange current density at both electrodes, lower vapor pressure, and lower cathode dissolution rates. However, when the substitution is made in cells optimized for use with the Li/K electrolyte, the promised increase in performance is not realized. As a consequence the literature contains conflicting data with regard to the performance, compositional stability, and chemical reactivity of the Li/Na electrolyte. Experiments conducted at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) concluded that the source of the problem is the different wetting characteristics of the two electrolytes. Electrode pore structures optimized for use with Li/K do not work well with Li/Na. Using proprietary methods and materials, IGT was able to optimize a set of electrodes for the Li/Na electrolyte. Experiments conducted in bench-scale cells have confirmed the superior performance of the Li/Na electrolyte compared to the Li/K electrolyte. The Li/Na cells exhibited a 5 to 8 percent improvement in overall performance, a substantial decrease in the rate of cathode dissolution, and a decreased decay rate. The longest running cell has logged over 13,000 hours of operation with a decay rate of less than 2 mV/1000 hours.

  2. High temperature corrosion of separator materials for MCFC

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagida, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Kazumi; Kojima, Toshikatsu

    1996-12-31

    The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is one of promising high efficiency power generation devices with low emission. Molten carbonate used for its electrolyte plays an important role in MCFC. It separates between anode and cathode gas environment and provides ionic conductivity on MCFC operation. Stainless steel is conventionally used as separator/current collector materials in MCFC cathode environment. As corrosion of the components of MCFC caused by the electrolyte proceeds with the electrolyte consumption, the corrosion in the MCFC is related to its performance and life. To understand and inhibit the corrosion in the MCFC is important to realize MCFC power generation system. We have studied the effect of alkaline earth carbonate addition into carbonate on corrosion of type 316L stainless steel. In this paper, we describe the effect of the temperature on corrosion behavior of type 316L stainless steel with carbonate mixture, (Li{sub 0.62}K{sub 0.38}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}, under the cathode environment in out-of-cell test.

  3. MCFC performance diagnosis by using the current-pulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kimihiko; Matsuoka, Hironori; Tanimoto, Kazumi

    Several problems prevent molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) operation for an extended period. However, if the degradation factors can be identified and resolved in a timely manner, MCFC could become a valuable technology. Therefore, a performance diagnosis should be developed which enables the simple and instantaneous determination of MCFC degradation factors. A suitable six parameter equation obtained by a current-pulse method, obtainable from MCFC's transient response in 100 ms, is expressible in an equivalent circuit composed of three sub-circuits. The relationship between these parameters and each degradation factor is evaluated by a single MCFC cell, the electrode area of which is 16 cm 2. Degradation factors include cross-leakage, electrolytic loss, cell temperature distribution and gas composition/flow rate. As a result, each of six parameters in the MCFC transient response corresponds to an ohmic potential drop, anode/cathode gas diffusion resistance, reactive resistance, three-phase interfacial resistance and electrolyte properties, respectively. The proposed performance diagnosis specifies the degradation factors by combining the six parameters. Performance diagnosis was applied to a single MCFC cell of an electrode area of 81 cm in extended operations, and the degradation factor diagnosed. As a result, the diagnosis was able to specify the cell degradation factors from the degradation factor ratio, corresponding to cell voltage, cell resistance and the N 2 concentration of MCFC single cell performance. Therefore, the proposed performance diagnosis is able to easily specify the driven MCFC degradation factors in a timely manner.

  4. Experimental comparison of MCFC performance using three different biogas types and methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, Roberto; Lunghi, Piero

    Biogas recovery is an environmentally friendly and cost-effective practice that is getting consensus in both the scientific and industrial community, as the growing number of projects demonstrate. The use of fuel cells as energy conversion systems increases the conversion efficiency, as well as the environmental benefits. Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) operate at a temperature of about 650 °C, thus presenting a high fuel flexibility, compared to low temperature fuel cells. Aim of the present study is to compare the performance of an MCFC single cell, fuelled with different biogas types as well as methane. The biogases considered are derived from the following processes: (1) steam gasification in an entrained flow gasifier; (2) steam gasification in a duel interconnect fluidized bed gasifier; (3) biogas from an anaerobic digestion process. The performances are evaluated for different fuel utilization and current densities. The results are an essential starting point for a complete system design and demonstration.

  5. High performance electrolytes for MCFC

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Roche, Michael F.

    1999-01-01

    A carbonate electrolyte of the Li/Na or CaBaLiNa system. The Li/Na carbonate has a composition displaced from the eutectic composition to diminish segregation effects in a molten carbonate fuel cell. The CaBaLiNa system includes relatively small amounts of Ca.sub.2 CO.sub.3 and BaCO.sub.3, and preferably of equimolar amounts. The presence of both Ca and BaCO.sub.3 enables lower temperature fuel cell operation.

  6. High performance electrolytes for MCFC

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.; Roche, M.F.

    1999-08-24

    A carbonate electrolyte of the Li/Na or CaBaLiNa system is described. The Li/Na carbonate has a composition displaced from the eutectic composition to diminish segregation effects in a molten carbonate fuel cell. The CaBaLiNa system includes relatively small amounts of Ca{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and BaCO{sub 3}, and preferably of equimolar amounts. The presence of both Ca and BaCO{sub 3} enables lower temperature fuel cell operation. 15 figs.

  7. Technology base studies of long-term MCFC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Selman, J.R.; Yazici, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    This project aims to identify the long-term endurance problems of the MCFC by investigating corrosion of stainless steel (310, 316L). This presentation focuses on results from SEM and cross-section analysis. Significant differences between immersed and film-wetted electrodes are summarized. Results suggest that pre-oxidation can be a solution to obtaining a compact oxide layer. Adding Al to alloy leads to a very stable oxide layer, but increases resistivity. Alloy behavior must be investigated under continuously polarized conditions. 4 figs.

  8. MCFC component development at ANL.

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, I.

    1998-09-15

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing advanced cathode and electrolyte components for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). Working in support of the MCFC developers, the goal of this effort is to extend the life of the MCFC cell and to improve its performance.

  9. Technology base studies of long-term MCFC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Selman, J.R.; Yazici, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    Cathode dissolution into the electrolyte matrix and endurance of current collector/separator plate materials are the main life-limiting factors of the state-of-the art MCFC. These components are also major contributors to the total system cost. Therefore, to reduce capital cost, it is necessary to minimize hardware corrosion and increase cell life. This study consists of experimental evaluation of corrosion processes with the objective to further practical; understanding of corrosion behavior of alloys and alloy components under cathodic gas conditions. Nickel, iron, cobalt and stainless steels 310 and 316L are analyzed. The experimental study consists of: (1) Observation of open circuit potential (OCP) changes. Surface reactions occurring without net passage of current are proposed based on this measurement. (2) Applying cyclic voltammetry, which provides information about the possible electrode reactions at different stages of polarization. (3) Applying AC impedance to support the result of tasks 1 and 2 at different stages of oxidation, and data analysis by means of equivalent circuits. Open circuit conditions as well as positive and negative polarization are used in the impedance measurements. (4) Surface analysis of the electrodes by SEM-EDX and X-ray diffraction. To obtain more information from electrochemical measurements a novel approach has been applied in cell design. In this two electrode approach, one electrode is fully immersed, and the other is wetted by carbonate melt via an alumina tube which has a thin film on it. While camera observation of these two different electrode conditions will identify the effect of carbonate wetting on the state of the surface, electrochemical measurements enable a quantitative comparison between complete submersion and wetting by a film of carbonate.

  10. Technology base studies of long-term MCFC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Selman, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    Cathode dissolution into the electrolyte matrix and endurance of current collector/separator plate materials are the main life-limiting factors of the state-of-the art MCFC. These components are also major contributors to the total system cost. Therefore, to reduce capital cost, it is necessary to minimize hardware corrosion and increase cell life. This study consists of experimental evaluation of corrosion processes with the objective to further practical; understanding of corrosion behavior of alloys and alloy components under cathodic gas conditions. Nickel, iron, cobalt and stainless steels 310 and 316L are analyzed. The experimental study consists of (1) Observation of open circuit potential (OCP) changes. Surface reactions occurring without net passage of current are proposed based on this measurement. (2) Applying cyclic voltammetry, which provides information about the possible electrode reactions at different stages of polarization. (3) Applying AC impedance to support the result of tasks 1 and 2 at different stages of oxidation, and data analysis by means of equivalent circuits. Open circuit conditions as well as positive and negative polarization are used in the impedance measurements. (4) Surface analysis of the electrodes by SEM-EDX and X-ray diffraction. To obtain more information from electrochemical measurements a novel approach has been applied in cell design. In this two-electrode approach, one electrode is fully immersed, and the other is wetted by carbonate melt via an alumina tube which has a thin film on it. While camera observation of these two different electrode conditions will identify the effect of carbonate wetting on the state of the surface, electrochemical measurements enable a quantitative comparison between complete submersion and wetting by a film of carbonate.

  11. Improved MCFC performance with Li/Na/Ba/Ca carbonate electrolyte.

    SciTech Connect

    Centeno, C.-J.; Kaun, T. D.; Krumpelt, M.; Schoeler, A.

    1999-07-21

    Earlier electrolyte segregation tests of Li/Na carbonate used chemical analysis such as inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES) of matrix strips wetted with carbonate and exposed to 5- to 20-V potential gradients. A segregation factor was correlated to the Li/Na carbonate composition. While fairly substantial segregation occurs at the eutectic composition of 52% Li, it is minimal at 60% to 75% Li. Such lithium-rich Li/Na carbonates may not be practical because the melting points are too high (i.e., liquidus point is 625 C). By adding calcium and barium to the lithium/sodium carbonates, we were able to lower the melting point and maintain nonsegregating behavior. This work is directed at examining the long-term stability of the quaternary Li/Na/Ba/Ca electrolytes. Electrolyte optimization work evaluates Li/Na ratio and Ba/Ca level to improve cell performance at 320 mA/cm{sup 2} and reduce temperature sensitivity. A number of cells with quaternary Li/Na/Ba/Ca electrolytes ranging from 3 to 5% Ba/Ca have operated well with stable, long-term performance. Congruent melting carbonate is important for commercial development. The best so far is 3.5% Ba/Ca/Na/Li (3.5 mol%/3.5 mol% Ba/Ca) carbonate (m.p. 440 C). Performance at 160 mA/cm{sup 2} is increased up to 150mV as compared with the baseline cell containing the Li/Na eutectic composition. Life stability has been reproduced by a number of bench-scale MCFC test with operations of 2000-4300 h and the electrolyte composition across the matrix little changed.

  12. Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) porous electrode and kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Selman, J.R. )

    1992-10-01

    This report sumarizes a research project undertaken to improve the performance and understand the limitations of porous electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Using a novel MCFC rotating-disk'' electrode, the electrode kinetic and mass transfer properties of commonly used electrode materials were determined, and a practical performance model for MCFC electrodes was developed. The report also outlines a general strategy for designing a high-performance MCFC electrode, assesses the current understanding of porous electrode operation, and discusses some of the unresolved questions of the field. An appendix gives a complete list of the many theses, journal articles, and symposium contributions based on this research.

  13. Mathematical modeling of MCFC cells/stacks and networks

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.C.; Wimer, J.; Sudhoff, F.; Archer, D.

    1993-11-01

    In this paper, various (molten carbonate fuel cell) MCFC cell/stack and network arid system models available in the public domain are discussed. Parametric and phenomenological fuel cell mathematical models are being used to simulate individual MCFC cell/stack performance. With initial demonstration of full-area, full-height 250-kW to 2-MW MCFC power plants, the spatial configuration of the MCFC stacks into networks in the fuel cell power plant takes on new importance. MCFC network and power plant system flowsheet performance is being modeled using-the ASPEN system model. ASPEN is a tear and iterate flowsheet simulator in the public domain. ASPEN is suitable for MCFC network simulation since it has strong systems and property database capabilities. With emergence of larger MCFC power plant system demonstrations, system modeling of MCFC power plants is now essential. DOE routinely uses MCFC models in making performance comparisons and in decision-making.

  14. Mechanical strength of porous nickel plates containing lithium and their performance as the cathode for MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Goo; Yoon, Sung Pil; Han, Jonghee; Nam, Suk Woo; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Oh, In-Hwan; Hong, Seong-Ahn

    To improve the mechanical properties of MCFC cathode materials, pre-lithiated porous nickel plates containing 1-5 mol% of lithium were fabricated by the tape casting method, and the microstructures, mechanical properties, and performance was examined. The microstructure and pore distribution was not changed until the lithum content reached 3 mol%. The sample containing 5 mol% of lithium had patch structure on the skeleton and a smaller volume of primary pores. XRD analysis showed that lithium-containing porous nickel plates can easily form solid solutions without any undesirable byproducts after the oxidation. Both the bending strength and Young's modulus of the porous plates increased with the increase of lithium content. The average bending strengths of the samples containing 1, 3, and 5 mol% of lithium were 1.29, 1.33, and 1.49 kgf/mm 2 which were 2.9, 3.0, and 3.4 times higher than that of pure porous nickel plate. The Young's modulus increased up to 1.35 kgf/mm in the case of the 5 mol% lithium containing sample that is 5.4 times higher than that of pure porous nickel plate. The OCV of single cells using pre-lithiated cathodes were between 1.065 and 1.067 V, and comparable cell performance was obtained for 500 h of single cell operation.

  15. Performance of new 10 kW class MCFC using Li/K and Li/Na electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Mugikura, Yoshihiro; Yoshiba, Fumihiko; Izaki, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Takao

    1996-12-31

    The molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) uses generally mixture of lithium carbonate and potassium carbonate (Li/K) as the electrolyte. NiO cathode dissolution is one of serious problems for MCFC life. The NiO cathode has been found to dissolve into the electrolyte as Ni{sup 2+} ion which is reduced to metallic Ni by H{sub 2} in the fuel gas and bridges the anode and the cathode. The bridges short circuit and degrade cell performance and shorten cell life. Since solubility of NiO in mixture of lithium carbonate and sodium carbonate (Li/Na) is lower than in Li/K, it takes longer time to take place slowing by NiO cathode dissolution in Li/Na compared with in Li/K. The ionic conductivity of Li/Na is higher than of Li/K, however, oxygen solubility in Li/Na is lower 9 than in Li/K. A new 10 kW class MCFC stack composed of Li/K cells and Li/Na cells, was tested. Basic performance of the Li/K cells and Li/Na cells of the stack was reported.

  16. Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) porous electrode and kinetic studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Selman, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    This report sumarizes a research project undertaken to improve the performance and understand the limitations of porous electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Using a novel MCFC ``rotating-disk`` electrode, the electrode kinetic and mass transfer properties of commonly used electrode materials were determined, and a practical performance model for MCFC electrodes was developed. The report also outlines a general strategy for designing a high-performance MCFC electrode, assesses the current understanding of porous electrode operation, and discusses some of the unresolved questions of the field. An appendix gives a complete list of the many theses, journal articles, and symposium contributions based on this research.

  17. Prediction of temperature profile in MCFC stack

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kab Soo; Kim, Hwayong; Hong, Seong-An; Lim, Hee Chun

    1996-12-31

    A simple three dimensional model was developed to simulate the temperature distribution and the performance of various flow types of the MCFC stack. The objective of this study was to understand the complicated phenomena occurring in the MCFC stack and to supply the basic data for optimizing the operating condition of the MCFC stack. Assuming that the stack consists of a number of differential elements which have uniform temperature and gas composition, the model was solved by finite difference method. The performance of this model was demonstrated by comparing the calculated value with experimental data of the 1.5kW class co-flow type MCFC stack operated in KIST. This model can be utilized as a simple diagnostic tool in case of the operational abnormality such as the hot spot which often occurs inside the stack.

  18. MCFC diagnostics: HCl detection

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, B.A.; Oldenborgn, R.C.; Funk, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are being developed for large- scale power generation. One source of fuel is coal gasifiers, which presents the problem of coal gas contaminants and their effect on MCFC; HCl is the most serious and hence needs to be monitored. Different methods of detecting HCl in the gas phase were evaluated, and laser diode absorption is the most suitable. Temperature sensitivity and spectral interferences are discussed; it is shown that the P10 spectral line is the best. A diode for the P10 line is on order; experiments using the P5 line show the line to be unacceptable (overlap with CH{sub 4} line). Future planned work is outlined briefly. (DLC)

  19. MCFC diagnostics: HCl detection

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, B.A.; Oldenborgn, R.C.; Funk, D.J.

    1992-09-01

    Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are being developed for large- scale power generation. One source of fuel is coal gasifiers, which presents the problem of coal gas contaminants and their effect on MCFC; HCl is the most serious and hence needs to be monitored. Different methods of detecting HCl in the gas phase were evaluated, and laser diode absorption is the most suitable. Temperature sensitivity and spectral interferences are discussed; it is shown that the P10 spectral line is the best. A diode for the P10 line is on order; experiments using the P5 line show the line to be unacceptable (overlap with CH{sub 4} line). Future planned work is outlined briefly. (DLC)

  20. A compact MCFC power plant for industrial cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, P.

    1998-12-31

    Of all existing or emerging fuel cell technologies the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is specifically suited for stationary cogeneration applications in small to medium power range (several hundred kilowatts up to several megawatts). At a temperature level of 650 C the MCFC incorporates all the advantages of high temperature fuel cells: internal reforming of hydrocarbons for simplest system design and highest efficiency and useful high temperature heat for industrial steam generation, without having to cope with the problems of ceramic fuel cell manufacturing. The paper describes the fuel cell, the European MCFC development consortium, optimization by simplification and integration, scope of applications, and qualification and future development.

  1. MCFC and microturbine power plant simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orecchini, F.; Bocci, E.; Di Carlo, A.

    The consistent problem of the CO 2 emissions and the necessity to find new energy sources, are motivating the scientific research to use high efficiency electric energy production's technologies that could exploit renewable energy sources too. The molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) due to its high efficiencies and low emissions seems a valid alternative to the traditional plant. Moreover, the high operating temperature and pressure give the possibility to use a turbine at the bottom of the cells to produce further energy, increasing therefore the plant's efficiencies. The basic idea using this two kind of technologies (MCFC and microturbine), is to recover, via the microturbine, the necessary power for the compressor, that otherwise would remove a consistent part of the MCFC power generated. The purpose of this work is to develop the necessary models to analyze different plant configurations. In particular, it was studied a plant composed of a MCFC 500 kW Ansaldo at the top of a microturbine 100 kW Turbec. To study this plant it was necessary to develop: (i) MCFC mathematical model, that starting from the geometrical and thermofluidodynamic parameter of the cell, analyze the electrochemical reaction and shift reaction that take part in it; (ii) plate reformer model, a particular compact reformer that exploit the heat obtained by a catalytic combustion of the anode and part of cathode exhausts to reform methane and steam; and (iii) microturbine-compressor model that describe the efficiency and pressure ratio of the two machines as a function of the mass flow and rotational regime. The models developed was developed in Fortran language and interfaced in Chemcad © to analyze the power plant thermodynamic behavior. The results show a possible plant configuration with high electrical and global efficiency (over 50 and 74%).

  2. Status of MCFC stack technology at IHI

    SciTech Connect

    Hosaka, M.; Morita, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Otsubo, M.

    1996-12-31

    The molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) is a promising option for highly efficient power generation possible to enlarge. IHI has been studying parallel flow MCFC stacks with internal manifolds that have a large electrode area of 1m{sup 2}. IHI will make two 250 kW stacks for MW plant, and has begun to make cell components for the plant. To improve the stability of stack, soft corrugated plate used in the separator has been developed, and a way of gathering current from stacks has been studied. The DC output potential of the plant being very high, the design of electric insulation will be very important. A 20 kW short stack test was conducted in 1995 FY to certificate some of the improvements and components of the MW plant. These activities are presented below.

  3. Low cost MCFC anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

  4. Corrosion resistant materials in MCFC environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigeaud, A.; Yuh, C. Y.; Singh, P.

    A 24-month effort in the development of a corrosion resistant hardware material for molten carbonate fuel cell (MFC) application is described. The objective was to identify an inexpensive alloy for MCFC current collector/bipolar plate application. For this, 310S was selected as the base alloy composition and La, Ce and Si were added to improve corrosion resistance. Eight candidate alloys, including 310S and 316L, were screened in MCFC anode and cathode atmospheres. The techniques used include isothermal corrosion, acoustic emission, thermal cycling corrosion, thermogravimetric analyses, electrical surface resistance, and dual atmosphere corrosion testing. Oxide scales formed were analyzed by standard metallographic techniques. The results indicate that COLT-25+ and Crutemp-25 alloys (both containing 25Cr-25Ni and balance Fe) have the best corrosion resistance in the MCFC environment. Rare earth additives, La and Ce, do not appear to improve isothermal or thermal cycling resistance. Silicon addition appears to improve thermal cycling but not isothermal corrosion resistance. High Mn content (approx. 18%) appears detrimental based on this limited investigation. Currently used 316L has the least corrosion resistance of all the alloys tested. Pressurized tests have shown that high pressure (10 atm) reduces corrosion rate in the anode atmosphere whereas it only slightly affects corrosion rate in the cathode atmosphere.

  5. Studies of biomass fuelled MCFC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivisaari, Timo; Björnbom, Pehr; Sylwan, Christopher

    In the present work, the methods, techniques and results obtained during the studies of biomass fuelled molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) systems within the Swedish national fuel cell program are presented. The power plants are 60 MW class, utilising biomass (i.e. wood chips) as the primary fuel. The biomass is converted via pressurised gasification into a gaseous form that, after subsequent cleaning, can be used in the fuel cells. An investigation of the effects of gasification pressure, temperature and the influence of internal reforming on the overall system performance is presented. All studies were carried out using the Aspen Plus™ with Model Manager™ simulation package.

  6. Development of aluminized coatings for MCFC wet seal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y.; Singh, P.; Paetsch, L.; Maru, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    The molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) wet seal are has been found to experience accelerated corrosion in the presence of molten electrolyte because of simultaneous exposure to reducing and oxidizing atmospheres. Development of protective coatings plays an important role in minimizing this corrosion. Various aluminizing processes, such as flame spraying, slurry spraying, pack cementation, and ion vapor deposition, have been evaluated for their effectiveness. Continuous interdiffusion of aluminum and substrate Fe, Ni, and Cr occurred during high-temperature corrosion tests. Among the four aluminizing methods, ion-vapor deposition (IVD) with subsequent diffusion bonding appears to provide the most protective coating in the MCFC wet seal environment.

  7. The `advanced DIR-MCFC development' project, an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortbeek, P. J.; Ottervanger, R.

    An overview is given of the approach and mid-term status of the joint European `Advanced DIR-MCFC Development' project, in which BCN, BG plc, GDF, ECN, Stork, Schelde and Sydkraft co-operate. Hospitals are identified as an attractive initial market for cogeneration direct internal reforming-molten carbonate fuel cell (DIR-MCFC) systems in the size of 400 kWe. Innovative system and stack design concepts are being developed for this application. The `SMARTER' system, based on DIR stacks, combines high electric efficiency and a wide operational window with optimal system simplicity and low cost.

  8. MCFC product development test

    SciTech Connect

    Kush, A.K.; Leo, A.J.; O`Shea, T.P.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of the 2MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project is the demonstration of the direct carbonate fuel cell technology at full scale. Specific objectives of the project include the demonstration of advantages of the carbonate fuel cell power plant, such as high efficiency, low emissions, reactive power capability, and high reliability and availability. The project will also provide a design basis for pre-commercial power plants.

  9. Analysis and optimization of hybrid MCFC gas turbines plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunghi, Piero; Bove, Roberto; Desideri, Umberto

    High temperature fuel cells are electricity producers that guarantee relevant energetic and environmental performances. They feature high electricity to input chemical energy ratios and availability of high temperature heat. Notwithstanding, the search for a further increase in electric efficiency, especially when applying a CHP solution is not feasible, has brought to plant integration with gas turbines (GTs) in several studies and some pilot installations. While for pressurized fuel cells the choice of internal combustion gas turbines seem to be the only one feasible, in ambient pressure fuel cells it seems useful to analyze the combination with indirect heated GT. This choice allows to optimize turbine pressure ratio and cell size. In this work, a parametric performance evaluation of a hybrid molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) indirect heated gas turbine has been performed by varying the fuel cell section size and the fuel utilization coefficient. The analysis of performance variation with the latter parameter shows how a cell that is optimized for stand alone operation is not necessarily optimized for the integration in a hybrid cycle. Working with reduced utilization factors, in fact can reduce irreversible losses and does not necessarily yield to less electricity production since the heat produced in the post combustor is recovered by the gas turbine section. This aspect has not been taken into sufficient consideration in literature. The analysis illustrates the methodology to define new operating conditions so to allow global output and global efficiency maximization.

  10. Progress of MCFC stack technology at Toshiba

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, M.; Hayashi, T.; Shimizu, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Toshiba is working on the development of MCFC stack technology; improvement of cell characteristics, and establishment of separator technology. For the cell technology, Toshiba has concentrated on both the restraints of NiO cathode dissolution and electrolyte loss from cells, which are the critical issues to extend cell life in MCFC, and great progress has been made. On the other hand, recognizing that the separator is one of key elements in accomplishing reliable and cost-competitive MCFC stacks, Toshiba has been accelerating the technology establishment and verification of an advanced type separator. A sub-scale stack with such a separator was provided for an electric generating test, and has been operated for more than 10,000 hours. This paper presents several topics obtained through the technical activities in the MCFC field at Toshiba.

  11. MOLCARE development towards MCFC commercial power plants based on 500 kW standard modules

    SciTech Connect

    Torazza, A.; Dufour, A.; Perfumo, A.; Ricerche, A.; Gegundez, J.; Sanson, F.; Moreno, A.

    1998-07-01

    Fuel cells technologies for stationary applications are expected to play a remarkable role in the field of next decade energy production systems ranging from some hundreds kW to some MW. The interest in using fuel cells to produce electric energy comes from the advantages that fuel cells offer in terms of high efficiency, good behavior at base and partial load, very low emissions, modularity (easy adjustment of plant capacity to power-demand increase), and reduced time to be spent for plant erection. At least four types of fuel cells can be considered suitable for stationary applications. With reference to their electrolyte they can be classified as: Polymeric Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells (PAFC), Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFC) and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). Each of them works at a temperature level that is depending on the type of electrolyte. From a general point of view all the fuel cell technologies present, at various extents, the above listed advantages. Nevertheless specific features of each fuel cell type suggest to identify a specific field of application for each type of solution, in order to stress the potential advantages of any technology and minimize its possible drawbacks. Anyway the different level of maturity for the various fuel cell technologies does not allow an homogeneous comparison of technical and economical key parameters. PAFCs, due to their present commercial availability and operation experience, are well outlined in terms of performance and costs; on the contrary with regard to the other technologies--PEMFC, MCFC and SOFC--which are still under development, their commercialization is expected within a period of 7 to 13 years according to single technology maturity level (MCFC level seems to be more ready), kind of application, competitors, environmental constraints, etc.

  12. R&D of MCFC matrix for long term operation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Takashi; Fujita, Yoji; Urushibata, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Akira

    1996-12-31

    Long term operation is an essential subject in the commercialization of the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC). Material stability is important for the development of the MCFC. particularly for long term operation. In this paper, the specification and the stabilization of MCFC matrix arc investigated, with the aim of producing 40000 hours of operation. It is common knowledge that matrix thickness has a large influence on shorting time, as shorting is caused by the dissolution of the nickel oxide cathodes. Therefore, the optimum thickness of a matrix designed for 40000 hours operation without the nickel shorting was sought. The influences of different electrolytes and matrix specifications on the shorting time were measured with accelerated cell tests. The internal resistance of the matrix was also estimated. Gamma( {gamma} )-lithium aluminate (LiAlO{sub 2}) powder with a sub-micron particle diameter is commonly used for a raw material of matrix to retain molten carbonate electrolytes. This is because most researchers found that {gamma}-LiA1O{sub 2} was the most stable material in the MCFC environment among the three allotropic forms alpha ( {alpha} ), beta ( {beta} ), and {gamma}. However. two problems with the stability of {gamma} -LiAlO{sub 2} are being vigorously discussed. especially in Japan: particle growth causes decreasing electrolyte retention, and the transformation of {gamma} to {alpha}. This transformation contradicts the accepted opinion that {gamma} is the most stable form. In this paper, the particle growth and the phase transformation of LiAlO{sub 2} are examined with post-test analyses. The influence of matrix degradation on cell performance is also considered.

  13. The carbon dioxide concentrator by using MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kimihiko; Takei, Kenji; Tanimoto, Kazumi; Miyazaki, Yoshinori

    The removal characteristics of CO 2 in molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) were elucidated by the single cell whose electrode area was 81 cm 2 and electrolyte was 52Li 2CO 3/48Na 2CO 3. The experimental value of the CO 2 removal rate from cathode to anode was almost corresponding to the theoretical value. Cell voltage dropped drastically when concentration of CO 2 in cathode became 15% or less. This tendency showed strikingly, as concentration of O 2 in cathode became lower and lower. The cell performance is influenced with the pO 2/ pCO 2 ratio of the cathode gases, because cell voltage decreases by decreasing the pO 2/ pCO 2 ratio. Therefore, when the pO 2/ pCO 2 ratio is as low as the thermal power plant, it is necessary to add air to cathode for improving the cell performance. Consequently, the reduction target of CO 2 in COP3 can be achieved.

  14. Development of spinel forming alloys with improved electronic conductivity for MCFC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parezanović, I.; Strauch, E.; Spiegel, M.

    The molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC), as an alternative power source, present one of the most promising and environmental cleanest processes. As a high temperature fuel cell, problems arise due to corrosion of the metallic current collectors and voltage drop by formation of insulating corrosion products. The aim of this work is to develop Fe-Cr stainless steels, alloyed with different amounts of Mn, Co, Si, Ni, Mo, in order to obtain an acceptable thin corrosion scale with a low electrical resistivity by spinel formation. The formation of spinel layers as corrosion products, containing multivalent elements like Mn, Co and Mo is expected to give satisfactory results. In situ conductivity measurements and corrosion tests have been performed in the presence of a (Li, K) carbonate melt at 650 °C under an oxidizing gas atmosphere (15 vol.% CO 2 and synthetic air) up to 5000 h. Investigations of the corrosion scales on the hot rolled alloys indicated a solubility of Co and Mn in the spinel layer, formed under the simulated MCFC conditions. Outward diffusion of Mn and Co was observed after longer reaction times. An inner oxidation zone was also measured and connection between conductivity behaviour and the composition of this layers is found.

  15. Improvement of electricity generating performance and life expectancy of MCFC stack by applying Li/Na carbonate electrolyte. Test results and analysis of 0.44 m 2/10 kW- and 1.03 m 2/10 kW-class stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiba, Fumihiko; Morita, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Mugikura, Yoshihiro; Izaki, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Takao; Komoda, Mineo; Masuda, Yuji; Zaima, Nobuyuki

    . According to a comparison of the stack electricity generating performance of the 0.44 m 2 and the 1.03 m 2/10 kW-class stack under the same operating conditions, the performance of the 1.03 m 2 stack was lower at the beginning of the endurance test, however, its performance exceeded the performance of the 0.44 m 2/10 kW-class stack during the 10,000 h operating test. By carrying out the high current density operating test and the 10,000-hour endurance test using commercial sized 10 kW-class stacks, the stability of the MCFC stack with a Li/Na carbonate electrolyte and a press stamping separator has been proven.

  16. Test results of a 2 kW internal manifold MCFC stack

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H C; Seol, J H; Ahn, K S

    1996-01-01

    A R&D program on MCFC, of which current target is to establish the fundamental technology through fabricating a 2k-W stack with the performance higher than 0.8V at 150mA/cm{sup 2}, has been started since 1993. The program consisted of two phases : a AW class MCFC stack and the test facility will be constructed and operated during the first phase (1993-1996) and then a 100k-W MCFC system will be constructed in the second phase (1997-2002) on the basement of first phase results. From this strategy, KEPRI former the MCFC developing group with Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) and Samsung Heavy Industry (SHI) for fabricating, operating and evaluating of 2k-W MCFC stack. This paper presents the results of this first phase program and some of the problems experienced during its operation and fabrication of stack components. Specification of the stack under operation is shown in Table 1.

  17. Electrolyte loss in corrosion of 30Cr-45Ni-1Al-0.03 Y-Fe alloy for MCFC separator

    SciTech Connect

    Masamura, Katsumi; Ohe, Koichiro; Takemura, Masahiro

    1996-12-31

    To establish high performance of MCFC, a new high corrosion resistant alloy (30%Cr-45%Ni-1 %Al-0.03%Y-Fe) for MCFC separator has been developed. The developed alloy has good corrosion resistance for both anode and cathode environments. On the other hand, one of the main factors to determine the life time of MCFC stack is electrolyte loss. A potential danger of electrolyte loss cased by corrosion of metal components is pointed out. Basic mechanism of electrolyte loss is proposed according to following reactions. High Cr content alloy such as type 310S(25%Cr-20%Ni) has disadvantages in view of electrolyte loss in spite of high corrosion resistance. It is said that the dissolution of Cr ion into electrolyte is detrimental for electrolyte loss, because a mole of CrO{sub 4}{sup 2+} ion combines 2 moles of K{sup +} ions as K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}, while a mole of Fe{sup 3+} ion combine a mole of Li{sup +} ion as LiFeO{sub 2}. To understand the mechanism of electrolyte loss due to corrosion of metal component, the distribution of metal ions in oxide and molten salt were studied.

  18. Effects of system configuration and operating condition on MCFC system efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byoung Sam; Koh, Joon-Ho; Lim, Hee Chun

    A process simulation model of an externally reformed molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) system is used to analyze quantitatively parametric effects on system efficiency. In order to verify the MCFC process simulation model, a 25 kW system is analyzed on the basis of experimental data and its calculated efficiency is found to be reasonable. The overall system efficiency of a high-temperature fuel cell system, especially a MCFC, cannot be increased without proper thermal integration between the heat recovery units and without additional power from auxiliary power generation units such as turbines. The results of the simulation show that the configuration of the unit operators in a given system has a great effect on system efficiency, while system size and operating conditions have slightly less effects. Based on the system configuration, the optimal operating conditions (including fuel, oxidant utilization, and recycle ratio) can be specified to maximize the system efficiency.

  19. Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, T.G.; Camara, E.H.; Laurens, R.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    The overall program objective is the demonstration of a full-scale, full-height IMHEX {reg sign} molten carbonate fuel cell stack in a 250 kW dual-fuel power plant test on natural gas and simulated coal gas. Issues impeding development of manufacturing and testing facilities will be addressed in support of MCFC stack research and power plant development. Issues will be identified and resolved in engineering, manufacturing, assembling, cost, performance, and endurance of the stack repeat and non-repeat components. The program is being executed by M-C Power (MCP) and several major subcontractors.

  20. Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, T.G.; Camara, E.H.; Laurens, R.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1992-09-01

    The overall program objective is the demonstration of a full-scale, full-height IMHEX {reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell stack in a 250 kW dual-fuel power plant test on natural gas and simulated coal gas. Issues impeding development of manufacturing and testing facilities will be addressed in support of MCFC stack research and power plant development. Issues will be identified and resolved in engineering, manufacturing, assembling, cost, performance, and endurance of the stack repeat and non-repeat components. The program is being executed by M-C Power (MCP) and several major subcontractors.

  1. Development of 1000kW-class MCFC pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ooue, M.; Yasue, H.; Takasu, K.; Tsuchitori, T.

    1996-12-31

    This pilot plant is a part of the New Sunshine Program which has proceeded by the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. MCFC Research Association is entrusted with the development of the pilot plant, and constructing it at Kawagoe site. Following items will be verified by this pilot plant operation. (a) Development of 250kW class stack and confirmation of stack performance and decay rate. (b) System verification such as basic process, control system and operation characteristics, toward commercialization. (c) To get design data for demonstration plant.

  2. Wide range load controllable MCFC cycle with pressure swing operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiba, Fumihiko; Izaki, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Takao

    Partial load efficiencies of a natural gas fuelled MCFC/GT system are calculated; the efficiencies of four systems are compared. A constant pressure air compressor is applied in system cases 1 and 2, whereas a pressure swing air compressor is provided in system cases 3 and 4. A gas cooler is integrated in the cathode gas recycling line of cases 2-4, and an anode recycling with sub-reformer is provided in case 4. The cathode pressure loss in the MCFC stack is kept below 3 kPa during the calculation procedure to avoid a leakage of cathode gas. The range of the power load is limited to 50-100% in the constant operating pressure system (cases 1 and 2), mainly because of the limited cathode gas pressure loss of 3 kPa. The range of the power load is enlarged to 20-100% in cases 3 and 4 by combining the pressure swing operation with gas cooling in the cathode recycling line. In system cases 3 and 4, the efficiency at the lowest load operation (approx. 20-30% load) remains over 35% HHV-CH 4, whereas the maximum efficiency is calculated to be 53% HHV-CH 4 in middle load operation; the efficiency of case 4 at 100% load is estimated to be 50% HHV-CH 4. The combination of the pressure swing operation and gas cooling in the cathode recycling line offers a high efficiency of the MCFC system in a wide range of loads.

  3. Status of the M-C Power MCFC commercialization program

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, T.G.; Erickson, D.S.; Haugh, E.J.; Petri, R.J.

    1997-12-31

    M-C Power Corporation`s (MCP) mission is to commercialize molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plants based on an internally manifolded IMHEX stack concept patented by the Institute of Gas Technology. MCP has successfully scaled up the manufacturing and design of the MCFC technology to commercial area (1-m{sup 2}). Five commercial-area 20-kW stacks and two commercial-area 250-kW stack have been built and operated. A third commercial (250-kW) stack is being assembled. Continuous process improvements and yield increases have been demonstrated for the manufacturing run for each successive 250-kW stack. These improvements resulted in a 63% reduction in the cost of the active area components from the first to the third 250-kW stack. Concurrent with the production and testing of commercial-area fuel cell stacks, M-C Power has an ongoing effort to develop, test, and scale-up to commercial-area advanced component technologies that will enable M-C Power to meet cost and performance, and endurance goals. This effort focuses on developing lower cost stack components with improved endurance and performance and evaluating alternate manufacturing procedures and raw materials which significantly lower the stack costs. Following performance verification at the bench scale level, scale-up of the advanced component manufacturing processes to commercial-area has been ongoing in the past year.

  4. Long term operation of the 100-cm{sup 2} class single cell of MCFC

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, Kazumi; Yanagida, Masahiro; Kojima, Toshikatsu

    1996-12-31

    The R&D on Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is proceeding as one of the New Sun Shine Project sponsored by Japanese government. In ONRI (Osaka National Research Institute), the tested MCFCs were assembled with the state-of-the-art components and operated under the load condition for 40000 hours and 34000 hours. We analyzed the performance reduction.

  5. Research and development on porous components for MCFC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergaglio, E.; Sabattini, A.; Capobianco, P.

    A fuel cell is a complex system in which every single part must have optimal and long lasting characteristics to assure a good performance. Our research group has focused on a specific section of a cell, the porous components, the elements that directly come into play and more strongly influence the working and performance. Attention has been focused on matrix, in particular trying to improve it by intervening in the first step of raw powder choice. α-LiAlO 2 has been considered a new interesting and promising material to test. The purpose of this work is the study of the possibility of producing an α-LiAlO 2-based matrix with suitable properties for a MCFC cell. The subsequent steps of powder characterisation, tape preparation and final product analysis are presented as well as the various application techniques.

  6. ANL's development of conductive ceramic components for MCFC

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, G.H.; Brown, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    The emphasis of this project is to develop new, conductive ceramic materials and to produce structures from these materials for use as the components in the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The components under study include the cathode, anode, and interconnect, each of which is at a different stage of development. The cathode work focuses on assessing the viability of LiFeO{sub 2} as a replacement for the state-of-the-art NiO; this assessment relies on cell testing, with the performance data serving as the bases for component improvement. The anode studies seek to develop the required conductivity in a stable compound that exhibits little sensitivity to the range of anode oxygen partial pressures; this can be achieved through doping. The interconnect work emphasizes determining the effect of fuel and oxidant on conductivity, material properties, and structural integrity. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Modeling studies in support of the IMHEX MCFC commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Jewulski, J.R.; Resnick, G.L.; Hu, W.C.S.

    1998-07-01

    Performance modeling studies are a necessary and cost effective element of the IMHEX-MCFC stack commercialization. Technologix Corporation, in cooperation with M-C Power, has developed the algorithms and computer code for two of the models in addition to modifying the PSI model for applications specific to IMHEX fuel cell concept. Three performance models support the product development effort: a modified PSI model; a two-dimensional cross-flow cell model and a three-dimensional stack model. The sizing, number and location of the stack inter-coolers in a fuel cell stack are typical model application. Recently M-C Power modified its stack configuration to cross-flow. The cross-flow allows simplified repeat parts manufacturing and reduces the risk of gas crossover. The MCFC cross-flow model developed at M-C Power supports heat loss from the stack edges, variable fuel flow rate regions and variable oxidant flow rate regions (coupled with the optimization module) among other features. Extensive computational experiments were conducted in support of the cross-flow geometry development for the MCFC stack. The oxidant flow distribution optimization was used to mitigate the hardware temperature hot-spot typical for the cross-flow geometry. The hardware temperature hot-spot increases corrosion rate, electrolyte loss, and leads to deterioration of the long-term MCFC stack performance. Under the normal operating conditions, the maximum local temperature of the cell hardware should not exceed 960 K. The mathematical optimization software was applied to find the optimum flow distribution. The minimization of the maximum hardware temperature was defined as an optimization goal. The gas flow rate in each region was selected as independent variable subjected to optimization. In some cases the authors have also added a distance between the fuel inlet and the flow region divider to the list of independent variables. The total gas flow rates, inlet gas temperatures and compositions

  8. MCFC power plant with CO{sub 2} separation

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Noboru

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell power plant has been developed for many years with expectation of high system efficiency. In the meantime the gas turbine combined cycle has shown its considerable progress in improving system efficiency. Fuel cell power plant will no longer be attractive unless it exceeds the gas turbine combined cycle at least in the system efficiency. It is said CO{sub 2} separation could improve the efficiency of fuel cell power plant. IHI has developed the CO{sub 2} separator for fuel cell power plant. This study describes that the CO{sub 2} separator can increase the efficiency of the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plant by 5% and the expected efficiency reaches 63 % in HHV basis.

  9. Status of MCFC stack development at Hitachi

    SciTech Connect

    Takashima, S.; Kahara, T.; Takeuchi, M.

    1996-12-31

    Hitachi, Ltd. has been developing Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells in the New Sunshine project in Japan, and Hitachi is taking part in the development of 1,000kW MCFC pilot plant at Kawagoe. Hitachi is engaged in system planning of the 1,000kW pilot plant, design and manufacturing of the reformer subsystem and the fuel cell subsystem, and design and manufacturing of the 250kW stacks for the 1,000kW plant. The 250kW stacks are developed on the basis of the results of the 100kW stack in 1993 and the following 25kW stack in 1994. In parallel to the stack development, Hitachi is also conducting researches for long endurance cells and stacks. In addition to the researches for anode, cathode, electrolyte, and electrolyte matrix, improvement of temperature distribution in stacks is investigated to extend the stack life. This paper describes the planning status of the 250kW stacks for the 1,000kW MCFC plant and the developing status of stack cooling method for longer life.

  10. Ammonia synthesis and ER-MCFC-technology - a profitable combination?

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkema, G.P.J.; Vervoort, J.; Daniels, R.J.E.; Luteijn, C.P.

    1996-12-31

    Similar to stand-alone ER-MCFC power systems industrial ammonia production facilities include hydrogen-rich synthesis-gas production. Therefore, integration of ER-MCFC stacks in a conventional industrial ammonia plant was investigated. By preliminary process design calculations three promising process structures were evaluated: (1) ER-MCFC is fed by the ammonia plant`s steam-reformer; anode off-gas to firing (2) similar to structure 1; in this case the anode off-gas is redirected to the ammonia process (3) ER-MCFC is fed by ammonia-synthesis purge gas The results indicate that for options 1 and 3 a return-on-investment for the ER-MCFC of around 8% is achievable at a stack cost of $250/kW and a revenue of 7c/kWh. Option 2 is not profitable, because of the associated reduction in ammonia production. The degree of hydrogen-utilization in the ER-MCFC to be selected for maximum profit varies with the process structure and indicates that there is scope for ER-MCFC stacks which operate at low hydrogen-utilization.

  11. MCFC technology development at M-C Power and the Institute of Gas Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.S.; Haugh, E.J.; Ong, E.T.; Sishtla, C.I.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of M-C Power Corporation (MCP) is to design, develop, scale-up, and demonstrate commercial molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) stacks. In addition to stack manufacturing and power plant demonstrations, M-C Power, with the cooperation of the Institute of Gas Technology, is developing advanced cell component technologies. These advanced component technologies are designed to enable MCP to meet the cost per kilowatt and performance goals for the commercial MCFC power plants. Advanced component technologies which have reached the final stages of development prior to full-area manufacturing include a lower cost matrix and lower cost stabilized cathode. The development of advanced components capable of operating at market entry stack conditions including higher current densities (> 250 mA/cm{sup 2}) has been initiated. Initial bench scale test results at market entry conditions are encouraging.

  12. Steam reforming of ethanol on Ni/MgO catalysts: H 2 production for MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freni, S.; Cavallaro, S.; Mondello, N.; Spadaro, L.; Frusteri, F.

    H 2 production by ethanol steam reforming in simulating molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) conditions was explored. Ni/MgO catalysts exhibit very high selectivity to H 2 and CO 2 as a consequence of their low tendency to promote carbon monoxide methanation and ethanol decomposition reactions. Coke formation is strongly depressed due to the benefits induced by the use of basic carrier which positively modify the electronic properties of supported Ni.

  13. Operation characteristics of a multiple type MCFC

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroe, S.; Kamo, T.; Fujimura, H.; Kahara, T.

    1996-12-31

    Multiple type structure of MCFC of which the separator of the cell is divided by four element cells has been studied. For the stable operation of this type cell, the effect of gas flow rate and temperature distribution on the cell voltage should be clear. In order to clarify these characteristics, a small sized mimic model has been made and tested. The flow rate distribution for the four element cells were varied and cell voltage and temperature distribution were measured for each cell. The decrease in cell voltage and the increase in maximum temperature became remarkable when the apparent utilization factor for one element cell became over 100%. The calculated results agreed fairly good with test results.

  14. Analysis of Multi-step Forming of Metallic Bipolar Plate for MCFC Using Various Shapes of Preforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Ryu, Seung-Min; Yang, Dong-Yol; Kang, Dong-Woo; Chang, In-Gab; Lee, Tae-Won

    2010-06-01

    The metallic bipolar plates of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) consist of a shielded slot plate and a center plate. Among these, the shielded slot plate (the current collector) supports the Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) mechanically. The anode gases and the cathode gases pass through a space between individual slot patterns. The catalysts are located in the upper part of the shielded slot plate. Therefore, triple phase boundaries can be generated, and carbonate ions can act as the mobile charge carrier for the MCFC. Due to these properties, the shielded slot plate should have a sheared corrugated pattern. In order to form a sheared corrugated pattern, a slitting process is required during the first stage of the forming process. However, it is not possible to obtain a high aspect ratio in a sheared corrugated trapezoidal pattern due to the plastic strain concentration on the upper round region of the pattern. Therefore additional forming processes are required to form a high aspect-ratio pattern. For example, the two additional processes such as a "stretching process using a preform" and a "final forming process" can be done subsequent to the first slitting process. Before the final forming process, a stretching process, which forms an intermediate shape (perform), can make the strain distribution more uniform. Hence, various examples of performs were evaluated by using FEM simulation employing simplified boundary conditions. Finally, experiments involving microscopic and macroscopic observations using the proposed shape of a preform were conducted to characterize the formability of the sheared corrugated pattern. It was found that the numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Evaluation of volatile behaviour and the volatilization volume of molten salt in DIR-MCFC by using the image measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kimihiko; Yamauchi, Makoto; Tanimoto, Kazumi; Yoshitani, Yasumasa

    The volatilization of molten salt is one of the factors that control the performance of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC). Volatilization of molten salt promotes the cross-leakage and corrosion of metallic components. Moreover, pipe blockage is caused by the solidification of volatile matter. Especially, because reforming catalysts filling the anode channel are polluted by molten salt volatile matter in direct internal reforming molten carbonate fuel cells (DIR-MCFC), volatilizing of the molten salt is a weighty subject. However, neither the behaviour nor the volatilization volume of molten salt volatile matter has been elucidated, because molten salt volatile matter that has strong alkalinity cannot be supplied directly to an analyzer, its volatilization volume is small, and the analytical accuracy is poor. Therefore, an attempt was made to elucidate the behaviour of vaporized alkali hydroxide by using a non-contact image measurement technique. The DIR-MCFC electrolyte is generally 62Li 2CO 3/38K 2CO 3. Consideration was given to the DIR-MCFC catalyst pollution mechanism as follows. Molten salt volatile matter is KOH generated as water generated in the cell reacts with the electrolyte. The generated KOH returns to K 2CO 3 again in high CO 2 concentration regions, and catalyst pollution is caused by the adherence of the K 2CO 3 to the catalyst. Moreover, the K 2CO 3 particles mutually cohere when the generated water assists bonding and blocks the piping. The present report experimentally evaluates the volatilization volume of KOH, the change from KOH to K 2CO 3, and the particulate growth of K 2CO 3, using the image measurement technique. In measuring the KOH volatilization volume, K 2CO 3 is generated as KOH volatilized by heating it in a crucible in an electric furnace reacts with CO 2, and is then injected into a reaction tube. The amount of K 2CO 3 is measured by measuring the image of the K 2CO 3 particle with a YAG laser and a CCD camera, thereby obtaining

  16. MCFC integrated system in a biodiesel production process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbani, F.; Freni, S.; Galvagno, A.; Chiodo, V.

