Science.gov

Sample records for high power free-electron

  1. High Power Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2004-04-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high pulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. User programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few. Recently the incorporation of energy recovery systems has permitted extension of the average power capabilities to the kW level and beyond. Development of substantially higher power systems with applications in defense and security is believed feasible with modest R&D efforts applied to a few technology areas. This paper will discuss at a summary level the physics of such devices, survey existing and planned facilities, and touch on the applications that have driven the development of these popular light sources.

  2. High power free-electron laser concepts and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) have long been thought to offer the potential of high average power operation. That potential exists because of several unique properties of FELs, such as the removal of ``waste heat`` at the velocity of light, the ``laser medium`` (the electron beam) is impervious to damage by very high optical intensitites, and the technology of generating very high average power relativistic electron beams. In particular, if one can build a laser with a power extraction efficiency 11 which is driven by an electron beam of average Power P{sub EB}, one expects a laser output power of P{sub L} = {eta} P{sub EB}. One approach to FEL devices with large values of {eta} (in excess of 10 %) is to use a ``tapered`` (or nonuniform) wiggler. This approach was followed at several laboratories during the FEL development Program for the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) project. In this paper, we review some concepts and technical requirements for high-power tapered-wiggler FELs driven by radio-frequency linear accelerators (rf-linacs) which were developed during the SDI project. Contributions from three quite different technologies - rf-accelerators, optics, and magnets - are needed to construct and operate an FEL oscillator. The particular requirements on these technologies for a high-power FEL were far beyond the state of the art in those areas when the SDI project started, so significant advances had to be made before a working device could be constructed. Many of those requirements were not clearly understood when the project started, but were developed during the course of the experimental and theoretical research for the project. This information can be useful in planning future high-power FEL projects.

  3. First high power experiments with the Dutch free electron maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Bratman, V. L.; Caplan, M.; Denisov, G. G.; van Dijk, G.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Manintveld, P.; Poelman, A. J.; Pluygers, J.; Shmelyov, M. Yu.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Sterk, A. B.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1998-05-01

    A free electron maser (FEM) has been built as a mm-wave source for applications on future fusion research devices such as ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor [M. A. Makowski, F. Elio, and D. Loeser, April 97, Proc. 10th Workshop on ECE and ECRH, EC10, 549-559. World Scientific (1998)]. A unique feature of the Dutch fusion-FEM is the possibility to tune the frequency over the entire range from 130 to 260 GHz at an output power exceeding 1 MW. In the first phase of the project, a so-called inverse setup is used. The electron gun is mounted inside the high-voltage terminal. The entire beam line was tested successfully with extremely low loss current, lower than 0.05%. This included the accelerating structure up to 2 MV level and the transport through the undulator. First generation of mm-waves was achieved in October 1997. With an electron beam current around 8 A and an accelerator voltage of 1.76 MV the mm-wave pulse starts after 3 μs and lasts for 3 μs, reaching a maximum saturated peak power level of more than 500 kW at a frequency of 200 GHz. Output power, start-up time, and frequency correspond well with simulation results.

  4. Design Challenges in High Power Free-electron Laser Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    S.V. Benson

    2005-08-21

    Several FELs have now demonstrated high power lasing and several projects are under construction to deliver higher power or shorter wavelengths. This presentation will summarize progress in upgrading FEL oscillators towards higher power and will discuss some of the challenges these projects face. The challenges fall into three categories: 1. energy recovery with large exhaust energy spread, 2. output coupling and maintaining mirror figure in the presence of high intracavity power loading, and 3. high current operation in an energy recovery linac (ERL). Progress in all three of these areas has been made in the last year. Energy recovery of over 12% of exhaust energy spread has been demonstrated and designs capable of accepting even larger energy spreads have been proposed. Cryogenic transmissive output couplers for narrow band operation and both hole and scraper output coupling have been developed. Investigation of short Rayleigh range operation has started as well. Energy recovery of over 20 mA CW has been demonstrated and several methods of mitigating transverse beam breakup instabilities were demonstrated. This talk will summarize these achievements and give a roadmap of where the field is headed.

  5. Narrow high power microwave pulses from a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.C.; Zhang, T.B.

    1995-11-01

    The authors have explored high power microwave ({lambda} = 1.5mm) pulse amplification along a tapered undulator FEL using the 1D Compton FEL equations with slippage. For an appropriate taper, sideband instabilities are suppressed and a short ({approximately}50psec) Gaussian pulse will propagate in a nearly self-similar way as it grows in power, slipping through a much longer electron pulse (beam energy, 750kV; current, 100A; radius = 2mm; length = 200 radiation periods). This is in contrast to the example of pulse propagation in a constant parameter undulator, where the Gaussian pulse breaks up into irregularities identified with sidebanding. Variation of initial pulse width shows convergence to a 50psec wide output pulse. Because of the slippage of the radiation pulse through the electron pulse, the peak microwave pulse intensity, {approximately}3GW/cm2, is about three times the kinetic energy density of the electron beam.

  6. HIGH AVERAGE POWER UV FREE ELECTRON LASER EXPERIMENTS AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David; Evtushenko, Pavel; Gubeli, Joseph; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Legg, Robert; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher; Williams, Gwyn

    2012-07-01

    Having produced 14 kW of average power at {approx}2 microns, JLAB has shifted its focus to the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. This presentation will describe the JLab UV Demo FEL, present specifics of its driver ERL, and discuss the latest experimental results from FEL experiments and machine operations.

  7. High Average Power Operation of a Scraper-Outcoupled Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle D. Shinn; Chris Behre; Stephen Vincent Benson; Michael Bevins; Don Bullard; James Coleman; L. Dillon-Townes; Tom Elliott; Joe Gubeli; David Hardy; Kevin Jordan; Ronald Lassiter; George Neil; Shukui Zhang

    2004-08-01

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a high average power free-electron laser using scraper outcoupling. Using the FEL in this all-reflective configuration, we achieved approximately 2 kW of stable output at 10 um. Measurements of gain, loss, and output mode will be compared with our models.

  8. Alternative lattice options for energy recovery in high-average-power high-efficiency free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /NICADD, DeKalb /Fermilab

    2009-03-01

    High-average-power free-electron lasers often rely on energy-recovering linacs. In a high-efficiency free electron laser, the main limitation to high average power stems from the fractional energy spread induced by the free-electron laser process. Managing beams with large fractional energy spread while simultaneously avoiding beam losses is extremely challenging and relies on intricate longitudinal phase space manipulations. In this paper we discuss a possible alternative technique that makes use of an emittance exchange between one of the transverse and the longitudinal phase spaces.

  9. An efficient high power microwave source at 35 GHz using an induction linac free electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.C.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Yarema, S.M.

    1986-11-01

    The Electron Laser Facility (ELF) is a free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier operating in the millimeter-wave regime. ELF uses the electron beam produced by the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA), which is a linear-induction accelerator. We discuss here (1) the experimental results reflecting the high-peak-power output and high-extraction efficiency obtained from an FEL amplifier operated with a tapered wiggler magnetic field and (2) the results of studies of the exponential gain and saturated power obtained from an FEL amplifier with a flat wiggler while we parametrically varied the input power to the amplifier and the beam current into the wiggler.

  10. Simulations of the high average power selene free electron laser prototype. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, D.D.

    1994-06-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) technology continues to advance, providing alternative solutions to existing and potential problems. The capabilities of an FEL with respect to tunability, power and efficiency make it an attractive choice when moving into new laser utilization fields. The initial design parameters, for any new system, offer a good base to begin system simulation tests in an effort to determine the best possible design. This is a study of the Novosibirsk design which is a prototype for the proposed SELENE FEL. The design uses a three-section, low-power optical klystron followed by a single-pass, high-power radiator. This system is inherently sensitive to electron beam quality, but affords flexibility in achieving the final design. The performance of the system is studied using the initial parameters. An FEL, configured as a simple, two section optical klystron is studied to determine the basic operating characteristics of a high current FEL klystron.