    2011-03-01

    The continuous increasing in biodiesel production by transesterification process is leading to an excess of glycerol production as a byproduct. The utilization of this huge amount of glycerol appears as a not easy solvable problem and thus several authors have proposed alternative ways. The integration of the main production process with a glycerol feed molten carbonate fuel cells bottoming cycle, to satisfy plant energy requirements, seems to be one of the most promising one. The proposed paper reports the main results obtained by authors in the framework of an investigation on a possible use of glycerol as energy sources for a real pilot plant for biodiesel production. An overall evaluation of worldwide biodiesel production plants was made and especially about the production capacity in European Union in the last decade. To make a more detailed study, authors were taken into account a real production plant. After a preliminary step, purported to plant mass and energy flows determination, authors considered the integration of a bottoming cycle based on: (i) steam reforming of glycerol for syn-gas production; (ii) molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) system supplied by syn-gas for heat and electricity production. A mathematical model, based on experimental data, has been developed to calculate mass and energy balances for the proposed plant lay-out as well as plant energy efficiency enhancement has been determined. Results have evidenced the feasibility of this process and demonstrated that plant integrated with bottoming cycle can reach a very high level of energy self-production.

  17. Endurance test on a single cell of a novel cathode material for MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, J.; González, T.; Escudero, M. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Daza, L.

    The molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) is expected to be an efficient device for the conversion of chemical energy in the near future. However, one of the major limits to the lifetime is the dissolution of the nickel oxide cathode in the electrolyte. This problem can be overcome by the addition of new compounds to the nickel oxide. In this way, the performance and the endurance of a new Ni-Ce cathode for MCFC has been tested and the results compared to a commercial nickel cathode. The polarisation curves were measured in order to check the degradation of the cell performance with time. The results showed a better performance with the novel cathode material (136 mW/cm 2 at 200 mA/cm 2 during 2100 h) than the commercial one (the voltage decreased from 120 to 108 mW/cm 2 at 150 mA/cm 2 in 1000 h). The better performance of Ni-Ce cathode with respect to the Ni one can be attributed to the good effect of cerium in the cathode. The change in the nickel crystalline structure reduces the dissolution of nickel in the electrolyte and implies a greater endurance of the cell. The current-voltage curves were measured and showed the same trend for both cells. Postmortem analyses were done in order to characterise the cells. As a conclusion, the addition of cerium can be beneficial to overcome the dissolution of the nickel cathode in the electrolyte, which is considered one of the major limits to the lifetime of a MCFC.

  18. Manufacturing method for tubular molten carbonate fuel cells and basic cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    The combination of syngas from gasification and high-temperature fuel cells is a candidate for high-efficiency power generation systems. Reducing the production cost of fuel cells and gas-cleaning devices is an important issue for commercial application. This study focuses on molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs), which are relatively durable against poisoning by impurities in syngas. However, the development of MCFC systems has come to a halt in Japan because the production cost of MCFCs made them commercially infeasible. To reduce the production cost significantly, a tubular MCFC has been developed instead of the conventional planar type. The tubular MCFC requires neither a complex separator nor cell components with high dimensional accuracy. However, there have been no reports about tubular MCFCs because the electrolytes used for these MCFCs are liquid, which makes it difficult to fasten the fuel cell stack without a fastener. In this study, a fastening method is developed by using the self-shrinking effect of anodes during sintering. Using this technique, the tubular MCFC was successfully manufactured. The results of a power generation test for 1000 h show that the cell voltage was kept stable. Moreover, the cell performance was close to that of a conventional planar MCFC.

  19. The influence of powders on the final properties of the porous components for MCFC application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabattini, A.; Bergaglio, E.

    A fuel cell life time and its correct working are strongly dependent on its main components characteristics: anode, cathode and matrix. The required performances are directly correlated to two very important parameters: porosity and average pore diameter. In particular the influence of raw powders on MCFC anode porosimetric properties was studied. Ni-Al spherical and non-spherical powders were tested for anode production and the final samples were analysed by mercury porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray.

  20. Experimental analysis of heat transfer mechanism in MCFC

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, K.; Naruse, I.; Ohtake, K.

    1998-07-01

    Characteristics of heat transfer in Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells(MCFC) installed with offset-type fins are studied by using a fuel cell model consisting of electrodes, a perforated plate and a corrugated current collector. In this study the effect of several kinds of reacting gas on heat transfer characteristics is elucidated by measuring gas and surface temperatures, gas species composition, cell components and vertical heat flux. As a result, Wieting's equation to evaluate heat transfer characteristics in heat exchangers is not appropriate to the MCFC since Reynolds number in operating the MCFC is far less than the applicable range of the equation. Most of the vertical heat flux is controlled by heat conduction in the cell components. The convective heat transfer coefficient depends on kinds of gas species rather than the gas flow rate. Thermal properties affect the convective heat transfer coefficient. Especially, the vertical heat flux increases with an increase of H{sub 2} concentration. The obtained fundamental results can elucidate phenomena of heat transfer in practical MCFC appropriately.

  1. Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The following tasks are included in this project: Commercialization; Power plant development; Manufacturing facilities development; Test facility development; Stack research; and Advanced research and technology development. This report briefly describes the subtasks still to be completed: Power plant system test with reformed natural gas; Upgrading of existing, US government-owned, test facilities; and Advanced MCFC component research.

  2. Performance, Performance System, and High Performance System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Hwan Young

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes needed transitions in the field of human performance technology. The following three transitions are discussed: transitioning from training to performance, transitioning from performance to performance system, and transitioning from learning organization to high performance system. A proposed framework that comprises…

  3. Potassium improved stability of Ni/MgO in the steam reforming of ethanol for the production of hydrogen for MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frusteri, F.; Freni, S.; Chiodo, V.; Spadaro, L.; Bonura, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    The catalytic behavior of the bare and K-promoted 21% Ni/MgO catalyst in the ethanol steam reforming at MCFC operative conditions has been investigated. The effect of K loading (1-3 wt.%) on the catalytic activity, stability and coking rate have been addressed. K addition stabilizes Ni catalyst mainly by depressing the metal sintering, while coke formation does not seem to be influenced by alkali addition. Endurance test (500 h -1) performed at 20,000 h -1 allows foresee a very long catalyst life in the case of practical application. High H 2 productivity (>5 mol H 2/mol fed ethanol) was obtained. A change in the electronic properties of the active phase accounts for the effect of K addition on the catalytic behavior of the Ni/MgO catalyst.

  4. Operation result of 40kW class MCFC pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Hatori, S.; Hosaka, M.; Uematsu, H.

    1996-12-31

    Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. developed unique Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) system based on our original concept. To demonstrate the possibility of this system, based on MCFC technology of consigned research from New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) in Japan, we designed 40kW class MCFC pilot plant which had all equipments required as a power plant and constructed in our TO-2 Technical Center. This paper presents the test results of the plant.

  5. Development of a new electrolyte matrix for MCFC

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, I.; Higaki, K.; Terada, S.; Suemitsu, T.

    1996-12-31

    To prolong the life of cell is one of the most important issues for MCFC to be brought into actual application. In this respect, investigators have been proposing the addition of tungstate salt such as K2WO4 into MCFC electrolyte, which is supposed effectively to reduce the sintering of anode probably by precipitates formed through the reduction of tungstate with dissolved hydrogen near the anode surface. In this research, such effect upon sintering of anode was quantitatively examined by out-of-cell tests and the validity of above assumption for the mechanism was confirmed. Also other effects of tungstate salt addition into electrolyte, such upon corrosion of separator, solubility of cathode, stability of matrix substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}) were investigated.

  6. Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-30

    The objective of the main project is to identify the current developmental status of MCFC systems and address those technical issues that need to be resolved to move the technology from its current status to the demonstration stage in the shortest possible time. The specific objectives are separated into five major tasks as follows: Stack research; Power plant development; Test facilities development; Manufacturing facilities development; and Commercialization. This Final Report discusses the M-C power Corporation effort which is part of a general program for the development of commercial MCFC systems. This final report covers the entire subject of the Unocal 250-cell stack. Certain project activities have been funded by organizations other than DOE and are included in this report to provide a comprehensive overview of the work accomplished.

  7. A simple high-performance matrix-free biomass molten carbonate fuel cell without CO2 recirculation

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2016-01-01

    In previous reports, flowing CO2 at the cathode is essential for either conventional molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) based on molten carbonate/LiAlO2 electrolytes or matrix-free MCFCs. For the first time, we demonstrate a high-performance matrix-free MCFC without CO2 recirculation. At 800°C, power densities of 430 and 410 mW/cm2 are achieved when biomass—bamboo charcoal and wood, respectively–is used as fuel. At 600°C, a stable performance is observed during the measured 90 hours after the initial degradation. In this MCFC, CO2 is produced at the anode when carbon-containing fuels are used. The produced CO2 then dissolves and diffuses to the cathode to react with oxygen in open air, forming the required CO32− or CO42− ions for continuous operation. The dissolved O2− ions may also take part in the cell reactions. This provides a simple new fuel cell technology to directly convert carbon-containing fuels such as carbon and biomass into electricity with high efficiency. PMID:27540588

  8. A simple high-performance matrix-free biomass molten carbonate fuel cell without CO2 recirculation.

    PubMed

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2016-08-01

    In previous reports, flowing CO2 at the cathode is essential for either conventional molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) based on molten carbonate/LiAlO2 electrolytes or matrix-free MCFCs. For the first time, we demonstrate a high-performance matrix-free MCFC without CO2 recirculation. At 800°C, power densities of 430 and 410 mW/cm(2) are achieved when biomass-bamboo charcoal and wood, respectively-is used as fuel. At 600°C, a stable performance is observed during the measured 90 hours after the initial degradation. In this MCFC, CO2 is produced at the anode when carbon-containing fuels are used. The produced CO2 then dissolves and diffuses to the cathode to react with oxygen in open air, forming the required [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] ions for continuous operation. The dissolved [Formula: see text] ions may also take part in the cell reactions. This provides a simple new fuel cell technology to directly convert carbon-containing fuels such as carbon and biomass into electricity with high efficiency. PMID:27540588

  9. High performance polymer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    The term high performance as applied to polymers is generally associated with polymers that operate at high temperatures. High performance is used to describe polymers that perform at temperatures of 177 C or higher. In addition to temperature, other factors obviously influence the performance of polymers such as thermal cycling, stress level, and environmental effects. Some recent developments at NASA Langley in polyimides, poly(arylene ethers), and acetylenic terminated materials are discussed. The high performance/high temperature polymers discussed are representative of the type of work underway at NASA Langley Research Center. Further improvement in these materials as well as the development of new polymers will provide technology to help meet NASA future needs in high performance/high temperature applications. In addition, because of the combination of properties offered by many of these polymers, they should find use in many other applications.

  10. Demonstration of direct internal reforming for MCFC power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Aasberg-Petersen, K.; Christensen, P.S.; Winther, S.K.

    1996-12-31

    The conversion of methane into hydrogen for an MCFC by steam reforming is accomplished either externally or internally in the stack. In the case of external reforming the plant electrical efficiency is 5% abs. lower mainly because more parasitic power is required for air compression for stack cooling. Furthermore, heat produced in the stack must be transferred to the external reformer to drive the endothermic steam reforming reaction giving a more complex plant lay-out. A more suitable and cost effective approach is to use internal steam reforming of methane. Internal reforming may be accomplished either by Indirect Internal Reforming (DIR) and Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) in series or by DIR-only as illustrated. To avoid carbon formation in the anode compartment higher hydrocarbons in the feedstock are converted into hydrogen, methane and carbon oxides by reaction with steam in ail adiabatic prereformer upstream the fuel cell stack. This paper discusses key elements of the desire of both types of internal reforming and presents data from pilot plants with a combined total of more than 10,000 operating hours. The project is being carried out as part of the activities of the European MCFC Consortium ARGE.

  11. Thermodynamic performance analysis of a molten carbonate fuel cell at very high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramandi, M. Y.; Dincer, I.

    2011-10-01

    This study is basically composed of two sections. In the first section, a CFD analysis is used to provide a better insight to molten carbonate fuel cell operation and performance characteristics at very high current densities. Therefore, a mathematical model is developed by employing mass and momentum conservation, electrochemical reaction mechanisms and electric charges. The model results are then compared with the available data for an MCFC unit, and a good agreement is observed. In addition, the model is applied to predict the unit cell behaviour at various operating pressures, temperatures, and cathode gas stoichiometric ratios. In the second section, a thermodynamic model is utilized to examine energy efficiency, exergy efficiency and entropy generation of the MCFC. At low current densities, no considerable difference in output voltage and power is observed; however, for greater values of current densities, the difference is not negligible. If the molten carbonate fuel cell is to operate at current densities smaller than 2500 A m-2, there is no point to pressurize the system. If the fuel cell operates at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure, the unit cell cost could be minimized. In addition, various partial pressure ratios at the cathode side demonstrated nearly the same effect on the performance of the fuel cell. With a 60 K change in operating temperature, almost 10% improvement in energy and exergy efficiencies is obtained. Both efficiencies initially increase at lower current densities and then reach their maximum values and ultimately decrease with the increase of current density. By elevating the pressure, both energy and exergy efficiencies of the cell enhance. In addition, higher operating pressure and temperature decrease the unit cell entropy generation.

  12. Impact on soot control measures on MCFC powerplants. Task report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, D.P.

    1980-12-12

    Physical Sciences Inc. has performed a preliminary evaluation of the effects of soot control measures on the molten carbonate fuel cell powerplant. Soot control measures are required because of the temperature and humidity restrictions imposed on the system by the low temperature gas cleanup system. The system configuration chosen is the General Electric System 1 configuration. This system uses a Texaco, oxygen blown gasifier and a low temperature (Selexol) gas cleanup system. The pressure of this portion of the system is about 600 psi which drops to 500 psi at the exit of the gas cleanup system. The gas which at this point has dew point of 100/sup 0/F is expanded to about 105 psi. At this point, steam is injected. The function of this steam is to suppress soot formation both in the anode inlet preheater and in the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode. GE alludes that the function of the steam may also be to optimize the output of the steam turbines. Upon leaving the anode, the sensible heat in the anode exhaust is used to regeneratively preheat the anode inlet gas. Finally, the anode exhaust is fed to a catalytic combustor via a compressor. The combustor effluent is mixed with fresh cathode inlet air. This stream is then mixed with cathode exhaust recycle. The resulting mixture is fed to the MCFC cathode. The cathode exhaust is split into recycle and system exhaust streams. About 77% of the cathode exhaust is recycled. The system exhaust is expanded through a gas turbine, a regenerative heat exchanger and an economizer. Results of the study are reported. (WHK)

  13. High performance systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.B.

    1995-03-01

    This document provides a written compilation of the presentations and viewgraphs from the 1994 Conference on High Speed Computing given at the High Speed Computing Conference, {open_quotes}High Performance Systems,{close_quotes} held at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, on April 18 through 21, 1994.

  14. High Performance Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venumbaka, Sreenivasulu R.; Cassidy, Patrick E.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes results from research on high performance polymers. The research areas proposed in this report include: 1) Effort to improve the synthesis and to understand and replicate the dielectric behavior of 6HC17-PEK; 2) Continue preparation and evaluation of flexible, low dielectric silicon- and fluorine- containing polymers with improved toughness; and 3) Synthesis and characterization of high performance polymers containing the spirodilactam moiety.

  15. The behavior of MCFCs using Li/K and Li/Na carbonates as the electrolyte at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, M.; Mugikura, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Ota, T.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-08-01

    High operating pressure, about 12--25 atm, is required to develop a highly efficient molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) plant system combined with a gas turbine or coal gasifier system. Operation at high pressure, over 10 atm, will accelerate dissolution of the NiO cathode and shorten cell life. Therefore, economical applicability as a high-pressure and high-efficiency MCFC plant system and the economical requirement of cell life time must be totally investigated. It is very important to clarify the performance of the MCFC under such high pressures as the first step for such an investigation. The authors have examined the performance of several MCFC cells using Li/K and Li/Na electrolyte at pressures of up to 44.5 atm, avoiding possible carbon formation in the fuel stream. The analysis method for cell performance developed below 7 atm pressure conditions has proved applicable for analyzing cell performance over 10 atm. The smaller cathode polarization concerned with CO{sub 2} concentration and the higher conductivity of the Li/Na electrolyte enabled a higher performance than that of a Li/K cell. Application of the Li/Na electrolyte to MCFCs seems to be an effective way of prolonging cell life with measurements of the small amount of deposited nickel. Furthermore, the Li/Na cell attained 3.3 kW/m{sup 2} power density, and a high cell voltage (0.82 V) was obtained at 400 mA/cm{sup 2} in 16 atm. This result shows the possibility of developing a high-efficiency MCFC plant system.

  16. Development of advanced concepts for DIR-MCFC cogeneration applications in the European Market

    SciTech Connect

    Kortbeek, P.J.; Ottervanger, R.G.; Dicks, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Early 1996 a three year (1996 - 1998) joint European project was launched under the name {open_quote}Advanced DIR-MCFC Development{close_quote}, aiming at the development of Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) systems for cogeneration applications for the European market. In this project participate: Brandstofcel Nederland BV (BCN), British Gas pic (BG), Gaz de France (GDF), Netherlands Energy Research foundation (ECN), Stork, Royal Schelde and Sydkraft AB. The European Fuel Cell User Group (EFCUG) supports the project as an advisory board. Whereas the US and Japanese programmes are aimed at large-scale demonstrations of the MCFC technology, this project focusses on the development of concepts and technology, required for MCFC systems that will be competative on the cogeneration market. The project partners provide the essential expertise: from end-user, system engineering, stack development up to fundamental material research.

  17. High performance polymeric foams

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L.; Iannace, S.

    2008-08-28

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy.

  18. High performance parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E. )

    1989-09-01

    In this paper the author describes current high performance parallel computer architectures. A taxonomy is presented to show computer architecture from the user programmer's point-of-view. The effects of the taxonomy upon the programming model are described. Some current architectures are described with respect to the taxonomy. Finally, some predictions about future systems are presented. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  19. High-Performance Happy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Charlene

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, the high-performance computing (HPC) systems used to conduct research at universities have amounted to silos of technology scattered across the campus and falling under the purview of the researchers themselves. This article reports that a growing number of universities are now taking over the management of those systems and…

  20. Study of LiFeO 2 coated NiO as cathodes for MCFC by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bo; Yu, Qing-chun; Wang, Hui-min; Chen, Gang; Hu, Ke-ao

    LiFeO 2 was coated on porous NiO cathode using a simple combustion process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed in the cathode characterizations. The electrochemical behaviors of LiFeO 2 coated NiO cathode (LFO-NiO) were also evaluated in a molten 62 mol% Li 2CO 3 + 38 mol% K 2CO 3 eutectic at 650 °C under the standard cathode gas condition by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The impedance response of the NiO and LFO-NiO at different immersion time is characterized by the presence of depressed semicircles in the high frequency range changing over into the lines with the angle of which observed with the real axis differing 45° or 90° in the low frequency range. The experimental Nyquist plots can be well analyzed theoretically with a modified model based on the well known Randles-Ershler equivalent circuit model. In the new model, the double layer capacity ( Cd) is replaced by the parallel combination of Cd and b/ ω to take into consideration the non-uniform of electric field at the electrode/electrolyte interface owing to the roughness of electrode surface. The LFO-NiO showed a lower dissolution and a good catalytic efficiency close to the state-of-the-art NiO value. In the unit cell test, the performance of the cell composed of LiFeO 2 coated NiO cathode maintained more stable values than that of the cell composed of NiO cathode. Thus the cathode prepared with coating method to coat LiFeO 2 on the surface of NiO cathode is able to reduce the solubility of NiO to lengthen the lifetime of MCFC while maintaining the advantages of NiO cathode.

  1. Performance model of molten carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, S.; Sasaki, A.; Urushibata, H.; Tanaka, T. )

    1990-06-01

    A performance model of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), that is an electrochemical energy conversion device for electric power generation, is discussed. The authors' purpose is to improve the presumptive ability of the MCFC model and to investigate the impact of MCFC characteristics in fuel cell system simulations. Basic data are obtained experimentally by single-cell tests. The authors pay special attention to the MCFC overall characteristics with respect to oxidant composition. A correlation formula based on the experimental data is derived as for the cell voltage, oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures. After three types of the MCFC system option are assumed, trade-off studies are made dependant on the performance models.

  2. High Performance, Dependable Multiprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos, Jeremy; Samson, John R.; Troxel, Ian; Subramaniyan, Rajagopal; Jacobs, Adam; Greco, James; Cieslewski, Grzegorz; Curreri, John; Fischer, Michael; Grobelny, Eric; George, Alan; Aggarwal, Vikas; Patel, Minesh; Some, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    With the ever increasing demand for higher bandwidth and processing capacity of today's space exploration, space science, and defense missions, the ability to efficiently apply commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) processors for on-board computing is now a critical need. In response to this need, NASA's New Millennium Program office has commissioned the development of Dependable Multiprocessor (DM) technology for use in payload and robotic missions. The Dependable Multiprocessor technology is a COTS-based, power efficient, high performance, highly dependable, fault tolerant cluster computer. To date, Honeywell has successfully demonstrated a TRL4 prototype of the Dependable Multiprocessor [I], and is now working on the development of a TRLS prototype. For the present effort Honeywell has teamed up with the University of Florida's High-performance Computing and Simulation (HCS) Lab, and together the team has demonstrated major elements of the Dependable Multiprocessor TRLS system.

  3. High performance steam development

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

    1995-12-31

    DOE has launched a program to make a step change in power plant to 1500 F steam, since the highest possible performance gains can be achieved in a 1500 F steam system when using a topping turbine in a back pressure steam turbine for cogeneration. A 500-hour proof-of-concept steam generator test module was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested. It has four once-through steam generator circuits. The complete HPSS (high performance steam system) was tested above 1500 F and 1500 psig for over 102 hours at full power.

  4. High Performance FORTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush

    1994-01-01

    High performance FORTRAN is a set of extensions for FORTRAN 90 designed to allow specification of data parallel algorithms. The programmer annotates the program with distribution directives to specify the desired layout of data. The underlying programming model provides a global name space and a single thread of control. Explicitly parallel constructs allow the expression of fairly controlled forms of parallelism in particular data parallelism. Thus the code is specified in a high level portable manner with no explicit tasking or communication statements. The goal is to allow architecture specific compilers to generate efficient code for a wide variety of architectures including SIMD, MIMD shared and distributed memory machines.

  5. High Performance Window Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Hun, Diana E; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2013-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and Traco partnered to develop high-performance windows for commercial building that are cost-effective. The main performance requirement for these windows was that they needed to have an R-value of at least 5 ft2 F h/Btu. This project seeks to quantify the potential energy savings from installing these windows in commercial buildings that are at least 20 years old. To this end, we are conducting evaluations at a two-story test facility that is representative of a commercial building from the 1980s, and are gathering measurements on the performance of its windows before and after double-pane, clear-glazed units are upgraded with R5 windows. Additionally, we will use these data to calibrate EnergyPlus models that we will allow us to extrapolate results to other climates. Findings from this project will provide empirical data on the benefits from high-performance windows, which will help promote their adoption in new and existing commercial buildings. This report describes the experimental setup, and includes some of the field and simulation results.

  6. High Performance Buildings Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The High Performance Buildings Database is a shared resource for the building industry, a unique central repository of in-depth information and data on high-performance, green building projects across the United States and abroad. The database includes information on the energy use, environmental performance, design process, finances, and other aspects of each project. Members of the design and construction teams are listed, as are sources for additional information. In total, up to twelve screens of detailed information are provided for each project profile. Projects range in size from small single-family homes or tenant fit-outs within buildings to large commercial and institutional buildings and even entire campuses. The database is a data repository as well. A series of Web-based data-entry templates allows anyone to enter information about a building project into the database. Once a project has been submitted, each of the partner organizations can review the entry and choose whether or not to publish that particular project on its own Web site.

  7. High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talcott, Stephen

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has many applications in food chemistry. Food components that have been analyzed with HPLC include organic acids, vitamins, amino acids, sugars, nitrosamines, certain pesticides, metabolites, fatty acids, aflatoxins, pigments, and certain food additives. Unlike gas chromatography, it is not necessary for the compound being analyzed to be volatile. It is necessary, however, for the compounds to have some solubility in the mobile phase. It is important that the solubilized samples for injection be free from all particulate matter, so centrifugation and filtration are common procedures. Also, solid-phase extraction is used commonly in sample preparation to remove interfering compounds from the sample matrix prior to HPLC analysis.

  8. High Performance Work Practices and Firm Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Labor, Washington, DC. Office of the American Workplace.

    A literature survey established that a substantial amount of research has been conducted on the relationship between productivity and the following specific high performance work practices: employee involvement in decision making, compensation linked to firm or worker performance, and training. According to these studies, high performance work…

  9. Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC): Structure and operation

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The main components of an individual cell are the anode, the cathode, and the molten carbonate electrolyte. Electrode materials are usually porous nickel alloys for reducing atmospheres (anode) and nickel oxide for oxidizing atmospheres (cathode). The electrolyte, typically a combination of molten, alkali (Li, K, Na) carbonates, is contained within a porous ceramic matrix, commonly made of lithium aluminate (LiAlO{sub 2}). The molten carbonate electrolyte, sandwiched between the anode and cathode, partially fills these porous electrodes. Electrochemical reactions take place at a three-phase interface formed by the electrolyte, the electrodes, and the gas streams. Carbonate ions are formed at an oxidant/electrolyte interface in the cathode and are transported through the electrolyte to a fuel/electrolyte interface in the anode. There, the carbonate ions react with the fuel, releasing electrons into the anode. The electrons then travel through an external circuit and through the load, suffering a voltage drop. Finally, the circuit is completed as the electrons return to the cathode. The paper gives data on MCFC efficiency and NO{sub x} emissions compared with engines and turbines.

  10. High performance sapphire windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.; Liou, Larry

    1993-01-01

    High-quality, wide-aperture optical access is usually required for the advanced laser diagnostics that can now make a wide variety of non-intrusive measurements of combustion processes. Specially processed and mounted sapphire windows are proposed to provide this optical access to extreme environment. Through surface treatments and proper thermal stress design, single crystal sapphire can be a mechanically equivalent replacement for high strength steel. A prototype sapphire window and mounting system have been developed in a successful NASA SBIR Phase 1 project. A large and reliable increase in sapphire design strength (as much as 10x) has been achieved, and the initial specifications necessary for these gains have been defined. Failure testing of small windows has conclusively demonstrated the increased sapphire strength, indicating that a nearly flawless surface polish is the primary cause of strengthening, while an unusual mounting arrangement also significantly contributes to a larger effective strength. Phase 2 work will complete specification and demonstration of these windows, and will fabricate a set for use at NASA. The enhanced capabilities of these high performance sapphire windows will lead to many diagnostic capabilities not previously possible, as well as new applications for sapphire.

  11. High Performance Work Systems and Firm Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kling, Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    A review of 17 studies of high-performance work systems concludes that benefits of employee involvement, skill training, and other high-performance work practices tend to be greater when new methods are adopted as part of a consistent whole. (Author)

  12. Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) product development test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-02-01

    M-C Power Corporation will design, fabricate, install, test, and evaluate a 250 kW Proof-of-Concept Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Power Plant. The plant is to be located at the Naval Air Station Miramar in San Diego, California. This report summarizes the technical progress that has occurred in conjunction with this project in 1994. M-C Power has completed the tape casting and sintering of cathodes and is proceeding with the tape casting and sintering of anodes for the first 250 cell stack. M-C Power and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) relocated the fuel cell demonstration project to an alternate site at the Naval Air Station Miramar. For the new project location, an Environmental Assessment has been prepared by the Department of Energy in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. The Environmental Assessment resulted in a categorical exclusion of the proposed action from all environmental permit requirements. Bechtel Corporation has completed the reformer process design coordination, a Process Description, the Pipe and Instrumentation Diagrams, a Design Criteria Document and General Project Requirement Document. Bechtel developed the requirements for soils investigation report and issued the following equipment bid packages to the suppliers for bids: inverter, reformer, desulfurization vessels, hot gas recycle blower, heat recovery steam generator, and recycle gas cooler. SDG&E has secured necessary site permits, conducted soils investigations, and is working on the construction plan. They are in final negotiations with the US Navy on a site agreement. Site drawings are required for finalization of the agreement.

  13. High Performance Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Jesse E

    2012-08-10

    Network Monitoring requires a substantial use of data and error analysis to overcome issues with clusters. Zenoss and Splunk help to monitor system log messages that are reporting issues about the clusters to monitoring services. Infiniband infrastructure on a number of clusters upgraded to ibmon2. ibmon2 requires different filters to report errors to system administrators. Focus for this summer is to: (1) Implement ibmon2 filters on monitoring boxes to report system errors to system administrators using Zenoss and Splunk; (2) Modify and improve scripts for monitoring and administrative usage; (3) Learn more about networks including services and maintenance for high performance computing systems; and (4) Gain a life experience working with professionals under real world situations. Filters were created to account for clusters running ibmon2 v1.0.0-1 10 Filters currently implemented for ibmon2 using Python. Filters look for threshold of port counters. Over certain counts, filters report errors to on-call system administrators and modifies grid to show local host with issue.

  14. Advanced component development of MCFC technology at M-C Power

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.S.; Haugh, E.J.; Benjamin, T.G.

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power Corporation (MCP) was founded in 1987 to commercialize Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) stacks. The first generation of active area cell components were successfully scaled-up from the 100-cm{sup 2} area laboratory scale to continuous production of commercial-area (1-m) components. These components have been tested in five commercial-area subscale (20-kW) stacks and one commercial-scale (250-kW) stack. The second 250 kW stack is being installed in the power plant for operation in late 1996 and components have already been manufactured for the third 250-kW stack which is scheduled to go on-line in the middle of 1997. Concurrent with commercial-area (1-m{sup 2}) active component manufacturing has been an ongoing effort to develop and test advanced component technologies that will enable MCP to meet its future cost and performance goals. The primary goal is to lower the total cell package cost, while attaining improvements in cell performance and endurance. This work is being completed through analysis of the cost drivers for raw materials and manufacturing techniques. A program is in place to verify the performance of the lower cost materials through pressurized (3 atm) bench scale (100-cm{sup 2}) cell tests. Bench-scale cell testing of advanced active area components has shown that simultaneous cost reduction and improvements in the performance and endurance are attainable. Following performance verification at the bench scale level, scale-up of the advanced component manufacturing processes to commercial-area has been ongoing in the past year. The following sections discuss some of the performance improvements and reductions in cost that have been realized.

  15. Commoditization of High Performance Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Studham, Scott S.

    2004-04-01

    The commoditization of high performance computers started in the late 80s with the attack of the killer micros. Previously, high performance computers were exotic vector systems that could only be afforded by an illustrious few. Now everyone has a supercomputer composed of clusters of commodity processors. A similar commoditization of high performance storage has begun. Commodity disks are being used for high performance storage, enabling a paradigm change in storage and significantly changing the price point of high volume storage.

  16. High Performance Computing Today

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, Jack; Meuer,Hans; Simon,Horst D.; Strohmaier,Erich

    2000-04-01

    In last 50 years, the field of scientific computing has seen a rapid change of vendors, architectures, technologies and the usage of systems. Despite all these changes the evolution of performance on a large scale however seems to be a very steady and continuous process. Moore's Law is often cited in this context. If the authors plot the peak performance of various computers of the last 5 decades in Figure 1 that could have been called the supercomputers of their time they indeed see how well this law holds for almost the complete lifespan of modern computing. On average they see an increase in performance of two magnitudes of order every decade.

  17. Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant systems verification. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The following tasks are included in this project: Commercialization; Power plant development; Manufacturing facilities development; Test facility development; Stack research; and Advanced research and technology development. This report briefly describes the subtasks still to be completed: Power plant system test with reformed natural gas; Upgrading of existing, US government-owned, test facilities; and Advanced MCFC component research.

  18. High Voltage TAL Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, David T.; Jankovsky, Robert S.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Manzella, David H.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a two-stage, anode layer Hall thruster was evaluated. Experiments were conducted in single and two-stage configurations. In single-stage configuration, the thruster was operated with discharge voltages ranging from 300 to 1700 V. Discharge specific impulses ranged from 1630 to 4140 sec. Thruster investigations were conducted with input power ranging from 1 to 8.7 kW, corresponding to power throttling of nearly 9: 1. An extensive two-stage performance map was generated. Data taken with total voltage (sum of discharge and accelerating voltage) constant revealed a decrease in thruster efficiency as the discharge voltage was increased. Anode specific impulse values were comparable in the single and two-stage configurations showing no strong advantage for two-stage operation.

  19. High Performance Arcjet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, Elliot B.; Ivanov, Alexey Nikolayevich; Nikolayev, Yuri Vyacheslavovich

    1994-01-01

    This effort sought to exploit advanced single crystal tungsten-tantalum alloy material for fabrication of a high strength, high temperature arcjet anode. The use of this material is expected to result in improved strength, temperature resistance, and lifetime compared to state of the art polycrystalline alloys. In addition, the use of high electrical and thermal conductivity carbon-carbon composites was considered, and is believed to be a feasible approach. Highly conductive carbon-carbon composite anode capability represents enabling technology for rotating-arc designs derived from the Russian Scientific Research Institute of Thermal Processes (NIITP) because of high heat fluxes at the anode surface. However, for US designs the anode heat flux is much smaller, and thus the benefits are not as great as in the case of NIITP-derived designs. Still, it does appear that the tensile properties of carbon-carbon can be even better than those of single crystal tungsten alloys, especially when nearly-single-crystal fibers such as vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) are used. Composites fabricated from such materials must be coated with a refractory carbide coating in order to ensure compatibility with high temperature hydrogen. Fabrication of tungsten alloy single crystals in the sizes required for fabrication of an arcjet anode has been shown to be feasible. Test data indicate that the material can be expected to be at least the equal of W-Re-HfC polycrystalline alloy in terms of its tensile properties, and possibly superior. We are also informed by our colleagues at Scientific Production Association Luch (NP0 Luch) that it is possible to use Russian technology to fabricate polycrystalline W-Re-HfC or other high strength alloys if desired. This is important because existing engines must rely on previously accumulated stocks of these materials, and a fabrication capability for future requirements is not assured.

  20. High performance cyclone development

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The results of cold flow experiments at atmospheric conditions of an air-shielded 18 in-dia electrocyclone with a central cusped electrode are reported using fine test dusts of both flyash and nickel powder. These results are found to confirm expectations of enhanced performance, similar to earlier work on a 12 in-dia model. An analysis of the combined inertial-electrostatic force field is also presented which identifies general design goals and scaling laws. From this, it is found that electrostatic enhancement will be particularly beneficial for fine dusts in large cyclones. Recommendations for further improvement in cyclone collection efficiency are proposed.

  1. START High Performance Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, D. A.

    1997-11-01

    Improvements to START (Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak), the first spherical tokamak in the world to achieve high plasma temperature with both a significant pulse length and confinement time, have been ongoing since 1991. Recent modifications include: expansion of the existing capacitor banks allowing plasma currents as high as 300kA, an increase in the available neutral beam heating power ( ~ 500kW), and improvements to the vacuum system. These improvements have led to the achievement of the world record plasma β (≡ 2μ_0 /B^2) of ~ 30% in a tokamak. The normalised β ( βN ≡ β aB/I_p) reached 4.5 with q_95 = 2.3. Properties of the reconstructed equilibrium will be discussed in detail. The theoretical limit to β is higher in a spherical tokamak than in a conventional machine, due to the higher values of normalised current (IN ≡ I_p/aB) achievable at low aspect ratio. The record β was achieved with IN ~ 8 while conventional tokamaks are limited to IN ~ 3, or less. Calculations of the ideal MHD stability of the record discharge indicate high β low-n kink modes are stable, but that the entire profile is at or near marginal stability for high-n ballooning modes. The phenomenology of the events leading up to the plasma termination is discussed. An important aspect of the START program is to explore the physics of neutral beam absorption at low aspect ratio. A passive neutral particle analyser has been used to study the temporal and spatial dependence of the fast hydrogen beam ions. These measurements have been used in conjunction with a single particle orbit code to estimate the fast ion losses due to collisions with slow neutrals from the plasma edge. Numerical analysis of neutral beam power deposition profiles are compared with the data from an instrumented beam stop. The global energy confinement time τE in beam heated discharges on START is similar to that obtained in Ohmic discharges, even though the input power has roughly doubled over the Ohmic case

  2. Tough high performance composite matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention is a semi-interpentrating polymer network which includes a high performance thermosetting polyimide having a nadic end group acting as a crosslinking site and a high performance linear thermoplastic polyimide. Provided is an improved high temperature matrix resin which is capable of performing in the 200 to 300 C range. This resin has significantly improved toughness and microcracking resistance, excellent processability, mechanical performance, and moisture and solvent resistances.

  3. High performance steam development

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

    1995-10-01

    Over 30 years ago U.S. industry introduced the world`s highest temperature (1200{degrees}F at 5000 psig) and most efficient power plant, the Eddystone coal-burning steam plant. The highest alloy material used in the plant was 316 stainless steel. Problems during the first few years of operation caused a reduction in operating temperature to 1100{degrees}F which has generally become the highest temperature used in plants around the world. Leadership in high temperature steam has moved to Japan and Europe over the last 30 years.

  4. High Voltage SPT Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Jacobson, David; Jankovsky, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A 2.3 kW stationary plasma thruster designed to operate at high voltage was tested at discharge voltages between 300 and 1250 V. Discharge specific impulses between 1600 and 3700 sec were demonstrated with thrust between 40 and 145 mN. Test data indicated that discharge voltage can be optimized for maximum discharge efficiency. The optimum discharge voltage was between 500 and 700 V for the various anode mass flow rates considered. The effect of operating voltage on optimal magnet field strength was investigated. The effect of cathode flow rate on thruster efficiency was considered for an 800 V discharge.

  5. Development of 1000 kW molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) pilot plant and 250 kW stack

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Kenichi

    1999-07-01

    The molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) is expected to be ready for commercial use early in the next century. This new power generation system has a higher thermal efficiency and can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. IHI has participated in the Ministry of International Trade and Industry's New Sunshine Program since 1993. Since joining the program, IHI has undertaken the development of the MCFC stack and 1,000 kW class power generation system under the supervision of the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization and the MCFC Research Association. The development outline of the 1,000 kW MCFC pilot plant constructed at the Kawagoe test site and the present development stage of the plant control system and the 250 kW stacks developed and manufactured by IHI are described here.

  6. High performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Winkelman, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.

  7. High Poverty, High Performing Schools. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes four articles on high performance by poor Texas schools. In "Principal of National Blue Ribbon School Says High Poverty Schools Can Excel" (interview with Robert Zarate by Christie L. Goodman), the principal of Mary Hull Elementary School (San Antonio, Texas) describes how the high-poverty, high-minority school…

  8. High Performance Fortran: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zosel, M.E.

    1992-12-23

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the work of the High Performance Fortran Forum (HPFF). This group of industry, academic, and user representatives has been meeting to define a set of extensions for Fortran dedicated to the special problems posed by a very high performance computers, especially the new generation of parallel computers. The paper describes the HPFF effort and its goals and gives a brief description of the functionality of High Performance Fortran (HPF).

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of biofuels as fuels for high temperature fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milewski, Jarosław; Bujalski, Wojciech; Lewandowski, Janusz

    2013-02-01

    Based on mathematical modeling and numerical simulations, applicativity of various biofuels on high temperature fuel cell performance are presented. Governing equations of high temperature fuel cell modeling are given. Adequate simulators of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) have been done and described. Performance of these fuel cells with different biofuels is shown. Some characteristics are given and described. Advantages and disadvantages of various biofuels from the system performance point of view are pointed out. An analysis of various biofuels as potential fuels for SOFC and MCFC is presented. The results are compared with both methane and hydrogen as the reference fuels. The biofuels are characterized by both lower efficiency and lower fuel utilization factors compared with methane. The presented results are based on a 0D mathematical model in the design point calculation. The governing equations of the model are also presented. Technical and financial analysis of high temperature fuel cells (SOFC and MCFC) are shown. High temperature fuel cells can be fed by biofuels like: biogas, bioethanol, and biomethanol. Operational costs and possible incomes of those installation types were estimated and analyzed. A comparison against classic power generation units is shown. A basic indicator net present value (NPV) for projects was estimated and commented.

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of biofuels as fuels for high temperature fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milewski, Jarosław; Bujalski, Wojciech; Lewandowski, Janusz

    2011-11-01

    Based on mathematical modeling and numerical simulations, applicativity of various biofuels on high temperature fuel cell performance are presented. Governing equations of high temperature fuel cell modeling are given. Adequate simulators of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) have been done and described. Performance of these fuel cells with different biofuels is shown. Some characteristics are given and described. Advantages and disadvantages of various biofuels from the system performance point of view are pointed out. An analysis of various biofuels as potential fuels for SOFC and MCFC is presented. The results are compared with both methane and hydrogen as the reference fuels. The biofuels are characterized by both lower efficiency and lower fuel utilization factors compared with methane. The presented results are based on a 0D mathematical model in the design point calculation. The governing equations of the model are also presented. Technical and financial analysis of high temperature fuel cells (SOFC and MCFC) are shown. High temperature fuel cells can be fed by biofuels like: biogas, bioethanol, and biomethanol. Operational costs and possible incomes of those installation types were estimated and analyzed. A comparison against classic power generation units is shown. A basic indicator net present value (NPV) for projects was estimated and commented.

  11. High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, Samuel J.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies where in the scheme of modern chromatography high performance thin layer chromatography (TLC) fits and why in some situations it is a viable alternative to gas and high performance liquid chromatography. New TLC plates, sample applications, plate development, and instrumental techniques are considered. (JN)

  12. High Performance Networks for High Impact Science

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Mary A.; Bair, Raymond A.

    2003-02-13

    This workshop was the first major activity in developing a strategic plan for high-performance networking in the Office of Science. Held August 13 through 15, 2002, it brought together a selection of end users, especially representing the emerging, high-visibility initiatives, and network visionaries to identify opportunities and begin defining the path forward.

  13. High performance flexible heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, R. M.; Gernert, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    A Phase I SBIR NASA program for developing and demonstrating high-performance flexible heat pipes for use in the thermal management of spacecraft is examined. The program combines several technologies such as flexible screen arteries and high-performance circumferential distribution wicks within an envelope which is flexible in the adiabatic heat transport zone. The first six months of work during which the Phase I contract goal were met, are described. Consideration is given to the heat-pipe performance requirements. A preliminary evaluation shows that the power requirement for Phase II of the program is 30.5 kilowatt meters at an operating temperature from 0 to 100 C.

  14. High performance dielectric materials development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piche, Joe; Kirchner, Ted; Jayaraj, K.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of polymer composites materials technology is to develop materials and processing technology to meet DoD and commercial needs. The following are outlined in this presentation: high performance capacitors, high temperature aerospace insulation, rationale for choosing Foster-Miller (the reporting industry), the approach to the development and evaluation of high temperature insulation materials, and the requirements/evaluation parameters. Supporting tables and diagrams are included.

  15. INL High Performance Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-02-01

    High performance buildings, also known as sustainable buildings and green buildings, are resource efficient structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reduce solid waste and pollutants, and limit the depletion of natural resources while also providing a thermally and visually comfortable working environment that increases productivity for building occupants. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish this mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate high performance sustainable design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. Additionally, INL is a large consumer of energy that contributes to both carbon emissions and resource inefficiency. In the current climate of rising energy prices and political pressure for carbon reduction, this guide will help new construction project teams to design facilities that are sustainable and reduce energy costs, thereby reducing carbon emissions. With these concerns in mind, the recommendations described in the INL High Performance Building Strategy (previously called the INL Green Building Strategy) are intended to form the INL foundation for high performance building standards. This revised strategy incorporates the latest federal and DOE orders (Executive Order [EO] 13514, “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance” [2009], EO 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management” [2007], and DOE Order 430.2B, “Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy, and Transportation Management” [2008]), the latest guidelines, trends, and observations in high performance building construction, and the latest changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

  16. High-Performance Thermoelectric Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Caillat, Thierry; Borshchevsky, Alexander

    1994-01-01

    Figures of merit almost double current state-of-art thermoelectric materials. IrSb3 is semiconductor found to exhibit exceptional thermoelectric properties. CoSb3 and RhSb3 have same skutterudite crystallographic structure as IrSb3, and exhibit exceptional transport properties expected to contribute to high thermoelectric performance. These three compounds form solid solutions. Combination of properties offers potential for development of new high-performance thermoelectric materials for more efficient thermoelectric power generators, coolers, and detectors.

  17. High-performance membrane chromatography.

    PubMed

    Belenkii, B G; Malt'sev, V G

    1995-02-01

    In gradient chromatography for proteins migrating along the chromatographic column, the critical distance X0 has been shown to exist at which the separation of zones is at a maximum and band spreading is at a minimum. With steep gradients and small elution velocity, the column length may be reduced to the level of membrane thickness--about one millimeter. The peculiarities of this novel separation method for proteins, high-performance membrane chromatography (HPMC), are discussed and stepwise elution is shown to be especially effective. HPMC combines the advantages of membrane technology and high-performance liquid chromatography, and avoids their drawbacks. PMID:7727132

  18. High Performance Photovoltaic Project Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Symko-Davies, M.; McConnell, R.

    2005-01-01

    The High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV) Project was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy to substantially increase the viability of photovoltaics (PV) for cost-competitive applications so that PV can contribute significantly to our energy supply and environment in the 21st century. To accomplish this, the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) directs in-house and subcontracted research in high-performance polycrystalline thin-film and multijunction concentrator devices. In this paper, we describe the recent research accomplishments in the in-house directed efforts and the research efforts under way in the subcontracted area.

  19. Panelized high performance multilayer insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkley, R. A.; Shriver, C. B.; Stuckey, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    Multilayer insulation coverings with low conductivity foam spacers are interleaved with quarter mil aluminized polymer film radiation shields to cover flight type liquid hydrogen tankage of space vehicles with a removable, structurally compatible, lightweight, high performance cryogenic insulation capable of surviving extended space mission environments.

  20. High performance rolling element bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursey, Jr., Roger W. (Inventor); Olinger, Jr., John B. (Inventor); Owen, Samuel S. (Inventor); Poole, William E. (Inventor); Haluck, David A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A high performance rolling element bearing (5) which is particularly suitable for use in a cryogenically cooled environment, comprises a composite cage (45) formed from glass fibers disposed in a solid lubricant matrix of a fluorocarbon polymer. The cage includes inserts (50) formed from a mixture of a soft metal and a solid lubricant such as a fluorocarbon polymer.

  1. High Performance Bulk Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhifeng

    2013-03-31

    Over 13 plus years, we have carried out research on electron pairing symmetry of superconductors, growth and their field emission property studies on carbon nanotubes and semiconducting nanowires, high performance thermoelectric materials and other interesting materials. As a result of the research, we have published 104 papers, have educated six undergraduate students, twenty graduate students, nine postdocs, nine visitors, and one technician.