  11. A High-Average-Power Free Electron Laser for Microfabrication and Surface Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dylla, H. F.; Benson, S.; Bisognano, J.; Bohn, C. L.; Cardman, L.; Engwall, D.; Fugitt, J.; Jordan, K.; Kehne, D.; Li, Z.; Liu, H.; Merminga, L.; Neil, G. R.; Neuffer, D.; Shinn, M.; Sinclair, C.; Wiseman, M.; Brillson, L. J.; Henkel, D. P.; Helvajian, H.; Kelley, M. J.; Nair, Shanti

    1995-01-01

    CEBAF has developed a comprehensive conceptual design of an industrial user facility based on a kilowatt ultraviolet (UV) (160-1000 mm) and infrared (IR) (2-25 micron) free electron laser (FEL) driven by a recirculating, energy recovering 200 MeV superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator. FEL users, CEBAF's partners in the Lase Processing Consortium, including AT&T, DuPont, IBM, Northrop Grumman, 3M, and Xerox, are developing applications such as metal, ceramic, and electronic material micro-fabrication and polymer and metal surface processing, with the overall effort leading to later scale-up to industrial systems at 50-100 kW. Representative applications are described. The proposed high-average-power FEL overcomes limitations of conventional laser sources in available power, cost-effectiveness, tunability, and pulse structure.

  12. Overview Of Control System For Jefferson Lab`s High Power Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, A. S.; Grippo, A. C.; Keesee, M. S.; Song, J.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper the current plans for the control system for Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility`s (Jefferson Lab`s) Infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) are presented. The goals for the FEL control system are fourfold: (1) to use EPICS and EPICS compatible tools, (2) to use VME and Industry Pack (IPs) interfaces for FEL specific devices such as controls and diagnostics for the drive laser, high power optics, photocathode gun and electron-beam diagnostics, (3) to migrate Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) technologies to VME when possible, and (4) to use CAMAC solutions for systems that duplicate CEBAF technologies such as RF linacs and DC magnets. This paper will describe the software developed for FEL specific devices and provide an overview of the FEL control system.

  13. High-power free-electron lasers-technology and future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socol, Yehoshua

    2013-03-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) is an all-electric, high-power, high beam-quality source of coherent radiation, tunable - unlike other laser sources - at any wavelength within wide spectral region from hard X-rays to far-IR and beyond. After the initial push in the framework of the “Star Wars” program, the FEL technology benefited from decades of R&D and scientific applications. Currently, there are clear signs that the FEL technology reached maturity, enabling real-world applications. E.g., successful and unexpectedly smooth commissioning of the world-first X-ray FEL in 2010 increased in one blow by more than an order of magnitude (40×) wavelength region available by FEL technology and thus demonstrated that the theoretical predictions just keep true in real machines. Experience of ordering turn-key electron beamlines from commercial companies is a further demonstration of the FEL technology maturity. Moreover, successful commissioning of the world-first multi-turn energy-recovery linac demonstrated feasibility of reducing FEL size, cost and power consumption by probably an order of magnitude in respect to previous configurations, opening way to applications, previously considered as non-feasible. This review takes engineer-oriented approach to discuss the FEL technology issues, keeping in mind applications in the fields of military and aerospace, next generation semiconductor lithography, photo-chemistry and isotope separation.

  14. Recirculating accelerator driver for a high-power free-electron laser: A design overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.

    1997-06-01

    Jefferson Lab is building a free-electron laser (FEL) to produce continuous-wave (cw), kW-level light at 3-6 {mu}m wavelength. A superconducting linac will drive the laser, generating a 5 mA average current, 42 MeV energy electron beam. A transport lattice will recirculate the beam back to the linac for deceleration and conversion of about 75% of its power into rf power. Bunch charge will range up to 135 pC, and bunch lengths will range down to 1 ps in parts of the transport lattice. Accordingly, space charge in the injector and coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bends come into play. The machine will thus enable studying these phenomena as a precursor to designing compact accelerators of high-brightness beams. The FEL is scheduled to be installed in its own facility by 1 October 1997. Given the short schedule, the machine design is conservative, based on modifications of the CEBAF cryomodule and MIT-Bates transport lattice. This paper surveys the machine design.

  15. High-power free-electron maser with frequency multiplication operating in a shortwave part of the millimeter wave range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kaminsky, A. K.; Perelstein, E. A.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Savilov, A. V.; Sedykh, S. N.

    2012-08-01

    The possibility of using frequency multiplication in order to obtain high-power short-wavelength radiation from a free-electron maser (FEM) with a Bragg resonator has been studied. Preliminary experiments with an LIU-3000 (JINR) linear induction accelerator demonstrate the operation of a frequency-multiplying FEM at megawatt power in the 6- and 4-mm wave bands on the second and third harmonic, respectively.

  16. Evolution of a finite pulse of radiation in a high-power free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, A.; Hafizi, B.; Sprangle, P.; Tang, C.M. . Plasma Physics Div.)

    1991-12-01

    The development of an optical pulse of finite axial extent is studied by means of an axisymmetric time-dependent particle simulation code for different rates of tapering of the wiggler field. The results provided in this paper illustrate a number of the physical phenomena underlying the free-electron laser mechanism. These include: suppression of the sideband instability; the role of gain focusing versus that of refractive guiding; efficiency enhancement; and pulse slippage. It is found that a significant reduction in the sideband modulation of the optical field can be achieved with a faster tapering of the wiggler parameters. Increasing the tapering rate also reduces refractive guiding, causing the optical wavefronts to become more convex, thus spreading the optical field into a larger cross section. The corresponding enhancement of the peak output power is associated with an increased lateral extent of the optical field rather than an increase in the field amplitude.

  17. High-energy density experiments on planetary materials using high-power lasers and X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Norimasa

    2015-06-01

    Laser-driven dynamic compression allows us to investigate the behavior of planetary and exoplanetary materials at extreme conditions. Our high-energy density (HED) experiments for applications to planetary sciences began over five years ago. We measured the equation-of-state of cryogenic liquid hydrogen under laser-shock compression up to 55 GPa. Since then, various materials constituting the icy giant planets and the Earth-like planets have been studied using laser-driven dynamic compression techniques. Pressure-volume-temperature EOS data and optical property data of water and molecular mixtures were obtained at the planetary/exoplanetary interior conditions. Silicates and oxides data show interesting behaviors in the warm-dense matter regime due to their phase transformations. Most recently the structural changes of iron were observed for understanding the kinetics under the bcc-hcp transformation phenomena on a new HED science platform coupling power-lasers and the X-ray free electron laser (SACLA). This work was performed under the joint research project at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. It was partially supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 20654042, 22224012, 23540556, and 24103507) and also by grants from the Core-to-Core Program of JSPS on International Alliance for Material Science in Extreme States with High Power Laser and XFEL, and the X-ray Free Electron Laser Priority Strategy Program of MEXT.

  18. Design and test of frequency tuner for a CAEP high power THz free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Zheng-Hui; Zhao, Dan-Yang; Sun, Yi; Pan, Wei-Min; Lin, Hai-Ying; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Luo, Xing; Li, Ming; Yang, Xing-Fan; Wang, Guang-Wei; Dai, Jian-Ping; Li, Zhong-Quan; Ma, Qiang; Sha, Peng

    2015-02-01

    Peking University is developing a 1.3 GHz superconducting accelerating section highpower THz free-electron laser for the China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). A compact fast/slow tuner has been developed by the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) for the accelerating section to control Lorentz detuning, compensate for beam loading effect, microphonics and liquid helium pressure fluctuations. The tuner design, warm test and cold test of the first prototype are presented, which has a guiding significance for the manufacture of the formal tuner and cryomodule assembly. Supported by the 500 MHz superconducting cavity electromechanical tuning system (Y190KFEOHD), NSAF (11176003) and National Major Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development projects(2011YQ130018)

  19. Statistical properties of radiation power levels from a high-gain free-electron laser at and beyond saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, William M.; Esarey, Eric

    2002-09-24

    We investigate the statistical properties (e.g., shot-to-shot power fluctuations) of the radiation from a high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) operating in the nonlinear regime. We consider the case of an FEL amplifier reaching saturation whose shot-to-shot fluctuations in input radiation power follow a gamma distribution. We analyze the corresponding output power fluctuations at and beyond first saturation, including beam energy spread effects, and find that there are well-characterized values of undulator length for which the fluctuation level reaches a minimum.