  2. High performance storable propellant resistojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    From 1965 until 1985 resistojets were used for a limited number of space missions. Capability increased in stages from an initial application using a 90 W gN2 thruster operating at 123 sec specific impulse (Isp) to a 830 W N2H4 thruster operating at 305 sec Isp. Prior to 1985 fewer than 100 resistojets were known to have been deployed on spacecraft. Building on this base NASA embarked upon the High Performance Storable Propellant Resistojet (HPSPR) program to significantly advance the resistojet state-of-the-art. Higher performance thrusters promised to increase the market demand for resistojets and enable space missions requiring higher performance. During the program three resistojets were fabricated and tested. High temperature wire and coupon materials tests were completed. A life test was conducted on an advanced gas generator.

  3. High performance bilateral telerobot control.

    PubMed

    Kline-Schoder, Robert; Finger, William; Hogan, Neville

    2002-01-01

    Telerobotic systems are used when the environment that requires manipulation is not easily accessible to humans, as in space, remote, hazardous, or microscopic applications or to extend the capabilities of an operator by scaling motions and forces. The Creare control algorithm and software is an enabling technology that makes possible guaranteed stability and high performance for force-feedback telerobots. We have developed the necessary theory, structure, and software design required to implement high performance telerobot systems with time delay. This includes controllers for the master and slave manipulators, the manipulator servo levels, the communication link, and impedance shaping modules. We verified the performance using both bench top hardware as well as a commercial microsurgery system. PMID:15458092

  4. High Performance Tools And Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Collette, M R; Corey, I R; Johnson, J R

    2005-01-24

    This goal of this project was to evaluate the capability and limits of current scientific simulation development tools and technologies with specific focus on their suitability for use with the next generation of scientific parallel applications and High Performance Computing (HPC) platforms. The opinions expressed in this document are those of the authors, and reflect the authors' current understanding and functionality of the many tools investigated. As a deliverable for this effort, we are presenting this report describing our findings along with an associated spreadsheet outlining current capabilities and characteristics of leading and emerging tools in the high performance computing arena. This first chapter summarizes our findings (which are detailed in the other chapters) and presents our conclusions, remarks, and anticipations for the future. In the second chapter, we detail how various teams in our local high performance community utilize HPC tools and technologies, and mention some common concerns they have about them. In the third chapter, we review the platforms currently or potentially available to utilize these tools and technologies on to help in software development. Subsequent chapters attempt to provide an exhaustive overview of the available parallel software development tools and technologies, including their strong and weak points and future concerns. We categorize them as debuggers, memory checkers, performance analysis tools, communication libraries, data visualization programs, and other parallel development aides. The last chapter contains our closing information. Included with this paper at the end is a table of the discussed development tools and their operational environment.

  5. ANL`s research and development of alternative components for MCFC`s

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, G.H.; Brown, A.P.; Roche, M.; Chu, D.; Indacochea, E.

    1992-09-01

    Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) systems are currently limited by several technical problems. The objectives of this project are to focus on these problems and develop materials . and cell components that will ameliorate or eliminate them. Specifically, new ceramic materials are being investigated for dimensionally stable electrode materials with improved chemical and electrochemical properties over the present NiO cathode and Ni/Cr and Ni/Al anodes. Also, altemative electrolyte formulations to the present Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} are being studied.

  6. High performance magnetically controllable microturbines.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Ku, Jin-Feng; He, Yan; Xu, Bin-Bin; Chen, Qi-Dai; Xia, Hong; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2010-11-01

    Reported in this paper is two-photon photopolymerization (TPP) fabrication of magnetic microturbines with high surface smoothness towards microfluids mixing. As the key component of the magnetic photoresist, Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were carefully screened for homogeneous doping. In this work, oleic acid stabilized Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles synthesized via high-temperature induced organic phase decomposition of an iron precursor show evident advantages in particle morphology. After modification with propoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate (PO(3)-TMPTA, a kind of cross-linker), the magnetic nanoparticles were homogeneously doped in acrylate-based photoresist for TPP fabrication of microstructures. Finally, a magnetic microturbine was successfully fabricated as an active mixing device for remote control of microfluids blending. The development of high quality magnetic photoresists would lead to high performance magnetically controllable microdevices for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) applications. PMID:20721411

  7. High performance ammonium nitrate propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, F. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A high performance propellant having greatly reduced hydrogen chloride emission is presented. It is comprised of: (1) a minor amount of hydrocarbon binder (10-15%), (2) at least 85% solids including ammonium nitrate as the primary oxidizer (about 40% to 70%), (3) a significant amount (5-25%) powdered metal fuel, such as aluminum, (4) a small amount (5-25%) of ammonium perchlorate as a supplementary oxidizer, and (5) optionally a small amount (0-20%) of a nitramine.

  8. New, high performance rotating parachute

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, W.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A new rotating parachute has been designed primarily for recovery of high performance reentry vehicles. Design and development/testing results are presented from low-speed wind tunnel testing, free-flight deployments at transonic speeds and tests in a supersonic wind tunnel at Mach 2.0. Drag coefficients of 1.15 based on the 2-ft diameter of the rotor have been measured in the wind tunnel. Stability of the rotor is excellent.

  9. High Efficiency, High Performance Clothes Dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Pescatore; Phil Carbone

    2005-03-31

    This program covered the development of two separate products; an electric heat pump clothes dryer and a modulating gas dryer. These development efforts were independent of one another and are presented in this report in two separate volumes. Volume 1 details the Heat Pump Dryer Development while Volume 2 details the Modulating Gas Dryer Development. In both product development efforts, the intent was to develop high efficiency, high performance designs that would be attractive to US consumers. Working with Whirlpool Corporation as our commercial partner, TIAX applied this approach of satisfying consumer needs throughout the Product Development Process for both dryer designs. Heat pump clothes dryers have been in existence for years, especially in Europe, but have not been able to penetrate the market. This has been especially true in the US market where no volume production heat pump dryers are available. The issue has typically been around two key areas: cost and performance. Cost is a given in that a heat pump clothes dryer has numerous additional components associated with it. While heat pump dryers have been able to achieve significant energy savings compared to standard electric resistance dryers (over 50% in some cases), designs to date have been hampered by excessively long dry times, a major market driver in the US. The development work done on the heat pump dryer over the course of this program led to a demonstration dryer that delivered the following performance characteristics: (1) 40-50% energy savings on large loads with 35 F lower fabric temperatures and similar dry times; (2) 10-30 F reduction in fabric temperature for delicate loads with up to 50% energy savings and 30-40% time savings; (3) Improved fabric temperature uniformity; and (4) Robust performance across a range of vent restrictions. For the gas dryer development, the concept developed was one of modulating the gas flow to the dryer throughout the dry cycle. Through heat modulation in a

  10. High Performance Parallel Computational Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At a recent press conference, NASA Administrator Dan Goldin encouraged NASA Ames Research Center to take a lead role in promoting research and development of advanced, high-performance computer technology, including nanotechnology. Manufacturers of leading-edge microprocessors currently perform large-scale simulations in the design and verification of semiconductor devices and microprocessors. Recently, the need for this intensive simulation and modeling analysis has greatly increased, due in part to the ever-increasing complexity of these devices, as well as the lessons of experiences such as the Pentium fiasco. Simulation, modeling, testing, and validation will be even more important for designing molecular computers because of the complex specification of millions of atoms, thousands of assembly steps, as well as the simulation and modeling needed to ensure reliable, robust and efficient fabrication of the molecular devices. The software for this capacity does not exist today, but it can be extrapolated from the software currently used in molecular modeling for other applications: semi-empirical methods, ab initio methods, self-consistent field methods, Hartree-Fock methods, molecular mechanics; and simulation methods for diamondoid structures. In as much as it seems clear that the application of such methods in nanotechnology will require powerful, highly powerful systems, this talk will discuss techniques and issues for performing these types of computations on parallel systems. We will describe system design issues (memory, I/O, mass storage, operating system requirements, special user interface issues, interconnects, bandwidths, and programming languages) involved in parallel methods for scalable classical, semiclassical, quantum, molecular mechanics, and continuum models; molecular nanotechnology computer-aided designs (NanoCAD) techniques; visualization using virtual reality techniques of structural models and assembly sequences; software required to

  11. Catalyzed double layer cathodes for high performance and long life molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, M.; Jantsch, U.; Rohland, B.

    1996-12-31

    NiO/LiCoO{sub 2} double layer cathodes (DLCs) were prepared with a thin highly active LiCoO{sub 2}-layer by a new double layer tape casting/sintering procedure. The resulting metallic porous precursor plates were mounted into the MCFC and heated up by a special procedure to form LiCoO{sub 2} from air, Co and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in a solid/gas reaction. MCFCs with highly active NiO/LiCoO{sub 2}-DLCs can operate over prolonged periods of time with a Ni-precipitation which is 10% lower than one finds with state of the art NiO cathodes. According to LiCoO{sub 2}-cathodes have theoretical life times of more than 100 000 hours at nonpressurized conditions. MCFCs with new NiO/LiCoO{sub 2} double layer cathodes (DLC) were investigated with regard to variable parameters of their microstructure. From the agglomerate model of the porous MCFC cathode, the dependence of the polarization resistance from the radius of the agglomerates and the inner agglomerate surface area was calculated.

  12. High Performance Pulse Tube Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J. R.; Roth, E.; Champagne, P.; Evtimov, B.; Nast, T. C.

    2008-03-01

    Lockheed Martin's Advanced Technology Center has been developing pulse tube cryocoolers for more than ten years. Recent innovations include successful testing of four-stage coldheads, no-load temperature below 4 K, and the recent development of a high-efficiency compressor. This paper discusses the predicted performance of single and multiple stage pulse tube coldheads driven by our new 6 kg "M5Midi" compressor, which is capable of 90% efficiency with 200 W input power, and a maximum input power of 1000 W. This compressor retains the simplicity of earlier LM-ATC compressors: it has a moving magnet and an external electrical coil, minimizing organics in the working gas and requiring no electrical penetrations through the pressure wall. Motor losses were minimized during design, resulting in a simple, easily-manufactured compressor with state-of-the-art motor efficiency. The predicted cryocooler performance is presented as simple formulae, allowing an engineer to include the impact of a highly-optimized cryocooler into a full system analysis. Performance is given as a function of the heat rejection temperature and the cold tip temperatures and cooling loads.

  13. High performance aerated lagoon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, L.

    1999-08-01

    At a time when less money is available for wastewater treatment facilities and there is increased competition for the local tax dollar, regulatory agencies are enforcing stricter effluent limits on treatment discharges. A solution for both municipalities and industry is to use aerated lagoon systems designed to meet these limits. This monograph, prepared by a recognized expert in the field, provides methods for the rational design of a wide variety of high-performance aerated lagoon systems. Such systems range from those that can be depended upon to meet secondary treatment standards alone to those that, with the inclusion of intermittent sand filters or elements of sequenced biological reactor (SBR) technology, can also provide for nitrification and nutrient removal. Considerable emphasis is placed on the use of appropriate performance parameters, and an entire chapter is devoted to diagnosing performance failures. Contents include: principles of microbiological processes, control of algae, benthal stabilization, design for CBOD removal, design for nitrification and denitrification in suspended-growth systems, design for nitrification in attached-growth systems, phosphorus removal, diagnosing performance.

  14. Electrochemical characterization of cobalt-encapsulated nickel as cathodes for MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durairajan, Anand; Colon-Mercado, Hector; Haran, Bala; White, Ralph; Popov, Branko

    The stability of the NiO cathodes in molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) has been improved through microencapsulation of the NiO cathode with nanostructured Co. Cobalt was deposited on the NiO cathode using an electroless deposition process. The electrochemical oxidation behavior of the Co-coated electrodes is similar to that of the bare NiO cathode. The cobalt-coated electrodes have a lower solubility in the molten carbonate melt when compared to bare nickel oxide electrodes in the presence of cathode gas. The solubility decreased more than 50% due to microencapsulation with cobalt. The thermal oxidation rate was also lower in case of the cobalt-encapsulated electrode. Impedance data from the modified electrode indicate that the oxygen reduction reaction depended inversely on the CO 2 and directly on the oxygen partial pressures respectively suggesting a similar reaction mechanism to that of nickel oxide. The results indicated that cobalt-encapsulated NiO is a viable solution in the development of alternate cathodes for MCFC applications.

  15. Morphological, structural and electrochemical analysis of sputter-deposited ceria and titania coatings for MCFC application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Valérie; Mendoza, Leonardo; Goux, Aurélie; Ringuedé, Armelle; Billard, Alain; Briois, Pascal; Cassir, Michel

    In order to protect the MCFC nickel cathode, TiO 2 and CeO 2 coatings were prepared by DC reactive magnetron sputtering. These oxides are stable thermodynamically whatever the cathode or anode gaseous conditions. Good quality, dense and homogeneous coatings were obtained at thicknesses lower than 1 μm. The structure of the deposits, as analysed by XRD, was the expected one. In this work only dense nickel substrates were used. After their direct immersion in a Li 2CO 3-Na 2CO 3 carbonate eutectic at 650 °C, which can be considered as extremely corrosive conditions with respect to the usual MCFC conditions, the coatings were affected. TiO 2 coatings were transformed into Li 2TiO 3, in agreement with thermodynamic predictions; however, they became progressively unstable, which was probably due to a problem of mechanical adhesion rather than to solubility. The thinner was the deposit, the higher was its conductance and the closer to that of a pure Ni electrode was its electrocatalytic activity. CeO 2 coatings were stable in a ceria form and their adhesion was better even though not fully satisfactory. These first preliminary results are promising regarding the direct contact of the coatings with the corrosive carbonate melt, but the improvement of the adhesion is one of the major problems to solve.

  16. HIGH PERFORMANCE EBIS FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI,J.; BEEBE, E.; GOULD, O.; KPONOU, A.; LOCKEY, R.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; SNYDSTRUP, L.

    2007-06-25

    An Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), capable of producing high charge states and high beam currents of any heavy ion species in short pulses, is ideally suited for injection into a synchrotron. An EBIS-based, high current, heavy ion preinjector is now being built at Brookhaven to provide increased capabilities for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Benefits of the new preinjector include the ability to produce ions of any species, fast switching between species to serve the simultaneous needs of multiple programs, and lower operating and maintenance costs. A state-of-the-art EBIS, operating with an electron beam current of up to 10 A, and producing multi-milliamperes of high charge state heavy ions, has been developed at Brookhaven, and has been operating very successfully on a test bench for several years. The present performance of this high-current EBIS is presented, along with details of the design of the scaled-up EBIS for RHIC, and the status of its construction. Other aspects of the project, including design and construction of the heavy ion RFQ, Linac, and matching beamlines, are also mentioned.

  17. High Performance Proactive Digital Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Soltan; Moa, Belaid; Weber-Jahnke, Jens; Traore, Issa

    2012-10-01

    With the increase in the number of digital crimes and in their sophistication, High Performance Computing (HPC) is becoming a must in Digital Forensics (DF). According to the FBI annual report, the size of data processed during the 2010 fiscal year reached 3,086 TB (compared to 2,334 TB in 2009) and the number of agencies that requested Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory assistance increasing from 689 in 2009 to 722 in 2010. Since most investigation tools are both I/O and CPU bound, the next-generation DF tools are required to be distributed and offer HPC capabilities. The need for HPC is even more evident in investigating crimes on clouds or when proactive DF analysis and on-site investigation, requiring semi-real time processing, are performed. Although overcoming the performance challenge is a major goal in DF, as far as we know, there is almost no research on HPC-DF except for few papers. As such, in this work, we extend our work on the need of a proactive system and present a high performance automated proactive digital forensic system. The most expensive phase of the system, namely proactive analysis and detection, uses a parallel extension of the iterative z algorithm. It also implements new parallel information-based outlier detection algorithms to proactively and forensically handle suspicious activities. To analyse a large number of targets and events and continuously do so (to capture the dynamics of the system), we rely on a multi-resolution approach to explore the digital forensic space. Data set from the Honeynet Forensic Challenge in 2001 is used to evaluate the system from DF and HPC perspectives.

  18. Status of Santa Clara MCFC product development test

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, A.J.; O`Shea, T.P.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of the 2MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project is the demonstration of the carbonate fuel cell technology at full scale. Additional objectives of the project include the demonstration of specific advantages of the direct carbonate fuel cell power plant, such as high efficiency, low emissions, reactive power capability, and high reliability and availability. The project will also provide design input for precommercial early production power plants.

  19. High-performance combinatorial algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Pinar, Ali

    2003-10-31

    Combinatorial algorithms have long played an important role in many applications of scientific computing such as sparse matrix computations and parallel computing. The growing importance of combinatorial algorithms in emerging applications like computational biology and scientific data mining calls for development of a high performance library for combinatorial algorithms. Building such a library requires a new structure for combinatorial algorithms research that enables fast implementation of new algorithms. We propose a structure for combinatorial algorithms research that mimics the research structure of numerical algorithms. Numerical algorithms research is nicely complemented with high performance libraries, and this can be attributed to the fact that there are only a small number of fundamental problems that underlie numerical solvers. Furthermore there are only a handful of kernels that enable implementation of algorithms for these fundamental problems. Building a similar structure for combinatorial algorithms will enable efficient implementations for existing algorithms and fast implementation of new algorithms. Our results will promote utilization of combinatorial techniques and will impact research in many scientific computing applications, some of which are listed.

  20. High-Performance Bipropellant Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaglow, James A.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1999-01-01

    TRW, under contract to the NASA Lewis Research Center, has successfully completed over 10 000 sec of testing of a rhenium thrust chamber manufactured via a new-generation powder metallurgy. High performance was achieved for two different propellants, N2O4- N2H4 and N2O4 -MMH. TRW conducted 44 tests with N2O4-N2H4, accumulating 5230 sec of operating time with maximum burn times of 600 sec and a specific impulse Isp of 333 sec. Seventeen tests were conducted with N2O4-MMH for an additional 4789 sec and a maximum Isp of 324 sec, with a maximum firing duration of 700 sec. Together, the 61 tests totalled 10 019 sec of operating time, with the chamber remaining in excellent condition. Of these tests, 11 lasted 600 to 700 sec. The performance of radiation-cooled rocket engines is limited by their operating temperature. For the past two to three decades, the majority of radiation-cooled rockets were composed of a high-temperature niobium alloy (C103) with a disilicide oxide coating (R512) for oxidation resistance. The R512 coating practically limits the operating temperature to 1370 C. For the Earth-storable bipropellants commonly used in satellite and spacecraft propulsion systems, a significant amount of fuel film cooling is needed. The large film-cooling requirement extracts a large penalty in performance from incomplete mixing and combustion. A material system with a higher temperature capability has been matured to the point where engines are being readied for flight, particularly the 100-lb-thrust class engine. This system has powder rhenium (Re) as a substrate material with an iridium (Ir) oxidation-resistant coating. Again, the operating temperature is limited by the coating; however, Ir is capable of long-life operation at 2200 C. For Earth-storable bipropellants, this allows for the virtual elimination of fuel film cooling (some film cooling is used for thermal control of the head end). This has resulted in significant increases in specific impulse performance

  1. High Performance Field Reversed Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binderbauer, Michl

    2014-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a prolate compact toroid with poloidal magnetic fields. FRCs could lead to economic fusion reactors with high power density, simple geometry, natural divertor, ease of translation, and possibly capable of burning aneutronic fuels. However, as in other high-beta plasmas, there are stability and confinement concerns. These concerns can be addressed by introducing and maintaining a significant fast ion population in the system. This is the approach adopted by TAE and implemented for the first time in the C-2 device. Studying the physics of FRCs driven by Neutral Beam (NB) injection, significant improvements were made in confinement and stability. Early C-2 discharges had relatively good confinement, but global power losses exceeded the available NB input power. The addition of axially streaming plasma guns, magnetic end plugs as well as advanced surface conditioning leads to dramatic reductions in turbulence driven losses and greatly improved stability. As a result, fast ion confinement significantly improved and allowed for build-up of a dominant fast particle population. Under such appropriate conditions we achieved highly reproducible, long-lived, macroscopically stable FRCs with record lifetimes. This demonstrated many beneficial effects of large orbit particles and their performance impact on FRCs Together these achievements point to the prospect of beam-driven FRCs as a path toward fusion reactors. This presentation will review and expand on key results and present context for their interpretation.

  2. Guidelines for design and development of industrially relevant MCFC stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Torazza, A.; Dufour, A.; Giorgi, L.

    1996-12-31

    An interesting way of reducing the production costs of the electrical energy by improving efficiency and, at the same time, having a good integration between environment and power plants is offered by the utilization of the fuel cells operating at high temperatures. From this point of view, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFCs) seem to be one of the most promising technologies because of their environmental friendly operation for various fuels and potential low cost. In fact it is well known that the MCFCs overall plant efficiency is typically some 500% and can reach, as a consequence of their high operating temperature, 65% with a bottoming cycle. Moreover MCFCs will be particularly attractive for dispersed power plants of MW size located at user sites. Additional advantages of MCFCs are their good response to base and partial load, short time for plant erection and modularity.

  3. High performance solar Stirling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, J. W.; Haglund, R.

    1981-01-01

    A full-scale Dish-Stirling system experiment, at a power level of 25 kWe, has been tested during 1981 on the Test Bed Concentrator No. 2 at the Parabolic Dish Test Site, Edwards, CA. Test components, designed and developed primarily by industrial contractors for the Department of Energy, include an advanced Stirling engine driving an induction alternator, a directly-coupled solar receiver with a natural gas combustor for hybrid operation and a breadboard control system based on a programmable controller and standard utility substation components. The experiment demonstrated practicality of the solar Stirling application and high system performance into a utility grid. This paper describes the design and its functions, and the test results obtained.

  4. FPGA Based High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Dave; Mason, Jeff; Sundararajan, Prasanna; Dellinger, Erik; Putnam, Andrew; Storaasli, Olaf O

    2008-01-01

    Current high performance computing (HPC) applications are found in many consumer, industrial and research fields. From web searches to auto crash simulations to weather predictions, these applications require large amounts of power by the compute farms and supercomputers required to run them. The demand for more and faster computation continues to increase along with an even sharper increase in the cost of the power required to operate and cool these installations. The ability of standard processor based systems to address these needs has declined in both speed of computation and in power consumption over the past few years. This paper presents a new method of computation based upon programmable logic as represented by Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) that addresses these needs in a manner requiring only minimal changes to the current software design environment.

  5. Molten carbonate fuel cells for power generation from high-ash Indian coals

    SciTech Connect

    Perumal, R.; Bali, S.; Balakrishnan, M.; Mathur, A.

    1997-12-31

    The recently completed first phase of the study on MCFC at TERI involved the development of a laboratory-scale MCFC single cell, testing its performance with simulated coal gas mixtures and the development of a mathematical model for the purpose of estimating the material and energy requirements of an integrated coal gasification-MCFC (IG-MCFC) system. The results obtained from the monocell indicate that the drop in performance while using simulated coal gas as compared to that using pure hydrogen as the fuel is nominal. Moreover, the efficiency levels predicted by the model indicate that IG-MCFC systems would be attractive for the Indian power sector, as over 60% of the power generation in India is coal-based. The second phase of this work, which is underway and scheduled to be completed by mid-1998, involves the development of a kilowatt level MCFC stack for continued testing with simulated coal gas. The third phase would comprise of field demonstration of a 5--10 kW MCFC stack coupled to an experimental gasifier.

  6. High power ion thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The ion thruster is one of several forms of space electric propulsion being considered for use on future SP-100-based missions. One possible major mission ground rule is the use of a single Space Shuttle launch. Thus, the mass in orbit at the reactor activation altitude would be limited by the Shuttle mass constraints. When the spacecraft subsystem masses are subtracted from this available mass limit, a maximum propellant mass may be calculated. Knowing the characteristics of each type of electric thruster allows maximum values of total impulse, mission velocity increment, and thrusting time to be calculated. Because ion thrusters easily operate at high values of efficiency (60 to 70%) and specific impulse (3000 to 5000 sec), they can impart large values of total impulse to a spacecraft. They also can be operated with separate control of the propellant flow rate and exhaust velocity. This paper presents values of demonstrated and projected performance of high power ion thrusters used in an analysis of electric propulsion for an SP-100 based mission.

  7. High Performance Solution Processable TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, David

    2008-03-01

    Organic-based electronic devices offer the potential to significantly impact the functionality and pervasiveness of large-area electronics. We report on soluble acene-based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) where the microstructure of as-cast films can be precisely controlled via interfacial chemistry. Chemically tailoring the source/drain contact interface is a novel route to self-patterning of soluble small molecule organic semiconductors and enables the growth of highly ordered regions along opposing contact edges which extend into the transistor channel. The unique film forming properties of soluble fluorinated anthradithiophenes allows us to fabricate high performance OTFTs, OTFT circuits, and to deterministically study the influence of the film microstructure on the electrical characteristics of devices. Most recently we have grown single crystals of soluble fluorinated anthradithiophenes by vapor transport method allowing us to probe deeper into their intrinsic properties and determine the potential and limitations of this promising family of oligomers for use in organic-based electronic devices. Co-Authors: O. D. Jurchescu^1,4, B. H. Hamadani^1, S. K. Park^4, D. A. Mourey^4, S. Subramanian^5, A. J. Moad^2, R. J. Kline^3, L. C. Teague^2, J. G. Kushmerick^2, L. J. Richter^2, T. N. Jackson^4, and J. E. Anthony^5 ^1Semiconductor Electronics Division, ^2Surface and Microanalysis Science Division, ^3Polymers Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 ^4Department of Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 ^5Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055

  8. High performance Cu adhesion coating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.W.; Viehbeck, A.; Chen, W.R.; Ree, M.

    1996-12-31

    Poly(arylene ether benzimidazole) (PAEBI) is a high performance thermoplastic polymer with imidazole functional groups forming the polymer backbone structure. It is proposed that upon coating PAEBI onto a copper surface the imidazole groups of PAEBI form a bond with or chelate to the copper surface resulting in strong adhesion between the copper and polymer. Adhesion of PAEBI to other polymers such as poly(biphenyl dianhydride-p-phenylene diamine) (BPDA-PDA) polyimide is also quite good and stable. The resulting locus of failure as studied by XPS and IR indicates that PAEBI gives strong cohesive adhesion to copper. Due to its good adhesion and mechanical properties, PAEBI can be used in fabricating thin film semiconductor packages such as multichip module dielectric (MCM-D) structures. In these applications, a thin PAEBI coating is applied directly to a wiring layer for enhancing adhesion to both the copper wiring and the polymer dielectric surface. In addition, a thin layer of PAEBI can also function as a protection layer for the copper wiring, eliminating the need for Cr or Ni barrier metallurgies and thus significantly reducing the number of process steps.

  9. ALMA high performance nutating subreflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasho, Victor L.; Radford, Simon J. E.; Kingsley, Jeffrey S.

    2003-02-01

    For the international ALMA project"s prototype antennas, we have developed a high performance, reactionless nutating subreflector (chopping secondary mirror). This single axis mechanism can switch the antenna"s optical axis by +/-1.5" within 10 ms or +/-5" within 20 ms and maintains pointing stability within the antenna"s 0.6" error budget. The light weight 75 cm diameter subreflector is made of carbon fiber composite to achieve a low moment of inertia, <0.25 kg m2. Its reflecting surface was formed in a compression mold. Carbon fiber is also used together with Invar in the supporting structure for thermal stability. Both the subreflector and the moving coil motors are mounted on flex pivots and the motor magnets counter rotate to absorb the nutation reaction force. Auxiliary motors provide active damping of external disturbances, such as wind gusts. Non contacting optical sensors measure the positions of the subreflector and the motor rocker. The principle mechanical resonance around 20 Hz is compensated with a digital PID servo loop that provides a closed loop bandwidth near 100 Hz. Shaped transitions are used to avoid overstressing mechanical links.

  10. Porous nickel MCFC cathode coated by potentiostatically deposited cobalt oxide. I. A structural and morphological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, M. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Mendoza, L.; Cassir, M.; Daza, L.

    Porous nickel cathode was protected by potentiostatically deposited cobalt at different experimental conditions: oxidation potential and electrolysis duration. The deposition growth increased with the oxidation potential yielding a more developed granular structure with smaller grains. Thin layers of Co 3O 4 were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. CoOOH was detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before annealing treatment and Co 3O 4 after heating the sample at 500 °C during 4 h in air. After this treatment, some morphological changes were observed on the coated samples due to grain compaction and oxidation of the nickel substrate. The porosity of the coated samples was relatively close to that of the sole porous nickel. These coatings exhibited an appropriate dual-pore structure with macro and micro pores, a basic MCFC requirement.

  11. Optimum operating conditions of DIR-MCFC without vapor-phase carbonate pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kimihiko; Daimon, Mayumi; Tanimoto, Kazumi

    In direct internal reforming-molten carbonate fuel cells (DIR-MCFC), deterioration of catalytic activity takes place in the anode channel due to both liquid-phase pollution and vapor-phase pollution. Although the liquid-phase pollution can be solved by installing protective barrier, an effective defense method and a reactivation method of vapor-phase polluted catalyst have not established yet. In order to study the reactivation method, the adhesion form of potassium compounds in the polluted catalyst under the various gas conditions was evaluated by using a thermogravimetric analyzer in which water vapor can feed. Additionally, the activity of the treated catalyst was also tested by a differential reactor. As a result, KOH changes to K 2CO 3 under a CO 2 concentration of 25% or more. KOH becomes a solid-phase from the liquid-phase when it is changed into K 2CO 3. Therefore, the catalyst can not be reactive because K 2CO 3 chokes pores of the catalyst. However, the activity of the polluted catalyst is revived to 80% of the initial activity by controlling the gas species concentration, especially CO 2. Moreover, the catalytic activity can be revived under a steam-carbon ratio of 2.0 or more. Based on the results obtained by these fundamental experiments, the reactivation methods of catalyst polluted are proposed as follows: (i) catalyst should be loaded more upstream in the anode; (ii) in order to reactivate the polluted catalyst, the DIR-MCFC should maintain a steam-carbon ratio of 2.0 or more; (iii) gas conditions to activate the catalyst should be applied regularly.

  12. High Performance Torso Cooling Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conger, Bruce; Makinen, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The concept proposed in this paper is to improve thermal efficiencies of the liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) in the torso area, which could facilitate removal of LCVG tubing from the arms and legs, thereby increasing suited crew member mobility. EVA space suit mobility in micro-gravity is challenging, and it becomes even more challenging in the gravity of Mars. By using shaped water tubes that greatly increase the contact area with the skin in the torso region of the body, the heat transfer efficiency can be increased. This increase in efficiency could provide the required liquid cooling via torso tubing only; no arm or leg LCVG tubing would be required. Benefits of this approach include increased crewmember mobility, enhanced evaporation cooling, increased comfort during Mars EVA tasks, and easing of the overly dry condition in the helmet associated with the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) ventilation loop currently under development. This report describes analysis and test activities performed to evaluate the potential improvements to the thermal performance of the LCVG. Analyses evaluated potential tube shapes for improving the thermal performance of the LCVG. The analysis results fed into the selection of flat flow strips to improve thermal contact with the skin of the suited test subject. Testing of small segments was performed to compare thermal performance of the tubing approach of the current LCVG to the flat flow strips proposed as the new concept. Results of the testing is presented along with recommendations for future development of this new concept.

  13. A high performance thermoacoustic engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijani, M. E. H.; Spoelstra, S.

    2011-11-01

    In thermoacoustic systems heat is converted into acoustic energy and vice versa. These systems use inert gases as working medium and have no moving parts which makes the thermoacoustic technology a serious alternative to produce mechanical or electrical power, cooling power, and heating in a sustainable and environmentally friendly way. A thermoacoustic Stirling heat engine is designed and built which achieves a record performance of 49% of the Carnot efficiency. The design and performance of the engine is presented. The engine has no moving parts and is made up of few simple components.

  14. High-performance composite chocolate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Julian; Thomson, Katrin; Hollands, Lisa; Bates, Joanna; Carter, Melvyn; Freeman, Colin; Kapranos, Plato; Goodall, Russell

    2013-07-01

    The performance of any engineering component depends on and is limited by the properties of the material from which it is fabricated. It is crucial for engineering students to understand these material properties, interpret them and select the right material for the right application. In this paper we present a new method to engage students with the material selection process. In a competition-based practical, first-year undergraduate students design, cost and cast composite chocolate samples to maximize a particular performance criterion. The same activity could be adapted for any level of education to introduce the subject of materials properties and their effects on the material chosen for specific applications.

  15. Sustaining High Performance in Bad Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassi, Laurie J.; Van Buren, Mark A.

    1997-01-01

    Summarizes the results of the American Society for Training and Development Human Resource and Performance Management Survey of 1996 that examined the performance outcomes of downsizing and high performance work systems, explored the relationship between high performance work systems and downsizing, and asked whether some downsizing practices were…

  16. High-Performance Composite Chocolate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Julian; Thomson, Katrin; Hollands, Lisa; Bates, Joanna; Carter, Melvyn; Freeman, Colin; Kapranos, Plato; Goodall, Russell

    2013-01-01

    The performance of any engineering component depends on and is limited by the properties of the material from which it is fabricated. It is crucial for engineering students to understand these material properties, interpret them and select the right material for the right application. In this paper we present a new method to engage students with…

  17. Toward High-Performance Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Edward E., III

    2002-01-01

    Reviews management changes that companies have made over time in adopting or adapting four approaches to organizational performance: employee involvement, total quality management, re-engineering, and knowledge management. Considers future possibilities and defines a new view of what constitutes effective organizational design in management.…

  18. A preliminary design and BOP cost analysis of M-C Power`s MCFC commerical unit

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.P.

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power Corporation plans to introduce its molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) market entry unit in the year 2000 for distributed and on-site power generation. Extensive efforts have been made to analyze the cell stack manufacturing costs. The major objective of this study is to conduct a detailed analysis of BOP costs based on an initial design of the market entry unit.

  19. Carpet Aids Learning in High Performance Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurd, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The Healthy and High Performance Schools Act of 2002 has set specific federal guidelines for school design, and developed a federal/state partnership program to assist local districts in their school planning. According to the Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS), high-performance schools are, among other things, healthy, comfortable,…

  20. High-Performance Schools Make Cents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen-Palacios, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Describes the educational benefits of high-performance schools, buildings that are efficient, healthy, safe, and easy to operate and maintain. Also briefly describes how to create a high-performance school drawn from volume I (Planning) of the three-volume Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS) "Best Practices Manual." (For more…

  1. High performance, high density hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankenfeld, J. W.; Hastings, T. W.; Lieberman, M.; Taylor, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The fuels were selected from 77 original candidates on the basis of estimated merit index and cost effectiveness. The ten candidates consisted of 3 pure compounds, 4 chemical plant streams and 3 refinery streams. Critical physical and chemical properties of the candidate fuels were measured including heat of combustion, density, and viscosity as a function of temperature, freezing points, vapor pressure, boiling point, thermal stability. The best all around candidate was found to be a chemical plant olefin stream rich in dicyclopentadiene. This material has a high merit index and is available at low cost. Possible problem areas were identified as low temperature flow properties and thermal stability. An economic analysis was carried out to determine the production costs of top candidates. The chemical plant and refinery streams were all less than 44 cent/kg while the pure compounds were greater than 44 cent/kg. A literature survey was conducted on the state of the art of advanced hydrocarbon fuel technology as applied to high energy propellents. Several areas for additional research were identified.

  2. High-Performance Miniature Hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zandt, Thomas R.; Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Crisp, David

    1994-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive hygrometer that occupies volume less than 4 in.(3) measures dewpoints as much as 100 degrees C below ambient temperatures, with accuracy of 0.1 degrees C. Field tests indicate accuracy and repeatability identical to those of state-of-the-art larger dewpoint hygrometers. Operates up to 100 times as fast as older hygrometers, and offers simplicity and small size needed to meet cost and performance requirements of many applications.

  3. High performance fibers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Economy, J.

    1994-01-01

    A two and a half year ONR/ARPA funded program to develop a low cost process for manufacture of a high strength/high modulus sigma/E boron nitride (BN) fiber was initiated on 7/1/90 and ended on 12/31/92. The preparation of high sigma/E BN fibers had been demonstrated in the late 1960's by the PI using a batch nitriding of B2O3 fiber with NH3 followed by stress graphitization at approx. 2000 deg C. Such fibers displayed values comparable to PAN based carbon fibers but the mechanicals were variable most likely because of redeposition of volatiles at 2000 deg C. In addition, the cost of the fibers was very high due to the need for many hours of nitriding necessary to convert the B2O3 fibers. The use of batch nitriding negated two possible cost advantages of this concept, namely, the ease of drawing very fine, multi-filament yarn of B2O3 and more importantly the very low cost of the starting materials.

  4. Operating experience with a 250 kW el molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Manfred; Huppmann, Gerhard

    The MTU MCFC program is carried out by a European consortium comprising the German companies MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH, Ruhrgas AG and RWE Energie AG as well as the Danish company Energi E2 S/A. MTU acts as consortium leader. The company shares a license and technology exchange agreement with Fuel Cell Energy Inc., Danbury, CT, USA (formerly Energy Research Corp., ERC). The program was started in 1990 and covers a period of about 10 years. The highlights of this program to date are: Considerable improvements regarding component stability have been demonstrated on laboratory scale. Manufacturing technology has been developed to a point which enables the consortium to fabricate the porous components on a 250 cm 2 scale. Several large area stacks with 5000-7660 cm 2 cell area and a power range of 3-10 kW have been tested at the facilities in Munich (Germany) and Kyndby (Denmark). These stacks have been supplied by FCE. As far as the system design is concerned it was soon realized that conventional systems do not hold the promise for competitive power plants. A system analysis led to the conclusion that a new innovative design approach is required. As a result the "Hot Module" system was developed by the consortium. A Hot Module combines all the components of a MCFC system operating at the similar temperatures and pressures into a common thermally insulated vessel. In August 1997 the consortium started its first full size Hot Module MCFC test plant at the facilities of Ruhrgas AG in Dorsten, Germany. The stack was assembled in Munich using 292 cell packages purchased from FCE. The plant is based on the consortium's unique and proprietary "Hot Module" concept. It operates on pipeline natural gas and was grid connected on 16 August 1997. After a total of 1500 h of operation, the plant was intentionally shut down in a controlled manner in April 1998 for post-test analysis. The Hot Module system concept has demonstrated its functionality. The safety concept has been

  5. High performance rotational vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderland, Andrew; Blair, David G.; Ju, Li; Golden, Howard; Torres, Francis; Chen, Xu; Lockwood, Ray; Wolfgram, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We present a new rotational vibration isolator with an extremely low resonant frequency of 0.055 ± 0.002 Hz. The isolator consists of two concentric spheres separated by a layer of water and joined by very soft silicone springs. The isolator reduces rotation noise at all frequencies above its resonance which is very important for airborne mineral detection. We show that more than 40 dB of isolation is achieved in a helicopter survey for rotations at frequencies between 2 Hz and 20 Hz. Issues affecting performance such as translation to rotation coupling and temperature are discussed. The isolator contains almost no metal, making it particularly suitable for electromagnetic sensors.

  6. A high performance magnetoplasmadynamic thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, M.; Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    A flared-anode MPD thruster has been modified to permit injection of propellant through the backplate near the anode wall. At 6 g/sec argon, this thruster displays an onset current of 41.4 kA, almost double the value observed for propellant injection at the cathode and intermediate radial positions. A magnetic field survey of the interelectrode region shows current density is highest at the upstream and downstream ends of the chamber. The operating efficiency at onset current inferred from magnetic field data exceeds 50 percent, but swinging-gate thrust stand measurements reveal a progressive divergence between inferred and actual thrust with increasing power. Near onset, the measured thrust is approximately 20 percent lower than that inferred from magnetic probing. Explanations for this behavior have been explored with viscous drag emerging as the most probable cause of performance degradation.

  7. An Associate Degree in High Performance Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packer, Arnold

    In order for more individuals to enter higher paying jobs, employers must create a sufficient number of high-performance positions (the demand side), and workers must acquire the skills needed to perform in these restructured workplaces (the supply side). Creating an associate degree in High Performance Manufacturing (HPM) will help address four…

  8. Designing high-performance jobs.

    PubMed

    Simons, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Tales of great strategies derailed by poor execution are all too common. That's because some organizations are designed to fail. For a company to achieve its potential, each employee's supply of organizational resources should equal the demand, and the same balance must apply to every business unit and to the company as a whole. To carry out his or her job, each employee has to know the answers to four basic questions: What resources do I control to accomplish my tasks? What measures will be used to evaluate my performance? Who do I need to interact with and influence to achieve my goals? And how much support can I expect when I reach out to others for help? The questions correspond to what the author calls the four basic spans of a job-control, accountability, influence, and support. Each span can be adjusted so that it is narrow or wide or somewhere in between. If you get the settings right, you can design a job in which a talented individual can successfully execute on your company's strategy. If you get the settings wrong, it will be difficult for an employee to be effective. The first step is to set the span of control to reflect the resources allocated to each position and unit that plays an important role in delivering customer value. This setting, like the others, is determined by how the business creates value for customers and differentiates its products and services. Next, you can dial in different levels of entrepreneurial behavior and creative tension by widening or narrowing spans of accountability and influence. Finally, you must adjust the span of support to ensure that the job or unit will get the informal help it needs. PMID:16028816

  9. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

  10. High performance computing and communications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, Lee

    1992-01-01

    A review of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) program is provided in vugraph format. The goals and objectives of this federal program are as follows: extend U.S. leadership in high performance computing and computer communications; disseminate the technologies to speed innovation and to serve national goals; and spur gains in industrial competitiveness by making high performance computing integral to design and production.

  11. Statistical properties of high performance cesium standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percival, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    The intermediate term frequency stability of a group of new high-performance cesium beam tubes at the U.S. Naval Observatory were analyzed from two viewpoints: (1) by comparison of the high-performance standards to the MEAN(USNO) time scale and (2) by intercomparisons among the standards themselves. For sampling times up to 5 days, the frequency stability of the high-performance units shows significant improvement over older commercial cesium beam standards.

  12. Factor Study for the Separator Plate of Mcfc Having Uniform Stiffness at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Jun, Joong-Hwan

    A molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) is composed of several stacks of unit cells. A unit cell is composed of two electrodes and a matrix that is inserted between separator plates. Separator plates should properly contact the electrodes to reduce the electricity loss arising from contact resistance. To this end, a pressure of about 2 kgf/cm2 is usually applied on the top of the stack, which results in the separator plates being somewhat compacted. Furthermore, the stiffness of the separator plates becomes degraded at elevated temperatures due to softening of the plate materials. Therefore, a nonuniform temperature distribution across the separator plates induced by exothermic reactions of the oxidant and reactant gases leads to a non-uniform plate stiffness. This study has firstly evaluated the change in separator plate stiffness as temperature changes by applying pressure to the plates. Secondly, using the Taguchi method, several design factors that affect stiffness have been investigated to determine which has the most influence. Based on these results, a new design for the separators, which allows for uniform stiffness at elevated temperatures, has been proposed.

  13. Study of cobalt-doped lithium-nickel oxides as cathodes for MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Prabhu; Colon, Hector; Haran, Bala; White, Ralph; Popov, Branko N.

    Cobalt substituted lithium-nickel oxides were synthesized by a solid-state reaction procedure using lithium nitrate, nickel hydroxide and cobalt oxalate precursor and were characterized as cathodes for molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). LiNi 0.8Co 0.2O 2 cathodes were prepared using non-aqueous tape casting technique followed by sintering in air. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of sintered LiNi 1- xCo xO 2 indicated that lithium evaporation occurs during heating. The lithium loss decreases with an increase of the cobalt content in the mixed oxides. The stability studies showed that dissolution of nickel into the molten carbonate melt is smaller in the case of LiNi 1- xCo xO 2 cathodes compared to the dissolution values reported in the literature for state-of-the-art NiO. Pore volume analysis of the sintered electrode indicated a mean pore size of 3 μm and a porosity of 40%. A current density of 160 mA/cm 2 was observed when LiNi 0.8Co 0.2O 2 cathodes were polarized at 140 mV. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies done on LiNi 0.8Co 0.2O 2 cathodes under different gas conditions indicated that the rate of the cathodic discharge reaction depends on the O 2 and CO 2 partial pressures.

  14. Effect of lithium carbonate on nickel catalysts for direct internal reforming MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Yun, Jung-Sook; Kwon, Heock-Hoi; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Lee, Ho-In

    Despite many advantages of the direct internal reforming molten carbonate fuel cell (DIR-MCFC) in producing electricity, there are many problems to solve before practical use. The deactivation of reforming catalyst by alkali like lithium is one of the major obstacles to overcome. A promising method is addition of TiO 2 into the Ni/MgO reforming catalyst, which resulted in the increased resistance to lithium poisoning as we previously reported. To understand how added titania worked, it is necessary to elucidate the deactivation mechanism of the catalysts supported on metal oxides such as MgO and MgO-TiO 2 composite oxide. Several supported nickel catalysts deactivated by lithium carbonate were prepared, characterized and evaluated. The Ni/MgO catalyst turned out to be most vulnerable to lithium deactivation among the employed catalysts. The activity of the Ni/MgO gradually decreased to zero with increasing amount of lithium addition. Deactivation by lithium addition resulted from the decrease of active site due to sintering of nickel particles as well as the formation of the Li yNi xMg 1- x- yO ternary solid solution. These were evidenced by H 2 chemisorption, temperature programmed reduction, and XRD analyses. As an effort to minimize Li-poisoning, titanium was introduced to MgO support. This resulted in the formation of Ni/Mg 2TiO 4, which seemed to increase resistance against Li-poisoning.

  15. Status of the M-C Power IMHEX{reg_sign} MCFC commercialization program

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, R.M.; Scroppo, J.A.; Petri, R.J.; Benjamin, T.G.

    1996-12-31

    Six years ago, M-C Power (MCP) developed a comprehensive business plan to commercialize molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plants. On an annual basis the plan has been reviewed and modified to adapt to identified end user needs and technological advancements. As a result, product definition kept abreast with marketing requirements. Over the last five years, there was order and reason for subtle shifts in supply, demand, competition and pricing policies. Today, however, traditional market assessment assumptions must be challenged. There is a revolution taking place. The revolution can be summed up in one word ... deregulation. Deregulation of the airline industry led to consideration of the natural gas industry. Now that natural gas deregulation is behind us, it is electric power and telecommunications that are receiving attention. Increased emphasis is being placed on achieving market-priced power. The net result will be thinner margins for the seller and the end user. What does this mean for the commercialization of molten carbonate fuel cells?

  16. Method of making a high performance ultracapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

    2000-05-09

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

  17. Method of making a high performance ultracapacitor

    DOEpatents

    Farahmandi, C. Joseph; Dispennette, John M.

    2000-07-26

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg.

  18. High performance carbon nanocomposites for ultracapacitors

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to composite electrodes for electrochemical devices, particularly to carbon nanotube composite electrodes for high performance electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors.

  19. Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Holton, J.

    2012-02-01

    The Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The high performance lighting strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner's expectations for high quality lighting.

  20. Common Factors of High Performance Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Bruce; Madsen, Susan R.

    2005-01-01

    Utilization of work teams is now wide spread in all types of organizations throughout the world. However, an understanding of the important factors common to high performance teams is rare. The purpose of this content analysis is to explore the literature and propose findings related to high performance teams. These include definition and types,…

  1. Turning High-Poverty Schools into High-Performing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrett, William H.; Budge, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    If some schools can overcome the powerful and pervasive effects of poverty to become high performing, shouldn't any school be able to do the same? Shouldn't we be compelled to learn from those schools? Although schools alone will never systemically eliminate poverty, high-poverty, high-performing (HP/HP) schools take control of what they can to…

  2. High performance computing at Sandia National Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, R.M.; Noe, J.P.; Vandevender, W.H.

    1995-10-01

    Sandia`s High Performance Computing Environment requires a hierarchy of resources ranging from desktop, to department, to centralized, and finally to very high-end corporate resources capable of teraflop performance linked via high-capacity Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) networks. The mission of the Scientific Computing Systems Department is to provide the support infrastructure for an integrated corporate scientific computing environment that will meet Sandia`s needs in high-performance and midrange computing, network storage, operational support tools, and systems management. This paper describes current efforts at SNL/NM to expand and modernize centralized computing resources in support of this mission.

  3. Strategy Guideline. Partnering for High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Prahl, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. This guide is intended for use by all parties associated in the design and construction of high performance homes. It serves as a starting point and features initial tools and resources for teams to collaborate to continually improve the energy efficiency and durability of new houses.

  4. Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) product development test. Annual report, September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    M-C Power Corporation will design, fabricate, install, test and evaluate a 250 kW Proof-of-Concept Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Power Plant. The plant is to be located at the Naval Air Station Miramar in San Diego, California. This report summarizes the technical progress that has occurred in conjunction with this project in 1994. M-C Power has completed the tape casting and sintering of cathodes and is proceeding with the tape casting and sintering of anodes for the first 250 cell stack. M-C Power and San Diego Gas and Electric relocated the fuel cell demonstration project to an alternate site at the Naval Air Station Miramar. For the new project location at the Naval Air Station Miramar, an Environmental Assessment has been prepared by the Department of Energy in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. The Environmental Assessment resulted in a categorical exclusion of the proposed action from all environmental permit requirements. Bechtel Corporation has completed the reformer process design coordination, a Process Description, the Pipe and Instrumentation Diagrams, a Design Criteria Document and General Project Requirement Document. Bechtel developed the requirements for soils investigation report and issued the following equipment bid packages to the suppliers for bids: Inverter, Reformer, Desulfurization Vessels, Hot Gas Recycle Blower, Heat Recovery Steam Generator, and Recycle Gas Cooler. SDG and E has secured necessary site permits, conducted soils investigations, and is working on the construction plan. They are in final negotiations with the US Navy on a site agreement. Site drawings are required for finalization of the agreement.

  5. Common Elements of High Performing, High Poverty Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Examined over 3 years high-achieving high-poverty middle schools to determine school practices and policies associated with higher student achievement. Found that high-poverty middle schools that are high performing acquire grants and manage money well, use a variety of teaming configurations, and use data-based goals to improve student…

  6. ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability.

  7. Dinosaurs can fly -- High performance refining

    SciTech Connect

    Treat, J.E.

    1995-09-01

    High performance refining requires that one develop a winning strategy based on a clear understanding of one`s position in one`s company`s value chain; one`s competitive position in the products markets one serves; and the most likely drivers and direction of future market forces. The author discussed all three points, then described measuring performance of the company. To become a true high performance refiner often involves redesigning the organization as well as the business processes. The author discusses such redesigning. The paper summarizes ten rules to follow to achieve high performance: listen to the market; optimize; organize around asset or area teams; trust the operators; stay flexible; source strategically; all maintenance is not equal; energy is not free; build project discipline; and measure and reward performance. The paper then discusses the constraints to the implementation of change.

  8. High performance pitch-based carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Tadokoro, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Hirotaka; Furuyama, Masatoshi

    1996-12-31

    The high performance pitch-based carbon fiber with smaller diameter, six micro in developed by Nippon Graphite Fiber Corporation. This fiber possesses high tensile modulus, high tensile strength, excellent yarn handle ability, low thermal expansion coefficient, and high thermal conductivity which make it an ideal material for space applications such as artificial satellites. Performance of this fiber as a reinforcement of composites was sufficient. With these characteristics, this pitch-based carbon fiber is expected to find wide variety of possible applications in space structures, industrial field, sporting goods and civil infrastructures.

  9. High-performance computing — an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marksteiner, Peter

    1996-08-01

    An overview of high-performance computing (HPC) is given. Different types of computer architectures used in HPC are discussed: vector supercomputers, high-performance RISC processors, various parallel computers like symmetric multiprocessors, workstation clusters, massively parallel processors. Software tools and programming techniques used in HPC are reviewed: vectorizing compilers, optimization and vector tuning, optimization for RISC processors; parallel programming techniques like shared-memory parallelism, message passing and data parallelism; and numerical libraries.

  10. Highlighting High Performance: Whitman Hanson Regional High School; Whitman, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    This brochure describes the key high-performance building features of the Whitman-Hanson Regional High School. The brochure was paid for by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative as part of their Green Schools Initiative. High-performance features described are daylighting and energy-efficient lighting, indoor air quality, solar and wind energy, building envelope, heating and cooling systems, water conservation, and acoustics. Energy cost savings are also discussed.

  11. Overview of high performance aircraft propulsion research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall scope of the NASA Lewis High Performance Aircraft Propulsion Research Program is presented. High performance fighter aircraft of interest include supersonic flights with such capabilities as short take off and vertical landing (STOVL) and/or high maneuverability. The NASA Lewis effort involving STOVL propulsion systems is focused primarily on component-level experimental and analytical research. The high-maneuverability portion of this effort, called the High Alpha Technology Program (HATP), is part of a cooperative program among NASA's Lewis, Langley, Ames, and Dryden facilities. The overall objective of the NASA Inlet Experiments portion of the HATP, which NASA Lewis leads, is to develop and enhance inlet technology that will ensure high performance and stability of the propulsion system during aircraft maneuvers at high angles of attack. To accomplish this objective, both wind-tunnel and flight experiments are used to obtain steady-state and dynamic data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are used for analyses. This overview of the High Performance Aircraft Propulsion Research Program includes a sampling of the results obtained thus far and plans for the future.

  12. High Performance Work Systems for Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contacos-Sawyer, Jonna; Revels, Mark; Ciampa, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the key elements of a High Performance Work System (HPWS) and explore the possibility of implementation in an online institution of higher learning. With the projected rapid growth of the demand for online education and its importance in post-secondary education, providing high quality curriculum, excellent…

  13. Development of a high performance peristaltic micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, My; Goo, Nam Seo

    2008-03-01

    In this study, a high performance peristaltic micropump has been developed and investigated. The micropump has three cylinder chambers which are connected through micro-channels for high pumping pressure performance. A circular-shaped mini LIPCA has been designed and manufactured for actuating diaphragm. In this LIPCA, a 0.1mm thickness PZT ceramic is used as an active layer. As a result, the actuator has shown to produce large out of plane deflection and consumed low power. During the design process, a coupled field analysis was conducted to predict the actuating behavior of a diaphragm and pumping performance. MEMS technique was used to fabricate the peristaltic micropump. Pumping performance of the present micropump was investigated both numerically and experimentally. The present peristaltic micropump was shown to have higher performance than the same kind of micropump developed else where.

  14. High Performance Computing in Solid Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, V. C.; Manea, M.; Pomeran, M.; Besutiu, L.; Zlagnean, L.

    2012-04-01

    Presently, the solid earth sciences started to move towards implementing high performance computational (HPC) research facilities. One of the key tenants of HPC is performance, and designing a HPC solution tailored to a specific research field as solid earth that represents an optimum price/performance ratio is often a challenge. The HPC system performance strongly depends on the software-hardware interaction, and therefore prior knowledge on how well specific parallelized software performs on different HPC architectures can weight significantly on choosing the final configuration. In this paper we present benchmark results from two different HPC systems: one low-end HPCC (Horus) with 300 cores and 1.6 TFlops theoretical peak performance, and one high-end HPCC (CyberDyn) with 1344 cores and 11.2 TFlops theoretical peak performance. The software benchmark used in this paper is the open source package CitcomS, which is widely used in the solid earth community (www.geodynamics.org). Testing a CFD code specific for earth sciences, the HPC system Horus based on Gigabit Ethernet performed remarkably well compared with its counterpart Cyeberdyn which is based on Infiniband QDR fabric, but only for a relatively small number of computing cores (96). However, increasing the mesh size and the number of computing cores the HPCC CyberDyn starts outperforming the HPCC Horus because of the low-latency high-speed QDR network dedicated to MPI traffic. Since presently we are moving towards high-resolution simulations for geodynamic predictions that require the same scale as observations, HPC facilities used in earth sciences should benefit from larger up-front investment in future systems that are based on high-speed interconnects.

  15. Feasibility study of the co-generation system with direct internal reforming-molten carbonate fuel cell (DIR-MCFC) for residential use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kimihiko; Naruse, Ichiro

    The possibility of introducing a co-generation system with a direct internal reforming-molten carbonate fuel cell (DIR-MCFC) for residential use is examined by a feasibility study. First, the structure of a system, which can maintain the cell temperature (650 °C) without the heat supply, is constructed by calculating heat and material balances among the system components. Secondly, a model family, which might use the co-generation system with a DIR-MCFC, is constructed from the results of a questionnaire on room layout, number of family members, and the number of electric appliances and consumption of electric power in Osaka. Thirdly, calculating the electric power and hot-water demand supply balance optimizes the scale of the co-generation system with a DIR-MCFC for residential use. Finally, the running costs of this optimum system using city gas or propane gas are considered. As a result, the optimum scale of a co-generation system a with DIR-MCFC and using city gas is 3 kW, while it is 6 kW for the case using propane gas. The co-generation system using city gas is suitable for a house. On the other hand, the system using propane gas is suitable for an apartment.

  16. High performance bio-integrated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Lee, Jongha; Park, Minjoon

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, personalized electronics for medical applications, particularly, have attracted much attention with the rise of smartphones because the coupling of such devices and smartphones enables the continuous health-monitoring in patients' daily life. Especially, it is expected that the high performance biomedical electronics integrated with the human body can open new opportunities in the ubiquitous healthcare. However, the mechanical and geometrical constraints inherent in all standard forms of high performance rigid wafer-based electronics raise unique integration challenges with biotic entities. Here, we describe materials and design constructs for high performance skin-mountable bio-integrated electronic devices, which incorporate arrays of single crystalline inorganic nanomembranes. The resulting electronic devices include flexible and stretchable electrophysiology electrodes and sensors coupled with active electronic components. These advances in bio-integrated systems create new directions in the personalized health monitoring and/or human-machine interfaces.

  17. Engineering high-performance vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.; Hou, H.Q.; Hietala, V.M.; Choquette, K.D.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The cw and high-speed performance of vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSELs) are affected by both electrical and optical issues arising from the geometry and fabrication of these devices. Structures with low resistance semiconductor mirrors and Al-oxide confinement layers address these issues and have produced record performance including 50% power conversion efficiency and modulation bandwidths up to 20 GHz at small bias currents.

  18. Programming high-performance reconfigurable computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Melissa C.; Peterson, Gregory D.

    2001-07-01

    High Performance Computers (HPC) provide dramatically improved capabilities for a number of defense and commercial applications, but often are too expensive to acquire and to program. The smaller market and customized nature of HPC architectures combine to increase the cost of most such platforms. To address the problems with high hardware costs, one may create more inexpensive Beowolf clusters of dedicated commodity processors. Despite the benefit of reduced hardware costs, programming the HPC platforms to achieve high performance often proves extremely time-consuming and expensive in practice. In recent years, programming productivity gains come from the development of common APIs and libraries of functions to support distributed applications. Examples include PVM, MPI, BLAS, and VSIPL. The implementation of each API or library is optimized for a given platform, but application developers can write code that is portable across specific HPC architectures. The application of reconfigurable computing (RC) into HPC platforms promises significantly enhanced performance and flexibility at a modest cost. Unfortunately, configuring (programming) the reconfigurable computing nodes remains a challenging task and relatively little work to date has focused on potential high performance reconfigurable computing (HPRC) platforms consisting of reconfigurable nodes paired with processing nodes. This paper addresses the challenge of effectively exploiting HPRC resources by first considering the performance evaluation and optimization problem before turning to improving the programming infrastructure used for porting applications to HPRC platforms.

  19. Performance variability of highly parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, William T.C.; Ryan, Clint

    2003-05-01

    The design and evaluation of high performance computers has concentrated on increasing computational speed for applications. This performance is often measured on a well configured dedicated system to show the best case. In the real environment, resources are not always dedicated to a single task, and systems run tasks that may influence each other, so run times vary, sometimes to an unreasonably large extent. This paper explores the amount of variation seen across four large distributed memory systems in a systematic manner. It then analyzes the causes for the variations seen and discusses what can be done to decrease the variation without impacting performance.

  20. Achieving High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, metal halide perovskite based solar cell with the characteristics of rather low raw materials cost, great potential for simple process and scalable production, and extreme high power conversion efficiency (PCE), have been highlighted as one of the most competitive technologies for next generation thin film photovoltaic (PV). In UCLA, we have realized an efficient pathway to achieve high performance pervoskite solar cells, where the findings are beneficial to this unique materials/devices system. Our recent progress lies in perovskite film formation, defect passivation, transport materials design, interface engineering with respect to high performance solar cell, as well as the exploration of its applications beyond photovoltaics. These achievements include: 1) development of vapor assisted solution process (VASP) and moisture assisted solution process, which produces perovskite film with improved conformity, high crystallinity, reduced recombination rate, and the resulting high performance; 2) examination of the defects property of perovskite materials, and demonstration of a self-induced passivation approach to reduce carrier recombination; 3) interface engineering based on design of the carrier transport materials and the electrodes, in combination with high quality perovskite film, which delivers 15 ~ 20% PCEs; 4) a novel integration of bulk heterojunction to perovskite solar cell to achieve better light harvest; 5) fabrication of inverted solar cell device with high efficiency and flexibility and 6) exploration the application of perovskite materials to photodetector. Further development in film, device architecture, and interfaces will lead to continuous improved perovskite solar cells and other organic-inorganic hybrid optoelectronics.

  1. Performance analysis of memory hierachies in high performance systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yogesh, A.

    1993-07-01

    This thesis studies memory bandwidth as a performance predictor of programs. The focus of this work is on computationally intensive programs. These programs are the most likely to access large amounts of data, stressing the memory system. Computationally intensive programs are also likely to use highly optimizing compilers to produce the fastest executables possible. Methods to reduce the amount of data traffic by increasing the average number of references to each item while it resides in the cache are explored. Increasing the average number of references to each cache item reduces the number of memory requests. Chapter 2 describes the DLX architecture. This is the architecture on which all the experiments were performed. Chapter 3 studies memory moves as a performance predictor for a group of application programs. Chapter 4 introduces a model to study the performance of programs in the presence of memory hierarchies. Chapter 5 explores some compiler optimizations that can help increase the references to each item while it resides in the cache.

  2. Strategy Guideline: Partnering for High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Prahl, D.

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. In an environment where the builder is the only source of communication between trades and consultants and where relationships are, in general, adversarial as opposed to cooperative, the chances of any one building system to fail are greater. Furthermore, it is much harder for the builder to identify and capitalize on synergistic opportunities. Partnering can help bridge the cross-functional aspects of the systems approach and achieve performance-based criteria. Critical success factors for partnering include support from top management, mutual trust, effective and open communication, effective coordination around common goals, team building, appropriate use of an outside facilitator, a partnering charter progress toward common goals, an effective problem-solving process, long-term commitment, continuous improvement, and a positive experience for all involved.

  3. High Performance Computing and Communications Panel Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, Washington, DC.

    This report offers advice on the strengths and weaknesses of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) initiative, one of five presidential initiatives launched in 1992 and coordinated by the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology. The HPCC program has the following objectives: (1) to extend U.S.…

  4. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Imagine Homes

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Imagine Homes, working with the DOE's Building America research team member IBACOS, has developed a system that can be replicated by other contractors to build affordable, high-performance homes. Imagine Homes has used the system to produce more than 70 Builders Challenge-certified homes per year in San Antonio over the past five years.

  5. Co-design for high performance computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, Sudip Singh; Hemmert, Karl Scott; Rodrigues, Arun F.

    2010-07-01

    Co-design has been identified as a key strategy for achieving Exascale computing in this decade. This paper describes the need for co-design in High Performance Computing related research in embedded computing the development of hardware/software co-simulation methods.

  6. Performing Arts High Schools: A Burgeoning Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses performing arts high schools that train students in general education and music, visual arts, theater, and dance. Enumerates purposes, advantages (mainly, a challenging and motivating atmosphere with opportunities to concentrate in one area), and problems (funding, understaffing, academic standards, and admission criteria). Advises…

  7. Debugging a high performance computing program

    DOEpatents

    Gooding, Thomas M.

    2014-08-19

    Methods, apparatus, and computer program products are disclosed for debugging a high performance computing program by gathering lists of addresses of calling instructions for a plurality of threads of execution of the program, assigning the threads to groups in dependence upon the addresses, and displaying the groups to identify defective threads.

  8. Debugging a high performance computing program

    DOEpatents

    Gooding, Thomas M.

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus, and computer program products are disclosed for debugging a high performance computing program by gathering lists of addresses of calling instructions for a plurality of threads of execution of the program, assigning the threads to groups in dependence upon the addresses, and displaying the groups to identify defective threads.

  9. High Performance Work Organizations. Myths and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Organizations are being urged to become "high performance work organizations" (HPWOs) and vocational teachers have begun considering how best to prepare workers for them. Little consensus exists as to what HPWOs are. Several common characteristics of HPWOs have been identified, and two distinct models of HPWOs are emerging in the United States.…

  10. Project materials [Commercial High Performance Buildings Project

    SciTech Connect

    2001-01-01

    The Consortium for High Performance Buildings (ChiPB) is an outgrowth of DOE'S Commercial Whole Buildings Roadmapping initiatives. It is a team-driven public/private partnership that seeks to enable and demonstrate the benefit of buildings that are designed, built and operated to be energy efficient, environmentally sustainable, superior quality, and cost effective.

  11. Using LEADS to shift to high performance.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Shauna; Hagge, Erna

    2016-03-01

    Health systems across Canada are tasked to measure results of all their strategic initiatives. Included in most strategic plans is leadership development. How to measure leadership effectiveness in relation to organizational objectives is key in determining organizational effectiveness. The following findings offer considerations for a 21(st)-century approach to shifting to high-performance systems. PMID:26872796

  12. Commercial Buildings High Performance Rooftop Unit Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commercial Building Energy Alliances (CBEAs) are releasing a new design specification for high performance rooftop air conditioning units (RTUs). Manufacturers who develop RTUs based on this new specification will find strong interest from the commercial sector due to the energy and financial savings.

  13. High-Performance, Low Environmental Impact Refrigerants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCullough, E. T.; Dhooge, P. M.; Glass, S. M.; Nimitz, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    Refrigerants used in process and facilities systems in the US include R-12, R-22, R-123, R-134a, R-404A, R-410A, R-500, and R-502. All but R-134a, R-404A, and R-410A contain ozone-depleting substances that will be phased out under the Montreal Protocol. Some of the substitutes do not perform as well as the refrigerants they are replacing, require new equipment, and have relatively high global warming potentials (GWPs). New refrigerants are needed that addresses environmental, safety, and performance issues simultaneously. In efforts sponsored by Ikon Corporation, NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), ETEC has developed and tested a new class of refrigerants, the Ikon (registered) refrigerants, based on iodofluorocarbons (IFCs). These refrigerants are nonflammable, have essentially zero ozone-depletion potential (ODP), low GWP, high performance (energy efficiency and capacity), and can be dropped into much existing equipment.

  14. Strategy Guideline. High Performance Residential Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Holton, J.

    2012-02-01

    This report has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner’s expectations for high quality lighting.

  15. Failure analysis of high performance ballistic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spatola, Jennifer S.

    High performance fibers have a high tensile strength and modulus, good wear resistance, and a low density, making them ideal for applications in ballistic impact resistance, such as body armor. However, the observed ballistic performance of these fibers is much lower than the predicted values. Since the predictions assume only tensile stress failure, it is safe to assume that the stress state is affecting fiber performance. The purpose of this research was to determine if there are failure mode changes in the fiber fracture when transversely loaded by indenters of different shapes. An experimental design mimicking transverse impact was used to determine any such effects. Three different indenters were used: round, FSP, and razor blade. The indenter height was changed to change the angle of failure tested. Five high performance fibers were examined: KevlarRTM KM2, SpectraRTM 130d, DyneemaRTM SK-62 and SK-76, and ZylonRTM 555. Failed fibers were analyzed using an SEM to determine failure mechanisms. The results show that the round and razor blade indenters produced a constant failure strain, as well as failure mechanisms independent of testing angle. The FSP indenter produced a decrease in failure strain as the angle increased. Fibrillation was the dominant failure mechanism at all angles for the round indenter, while through thickness shearing was the failure mechanism for the razor blade. The FSP indenter showed a transition from fibrillation at low angles to through thickness shearing at high angles, indicating that the round and razor blade indenters are extreme cases of the FSP indenter. The failure mechanisms observed with the FSP indenter at various angles correlated with the experimental strain data obtained during fiber testing. This indicates that geometry of the indenter tip in compression is a contributing factor in lowering the failure strain of the high performance fibers. TEM analysis of the fiber failure mechanisms was also attempted, though without

  16. High performance anode for advanced Li batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, Carla

    2015-11-02

    The overall objective of this Phase I SBIR effort was to advance the manufacturing technology for ASI’s Si-CNF high-performance anode by creating a framework for large volume production and utilization of low-cost Si-coated carbon nanofibers (Si-CNF) for the battery industry. This project explores the use of nano-structured silicon which is deposited on a nano-scale carbon filament to achieve the benefits of high cycle life and high charge capacity without the consequent fading of, or failure in the capacity resulting from stress-induced fracturing of the Si particles and de-coupling from the electrode. ASI’s patented coating process distinguishes itself from others, in that it is highly reproducible, readily scalable and results in a Si-CNF composite structure containing 25-30% silicon, with a compositionally graded interface at the Si-CNF interface that significantly improve cycling stability and enhances adhesion of silicon to the carbon fiber support. In Phase I, the team demonstrated the production of the Si-CNF anode material can successfully be transitioned from a static bench-scale reactor into a fluidized bed reactor. In addition, ASI made significant progress in the development of low cost, quick testing methods which can be performed on silicon coated CNFs as a means of quality control. To date, weight change, density, and cycling performance were the key metrics used to validate the high performance anode material. Under this effort, ASI made strides to establish a quality control protocol for the large volume production of Si-CNFs and has identified several key technical thrusts for future work. Using the results of this Phase I effort as a foundation, ASI has defined a path forward to commercialize and deliver high volume and low-cost production of SI-CNF material for anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  17. High performance RGB LED backlight in high temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabski, Grzegorz; Gurr, Walter; Green, John

    2008-04-01

    The Aerospace and Defense display industry is in the midst of converting light the sources used in AMLCD backlighting technology from fluorescent lamps to LEDs. Although challenging, the fluorescent backlighting technology delivered good product in high end applications. LEDs, however, have the promise of even greater efficiency and lower cost. The history of LED backlighting is short and very dynamic; expectations are high and promises are many. It appears that for engineers developing backlights for high performance displays life has not become easier with the change of the technology. This paper will discuss just one of many challenges engineer's face: operation of LED backlights in high temperature environments. It will present experimental data showing several advantages of the RGB LED technology over other lamp technologies for high performance commercial and military application.

  18. A Linux Workstation for High Performance Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geist, Robert; Westall, James

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of this effort was to provide a low-cost method of obtaining high-performance 3-D graphics using an industry standard library (OpenGL) on PC class computers. Previously, users interested in doing substantial visualization or graphical manipulation were constrained to using specialized, custom hardware most often found in computers from Silicon Graphics (SGI). We provided an alternative to expensive SGI hardware by taking advantage of third-party, 3-D graphics accelerators that have now become available at very affordable prices. To make use of this hardware our goal was to provide a free, redistributable, and fully-compatible OpenGL work-alike library so that existing bodies of code could simply be recompiled. for PC class machines running a free version of Unix. This should allow substantial cost savings while greatly expanding the population of people with access to a serious graphics development and viewing environment. This should offer a means for NASA to provide a spectrum of graphics performance to its scientists, supplying high-end specialized SGI hardware for high-performance visualization while fulfilling the requirements of medium and lower performance applications with generic, off-the-shelf components and still maintaining compatibility between the two.

  19. High Performance Commercial Fenestration Framing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Manteghi; Sneh Kumar; Joshua Early; Bhaskar Adusumalli

    2010-01-31

    A major objective of the U.S. Department of Energy is to have a zero energy commercial building by the year 2025. Windows have a major influence on the energy performance of the building envelope as they control over 55% of building energy load, and represent one important area where technologies can be developed to save energy. Aluminum framing systems are used in over 80% of commercial fenestration products (i.e. windows, curtain walls, store fronts, etc.). Aluminum framing systems are often required in commercial buildings because of their inherent good structural properties and long service life, which is required from commercial and architectural frames. At the same time, they are lightweight and durable, requiring very little maintenance, and offer design flexibility. An additional benefit of aluminum framing systems is their relatively low cost and easy manufacturability. Aluminum, being an easily recyclable material, also offers sustainable features. However, from energy efficiency point of view, aluminum frames have lower thermal performance due to the very high thermal conductivity of aluminum. Fenestration systems constructed of aluminum alloys therefore have lower performance in terms of being effective barrier to energy transfer (heat loss or gain). Despite the lower energy performance, aluminum is the choice material for commercial framing systems and dominates the commercial/architectural fenestration market because of the reasons mentioned above. In addition, there is no other cost effective and energy efficient replacement material available to take place of aluminum in the commercial/architectural market. Hence it is imperative to improve the performance of aluminum framing system to improve the energy performance of commercial fenestration system and in turn reduce the energy consumption of commercial building and achieve zero energy building by 2025. The objective of this project was to develop high performance, energy efficient commercial

  20. An Introduction to High Performance Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Sérgio

    2013-09-01

    High Performance Computing (HPC) has become an essential tool in every researcher's arsenal. Most research problems nowadays can be simulated, clarified or experimentally tested by using computational simulations. Researchers struggle with computational problems when they should be focusing on their research problems. Since most researchers have little-to-no knowledge in low-level computer science, they tend to look at computer programs as extensions of their minds and bodies instead of completely autonomous systems. Since computers do not work the same way as humans, the result is usually Low Performance Computing where HPC would be expected.

  1. High speed, high performance /Hg,Cd/Te photodiode detectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, D. A.; Pinkston, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The current performance of high speed photodiode detectors for the 1 to 10 micron spectral region is discussed. The (Hg,Cd)Te photodiode configuration, detector properties, integration in laser receiver modules, and frequency response are considered for near infrared and far infrared wavelengths. The recent advances in (Hg,Cd)Te material and device development are indicated by the realization not only of exceptionally high speed detectors but of detectors that exhibit excellent detectivities. The performance improves substantially when the detector is cooled. This detector junction technology has been extended to other compositions of (Hg,Cd)Te for peak spectral responses at 5 and 10 micron.

  2. Poisson's ratio of high-performance concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, B.

    1999-10-01

    This article outlines an experimental and numerical study on Poisson's ratio of high-performance concrete subjected to air or sealed curing. Eight qualities of concrete (about 100 cylinders and 900 cubes) were studied, both young and in the mature state. The concretes contained between 5 and 10% silica fume, and two concretes in addition contained air-entrainment. Parallel studies of strength and internal relative humidity were carried out. The results indicate that Poisson's ratio of high-performance concrete is slightly smaller than that of normal-strength concrete. Analyses of the influence of maturity, type of aggregate, and moisture on Poisson's ratio are also presented. The project was carried out from 1991 to 1998.

  3. Evaluation of high-performance computing software

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, S.; Dongarra, J.; Rowan, T.

    1996-12-31

    The absence of unbiased and up to date comparative evaluations of high-performance computing software complicates a user`s search for the appropriate software package. The National HPCC Software Exchange (NHSE) is attacking this problem using an approach that includes independent evaluations of software, incorporation of author and user feedback into the evaluations, and Web access to the evaluations. We are applying this approach to the Parallel Tools Library (PTLIB), a new software repository for parallel systems software and tools, and HPC-Netlib, a high performance branch of the Netlib mathematical software repository. Updating the evaluations with feed-back and making it available via the Web helps ensure accuracy and timeliness, and using independent reviewers produces unbiased comparative evaluations difficult to find elsewhere.

  4. High-performance parallel input device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, R. W.; Fischer, Patrick J.; Hunter, B.

    1993-12-01

    Research into force reflecting remote manipulation has recently started to move away from common error systems towards explicit force control. In order to maximize the benefit provided by explicit force reflection the designer has to take into account the asymmetry of the bandwidths of the forward and reflecting loops. This paper reports on a high performance system designed and built at Oxford University and Harwell Laboratories and on the preliminary results achieved when performing simple force reflecting tasks. The input device is based on a modified Stewart Platform, which offers the potential of very high bandwidth force reflection, well above the normal 2 - 10 Hz range achieved with common error systems. The slave is a nuclear hardened Puma industrial robot, offering a low cost, reliable solution to remote manipulation tasks.

  5. Monitoring SLAC High Performance UNIX Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lettsome, Annette K.; /Bethune-Cookman Coll. /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    Knowledge of the effectiveness and efficiency of computers is important when working with high performance systems. The monitoring of such systems is advantageous in order to foresee possible misfortunes or system failures. Ganglia is a software system designed for high performance computing systems to retrieve specific monitoring information. An alternative storage facility for Ganglia's collected data is needed since its default storage system, the round-robin database (RRD), struggles with data integrity. The creation of a script-driven MySQL database solves this dilemma. This paper describes the process took in the creation and implementation of the MySQL database for use by Ganglia. Comparisons between data storage by both databases are made using gnuplot and Ganglia's real-time graphical user interface.

  6. High performance forward swept wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, David G. (Inventor); Aoyagi, Kiyoshi (Inventor); Dudley, Michael R. (Inventor); Schmidt, Susan B. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A high performance aircraft capable of subsonic, transonic and supersonic speeds employs a forward swept wing planform and at least one first and second solution ejector located on the inboard section of the wing. A high degree of flow control on the inboard sections of the wing is achieved along with improved maneuverability and control of pitch, roll and yaw. Lift loss is delayed to higher angles of attack than in conventional aircraft. In one embodiment the ejectors may be advantageously positioned spanwise on the wing while the ductwork is kept to a minimum.

  7. Toward a theory of high performance.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Julia

    2005-01-01

    What does it mean to be a high-performance company? The process of measuring relative performance across industries and eras, declaring top performers, and finding the common drivers of their success is such a difficult one that it might seem a fool's errand to attempt. In fact, no one did for the first thousand or so years of business history. The question didn't even occur to many scholars until Tom Peters and Bob Waterman released In Search of Excellence in 1982. Twenty-three years later, we've witnessed several more attempts--and, just maybe, we're getting closer to answers. In this reported piece, HBR senior editor Julia Kirby explores why it's so difficult to study high performance and how various research efforts--including those from John Kotter and Jim Heskett; Jim Collins and Jerry Porras; Bill Joyce, Nitin Nohria, and Bruce Roberson; and several others outlined in a summary chart-have attacked the problem. The challenge starts with deciding which companies to study closely. Are the stars the ones with the highest market caps, the ones with the greatest sales growth, or simply the ones that remain standing at the end of the game? (And when's the end of the game?) Each major study differs in how it defines success, which companies it therefore declares to be worthy of emulation, and the patterns of activity and attitude it finds in common among them. Yet, Kirby concludes, as each study's method incrementally solves problems others have faced, we are progressing toward a consensus theory of high performance. PMID:16028814

  8. Design of high performance piezo composites actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almajid, Abdulhakim A.

    Design of high performance piezo composites actuators are developed. Functionally Graded Microstructure (FGM) piezoelectric actuators are designed to reduce the stress concentration at the middle interface existed in the standard bimorph actuators while maintaining high actuation performance. The FGM piezoelectric laminates are composite materials with electroelastic properties varied through the laminate thickness. The elastic behavior of piezo-laminates actuators is developed using a 2D-elasticity model and a modified classical lamination theory (CLT). The stresses and out-of-plane displacements are obtained for standard and FGM piezoelectric bimorph plates under cylindrical bending generated by an electric field throughout the thickness of the laminate. The analytical model is developed for two different actuator geometries, a rectangular plate actuator and a disk shape actuator. The limitations of CLT are investigated against the 2D-elasticity model for the rectangular plate geometry. The analytical models based on CLT (rectangular and circular) and 2D-elasticity are compared with a model based on Finite Element Method (FEM). The experimental study consists of two FGM actuator systems, the PZT/PZT FGM system and the porous FGM system. The electroelastic properties of each layer in the FGM systems were measured and input in the analytical models to predict the FGM actuator performance. The performance of the FGM actuator is optimized by manipulating the thickness of each layer in the FGM system. The thickness of each layer in the FGM system is made to vary in a linear or non-linear manner to achieve the best performance of the FGM piezoelectric actuator. The analytical and FEM results are found to agree well with the experimental measurements for both rectangular and disk actuators. CLT solutions are found to coincide well with the elasticity solutions for high aspect ratios while the CLT solutions gave poor results compared to the 2D elasticity solutions for

  9. Tough, High-Performance, Thermoplastic Addition Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Proctor, K. Mason; Gleason, John; Morgan, Cassandra; Partos, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Series of addition-type thermoplastics (ATT's) exhibit useful properties. Because of their addition curing and linear structure, ATT polymers have toughness, like thermoplastics, and easily processed, like thermosets. Work undertaken to develop chemical reaction forming stable aromatic rings in backbone of ATT polymer, combining high-temperature performance and thermo-oxidative stability with toughness and easy processibility, and minimizing or eliminating necessity for tradeoffs among properties often observed in conventional polymer syntheses.

  10. High Performance Databases For Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, James C.; Grimshaw, Andrew S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal for this task is to develop an Extensible File System (ELFS). ELFS attacks the problem of the following: 1. Providing high bandwidth performance architectures; 2. Reducing the cognitive burden faced by applications programmers when they attempt to optimize; and 3. Seamlessly managing the proliferation of data formats and architectural differences. The approach for ELFS solution consists of language and run-time system support that permits the specification on a hierarchy of file classes.

  11. High performance microsystem packaging: A perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Romig, A.D. Jr.; Dressendorfer, P.V.; Palmer, D.W.

    1997-10-01

    The second silicon revolution will be based on intelligent, integrated microsystems where multiple technologies (such as analog, digital, memory, sensor, micro-electro-mechanical, and communication devices) are integrated onto a single chip or within a multichip module. A necessary element for such systems is cost-effective, high-performance packaging. This paper examines many of the issues associated with the packaging of integrated microsystems, with an emphasis on the areas of packaging design, manufacturability, and reliability.

  12. High temperature furnace modeling and performance verifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical, numerical, and experimental studies were performed on two classes of high temperature materials processing sources for their potential use as directional solidification furnaces. The research concentrated on a commercially available high temperature furnace using a zirconia ceramic tube as the heating element and an Arc Furnace based on a tube welder. The first objective was to assemble the zirconia furnace and construct parts needed to successfully perform experiments. The 2nd objective was to evaluate the zirconia furnace performance as a directional solidification furnace element. The 3rd objective was to establish a data base on materials used in the furnace construction, with particular emphasis on emissivities, transmissivities, and absorptivities as functions of wavelength and temperature. A 1-D and 2-D spectral radiation heat transfer model was developed for comparison with standard modeling techniques, and were used to predict wall and crucible temperatures. The 4th objective addressed the development of a SINDA model for the Arc Furnace and was used to design sample holders and to estimate cooling media temperatures for the steady state operation of the furnace. And, the 5th objective addressed the initial performance evaluation of the Arc Furnace and associated equipment for directional solidification. Results of these objectives are presented.

  13. SOAR Telescope: 4-meter high-performance-mount performance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Michael; Krabbendam, Victor; Schumacher, German; Delgadillo, Juan C.

    2004-09-01

    The 4.1-meter SOuthern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope mount and drive systems have been commissioned and are in routine operation. The telescope mount, the structure and its full drive systems, was fully erected and tested at the factory prior to reassembly and commissioning at the observatory. This successful approach enabled complete integration, from a concrete pier to a pointing and tracking telescope, on the mountain, in a rapid 3-month period. The telescope mount with its high instrument payload and demanding efficiency requirements is an important component for the success of the SOAR scientific mission. The SOAR mount utilizes rolling element bearings for both azimuth and elevation support, counter torqued sets of gear motors on azimuth and two frameless torque motors built into the elevation axles. Tracking jitter and its associated spectra, pointing errors and their sources, bearing friction and servo performances are critical criteria for this mount concept and are important factors in achieving the mission. This paper addresses the performance results obtained during the integration, commissioning, and first light periods of the telescope mount system.

  14. Computational Biology and High Performance Computing 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.; Zorn, Manfred D.; Spengler, Sylvia J.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Stewart, Craig; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2000-10-19

    The pace of extraordinary advances in molecular biology has accelerated in the past decade due in large part to discoveries coming from genome projects on human and model organisms. The advances in the genome project so far, happening well ahead of schedule and under budget, have exceeded any dreams by its protagonists, let alone formal expectations. Biologists expect the next phase of the genome project to be even more startling in terms of dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of human biology, the biology of health and of disease. Only today can biologists begin to envision the necessary experimental, computational and theoretical steps necessary to exploit genome sequence information for its medical impact, its contribution to biotechnology and economic competitiveness, and its ultimate contribution to environmental quality. High performance computing has become one of the critical enabling technologies, which will help to translate this vision of future advances in biology into reality. Biologists are increasingly becoming aware of the potential of high performance computing. The goal of this tutorial is to introduce the exciting new developments in computational biology and genomics to the high performance computing community.

  15. High Performance Oxides-Based Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guangkun; Lan, Jinle; Zeng, Chengcheng; Liu, Yaochun; Zhan, Bin; Butt, Sajid; Lin, Yuan-Hua; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials have attracted much attention due to their applications in waste-heat recovery, power generation, and solid state cooling. In comparison with thermoelectric alloys, oxide semiconductors, which are thermally and chemically stable in air at high temperature, are regarded as the candidates for high-temperature thermoelectric applications. However, their figure-of-merit ZT value has remained low, around 0.1-0.4 for more than 20 years. The poor performance in oxides is ascribed to the low electrical conductivity and high thermal conductivity. Since the electrical transport properties in these thermoelectric oxides are strongly correlated, it is difficult to improve both the thermoelectric power and electrical conductivity simultaneously by conventional methods. This review summarizes recent progresses on high-performance oxide-based thermoelectric bulk-materials including n-type ZnO, SrTiO3, and In2O3, and p-type Ca3Co4O9, BiCuSeO, and NiO, enhanced by heavy-element doping, band engineering and nanostructuring.

  16. High Performance High-Tc Superconducting Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sukill; Goyal, Amit; Li, Jing; Gapud, Albert Agcaoili; Martin, Patrick M; Heatherly Jr, Lee; Thompson, James R; Christen, David K; List III, Frederick Alyious; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Lee, Dominic F

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrated short segments of a superconducting wire that meets or exceeds performance requirements for many large-scale applications of high-temperature superconducting materials, especially those requiring a high supercurrent and/or a high engineering critical current density in applied magnetic fields. The performance requirements for these varied applications were met in 3-micrometer-thick YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} films epitaxially grown via pulsed laser ablation on rolling assisted biaxially textured substrates. Enhancements of the critical current in self-field as well as excellent retention of this current in high applied magnetic fields were achieved in the thick films via incorporation of a periodic array of extended columnar defects, composed of self-aligned nanodots of nonsuperconducting material extending through the entire thickness of the film. These columnar defects are highly effective in pinning the superconducting vortices or flux lines, thereby resulting in the substantially enhanced performance of this wire.

  17. The path toward HEP High Performance Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolakis, John; Brun, René; Carminati, Federico; Gheata, Andrei; Wenzel, Sandro

    2014-06-01

    High Energy Physics code has been known for making poor use of high performance computing architectures. Efforts in optimising HEP code on vector and RISC architectures have yield limited results and recent studies have shown that, on modern architectures, it achieves a performance between 10% and 50% of the peak one. Although several successful attempts have been made to port selected codes on GPUs, no major HEP code suite has a "High Performance" implementation. With LHC undergoing a major upgrade and a number of challenging experiments on the drawing board, HEP cannot any longer neglect the less-than-optimal performance of its code and it has to try making the best usage of the hardware. This activity is one of the foci of the SFT group at CERN, which hosts, among others, the Root and Geant4 project. The activity of the experiments is shared and coordinated via a Concurrency Forum, where the experience in optimising HEP code is presented and discussed. Another activity is the Geant-V project, centred on the development of a highperformance prototype for particle transport. Achieving a good concurrency level on the emerging parallel architectures without a complete redesign of the framework can only be done by parallelizing at event level, or with a much larger effort at track level. Apart the shareable data structures, this typically implies a multiplication factor in terms of memory consumption compared to the single threaded version, together with sub-optimal handling of event processing tails. Besides this, the low level instruction pipelining of modern processors cannot be used efficiently to speedup the program. We have implemented a framework that allows scheduling vectors of particles to an arbitrary number of computing resources in a fine grain parallel approach. The talk will review the current optimisation activities within the SFT group with a particular emphasis on the development perspectives towards a simulation framework able to profit best from

  18. High Performance Fortran for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush; Zima, Hans; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of High Performance Fortran (HPF) for important classes of algorithms employed in aerospace applications. HPF is a set of Fortran extensions designed to provide users with a high-level interface for programming data parallel scientific applications, while delegating to the compiler/runtime system the task of generating explicitly parallel message-passing programs. We begin by providing a short overview of the HPF language. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the efficient use of HPF for applications involving multiple structured grids such as multiblock and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) codes as well as unstructured grid codes. We focus on the data structures and computational structures used in these codes and on the high-level strategies that can be expressed in HPF to optimally exploit the parallelism in these algorithms.

  19. High Performance Database Management for Earth Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rishe, Naphtali; Barton, David; Urban, Frank; Chekmasov, Maxim; Martinez, Maria; Alvarez, Elms; Gutierrez, Martha; Pardo, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    The High Performance Database Research Center at Florida International University is completing the development of a highly parallel database system based on the semantic/object-oriented approach. This system provides exceptional usability and flexibility. It allows shorter application design and programming cycles and gives the user control via an intuitive information structure. It empowers the end-user to pose complex ad hoc decision support queries. Superior efficiency is provided through a high level of optimization, which is transparent to the user. Manifold reduction in storage size is allowed for many applications. This system allows for operability via internet browsers. The system will be used for the NASA Applications Center program to store remote sensing data, as well as for Earth Science applications.

  20. Heavily Doped PBSE with High Thermoelectric Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Wang, Heng (Inventor); Pei, Yanzhong (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention discloses heavily doped PbSe with high thermoelectric performance. Thermoelectric property measurements disclosed herein indicated that PbSe is high zT material for mid-to-high temperature thermoelectric applications. At 850 K a peak zT (is) greater than 1.3 was observed when n(sub H) approximately 1.0 X 10(exp 20) cm(exp -3). The present invention also discloses that a number of strategies used to improve zT of PbTe, such as alloying with other elements, nanostructuring and band modification may also be used to further improve zT in PbSe.

  1. Performance of annular high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Ivan A.

    This thesis presents studies of the behavior of miniature annular thermoacoustic prime movers and the imaging of the complex sound fields using PIV inside the small acoustic wave guides when driven by a temperature gradient. Thermoacoustic engines operating in the standing wave mode are limited in their acoustic efficiency by a high degree of irreversibility that is inherent in how they work. Better performance can be achieved by using traveling waves in the thermoacoustic devices. This has led to the development of an annular high frequency thermoacoustic prime mover consisting of a regenerator, which is a random stack in-between a hot and cold heat exchanger, inside an annular waveguide. Miniature devices were developed and studied with operating frequencies in the range of 2-4 kHz. This corresponds to an average ring circumference of 11 cm for the 3 kHz device, the resonator bore being 6 mm. A similar device of 11 mm bore, length of 18 cm was also investigated; its resonant frequency was 2 kHz. Sound intensities as high as 166.8 dB were generated with limited heat input. Sound power was extracted from the annular structure by an impedance-matching side arm. The nature of the acoustic wave generated by heat was investigated using a high speed PIV instrument. Although the acoustic device appears symmetric, its performance is characterized by a broken symmetry and by perturbations that exist in its structure. Effects of these are observed in the PIV imaging; images show axial and radial components. Moreover, PIV studies show effects of streaming and instabilities which affect the devices' acoustic efficiency. The acoustic efficiency is high, being of 40% of Carnot. This type of device shows much promise as a high efficiency energy converter; it can be reduced in size for microcircuit applications.

  2. Small-Scale High-Performance Optics

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON, CHRISTOPHER W.; LEGER, CHRIS L.; SPLETZER, BARRY L.

    2002-06-01

    Historically, high resolution, high slew rate optics have been heavy, bulky, and expensive. Recent advances in MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology and micro-machining may change this. Specifically, the advent of steerable sub-millimeter sized mirror arrays could provide the breakthrough technology for producing very small-scale high-performance optical systems. For example, an array of steerable MEMS mirrors could be the building blocks for a Fresnel mirror of controllable focal length and direction of view. When coupled with a convex parabolic mirror the steerable array could realize a micro-scale pan, tilt and zoom system that provides full CCD sensor resolution over the desired field of view with no moving parts (other than MEMS elements). This LDRD provided the first steps towards the goal of a new class of small-scale high-performance optics based on MEMS technology. A large-scale, proof of concept system was built to demonstrate the effectiveness of an optical configuration applicable to producing a small-scale (< 1cm) pan and tilt imaging system. This configuration consists of a color CCD imager with a narrow field of view lens, a steerable flat mirror, and a convex parabolic mirror. The steerable flat mirror directs the camera's narrow field of view to small areas of the convex mirror providing much higher pixel density in the region of interest than is possible with a full 360 deg. imaging system. Improved image correction (dewarping) software based on texture mapping images to geometric solids was developed. This approach takes advantage of modern graphics hardware and provides a great deal of flexibility for correcting images from various mirror shapes. An analytical evaluation of blur spot size and axi-symmetric reflector optimization were performed to address depth of focus issues that occurred in the proof of concept system. The resulting equations will provide the tools for developing future system designs.

  3. Management issues for high performance storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, S.; Burris, R.

    1995-03-01

    Managing distributed high-performance storage systems is complex and, although sharing common ground with traditional network and systems management, presents unique storage-related issues. Integration technologies and frameworks exist to help manage distributed network and system environments. Industry-driven consortia provide open forums where vendors and users cooperate to leverage solutions. But these new approaches to open management fall short addressing the needs of scalable, distributed storage. We discuss the motivation and requirements for storage system management (SSM) capabilities and describe how SSM manages distributed servers and storage resource objects in the High Performance Storage System (HPSS), a new storage facility for data-intensive applications and large-scale computing. Modem storage systems, such as HPSS, require many SSM capabilities, including server and resource configuration control, performance monitoring, quality of service, flexible policies, file migration, file repacking, accounting, and quotas. We present results of initial HPSS SSM development including design decisions and implementation trade-offs. We conclude with plans for follow-on work and provide storage-related recommendations for vendors and standards groups seeking enterprise-wide management solutions.

  4. High capacity heat pipe performance demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A high capacity heat pipe which will operate in one-g and in zero-g is investigated. An artery configuration which is self-priming in one-g was emphasized. Two artery modifications were evolved as candidates to achieve one-g priming and will provide the very high performance: the four artery and the eight artery configurations. These were each evaluated analytically for performance and priming capability. The eight artery configuration was found to be inadequate from a performance standpoint. The four artery showed promise of working. A five-inch long priming element test article was fabricated using the four artery design. Plexiglas viewing windows were made on each end of the heat pipe to permit viewing of the priming activity. The five-inch primary element would not successfully prime in one-g. Difficulties on priming in one-g raised questions about zero-g priming. Therefore a small test element heat pipe for verifying that the proposed configuration will self-prime in zero-g was fabricated and delivered.

  5. A High Performance COTS Based Computer Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patte, Mathieu; Grimoldi, Raoul; Trautner, Roland

    2014-08-01

    Using Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) electronic components for space applications is a long standing idea. Indeed the difference in processing performance and energy efficiency between radiation hardened components and COTS components is so important that COTS components are very attractive for use in mass and power constrained systems. However using COTS components in space is not straightforward as one must account with the effects of the space environment on the COTS components behavior. In the frame of the ESA funded activity called High Performance COTS Based Computer, Airbus Defense and Space and its subcontractor OHB CGS have developed and prototyped a versatile COTS based architecture for high performance processing. The rest of the paper is organized as follows: in a first section we will start by recapitulating the interests and constraints of using COTS components for space applications; then we will briefly describe existing fault mitigation architectures and present our solution for fault mitigation based on a component called the SmartIO; in the last part of the paper we will describe the prototyping activities executed during the HiP CBC project.

  6. Performance of the CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotta, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increases in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. The increase in the number of interactions per bunch crossing, on average 25 in 2012, and expected to be around 40 in Run II, will be an additional complication. We present here the expected performance of the main triggers that will be used during the 2015 data taking campaign, paying particular attention to the new approaches that have been developed to cope with the challenges of the new run. This includes improvements in HLT electron and photon reconstruction as well as better performing muon triggers. We will also present the performance of the improved tracking and vertexing algorithms, discussing their impact on the b-tagging performance as well as on the jet and missing energy reconstruction.

  7. Automatic Energy Schemes for High Performance Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sundriyal, Vaibhav

    2013-01-01

    Although high-performance computing traditionally focuses on the efficient execution of large-scale applications, both energy and power have become critical concerns when approaching exascale. Drastic increases in the power consumption of supercomputers affect significantly their operating costs and failure rates. In modern microprocessor architectures, equipped with dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) and CPU clock modulation (throttling), the power consumption may be controlled in software. Additionally, network interconnect, such as Infiniband, may be exploited to maximize energy savings while the application performance loss and frequency switching overheads must be carefully balanced. This work first studies two important collective communication operations, all-to-all and allgather and proposes energy saving strategies on the per-call basis. Next, it targets point-to-point communications to group them into phases and apply frequency scaling to them to save energy by exploiting the architectural and communication stalls. Finally, it proposes an automatic runtime system which combines both collective and point-to-point communications into phases, and applies throttling to them apart from DVFS to maximize energy savings. The experimental results are presented for NAS parallel benchmark problems as well as for the realistic parallel electronic structure calculations performed by the widely used quantum chemistry package GAMESS. Close to the maximum energy savings were obtained with a substantially low performance loss on the given platform.