  20. Free electron lasers driven by linear induction accelerators: High power radiation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orzechowski, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    The technology of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and linear induction accelerators (LIAs) is addressed by outlining the following topics: fundamentals of FELs; basic concepts of linear induction accelerators; the Electron Laser Facility (a microwave FEL); PALADIN (an infrared FEL); magnetic switching; IMP; and future directions (relativistic klystrons). This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  1. Radiation control aspects of the civil construction for a high power free electron laser (FEL) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T.; Neil, G.; Stapleton, G.

    1996-12-31

    The paper discusses some of the assumptions and methods employed for the control of ionizing radiation in the specifications for the civil construction of a planned free electron laser facility based on a 200 MeV, 5 mA superconducting recirculation electron accelerator. Consideration is given firstly to the way in which the underlying building configuration and siting aspects were optimized on the basis of the early assumptions of beam loss and radiation goals. The various design requirements for radiation protection are then considered, and how they were folded into an aesthetically pleasing and functional building.

  2. High-power free-electron maser operated in a two-mode frequency-multiplying regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskov, N. Yu.; Bandurkin, I. V.; Kaminsky, A. K.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Perelstein, E. A.; Savilov, A. V.; Sedykh, S. N.; Vikharev, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The frequency multiplication effects in high-power free-electron masers (FEM) with Bragg cavities were studied to provide the advance of the oscillators into short-wavelength bands. Theoretical analysis of frequency-multiplying FEMs was carried out within the framework of the averaged coupled-wave approach. Proof-of-principle experiments were performed based on a moderately relativistic induction linac LIU-3000 (JINR). As a result, an FEM multiplier operated with a megawatt power level in the 6-mm and 4-mm wavelength bands at the second and third harmonics, respectively, was realized. The possibility of using two-mode bichromatic FEMs for powering a double-frequency accelerating structure was discussed.

  3. High average power CW FELs (Free Electron Laser) for application to plasma heating: Designs and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bidwell, S.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Zhang, Z.X. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Freund, H.P. )

    1989-01-01

    A short period wiggler (period {approximately} 1 cm), sheet beam FEL has been proposed as a low-cost source of high average power (1 MW) millimeter-wave radiation for plasma heating and space-based radar applications. Recent calculation and experiments have confirmed the feasibility of this concept in such critical areas as rf wall heating, intercepted beam ( body'') current, and high voltage (0.5 - 1 MV) sheet beam generation and propagation. Results of preliminary low-gain sheet beam FEL oscillator experiments using a field emission diode and pulse line accelerator have verified that lasing occurs at the predicted FEL frequency. Measured start oscillation currents also appear consistent with theoretical estimates. Finally, we consider the possibilities of using a short-period, superconducting planar wiggler for improved beam confinement, as well as access to the high gain, strong pump Compton regime with its potential for highly efficient FEL operation.

  4. Electron-Beam Diagnostics for Jefferson Lab's High Power Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, G. A.; Jordan, K.; Kehne, D.; Benson, S.; Denard, J.; Feldl, E.; Piot, P.; Song, J.; Ursic, R.

    1997-05-01

    In this paper the current plans for the diagnostic complement for Jefferson Lab's IRFEL are presented. Diagnostic devices include optical transition radiation beam viewers, both strip-line and button beam position monitors, multislit beam emittance measuring devices, coherent synchrotron and transition radiation bunch length monitoring devices, and synchrotron light cameras for measuring the beam profile at high average power. Most devices have update rates of order 1 sec or shorter, and all are controlled through an EPICS control system. Results of prototype testing in Jefferson Lab's Injector Test Stand are presented.

  5. Technical options for high average power free electron milimeter-wave and laser devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, James C.

    1989-01-01

    Many of the potential space power beaming applications require the generation of directed energy beams with respectable amounts of average power (MWs). A tutorial summary is provided here on recent advances in the laboratory aimed at producing direct conversion of electrical energy to electromagnetic radiation over a wide spectral regime from microwaves to the ultraviolet.

  6. Simulation of a high-average power free-electron laser oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    H.P. Freund; M. Shinn; S.V. Benson

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we compare the 10 kW-Upgrade experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA, with numerical simulations using the medusa code. medusa is a three-dimensional FEL simulation code that is capable of treating both amplifiers and oscillators in both the steady-state and time-dependent regimes. medusa employs a Gaussian modal expansion, and treats oscillators by decomposing the modal representation at the exit of the wiggler into the vacuum Gaussian modes of the resonator and then analytically determining the propagation of these vacuum resonator modes through the resonator back to the entrance of the wiggler in synchronism with the next electron bunch. The bunch length in the experiment is of the order of 380–420 fsec FWHM. The experiment operates at a wavelength of about 1.6 microns and the wiggler is 30 periods in length; hence, the slippage time is about 160 fsec. Because of this, slippage is important, and must be included in the simulation. The observed single pass gain is 65%–75% and, given the experimental uncertainties, this is in good agreement with the simulation. Multipass simulations including the cavity detuning yield an output power of 12.4 kW, which is also in good agreement with the experiment.

  7. Detecting vacuum birefringence with x-ray free electron lasers and high-power optical lasers: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Heinzl, Tom; Schramm, Ulrich; Cowan, Thomas E.; Sauerbrey, Roland

    2016-02-01

    We study the feasibility of measuring vacuum birefringence by probing the focus of a high-intensity optical laser with an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL). This amounts to performing a new type of QED precision experiment, employing only laser pulses, hence space- and time-dependent fields. To set the stage, we briefly review the status of QED precision tests and then focus on the example of vacuum birefringence. Adopting a realistic laser beam model in terms of pulsed Gaussian beams we calculate the induced phase shift and translate it into an experimental signal, counting the number of photons with flipped polarization. We carefully design a detailed experiment at the European XFEL operating in self-seeded mode, supplemented by a petawatt class optical laser via the HIBEF project. Assuming all components to represent the current state of the art, in particular the x-ray polarizers, realistic estimates of signal-to-noise ratios plus ensuing acquisition times are provided. This is accompanied by a statistical analysis of the impact of poor laser focus overlap either due to timing and pointing jitter as well as limited alignment accuracy. A number of parasitic effects are analyzed together with appropriate countermeasures. We conclude that vacuum birefringence can indeed be measured upon combining an XFEL with a high-power optical laser if depolarization effects in the x-ray lenses can be controlled.

  8. Evolution of a finite pulse of radiation in a high-power free-electron laser. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, A.; Hafizi, B.; Sprangle, P.; Tang, C.M.

    1991-06-20

    The development of an optical pulse of finite axial extent is studied by means of an axisymmetric, time-dependent, particle simulation code for different rates of tapering of the wiggler field. The results illustrate a number of the physical phenomena underlying the free-electron laser mechanism. These include: suppression of the sideband instability; the role of gain focusing versus that of refractive guiding; efficiency enhancement; and pulse slippage. It is found that a significant reduction in the sideband modulation of the optical field can be achieved with a faster tapering of the wiggler parameters. Increasing the tapering rate also reduces refractive guiding, causing the optical wavefronts to become more convex, thus spreading the optical field into a large cross-section. The corresponding enhancement of the peak output power is associated with an increased lateral extent of the optical field rather than an increase in the field amplitude. (Author)

  9. High power coupled midinfrared free-electron-laser oscillator scheme as a driver for up-frequency conversion processes in the x-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecimer, M.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we present a high-gain free-electron-laser (FEL) oscillator scheme composed of two oscillators that are ideally coupled unidirectionally, with the coupled signal power flowing from the master to the amplifier oscillator. Electron bunches driving the oscillators are in perfect synchronization with the optical pulses building up within the respective cavities. The scheme is applied to a 100 MeV range superconducting energy recovery linac FEL. The computed mJ level, ultrashort pulse (<10cycles) output in the midinfrared region indicates the potential of the proposed FEL oscillator scheme in driving up-frequency conversion processes in the x-ray region, enabling tunable, high average brightness, attosecond scale coherent soft/hard x-ray sources.

  10. Electrostatic-accelerator free-electron lasers for power beaming

    SciTech Connect

    Pinhasi, Y.; Yakover, I.M.; Gover, A.