  8. RISC Processors and High Performance Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Bailey, David H.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In this tutorial, we will discuss top five current RISC microprocessors: The IBM Power2, which is used in the IBM RS6000/590 workstation and in the IBM SP2 parallel supercomputer, the DEC Alpha, which is in the DEC Alpha workstation and in the Cray T3D; the MIPS R8000, which is used in the SGI Power Challenge; the HP PA-RISC 7100, which is used in the HP 700 series workstations and in the Convex Exemplar; and the Cray proprietary processor, which is used in the new Cray J916. The architecture of these microprocessors will first be presented. The effective performance of these processors will then be compared, both by citing standard benchmarks and also in the context of implementing a real applications. In the process, different programming models such as data parallel (CM Fortran and HPF) and message passing (PVM and MPI) will be introduced and compared. The latest NAS Parallel Benchmark (NPB) absolute performance and performance per dollar figures will be presented. The next generation of the NP13 will also be described. The tutorial will conclude with a discussion of general trends in the field of high performance computing, including likely future developments in hardware and software technology, and the relative roles of vector supercomputers tightly coupled parallel computers, and clusters of workstations. This tutorial will provide a unique cross-machine comparison not available elsewhere.

  9. DOE High Performance Concentrator PV Project

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.; Symko-Davies, M.

    2005-08-01

    Much in demand are next-generation photovoltaic (PV) technologies that can be used economically to make a large-scale impact on world electricity production. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV) Project to substantially increase the viability of PV for cost-competitive applications so that PV can contribute significantly to both our energy supply and environment. To accomplish such results, the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) directs in-house and subcontracted research in high-performance polycrystalline thin-film and multijunction concentrator devices with the goal of enabling progress of high-efficiency technologies toward commercial-prototype products. We will describe the details of the subcontractor and in-house progress in exploring and accelerating pathways of III-V multijunction concentrator solar cells and systems toward their long-term goals. By 2020, we anticipate that this project will have demonstrated 33% system efficiency and a system price of $1.00/Wp for concentrator PV systems using III-V multijunction solar cells with efficiencies over 41%.

  10. High-performance computing in seismology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    The scientific, technical, and economic importance of the issues discussed here presents a clear agenda for future research in computational seismology. In this way these problems will drive advances in high-performance computing in the field of seismology. There is a broad community that will benefit from this work, including the petroleum industry, research geophysicists, engineers concerned with seismic hazard mitigation, and governments charged with enforcing a comprehensive test ban treaty. These advances may also lead to new applications for seismological research. The recent application of high-resolution seismic imaging of the shallow subsurface for the environmental remediation industry is an example of this activity. This report makes the following recommendations: (1) focused efforts to develop validated documented software for seismological computations should be supported, with special emphasis on scalable algorithms for parallel processors; (2) the education of seismologists in high-performance computing technologies and methodologies should be improved; (3) collaborations between seismologists and computational scientists and engineers should be increased; (4) the infrastructure for archiving, disseminating, and processing large volumes of seismological data should be improved.

  11. High Power MPD Thruster Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Strzempkowski, Eugene; Pencil, Eric

    2004-01-01

    High power magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are being developed as cost effective propulsion systems for cargo transport to lunar and Mars bases, crewed missions to Mars and the outer planets, and robotic deep space exploration missions. Electromagnetic MPD thrusters have demonstrated, at the laboratory level, the ability to process megawatts of electrical power while providing significantly higher thrust densities than electrostatic electric propulsion systems. The ability to generate higher thrust densities permits a reduction in the number of thrusters required to perform a given mission, and alleviates the system complexity associated with multiple thruster arrays. The specific impulse of an MPD thruster can be optimized to meet given mission requirements, from a few thousand seconds with heavier gas propellants up to 10,000 seconds with hydrogen propellant. In support of programs envisioned by the NASA Office of Exploration Systems, Glenn Research Center is developing and testing quasi-steady MW-class MPD thrusters as a prelude to steady state high power thruster tests. This paper provides an overview of the GRC high power pulsed thruster test facility, and presents preliminary performance data for a quasi-steady baseline MPD thruster geometry.

  12. High performance Split-Stirling cooler program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeker, R. P.

    1982-09-01

    This report describes the physical characteristics of the final design configuration of the 1 Watt Split-Stirling Cryogenic Cooler. Qualification testing included evaluation of the 1.0 Watt Cryogenic Cooler under the following conditions: Performance tests over the temperature range of -40 degrees C to +55 degrees C; High and Low Temperature Shock Tests; Mechanical Shock Tests; Sinsoidal Vibration; Self-Induced Vibration; Acoustical Testing; and 1000-Hour Mean Time Between Failure Life Tests. The cryogenic cooler design consists of a motor and compressor assembly, and a remote expander assembly, interconnected by a stainless steel capillary line. The system is nominally a 18.5 VDC, 60 Watt cooler and has a maximum weight of 4 pounds. This report summarizes the results of the performance, environmental and life qualification tests conducted under the contract and provides supporting data for each of the test categories.

  13. Roof support performance in high stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mucho, T.P.; Mark, C.; Zelanko, J.C.; Compton, C.S.

    1995-11-01

    To document the performance of mine roof and roof support systems the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) has been installing instrumentation at selected sites in US coal mines. Much of this support and roof instrumentation has been installed in high stress conditions to maximize differences in performance. Summarized in this paper are the results of four such site investigations. The roof geology at the four sites is quite different and is quantified using the USBM`s Coal Mine Roof Rating (CMRR). The studies included detailed measurements of roof movement using multi-point extensometers, as well as measurements and monitoring of bolt loading. The investigations include developmental loading and abutment loading from longwall and room-and-pillar mining operations. Some of the issues examined are the effect of the horizontal stress field, the effect of installed tension (torque-tension versus resin bolts), the effect of reduced annulus bolt holes, and the differences between similar bolts supplied by different manufacturers.

  14. High performance robotic traverse of desert terrain.

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, William

    2004-09-01

    This report presents tentative innovations to enable unmanned vehicle guidance for a class of off-road traverse at sustained speeds greater than 30 miles per hour. Analyses and field trials suggest that even greater navigation speeds might be achieved. The performance calls for innovation in mapping, perception, planning and inertial-referenced stabilization of components, hosted aboard capable locomotion. The innovations are motivated by the challenge of autonomous ground vehicle traverse of 250 miles of desert terrain in less than 10 hours, averaging 30 miles per hour. GPS coverage is assumed to be available with localized blackouts. Terrain and vegetation are assumed to be akin to that of the Mojave Desert. This terrain is interlaced with networks of unimproved roads and trails, which are a key to achieving the high performance mapping, planning and navigation that is presented here.

  15. High performance railgun barrels for laboratory use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, David P.; Newman, Duane C.

    1993-01-01

    High performance low-cost, laboratory railgun barrels are now available, comprised of an inherently stiff containment structure which surrounds the bore components machined from 'off the-shelf' materials. The shape of the containment structure was selected to make the barrel inherently stiff. The structure consists of stainless steel laminations which do not compromise the electrical efficiency of the railgun. The modular design enhances the utility of the barrel, as it is easy to service between shots, and can be 're-cored' to produce different configurations and sizes using the same structure. We have produced barrels ranging from 15 mm to 90 mm square bore, a 30 mm round bore, and in lengths varying from 0.25 meters to 10 meters long. Successful tests with both plasma and solid metal armatures have demonstrated the versatility and performance of this design.

  16. Advanced solidification system using high performance cement

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Matsuda, Masami; Nishi, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Izumida, Tatsuo

    1995-12-31

    Advanced cement solidification is proposed for the solidification of radioactive waste such as spent ion exchange resin, incineration ash and liquid waste. A new, high performance cement has been developed to raise volume reduction efficiency and lower radioactivity release into the environment. It consists of slag cement, reinforcing fiber, natural zeolite and lithium nitrate (LiNO{sub 3}). The fiber allows waste loading to be increased from 20 to 55kg-dry resin/200L. The zeolite, whose main constituent is clinoptilolite, reduces cesium leachability from the waste form to about 1/10. Lithium nitrate prevents alkaline corrosion of the aluminum, contained in ash, and reduces hydrogen gas generation. Laboratory and full-scale pilot plant experiments were performed to evaluate properties of the waste form, using simulated wastes. Emphasis was laid on improvement of solidification of spent resin and ash.

  17. Improving UV Resistance of High Performance Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanin, Ahmed

    High performance fibers are characterized by their superior properties compared to the traditional textile fibers. High strength fibers have high modules, high strength to weight ratio, high chemical resistance, and usually high temperature resistance. It is used in application where superior properties are needed such as bulletproof vests, ropes and cables, cut resistant products, load tendons for giant scientific balloons, fishing rods, tennis racket strings, parachute cords, adhesives and sealants, protective apparel and tire cords. Unfortunately, Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes serious degradation to the most of high performance fibers. UV lights, either natural or artificial, cause organic compounds to decompose and degrade, because the energy of the photons of UV light is high enough to break chemical bonds causing chain scission. This work is aiming at achieving maximum protection of high performance fibers using sheathing approaches. The sheaths proposed are of lightweight to maintain the advantage of the high performance fiber that is the high strength to weight ratio. This study involves developing three different types of sheathing. The product of interest that need be protected from UV is braid from PBO. First approach is extruding a sheath from Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) loaded with different rutile TiO2 % nanoparticles around the braid from the PBO. The results of this approach showed that LDPE sheath loaded with 10% TiO2 by weight achieved the highest protection compare to 0% and 5% TiO2. The protection here is judged by strength loss of PBO. This trend noticed in different weathering environments, where the sheathed samples were exposed to UV-VIS radiations in different weatheromter equipments as well as exposure to high altitude environment using NASA BRDL balloon. The second approach is focusing in developing a protective porous membrane from polyurethane loaded with rutile TiO2 nanoparticles. Membrane from polyurethane loaded with 4

  18. High-Performance Water-Iodinating Cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard; Gibbons, Randall E.; Flanagan, David T.

    1993-01-01

    High-performance cartridge contains bed of crystalline iodine iodinates water to near saturation in single pass. Cartridge includes stainless-steel housing equipped with inlet and outlet for water. Bed of iodine crystals divided into layers by polytetrafluoroethylene baffles. Holes made in baffles and positioned to maximize length of flow path through layers of iodine crystals. Resulting concentration of iodine biocidal; suppresses growth of microbes in stored water or disinfects contaminated equipment. Cartridge resists corrosion and can be stored wet. Reused several times before necessary to refill with fresh iodine crystals.

  19. High-performance neural networks. [Neural computers

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1987-06-01

    The new Forth hardware architectures offer an intermediate solution to high-performance neural networks while the theory and programming details of neural networks for synthetic intelligence are developed. This approach has been used successfully to determine the parameters and run the resulting network for a synthetic insect consisting of a 200-node ''brain'' with 1760 interconnections. Both the insect's environment and its sensor input have thus far been simulated. However, the frequency-coded nature of the Browning network allows easy replacement of the simulated sensors by real-world counterparts.

  20. Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mirin, A A

    2007-02-05

    The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon Science Group of Energy and Environment (E and E) are working together to improve predictions of future climate by applying the best available computational methods and computer resources to this problem. Over the last decade, researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a number of climate models that provide state-of-the-art simulations on a wide variety of massively parallel computers. We are now developing and applying a second generation of high-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well.

  1. High Performance Piezoelectric Actuated Gimbal (HIERAX)

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Tschaggeny; Warren Jones; Eberhard Bamberg

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a 3-axis gimbal whose three rotational axes are actuated by a novel drive system: linear piezoelectric motors whose linear output is converted to rotation by using drive disks. Advantages of this technology are: fast response, high accelerations, dither-free actuation and backlash-free positioning. The gimbal was developed to house a laser range finder for the purpose of tracking and guiding unmanned aerial vehicles during landing maneuvers. The tilt axis was built and the test results indicate excellent performance that meets design specifications.

  2. Portability Support for High Performance Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Doreen Y.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    While a large number of tools have been developed to support application portability, high performance application developers often prefer to use vendor-provided, non-portable programming interfaces. This phenomena indicates the mismatch between user priorities and tool capabilities. This paper summarizes the results of a user survey and a developer survey. The user survey has revealed the user priorities and resulted in three criteria for evaluating tool support for portability. The developer survey has resulted in the evaluation of portability support and indicated the possibilities and difficulties of improvements.

  3. High performance channel injection sealant invention abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Basiulis, D. I.; Salisbury, D. P. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High performance channel sealant is based on NASA patented cyano and diamidoximine-terminated perfluoroalkylene ether prepolymers that are thermally condensed and cross linked. The sealant contains asbestos and, in its preferred embodiments, Lithofrax, to lower its thermal expansion coefficient and a phenolic metal deactivator. Extensive evaluation shows the sealant is extremely resistant to thermal degradation with an onset point of 280 C. The materials have a volatile content of 0.18%, excellent flexibility, and adherence properties, and fuel resistance. No corrosibility to aluminum or titanium was observed.

  4. Performance Evaluation of Emerging High Performance Computing Technologies using WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, G. B.; Morton, D.

    2008-12-01

    The Arctic Region Supercomputing Center (ARSC) has evaluated multicore processors and other emerging processor technologies for a variety of high performance computing applications in the earth and space sciences, especially climate and weather applications. A flagship effort has been to assess dual core processor nodes on ARSC's Midnight supercomputer, in which two-socket systems were compared to eight-socket systems. Midnight is utilized for ARSC's twice-daily weather research and forecasting (WRF) model runs, available at weather.arsc.edu. Among other findings on Midnight, it was found that the Hypertransport system for interconnecting Opteron processors, memory, and other subsystems does not scale as well on eight-socket (sixteen processor) systems as well as two-socket (four processor) systems. A fundamental limitation is the cache snooping operation performed whenever a computational thread accesses main memory. This increases memory latency as the number of processor sockets increases. This is particularly noticeable on applications such as WRF that are primarily CPU-bound, versus applications that are bound by input/output or communication. The new Cray XT5 supercomputer at ARSC features quad core processors, and will host a variety of scaling experiments for WRF, CCSM4, and other models. Early results will be presented, including a series of WRF runs for Alaska with grid resolutions under 2km. ARSC will discuss a set of standardized test cases for the Alaska domain, similar to existing test cases for CONUS. These test cases will provide different configuration sizes and resolutions, suitable for single processors up to thousands. Beyond multi-core Opteron-based supercomputers, ARSC has examined WRF and other applications on additional emerging technologies. One such technology is the graphics processing unit, or GPU. The 9800-series nVidia GPU was evaluated with the cuBLAS software library. While in-socket GPUs might be forthcoming in the future, current

  5. High-temperature testing of high performance fiber reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fořt, Jan; Vejmelková, Eva; Pavlíková, Milena; Trník, Anton; Čítek, David; Kolísko, Jiří; Černý, Robert; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    The effect of high-temperature exposure on properties of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Concrete (HPFRC) is researched in the paper. At first, reference measurements are done on HPFRC samples without high-temperature loading. Then, the HPFRC samples are exposed to the temperatures of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 °C. For the temperature loaded samples, measurement of residual mechanical and basic physical properties is done. Linear thermal expansion coefficient as function of temperature is accessed on the basis of measured thermal strain data. Additionally, simultaneous difference scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG) analysis is performed in order to observe and explain material changes at elevated temperature. It is found that the applied high temperature loading significantly increases material porosity due to the physical, chemical and combined damage of material inner structure, and negatively affects also the mechanical strength. Linear thermal expansion coefficient exhibits significant dependence on temperature and changes of material structure. The obtained data will find use as input material parameters for modelling the damage of HPFRC structures exposed to the fire and high temperature action.

  6. High temperature furnace modeling and performance verifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical, numerical and experimental studies were performed on two classes of high temperature materials processing furnaces. The research concentrates on a commercially available high temperature furnace using zirconia as the heating element and an arc furnace based on a ST International tube welder. The zirconia furnace was delivered and work is progressing on schedule. The work on the arc furnace was initially stalled due to the unavailability of the NASA prototype, which is actively being tested aboard the KC-135 experimental aircraft. A proposal was written and funded to purchase an additional arc welder to alleviate this problem. The ST International weld head and power supply were received and testing will begin in early November. The first 6 months of the grant are covered.

  7. Parallel Algebraic Multigrid Methods - High Performance Preconditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, U M

    2004-11-11

    The development of high performance, massively parallel computers and the increasing demands of computationally challenging applications have necessitated the development of scalable solvers and preconditioners. One of the most effective ways to achieve scalability is the use of multigrid or multilevel techniques. Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a very efficient algorithm for solving large problems on unstructured grids. While much of it can be parallelized in a straightforward way, some components of the classical algorithm, particularly the coarsening process and some of the most efficient smoothers, are highly sequential, and require new parallel approaches. This chapter presents the basic principles of AMG and gives an overview of various parallel implementations of AMG, including descriptions of parallel coarsening schemes and smoothers, some numerical results as well as references to existing software packages.

  8. High Performance Data Distribution for Scientific Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirado, Juan M.; Higuero, Daniel; Carretero, Jesus

    2010-05-01

    Institutions such as NASA, ESA or JAXA find solutions to distribute data from their missions to the scientific community, and their long term archives. This is a complex problem, as it includes a vast amount of data, several geographically distributed archives, heterogeneous architectures with heterogeneous networks, and users spread around the world. We propose a novel architecture (HIDDRA) that solves this problem aiming to reduce user intervention in data acquisition and processing. HIDDRA is a modular system that provides a highly efficient parallel multiprotocol download engine, using a publish/subscribe policy which helps the final user to obtain data of interest transparently. Our system can deal simultaneously with multiple protocols (HTTP,HTTPS, FTP, GridFTP among others) to obtain the maximum bandwidth, reducing the workload in data server and increasing flexibility. It can also provide high reliability and fault tolerance, as several sources of data can be used to perform one file download. HIDDRA architecture can be arranged into a data distribution network deployed on several sites that can cooperate to provide former features. HIDDRA has been addressed by the 2009 e-IRG Report on Data Management as a promising initiative for data interoperability. Our first prototype has been evaluated in collaboration with the ESAC centre in Villafranca del Castillo (Spain) that shows a high scalability and performance, opening a wide spectrum of opportunities. Some preliminary results have been published in the Journal of Astrophysics and Space Science [1]. [1] D. Higuero, J.M. Tirado, J. Carretero, F. Félix, and A. de La Fuente. HIDDRA: a highly independent data distribution and retrieval architecture for space observation missions. Astrophysics and Space Science, 321(3):169-175, 2009

  9. High-performance laboratories and cleanrooms

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, William; Sartor, Dale; Mills, Evan; Xu, Tengfang

    2002-07-01

    The California Energy Commission sponsored this roadmap to guide energy efficiency research and deployment for high performance cleanrooms and laboratories. Industries and institutions utilizing these building types (termed high-tech buildings) have played an important part in the vitality of the California economy. This roadmap's key objective to present a multi-year agenda to prioritize and coordinate research efforts. It also addresses delivery mechanisms to get the research products into the market. Because of the importance to the California economy, it is appropriate and important for California to take the lead in assessing the energy efficiency research needs, opportunities, and priorities for this market. In addition to the importance to California's economy, energy demand for this market segment is large and growing (estimated at 9400 GWH for 1996, Mills et al. 1996). With their 24hr. continuous operation, high tech facilities are a major contributor to the peak electrical demand. Laboratories and cleanrooms constitute the high tech building market, and although each building type has its unique features, they are similar in that they are extremely energy intensive, involve special environmental considerations, have very high ventilation requirements, and are subject to regulations--primarily safety driven--that tend to have adverse energy implications. High-tech buildings have largely been overlooked in past energy efficiency research. Many industries and institutions utilize laboratories and cleanrooms. As illustrated, there are many industries operating cleanrooms in California. These include semiconductor manufacturing, semiconductor suppliers, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, disk drive manufacturing, flat panel displays, automotive, aerospace, food, hospitals, medical devices, universities, and federal research facilities.

  10. High performance amorphous selenium lateral photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    Lateral amorphous selenium (a-Se) detectors based on the metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device structure have been studied for indirect detector medical imaging applications. These detectors have raised interest due to their simple structure, ease of fabrication, high-speed, low dark current, low capacitance per unit area and better light utilization. The lateral device structure has a benefit that the electrode spacing may be easily controlled to reduce the required bias for a given desired electric field. In indirect conversion x-ray imaging, the scintillator is coupled to the top of the a-Se MSM photodetector, which itself is integrated on top of the thin-film-transistor (TFT) array. The carriers generated at the top surface of the a-Se layer experience a field that is parallel to the surface, and does not initially sweep them away from the surface. Therefore these carriers may recombine or get trapped in surface states and change the field at the surface, which may degrade the performance of the photodetector. In addition, due to the finite width of the electrodes, the fill factor of the device is less than unity. In this study we examine the effect of lateral drift of carriers and the fill factor on the photodetector performance. The impact of field magnitude on the performance is also investigated.

  11. Achieving high performance on the Intel Paragon

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, D.S.; Maccabe, B.; Riesen, R.; Wheat, S.; Womble, D.

    1993-11-01

    When presented with a new supercomputer most users will first ask {open_quotes}How much faster will my applications run?{close_quotes} and then add a fearful {open_quotes}How much effort will it take me to convert to the new machine?{close_quotes} This paper describes some lessons learned at Sandia while asking these questions about the new 1800+ node Intel Paragon. The authors conclude that the operating system is crucial to both achieving high performance and allowing easy conversion from previous parallel implementations to a new machine. Using the Sandia/UNM Operating System (SUNMOS) they were able to port a LU factorization of dense matrices from the nCUBE2 to the Paragon and achieve 92% scaled speed-up on 1024 nodes. Thus on a 44,000 by 44,000 matrix which had required over 10 hours on the previous machine, they completed in less than 1/2 hour at a rate of over 40 GFLOPS. Two keys to achieving such high performance were the small size of SUNMOS (less than 256 kbytes) and the ability to send large messages with very low overhead.

  12. High-performance computing for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M; Manuzzato, Andrea; Fairbanks, Tom; Dallmann, Nicholas; Desgeorges, Rose

    2010-06-28

    Recently, there has been attempts to move common satellite tasks to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are significantly cheaper to buy than satellites and easier to deploy on an as-needed basis. The more benign radiation environment also allows for an aggressive adoption of state-of-the-art commercial computational devices, which increases the amount of data that can be collected. There are a number of commercial computing devices currently available that are well-suited to high-performance computing. These devices range from specialized computational devices, such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and digital signal processors (DSPs), to traditional computing platforms, such as microprocessors. Even though the radiation environment is relatively benign, these devices could be susceptible to single-event effects. In this paper, we will present radiation data for high-performance computing devices in a accelerated neutron environment. These devices include a multi-core digital signal processor, two field-programmable gate arrays, and a microprocessor. From these results, we found that all of these devices are suitable for many airplane environments without reliability problems.

  13. High Performance Computing CFRD -- Final Technial Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hope Forsmann; Kurt Hamman

    2003-01-01

    The Bechtel Waste Treatment Project (WTP), located in Richland, WA, is comprised of many processes containing complex physics. Accurate analyses of the underlying physics of these processes is needed to reduce the amount of added costs during and after construction that are due to unknown process behavior. The WTP will have tight operating margins in order to complete the treatment of the waste on schedule. The combination of tight operating constraints coupled with complex physical processes requires analysis methods that are more accurate than traditional approaches. This study is focused specifically on multidimensional computer aided solutions. There are many skills and tools required to solve engineering problems. Many physical processes are governed by nonlinear partial differential equations. These governing equations have few, if any, closed form solutions. Past and present solution methods require assumptions to reduce these equations to solvable forms. Computational methods take the governing equations and solve them directly on a computational grid. This ability to approach the equations in their exact form reduces the number of assumptions that must be made. This approach increases the accuracy of the solution and its applicability to the problem at hand. Recent advances in computer technology have allowed computer simulations to become an essential tool for problem solving. In order to perform computer simulations as quickly and accurately as possible, both hardware and software must be evaluated. With regards to hardware, the average consumer personal computers (PCs) are not configured for optimal scientific use. Only a few vendors create high performance computers to satisfy engineering needs. Software must be optimized for quick and accurate execution. Operating systems must utilize the hardware efficiently while supplying the software with seamless access to the computer’s resources. From the perspective of Bechtel Corporation and the Idaho

  14. SOFC-Gas Turbine Hybrid System for Aircraft Applications: Modeling and Performance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Nischal

    2005-11-01

    There is a growing interest in fuel cells for aircraft applications. Fuel cells when combined with conventional turbine power plants offer high fuel efficiencies. The feature of fuel cells (SOFC, MCFC) used in aircraft applications, which makes them suitable for hybrid systems, is their high operating temperature. Their dynamic nature, both electrical and thermodynamic, demands a dynamic study of the complete hybrid cycle. In this paper we present a model for a SOFC/Gas Turbine hybrid system and its implementation in Matlab-Simulink. The main focus of the paper is on the dynamic analysis of the combined SOFC/GT cycle. Various configurations of the hybrid system are proposed and simulated. A comparative study of the simulated configurations, based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics, is presented. An exergy analysis for the chosen configuration is used to perform a parametric study of the overall hybrid system performance.

  15. SISYPHUS: A high performance seismic inversion factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhberg, Alexey; Simutė, Saulė; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In the recent years the massively parallel high performance computers became the standard instruments for solving the forward and inverse problems in seismology. The respective software packages dedicated to forward and inverse waveform modelling specially designed for such computers (SPECFEM3D, SES3D) became mature and widely available. These packages achieve significant computational performance and provide researchers with an opportunity to solve problems of bigger size at higher resolution within a shorter time. However, a typical seismic inversion process contains various activities that are beyond the common solver functionality. They include management of information on seismic events and stations, 3D models, observed and synthetic seismograms, pre-processing of the observed signals, computation of misfits and adjoint sources, minimization of misfits, and process workflow management. These activities are time consuming, seldom sufficiently automated, and therefore represent a bottleneck that can substantially offset performance benefits provided by even the most powerful modern supercomputers. Furthermore, a typical system architecture of modern supercomputing platforms is oriented towards the maximum computational performance and provides limited standard facilities for automation of the supporting activities. We present a prototype solution that automates all aspects of the seismic inversion process and is tuned for the modern massively parallel high performance computing systems. We address several major aspects of the solution architecture, which include (1) design of an inversion state database for tracing all relevant aspects of the entire solution process, (2) design of an extensible workflow management framework, (3) integration with wave propagation solvers, (4) integration with optimization packages, (5) computation of misfits and adjoint sources, and (6) process monitoring. The inversion state database represents a hierarchical structure with

  16. Scalable resource management in high performance computers.

    SciTech Connect

    Frachtenberg, E.; Petrini, F.; Fernandez Peinador, J.; Coll, S.

    2002-01-01

    Clusters of workstations have emerged as an important platform for building cost-effective, scalable and highly-available computers. Although many hardware solutions are available today, the largest challenge in making large-scale clusters usable lies in the system software. In this paper we present STORM, a resource management tool designed to provide scalability, low overhead and the flexibility necessary to efficiently support and analyze a wide range of job scheduling algorithms. STORM achieves these feats by closely integrating the management daemons with the low-level features that are common in state-of-the-art high-performance system area networks. The architecture of STORM is based on three main technical innovations. First, a sizable part of the scheduler runs in the thread processor located on the network interface. Second, we use hardware collectives that are highly scalable both for implementing control heartbeats and to distribute the binary of a parallel job in near-constant time, irrespective of job and machine sizes. Third, we use an I/O bypass protocol that allows fast data movements from the file system to the communication buffers in the network interface and vice versa. The experimental results show that STORM can launch a job with a binary of 12MB on a 64 processor/32 node cluster in less than 0.25 sec on an empty network, in less than 0.45 sec when all the processors are busy computing other jobs, and in less than 0.65 sec when the network is flooded with a background traffic. This paper provides experimental and analytical evidence that these results scale to a much larger number of nodes. To the best of our knowledge, STORM is at least two orders of magnitude faster than existing production schedulers in launching jobs, performing resource management tasks and gang scheduling.

  17. PREFACE: High Performance Computing Symposium 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talon, Suzanne; Mousseau, Normand; Peslherbe, Gilles; Bertrand, François; Gauthier, Pierre; Kadem, Lyes; Moitessier, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy; Wittig, Rod

    2012-02-01

    HPCS (High Performance Computing Symposium) is a multidisciplinary conference that focuses on research involving High Performance Computing and its application. Attended by Canadian and international experts and renowned researchers in the sciences, all areas of engineering, the applied sciences, medicine and life sciences, mathematics, the humanities and social sciences, it is Canada's pre-eminent forum for HPC. The 25th edition was held in Montréal, at the Université du Québec à Montréal, from 15-17 June and focused on HPC in Medical Science. The conference was preceded by tutorials held at Concordia University, where 56 participants learned about HPC best practices, GPU computing, parallel computing, debugging and a number of high-level languages. 274 participants from six countries attended the main conference, which involved 11 invited and 37 contributed oral presentations, 33 posters, and an exhibit hall with 16 booths from our sponsors. The work that follows is a collection of papers presented at the conference covering HPC topics ranging from computer science to bioinformatics. They are divided here into four sections: HPC in Engineering, Physics and Materials Science, HPC in Medical Science, HPC Enabling to Explore our World and New Algorithms for HPC. We would once more like to thank the participants and invited speakers, the members of the Scientific Committee, the referees who spent time reviewing the papers and our invaluable sponsors. To hear the invited talks and learn about 25 years of HPC development in Canada visit the Symposium website: http://2011.hpcs.ca/lang/en/conference/keynote-speakers/ Enjoy the excellent papers that follow, and we look forward to seeing you in Vancouver for HPCS 2012! Gilles Peslherbe Chair of the Scientific Committee Normand Mousseau Co-Chair of HPCS 2011 Suzanne Talon Chair of the Organizing Committee UQAM Sponsors The PDF also contains photographs from the conference banquet.

  18. Study of High-Performance Coronagraphic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker; Aziz, M. J.; Gonsalves, R. A.; Korzennik, S. G.; Labeyrie, A.; Lyon, R. G.; Melnick, G. J.; Somerstein, S.; Vasudevan, G.; Woodruff, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    We will provide a progress report about our study of high-performance coronagraphic techniques. At SAO we have set up a testbed to test coronagraphic masks and to demonstrate Labeyrie's multi-step speckle reduction technique. This technique expands the general concept of a coronagraph by incorporating a speckle corrector (phase or amplitude) and second occulter for speckle light suppression. The testbed consists of a coronagraph with high precision optics (2 inch spherical mirrors with lambda/1000 surface quality), lasers simulating the host star and the planet, and a single Labeyrie correction stage with a MEMS deformable mirror (DM) for the phase correction. The correction function is derived from images taken in- and slightly out-of-focus using phase diversity. The testbed is operational awaiting coronagraphic masks. The testbed control software for operating the CCD camera, the translation stage that moves the camera in- and out-of-focus, the wavefront recovery (phase diversity) module, and DM control is under development. We are also developing coronagraphic masks in collaboration with Harvard University and Lockheed Martin Corp. (LMCO). The development at Harvard utilizes a focused ion beam system to mill masks out of absorber material and the LMCO approach uses patterns of dots to achieve the desired mask performance. We will present results of both investigations including test results from the first generation of LMCO masks obtained with our high-precision mask scanner. This work was supported by NASA through grant NNG04GC57G, through SAO IR&D funding, and by Harvard University through the Research Experience for Undergraduate Program of Harvard's Materials Science and Engineering Center. Central facilities were provided by Harvard's Center for Nanoscale Systems.

  19. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI.

    PubMed

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; LaPierre, Cristen D; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E J; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm(3) imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices. PMID:26469756

  20. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; LaPierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5–3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices. PMID:26469756

  1. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lapierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices.

  2. Thermal interface pastes nanostructured for high performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chuangang

    Thermal interface materials in the form of pastes are needed to improve thermal contacts, such as that between a microprocessor and a heat sink of a computer. High-performance and low-cost thermal pastes have been developed in this dissertation by using polyol esters as the vehicle and various nanoscale solid components. The proportion of a solid component needs to be optimized, as an excessive amount degrades the performance, due to the increase in the bond line thickness. The optimum solid volume fraction tends to be lower when the mating surfaces are smoother, and higher when the thermal conductivity is higher. Both a low bond line thickness and a high thermal conductivity help the performance. When the surfaces are smooth, a low bond line thickness can be even more important than a high thermal conductivity, as shown by the outstanding performance of the nanoclay paste of low thermal conductivity in the smooth case (0.009 mum), with the bond line thickness less than 1 mum, as enabled by low storage modulus G', low loss modulus G" and high tan delta. However, for rough surfaces, the thermal conductivity is important. The rheology affects the bond line thickness, but it does not correlate well with the performance. This study found that the structure of carbon black is an important parameter that governs the effectiveness of a carbon black for use in a thermal paste. By using a carbon black with a lower structure (i.e., a lower DBP value), a thermal paste that is more effective than the previously reported carbon black paste was obtained. Graphite nanoplatelet (GNP) was found to be comparable in effectiveness to carbon black (CB) pastes for rough surfaces, but it is less effective for smooth surfaces. At the same filler volume fraction, GNP gives higher thermal conductivity than carbon black paste. At the same pressure, GNP gives higher bond line thickness than CB (Tokai or Cabot). The effectiveness of GNP is limited, due to the high bond line thickness. A

  3. Integrating advanced facades into high performance buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2001-05-01

    Glass is a remarkable material but its functionality is significantly enhanced when it is processed or altered to provide added intrinsic capabilities. The overall performance of glass elements in a building can be further enhanced when they are designed to be part of a complete facade system. Finally the facade system delivers the greatest performance to the building owner and occupants when it becomes an essential element of a fully integrated building design. This presentation examines the growing interest in incorporating advanced glazing elements into more comprehensive facade and building systems in a manner that increases comfort, productivity and amenity for occupants, reduces operating costs for building owners, and contributes to improving the health of the planet by reducing overall energy use and negative environmental impacts. We explore the role of glazing systems in dynamic and responsive facades that provide the following functionality: Enhanced sun protection and cooling load control while improving thermal comfort and providing most of the light needed with daylighting; Enhanced air quality and reduced cooling loads using natural ventilation schemes employing the facade as an active air control element; Reduced operating costs by minimizing lighting, cooling and heating energy use by optimizing the daylighting-thermal tradeoffs; Net positive contributions to the energy balance of the building using integrated photovoltaic systems; Improved indoor environments leading to enhanced occupant health, comfort and performance. In addressing these issues facade system solutions must, of course, respect the constraints of latitude, location, solar orientation, acoustics, earthquake and fire safety, etc. Since climate and occupant needs are dynamic variables, in a high performance building the facade solution have the capacity to respond and adapt to these variable exterior conditions and to changing occupant needs. This responsive performance capability

  4. High performance bonded neo magnets using high density compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herchenroeder, J.; Miller, D.; Sheth, N. K.; Foo, M. C.; Nagarathnam, K.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a manufacturing method called Combustion Driven Compaction (CDC) for the manufacture of isotropic bonded NdFeB magnets (bonded Neo). Magnets produced by the CDC method have density up to 6.5 g/cm3 which is 7-10% higher compared to commercially available bonded Neo magnets of the same shape. The performance of an actual seat motor with a representative CDC ring magnet is presented and compared with the seat motor performance with both commercial isotropic bonded Neo and anisotropic NdFeB rings of the same geometry. The comparisons are made at both room and elevated temperatures. The airgap flux for the magnet produced by the proposed method is 6% more compared to the commercial isotropic bonded Neo magnet. After exposure to high temperature due to the superior thermal aging stability of isotropic NdFeB powders the motor performance with this material is comparable to the motor performance with an anisotropic NdFeB magnet.

  5. High performance computing applications in neurobiological research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Cheng, Rei; Doshay, David G.; Linton, Samuel W.; Montgomery, Kevin; Parnas, Bruce R.

    1994-01-01

    The human nervous system is a massively parallel processor of information. The vast numbers of neurons, synapses and circuits is daunting to those seeking to understand the neural basis of consciousness and intellect. Pervading obstacles are lack of knowledge of the detailed, three-dimensional (3-D) organization of even a simple neural system and the paucity of large scale, biologically relevant computer simulations. We use high performance graphics workstations and supercomputers to study the 3-D organization of gravity sensors as a prototype architecture foreshadowing more complex systems. Scaled-down simulations run on a Silicon Graphics workstation and scale-up, three-dimensional versions run on the Cray Y-MP and CM5 supercomputers.

  6. High-performance capillary electrophoresis of histones

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, L.R.; London, J.E.; Valdez, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) system has been developed for the fractionation of histones. This system involves electroinjection of the sample and electrophoresis in a 0.1M phosphate buffer at pH 2.5 in a 50 {mu}m {times} 35 cm coated capillary. Electrophoresis was accomplished in 9 minutes separating a whole histone preparation into its components in the following order of decreasing mobility; (MHP) H3, H1 (major variant), H1 (minor variant), (LHP) H3, (MHP) H2A (major variant), (LHP) H2A, H4, H2B, (MHP) H2A (minor variant) where MHP is the more hydrophobic component and LHP is the less hydrophobic component. This order of separation is very different from that found in acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and in reversed-phase HPLC and, thus, brings the histone biochemist a new dimension for the qualitative analysis of histone samples. 27 refs., 8 figs.

  7. How to create high-performing teams.

    PubMed

    Lam, Samuel M

    2010-02-01

    This article is intended to discuss inspirational aspects on how to lead a high-performance team. Cogent topics discussed include how to hire staff through methods of "topgrading" with reference to Geoff Smart and "getting the right people on the bus" referencing Jim Collins' work. In addition, once the staff is hired, this article covers how to separate the "eagles from the ducks" and how to inspire one's staff by creating the right culture with suggestions for further reading by Don Miguel Ruiz (The four agreements) and John Maxwell (21 Irrefutable laws of leadership). In addition, Simon Sinek's concept of "Start with Why" is elaborated to help a leader know what the core element should be with any superior culture. PMID:20127598

  8. High performance stepper motors for space mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sega, Patrick; Estevenon, Christine

    1995-05-01

    Hybrid stepper motors are very well adapted to high performance space mechanisms. They are very simple to operate and are often used for accurate positioning and for smooth rotations. In order to fulfill these requirements, the motor torque, its harmonic content, and the magnetic parasitic torque have to be properly designed. Only finite element computations can provide enough accuracy to determine the toothed structures' magnetic permeance, whose derivative function leads to the torque. It is then possible to design motors with a maximum torque capability or with the most reduced torque harmonic content (less than 3 percent of fundamental). These later motors are dedicated to applications where a microstep or a synchronous mode is selected for minimal dynamic disturbances. In every case, the capability to convert electrical power into torque is much higher than on DC brushless motors.

  9. High performance stepper motors for space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sega, Patrick; Estevenon, Christine

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid stepper motors are very well adapted to high performance space mechanisms. They are very simple to operate and are often used for accurate positioning and for smooth rotations. In order to fulfill these requirements, the motor torque, its harmonic content, and the magnetic parasitic torque have to be properly designed. Only finite element computations can provide enough accuracy to determine the toothed structures' magnetic permeance, whose derivative function leads to the torque. It is then possible to design motors with a maximum torque capability or with the most reduced torque harmonic content (less than 3 percent of fundamental). These later motors are dedicated to applications where a microstep or a synchronous mode is selected for minimal dynamic disturbances. In every case, the capability to convert electrical power into torque is much higher than on DC brushless motors.

  10. Quantum image with high retrieval performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Yue; Chen, Hanwu; Liu, Zhihao; Tan, Jianing

    2016-02-01

    Quantum image retrieval is an exhaustive work due to exponential measurements. Casting aside the background of image processing, quantum image is a pure many-body state, and the retrieval task is a physical process named as quantum state tomography. Tomography of a special class of states, permutationally symmetric states, just needs quadratic measurement scales with the number of qubits. In order to take advantage of this result, we propose a method to map the main energy of the image to these states. First, we deduce that n+1 permutationally symmetric states can be constructed as bases of 2^n Hilbert space ( n qubits) at least. Second, we execute Schmidt decomposition by continually bipartite splitting of the quantum image (state). At last, we select n+1 maximum coefficients, do base transformation to map these coefficients to new bases (permutationally symmetric states). By these means, the quantum image with high retrieval performance can be gotten.

  11. Study of High Performance Coronagraphic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Phil (Technical Monitor); Tolls, Volker

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the Study of High Performance Coronagraphic Techniques project (called CoronaTech) is: 1) to verify the Labeyrie multi-step speckle reduction method and 2) to develop new techniques to manufacture soft-edge occulter masks preferably with Gaussian absorption profile. In a coronagraph, the light from a bright host star which is centered on the optical axis in the image plane is blocked by an occulter centered on the optical axis while the light from a planet passes the occulter (the planet has a certain minimal distance from the optical axis). Unfortunately, stray light originating in the telescope and subsequent optical elements is not completely blocked causing a so-called speckle pattern in the image plane of the coronagraph limiting the sensitivity of the system. The sensitivity can be increased significantly by reducing the amount of speckle light. The Labeyrie multi-step speckle reduction method implements one (or more) phase correction steps to suppress the unwanted speckle light. In each step, the stray light is rephased and then blocked with an additional occulter which affects the planet light (or other companion) only slightly. Since the suppression is still not complete, a series of steps is required in order to achieve significant suppression. The second part of the project is the development of soft-edge occulters. Simulations have shown that soft-edge occulters show better performance in coronagraphs than hard-edge occulters. In order to utilize the performance gain of soft-edge occulters. fabrication methods have to be developed to manufacture these occulters according to the specification set forth by the sensitivity requirements of the coronagraph.

  12. High-Performance Monopropellants and Catalysts Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is sponsoring efforts to develop advanced monopropellant technology. The focus has been on monopropellant formulations composed of an aqueous solution of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) and a fuel component. HAN-based monopropellants do not have a toxic vapor and do not need the extraordinary procedures for storage, handling, and disposal required of hydrazine (N2H4). Generically, HAN-based monopropellants are denser and have lower freezing points than N2H4. The performance of HAN-based monopropellants depends on the selection of fuel, the HAN-to-fuel ratio, and the amount of water in the formulation. HAN-based monopropellants are not seen as a replacement for N2H4 per se, but rather as a propulsion option in their own right. For example, HAN-based monopropellants would prove beneficial to the orbit insertion of small, power-limited satellites because of this propellant's high performance (reduced system mass), high density (reduced system volume), and low freezing point (elimination of tank and line heaters). Under a Glenn-contracted effort, Aerojet Redmond Rocket Center conducted testing to provide the foundation for the development of monopropellant thrusters with an I(sub sp) goal of 250 sec. A modular, workhorse reactor (representative of a 1-lbf thruster) was used to evaluate HAN formulations with catalyst materials. Stoichiometric, oxygen-rich, and fuelrich formulations of HAN-methanol and HAN-tris(aminoethyl)amine trinitrate were tested to investigate the effects of stoichiometry on combustion behavior. Aerojet found that fuelrich formulations degrade the catalyst and reactor faster than oxygen-rich and stoichiometric formulations do. A HAN-methanol formulation with a theoretical Isp of 269 sec (designated HAN269MEO) was selected as the baseline. With a combustion efficiency of at least 93 percent demonstrated for HAN-based monopropellants, HAN269MEO will meet the I(sub sp) 250 sec goal.

  13. A high performance thin film thermoelectric cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, D.M.; Min, G.; Volklein, F.

    1998-07-01

    Thin film thermoelectric devices with small dimensions have been fabricated using microelectronics technology and operated successfully in the Seebeck mode as sensors or generators. However, they do not operate successfully in the Peltier mode as coolers, because of the thermal bypass provided by the relatively thick substrate upon which the thermoelectric device is fabricated. In this paper a processing sequence is described which dramatically reduces this thermal bypass and facilitates the fabrication of high performance integrated thin film thermoelectric coolers. In the processing sequence a very thin amorphous SiC (or SiO{sub 2}SiN{sub 4}) film is deposited on a silicon substrate using conventional thin film deposition and a membrane formed by removing the silicon substrate over a desired region using chemical etching or micro-machining. Thermoelements are deposited on the membrane using conventional thin film deposition and patterning techniques and configured so that the region which is to be cooled is abutted to the cold junctions of the Peltier thermoelements while the hot junctions are located at the outer peripheral area which rests on the silicon substrate rim. Heat is pumped laterally from the cooled region to the silicon substrate rim and then dissipated vertically through it to an external heat sink. Theoretical calculations of the performance of a cooler described above indicate that a maximum temperature difference of about 40--50K can be achieved with a maximum heat pumping capacity of around 10 milliwatts.

  14. USING MULTITAIL NETWORKS IN HIGH PERFORMANCE CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    S. COLL; E. FRACHTEMBERG; F. PETRINI; A. HOISIE; L. GURVITS

    2001-03-01

    Using multiple independent networks (also known as rails) is an emerging technique to overcome bandwidth limitations and enhance fault-tolerance of current high-performance clusters. We present and analyze various venues for exploiting multiple rails. Different rail access policies are presented and compared, including static and dynamic allocation schemes. An analytical lower bound on the number of networks required for static rail allocation is shown. We also present an extensive experimental comparison of the behavior of various allocation schemes in terms of bandwidth and latency. Striping messages over multiple rails can substantially reduce network latency, depending on average message size, network load and allocation scheme. The methods compared include a static rail allocation, a round-robin rail allocation, a dynamic allocation based on local knowledge, and a rail allocation that reserves both end-points of a message before sending it. The latter is shown to perform better than other methods at higher loads: up to 49% better than local-knowledge allocation and 37% better than the round-robin allocation. This allocation scheme also shows lower latency and it saturates on higher loads (for messages large enough). Most importantly, this proposed allocation scheme scales well with the number of rails and message sizes.

  15. The design of high-performance gliders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, B.; Heuermann, V.

    1985-01-01

    A high-performance glider is defined as a glider which has been designed to carry the pilot in a minimum of time a given distance, taking into account conditions which are as conveniently as possible. The present investigation has the objective to show approaches for enhancing the cross-country flight cruising speed, giving attention to the difficulties which the design engineer will have to overcome. The characteristics of the cross-country flight and their relation to the cruising speed are discussed, and a description is provided of mathematical expressions concerning the cruising speed, the sinking speed, and the optimum gliding speed. The effect of aspect ratio and wing loading on the cruising speed is illustrated with the aid of a graph. Trends in glider development are explored, taking into consideration the design of laminar profiles, the reduction of profile-related drag by plain flaps, and the variation of wing loading during the flight. A number of suggestions are made for obtaining gliders with improved performance.

  16. High Temperature Oxidation Performance of Aluminide Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Zhang, Ying; Haynes, James A; Wright, Ian G

    2004-01-01

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the oxidation resistance of structural alloys by forming a protective external alumina scale. Steam and exhaust gas environments are of particular interest because alumina is less susceptible to the accelerated attack due to hydroxide formation observed for chromia- and silica-forming alloys and ceramics. For water vapor testing, one ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and one austenitic alloy (304L) have been selected as substrate materials and CVD coatings have been used in order to have a well-controlled, high purity coating. It is anticipated that similar aluminide coatings could be made by a higher-volume, commercial process such as pack cementation. Previous work on this program has examined as-deposited coatings made by high and low Al activity CVD processes and the short-term performance of these coatings. The current work is focusing on the long term behavior in both diffusion tests16 and oxidation tests of the thicker, high Al activity coatings. For long-term coating durability, one area of concern has been the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between coating and substrate. This difference could cause cracking or deformation that could reduce coating life. Corrosion testing using thermal cycling is of particular interest because of this potential problem and results are presented where a short exposure cycle (1h) severely degraded aluminide coatings on both types of substrates. To further study the potential role of aluminide coatings in fossil energy applications, several high creep strength Ni-base alloys were coated by CVD for testing in a high pressure (20atm) steam-CO{sub 2} environment for the ZEST (zero-emission steam turbine) program. Such alloys would be needed as structural and turbine materials in this concept. For Ni-base alloys, CVD produces a {approx}50{mu}m {beta}-NiAl outer layer with an underlying interdiffusion zone

  17. High-performance, high-volume fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-15

    This booklet offers the construction professional an in-depth description of the use of high-volume fly ash in concrete. Emphasis is placed on the need for increased utilization of coal-fired power plant byproducts in lieu of Portland cement materials to eliminate increased CO{sub 2} emissions during the production of cement. Also addressed is the dramatic increase in concrete performance with the use of 50+ percent fly ash volume. The booklet contains numerous color and black and white photos, charts of test results, mixtures and comparisons, and several HVFA case studies.

  18. High performance internal reforming unit for high temperature fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ma, Zhiwen; Venkataraman, Ramakrishnan; Novacco, Lawrence J.

    2008-10-07

    A fuel reformer having an enclosure with first and second opposing surfaces, a sidewall connecting the first and second opposing surfaces and an inlet port and an outlet port in the sidewall. A plate assembly supporting a catalyst and baffles are also disposed in the enclosure. A main baffle extends into the enclosure from a point of the sidewall between the inlet and outlet ports. The main baffle cooperates with the enclosure and the plate assembly to establish a path for the flow of fuel gas through the reformer from the inlet port to the outlet port. At least a first directing baffle extends in the enclosure from one of the sidewall and the main baffle and cooperates with the plate assembly and the enclosure to alter the gas flow path. Desired graded catalyst loading pattern has been defined for optimized thermal management for the internal reforming high temperature fuel cells so as to achieve high cell performance.

  19. High-performance computing in image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Michele; Remondino, Fabio; Dalla Mura, Mauro

    2012-10-01

    Thanks to the recent technological advances, a large variety of image data is at our disposal with variable geometric, radiometric and temporal resolution. In many applications the processing of such images needs high performance computing techniques in order to deliver timely responses e.g. for rapid decisions or real-time actions. Thus, parallel or distributed computing methods, Digital Signal Processor (DSP) architectures, Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) programming and Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices have become essential tools for the challenging issue of processing large amount of geo-data. The article focuses on the processing and registration of large datasets of terrestrial and aerial images for 3D reconstruction, diagnostic purposes and monitoring of the environment. For the image alignment procedure, sets of corresponding feature points need to be automatically extracted in order to successively compute the geometric transformation that aligns the data. The feature extraction and matching are ones of the most computationally demanding operations in the processing chain thus, a great degree of automation and speed is mandatory. The details of the implemented operations (named LARES) exploiting parallel architectures and GPU are thus presented. The innovative aspects of the implementation are (i) the effectiveness on a large variety of unorganized and complex datasets, (ii) capability to work with high-resolution images and (iii) the speed of the computations. Examples and comparisons with standard CPU processing are also reported and commented.

  20. High Performance Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bondyopadhyay, Probir K. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A microstrip antenna for radiating circularly polarized electromagnetic waves comprising a cluster array of at least four microstrip radiator elements, each of which is provided with dual orthogonal coplanar feeds in phase quadrature relation achieved by connection to an asymmetric T-junction power divider impedance notched at resonance. The dual fed circularly polarized reference element is positioned with its axis at a 45 deg angle with respect to the unit cell axis. The other three dual fed elements in the unit cell are positioned and fed with a coplanar feed structure with sequential rotation and phasing to enhance the axial ratio and impedance matching performance over a wide bandwidth. The centers of the radiator elements are disposed at the corners of a square with each side of a length d in the range of 0.7 to 0.9 times the free space wavelength of the antenna radiation and the radiator elements reside in a square unit cell area of sides equal to 2d and thereby permit the array to be used as a phased array antenna for electronic scanning and is realizable in a high temperature superconducting thin film material for high efficiency.

  1. High performance BGMI circuit for VLWIR FPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Li-chao; Chen, Hong-lei; Huang, Ai-bo; Zhang, Jun-ling; Ding, Rui-jun

    2013-09-01

    An improved CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) for N-on-P very long wavelength (VLWIR) detectors is designed, which has the ability to operate with a simple background suppression. It increases the integration time and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of image data. A buffered gate modulation input (BGMI) cell as input circuit provides a low input resistance, high injection efficiency, and precise biasing voltage to the photodiode. By theoretically analyzing the characteristic parameters of MOS device at low temperature, a high gain's feedback amplifier is devised which using a differential stage to provide the inverting gain to improve linearity and to provide tight control of the detector bias. The final chip is fabricated with HHNEC 0.35um 1P4M process technology. The measurement results of the fabricated readout chip under 50K have successfully verified both readout function and performance improvement. With the 5.0V power supply, ROIC provides the output dynamic range over 2.5V. At the same time, the total power dissipation is less than 200mW, and the maximum readout speed is more than 2.5MHz.

  2. New high performance Si for optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenma, T.; Matsuzaka, M.; Sako, R.; Takase, K.; Chiba, K.

    2016-05-01

    Against the backdrop of a growing demand in the areas of smart buildings, security, vehicle installation, and other applications, the market for far infrared cameras is expected to grow significantly in the future. However, since germanium (Ge) and chalcogenide glass, which have been used as the lens materials of far infrared cameras, are very expensive or highly toxic, there are some problems supporting the growing demand. We have therefore focused attention on silicon, which is inexpensive and less toxic. Although silicon has been used as a lens material of far infrared cameras, there are some problems remaining to be solved: Cz silicon is inexpensive but delivers low transmittance, and Fz silicon delivers sufficient transmittance but is expensive. We have developed New Cz silicon, which delivers high transmittance as Fz silicon does, and is inexpensive as conventional Cz silicon is. We have already started its sample work at both companies in Japan and overseas and have obtained excellent performance results. Mass production is scheduled to start in this fiscal year.

  3. High-performance computers for unmanned vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toms, David; Ettinger, Gil J.

    2005-10-01

    The present trend of increasing functionality onboard unmanned vehicles is made possible by rapid advances in high-performance computers (HPCs). An HPC is characterized by very high computational capability (100s of billions of operations per second) contained in lightweight, rugged, low-power packages. HPCs are critical to the processing of sensor data onboard these vehicles. Operations such as radar image formation, target tracking, target recognition, signal intelligence signature collection and analysis, electro-optic image compression, and onboard data exploitation are provided by these machines. The net effect of an HPC is to minimize communication bandwidth requirements and maximize mission flexibility. This paper focuses on new and emerging technologies in the HPC market. Emerging capabilities include new lightweight, low-power computing systems: multi-mission computing (using a common computer to support several sensors); onboard data exploitation; and large image data storage capacities. These new capabilities will enable an entirely new generation of deployed capabilities at reduced cost. New software tools and architectures available to unmanned vehicle developers will enable them to rapidly develop optimum solutions with maximum productivity and return on investment. These new technologies effectively open the trade space for unmanned vehicle designers.

  4. NCI's Transdisciplinary High Performance Scientific Data Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Car, Nicholas; Cox, Simon; Druken, Kelsey; Evans, Bradley; Fraser, Ryan; Ip, Alex; Kemp, Carina; King, Edward; Minchin, Stuart; Larraondo, Pablo; Pugh, Tim; Richards, Clare; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages Earth Systems data collections sourced from several domains and organisations onto a single High Performance Data (HPD) Node to further Australia's national priority research and innovation agenda. The NCI HPD Node has rapidly established its value, currently managing over 10 PBytes of datasets from collections that span a wide range of disciplines including climate, weather, environment, geoscience, geophysics, water resources and social sciences. Importantly, in order to facilitate broad user uptake, maximise reuse and enable transdisciplinary access through software and standardised interfaces, the datasets, associated information systems and processes have been incorporated into the design and operation of a unified platform that NCI has called, the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). The key goal of the NERDIP is to regularise data access so that it is easily discoverable, interoperable for different domains and enabled for high performance methods. It adopts and implements international standards and data conventions, and promotes scientific integrity within a high performance computing and data analysis environment. NCI has established a rich and flexible computing environment to access to this data, through the NCI supercomputer; a private cloud that supports both domain focused virtual laboratories and in-common interactive analysis interfaces; as well as remotely through scalable data services. Data collections of this importance must be managed with careful consideration of both their current use and the needs of the end-communities, as well as its future potential use, such as transitioning to more advanced software and improved methods. It is therefore critical that the data platform is both well-managed and trusted for stable production use (including transparency and reproducibility), agile enough to incorporate new technological advances and

  5. High Power Flex-Propellant Arcjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2011-01-01

    implied nearly frozen flow in the nozzle and yielded performance ranges of 800-1100 sec for hydrogen and 400-600 sec for ammonia. Inferred thrust-to-power ratios were in the range of 30-10 lbf/MWe for hydrogen and 60-20 lbf/MWe for ammonia. Successful completion of this test series represents a fundamental milestone in the progression of high power arcjet technology, and it is hoped that the results may serve as a reliable touchstone for the future development of MW-class regeneratively-cooled flex-propellant plasma rockets.

  6. High performance vapour-cell frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Bandi, T.; Gruet, F.; Pellaton, M.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We report our investigations on a compact high-performance rubidium (Rb) vapour-cell clock based on microwave-optical double-resonance (DR). These studies are done in both DR continuous-wave (CW) and Ramsey schemes using the same Physics Package (PP), with the same Rb vapour cell and a magnetron-type cavity with only 45 cm3 external volume. In the CW-DR scheme, we demonstrate a DR signal with a contrast of 26% and a linewidth of 334 Hz; in Ramsey-DR mode Ramsey signals with higher contrast up to 35% and a linewidth of 160 Hz have been demonstrated. Short-term stabilities of 1.4×10-13 τ-1/2 and 2.4×10-13 τ-1/2 are measured for CW-DR and Ramsey-DR schemes, respectively. In the Ramsey-DR operation, thanks to the separation of light and microwave interactions in time, the light-shift effect has been suppressed which allows improving the long-term clock stability as compared to CW-DR operation. Implementations in miniature atomic clocks are considered.

  7. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.M.

    1998-04-28

    The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a high performance hand-held, real time detection gas chromatograph (HHGC) by Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this hand-held gas chromatograph is about five lbs., with a physical size of 8{close_quotes} x 5{close_quotes} x 3{close_quotes} including carrier gas and battery. It consumes about 12 watts of electrical power with a response time on the order of one to two minutes. This HHGC has an average effective theoretical plate of about 40k. Presently, its sensitivity is limited by its thermal sensitive detector at PPM. Like a conventional G.C., this HHGC consists mainly of three major components: (1) the sample injector, (2) the column, and (3) the detector with related electronics. The present HHGC injector is a modified version of the conventional injector. Its separation column is fabricated completely on silicon wafers by means of MEMS technology. This separation column has a circular cross section with a diameter of 100 pm. The detector developed for this hand-held GC is a thermal conductivity detector fabricated on a silicon nitride window by MEMS technology. A normal Wheatstone bridge is used. The signal is fed into a PC and displayed through LabView software.

  8. High Performance Data Analysis via Coordinated Caches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M.; Metzlaff, C.; Kühn, E.; Giffels, M.; Quast, G.; Jung, C.; Hauth, T.

    2015-12-01

    With the second run period of the LHC, high energy physics collaborations will have to face increasing computing infrastructural needs. Opportunistic resources are expected to absorb many computationally expensive tasks, such as Monte Carlo event simulation. This leaves dedicated HEP infrastructure with an increased load of analysis tasks that in turn will need to process an increased volume of data. In addition to storage capacities, a key factor for future computing infrastructure is therefore input bandwidth available per core. Modern data analysis infrastructure relies on one of two paradigms: data is kept on dedicated storage and accessed via network or distributed over all compute nodes and accessed locally. Dedicated storage allows data volume to grow independently of processing capacities, whereas local access allows processing capacities to scale linearly. However, with the growing data volume and processing requirements, HEP will require both of these features. For enabling adequate user analyses in the future, the KIT CMS group is merging both paradigms: popular data is spread over a local disk layer on compute nodes, while any data is available from an arbitrarily sized background storage. This concept is implemented as a pool of distributed caches, which are loosely coordinated by a central service. A Tier 3 prototype cluster is currently being set up for performant user analyses of both local and remote data.

  9. High Performance Graphene Oxide Based Rubber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W.; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications.

  10. An integrated high performance Fastbus slave interface

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J.; Ljuslin, C. )

    1993-08-01

    A high performance CMOS Fastbus slave interface ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) supporting all addressing and data transfer modes defined in the IEEE 960 - 1986 standard is presented. The FAstbus Slave Integrated Circuit (FASIC) is an interface between the asynchronous Fastbus and a clock synchronous processor/memory bus. It can work stand-alone or together with a 32 bit microprocessor. The FASIC is a programmable device enabling its direct use in many different applications. A set of programmable address mapping windows can map Fastbus addresses to convenient memory addresses and at the same time act as address decoding logic. Data rates of 100 MBytes/sec to Fastbus can be obtained using an internal FIFO in the FASIC to buffer data between the two buses during block transfers. Message passing from Fastbus to a microprocessor on the slave module is supported. A compact (70 mm x 170 mm) Fastbus slave piggy back sub-card interface including level conversion between ECL and TTL signal levels has been implemented using surface mount components and the 208 pin FASIC chip.

  11. High Performance Graphene Oxide Based Rubber Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingyan; Wen, Shipeng; Chen, Yulong; Zhang, Fazhong; Panine, Pierre; Chan, Tung W.; Zhang, Liqun; Liang, Yongri; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide/styrene-butadiene rubber (GO/SBR) composites with complete exfoliation of GO sheets were prepared by aqueous-phase mixing of GO colloid with SBR latex and a small loading of butadiene-styrene-vinyl-pyridine rubber (VPR) latex, followed by their co-coagulation. During co-coagulation, VPR not only plays a key role in the prevention of aggregation of GO sheets but also acts as an interface-bridge between GO and SBR. The results demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the GO/SBR composite with 2.0 vol.% GO is comparable with those of the SBR composite reinforced with 13.1 vol.% of carbon black (CB), with a low mass density and a good gas barrier ability to boot. The present work also showed that GO-silica/SBR composite exhibited outstanding wear resistance and low-rolling resistance which make GO-silica/SBR very competitive for the green tire application, opening up enormous opportunities to prepare high performance rubber composites for future engineering applications. PMID:23974435

  12. High performance composites with active stiffness control.

    PubMed

    Tridech, Charnwit; Maples, Henry A; Robinson, Paul; Bismarck, Alexander

    2013-09-25

    High performance carbon fiber reinforced composites with controllable stiffness could revolutionize the use of composite materials in structural applications. Here we describe a structural material, which has a stiffness that can be actively controlled on demand. Such a material could have applications in morphing wings or deployable structures. A carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy composite is described that can undergo an 88% reduction in flexural stiffness at elevated temperatures and fully recover when cooled, with no discernible damage or loss in properties. Once the stiffness has been reduced, the required deformations can be achieved at much lower actuation forces. For this proof-of-concept study a thin polyacrylamide (PAAm) layer was electrocoated onto carbon fibers that were then embedded into an epoxy matrix via resin infusion. Heating the PAAm coating above its glass transition temperature caused it to soften and allowed the fibers to slide within the matrix. To produce the stiffness change the carbon fibers were used as resistance heating elements by passing a current through them. When the PAAm coating had softened, the ability of the interphase to transfer load to the fibers was significantly reduced, greatly lowering the flexural stiffness of the composite. By changing the moisture content in PAAm fiber coating, the temperature at which the PAAm softens and the composites undergo a reduction in stiffness can be tuned. PMID:23978266

  13. High performance techniques for space mission scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen F.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize current research at Carnegie Mellon University aimed at development of high performance techniques and tools for space mission scheduling. Similar to prior research in opportunistic scheduling, our approach assumes the use of dynamic analysis of problem constraints as a basis for heuristic focusing of problem solving search. This methodology, however, is grounded in representational assumptions more akin to those adopted in recent temporal planning research, and in a problem solving framework which similarly emphasizes constraint posting in an explicitly maintained solution constraint network. These more general representational assumptions are necessitated by the predominance of state-dependent constraints in space mission planning domains, and the consequent need to integrate resource allocation and plan synthesis processes. First, we review the space mission problems we have considered to date and indicate the results obtained in these application domains. Next, we summarize recent work in constraint posting scheduling procedures, which offer the promise of better future solutions to this class of problems.

  14. Three Dimensional Forming Simulation of the Shielded Slot Plate for the MCFC Using a Ductile Fracture Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Yang, D. Y.; Lee, S. R.; Chang, I. G.; Lee, T. W.

    2011-08-01

    The shielded slot plate, which has a sheared corrugated trapezoidal pattern, is a component of the metallic bipolar plate for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). In order to increase the efficiency of the fuel cell, the unit cell of the shielded slot plate should have a relatively large upper area. Additionally, defects from the forming process should be minimized. In order to simulate the slitting process, whereby sheared corrugated patterns are formed, ductile fracture criteria based on the histories of stress and strain are employed. The user material subroutine VUMAT is employed for implementation of the material and ductile fracture criteria in the commercial FEM software ABAQUS. The variables of the ductile fracture criteria were determined by comparing the simulation results and the experimental results of the tension test and the shearing test. Parametric studies were conducted to determine the critical value of the ductile fracture criterion. Employing these ductile fracture criteria, the three dimensional forming process of the shielded slot plate was numerically simulated. The effects of the slitting process in the forming process of the shielded slot plate were analyzed through a FEM simulation and experimental studies. Finally, experiments involving microscopic and macroscopic observations were conducted to verify the numerical simulations of the 3-step forming process.

  15. Experience with high-performance PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dennis L.; Goldburgh, Mitchell M.; Head, Calvin

    1997-05-01

    Lockheed Martin (Loral) has installed PACS with associated teleradiology in several tens of hospitals. The PACS that have been installed have been the basis for a shift to filmless radiology in many of the hospitals. the basic structure for the PACS and the teleradiology that is being used is outlined. The way that the PACS are being used in the hospitals is instructive. The three most used areas for radiology in the hospital are the wards including the ICU wards, the emergency room, and the orthopedics clinic. The examinations are mostly CR images with 20 percent to 30 percent of the examinations being CT, MR, and ultrasound exams. The PACS are being used to realize improved productivity for radiology and for the clinicians. For radiology the same staff is being used for 30 to 50 percent more workload. For the clinicians 10 to 20 percent of their time is being saved in dealing with radiology images. The improved productivity stems from the high performance of the PACS that has been designed and installed. Images are available on any workstation in the hospital within less than two seconds, even during the busiest hour of the day. The examination management functions to restrict the attention of any one user to the examinations that are of interest. The examination management organizes the workflow through the radiology department and the hospital, improving the service of the radiology department by reducing the time until the information from a radiology examination is available. The remaining weak link in the PACS system is transcription. The examination can be acquired, read, an the report dictated in much less than ten minutes. The transcription of the dictated reports can take from a few hours to a few days. The addition of automatic transcription services will remove this weak link.

  16. High-performance commercial building systems

    SciTech Connect

    Selkowitz, Stephen

    2003-10-01

    This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and

  17. High performance backplane components for modular avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves-Kirkby, C. J.; Goodwin, M. J.; Hall, J. P.; Glynn, G.; Hankey, J.; Salik, M. D.; Goodfellow, R. C.; Jibb, D. J.

    1994-10-01

    The design and development of optoelectronic transceiver and optical pathway components for application in a modular avionics backplane demonstrator system are described and initial performance results are presented.

  18. High Performance Input/Output Systems for High Performance Computing and Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Geoffrey C.; Ou, Chao-Wei

    1997-01-01

    The approach of this task was to apply leading parallel computing research to a number of existing techniques for assimilation, and extract parameters indicating where and how input/output limits computational performance. The following was used for detailed knowledge of the application problems: 1. Developing a parallel input/output system specifically for this application 2. Extracting the important input/output characteristics of data assimilation problems; and 3. Building these characteristics s parameters into our runtime library (Fortran D/High Performance Fortran) for parallel input/output support.

  19. Properties of LiCoO{sub 2}-coated NiO MCFC cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Kuk, S.T.; Kim, C.K.; Chun, H.S.; Kwon, H.J.

    1996-12-31

    PVA-assisted sol-gel method is useful in producing metal oxides with large surface area at low temperature. We fabricated LiCoO{sub 2}-coated NiO(LC-NiO) cathode by PVA-assisted sol-gel method and measured its properties, The electrical conductivity of LC-NiO cathode was measured to be more than 5 times as high as that of NiO and unit cell test showed improved performance. From the SEM images and Raman spectra. we confirmed that the structure of LC-NiO was different from that of NiO. For 250 hours of steady operation of unit cells. the mean voltage of the cells were 0.78V for NiO and 0.85V for LiCoO{sub 2}-Coated NiO at a current density of l50mA/cm{sup 2}.

  20. Maintaining safety and high performance on shiftwork

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Folkard, S.; Wedderburn, A. I.

    1996-01-01

    This review of the shiftwork area focuses on aspects of safety and productivity. It discusses the situations in which shiftworker performance is critical, the types of problem that can develop and the reasons why shiftworker performance can be impaired. The review ends with a discnssion of the various advantages and disadvantages of several shift rotation systems, and of other possible solutions to the problem.

  1. High Performance Diesel Fueled Cabin Heater

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, Tom

    2001-08-05

    Recent DOE-OHVT studies show that diesel emissions and fuel consumption can be greatly reduced at truck stops by switching from engine idle to auxiliary-fired heaters. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has studied high performance diesel burner designs that address the shortcomings of current low fire-rate burners. Initial test results suggest a real opportunity for the development of a truly advanced truck heating system. The BNL approach is to use a low pressure, air-atomized burner derived form burner designs used commonly in gas turbine combustors. This paper reviews the design and test results of the BNL diesel fueled cabin heater. The burner design is covered by U.S. Patent 6,102,687 and was issued to U.S. DOE on August 15, 2000.The development of several novel oil burner applications based on low-pressure air atomization is described. The atomizer used is a pre-filming, air blast nozzle of the type commonly used in gas turbine combustion. The air pressure used can b e as low as 1300 Pa and such pressure can be easily achieved with a fan. Advantages over conventional, pressure-atomized nozzles include ability to operate at low input rates without very small passages and much lower fuel pressure requirements. At very low firing rates the small passage sizes in pressure swirl nozzles lead to poor reliability and this factor has practically constrained these burners to firing rates over 14 kW. Air atomization can be used very effectively at low firing rates to overcome this concern. However, many air atomizer designs require pressures that can be achieved only with a compressor, greatly complicating the burner package and increasing cost. The work described in this paper has been aimed at the practical adaptation of low-pressure air atomization to low input oil burners. The objective of this work is the development of burners that can achieve the benefits of air atomization with air pressures practically achievable with a simple burner fan.

  2. Compact LCD projector with high optical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zengrong; Xu, Liu; Gu, Peifu; Li, Haifeng; Xu, Anxi; Zhang, Yanping; Tang, Jinfa

    1998-08-01

    A compact LCD projection display system and its optical performance are discussed in this paper. In order to improve optical performance, two flyingeye lens have been employed in the system. It can improve the brightness uniformity of display image. Also, a polarized light transformer, which involves two functions: polarizing light radiation and converting unpolarized light into the same polarization direction light beam for LCD panels, has been developed to increase the optical efficiency and contrast ratio. Moreover, color separation and combination system has been designed and developed. Under these construction, the system with good optical performance and outstanding picture quality has been achieved.

  3. Bedford Farmhouse High Performance Retrofit Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-26

    In this case study, Building Science Corporation partnered with Habitat for Humanity of Greater Lowell on a retrofit of a mid-19th century farmhouse into affordable housing meeting Building America performance standards.

  4. High Efficiency Thermoelectric Generators Using New Very High Performance Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Ewell, Richard; Caillat, Thierry; Vandersande, Jan

    1994-07-01

    Extensive theoretical and experimental studies have resulted in reasonable performance improvements (from an average ZT of 0.62 up to 0.75) of the state of the art high temperature SiGe thermoelectric materials in the last 5 years. However, significantly higher material conversion efficiencies are needed to make thermoelectrics competitive and economically attractive. A new approach that looks at radically different compounds and alloys was recently started at JPL and a new family of materials with great potential has been discovered. A real breakthrough was achieved when maximum ZT values of 2.0 were obtained to date on one of these materials in the 300-400C temperature range. Initial analysis of various experimental tests have confirmed its good mechanical and physico-chemical properties. Substantial increases in conversion efficiency and specific power are predicted (60-90%) by incorporating this new material into state of the art space nuclear power systems such as Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG).

  5. High Performance Electrolyzers for Hybrid Thermochemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John W. Weidner

    2009-05-10

    Extensive electrolyzer testing was performed at the University of South Carolina (USC). Emphasis was given to understanding water transport under various operating (i.e., temperature, membrane pressure differential and current density) and design (i.e., membrane thickness) conditions when it became apparent that water transport plays a deciding role in cell voltage. A mathematical model was developed to further understand the mechanisms of water and SO2 transport, and to predict the effect of operating and design parameters on electrolyzer performance.

  6. Secrets of high-performance image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desormeaux, David A.

    1996-04-01

    Medical imaging companies have traditionally supplied the industry with image visualization solutions based on their own custom hardware designs. Today, more and more systems are being deployed using only off-the-shelf workstations. Two major factors are driving this change. First, workstations are delivering the functionality and performance required to replace custom hardware for an ever increasing subset of visualization techniques, while continuing to come down in cost. Second, cost pressures are forcing medical imaging companies to OEM the hardware platform and focus on what they do best -- delivering solutions to health care providers. This industry shift is challenging the workstation vendors to deliver the maximum inherent performance in their computer systems to medical imaging applications without locking the application into a specific vendor's hardware. Since extracting the maximum performance from a workstation is not always intuitively obvious and often requires vendor-specific tricks, the best way to deliver performance to an application is through an application programmer's interface (API). The Hewlett-Packard Image Visualization Library (HP-IVL) is such an API. It transparently delivers the maximum possible imaging performance on Hewlett-Packard workstations, while allowing significant portability between platforms. This paper describes the performance tricks and trade-offs made in the software implementation of HP's Image Visualization Library and how the HP Image Visualization Accelerator (HP-IVX) fits into the overall architecture.

  7. Benchmarking: More Aspects of High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Rahul Ravindrudu

    2004-12-19

    The original HPL algorithm makes the assumption that all data can be fit entirely in the main memory. This assumption will obviously give a good performance due to the absence of disk I/O. However, not all applications can fit their entire data in memory. These applications which require a fair amount of I/O to move data to and from main memory and secondary storage, are more indicative of usage of an Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) System. Given this scenario a well designed I/O architecture will play a significant part in the performance of the MPP System on regular jobs. And, this is not represented in the current Benchmark. The modified HPL algorithm is hoped to be a step in filling this void. The most important factor in the performance of out-of-core algorithms is the actual I/O operations performed and their efficiency in transferring data to/from main memory and disk, Various methods were introduced in the report for performing I/O operations. The I/O method to use depends on the design of the out-of-core algorithm. Conversely, the performance of the out-of-core algorithm is affected by the choice of I/O operations. This implies, good performance is achieved when I/O efficiency is closely tied with the out-of-core algorithms. The out-of-core algorithms must be designed from the start. It is easily observed in the timings for various plots, that I/O plays a significant part in the overall execution time. This leads to an important conclusion, retro-fitting an existing code may not be the best choice. The right-looking algorithm selected for the LU factorization is a recursive algorithm and performs well when the entire dataset is in memory. At each stage of the loop the entire trailing submatrix is read into memory panel by panel. This gives a polynomial number of I/O reads and writes. If the left-looking algorithm was selected for the main loop, the number of I/O operations involved will be linear on the number of columns. This is due to the data access

  8. High Performance Home Building Guide for Habitat for Humanity Affiliates

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey Marburger

    2010-10-01

    This guide covers basic principles of high performance Habitat construction, steps to achieving high performance Habitat construction, resources to help improve building practices, materials, etc., and affiliate profiles and recommendations.

  9. New materials drive high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhmann, Douglas C.; Bates, William F., Jr.; Dexter, H. B.; June, Reid B.

    1992-01-01

    This report shows how advanced composite materials and new processing methods are enabling lighter, lower cost aircraft structures. High-temperature polymers research will focus on systems capable of 50,000 to 100,000 hours of operation in the 212-400 F temperature range. Prospective materials being evaluated include high-temperature epoxies, toughened bismaleimides, cyanates, thermoplastics, polyimides and other polymers.

  10. Green Schools as High Performance Learning Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas E.

    2010-01-01

    In practice, a green school is the physical result of a consensus process of planning, design, and construction that takes into account a building's performance over its entire 50- to 60-year life cycle. The main focus of the process is to reinforce optimal learning, a goal very much in keeping with the parallel goals of resource efficiency and…

  11. Assessing Performance When the Stakes are High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, William R.

    This paper is concerned with measuring achievement levels of medical students. Precise tools are needed to assess the readiness of an individual to practice. The basic question then becomes, what can this candidate do, at a given time, under given circumstances. Given the definition of the circumstances, and the candidate's performance, the…

  12. Workplace Learning of High Performance Sports Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rynne, Steven B.; Mallett, Clifford J.; Tinning, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Australian coaching workplace (to be referred to as the State Institute of Sport; SIS) under consideration in this study employs significant numbers of full-time performance sport coaches and can be accurately characterized as a genuine workplace. Through a consideration of the interaction between what the workplace (SIS) affords the…

  13. Molten carbonate fuel cells: A high temperature fuel cell on the edge to commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Manfred

    The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) technology has been developed in USA, Japan, Korea and Europe for many years. What has started about 30 years ago as an interesting laboratory object has now matured to a potential alternative to conventional power generation systems. Especially the combined heat and power (CHP) generation is an area, where MCFC power plants can be applied with great advantage, due to the high efficiencies which can be achieved. It was demonstrated by several manufacturers that in the sub-MW region MCFC power plants can reach electrical efficiencies of 47%. By making use of the heat generated by the system, total efficiencies of more than 80% can be achieved. The present paper will discuss some aspects of the development work going on with a focus on the role of the molten carbonate contained in the cells. An outlook will be given for the future prospects of this young technology in a changing energy market.

  14. 7 CFR 275.24 - High performance bonuses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High performance bonuses. 275.24 Section 275.24... High performance bonuses. (a) General rule. (1) FNS will award bonuses totaling $48 million for each fiscal year to State agencies that show high or improved performance in accordance with the...

  15. Study of high performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    More panels electroformed with intentional variations of pulse plating parameters are being made. Pulse plating frequency was noted to have a significant effect regarding mechanical properties. The use of a high pulse frequency (assuming fixed duty cycles) results in an increase in ductility and a decrease in ultimate and yield strengths. Electroforming to intermediate frequencies is being done to obtain the best possible combination of ductility and strength. Results of some tests from high frequency specimens are tabulated.

  16. High Performance Green LEDs by Homoepitaxial

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Christian; Schubert, E Fred

    2009-11-22

    This work's objective was the development of processes to double or triple the light output power from green and deep green (525 - 555 nm) AlGaInN light emitting diode (LED) dies within 3 years in reference to the Lumileds Luxeon II. The project paid particular effort to all aspects of the internal generation efficiency of light. LEDs in this spectral region show the highest potential for significant performance boosts and enable the realization of phosphor-free white LEDs comprised by red-green-blue LED modules. Such modules will perform at and outperform the efficacy target projections for white-light LED systems in the Department of Energy's accelerated roadmap of the SSL initiative.

  17. High-performance iodine fiber frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Anna; Baynes, Fred N; Anstie, James D; Light, Philip S; Benabid, Fetah; Stace, Thomas M; Luiten, Andre N

    2011-12-15

    We have constructed a compact and robust optical frequency standard based around iodine vapor loaded into the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). A 532 nm laser was frequency locked to one hyperfine component of the R(56) 32-0 (127)I(2) transition using modulation transfer spectroscopy. The stabilized laser demonstrated a frequency stability of 2.3×10(-12) at 1 s, almost an order of magnitude better than previously reported for a laser stabilized to a gas-filled HC-PCF. This limit is set by the shot noise in the detection system. We present a discussion of the current limitations to the performance and a route to improve the performance by more than an order of magnitude. PMID:22179880

  18. A systems approach to high performance oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, S. R.; Manney, C. M., Jr.; Walls, F. L.; Gray, J. E.; Besson, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how systems composed of multiple oscillators and resonators can achieve superior performance compared to a single oscillator. Experimental results are presented for two systems based on quartz crystals which provide state-of-the-art stability over a much wider range of averaging times than has been previously achieved. One system has achieved a factor of five improvement in noise floor compared to all previously reported results.

  19. High performance compound semiconductor SPAD arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Eric S.; Naydenkov, Mikhail; Bowling, Jared

    2016-05-01

    Aggregated compound semiconductor single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays are emerging as a viable alternative to the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). Compound semiconductors have the potential to surpass SiPM performance, potentially achieving orders of magnitude lower dark count rates and improved radiation hardness. New planar processing techniques have been developed to enable compound semiconductor SPAD devices to be produced with pixel pitches of 11 - 25 microns, with thousands of SPADs per array.

  20. High Performance Radiation Transport Simulations on TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Christopher G; Davidson, Gregory G; Evans, Thomas M; Hamilton, Steven P; Jarrell, Joshua J; Joubert, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe the Denovo code system. Denovo solves the six-dimensional, steady-state, linear Boltzmann transport equation, of central importance to nuclear technology applications such as reactor core analysis (neutronics), radiation shielding, nuclear forensics and radiation detection. The code features multiple spatial differencing schemes, state-of-the-art linear solvers, the Koch-Baker-Alcouffe (KBA) parallel-wavefront sweep algorithm for inverting the transport operator, a new multilevel energy decomposition method scaling to hundreds of thousands of processing cores, and a modern, novel code architecture that supports straightforward integration of new features. In this paper we discuss the performance of Denovo on the 10--20 petaflop ORNL GPU-based system, Titan. We describe algorithms and techniques used to exploit the capabilities of Titan's heterogeneous compute node architecture and the challenges of obtaining good parallel performance for this sparse hyperbolic PDE solver containing inherently sequential computations. Numerical results demonstrating Denovo performance on early Titan hardware are presented.

  1. High performance zinc anode for battery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, John E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved zinc anode for use in a high density rechargeable alkaline battery is disclosed. A process for making the zinc electrode comprises electrolytic loading of the zinc active material from a slightly acidic zinc nitrate solution into a substrate of nickel, copper or silver. The substrate comprises a sintered plaque having very fine pores, a high surface area, and 80-85 percent total initial porosity. The residual porosity after zinc loading is approximately 25-30%. The electrode of the present invention exhibits reduced zinc mobility, shape change and distortion, and demonstrates reduced dendrite buildup cycling of the battery. The disclosed battery is useful for applications requiring high energy density and multiple charge capability.

  2. High-Performance Power-Semiconductor Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, David; Hansen, Irving; Berman, Albert

    1989-01-01

    A 600-V, 50-A transistor and 1,200-V, 50-A diode in rugged, compact, lightweight packages intended for use in inverter-type power supplies having switching frequencies up to 20 kHz. Packages provide low-inductance connections, low loss, electrical isolation, and long-life hermetic seal. Low inductance achieved by making all electrical connections to each package on same plane. Also reduces high-frequency losses by reducing coupling into inherent shorted turns in packaging material around conductor axes. Stranded internal power conductors aid conduction at high frequencies, where skin effect predominates. Design of packages solves historical problem of separation of electrical interface from thermal interface of high-power semiconductor device.

  3. High performance MPEG-audio decoder IC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorn, M.; Benbassat, G.; Cyr, K.; Li, S.; Gill, M.; Kam, D.; Walker, K.; Look, P.; Eldridge, C.; Ng, P.

    1993-01-01

    The emerging digital audio and video compression technology brings both an opportunity and a new challenge to IC design. The pervasive application of compression technology to consumer electronics will require high volume, low cost IC's and fast time to market of the prototypes and production units. At the same time, the algorithms used in the compression technology result in complex VLSI IC's. The conflicting challenges of algorithm complexity, low cost, and fast time to market have an impact on device architecture and design methodology. The work presented in this paper is about the design of a dedicated, high precision, Motion Picture Expert Group (MPEG) audio decoder.

  4. Radiation effects on high performance polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Polymer matrix materials are candidates for use in large space antennas and space platforms that may be deployed in geosynchronous orbit 22,500 miles above the Earth. A principal concern is the long term effects of an environment that is hostile to organic polymers, including high energy electromagnetic radiation, bombardment by charged particles, and large abrupt changes in temperature. Two polyarylene ethers which might be utilized as models for polymers in space applications were subjected to dosages of 70 keV electrons up to 3.4 x 10 to the 10th power rad. The irradiated films were then examined to determine the effects of the high-energy electrons.

  5. Study of high performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    The nickel-manganese experimental electrolyte was hydrogen peroxide treated and carbon purified for removal of residual sodium saccharin and related organic decomposition products from the plating of previous test panels. The saccharin additive was used to reduce stress where high concentrations of manganese and high pulse peak current densities were used. A large quantity of nickel-manganese alloy plates containing 0.35 to 0.40 percent by weight manganese was electroformed for testing to supply data for a mechanical property data table. The aluminum billet required for the machining of the subscale SSME main combustion chamber was acquired.

  6. Aromatic Polyimides with High Performances and Deuteration

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, E.; Raby, J.; Balland-Longeau, A.

    2004-03-15

    Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments are conducted in polymer capsule in which nuclear products are located. In order to vary optical properties, we need to develop polyimides with high mechanical properties in which we have to substitute all the hydrogen atoms by deuterium atoms. The best way to obtain deuterated polymer is to deuterate monomers instead of direct deuteration of polymers. In a first part, mechanical properties of aromatic polyimide films based on two dianhydrides (pyromellitic dianhydride PMDA and 3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride BPDA) and two diamines (4,4'-oxydianiline ODA and pphenylenediamine PDA) have been described. The optimization of synthesis and fabrication parameters of polyimide films PMDA/ODA and BPDA/PDA having high inherent viscosity, so high molecular weight, have allowed us to obtain high mechanical properties. And in a second part, deuterated monomers have been synthesized via multi-steps organic reactions and/or under pressure conditions. We have investigated the preparation of deuterated poly(amic-acid) solutions in NMP and the preparation of the corresponding polyimides deuterated membranes. Results show that deuterium does not affect the reactivity of monomers to form the poly(amic-acid) solution.

  7. Preparing for a High Performance Work Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Council on Vocational-Technical Education, Hartford.

    As part of the effort to create a labor force that is competitive across the world, Connecticut is planning a School-to-Career System that would give high school students the opportunity to extend learning into the community and workplace. The state would provide schools with information about the fastest-growing jobs and skills needed for…

  8. High performance flexible electronics for biomedical devices.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Giovanni A; Munzenrieder, Niko; Zysset, Christoph; Kinkeldei, Thomas; Petti, Luisa; Troster, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Plastic electronics is soft, deformable and lightweight and it is suitable for the realization of devices which can form an intimate interface with the body, be implanted or integrated into textile for wearable and biomedical applications. Here, we present flexible electronics based on amorphous oxide semiconductors (a-IGZO) whose performance can achieve MHz frequency even when bent around hair. We developed an assembly technique to integrate complex electronic functionalities into textile while preserving the softness of the garment. All this and further developments can open up new opportunities in health monitoring, biotechnology and telemedicine. PMID:25570912

  9. Alexandrite-laser performance at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Guch, S. Jr.; Jones, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    The performance of a flash-pumped alexandrite laser operating in a long-pulse mode has been characterized at temperatures from 34 to 310 /sup 0/C. Laser gain and efficiency increased monotonically up to 225 /sup 0/C, with a peak pulse energy there more than four times the value at 34 /sup 0/C. The output wavelength also increased monotonically from the 34 /sup 0/C value of 752 nm to a maximum of 790 nm at 310 /sup 0/C.

  10. High performance polymer tandem solar cell

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Wilson Jose; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid bin; Jang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A power conversion efficiency of 9.02% is obtained for a fully solution-processed polymer tandem solar cell, based on the diketopyrrolopyrrole unit polymer as a low bandgap photoactive material in the rear subcell, in conjunction with a new robust interconnecting layer. This interconnecting layer is optically transparent, electrically conductive, and physically strong, thus, the charges can be collected and recombined in the interconnecting layer under illumination, while the charge is generated and extracted under dark conditions. This indicates that careful interface engineering of the charge-carrier transport layer is a useful approach to further improve the performance of polymer tandem solar cells. PMID:26669577

  11. High performance image processing of SPRINT

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroot, T.

    1994-11-15

    This talk will describe computed tomography (CT) reconstruction using filtered back-projection on SPRINT parallel computers. CT is a computationally intensive task, typically requiring several minutes to reconstruct a 512x512 image. SPRINT and other parallel computers can be applied to CT reconstruction to reduce computation time from minutes to seconds. SPRINT is a family of massively parallel computers developed at LLNL. SPRINT-2.5 is a 128-node multiprocessor whose performance can exceed twice that of a Cray-Y/MP. SPRINT-3 will be 10 times faster. Described will be the parallel algorithms for filtered back-projection and their execution on SPRINT parallel computers.

  12. High-performance commercial building facades

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eleanor; Selkowitz, Stephen; Bazjanac, Vladimir; Inkarojrit, Vorapat; Kohler, Christian

    2002-06-01

    This study focuses on advanced building facades that use daylighting, sun control, ventilation systems, and dynamic systems. A quick perusal of the leading architectural magazines, or a discussion in most architectural firms today will eventually lead to mention of some of the innovative new buildings that are being constructed with all-glass facades. Most of these buildings are appearing in Europe, although interestingly U.S. A/E firms often have a leading role in their design. This ''emerging technology'' of heavily glazed fagades is often associated with buildings whose design goals include energy efficiency, sustainability, and a ''green'' image. While there are a number of new books on the subject with impressive photos and drawings, there is little critical examination of the actual performance of such buildings, and a generally poor understanding as to whether they achieve their performance goals, or even what those goals might be. Even if the building ''works'' it is often dangerous to take a design solution from one climate and location and transport it to a new one without a good causal understanding of how the systems work. In addition, there is a wide range of existing and emerging glazing and fenestration technologies in use in these buildings, many of which break new ground with respect to innovative structural use of glass. It is unclear as to how well many of these designs would work as currently formulated in California locations dominated by intense sunlight and seismic events. Finally, the costs of these systems are higher than normal facades, but claims of energy and productivity savings are used to justify some of them. Once again these claims, while plausible, are largely unsupported. There have been major advances in glazing and facade technology over the past 30 years and we expect to see continued innovation and product development. It is critical in this process to be able to understand which performance goals are being met by current

  13. High performance polymer tandem solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Wilson Jose; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid Bin; Jang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    A power conversion efficiency of 9.02% is obtained for a fully solution-processed polymer tandem solar cell, based on the diketopyrrolopyrrole unit polymer as a low bandgap photoactive material in the rear subcell, in conjunction with a new robust interconnecting layer. This interconnecting layer is optically transparent, electrically conductive, and physically strong, thus, the charges can be collected and recombined in the interconnecting layer under illumination, while the charge is generated and extracted under dark conditions. This indicates that careful interface engineering of the charge-carrier transport layer is a useful approach to further improve the performance of polymer tandem solar cells.

  14. High performance computations using dynamical nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windus, T. L.; Kathmann, S. M.; Crosby, L. D.

    2008-07-01

    Chemists continue to explore the use of very large computations to perform simulations that describe the molecular level physics of critical challenges in science. In this paper, we describe the Dynamical Nucleation Theory Monte Carlo (DNTMC) model - a model for determining molecular scale nucleation rate constants - and its parallel capabilities. The potential for bottlenecks and the challenges to running on future petascale or larger resources are delineated. A 'master-slave' solution is proposed to scale to the petascale and will be developed in the NWChem software. In addition, mathematical and data analysis challenges are described.

  15. High-performance sport, marijuana, and cannabimimetics.

    PubMed

    Hilderbrand, Richard L

    2011-11-01

    The prohibition on use of cannabinoids in sporting competitions has been widely debated and continues to be a contentious issue. Information continues to accumulate on the adverse health effects of smoked marijuana and the decrement of performance caused by the use of cannabinoids. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of cannabinoids and cannabimimetics that directly or indirectly impact sport, the rules of sport, and performance of the athlete. This article reviews some of the history of marijuana in Olympic and Collegiate sport, summarizes the guidelines by which a substance is added to the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List, and updates information on the pharmacologic effects of cannabinoids and their mechanism of action. The recently marketed cannabimimetics Spice and K2 are included in the discussion as they activate the same receptors as are activated by THC. The article also provides a view as to why the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibits cannabinoid or cannabimimetic use incompetition and should continue to do so. PMID:22080902

  16. High Performance, Three-Dimensional Bilateral Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes

    2008-06-05

    Image smoothing is a fundamental operation in computer vision and image processing. This work has two main thrusts: (1) implementation of a bilateral filter suitable for use in smoothing, or denoising, 3D volumetric data; (2) implementation of the 3D bilateral filter in three different parallelization models, along with parallel performance studies on two modern HPC architectures. Our bilateral filter formulation is based upon the work of Tomasi [11], but extended to 3D for use on volumetric data. Our three parallel implementations use POSIX threads, the Message Passing Interface (MPI), and Unified Parallel C (UPC), a Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) language. Our parallel performance studies, which were conducted on a Cray XT4 supercomputer and aquad-socket, quad-core Opteron workstation, show our algorithm to have near-perfect scalability up to 120 processors. Parallel algorithms, such as the one we present here, will have an increasingly important role for use in production visual analysis systems as the underlying computational platforms transition from single- to multi-core architectures in the future.

  17. A high performance totally ordered multicast protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Todd; Whetten, Brian; Kaplan, Simon

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the Reliable Multicast Protocol (RMP). RMP provides a totally ordered, reliable, atomic multicast service on top of an unreliable multicast datagram service such as IP Multicasting. RMP is fully and symmetrically distributed so that no site bears un undue portion of the communication load. RMP provides a wide range of guarantees, from unreliable delivery to totally ordered delivery, to K-resilient, majority resilient, and totally resilient atomic delivery. These QoS guarantees are selectable on a per packet basis. RMP provides many communication options, including virtual synchrony, a publisher/subscriber model of message delivery, an implicit naming service, mutually exclusive handlers for messages, and mutually exclusive locks. It has commonly been held that a large performance penalty must be paid in order to implement total ordering -- RMP discounts this. On SparcStation 10's on a 1250 KB/sec Ethernet, RMP provides totally ordered packet delivery to one destination at 842 KB/sec throughput and with 3.1 ms packet latency. The performance stays roughly constant independent of the number of destinations. For two or more destinations on a LAN, RMP provides higher throughput than any protocol that does not use multicast or broadcast.

  18. Functional Extensions To High Performance Document Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, W. B.; Chansky, L. M.; Land, R. A.; Van den Heuvel, R. C.; Kraemer, E. J.; Steele, L. W.; Sherrill, C. J.

    1989-07-01

    Document processing systems based on electronic imaging technology are evolving rapidly, motivated by technology advances in optical storage, image scanners, image compression, high speed digital communications, and high resolution displays. These evolving systems require high speed reliable image scanning systems to create the digital image data base that is at the heart of the applications addressed by these evolving systems. High speed production document scanners must provide the capability of converting a wide variety of input material into high quality digital imagery. The required capabilities include: (i) the ability to scan varying sizes and weights of paper, (ii) image enhancement techniques adequate to produce quality imagery from a document material that may depart significantly from standard high contrast black and white office correspondence, (iii) standard compression options, and (iv) a standard interface to a host or control processor providing full control of all scanner operations and all image processing options. As electronic document processing systems proliferate, additional capabilities will be required to support automated or semi-automated document indexing and selective capture of document content. Capabilities now present on microfilming systems will be required as options or features on document capture systems. These capabilities will include: endorsers, bar code readers, and optical character recognition (OCR) capability. Bar code and OCR capabilities will be required to support automated indexing of scanned material, and OCR capability within specific areas of scanned document material will be required to support indexing and specific application needs. These features will also be supported and controlled through a standard host interface. This paper describes the architecture of the TDC DocuScan Digital Image Scanner. The scanner is a double-sided scanner that produces compressed imagery of both sides of a scanned page in under two

  19. High-performance midinfrared quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capasso, Federico

    2010-11-01

    The design and operating principles of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are reviewed along with recent developments in high-power cw and broadband devices. Cw power levels of several watts at room temperature have been achieved at 4.6-μm wavelength; broadband single-mode tuning (~400 cm-1) has been achieved using an external-cavity QCL with a grating as a tuning element. An alternative approach, consisting of a monolithically integrated array of single-mode QCLs individually current-driven by a microcontroller, has led to broadband single-mode tuning over a range of 200 cm-1 without requiring the use of moving parts. This spectrometer on a chip holds promise for high-brightness compact trace-gas sensors capable of operating in harsh environments.