    1995-12-31

    Novel concepts of electrostatic-accelerator free-electron lasers (EA-FELs) for energy transfer through the atmosphere are presented. The high average power attained from an EA-FEL makes it an efficient source of mm-wave for power beaming from a ground stations. General aspects of operating the FEL as a high power oscillator (like acceleration voltage, e-beam. current, gain and efficiency) are studied and design considerations are described. The study takes into account requirements of power beaming application such as characteristic dips in the atmospheric absorption spectrum, sizes of transmitting and receiving antennas and meteorological conditions. We present a conceptual design of a moderate voltage (.5-3 MeV) high current (1-10 Amp) EA-FEL operating at mm-wavelength bands, where the atmospheric attenuation allows efficient power beaming to space. The FEL parameters were calculated, employing analytical and numerical models. The performance parameters of the FEL (power, energy conversion efficiency average power) will be discussed in connection to the proposed application.

  11. The ETA-II linear induction accelerator and IMP wiggler: A high-average-power millimeter-wave free-electron-laser for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1992-05-01

    We have constructed a 140-GHz free-electron laser to generate high-average-power microwaves for heating the MTX tokamak plasma. A 5.5-m steady-state wiggler (intense Microwave Prototype-IMP) has been installed at the end of the upgraded 60-cell ETA-II accelerator, and is configured as an FEL amplifier for the output of a 140-GHz long-pulse gyrotron. Improvements in the ETA-II accelerator include a multicable-feed power distribution network, better magnetic alignment using a stretched-wire alignment technique (SWAT). and a computerized tuning algorithm that directly minimizes the transverse sweep (corkscrew motion) of the electron beam. The upgrades were first tested on the 20-cell, 3-MeV front end of ETA-II and resulted in greatly improved energy flatness and reduced corkscrew motion. The upgrades were then incorporated into the full 60-cell configuration of ETA-II, along with modifications to allow operation in 50-pulse bursts at pulse repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The pulse power modifications were developed and tested on the High Average Power Test Stand (HAPTS), and have significantly reduced the voltage and timing jitter of the MAG 1D magnetic pulse compressors. The 2-3 kA. 6-7 MeV beam from ETA-II is transported to the IMP wiggler, which has been reconfigured as a laced wiggler, with both permanent magnets and electromagnets, for high magnetic field operation. Tapering of the wiggler magnetic field is completely computer controlled and can be optimized based on the output power. The microwaves from the FEL are transmitted to the MTX tokamak by a windowless quasi-optical microwave transmission system. Experiments at MTX are focused on studies of electron-cyclotron-resonance heating (ECRH) of the plasma. We summarize here the accelerator and pulse power modifications, and describe the status of ETA-II, IMP, and MTX operations.

  12. Efficient generation of short and high-power x-ray free-electron-laser pulses based on superradiance with a transversely tilted beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Eduard; Löhl, Florian; Reiche, Sven

    2015-10-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are innovative research tools able to produce high-power and short radiation pulses for multiple scientific applications. We present a new method to produce XFEL radiation with much higher power and shorter pulse lengths than the ones obtained at standard XFEL facilities. This will enable new kinds of experiments in scientific fields such as nonlinear optics and bioimaging. The scheme is based on introducing a transverse tilt to the electron beam, thus limiting the fraction of the bunch able to produce XFEL radiation. In the first part of the undulator beam line only the tail of the electron bunch lases. Then, by properly delaying and correcting the trajectory of the electron beam between some undulator modules, all the electrons can contribute to the amplification of a very short XFEL pulse. Apart from being efficient, our method is flexible since by tuning the tilt amplitude one can obtain shorter or more energetic XFEL pulses. The scheme can readily be applied since, besides the standard components of an XFEL facility, it only needs small chicanes between certain undulator modules. We have confirmed the validity of our proposal with numerical simulations done for the SwissFEL case.

  13. An Efficient Microwave Power Source: Free-electron Laser Afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Sessler, Andrew M.

    1993-03-04

    A kind of microwave power source, called a free-electron laser afterburner (FEL afterburner) which consists of a free-electron laser buncher and a slow-wave output structure sharing a magnetic wiggler field with the buncher, is proposed. The buncher and the slow-wave structure can operate in either a travelling-wave state or a standing-wave state. In the buncher, the wiggler field together with the radiation field makes an electron beam bunched, and in the slow-wave structure the wiggler field keeps the beam bunched while the bunched beam interacts strongly with the slow-wave structure and so produces rf power. The bunching process comes from the free-electron laser mechanism and the generating process of rf power is in a slow-wave structure. A three-dimensional, time-dependent code is used to simulate a particular standing-wave FEL afterburner and it is shown that rf power of up to 1.57 GW can be obtained, at 17.12 GHz, from a l-kA, 5-MeV electron beam.

  14. Optimization of a high efficiency free electron laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2015-03-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) amplifier is implemented in x-ray FEL facilities to generate short wavelength radiation. The problem of an efficiency increase of an FEL amplifier is now of great practical importance. The technique of undulator tapering in the postsaturation regime is used at the existing x-ray FELs LCLS, SACLA and FERMI, and is planned for use at FLASH, European XFEL, Swiss FEL, and PAL XFEL. There are also discussions on the future of high peak and average power FELs for scientific and industrial applications. In this paper we perform a detailed analysis of the tapering strategies for high power seeded FEL amplifiers. Analysis of the radiation properties from the modulated electron beam and application of similarity techniques allows us to derive the universal law of the undulator tapering.

  15. High efficiency, multiterawatt x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emma, C.; Fang, K.; Wu, J.; Pellegrini, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present undulator magnet tapering methods for obtaining high efficiency and multiterawatt peak powers in x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), a key requirement for enabling 3D atomic resolution single molecule imaging and nonlinear x-ray science. The peak power and efficiency of tapered XFELs is sensitive to time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. To analyze this dependence in detail we perform a comparative numerical optimization for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile including and intentionally disabling these effects. We show that the solution for the magnetic field taper profile obtained from time independent optimization does not yield the highest extraction efficiency when time dependent effects are included. Our comparative optimization is performed for a novel undulator designed specifically to obtain TW power x-ray pulses in the shortest distance: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. We determine that after a fully time dependent optimization of a 100 m long Linac coherent light source-like XFEL we can obtain a maximum efficiency of 7%, corresponding to 3.7 TW peak radiation power. Possible methods to suppress the synchrotron sidebands, and further enhance the FEL peak power, up to about 6 TW by increasing the seed power and reducing the electron beam energy spread, are also discussed.

  16. Microwave generation for magnetic fusion energy applications. Task A, Free electron lasers with small period wigglers; Task B, Theory and modeling of high frequency, high power gyrotron operation: Progress report, May 1, 1993--May 1, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.; Levush, B.

    1994-05-01

    This task involves the feasibility of high-power pulsed, high- efficiency, millimeter-wave free electron lasers (FEL) for ecr of thermonuclear plasmas. The research undertaken is to develop high average power FEL at voltage below IMV allowing for smaller and less costly power supplies. Linear amplification experiments employing a No. 56 period untapered wiggler have been conducted, and substantial small signal gain was observed at 95 GHz over a wide range of experimental conditions consistent with the prediction of one-dimensional numerical simulation. Progress is also reported on theoretical studies relating to the development of high-power gryotron and the ability to predict and improve the performance of various cavity designs.

  17. Resonator modes in high gain free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming ); Deacon, D.A.G. ); Madey, J.M.J. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-10-01

    When the gain in a free electron laser is high enough to produce optical guiding, the resonator mode distorts and loses its forward-backward symmetry. We show that the resonator mode in a high gain FEL can be easily constructed using the mode expansion technique taken separately in the interaction and the free-space regions. We propose design strategies to achieve maximal gain and optimal mode quality, and discuss the stability of the optimized mode. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Grid pulser for an electron gun with a thermionic cathode for the high-power operation of a terahertz free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemine, Shoji; Kawase, Keigo; Sugimoto, Naoya; Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Furukawa, Kazuya; Kato, Ryukou; Irizawa, Akinori; Fujimoto, Masaki; Ohsumi, Hiroki; Yaguchi, Masaki; Funakoshi, Sousuke; Tsutsumi, Ryouta; Kubo, Kumiko; Tokuchi, Akira; Isoyama, Goro

    2015-02-01

    A grid pulser for a thermionic-cathode electron gun for an L-band electron linac with an RF frequency of 1.3 GHz was developed in an effort to increase the power of a terahertz (THz) free-electron laser (FEL) based on the linac. The grid pulser can generate a train of electron pulses with a 5-ns duration at intervals of 36.9 ns or at a repetition frequency of 27 MHz, which is the 48th sub-harmonic of the RF frequency, and with a peak current of up to 2.4 A or higher, which is four times higher than the current that can be obtained with the conventional grid pulser. In combination with the sub-harmonic buncher (SHB) system, whose fundamental frequency is 108 MHz (the 12th sub-harmonic of the RF frequency), an electron beam that comprises electron bunches separated by 36.9-ns intervals for a period of 8 μs can be successfully accelerated using the linac to an energy of 15 MeV under the condition that the average beam current or, correspondingly, the beam loading in the acceleration tube of the linac is the same as that obtained using the conventional grid pulser. The time-resolved energy spectrum indicates that the energy is constant over the latter 6 μs and that the energy spread is 1.2% (FWHM); this performance satisfies the requirements for the FEL. The bunch charge measured at the end of the FEL beamline is 4 nC, which is four times higher than that obtained using the conventional grid pulser.