  20. High-Performance Flexible Waveguiding Photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chun-Hsien; Chuang, Jui-Kang; Chen, Fang-Chung

    2013-01-01

    The use of flat-plane solar concentrators is an effective approach toward collecting sunlight economically and without sun trackers. The optical concentrators are, however, usually made of rigid glass or plastics having limited flexibility, potentially restricting their applicability. In this communication, we describe flexible waveguiding photovoltaics (FWPVs) that exhibit high optical efficiencies and great mechanical flexibility. We constructed these FWPVs by integrating poly-Si solar cells, a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) waveguide, and a TiO2-doped backside reflector. Optical microstructures that increase the light harvesting ability of the FWPVs can be fabricated readily, through soft lithography, on the top surface of the PDMS waveguide. Our optimized structure displayed an optical efficiency of greater than 42% and a certified power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5.57%, with a projected PCE as high as approximately 18%. This approach might open new avenues for the harvesting of solar energy at low cost with efficient, mechanically flexible photovoltaics. PMID:23873225

  1. High Performance Airbrushed Organic Thin Film Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.; Richter, L; Dinardo, B; Jaye, C; Conrad, B; Ro, H; Germack, D; Fischer, D; DeLongchamp, D; Gunlach, D

    2010-01-01

    Spray-deposited poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) transistors were characterized using electrical and structural methods. Thin-film transistors with octyltrichlorosilane treated gate dielectrics and spray-deposited P3HT active layers exhibited a saturation regime mobility as high as 0.1 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, which is comparable to the best mobilities observed in high molecular mass P3HT transistors prepared using other methods. Optical and atomic force microscopy showed the presence of individual droplets with an average diameter of 20 {micro}m and appreciable large-scale film inhomogeneities. Despite these inhomogeneities, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of the device-relevant channel interface indicated excellent orientation of the P3HT.

  2. High Thermoelectric Performance in Copper Telluride

    SciTech Connect

    He, Ying; Zhang, Tiansong; Shi, Xun; Wei, Su-Huai; Chen, Lidong

    2015-06-21

    Recently, Cu 2-δ S and Cu 2-δ Se were reported to have an ultralow thermal conductivity and high thermoelectric figure of merit zT. Thus, as a member of the copper chalcogenide group, Cu 2-δ Te is expected to possess superior zTs because Te is less ionic and heavy. However, the zT value is low in the Cu2Te sintered using spark plasma sintering, which is typically used to fabricate high-density bulk samples. In addition, the extra sintering processes may change the samples’ compositions as well as their physical properties, especially for Cu2Te, which has many stable and meta-stable phases as well as weaker ionic bonding between Cu and Te as compared with Cu2S and Cu2Se. In this study, high-density Cu2Te samples were obtained using direct annealing without a sintering process. In the absence of sintering processes, the samples’ compositions could be well controlled, leading to substantially reduced carrier concentrations that are close to the optimal value. The electrical transports were optimized, and the thermal conductivity was considerably reduced. The zT values were significantly improved—to 1.1 at 1000 K—which is nearly 100% improvement. Furthermore, this method saves substantial time and cost during the sample’s growth. The study demonstrates that Cu 2-δ X (X=S, Se and Te) is the only existing system to show high zTs in the series of compounds composed of three sequential primary group elements.

  3. High Thermoelectric Performance in Copper Telluride

    DOE PAGESBeta

    He, Ying; Zhang, Tiansong; Shi, Xun; Wei, Su-Huai; Chen, Lidong

    2015-06-21

    Recently, Cu 2-δ S and Cu 2-δ Se were reported to have an ultralow thermal conductivity and high thermoelectric figure of merit zT. Thus, as a member of the copper chalcogenide group, Cu 2-δ Te is expected to possess superior zTs because Te is less ionic and heavy. However, the zT value is low in the Cu2Te sintered using spark plasma sintering, which is typically used to fabricate high-density bulk samples. In addition, the extra sintering processes may change the samples’ compositions as well as their physical properties, especially for Cu2Te, which has many stable and meta-stable phasesmore » as well as weaker ionic bonding between Cu and Te as compared with Cu2S and Cu2Se. In this study, high-density Cu2Te samples were obtained using direct annealing without a sintering process. In the absence of sintering processes, the samples’ compositions could be well controlled, leading to substantially reduced carrier concentrations that are close to the optimal value. The electrical transports were optimized, and the thermal conductivity was considerably reduced. The zT values were significantly improved—to 1.1 at 1000 K—which is nearly 100% improvement. Furthermore, this method saves substantial time and cost during the sample’s growth. The study demonstrates that Cu 2-δ X (X=S, Se and Te) is the only existing system to show high zTs in the series of compounds composed of three sequential primary group elements.« less

  4. High-performance microlasers enable display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eric B.; Hargis, David E.; Bergstedt, Robert; Dion, Al; Hurtado, Randy; Solone, Paul J.

    1999-08-01

    Recent advances in compact, air-cooled, diode-pumped solid- state visible microlasers have enabled the development of portable laser display systems. In addition to the added benefits of large color gamut, invariant color accuracy, image uniformity, high contrast, and large depth of focus inherent in the microlaser design, the reliability of these all-solid state red-green-blue (RGB) sources make them attractive for display applications. Compact, multi-watt laser modules have been demonstrated for use as a high brightness 'laser light engine' for replacing arc lamps in LCD/DMD type display configurations. Using this 'backlit' approach, a microlaser- based projector has been demonstrated, providing greater than 500 lumens at 1280 X 1024 resolution using reflective AMLCD light valves. Also being developed is an airborne tactical HMD system wherein the laser module is remotely coupled to a subtractive color LCD assembly through an optical fiber to provide a more than 24,000,000 (twenty-four million) cd/m2 luminance for illuminating the LCD assembly. This technology could be applied to a variety of cockpit displays providing sunlight readable illumination for both head-down and head-up backlit display configurations. The advantages of the microlaser technology will enable further applications in other military platforms such as command and control centers, simulators and HMDs. Longer term potential includes high end CAD workstations, entertainment systems, and electronic cinema.

  5. HIGH TEMPERATURE OXIDATION PERFORMANCE OF ALUMINIDE COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, B.A.; Zhang, Y.; Haynes, J.A.; Wright, I.G.

    2003-04-22

    In order to determine the potential benefits and limitations of aluminide coatings, coatings made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Fe- and Ni-base alloy substrates are being evaluated in various high-temperature environments. Testing of coatings on representative ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (type 304L stainless steel) alloys has found that high frequency thermal cycling (1h cycle time) can significantly degrade the coating. Based on comparison with similar specimens with no thermal cycling or a longer cycle time (100h), this degradation was not due to Al loss from the coating but most likely because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the coating and the substrate. Several coated Ni-base alloys were tested in a high pressure (20atm) steam-CO2 environment for the ZEST (zero-emission steam turbine) program. Coated specimens showed less mass loss than the uncoated specimens after 1000h at 900 C and preliminary characterization examined the post-test coating structure and extent of attack.

  6. New monomers for high performance polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Roy F.

    1993-01-01

    This laboratory has been concerned with the development of new polymeric materials with high thermo-oxidative stability for use in the aerospace and electronics industries. Currently, there is special emphasis on developing matrix resins and composites for the high speed civil transport (HSCT) program. This application requires polymers that have service lifetimes of 60,000 hr at 350 F (177 C) and that are readily processible into void-free composites, preferably by melt-flow or powder techniques that avoid the use of high boiling solvents. Recent work has focused on copolymers which have thermally stable imide groups separated by flexible arylene ether linkages, some with trifluoromethyl groups attached to the aromatic rings. The presence of trifluoromethyl groups in monomers and polymers often improves their solubility and processibility. The goal of this research was to synthesize several new monomers containing pendant trifluoromethyl groups and to incorporate these monomers into new imide/arylene ether copolymers. Initially, work was begun on the synthesis of three target compounds. The first two, 3,5-dihydroxybenzo trifluoride and 3-amino 5-hydroxybenzo trifluoride, are intermediates in the synthesis of more complex monomers. The third, 3,5-bis (3-amino-phenoxy) benzotrifluoride, is an interesting diamine that could be incorporated into a polyimide directly.

  7. Traction contact performance evaluation at high speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevaarwerk, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of traction tests performed on two fluids are presented. These tests covered a pressure range of 1.0 to 2.5 GPa, an inlet temperature range of 30 'C to 70 'C, a speed range of 10 to 80 m/sec, aspect ratios of .5 to 5 and spin from 0 to 2.1 percent. The test results are presented in the form of two dimensionless parameters, the initial traction slope and the maximum traction peak. With the use of a suitable rheological fluid model the actual traction curves measured can now be reconstituted from the two fluid parameters. More importantly, the knowledge of these parameters together with the fluid rheological model, allow the prediction of traction under conditions of spin, slip and any combination thereof. Comparison between theoretically predicted traction under these conditions and those measured in actual traction tests shows that this method gives good results.

  8. A high performance current source inverter

    SciTech Connect

    Joos, G.; Moschopoulos, G.; Ziogas, P.D.

    1993-10-01

    A recent innovation in current source inverter (CSI) drives has been the introduction of pulsewidth modulation (PWM) for the purpose of improving the quality of the load currents and voltages. However, the typical six switch CSI circuit is not compatible with all standard PWM techniques thus limiting the number of schemes that can be used. The modified CSI circuit discussed in this paper removes most of the restrictions at the ``cost`` of an extra switch. Additional advantages include faster response times through modulation index control and higher efficiency. This paper includes a detailed steady-state analysis and design procedure. The feasibility and performance of the modified CSI are verified by simulation and experimental implementation on a 5 kVA converter.

  9. High performance computations using dynamical nucleation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Windus, Theresa L.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Crosby, Lonnie D.

    2008-07-14

    Chemists continue to explore the use of very large computations to perform simulations that describe the molecular level physics of critical challenges in science. In this paper, the Dynamical Nucleation Theory Monte Carlo (DNTMC) model - a model for determining molecular scale nucleation rate constants - and its parallel capabilities are described. The potential for bottlenecks and the challenges to running on future petascale or larger resources are delineated. A "master-slave" solution is proposed to scale to the petascale and will be developed in the NWChem software. In addition, mathematical and data analysis challenges are also described. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  10. GAMMA: a high performance dataflow database machine

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, D.J.; Gerber, R.H.; Graefe, G.; Heytens, M.L.; Kumar, K.B.; Muralikrishna, M.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper, the design, implementation techniques, and initial performance evaluation of Gamma are presented. Gamma is a new relational database machine that exploits dataflow query processing techniques. Ganma is a fully operational prototype consisting of 20 VAX 11/750 computers. The design of Gamma is based on an earlier multiprocessor database machine prototype (DIRECT) and several years of subsequent research on the problems raised by the DIRECT prototype. In addition to demonstrating that parallelism can really be made to work in a database machine context, the Gamma prototype shows how parallelism can be controlled with minimal control overhead through a combination of the use of algorithms based on hashing and the pipelining of data between processes. Except for 2 messages to initiate each operator of a query tree and 1 message when the operator terminates, the execution of a query is entirely self-scheduling. 52 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Development of Mitsubishi High Thermal Performance Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kazuo; Hoshi, Masaya

    Mitsubishi has developed a new zircalloy grid spacer for PWR fuel with higher thermal performance. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation method has been applied for designing of the new lower pressure loss and higher Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) benefit grid spacer. Reduction of pressure loss of grid structures has been examined by CFD. Also, CFD has been developed as a design tool to predict the coolant mixing ability of vane structures, which is to compare the relative peak spot temperatures around fuel rods at the same heat flux condition. Prototype grids were manufactured and several tests, which were pressure loss measurements, cross-flow measurements and freon DNB tests, were conducted to verify CFD predictions. It is concluded that the applicability of the CFD evaluation method for the thermal hydraulic design of the grid is confirmed.

  12. High pressure compressor component performance report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, S. J.; Fesler, W.; Liu, H. S.; Lovell, R. C.; Shaffer, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    A compressor optimization study defined a 10 stage configuration with a 22.6:1 pressure ratio, an adiabatic efficiency goal of 86.1%, and a polytropic efficiency of 90.6%; the corrected airflow is 53.5 kg/s. Subsequent component testing included three full scale tests: a six stage rig test, a 10 stage rig test, and another 10 stage rig test completed in the second quarter of 1982. Information from these tests is used to select the configuration for a core engine test and an integrated core/low spool test. The test results will also provide data base for the flight propulsion system. The results of the test series with both aerodynamic and mechanical performance of each compressor build are presented. The second 10 stage compressor adiabatic efficiency was 0.848 at a cruise operating point versus a test goal of 0.846.

  13. High-power hydrogen arcjet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.; Curran, Francis M.

    1991-01-01

    A hydrogen arcjet was operated at power levels ranging from 5 to 30 kW with three different nozzle geometries. Test results using all three nozzle geometries are reported and include variations of specific impulse with flow rate, and thrust with power. Geometric variables investigated included constrictor diameter, length, and diverging exit angle. The nozzle with a constrictor diameter of 1.78 mm and divergence angle of 20 degrees was found to give the highest performance. A specific impulse of 1460 s was attained with this nozzle at a thrust efficiency of 29.8 percent. The best efficiency measured was 34.4 percent at a specific impulse of 1045 s. Post test examination of the cathode showed erosion after 28 hours of operation to be small, and limited to the conical tip where steady state arc attachment occurred. Each nozzle was tested to destruction.

  14. High-power hydrogen arcjet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.; Curran, Francis M.

    1991-01-01

    A hydrogen arcjet was operated at power levels ranging from 5 to 30 kW with three different nozzle geometries. Test results using all three nozzle geometries are reported and include variations of specific impulse with flow rate, and thrust with power. Geometric variables investigated included constrictor diameter, length, and diverging exit angle. The nozzle with a constrictor diameter of 1.78 mm and divergence angle of 20 deg was found to give the highest performance. A specific impulse of 1460 s was attained with this nozzle at a thrust efficiency of 29.8 percent. The best efficiency measured was 34.4 percent at a specific impulse of 1045 s. Post test examination of the cathode showed erosion after 28 hours of operation to be small, and limited to the conical tip where steady state arc attachment occurred. Each nozzle was tested to destruction.

  15. High performance VLSI telemetry data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesney, J.; Speciale, N.; Horner, W.; Sabia, S.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's deployment of major space complexes such as Space Station Freedom (SSF) and the Earth Observing System (EOS) will demand increased functionality and performance from ground based telemetry acquisition systems well above current system capabilities. Adaptation of space telemetry data transport and processing standards such as those specified by the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standards and those required for commercial ground distribution of telemetry data, will drive these functional and performance requirements. In addition, budget limitations will force the requirement for higher modularity, flexibility, and interchangeability at lower cost in new ground telemetry data system elements. At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), the design and development of generic ground telemetry data system elements, over the last five years, has resulted in significant solutions to these problems. This solution, referred to as the functional components approach includes both hardware and software components ready for end user application. The hardware functional components consist of modern data flow architectures utilizing Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC's) developed specifically to support NASA's telemetry data systems needs and designed to meet a range of data rate requirements up to 300 Mbps. Real-time operating system software components support both embedded local software intelligence, and overall system control, status, processing, and interface requirements. These components, hardware and software, form the superstructure upon which project specific elements are added to complete a telemetry ground data system installation. This paper describes the functional components approach, some specific component examples, and a project example of the evolution from VLSI component, to basic board level functional component, to integrated telemetry data system.

  16. High performance radiation curable hybrid coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nik Salleh, Nik Ghazali; Sofian Alias, Mohd; Gläsel, H.-J.; Mehnert, R.

    2013-03-01

    Radiation curing is one of the most effective processes to produce rapidly composite materials at ambient temperature. Silica nanoparticles can be introduced into radiation curable resins to produce scratch and abrasion resistant materials, which can be used as sealants or clear coatings. In preparation of radiation cured polymeric composites for wood based products such as medium density fiberboard etc., we synthesized radiation curable silico-organic nanoparticles from silica/acrylates system. These nano-sized silica particles were used as fillers. Epoxy acrylates was used as prepolymer while pentaerythritol triacrylate and tetraacrylate (PETIA) was used as monomer. The acrylated epoxy resin synthesized from palm oil based product (EPOLA) i.e. bio-renewable raw materials was also used in the system. The surface of the silica was chemically modified to improve the embedding of the filler within the acrylate matrix. Modification of the silica surface using silane was done to overcome the problem of incompatibility with acrylates at high silica contents. The nature of the nanoparticles is now changed from hydrophilic to organophilic. In these investigations, we use low energy electron beam accelerator to initiate polymerization and interaction at the interface between the nanoparticles and the monomeric materials. These polymerization active nanoparticles were obtained by heterogeneous hydrolytic condensation of the silane to the silanol groups of the silica particles. Formulations useful for technical coating processes could be prepared and these composite materials showed highly improved mechanical properties. They also provided a high network density whilst the coatings remain transparent. These polymeric nanocomposites show excellent resistances toward abrasion properties including scratch property as compared to pure acrylates.

  17. High-performance silicon nanowire bipolar phototransistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Siew Li; Zhao, Xingyan; Chen, Kaixiang; Crozier, Kenneth B.; Dan, Yaping

    2016-07-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have emerged as sensitive absorbing materials for photodetection at wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet (UV) to the near infrared. Most of the reports on SiNW photodetectors are based on photoconductor, photodiode, or field-effect transistor device structures. These SiNW devices each have their own advantages and trade-offs in optical gain, response time, operating voltage, and dark current noise. Here, we report on the experimental realization of single SiNW bipolar phototransistors on silicon-on-insulator substrates. Our SiNW devices are based on bipolar transistor structures with an optically injected base region and are fabricated using CMOS-compatible processes. The experimentally measured optoelectronic characteristics of the SiNW phototransistors are in good agreement with simulation results. The SiNW phototransistors exhibit significantly enhanced response to UV and visible light, compared with typical Si p-i-n photodiodes. The near infrared responsivities of the SiNW phototransistors are comparable to those of Si avalanche photodiodes but are achieved at much lower operating voltages. Compared with other reported SiNW photodetectors as well as conventional bulk Si photodiodes and phototransistors, the SiNW phototransistors in this work demonstrate the combined advantages of high gain, high photoresponse, low dark current, and low operating voltage.

  18. A high performance field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Garate, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Smirnov, A.; Gota, H.; Barnes, D.; Deng, B. H.; Thompson, M. C.; Trask, E.; Yang, X.; Putvinski, S.; Rostoker, N.; Andow, R.; Aefsky, S.; Bolte, N.; Bui, D. Q.; Ceccherini, F.; Clary, R.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Conventional field-reversed configurations (FRCs), high-beta, prolate compact toroids embedded in poloidal magnetic fields, face notable stability and confinement concerns. These can be ameliorated by various control techniques, such as introducing a significant fast ion population. Indeed, adding neutral beam injection into the FRC over the past half-decade has contributed to striking improvements in confinement and stability. Further, the addition of electrically biased plasma guns at the ends, magnetic end plugs, and advanced surface conditioning led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses and greatly improved stability. Together, these enabled the build-up of a well-confined and dominant fast-ion population. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, macroscopically stable hot FRCs (with total plasma temperature of ∼1 keV) with record lifetimes were achieved. These accomplishments point to the prospect of advanced, beam-driven FRCs as an intriguing path toward fusion reactors. This paper reviews key results and presents context for further interpretation.

  19. A high performance field-reversed configurationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Garate, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Schmitz, L.; Guo, H. Y.; Smirnov, A.; Gota, H.; Barnes, D.; Deng, B. H.; Thompson, M. C.; Trask, E.; Yang, X.; Putvinski, S.; Rostoker, N.; Andow, R.; Aefsky, S.; Bolte, N.; Bui, D. Q.; Ceccherini, F.; Clary, R.; Cheung, A. H.; Conroy, K. D.; Dettrick, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Feng, P.; Galeotti, L.; Giammanco, F.; Granstedt, E.; Gupta, D.; Gupta, S.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kinley, J. S.; Knapp, K.; Korepanov, S.; Hollins, M.; Magee, R.; Mendoza, R.; Mok, Y.; Necas, A.; Primavera, S.; Onofri, M.; Osin, D.; Rath, N.; Roche, T.; Romero, J.; Schroeder, J. H.; Sevier, L.; Sibley, A.; Song, Y.; Van Drie, A. D.; Walters, J. K.; Waggoner, W.; Yushmanov, P.; Zhai, K.

    2015-05-01

    Conventional field-reversed configurations (FRCs), high-beta, prolate compact toroids embedded in poloidal magnetic fields, face notable stability and confinement concerns. These can be ameliorated by various control techniques, such as introducing a significant fast ion population. Indeed, adding neutral beam injection into the FRC over the past half-decade has contributed to striking improvements in confinement and stability. Further, the addition of electrically biased plasma guns at the ends, magnetic end plugs, and advanced surface conditioning led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses and greatly improved stability. Together, these enabled the build-up of a well-confined and dominant fast-ion population. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, macroscopically stable hot FRCs (with total plasma temperature of ˜1 keV) with record lifetimes were achieved. These accomplishments point to the prospect of advanced, beam-driven FRCs as an intriguing path toward fusion reactors. This paper reviews key results and presents context for further interpretation.

  20. Video performance for high security applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, Jack C.; Norman, Bradley C.

    2010-06-01

    The complexity of physical protection systems has increased to address modern threats to national security and emerging commercial technologies. A key element of modern physical protection systems is the data presented to the human operator used for rapid determination of the cause of an alarm, whether false (e.g., caused by an animal, debris, etc.) or real (e.g., a human adversary). Alarm assessment, the human validation of a sensor alarm, primarily relies on imaging technologies and video systems. Developing measures of effectiveness (MOE) that drive the design or evaluation of a video system or technology becomes a challenge, given the subjectivity of the application (e.g., alarm assessment). Sandia National Laboratories has conducted empirical analysis using field test data and mathematical models such as binomial distribution and Johnson target transfer functions to develop MOEs for video system technologies. Depending on the technology, the task of the security operator and the distance to the target, the Probability of Assessment (PAs) can be determined as a function of a variety of conditions or assumptions. PAs used as an MOE allows the systems engineer to conduct trade studies, make informed design decisions, or evaluate new higher-risk technologies. This paper outlines general video system design trade-offs, discusses ways video can be used to increase system performance and lists MOEs for video systems used in subjective applications such as alarm assessment.

  1. Development of high performance hybrid rocket fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaseck, Christopher R.

    . In order to examine paraffin/additive combustion in a motor environment, I conducted experiments on well characterized aluminum based additives. In particular, I investigate the influence of aluminum, unpassivated aluminum, milled aluminum/polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and aluminum hydride on the performance of paraffin fuels for hybrid rocket propulsion. I use an optically accessible combustor to examine the performance of the fuel mixtures in terms of characteristic velocity efficiency and regression rate. Each combustor test consumes a 12.7 cm long, 1.9 cm diameter fuel strand under 160 kg/m 2s of oxygen at up to 1.4 MPa. The experimental results indicate that the addition of 5 wt.% 30 mum or 80 nm aluminum to paraffin increases the regression rate by approximately 15% compared to neat paraffin grains. At higher aluminum concentrations and nano-scale particles sizes, the increased melt layer viscosity causes slower regression. Alane and Al/PTFE at 12.5 wt.% increase the regression of paraffin by 21% and 32% respectively. Finally, an aging study indicates that paraffin can protect air and moisture sensitive particles from oxidation. The opposed burner and aluminum/paraffin hybrid rocket experiments show that additives can alter bulk fuel properties, such as viscosity, that regulate entrainment. The general effect of melt layer properties on the entrainment and regression rate of paraffin is not well understood. Improved understanding of how solid additives affect the properties and regression of paraffin is essential to maximize performance. In this document I investigate the effect of melt layer properties on paraffin regression using inert additives. Tests are performed in the optical cylindrical combustor at ˜1 MPa under a gaseous oxygen mass flux of ˜160 kg/m2s. The experiments indicate that the regression rate is proportional to mu0.08rho 0.38kappa0.82. In addition, I explore how to predict fuel viscosity, thermal conductivity, and density prior to testing

  2. High performance magnet power supply optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, L.T.

    1988-01-01

    The power supply system for the joint LBL--SLAC proposed accelerator PEP provides the opportunity to take a fresh look at the current techniques employed for controlling large amounts of dc power and the possibility of using a new one. A basic requirement of +- 100 ppM regulation is placed on the guide field of the bending magnets and quadrupoles placed around the 2200 meter circumference of the accelerator. The optimization questions to be answered by this paper are threefold: Can a firing circuit be designed to reduce the combined effects of the harmonics and line voltage combined effects of the harmonics and line voltage unbalance to less than 100 ppM in the magnet field. Given the ambiguity of the previous statement, is the addition of a transistor bank to a nominal SCR controlled system the way to go or should one opt for an SCR chopper system running at 1 KHz where multiple supplies are fed from one large dc bus and the cost--performance evaluation of the three possible systems.

  3. DOE research in utilization of high-performance computers

    SciTech Connect

    Buzbee, B.L.; Worlton, W.J.; Michael, G.; Rodrigue, G.

    1980-12-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) and other Government research laboratories depend on high-performance computer systems to accomplish their programatic goals. As the most powerful computer systems become available, they are acquired by these laboratories so that advances can be made in their disciplines. These advances are often the result of added sophistication to numerical models whose execution is made possible by high-performance computer systems. However, high-performance computer systems have become increasingly complex; consequently, it has become increasingly difficult to realize their potential performance. The result is a need for research on issues related to the utilization of these systems. This report gives a brief description of high-performance computers, and then addresses the use of and future needs for high-performance computers within DOE, the growing complexity of applications within DOE, and areas of high-performance computer systems warranting research. 1 figure.

  4. High-Performance Energy Applications and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Barton

    2014-05-19

    The Paradyn project has a history of developing algorithms, techniques, and software that push the cutting edge of tool technology for high-end computing systems. Under this funding, we are working on a three-year agenda to make substantial new advances in support of new and emerging Petascale systems. The overall goal for this work is to address the steady increase in complexity of these petascale systems. Our work covers two key areas: (1) The analysis, instrumentation and control of binary programs. Work in this area falls under the general framework of the Dyninst API tool kits. (2) Infrastructure for building tools and applications at extreme scale. Work in this area falls under the general framework of the MRNet scalability framework. Note that work done under this funding is closely related to work done under a contemporaneous grant, “Foundational Tools for Petascale Computing”, SC0003922/FG02-10ER25940, UW PRJ27NU.

  5. High power performance limits of fiber components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holehouse, Nigel; Magné, Julien; Auger, Mathieu

    2015-03-01

    High power combiners are essential for practical fiber lasers, recent developments in pump technology has increased the available brightness and power of pumps significantly, enabling multi kW lasers and pushing combiner designs to new limits. I will present the challenges, measurements and some solutions to these issues. Traditional calculations for combiners underestimate the issues associated with the `tails' of the pump NA distribution, losses in fully filled combiners increase rapidly as pump NA blooms, and subsequent heating effects dominate the combiner's power handling. Acrylate coated pump fibers are reaching their limits and devices and measurements on double clad pump combiners with losses <0.05dB, will be presented enabling multi kW operation, The use of triple clad fibers in the gain section will discussed as a solution for multi kW applications. Results on ultra-low background loss FBG's will be presented, along with developed measurement techniques.

  6. Training High Performance Skills: Fallacies and Guidelines. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Walter

    High performance skills are defined as ones: (1) which require over 100 hours of training, (2) in which a substantial number of individuals fail to develop proficiency, and (3) in which the performance of the expert is qualitatively different from that of the novice. Training programs for developing high performance skills are often based on…

  7. Conceptual designs of advanced high-temperature desulfurization processes: Volume 1, Molten carbonate fuel cell power plants: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, M.G.; Boulay, R.B.; Buchanan, T.L.; Chen, H.T.; Fischer, W.H.; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Losovsky, M.L.; Underkoffler, V.S.

    1986-12-01

    Purpose of this effort is to provide conceptual commercial-scale designs, including engineering, relative cost, and economic information for high-temperature desulfurization processes. The commercial-scale processes were designed as an integral part of a nominal 100-MW(e) power plant. Two types of power plants were considered, a coal gasification molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plant and an integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant. Three desulfurization processes combined with three different gasification processes were evaluated, for a total of 16 cases for the MCFC power plant. The three desulfurization processes evaluated were: METC's zinc ferrite process, Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory's solid-supported molten salt process, and Institute of Gas Technology's mixed metal oxide process. Volume I of this report presents the results for the MCFC power plant.

  8. High performance alloy electroforming. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, G.A.; Winkelman, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.

  9. Repair of high performance multilayer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, D.P. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Ceglio, N.M. ); Vernon, S.P. ); Krumrey, M.; Mueller, P. . VUV Radiometric Lab.)

    1991-07-01

    Fabrication and environmental damage issues may require that the multilayer x-ray reflection coatings used in soft x-ray projection lithography be replaced or repaired. Two repair strategies were investigated. The first was to overcoat defective multilayers with a new multilayer. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by depositing high reflectivity (61% at 130 {Angstrom}) molybdenum silicon (Mo/Si) multilayers onto fused silica figured optics that had already been coated with a Mo/Si multilayer. Because some types of damage mechanisms and fabrication errors are not repairable by this method, a second method of repair was investigated. The multilayer was stripped from the optical substrate by etching a release layer which was deposited onto the substrate beneath the multilayer. The release layer consisted of a 1000 {Angstrom} aluminum film deposited by ion beam sputtering or by electron beam evaporation, with a 300 {Angstrom} SiO{sub 2} protective overcoat. The substrates were superpolished zerodur optical flats. The normal incidence x-ray reflectivity of multilayers deposited on these aluminized substrates was degraded, presumably due to the roughness of the aluminum films. Multilayers, and the underlying release layers, have been removed without damaging the substrates.

  10. Repair of high-performance multilayer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, David P.; Ceglio, Natale M.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Krumrey, Michael K.; Mueller, Peter

    1992-01-01

    Fabrication and environmental damage issues may require that the multilayer x-ray reflection coatings used in soft x-ray projection lithography be replaced or repaired. Two repair strategies were investigated. The first was to overcoat defective multilayers with a new multilayer. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by depositing high reflectivity (61% at 130 A) molybdenum silicon (Mo/Si) multilayers onto fused silica figured optics that had already been coated with a Mo/Si multilayer. Because some types of damage mechanisms and fabrication errors are not repairable by this method, a second method of repair was investigated. The multilayer was stripped from the optical substrate by etching a release layer which was deposited onto the substrate beneath the multilayer. The release layer consisted of a 1000 A aluminum film deposited by ion beam sputtering or by electron beam evaporation, with a 300 A SiO protective overcoat. The substrates were superpolished zerodur optical flats. The normal incidence x-ray reflectivity of multilayers deposited on these aluminized substrates was degraded, presumably due to roughness of the aluminum films. Multilayers, and the underlying release layers, have been removed without damaging the substrates.

  11. Complex Suspension Rheology Using High Performance Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, David

    In processing advanced ceramic materials, the properties of the final product depend on the process conditions and the interactions between the materials at the scale of the individual particles. Along with general bulk properties, more subtle properties including particle orientation, segregation, and pore structure must be established during processing to achieve the desired functionality. Accomplishing this requires a thorough understanding of the mesoscale interactions and how they influence the macroscale behavior. We conduct a series of large scale simulations of highly filled polymer-nanoparticle composites as analogs of ceramic pastes and reveal how the ceramic particle and binder properties determine the structure and rheology of the bulk material. As with real ceramic pastes, particle shape and size distribution along with composition determine the shear modulus, extent of segregation, and degree of particle alignment. These factors are influenced by the binder through the rheology of the binder phase and the interaction between binder and particles. This talk presents the results of this study of polymer-nanoparticle composites along with a brief overview of research and development at Corning showing the similarities and differences between research in industry and academia.

  12. A History of High-Performance Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Faster than most speedy computers. More powerful than its NASA data-processing predecessors. Able to leap large, mission-related computational problems in a single bound. Clearly, it s neither a bird nor a plane, nor does it need to don a red cape, because it s super in its own way. It's Columbia, NASA s newest supercomputer and one of the world s most powerful production/processing units. Named Columbia to honor the STS-107 Space Shuttle Columbia crewmembers, the new supercomputer is making it possible for NASA to achieve breakthroughs in science and engineering, fulfilling the Agency s missions, and, ultimately, the Vision for Space Exploration. Shortly after being built in 2004, Columbia achieved a benchmark rating of 51.9 teraflop/s on 10,240 processors, making it the world s fastest operational computer at the time of completion. Putting this speed into perspective, 20 years ago, the most powerful computer at NASA s Ames Research Center, home of the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division (NAS), ran at a speed of about 1 gigaflop (one billion calculations per second). The Columbia supercomputer is 50,000 times faster than this computer and offers a tenfold increase in capacity over the prior system housed at Ames. What s more, Columbia is considered the world s largest Linux-based, shared-memory system. The system is offering immeasurable benefits to society and is the zenith of years of NASA/private industry collaboration that has spawned new generations of commercial, high-speed computing systems.

  13. Technologies of high-performance thermography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, R.; Cabanski, Wolfgang A.; Mauk, K. H.; Kock, R.; Rode, W.

    1997-08-01

    A family of 2 dimensional detection modules based on 256 by 256 and 486 by 640 platinum silicide (PtSi) focal planes, or 128 by 128 and 256 by 256 mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) focal planes for applications in either the 3 - 5 micrometer (MWIR) or 8 - 10 micrometer (LWIR) range was recently developed by AIM. A wide variety of applications is covered by the specific features unique for these two material systems. The PtSi units provide state of the art correctability with long term stable gain and offset coefficients. The MCT units provide extremely fast frame rates like 400 Hz with snapshot integration times as short as 250 microseconds and with a thermal resolution NETD less than 20 mK for e.g. the 128 by 128 LWIR module. The unique design idea general for all of these modules is the exclusively digital interface, using 14 bit analog to digital conversion to provide state of the art correctability, access to highly dynamic scenes without any loss of information and simplified exchangeability of the units. Device specific features like bias voltages etc. are identified during the final test and stored in a memory on the driving electronics. This concept allows an easy exchange of IDCAs of the same type without any need for tuning or e.g. the possibility to upgrade a PtSi based unit to an MCT module by just loading the suitable software. Miniaturized digital signal processor (DSP) based image correction units were developed for testing and operating the units with output data rates of up to 16 Mpixels/s. These boards provide the ability for freely programmable realtime functions like two point correction and various data manipulations in thermography applications.

  14. Mitigating project risk by use of high performance collector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richert, Timo; Riffelmann, Klaus-Jürgen; Nava, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Collectors with a high optical quality are generally valued for their additional performance, i.e. the expected additional output due to the performance gain compared to a lower quality reference collector. However, high-performance collectors additionally have a lower sensitivity to additional optical errors and, thus not only perform better nominally, but are also more likely to reach their nominal performance even when project uncertainties (e.g. increased sun-shape) or quality issues (e.g. increased component optical error) degrade their performance. This has physical reasons, whose cause and effect will be described and quantified within this paper.

  15. High-performance positive paste for lead-acid batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, W.H.

    1996-09-01

    Positive lead-acid plates with high porosity and surface area, aiming to deliver a very high current density, about 1 A/cm{sup 2}, were developed. The high porosity and surface area were achieved by using a combination of fine particles of lead oxide and/or basic lead sulfates with an adequate amount of persulfate and water. The relationship between the positive paste phase composition and the high rate performance of the plate was studied. The highly porous plate is able to deliver a very high current owing to more acid being available in the plate structure. In the low rate applications when acid diffusion from the bulk becomes the limiting factor, the high-performance plate is not more advantageous than the conventional starting lighting, and ignition (SLI) plates. The cycle life of the high-performance plate is sensitive to depth of discharge. The deep discharge high rate capacity of the high-performance plates falls faster than that of the SLI plate. Nevertheless, the high-performance paste delivers at least 30% more energy, either to the same depth of discharge per cycle or for the entire service life with constant capacity removal in each cycle. One failure mode of the high-performance plates is the change of material morphology during deep discharge cycling, which results in material shedding.

  16. High performance interconnection between high data rate networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, K.; Overstreet, C. M.; Zhang, L.; Sun, W.

    1992-01-01

    The bridge/gateway system needed to interconnect a wide range of computer networks to support a wide range of user quality-of-service requirements is discussed. The bridge/gateway must handle a wide range of message types including synchronous and asynchronous traffic, large, bursty messages, short, self-contained messages, time critical messages, etc. It is shown that messages can be classified into three basic classes, synchronous and large and small asynchronous messages. The first two require call setup so that packet identification, buffer handling, etc. can be supported in the bridge/gateway. Identification enables resequences in packet size. The third class is for messages which do not require call setup. Resequencing hardware based to handle two types of resequencing problems is presented. The first is for a virtual parallel circuit which can scramble channel bytes. The second system is effective in handling both synchronous and asynchronous traffic between networks with highly differing packet sizes and data rates. The two other major needs for the bridge/gateway are congestion and error control. A dynamic, lossless congestion control scheme which can easily support effective error correction is presented. Results indicate that the congestion control scheme provides close to optimal capacity under congested conditions. Under conditions where error may develop due to intervening networks which are not lossless, intermediate error recovery and correction takes 1/3 less time than equivalent end-to-end error correction under similar conditions.

  17. Building Synergy: The Power of High Performance Work Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gephart, Martha A.; Van Buren, Mark E.

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that high-performance work systems create the synergy that lets companies gain and keep a competitive advantage. Identifies the components of high-performance work systems and critical action steps for implementation. Describes the results companies such as Xerox, Lever Brothers, and Corning Incorporated have achieved by using them. (JOW)

  18. From the Editor: The High Performance Computing Act of 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses issues related to the High Performance Computing and Communication program and National Research and Education Network (NREN) established by the High Performance Computing Act of 1991, including program management, specific program development, affecting policy decisions, access to the NREN, the Department of Education role, and…

  19. A Theoretical Structure of High School Concert Band Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergee, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to verify a theoretical structure for high school concert band performance and to test that structure for viability, generality, and invariance. A total of 101 university students enrolled in two different bands rated two high school band performances (a "first"…

  20. Rotordynamic Instability Problems in High-Performance Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Rotordynamics and predictions on the stability of characteristics of high performance turbomachinery were discussed. Resolutions of problems on experimental validation of the forces that influence rotordynamics were emphasized. The programs to predict or measure forces and force coefficients in high-performance turbomachinery are illustrated. Data to design new machines with enhanced stability characteristics or upgrading existing machines are presented.

  1. An Analysis of a High Performing School District's Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corum, Kenneth D.; Schuetz, Todd B.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a problem based learning project focusing on the cultural elements of a high performing school district. Current literature on school district culture provides numerous cultural elements that are present in high performing school districts. With the current climate in education placing pressure on school districts to perform…

  2. Micromagnetics on high-performance workstation and mobile computational platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S.; Chang, R.; Couture, S.; Menarini, M.; Escobar, M. A.; Kuteifan, M.; Lubarda, M.; Gabay, D.; Lomakin, V.

    2015-05-01

    The feasibility of using high-performance desktop and embedded mobile computational platforms is presented, including multi-core Intel central processing unit, Nvidia desktop graphics processing units, and Nvidia Jetson TK1 Platform. FastMag finite element method-based micromagnetic simulator is used as a testbed, showing high efficiency on all the platforms. Optimization aspects of improving the performance of the mobile systems are discussed. The high performance, low cost, low power consumption, and rapid performance increase of the embedded mobile systems make them a promising candidate for micromagnetic simulations. Such architectures can be used as standalone systems or can be built as low-power computing clusters.

  3. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist, and reducing the amount of wood penetrating the wall cavity.

  4. High performance thermal imaging for the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, David J.; Knowles, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In recent years IR detector technology has developed from early short linear arrays. Such devices require high performance signal processing electronics to meet today's thermal imaging requirements for military and para-military applications. This paper describes BAE SYSTEMS Avionics Group's Sensor Integrated Modular Architecture thermal imager which has been developed alongside the group's Eagle 640×512 arrays to provide high performance imaging capability. The electronics architecture also supprots High Definition TV format 2D arrays for future growth capability.

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory's high-performance data system

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, C.; Chorn, G.; Christman, R.; Collins, B.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing a High-Performance Data System (HPDS) that will provide storage for supercomputers requiring large files and fast transfer speeds. The HPDS will meet the performance requirements by managing data transfers from high-speed storage systems connected directly to a high-speed network. File and storage management software will be distributed in workstations. Network protocols will ensure reliable, wide-area network data delivery to support long-distance distributed processing. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  6. High Performance Work System, HRD Climate and Organisational Performance: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muduli, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to study the relationship between high-performance work system (HPWS) and organizational performance and to examine the role of human resource development (HRD) Climate in mediating the relationship between HPWS and the organizational performance in the context of the power sector of India. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  7. Design method of water jet pump towards high cavitation performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L. L.; Che, B. X.; Hu, L. J.; Wu, D. Z.

    2016-05-01

    As one of the crucial components for power supply, the propulsion system is of great significance to the advance speed, noise performances, stabilities and other associated critical performances of underwater vehicles. Developing towards much higher advance speed, the underwater vehicles make more critical demands on the performances of the propulsion system. Basically, the increased advance speed requires the significantly raised rotation speed of the propulsion system, which would result in the deteriorated cavitation performances and consequently limit the thrust and efficiency of the whole system. Compared with the traditional propeller, the water jet pump offers more favourite cavitation, propulsion efficiency and other associated performances. The present research focuses on the cavitation performances of the waterjet pump blade profile in expectation of enlarging its advantages in high-speed vehicle propulsion. Based on the specifications of a certain underwater vehicle, the design method of the waterjet blade with high cavitation performances was investigated in terms of numerical simulation.

  8. High School Employment, School Performance, and College Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chanyoung; Orazem, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    The proportion of U.S. high school students working during the school year ranges from 23% in the freshman year to 75% in the senior year. This study estimates how cumulative work histories during the high school years affect probability of dropout, high school academic performance, and the probability of attending college. Variations in…

  9. High-temperature alloys: Single-crystal performance boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys are lightweight and have attractive properties for high-temperature applications. A new growth method that enables single-crystal production now boosts their mechanical performance.

  10. Rotordynamic Instability Problems in High-Performance Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Rotor dynamic instability problems in high performance turbomachinery are reviewed. Mechanical instability mechanisms are discussed. Seal forces and working fluid forces in turbomachinery are discussed. Control of rotor instability is also investigated.

  11. Mastering the Challenge of High-Performance Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how, just as all of higher education got serious with wiring individual campuses for the Internet, the nation's leading research institutions have initiated "high-performance computing." Describes several such initiatives involving historically black colleges and universities. (EV)

  12. Tiny biomedical amplifier combines high performance, low power drain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.

    1965-01-01

    Transistorized, portable, high performance amplifier with low power drain facilitates biomedical studies on mobile subjects. This device, which utilizes a differential input to obtain a common-mode rejection, is used for amplifying electrocardiogram and electromyogram signals.

  13. Exploring KM Features of High-Performance Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei-Wen

    2007-12-01

    For reacting to an increasingly rival business environment, many companies emphasize the importance of knowledge management (KM). It is a favorable way to explore and learn KM features of high-performance companies. However, finding out the critical KM features of high-performance companies is a qualitative analysis problem. To handle this kind of problem, the rough set approach is suitable because it is based on data-mining techniques to discover knowledge without rigorous statistical assumptions. Thus, this paper explored KM features of high-performance companies by using the rough set approach. The results show that high-performance companies stress the importance on both tacit and explicit knowledge, and consider that incentives and evaluations are the essentials to implementing KM.

  14. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Tropical Island Climates

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    Design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of K-12 schools in tropical island climates. By incorporating energy improvements into construction or renovation plans, schools can reduce energy consumption and costs.

  15. A DRAM compiler algorithm for high performance VLSI embedded memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldin, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    In many applications, the limited density of the embedded SRAM does not allow integrating the memory on the same chip with other logic and functional blocks. In such cases, the embedded DRAM provides the optimum combination of very high density, low power, and high performance. For ASIC's to take full advantage of this design strategy, an efficient and highly reliable DRAM compiler must be used. The embedded DRAM architecture, cell, and peripheral circuit design considerations and the algorithm of a high performance memory compiler are presented .

  16. MCFC PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-01-01

    This contract is supported by DOE and DOD/DARPA funds. The objective of the DOE program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry. The specific objectives of the DOD's initiative on 2 MW Fuel Cell Fixed Base Power Plant are: (A) to provide a detailed engineering design, development and cost estimate of the 2 MW fuel cell fixed base dual fuel power plant for DOD applications. Installation and operational support systems will also be developed. (B) To construct a full-size MW-class dual fuel power plant simulator.

  17. MCFC PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-04-30

    The objective of the DOE program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry. The specific objectives of the DOD's initiative on 2 MW Fuel Cell Fixed Base Power Plant are: (1) To provide a detailed engineering design, development and cost estimate of the 2 MW fuel cell fixed base dual fuel power plant for DOD applications. Installation and operational support systems will also be developed. (2) To construct a full-size MW-class dual fuel power plant simulator. These objectives are planned to be achieved in the program coordinated with the Department of Energy, which has been funding a multiyear natural gas fueled direct fuel cell power plant program (DE-FC21-95MC31184) for civilian applications. Because many DARPA and DOE objectives are similar, the coordinated program activities are considered the most cost-effective for accomplishment of the program objectives. The DARPA/DOE joint program was launched in 1994. The DOE part of the program is expected to continue to Year 2000. The final output of this DOE program is to construct and operate a 2 MW power plant on an East Coast site. The site will be accessible to DOD energy/environmental systems base planners and logistics personnel as well as mission and policy planners to refine deployment configurations of this new power generation system for fixed base applications.

  18. MCFC product design improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-05-01

    This contract is supported by DOE and DOD/DARPA funds. The objective of the DOE program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry. The specific objectives of the DOE's initiative on 2 MW Fuel Cell Fixed Base Power Plant are: (A) To provide a detailed engineering design, development and cost estimate of the 2 MW fuel cell fixed base dual fuel power plant for DOD applications. Installation and operational support systems will also be developed; and (B) To construct a full-size MW-class dual fuel power plant simulator. These objectives are planned to be achieved in the program coordinated with the Department of Energy, which has been funding a multiyear natural gas fueled direct fuel cell power plant program for civilian applications. Because many DARPA and DOE objectives are similar, the coordinated program activities are considered the most cost-effective for accomplishment of the program objectives. The DARPA/DOE joint program was launched in 1994. The DOE part of the program is expected to continue to the year 2000. The final output of this DOE program is to construct and operate a 2 MW power plant on an East Coast site. The site will be accessible to DOD energy/environmental systems base planners and logistics personnel as well as mission and policy planners to refine deployment configurations of this new power generation system for fixed base applications. A dual fuel fixed base design for military fuels operation, as well as support system logistics will be the key deliverables for the DARPA part of the program.

  19. Variational formulation of high performance finite elements: Parametrized variational principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Militello, Carmello

    1991-01-01

    High performance elements are simple finite elements constructed to deliver engineering accuracy with coarse arbitrary grids. This is part of a series on the variational basis of high-performance elements, with emphasis on those constructed with the free formulation (FF) and assumed natural strain (ANS) methods. Parametrized variational principles that provide a foundation for the FF and ANS methods, as well as for a combination of both are presented.

  20. OHMSETT 'HIGH SEAS' PERFORMANCE TESTING: MARCO CLASS V OIL SKIMMER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A MARCO Class V oil skimmer was tested at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's OHMSETT facility to determine the device's 'high seas' performance characteristics. Performance data was obtained for several simulated offshore wave conditions at various collection speeds. Skim...

  1. Analysis and Performance of a 12-Pulse High Power Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Arnold; Daeges, John

    1994-01-01

    Under work being performed to upgrade the 20 Kilowatt CW uplink transmitters of the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN), the high voltage regulator has been revisited in order to optimize its performance (long-term stability and regulation), and enhance field reliability.

  2. Teacher Performance Trajectories in High- and Lower-Poverty Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Zeyu; Özek, Umut; Hansen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study explores whether teacher performance trajectory over time differs by school-poverty settings. Focusing on elementary school mathematics teachers in North Carolina and Florida, we find no systematic relationship between school student poverty rates and teacher performance trajectories. In both high- (=60% free/reduced-price lunch [FRPL])…

  3. Neural Correlates of High Performance in Foreign Language Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macedonia, Manuela; Muller, Karsten; Friederici, Angela D.

    2010-01-01

    Learning vocabulary in a foreign language is a laborious task which people perform with varying levels of success. Here, we investigated the neural underpinning of high performance on this task. In a within-subjects paradigm, participants learned 92 vocabulary items under two multimodal conditions: one condition paired novel words with iconic…

  4. Student Performance Standards for Senior High Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard County School Board, Cocoa, FL.