  19. Undulator interruption in high-gain free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1997-10-01

    The effect of interrupting an undulator on the performance of high-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) is evaluated by analyzing 1-D Maxwell-Vlasov equations. It is found that the effect is small for a reasonable length of the interruptions for FEL parameters envisaged for short wavelength self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). Since the interruptions provide valuable space for quadrupoles and diagnostics, and at the same time permit a greater flexibility in mechanical design, the result of this paper is encouraging for construction of long undulator magnets required for SASE.

  20. Development of an S-band cavity-type beam position monitor for a high power THz free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Seon Yeong; Kim, Eun-San Hwang, Ji-Gwang; Heo, A.; Won, Jang Si; Vinokurov, Nikolay A.; Jeong, Young UK Hee Park, Seong; Jang, Kyu-Ha

    2015-01-15

    A cavity-type beam position monitor (BPM) has been developed for a compact terahertz (THz) free-electron laser (FEL) system and ultra-short pulsed electron Linac system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Compared with other types of BPMs, the cavity-type BPM has higher sensitivity and faster response time even at low charge levels. When electron beam passes through the cavity-type BPM, it excites the dipole mode of the cavity of which amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the center of the cavity. Signals from the BPM were measured as a function of the beam offset by using an oscilloscope. The microtron accelerator for the KAERI THz FEL produces the electron beam with an energy of 6.5 MeV and pulse length of 5 μs with a micropulse of 10-20 ps at the frequency of 2.801 GHz. The macropulse beam current is 40 mA. Because the microtron provides multi-bunch system, output signal would be the superposition of each single bunch. So high output signal can be obtained from superposition of each single bunch. The designed position resolution of the cavity-type BPM in multi-bunch is submicron. Our cavity-type BPM is made of aluminum and vacuum can be maintained by indium sealing without brazing process, resulting in easy modification and cost saving. The resonance frequency of the cavity-type BPM is 2.803 GHz and the cavity-type BPM dimensions are 200 × 220 mm (length × height) with a pipe diameter of 38 mm. The measured position sensitivity was 6.19 (mV/mm)/mA and the measured isolation between the X and Y axis was −39 dB. By measuring the thermal noise of system, position resolution of the cavity-type BPM was estimated to be less than 1 μm. In this article, we present the test results of the S-band cavity-type BPM and prove the feasibility of the beam position measurement with high resolution using this device.

  1. Development of an S-band cavity-type beam position monitor for a high power THz free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Seon Yeong; Kim, Eun-San; Hwang, Ji-Gwang; Heo, A.; won Jang, Si; Vinokurov, Nikolay A.; Jeong, Young UK; Hee Park, Seong; Jang, Kyu-Ha

    2015-01-01

    A cavity-type beam position monitor (BPM) has been developed for a compact terahertz (THz) free-electron laser (FEL) system and ultra-short pulsed electron Linac system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Compared with other types of BPMs, the cavity-type BPM has higher sensitivity and faster response time even at low charge levels. When electron beam passes through the cavity-type BPM, it excites the dipole mode of the cavity of which amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the center of the cavity. Signals from the BPM were measured as a function of the beam offset by using an oscilloscope. The microtron accelerator for the KAERI THz FEL produces the electron beam with an energy of 6.5 MeV and pulse length of 5 μs with a micropulse of 10-20 ps at the frequency of 2.801 GHz. The macropulse beam current is 40 mA. Because the microtron provides multi-bunch system, output signal would be the superposition of each single bunch. So high output signal can be obtained from superposition of each single bunch. The designed position resolution of the cavity-type BPM in multi-bunch is submicron. Our cavity-type BPM is made of aluminum and vacuum can be maintained by indium sealing without brazing process, resulting in easy modification and cost saving. The resonance frequency of the cavity-type BPM is 2.803 GHz and the cavity-type BPM dimensions are 200 × 220 mm (length × height) with a pipe diameter of 38 mm. The measured position sensitivity was 6.19 (mV/mm)/mA and the measured isolation between the X and Y axis was -39 dB. By measuring the thermal noise of system, position resolution of the cavity-type BPM was estimated to be less than 1 μm. In this article, we present the test results of the S-band cavity-type BPM and prove the feasibility of the beam position measurement with high resolution using this device.

  2. High harmonic generation in the undulators for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, K.

    2015-10-01

    We present the analysis of the undulator radiation (UR) with account for major sources of the spectral line broadening. For relativistic electrons we obtain the analytical expressions for the UR spectrum, the intensity and the emission line shape with account for the finite size of the beam, the emittance and the energy spread. Partial compensation of the divergency by properly imposed weak constant magnetic component is demonstrated in the analytical form. Considering the examples of radiation from single and double frequency undulators, we study high harmonic generation with account for all major sources of homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening with account for the characteristics of the electrons beam. We apply our analysis to free electron laser (FEL) calculations and we compare the obtained results with the radiation of a FEL on the supposition of the ideal undulator.

  3. Principles of gyrotron powered electromagnetic wigglers for free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, B.G.; Bekefi, G.; Davidson, R.C.; Temkin, R.J.; Tran, T.M.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of free-electron lasers (FEL's) with axial electron beams and high-power electromagnetic wiggler fields such as those produced by high-power gyrotrons is discussed. The use of short wavelength electromagnetic wigglers in waveguides and resonant cavities can significantly reduce required electron beam voltages, resulting in compact FEL's. Gain calculations in the low- and high-gain Compton regime are presented, including the effects of emittance, transverse wiggler gradient, and electron temperature. Optimized scaling laws for the FEL gain and the required electromagnetic wiggler field power are discussed. Several possible configurations for FEL's with electromagnetic wigglers powered by millimeter wavelength gyrotrons are presented. Gyrotron powered wigglers appear promising for operation of compact FEL's in the infrared regime using moderate energy (<10 MeV) electron beams.

  4. HIGH GAIN HARMONIC GENERATION UV TO DUV FREE ELECTRON LASERS AT THE NSLS.

    SciTech Connect

    WU, J.; YU, L.H.

    2001-06-18

    In this paper, we present the calculation on the performance of High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) UV to DUV Free Electron Lasers (FELs) at the NSLS. Based on the beam quality and the available undulators at the NSLS, the calculation shows that it is possible to produce fully coherent DUV FEL down to 500 Angstrom, with a peak power of several hundred Mega Watts. One further attractive feature is the possibility to produce ultra short radiation pulse based on such HGHG scheme.

  5. High-gain reverse guide field free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, K.H.

    1995-10-01

    Electron beam trajectories under circularly polarized external wigglers in free electron laser devices with axial guide fields are reconsidered by introducing the self-fields of the electron beam. The competition between the self-fields and the wiggler field plus the action of the guide field are not only responsible for the known positive guide field singularity, but also the new reverse guide field singularity. The physics of the new reverse field singularity relies on the fact that an azimuthal magnetic field uniform in {ital z} is able to generate steady-state helical beam orbits just as if it were a transverse wiggler. According to this theory, the handness of the circularly polarized microwave should depend on the guide field configuration. High-gain strong pump equations coupled to these trajectories are used to account for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology reverse guide field results [Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 67}, 3082 (1991)]. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. A 1-kW power demonstration from the advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.; Conner, C.A.; Fortgang, C.M.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective of this project was to engineer and procure an electron beamline compatible with the operation of a 1-kW free-electron laser (FEL). Another major task is the physics design of the electron beam line from the end of the wiggler to the electron beam dump. This task is especially difficult because electron beam is expected to have 20 kW of average power and to simultaneously have a 25% energy spread. The project goals were accomplished. The high-power electron design was completed. All of the hardware necessary for high-power operation was designed and procured.

  7. High-efficiency free-electron-laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, K.; Brau, C.A.; Goldstein, J.C.; Hohla, K.L.; Newnam, B.E.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.; Winston, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments with a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser have demonstrated extraction of about 3% of the energy from the electron beam and measured the corresponding optical emission. These results are in excellent agreement with theory and represent an order-of-magnitude improvement over all previous results.

  8. First Operation of a Free-Electron Laser Generating GW Power Radiation at 32-Nm Wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Ayvazian, V.; Baboi, N.; Bahr, J.; Balandin, V.; Beutner, B.; Brandt, A.; Bohnet, I.; Bolzmann, A.; Brinkmann, R.; Brovko, O.I.; Carneiro, J.P.; Casalbuoni, S.; Castellano, M.; Castro, P.; Catani, L.; Chiadroni, E.; Choroba, S.; Cianchi, A.; Delsim-Hashemi, H.; Di Pirro, G.; Dohlus, M.; /Saclay /Wurzburg U. /BESSY, Berlin /CANDLE, Yerevan /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Fermilab /Hamburg U. /INFM, Padua /Frascati /INFN, Milan /INFN, Rome2 /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Dubna, JINR /Orsay, LAL /Max Born Inst., Berlin /SLAC

    2006-09-15

    Many scientific disciplines ranging from physics, chemistry and biology to material sciences, geophysics and medical diagnostics need a powerful X-ray source with pulse lengths in the femtosecond range. This would allow, for example, time-resolved observation of chemical reactions with atomic resolution. Such radiation of extreme intensity, and tunable over a wide range of wavelengths, can be accomplished using high-gain free-electron lasers (FEL). Here we present results of the first successful operation of an FEL at a wavelength of 32 nm, with ultra-short pulses (25 fs FWHM), a peak power at the Gigawatt level, and a high degree of transverse and longitudinal coherence. The experimental data are in full agreement with theory. This is the shortest wavelength achieved with an FEL to date and an important milestone towards a user facility designed for wavelengths down to 6 nm. With a peak brilliance exceeding the state-of-the-art of synchrotron radiation sources by seven orders of magnitude, this device opens a new field of experiments, and it paves the way towards sources with even shorter wavelengths, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford, USA, and the European X-ray Free Electron Laser Facility in Hamburg, Germany.

  9. First operation of a free-electron laser generating GW power radiation at 32 nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayvazyan, V.; Baboi, N.; Bähr, J.; Balandin, V.; Beutner, B.; Brandt, A.; Bohnet, I.; Bolzmann, A.; Brinkmann, R.; Brovko, O. I.; Carneiro, J. P.; Casalbuoni, S.; Castellano, M.; Castro, P.; Catani, L.; Chiadroni, E.; Choroba, S.; Cianchi, A.; Delsim-Hashemi, H.; di Pirro, G.; Dohlus, M.; Düsterer, S.; Edwards, H. T.; Faatz, B.; Fateev, A. A.; Feldhaus, J.; Flöttmann, K.; Frisch, J.; Fröhlich, L.; Garvey, T.; Gensch, U.; Golubeva, N.; Grabosch, H.-J.; Grigoryan, B.; Grimm, O.; Hahn, U.; Han, J. H.; Hartrott, M. V.; Honkavaara, K.; Hüning, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Jaeschke, E.; Jablonka, M.; Kammering, R.; Katalev, V.; Keitel, B.; Khodyachykh, S.; Kim, Y.; Kocharyan, V.; Körfer, M.; Kollewe, M.; Kostin, D.; Krämer, D.; Krassilnikov, M.; Kube, G.; Lilje, L.; Limberg, T.; Lipka, D.; Löhl, F.; Luong, M.; Magne, C.; Menzel, J.; Michelato, P.; Miltchev, V.; Minty, M.; Möller, W. D.; Monaco, L.; Müller, W.; Nagl, M.; Napoly, O.; Nicolosi, P.; Nölle, D.; Nuñez, T.; Oppelt, A.; Pagani, C.; Paparella, R.; Petersen, B.; Petrosyan, B.; Pflüger, J.; Piot, P.; Plönjes, E.; Poletto, L.; Proch, D.; Pugachov, D.; Rehlich, K.; Richter, D.; Riemann, S.; Ross, M.; Rossbach, J.; Sachwitz, M.; Saldin, E. L.; Sandner, W.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schmitz, M.; Schmüser, P.; Schneider, J. R.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Schreiber, H.-J.; Schreiber, S.; Shabunov, A. V.; Sertore, D.; Setzer, S.; Simrock, S.; Sombrowski, E.; Staykov, L.; Steffen, B.; Stephan, F.; Stulle, F.; Sytchev, K. P.; Thom, H.; Tiedtke, K.; Tischer, M.; Treusch, R.; Trines, D.; Tsakov, I.; Vardanyan, A.; Wanzenberg, R.; Weiland, T.; Weise, H.; Wendt, M.; Will, I.; Winter, A.; Wittenburg, K.; Yurkov, M. V.; Zagorodnov, I.; Zambolin, P.; Zapfe, K.

    2006-02-01

    Many scientific disciplines ranging from physics, chemistry and biology to material sciences, geophysics and medical diagnostics need a powerful X-ray source with pulse lengths in the femtosecond range [1-4]. This would allow, for example, time-resolved observation of chemical reactions with atomic resolution. Such radiation of extreme intensity, and tunable over a wide range of wavelengths, can be accomplished using high-gain free-electron lasers (FEL) [5-10]. Here we present results of the first successful operation of an FEL at a wavelength of 32 nm, with ultra-short pulses (25 fs FWHM), a peak power at the Gigawatt level, and a high degree of transverse and longitudinal coherence. The experimental data are in full agreement with theory. This is the shortest wavelength achieved with an FEL to date and an important milestone towards a user facility designed for wavelengths down to 6 nm. With a peak brilliance exceeding the state-of-the-art of synchrotron radiation sources [4] by seven orders of magnitude, this device opens a new field of experiments, and it paves the way towards sources with even shorter wavelengths, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source [3] at Stanford, USA, and the European X-ray Free Electron Laser Facility [4] in Hamburg, Germany.

  10. High current operation of a storage-ring free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, R.; Couprie, M. E.; Bakker, R. J.; Garzella, D.; Nutarelli, D.; Nahon, L.; Billardon, M.

    1998-11-01

    The operation of storage-ring free-electron lasers (SRFEL) at high current still represents a challenge because of the growth of longitudinal beam instabilities. One of these, the quadrupolar coherent synchrotron oscillation, is very harmful for free-electron-laser (FEL) operation. On the Super-ACO storage ring, they either prevent the FEL start-up, or result in a very poor stability of the FEL source. A new feedback system to damp the quadrupolar coherent synchrotron oscillation has been installed on the ring and the stabilized beam parameters have been systematically measured. As a result, the FEL gain is higher and the FEL operates more easily and with a higher average power. Its stability, which is very critical for user applications, has been significantly improved as it has been observed via systematic measurements of FEL dynamics performed with a double sweep streak camera.

  11. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Höppner, H.; Tanikawa, T.; Schulz, M.; Riedel, R.; Teubner, U.; Faatz, B.; Tavella, F.

    2015-05-15

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to many hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation.

  12. Brightness and coherence of synchrotron radiation and high-gain free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1986-10-01

    The characteristics of synchrotron radiation are reviewed with particular attention to its phase-space properties and coherence. The transition of the simple undulator radiation to more intense, more coherent high-gain free electron lasers, is discussed.