    Developed by a team of 13 teachers, this guide presents student performance standards for 36 high school language arts courses. For each course described, performance standards and intended outcomes are preceded by a curriculum framework that includes a statement of major concepts and content, laboratory activities, special notes, and intended…

  5. Two Profiles of the Dutch High Performing Employee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Waal, A. A.; Oudshoorn, Michella

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the profile of an ideal employee, to be more precise the behavioral characteristics of the Dutch high-performing employee (HPE). Organizational performance depends for a large part on the commitment of employees. Employees provide their knowledge, skills, experiences and creativity to the…

  6. Dynamic Open Inquiry Performances of High-School Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Sadeh, Irit

    2010-01-01

    In examining open inquiry projects among high-school biology students, we found dynamic inquiry performances expressed in two criteria: "changes occurring during inquiry" and "procedural understanding". Characterizing performances in a dynamic open inquiry project can shed light on both the procedural and epistemological scientific understanding…

  7. Manufacturing Advantage: Why High-Performance Work Systems Pay Off.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelbaum, Eileen; Bailey, Thomas; Berg, Peter; Kalleberg, Arne L.

    A study examined the relationship between high-performance workplace practices and the performance of plants in the following manufacturing industries: steel, apparel, and medical electronic instruments and imaging. The multilevel research methodology combined the following data collection activities: (1) site visits; (2) collection of plant…

  8. 7 CFR 275.24 - High performance bonuses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... outlined in paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(4) of this section, FNS will add the additional State(s) into the... fiscal year to State agencies that show high or improved performance in accordance with the performance... a bonus payment in any fiscal year for which it has a liability amount established as a result of...

  9. Implementing High Performance Remote Method Invocation in CCA

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jian; Agarwal, Khushbu; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Gorton, Ian; Epperly, Thomas G.

    2011-09-30

    We report our effort in engineering a high performance remote method invocation (RMI) mechanism for the Common Component Architecture (CCA). This mechanism provides a highly efficient and easy-to-use mechanism for distributed computing in CCA, enabling CCA applications to effectively leverage parallel systems to accelerate computations. This work is built on the previous work of Babel RMI. Babel is a high performance language interoperability tool that is used in CCA for scientific application writers to share, reuse, and compose applications from software components written in different programming languages. Babel provides a transparent and flexible RMI framework for distributed computing. However, the existing Babel RMI implementation is built on top of TCP and does not provide the level of performance required to distribute fine-grained tasks. We observed that the main reason the TCP based RMI does not perform well is because it does not utilize the high performance interconnect hardware on a cluster efficiently. We have implemented a high performance RMI protocol, HPCRMI. HPCRMI achieves low latency by building on top of a low-level portable communication library, Aggregated Remote Message Copy Interface (ARMCI), and minimizing communication for each RMI call. Our design allows a RMI operation to be completed by only two RDMA operations. We also aggressively optimize our system to reduce copying. In this paper, we discuss the design and our experimental evaluation of this protocol. Our experimental results show that our protocol can improve RMI performance by an order of magnitude.

  10. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  11. The Quest for a High Performance Boltzmann Transport Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.N.; Chang, B.; Hanebutte, U.R.; Woodward, C.S.

    1999-09-01

    A 3-d Boltzmann transport code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory exploits concurrency (problem permitting) with respect to all phase space variables represented by direction, position and energy. To demonstrate the capabilities of the code, a highly resolved Boltzmann transport calculation with 27.6 billion unknowns (332 billion discretization points) was performed on 4992 processors of the IBM RS/6000 SP ASCI Blue machine at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Detailed performance measurements were collected during this calculation. Analyzing the timing data revealed a relatively modest performance, i.e. obtained fraction of peak performance. A detailed study of the performance data confirmed that this modest performance was caused by low utilization of local processor performance, as well as low parallel efficiency of the intrinsically sequential sweep procedure. Both issues and their ramifications will be addressed in this paper.

  12. Performance measurement and modeling of component applications in a high performance computing environment : a case study.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Robert C.; Ray, Jaideep; Malony, A.; Shende, Sameer; Trebon, Nicholas D.

    2003-11-01

    We present a case study of performance measurement and modeling of a CCA (Common Component Architecture) component-based application in a high performance computing environment. We explore issues peculiar to component-based HPC applications and propose a performance measurement infrastructure for HPC based loosely on recent work done for Grid environments. A prototypical implementation of the infrastructure is used to collect data for a three components in a scientific application and construct performance models for two of them. Both computational and message-passing performance are addressed.

  13. Ideation High Performers: A Study of Motivational Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergendahl, Magnus; Magnusson, Mats; Björk, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    As innovation today is one of the keys to success for firms, creativity among employees becomes an important asset and the understanding about what motivates employees in ideation is consequently of high interest. This article addresses differences in motivation among high and low performers in ideation and contributes to existing theory by…

  14. Promoting High-Performance Computing and Communications. A CBO Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webre, Philip

    In 1991 the Federal Government initiated the multiagency High Performance Computing and Communications program (HPCC) to further the development of U.S. supercomputer technology and high-speed computer network technology. This overview by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) concentrates on obstacles that might prevent the growth of the…

  15. Stretchable and High-Performance Supercapacitors with Crumpled Graphene Papers

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Jianfeng; Cao, Changyong; Feng, Yaying; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2014-01-01

    Fabrication of unconventional energy storage devices with high stretchability and performance is challenging, but critical to practical operations of fully power-independent stretchable electronics. While supercapacitors represent a promising candidate for unconventional energy-storage devices, existing stretchable supercapacitors are limited by their low stretchability, complicated fabrication process, and high cost. Here, we report a simple and low-cost method to fabricate extremely stretchable and high-performance electrodes for supercapacitors based on new crumpled-graphene papers. Electrolyte-mediated-graphene paper bonded on a compliant substrate can be crumpled into self-organized patterns by harnessing mechanical instabilities in the graphene paper. As the substrate is stretched, the crumpled patterns unfold, maintaining high reliability of the graphene paper under multiple cycles of large deformation. Supercapacitor electrodes based on the crumpled graphene papers exhibit a unique combination of high stretchability (e.g., linear strain ~300%, areal strain ~800%), high electrochemical performance (e.g., specific capacitance ~196 F g−1), and high reliability (e.g., over 1000 stretch/relax cycles). An all-solid-state supercapacitor capable of large deformation is further fabricated to demonstrate practical applications of the crumpled-graphene-paper electrodes. Our method and design open a wide range of opportunities for manufacturing future energy-storage devices with desired deformability together with high performance. PMID:25270673

  16. A Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, D E; Allan, B A; Armstrong, R; Bertrand, F; Chiu, K; Dahlgren, T L; Damevski, K; Elwasif, W R; Epperly, T W; Govindaraju, M; Katz, D S; Kohl, J A; Krishnan, M; Kumfert, G; Larson, J W; Lefantzi, S; Lewis, M J; Malony, A D; McInnes, L C; Nieplocha, J; Norris, B; Parker, S G; Ray, J; Shende, S; Windus, T L; Zhou, S

    2004-12-14

    The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for software developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific simulations and to move toward a plug-and-play environment for high-performance computing. In the scientific computing context, component models also promote collaboration using independently developed software, thereby allowing particular individuals or groups to focus on the aspects of greatest interest to them. The CCA supports parallel and distributed computing as well as local high-performance connections between components in a language-independent manner. The design places minimal requirements on components and thus facilitates the integration of existing code into the CCA environment. The CCA model imposes minimal overhead to minimize the impact on application performance. The focus on high performance distinguishes the CCA from most other component models. The CCA is being applied within an increasing range of disciplines, including combustion research, global climate simulation, and computational chemistry.

  17. A Component Architecture for High-Performance Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, David E; Allan, Benjamin A; Armstrong, Robert C; Bertrand, Felipe; Chiu, Kenneth; Dahlgren, Tamara L; Damevski, Kostadin; Elwasif, Wael R; Epperly, Thomas G; Govindaraju, Madhusudhan; Katz, Daniel S; Kohl, James A; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Kumfert, Gary K; Larson, J Walter; Lefantzi, Sophia; Lewis, Michael J; Malony, Allen D; McInnes, Lois C; Nieplocha, Jarek; Norris, Boyana; Parker, Steven G; Ray, Jaideep; Shende, Sameer; Windus, Theresa L; Zhou, Shujia

    2006-07-03

    The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for software developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific simulations and to move toward a plug-and-play environment for high-performance computing. In the scientific computing context, component models also promote collaboration using independently developed software, thereby allowing particular individuals or groups to focus on the aspects of greatest interest to them. The CCA supports parallel and distributed computing as well as local high-performance connections between components in a language-independent manner. The design places minimal requirements on components and thus facilitates the integration of existing code into the CCA environment. The CCA model imposes minimal overhead to minimize the impact on application performance. The focus on high performance distinguishes the CCA from most other component models. The CCA is being applied within an increasing range of disciplines, including combustion research, global climate simulation, and computational chemistry.

  18. High Performance Nickel Electrodes for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adanuvor, Prosper K.; Pearson, Johnnie A.; Miller, Brian; Tatarchuk, Bruce; Britton, Doris L.

    1996-01-01

    Performance characteristics such as efficiency, specific energy density and power density of nickel electrodes are generally limited by the electrode microstructure and nature of the active material within the electrode matrix. Progress is being made in our laboratory in a collaborative effort with NASA-Lewis Research Center to develop lighter weight, mechanically stable and highly efficient nickel electrodes for aerospace applications. Our approach is based on an electrode microstructure fabricated from a mixture of nickel fibers as small as 2 microns diameter and cellulose fibers. Performance data in flooded cell tests and cycle life data are presented. Performance characteristics are compared to other electrode microstructures such as the Fibrex Fiber mat and the Fibrex Powder substrate. The flexibility of our electrode microstructure and the significant advantages it offers in terms of weight and performance are demonstrated, in particular, its ability to accept charge at high rates and to discharge at high rates.

  19. The architecture of the High Performance Storage System (HPSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teaff, Danny; Watson, Dick; Coyne, Bob

    1994-01-01

    The rapid growth in the size of datasets has caused a serious imbalance in I/O and storage system performance and functionality relative to application requirements and the capabilities of other system components. The High Performance Storage System (HPSS) is a scalable, next-generation storage system that will meet the functionality and performance requirements or large-scale scientific and commercial computing environments. Our goal is to improve the performance and capacity of storage by two orders of magnitude or more over what is available in the general or mass marketplace today. We are also providing corresponding improvements in architecture and functionality. This paper describes the architecture and functionality of HPSS.

  20. A Component Architecture for High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, D E; Elwasif, W R; Kohl, J A; Epperly, T G W

    2003-01-21

    The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific software systems and to move toward a ''plug and play'' environment for high-performance computing. The CCA model allows for a direct connection between components within the same process to maintain performance on inter-component calls. It is neutral with respect to parallelism, allowing components to use whatever means they desire to communicate within their parallel ''cohort.'' We will discuss in detail the importance of performance in the design of the CCA and will analyze the performance costs associated with features of the CCA.

  1. Advances in Experiment Design for High Performance Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Engene A.

    1998-01-01

    A general overview and summary of recent advances in experiment design for high performance aircraft is presented, along with results from flight tests. General theoretical background is included, with some discussion of various approaches to maneuver design. Flight test examples from the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) are used to illustrate applications of the theory. Input forms are compared using Cramer-Rao bounds for the standard errors of estimated model parameters. Directions for future research in experiment design for high performance aircraft are identified.

  2. High performance surface-emitting lasers with dry etched facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, S. S.; Jansen, M.; Yang, J. J.; Sergant, M.; Mawst, L. J.; Botez, D.; Roth, T. J.; Hess, C.; Tu, C.

    1992-12-01

    The fabrication, performance characteristics, and applications of monolithic in-plane surface-emitting lasers (IPSELs) with dry-etched 45-degree micromirrors are reviewed. Several types of such laser diode structures in both junction-up and junction-down configurations are considered. The performance goals for IPSELs with 45-degree micromirrors are high power and efficiency, high duty cycle and CW operation, good reliability, and high fabrication yields. The proposed approach for achieving these goals includes uniform quantum well material growth and dry etching of the laser micromirrors with tight fabrication tolerances.

  3. Coated Porous Si for High Performance On-Chip Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoras, K.; Keskinen, J.; Grönberg, L.; Ahopelto, J.; Prunnila, M.

    2014-11-01

    High performance porous Si based supercapacitor electrodes are demonstrated. High power density and stability is provided by ultra-thin TiN coating of the porous Si matrix. The TiN layer is deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), which provides sufficient conformality to reach the bottom of the high aspect ratio pores. Our porous Si supercapacitor devices exhibit almost ideal double layer capacitor characteristic with electrode volumetric capacitance of 7.3 F/cm3. Several orders of magnitude increase in power and energy density is obtained comparing to uncoated porous silicon electrodes. Good stability of devices is confirmed performing several thousands of charge/discharge cycles.

  4. High-Performance Photovoltaic Project: Identifying Critical Pathways; Kickoff Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Symko-Davis, M.

    2001-11-07

    The High Performance Photovoltaic Project held a Kickoff Meeting in October, 2001. This booklet contains the presentations given by subcontractors and in-house teams at that meeting. The areas of subcontracted research under the HiPer project include Polycrystalline Thin Films and Multijunction Concentrators. The in-house teams in this initiative will focus on three areas: (1) High-Performance Thin-Film Team-leads the investigation of tandem structures and low-flux concentrators, (2) High-Efficiency Concepts and Concentrators Team-an expansion of an existing team that leads the development of high-flux concentrators, and (3) Thin-Film Process Integration Team-will perform fundamental process and characterization research, to resolve the complex issues of making thin-film multijunction devices.

  5. Modelling and design of high performance indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, Sandra L.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1989-01-01

    A first principles pn junction device model has predicted new designs for high voltage, high efficiency InP solar cells. Measured InP material properties were applied and device parameters (thicknesses and doping) were adjusted to obtain optimal performance designs. Results indicate that p/n InP designs will provide higher voltages and higher energy conversion efficiencies than n/p structures. Improvements to n/p structures for increased efficiency are predicted. These new designs exploit the high absorption capabilities, relatively long diffusion lengths, and modest surface recombination velocities characteristic of InP. Predictions of performance indicate achievable open-circuit voltage values as high as 943 mV for InP and a practical maximum AM0 efficiency of 22.5 percent at 1 sun and 27 C. The details of the model, the optimal InP structure and the effect of individual parameter variations on device performance are presented.

  6. Design concepts to improve high performance solar simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juranek, H. J.; Frey, H. U.

    1986-01-01

    By improving several important components of the well known off-axis solar simulator system, a considerable step forward was made. The careful mathematical studies on the optics and the thermal side of the problem lead to a highly efficient system with low operational costs and a high reliability. The actual performance of the simulator is significantly better than the specified one, and the efficiency is outstanding. No more than 12 lamps operating at 18 kW are required to obtain one Solar Constant in the 6 m beam. It is now known that by using sophisticated optics, even larger facilities of high performance can be designed without leaving the proven off-axis concept and using a spherical mirror. Using high performance optics is a means of reducing costs at a given size of beam because the number of lamps is one of the most cost driving factors in the construction of a solar simulator.

  7. Inorganic nanostructured materials for high performance electrochemical supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng; Sun, Shouheng; You, Xiao-Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical supercapacitors (ES) are a well-known energy storage system that has high power density, long life-cycle and fast charge-discharge kinetics. Nanostructured materials are a new generation of electrode materials with large surface area and short transport/diffusion path for ions and electrons to achieve high specific capacitance in ES. This mini review highlights recent developments of inorganic nanostructure materials, including carbon nanomaterials, metal oxide nanoparticles, and metal oxide nanowires/nanotubes, for high performance ES applications.

  8. Life-cycle costs of high-performance cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R.; Burger, D.; Reiter, L.

    1985-01-01

    A life cycle cost analysis of high efficiency cells was presented. Although high efficiency cells produce more power, they also cost more to make and are more susceptible to array hot-spot heating. Three different computer analysis programs were used: SAMICS (solar array manufacturing industry costing standards), PVARRAY (an array failure mode/degradation simulator), and LCP (lifetime cost and performance). The high efficiency cell modules were found to be more economical in this study, but parallel redundancy is recommended.

  9. High School Teaching and College Performance: Looking for Connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Robert H.

    2006-12-01

    How much impact does high school have on college? Are decisions about classroom activities and student work in high school physics associated with student performance in college physics? In our paper, we look at several aspects of high school physics including laboratory experiences, homework activities, and classroom activities and their association with college physics grades. Our results revisit in greater depth and earlier analysis carried out a decade earlier.

  10. Unlocking the Black Box: Exploring the Link between High-Performance Work Systems and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messersmith, Jake G.; Patel, Pankaj C.; Lepak, David P.

    2011-01-01

    With a growing body of literature linking systems of high-performance work practices to organizational performance outcomes, recent research has pushed for examinations of the underlying mechanisms that enable this connection. In this study, based on a large sample of Welsh public-sector employees, we explored the role of several individual-level…

  11. TMD-Based Structural Control of High Performance Steel Bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Gun; Kyum Kim, Moon

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of structural control using tuned mass damper (TMD) for suppressing excessive traffic induced vibration of high performance steel bridge. The study considered 1-span steel plate girder bridge and bridge-vehicle interaction using HS-24 truck model. A numerical model of steel plate girder, traffic load, and TMD is constructed and time history analysis is performed using commercial structural analysis program ABAQUS 6.10. Results from analyses show that high performance steel bridge has dynamic serviceability problem, compared to relatively low performance steel bridge. Therefore, the structural control using TMD is implemented in order to alleviate dynamic serviceability problems. TMD is applied to the bridge with high performance steel and then vertical vibration due to dynamic behavior is assessed again. In consequent, by using TMD, it is confirmed that the residual amplitude is appreciably reduced by 85% in steady-state vibration. Moreover, vibration serviceability assessment using 'Reiher-Meister Curve' is also remarkably improved. As a result, this paper provides the guideline for economical design of I-girder using high performance steel and evaluates the effectiveness of structural control using TMD, simultaneously.

  12. Two failures to replicate high-performance-goal priming effects.

    PubMed

    Harris, Christine R; Coburn, Noriko; Rohrer, Doug; Pashler, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Bargh et al. (2001) reported two experiments in which people were exposed to words related to achievement (e.g., strive, attain) or to neutral words, and then performed a demanding cognitive task. Performance on the task was enhanced after exposure to the achievement related words. Bargh and colleagues concluded that better performance was due to the achievement words having activated a "high-performance goal". Because the paper has been cited well over 1100 times, an attempt to replicate its findings would seem warranted. Two direct replication attempts were performed. Results from the first experiment (n = 98) found no effect of priming, and the means were in the opposite direction from those reported by Bargh and colleagues. The second experiment followed up on the observation by Bargh et al. (2001) that high-performance-goal priming was enhanced by a 5-minute delay between priming and test. Adding such a delay, we still found no evidence for high-performance-goal priming (n = 66). These failures to replicate, along with other recent results, suggest that the literature on goal priming requires some skeptical scrutiny. PMID:23977304

  13. Resource Estimation in High Performance Medical Image Computing

    PubMed Central

    Banalagay, Rueben; Covington, Kelsie Jade; Wilkes, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging analysis processes often involve the concatenation of many steps (e.g., multi-stage scripts) to integrate and realize advancements from image acquisition, image processing, and computational analysis. With the dramatic increase in data size for medical imaging studies (e.g., improved resolution, higher throughput acquisition, shared databases), interesting study designs are becoming intractable or impractical on individual workstations and servers. Modern pipeline environments provide control structures to distribute computational load in high performance computing (HPC) environments. However, high performance computing environments are often shared resources, and scheduling computation across these resources necessitates higher level modeling of resource utilization. Submission of ‘jobs’ requires an estimate of the CPU runtime and memory usage. The resource requirements for medical image processing algorithms are difficult to predict since the requirements can vary greatly between different machines, different execution instances, and different data inputs. Poor resource estimates can lead to wasted resources in high performance environments due to incomplete executions and extended queue wait times. Hence, resource estimation is becoming a major hurdle for medical image processing algorithms to efficiently leverage high performance computing environments. Herein, we present our implementation of a resource estimation system to overcome these difficulties and ultimately provide users with the ability to more efficiently utilize high performance computing resources. PMID:24906466

  14. Performance calculation and simulation system of high energy laser weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Liu, Min; Su, Yu; Zhang, Ke

    2014-12-01

    High energy laser weapons are ready for some of today's most challenging military applications. Based on the analysis of the main tactical/technical index and combating process of high energy laser weapon, a performance calculation and simulation system of high energy laser weapon was established. Firstly, the index decomposition and workflow of high energy laser weapon was proposed. The entire system was composed of six parts, including classical target, platform of laser weapon, detect sensor, tracking and pointing control, laser atmosphere propagation and damage assessment module. Then, the index calculation modules were designed. Finally, anti-missile interception simulation was performed. The system can provide reference and basis for the analysis and evaluation of high energy laser weapon efficiency.

  15. A grid computing framework for high-performance medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mañana Guichón, Gabriel; Romero Castro, Eduardo

    2013-11-01

    Current medical image processing has become a complex mixture of many scienti c disciplines including mathematics, statistics, physics, and algorithmics, to perform tasks such as registration, segmentation, and visualization, with the ultimate purpose of helping clinicians in their daily routine. This requires high performance computing capabilities that can be achieved in several ways, usually una ordable for most medical institutions. This paper presents a space-based computational grid that uses the otherwise wasted CPU cycles of a set of personal computers, to provide high-performance medical imaging services over the Internet. By using an existing hardware infrastructure and software of free distribution, the proposed approach is apt for university hospitals and other low-budget institutions. This will be illustrated by the use of three real case studies of services where an important speedup factor has been obtained and whose performance has become suitable for use in real clinical scenarios.

  16. Class of service in the high performance storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, S.; Teaff, D.

    1995-01-10

    Quality of service capabilities are commonly deployed in archival mass storage systems as one or more client-specified parameters to influence physical location of data in multi-level device hierarchies for performance or cost reasons. The capabilities of new high-performance storage architectures and the needs of data-intensive applications require better quality of service models for modern storage systems. HPSS, a new distributed, high-performance, scalable, storage system, uses a Class of Service (COS) structure to influence system behavior. The authors summarize the design objectives and functionality of HPSS and describes how COS defines a set of performance, media, and residency attributes assigned to storage objects managed by HPSS servers. COS definitions are used to provide appropriate behavior and service levels as requested (or demanded) by storage system clients. They compare the HPSS COS approach with other quality of service concepts and discuss alignment possibilities.

  17. Flexible nanoscale high-performance FinFETs.

    PubMed

    Torres Sevilla, Galo A; Ghoneim, Mohamed T; Fahad, Hossain; Rojas, Jhonathan P; Hussain, Aftab M; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-10-28

    With the emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT), flexible high-performance nanoscale electronics are more desired. At the moment, FinFET is the most advanced transistor architecture used in the state-of-the-art microprocessors. Therefore, we show a soft-etch based substrate thinning process to transform silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based nanoscale FinFET into flexible FinFET and then conduct comprehensive electrical characterization under various bending conditions to understand its electrical performance. Our study shows that back-etch based substrate thinning process is gentler than traditional abrasive back-grinding process; it can attain ultraflexibility and the electrical characteristics of the flexible nanoscale FinFET show no performance degradation compared to its rigid bulk counterpart indicating its readiness to be used for flexible high-performance electronics. PMID:25185112

  18. Approaches to High-Performance Preparative Chromatography of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Shi, Qing-Hong

    Preparative liquid chromatography is widely used for the purification of chemical and biological substances. Different from high-performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of many different components at minimized sample loading, high-performance preparative chromatography is of much larger scale and should be of high resolution and high capacity at high operation speed and low to moderate pressure drop. There are various approaches to this end. For biochemical engineers, the traditional way is to model and optimize a purification process to make it exert its maximum capability. For high-performance separations, however, we need to improve chromatographic technology itself. We herein discuss four approaches in this review, mainly based on the recent studies in our group. The first is the development of high-performance matrices, because packing material is the central component of chromatography. Progress in the fabrication of superporous materials in both beaded and monolithic forms are reviewed. The second topic is the discovery and design of affinity ligands for proteins. In most chromatographic methods, proteins are separated based on their interactions with the ligands attached to the surface of porous media. A target-specific ligand can offer selective purification of desired proteins. Third, electrochromatography is discussed. An electric field applied to a chromatographic column can induce additional separation mechanisms besides chromatography, and result in electrokinetic transport of protein molecules and/or the fluid inside pores, thus leading to high-performance separations. Finally, expanded-bed adsorption is described for process integration to reduce separation steps and process time.

  19. Unlocking the black box: exploring the link between high-performance work systems and performance.

    PubMed

    Messersmith, Jake G; Patel, Pankaj C; Lepak, David P; Gould-Williams, Julian

    2011-11-01

    With a growing body of literature linking systems of high-performance work practices to organizational performance outcomes, recent research has pushed for examinations of the underlying mechanisms that enable this connection. In this study, based on a large sample of Welsh public-sector employees, we explored the role of several individual-level attitudinal factors--job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and psychological empowerment--as well as organizational citizenship behaviors that have the potential to provide insights into how human resource systems influence the performance of organizational units. The results support a unit-level path model, such that department-level, high-performance work system utilization is associated with enhanced levels of job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and psychological empowerment. In turn, these attitudinal variables were found to be positively linked to enhanced organizational citizenship behaviors, which are further related to a second-order construct measuring departmental performance. PMID:21787040

  20. SIMS analysis of high-performance accelerator niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Maheshwari, P.; Stevie, F. A.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Rigsbee, J, M.; Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Griffis, D. P.

    2014-11-01

    Niobium is used to fabricate superconducting radio frequency accelerator modules because of its high critical temperature, high critical magnetic field, and easy formability. Recent experiments have shown a very significant improvement in performance (over 100%) after a high-temperature bake at 1400 degrees C for 3h. SIMS analysis of this material showed the oxygen profile was significantly deeper than the native oxide with a shape that is indicative of diffusion. Positive secondary ion mass spectra showed the presence of Ti with a depth profile similar to that of O. It is suspected that Ti is associated with the performance improvement. The source of Ti contamination in the anneal furnace has been identified, and a new furnace was constructed without Ti. Initial results from the new furnace do not show the yield improvement. Further analyses should determine the relationship of Ti to cavity performance.

  1. Some design considerations for high-performance infrared imaging seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jinxiang; Huang, Jianxiong

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, precision guided weapons play more and more important role in modern war. The development and applications of infrared imaging guidance technology have been paid more and more attention. And with the increasing of the complexity of mission and environment, precision guided weapons make stricter demand for infrared imaging seeker. The demands for infrared imaging seeker include: high detection sensitivity, large dynamic range, having better target recognition capability, having better anti-jamming capability and better environment adaptability. To meet the strict demand of weapon system, several important issues should be considered in high-performance infrared imaging seeker design. The mission, targets, environment of infrared imaging guided missile must be regarded. The tradeoff among performance goal, design parameters, infrared technology constraints and missile constraints should be considered. The optimized application of IRFPA and ATR in complicated environment should be concerned. In this paper, some design considerations for high-performance infrared imaging seeker were discussed.

  2. Scientific data storage solutions: Meeting the high-performance challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Krantz, D.; Jones, L.; Kluegel, L.; Ramsey, C.; Collins, W.

    1994-04-01

    The Los Alamos High-Performance Data System (HPDS) has been developed to meet data storage and data access requirements of Grand Challenge and National Security problems running in a high-performance computing environment. HPDS is a fourth-generation data storage system in which storage devices are directly connected to a network, data is transferred directly between client machines and storage devices, and software distributed on workstations provides system management and control capabilities. Essential to the success of HPDS is the ability to effectively use HIPPI networks and HIPPI-attached storage devices for high-speed data transfer. This paper focuses on the performance of the HPDS storage systems in a Cray Supercomputer environment.

  3. The Process Guidelines for High-Performance Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Grondzik, W.

    1999-07-01

    The Process Guidelines for High-Performance Buildings are a set of recommendations for the design and operation of efficient and effective commercial/institutional buildings. The Process Guidelines have been developed in a searchable database format and are intended to replace print documents that provide guidance for new building designs for the State of Florida and for the operation of existing State buildings. The Process Guidelines for High-Performance buildings reside on the World Wide Web and are publicly accessible. Contents may be accessed in a variety of ways to best suit the needs of the user. The Process Guidelines address the interests of a range of facilities professionals; are organized around the primary phases of building design, construction, and operation; and include content dealing with all major building systems. The Process Guidelines for High-Performance Buildings may be accessed through the ``Resources'' area of the edesign Web site: http://fcn.state.fl.us/fdi/edesign/resource/index.html.

  4. High voltage stability performance of a gamma ray detection device

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Lombigit, Lojius; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd

    2014-02-12

    An industrial grade digital radiation survey meter device is currently being developed at Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This device used a cylindrical type Geiger Mueller (GM) which acts as a detector. GM detector operates at relatively high direct current voltages depend on the type of GM tube. This thin/thick walled cylindrical type of GM tube operates at 450-650 volts range. Proper value and stability performance of high voltage are important parameters to ensure that this device give a reliable radiation dose measurement. This paper will present an assessment of the stability and performance of the high voltage supply for radiation detector. The assessment is performed using System Identification tools box in MATLAB and mathematical statistics.

  5. High Performance Computing Software Applications for Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, C.; Schumacher, P.; Matson, C.; Chun, F.; Duncan, B.; Borelli, K.; Desonia, R.; Gusciora, G.; Roe, K.

    The High Performance Computing Software Applications Institute for Space Situational Awareness (HSAI-SSA) has completed its first full year of applications development. The emphasis of our work in this first year was in improving space surveillance sensor models and image enhancement software. These applications are the Space Surveillance Network Analysis Model (SSNAM), the Air Force Space Fence simulation (SimFence), and physically constrained iterative de-convolution (PCID) image enhancement software tool. Specifically, we have demonstrated order of magnitude speed-up in those codes running on the latest Cray XD-1 Linux supercomputer (Hoku) at the Maui High Performance Computing Center. The software applications improvements that HSAI-SSA has made, has had significant impact to the warfighter and has fundamentally changed the role of high performance computing in SSA.

  6. High performance nickel electrodes for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adanuvor, Prosper K.; Pearson, Johnnie A.; Miller, Brian; Tatarchuk, Bruce; Britton, Doris L.

    1995-01-01

    The specific energy density and the performance of nickel electrodes are generally limited by the electrode microstructure and the nature of the active material within the electrode matrix. Progress is being made in our laboratory in a collaborative effort with NASA-LEWIS Research Center to develop lighter weight, mechanically stable and highly efficient nickel electrodes for aerospace applications. Our approach is based on an electrode microstructure fabricated from a mixture of nickel fibers as small as 2 micro m diameter and cellulose fibers. Results will be presented to show the optimum conditions for impregnating this electrode microstructure with nickel hydroxide active material. Performance data in half-cell tests and cycle life data will also be presented. The flexibility of this electrode microstructure and the significant advantages it offers in terms of weight and performance will be demonstrated, in particular its ability to accept charge at high rates and to discharge at high rates.

  7. High performance APCS conceptual design and evaluation scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, N.; Liekhus, K.; Chambers, A.; Anderson, G.

    1998-02-01

    This Air Pollution Control System (APCS) Conceptual Design and Evaluation study was conducted to evaluate a high-performance (APC) system for minimizing air emissions from mixed waste thermal treatment systems. Seven variations of high-performance APCS designs were conceptualized using several design objectives. One of the system designs was selected for detailed process simulation using ASPEN PLUS to determine material and energy balances and evaluate performance. Installed system capital costs were also estimated. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate the incremental cost and benefit of added carbon adsorber beds for mercury control, specific catalytic reduction for NO{sub x} control, and offgas retention tanks for holding the offgas until sample analysis is conducted to verify that the offgas meets emission limits. Results show that the high-performance dry-wet APCS can easily meet all expected emission limits except for possibly mercury. The capability to achieve high levels of mercury control (potentially necessary for thermally treating some DOE mixed streams) could not be validated using current performance data for mercury control technologies. The engineering approach and ASPEN PLUS modeling tool developed and used in this study identified APC equipment and system performance, size, cost, and other issues that are not yet resolved. These issues need to be addressed in feasibility studies and conceptual designs for new facilities or for determining how to modify existing facilities to meet expected emission limits. The ASPEN PLUS process simulation with current and refined input assumptions and calculations can be used to provide system performance information for decision-making, identifying best options, estimating costs, reducing the potential for emission violations, providing information needed for waste flow analysis, incorporating new APCS technologies in existing designs, or performing facility design and permitting activities.

  8. High performance N2O4/amine elements blowapart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawver, B. R.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental and analytical program was conducted to develop an understanding of the mechanisms controlling hypergolic propellant reactive stream separation (RSS). RSS is a combustion induced phenomenon that results in striation of hypergolic propellant oxidizer and fuel sprays fans. This reduced intraelement mixing can influence thrust chamber performance, heat transfer, and stability. The program and product were the development of design criteria for coping with RSS to allow the design of high performance, stable injectors.

  9. Optimum selection of high performance mirror substrates for diamond finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, Kenneth S.; Comstock, Lovell E.; Wamboldt, Leonard; Sutherland, James S.

    2016-05-01

    Due to advances in manufacturing processes, the substrate options for high performance diamond machined mirrors are expanding. Fewer compromises have to be made to achieve the needed weight, stiffness and finish while maintaining reasonable costs. In addition to the traditional mirror materials like aluminum and beryllium, there are some less common materials that can now be included in the trade space that fill the cost and performance continuum between wrought aluminum and beryllium mirrors. Aluminum and beryllium, respectively, had been the low cost/fair performance and very high cost/very high performance bounds for substrate selection. These additional substrates provide multiple near net shape blank options and processes, mostly within these bounds, that can be considered in a mirror cost versus performance trade analysis. This paper will include a summary of some advances in manufacturing processes that provide more substrate options for diamond machined mirrors with some sample performance analysis and data. This is merged with the traditional substrate options to illustrate the now larger mirror substrate trade space. Some benchmark structural analysis is provided to back up a generic mirror design trade study.

  10. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, Marc; Springer, David; Dakin, Bill; German, Alea

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist. To support this activity, in 2013 the Pacific Gas & Electric Company initiated a project with Davis Energy Group (lead for the Building America team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation) to solicit builder involvement in California to participate in field demonstrations of high performance wall systems. Builders were given incentives and design support in exchange for providing site access for construction observation, cost information, and builder survey feedback. Information from the project was designed to feed into the 2016 Title 24 process, but also to serve as an initial mechanism to engage builders in more high performance construction strategies. This Building America project utilized information collected in the California project.

  11. High performance computing and communications: FY 1997 implementation plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally authorized by passage, with bipartisan support, of the High-Performance Computing Act of 1991, signed on December 9, 1991. The original Program, in which eight Federal agencies participated, has now grown to twelve agencies. This Plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` FY 1996 HPCC accomplishments and FY 1997 HPCC plans. Section 3 of this Plan provides an overview of the HPCC Program. Section 4 contains more detailed definitions of the Program Component Areas, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each PCA. Appendix A provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency.

  12. Identifying Critical Pathways to High-Performance PV: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Symko-Davies, M.; Noufi, R.; Kurtz, S.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV)Project was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy to substantially increase the viability of photovoltaics (PV) for cost-competitive applications so that PV can contribute significantly to our energy supply and our environment in the 21st century. To accomplish this, the NCPV directs in-house and subcontracted research in high-performance polycrystalline thin-film and multijunction concentrator devices. Details of the subcontractor and in-house progress will be described toward identifying critical pathways of 25% polycrystalline thin-film tandem cells and developing multijunction concentrator modules to 33%.

  13. Fully Aromatic High Performance Thermoset via Sydnone-Alkyne Cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Handa, Nisha V; Li, Shaoguang; Gerbec, Jeffrey A; Sumitani, Naoko; Hawker, Craig J; Klinger, Daniel

    2016-05-25

    We have developed an efficient synthetic platform for the preparation of a new class of high performance thermosets based on the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of a bifunctional sydnone with a trifunctional alkyne. These processable materials possess outstanding thermal stability, with Td5% of 520 °C and a weight loss of <0.1% per day at 225 °C (both in air). Key to this performance is the stability of the starting functional groups that allows for reactive B-staging via simple thermal activation to give fully aromatic and highly cross-linked polypyrazole-based thermosets. PMID:27180658

  14. GPU-based High-Performance Computing for Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xun; Ziegenhein, Peter; Jiang, Steve B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in radiotherapy therapy demand high computation powers to solve challenging problems in a timely fashion in a clinical environment. Graphics processing unit (GPU), as an emerging high-performance computing platform, has been introduced to radiotherapy. It is particularly attractive due to its high computational power, small size, and low cost for facility deployment and maintenance. Over the past a few years, GPU-based high-performance computing in radiotherapy has experienced rapid developments. A tremendous amount of studies have been conducted, in which large acceleration factors compared with the conventional CPU platform have been observed. In this article, we will first give a brief introduction to the GPU hardware structure and programming model. We will then review the current applications of GPU in major imaging-related and therapy-related problems encountered in radiotherapy. A comparison of GPU with other platforms will also be presented. PMID:24486639

  15. Tellurium as a high-performance elemental thermoelectric

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Siqi; Li, Wen; Chen, Zhiwei; Shen, Jiawen; Ge, Binghui; Pei, Yanzhong

    2016-01-01

    High-efficiency thermoelectric materials require a high conductivity. It is known that a large number of degenerate band valleys offers many conducting channels for improving the conductivity without detrimental effects on the other properties explicitly, and therefore, increases thermoelectric performance. In addition to the strategy of converging different bands, many semiconductors provide an inherent band nestification, equally enabling a large number of effective band valley degeneracy. Here we show as an example that a simple elemental semiconductor, tellurium, exhibits a high thermoelectric figure of merit of unity, not only demonstrating the concept but also filling up the high performance gap from 300 to 700 K for elemental thermoelectrics. The concept used here should be applicable in general for thermoelectrics with similar band features. PMID:26751919

  16. Stability and control of maneuvering high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, R. F.; Berry, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    The stability and control of a high-performance aircraft was analyzed, and a design methodology for a departure prevention stability augmentation system (DPSAS) was developed. A general linear aircraft model was derived which includes maneuvering flight effects and trim calculation procedures for investigating highly dynamic trajectories. The stability and control analysis systematically explored the effects of flight condition and angular motion, as well as the stability of typical air combat trajectories. The effects of configuration variation also were examined.

  17. Automated Fabrication Technologies for High Performance Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart , M. J.; Johnston, N. J.; Dexter, H. B.; Marchello, J. M.; Grenoble, R. W.

    1998-01-01

    New fabrication technologies are being exploited for building high graphite-fiber-reinforced composite structure. Stitched fiber preforms and resin film infusion have been successfully demonstrated for large, composite wing structures. Other automatic processes being developed include automated placement of tacky, drapable epoxy towpreg, automated heated head placement of consolidated ribbon/tape, and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding. These methods have the potential to yield low cost high performance structures by fabricating composite structures to net shape out-of-autoclave.

  18. Beating the Odds: High Performing, Small High-Schools in the Rural South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rural School and Community Trust, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Southern Rural High School Study Initiative seeks to identify high performing rural high schools in the South, engage education leaders in the region in analyzing the challenges faced by these schools and consider the public policies that might serve to transfer the lessons and strategies used by these schools to other small rural high schools…

  19. Driven To Succeed: High-Performing, High-Poverty, Turnaround Middle Schools. Volume I: Cross-Case Analysis of High-Performing, High-Poverty, Turnaround Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picucci, Ali Callicoatte; Brownson, Amanda; Kahlert, Rahel; Sobel, Andrew

    This study investigated how seven high-poverty middle schools demonstrated strong academic improvement so they were performing at levels consistent with, and often better than, higher-income schools in their states. Schools ranged in enrollment from 291-1,010 and represented several community types and ethnic groups. Among the characterisitics…

  20. High-performance mass storage system for workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, T.; Tang, Y.; Gupta, L.; Cooperman, S.

    1993-01-01

    Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) workstations and Personnel Computers (PC) are very popular tools for office automation, command and control, scientific analysis, database management, and many other applications. However, when using Input/Output (I/O) intensive applications, the RISC workstations and PC's are often overburdened with the tasks of collecting, staging, storing, and distributing data. Also, by using standard high-performance peripherals and storage devices, the I/O function can still be a common bottleneck process. Therefore, the high-performance mass storage system, developed by Loral AeroSys' Independent Research and Development (IR&D) engineers, can offload a RISC workstation of I/O related functions and provide high-performance I/O functions and external interfaces. The high-performance mass storage system has the capabilities to ingest high-speed real-time data, perform signal or image processing, and stage, archive, and distribute the data. This mass storage system uses a hierarchical storage structure, thus reducing the total data storage cost, while maintaining high-I/O performance. The high-performance mass storage system is a network of low-cost parallel processors and storage devices. The nodes in the network have special I/O functions such as: SCSI controller, Ethernet controller, gateway controller, RS232 controller, IEEE488 controller, and digital/analog converter. The nodes are interconnected through high-speed direct memory access links to form a network. The topology of the network is easily reconfigurable to maximize system throughput for various applications. This high-performance mass storage system takes advantage of a 'busless' architecture for maximum expandability. The mass storage system consists of magnetic disks, a WORM optical disk jukebox, and an 8mm helical scan tape to form a hierarchical storage structure. Commonly used files are kept in the magnetic disk for fast retrieval. The optical disks are used as archive

  1. Essential Elements of High Performing, High Quality Part C Systems. NECTAC Notes No. 25

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Anne; Hurth, Joicey; Kasprzak, Christina

    2010-01-01

    National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC) was asked to identify essential elements for supporting high performance and provision of high quality early intervention Part C services as determined by the Annual Performance Review (APR) required under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). To respond, NECTAC…

  2. Combining high performance simulation, data acquisition, and graphics display computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Issues involved in the continuing development of an advanced simulation complex are discussed. This approach provides the capability to perform the majority of tests on advanced systems, non-destructively. The controlled test environments can be replicated to examine the response of the systems under test to alternative treatments of the system control design, or test the function and qualification of specific hardware. Field tests verify that the elements simulated in the laboratories are sufficient. The digital computer is hosted by a Digital Equipment Corp. MicroVAX computer with an Aptec Computer Systems Model 24 I/O computer performing the communication function. An Applied Dynamics International AD100 performs the high speed simulation computing and an Evans and Sutherland PS350 performs on-line graphics display. A Scientific Computer Systems SCS40 acts as a high performance FORTRAN program processor to support the complex, by generating numerous large files from programs coded in FORTRAN that are required for the real time processing. Four programming languages are involved in the process, FORTRAN, ADSIM, ADRIO, and STAPLE. FORTRAN is employed on the MicroVAX host to initialize and terminate the simulation runs on the system. The generation of the data files on the SCS40 also is performed with FORTRAN programs. ADSIM and ADIRO are used to program the processing elements of the AD100 and its IOCP processor. STAPLE is used to program the Aptec DIP and DIA processors.

  3. Multichannel Detection in High-Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, James C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A linear photodiode array is used as the photodetector element in a new ultraviolet-visible detection system for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Using a computer network, the system processes eight different chromatographic signals simultaneously in real-time and acquires spectra manually/automatically. Applications in fast HPLC…

  4. High Performance Computing and Networking for Science--Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    The Office of Technology Assessment is conducting an assessment of the effects of new information technologies--including high performance computing, data networking, and mass data archiving--on research and development. This paper offers a view of the issues and their implications for current discussions about Federal supercomputer initiatives…

  5. Employee Retention and Performance Improvement in High-Tech Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, B. Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Considers the benefits of employee retention and performance improvement in high technology, new economy companies. Discusses attracting and retaining top talent in information technology companies; targeted recruiting and hiring; employee achievement; learning and professional growth; recognition; nurturing careers; team collaboration; the TALENT…

  6. Teacher and Leader Effectiveness in High-Performing Education Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda, Ed.; Rothman, Robert, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The issue of teacher effectiveness has risen rapidly to the top of the education policy agenda, and the federal government and states are considering bold steps to improve teacher and leader effectiveness. One place to look for ideas is the experiences of high-performing education systems around the world. Finland, Ontario, and Singapore all have…

  7. Planning and Implementing a High Performance Knowledge Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, Edwin M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the conceptual framework for developing a rapid-prototype high-performance knowledge base for the four mission agencies of the United States Department of Agriculture and their university partners. Describes the background of the project and methods used for establishing the requirements; examines issues and problems surrounding semantic…

  8. The role of interpreters in high performance computing

    SciTech Connect

    Naumann, Axel; Canal, Philippe; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    Compiled code is fast, interpreted code is slow. There is not much we can do about it, and it's the reason why interpreters use in high performance computing is usually restricted to job submission. We show where interpreters make sense even in the context of analysis code, and what aspects have to be taken into account to make this combination a success.

  9. Student Achievement Data Systems in High and Low Performing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stachowiak, Jeannie E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in how high and low performing elementary school districts use and analyze data to differentiate instruction, make changes to district/grade level curriculum, determine professional development needs, determine teacher effectiveness, and determine the use of school district…

  10. Determination of Caffeine in Beverages by High Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiNunzio, James E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the equipment, procedures, and results for the determination of caffeine in beverages by high performance liquid chromatography. The method is simple, fast, accurate, and, because sample preparation is minimal, it is well suited for use in a teaching laboratory. (JN)

  11. A Research and Development Strategy for High Performance Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Science and Technology Policy, Washington, DC.

    This report is the result of a systematic review of the status and directions of high performance computing and its relationship to federal research and development. Conducted by the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET), the review involved a series of workshops attended by numerous computer scientists and…

  12. Seeking Solution: High-Performance Computing for Science. Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This is the second publication from the Office of Technology Assessment's assessment on information technology and research, which was requested by the House Committee on Science and Technology and the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. The first background paper, "High Performance Computing & Networking for Science,"…

  13. Maintaining High-Performance Schools after Construction or Renovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luepke, Gary; Ronsivalli, Louis J., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    With taxpayers' considerable investment in schools, it is critical for school districts to preserve their community's assets with new construction or renovation and effective facility maintenance programs. "High-performance" school buildings are designed to link the physical environment to positive student achievement while providing such benefits…

  14. American Models of High-Performance Work Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelbaum, Eileen; Batt, Rosemary

    1993-01-01

    Looks at work systems that draw on quality engineering and management concepts and use incentives. Discusses how some U.S. companies improve performance and maintain high quality. Suggests that the federal government strategy should include measures to support change in production processes and promote efficient factors of production. (JOW)

  15. High Performance Computing and Communications: Toward a National Information Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology, Washington, DC.

    This report describes the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) initiative of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology. This program is supportive of and coordinated with the National Information Infrastructure Initiative. Now halfway through its 5-year effort, the HPCC program counts among its…

  16. High School Grades and University Performance: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyrenne, Philippe; Chan, Alan

    2012-01-01

    A critical issue facing a number of colleges and universities is how to allocate first year places to incoming students. The decision to admit students is often based on a number of factors, but a key statistic is a student's high school grades. This paper reports on a case study of the subsequent performance at the University of Winnipeg of high…

  17. Quantification of Tea Flavonoids by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Jessica D.; Niemeyer, Emily D.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory experiment that uses high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to quantify flavonoid levels in a variety of commercial teas. Specifically, this experiment analyzes a group of flavonoids known as catechins, plant-derived polyphenolic compounds commonly found in many foods and beverages, including green and black…

  18. Cobra Strikes! High-Performance Car Inspires Students, Markets Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Bonita

    2008-01-01

    Nestled in the Lower Piedmont region of upstate South Carolina, Piedmont Technical College (PTC) is one of 16 technical colleges in the state. Automotive technology is one of its most popular programs. The program features an instructive, motivating activity that the author describes in this article: building a high-performance car. The Cobra…

  19. The Case for High-Performance, Healthy Green Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Leesa

    2011-01-01

    When trying to reach their sustainability goals, schools and school districts often run into obstacles, including financing, training, and implementation tools. Last fall, the U.S. Green Building Council-Georgia (USGBC-Georgia) launched its High Performance, Healthy Schools (HPHS) Program to help Georgia schools overcome those obstacles. By…

  20. 24 CFR 902.71 - Incentives for high performers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... that remain in effect, such as those for competitive bidding or competitive negotiation (see 24 CFR 85... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Incentives for high performers. 902... DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING ASSESSMENT SYSTEM PHAS Incentives and Remedies § 902.71 Incentives for...