  13. High frequency limit of vacuum microelectronic grating free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, M.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The dependencies that limit high frequency operation of a vacuum microelectronic grating free-electron laser are examined. The important parameters are identified as the electron beam energy, emittance, and generalized perveance. The scaling of power with emittance and frequency is studied in the far-infrared spectral range using a modified scanning electron microscope (SEM) and submillimeter diffraction gratings. The SEM is suited to the task of generating and positioning a low emittance (10{sup -2}{pi}-mm-mrad), low current (100 {mu}A), but high current density (50-500 A cm{sup -2}) electron beam. It has been used to demonstrate the spontaneous emission process known as the Smith-Purcell effect. A vacuum microelectronic grating free-electron laser has the potential of generating radiation throughout the entire far-infrared spectral range which extends from approximately 10 to 10{sup 3}{mu}m. An introduction to the theory, initial results, and details of the experiment are reported.

  14. An efficient microwave power source: The free-electron laser afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Sessler, A.M. )

    1993-10-15

    A kind of microwave power source, called a free-electron laser (FEL) afterburner, that consists of a free-electron laser buncher and a slow-wave output structure sharing a magnetic wiggler field with the buncher is proposed. The buncher and the slow-wave structure can operate in either a traveling-wave state or a standing-wave state. In the buncher, the wiggler field together with the radiation field makes an electron beam bunched, and in the slow-wave structure the wiggler field keeps the beam bunched while the bunched beam interacts strongly with the slow-wave structure and thus produces rf power. The bunching process comes from the free-electron laser mechanism, and the generating process of rf power is in a slow-wave structure. A three-dimensional, time-dependent code is used to simulate a particular standing-wave FEL afterburner and it is shown that rf power of up to 1.4 GW at 17.12 GHz, can be obtained from a 1 kA, 5 MeV electron beam with an energy spread of less than 1% and an emittance of less than 0.5[times]10[sup [minus]3] [pi] rad m.

  15. Advances in tunable powerful lasers: The advanced free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.; Sheffield, R.

    1993-12-31

    In the past several decades, remarkable progress in laser science and technology has made it possible to obtain laser light from the ultra-violet to the far infra-red from a variety of laser types, and at power levels from milliwatts to kilowatts (and, some day, megawatts). However, the availability of tunable lasers at ``high`` power (above a few tens of watts) is more limited. Figure 1, an assessment of the availability of tunable lasers, shows the covered range to be about 400 to 2000 nanometers. A variety of dye lasers cover the visible and near infra red, each one of which is tunable over approximately a 10% range. In the same region, the TI:saphire laser is adjustable over a 20 to 25% range. And finally, optical parametric oscillators can cover the range from about 400 nanometers out to about 2000 nm (even farther at reduced energy output). The typical output energy per pulse may vary from a few to one hundred millijoules, and since repetition rates of 10 to 100 Hertz are generally attainable, average output powers of tens of watts are possible. In recent years, a new approach to powerful tunable lasers -- the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) -- has emerged. In this paper we will discuss advances in FEL technology which not only enable tunability at high average power over a very broad range of wavelengths, but also make this device more usable. At present, that range is about one micron to the far infra red; with extensions of existing technology, it should be extendable to the vacuum ultra violet region.

  16. Saturation-power enhancement of a free-electron laser amplifier through parameters adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yu-Pin; Xu, Y.-G.; Wang, S.-J.; Xu, J.-Y.; Liu, X.-X.; Zhang, S.-C.

    2015-06-01

    Saturation-power enhancement of a free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier by using tapered wiggler amplitude is based on the postponement of the saturation length of the uniform wiggler. In this paper, we qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrate that the saturation-power enhancement can be approached by means of the parameters adjustment, which is comparable to that by using a tapered wiggler. Compared to the method by tapering the wiggler amplitude, the method of parameters adjustment substantially shortens the saturation length, which is favorable to cutting down the manufacture and operation costs of the device.

  17. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Höppner, H.; Hage, A.; Tanikawa, T.; Schulz, M.; Riedel, R.; Teubner, U.; Prandolini, M. J.; Faatz, B.; Tavella, F.

    2015-05-15

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to manymore » hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation.« less

  18. Integrating a Machine Protection System for High-Current Free Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; James Coleman; Richard Evans; Al Grippo; Kevin Jordan

    2002-09-01

    A fully integrated Machine Protection System (MPS) is critical to efficient commissioning and safe operation of all high-current accelerators. The MPS needs to monitor the status of all devices that could enter the beam path, the beam loss monitors (BLMs), magnet settings, beam dump status, etc. This information is then presented to the electron source controller, which must limit the beam power or shut down the beam completely. The MPS for the energy recovery linac (ERL) at the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser [1] generates eight different power limits, or beam modes, which are passed to the drive laser pulse controller (DLPC) (photocathode source controller). These range from no beam to nearly 2 megawatts of electron beam power. Automatic masking is used for the BLMs during low-power modes when one might be using beam viewers. The system also reviews the setup for the two different beamlines, the IR path or the UV path, and will allow or disallow operations based on magnet settings and valve positions. This paper will describe the approach taken for the JLab 10-kW FEL. Additional details can be found on our website http://laser.jlab.org [2].

  19. Operating synchrotron light sources with a high gain free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.

    2015-11-01

    Since the 1980s synchrotron light sources have been considered as drivers of a high repetition rate (RR), high gain free electron laser (FEL) inserted in a by-pass line or in the ring itself. As of today, the high peak current required by the laser is not deemed to be compatible with the standard multi-bunch filling pattern of synchrotrons, and in particular with the operation of insertion device (ID) beamlines. We show that this problem can be overcome by virtue of magnetic bunch length compression in a ring section, and that, after lasing, the beam returns to equilibrium conditions without beam quality disruption. Bunch length compression brings a double advantage: the high peak current stimulates a high gain FEL emission, while the large energy spread makes the beam less sensitive to the FEL heating and to the microwave instability in the ring. The beam’s large energy spread at the undulator is matched to the FEL energy bandwidth through a transverse gradient undulator. Feasibility of lasing at 25 nm is shown for the Elettra synchrotron light source at 1 GeV, and scaling to shorter wavelengths as a function of momentum compaction, beam energy and transverse emittance in higher energy, larger rings is discussed. For the Elettra case study, a low (100 Hz) and a high (463 kHz) FEL RR are considered, corresponding to an average FEL output power at the level of ∼1 W (∼1013 photons per pulse) and ∼300 W (∼1011 photons per pulse), respectively. We also find that, as a by-product of compression, the ∼5 W Renieri’s limit on the average FEL power can be overcome. Our conclusion is that existing and planned synchrotron light sources may be made compatible with this new hybrid IDs-plus-FEL operational mode, with little impact on the standard beamlines functionality.

  20. Brightness and coherence of radiation from undulators and high-gain free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwang-Je

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the radiation characteristics of undulators and high-gain free electron lasers (FELs). The topics covered are: a phase-space method in wave optics and synchrotron radiation, coherence from the phase-space point of view, discussions of undulator performances in next-generation synchrotron radiation facility and the characteristics of the high-gain FELs and their performances. (LSP)

  1. Longitudinal Coherence Preservation and Chirp Evolution in a High Gain Laser Seeded Free Electron Laser Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.B.; Wu, Juhao; Wang, X.J.; Watanabe, T.; /BNL, NSLS

    2006-06-07

    In this letter we examine the start-up of a high gain free electron laser in which a frequency-chirped coherent seed laser pulse interacts with a relativistic electron beam. A Green function formalism is used to evaluate the initial value problem. We have fully characterized the startup and evolution through the exponential growth regime. We obtain explicit expressions for the pulse duration, bandwidth and chirp of the amplified light and show that the FEL light remains fully longitudinally coherent.

  2. Optical properties of the output of a high-gain, self-amplified free-electron laser.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Lewellen, J.; Huang, Z.; Krinsky, S.; Accelerator Systems Division; BNL

    2004-01-01

    The temporal structure and phase evolutions of a high-gain, self-amplified free-electron laser are measured, including single-shot analysis and statistics over many shots. Excellent agreement with the theory of free-electron laser and photon statistics is found.

  3. EXPERIMENTAL DEMONSTRATION OF WAVELENGTH TUNING IN HIGH-GAIN HARMONIC GENERATION FREE ELECTRON LASER.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAFTAN,T.; JOHNSON,E.; KRINSKY,S.; LOOS,H.; MURPHY,J.B.; RAKOWSKY,G.; ROSE,J.; SHEEHY,B.; SKARITKA,J.; WANG,X.J.; WU,Z.; YU,L.H.

    2004-08-29

    Tunability is one of the key aspects of any laser system. In High-Gain Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser (HGHG FEL) the seed laser determines the output wavelength. Conventional scheme of tunable HGHG FEL requires tunable seed laser. The alternative scheme [1] is based on compression of the electron bunch with energy-time correlation (chirped bunch) in the FEL dispersive section. The chirped energy modulation, induced by the seed laser with constant wavelength, compressed as the whole bunch undergoes compression. In this paper we discuss experimental verification of the proposed approach at the DUV FEL [2,3] and compare experimental results with analytical estimates.

  4. Free Electron Lasers Seeded by ir Laser Driven High-order Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Bolton, Paul R.; Murphy, James B.; Zhong, Xinming; /Beijing Normal U.

    2007-03-12

    Coherent x-ray production by a seeded free electron laser (FEL) is important for next generation synchrotron light sources. We examine the feasibility and features of FEL emission seeded by a high-order harmonic of an infrared laser (HHG). In addition to the intrinsic FEL chirp, the longitudinal profile and spectral bandwidth of the HHG seed are modified significantly by the FEL interaction well before saturation. This smears out the original attosecond pulselet structure. We introduce criteria for this smearing effect on the pulselet and the stretching effect on the entire pulse. We discuss the noise issue in such a seeded FEL.

  5. Plasma and cyclotron frequency effects on output power of the plasma wave-pumped free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolghadr, S. H.; Jafari, S.; Raghavi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Significant progress has been made employing plasmas in the free-electron lasers (FELs) interaction region. In this regard, we study the output power and saturation length of the plasma whistler wave-pumped FEL in a magnetized plasma channel. The small wavelength of the whistler wave (in sub-μm range) in plasma allows obtaining higher radiation frequency than conventional wiggler FELs. This configuration has a higher tunability by adjusting the plasma density relative to the conventional ones. A set of coupled nonlinear differential equations is employed which governs on the self-consistent evolution of an electromagnetic wave. The electron bunching process of the whistler-pumped FEL has been investigated numerically. The result reveals that for a long wiggler length, the bunching factor can appreciably change as the electron beam propagates through the wiggler. The effects of plasma frequency (or plasma density) and cyclotron frequency on the output power and saturation length have been studied. Simulation results indicate that with increasing the plasma frequency, the power increases and the saturation length decreases. In addition, when density of background plasma is higher than the electron beam density (i.e., for a dense plasma channel), the plasma effects are more pronounced and the FEL-power is significantly high. It is also found that with increasing the strength of the external magnetic field frequency, the power decreases and the saturation length increases, noticeably.

  6. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F.-J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T.J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion. PMID:25744344

  7. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore » in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  8. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  9. Very High Energy Gain at the Neptune Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Musumeci, P.; Boucher, S.; Doyuran, A.; England, R. J.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travish, G.; Yoder, R.; Tochitsky, S.Ya.; Joshi, C.; Ralph, J.; Sung, C.; Tolmachev, S.; Varfolomeev, A.; Varfolomeev, A. Jr.; Yarovoi, T.

    2004-12-07

    We report the observation of energy gain in excess of 20 MeV at the Inverse Free Electron Laser Accelerator experiment at the Neptune Laboratory at UCLA. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is injected in an undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The IFEL driver is a CO2 10.6 {mu}m laser with power larger than 400 GW. The Rayleigh range of the laser, {approx} 1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length so that the interaction is diffraction dominated. A few per cent of the injected particles are trapped in a stable accelerating bucket. Electrons with energies up to 35 MeV are measured by a magnetic spectrometer. Three-dimensional simulations, in good agreement with the measured electron energy spectrum, indicate that most of the acceleration occurs in the first 25 cm of the undulator, corresponding to an energy gradient larger than 70 MeV/m. The measured energy spectrum also indicates that higher harmonic Inverse Free Electron Laser interaction takes place in the second section of the undulator.

  10. High-quality electron beams from a helical inverse free-electron laser accelerator.

    PubMed

    Duris, J; Musumeci, P; Babzien, M; Fedurin, M; Kusche, K; Li, R K; Moody, J; Pogorelsky, I; Polyanskiy, M; Rosenzweig, J B; Sakai, Y; Swinson, C; Threlkeld, E; Williams, O; Yakimenko, V

    2014-01-01

    Compact, table-top sized accelerators are key to improving access to high-quality beams for use in industry, medicine and academic research. Among laser-based accelerating schemes, the inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) enjoys unique advantages. By using an undulator magnetic field in combination with a laser, GeV m(-1) gradients may be sustained over metre-scale distances using laser intensities several orders of magnitude less than those used in laser wake-field accelerators. Here we show for the first time the capture and high-gradient acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from a helical IFEL. Using a modest intensity (~10(13) W cm(-2)) laser pulse and strongly tapered 0.5 m long undulator, we demonstrate >100 MV m(-1) accelerating gradient, >50 MeV energy gain and excellent output beam quality. Our results pave the way towards compact, tunable GeV IFEL accelerators for applications such as driving soft X-ray free-electron lasers and producing γ-rays by inverse Compton scattering. PMID:25222026

  11. Free-electron maser with high-selectivity Bragg resonator using coupled propagating and trapped modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Golubev, I. I.; Golubykh, S. M.; Zaslavskii, V. Yu.; Zotova, I. V.; Kaminsky, A. K.; Kozlov, A. P.; Malkin, A. M.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Perel'Shteĭn, É. A.; Sedykh, S. N.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2010-10-01

    A free-electron maser (FEM) with a double-mirror resonator involving a new modification of Bragg structures operating on coupled propagating and quasi-cutoff (trapped) modes has been studied. The presence of trapped waves in the feedback chain improves the selectivity of Bragg resonators and ensures stable single-mode generation regime at a considerable superdimensionality of the interaction space. The possibility of using the new feedback mechanism has been confirmed by experiments with a 30-GHz FEM pumped by the electron beam of LIU-3000 (JINR) linear induction accelerator, in which narrow-band generation was obtained at a power of ˜10 MW and a frequency close to the cutoff frequency of the trapped mode excited in the input Bragg reflector.

  12. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; Patthey, L.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Feng, Y.; David, C.

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy of >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.

  13. Multicolor High-Gain Free-Electron Laser Driven by Seeded Microbunching Instability.

    PubMed

    Roussel, E; Ferrari, E; Allaria, E; Penco, G; Di Mitri, S; Veronese, M; Danailov, M; Gauthier, D; Giannessi, L

    2015-11-20

    Laser-heater systems are essential tools to control and optimize high-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) working in the x-ray wavelength range. Indeed, these systems induce a controllable increase of the energy spread of the electron bunch. The heating suppresses longitudinal microbunching instability which otherwise would limit the FEL performance. Here, we demonstrate that, through the action of the microbunching instability, a long-wavelength modulation of the electron beam induced by the laser heater at low energy can persist until the beam entrance into the undulators. This coherent longitudinal modulation is exploited to control the FEL spectral properties, in particular, multicolor extreme-ultraviolet FEL pulses can be generated through a frequency mixing of the modulations produced by the laser heater and the seed laser in the electron beam. We present an experimental demonstration of this novel configuration carried out at the FERMI FEL. PMID:26636852

  14. Multicolor High-Gain Free-Electron Laser Driven by Seeded Microbunching Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, E.; Ferrari, E.; Allaria, E.; Penco, G.; Di Mitri, S.; Veronese, M.; Danailov, M.; Gauthier, D.; Giannessi, L.

    2015-11-01

    Laser-heater systems are essential tools to control and optimize high-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) working in the x-ray wavelength range. Indeed, these systems induce a controllable increase of the energy spread of the electron bunch. The heating suppresses longitudinal microbunching instability which otherwise would limit the FEL performance. Here, we demonstrate that, through the action of the microbunching instability, a long-wavelength modulation of the electron beam induced by the laser heater at low energy can persist until the beam entrance into the undulators. This coherent longitudinal modulation is exploited to control the FEL spectral properties, in particular, multicolor extreme-ultraviolet FEL pulses can be generated through a frequency mixing of the modulations produced by the laser heater and the seed laser in the electron beam. We present an experimental demonstration of this novel configuration carried out at the FERMI FEL.

  15. Chirped-Pulse Inverse Free Electron Laser: A Tabletop, High-Gradient Vacuum Laser Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Troha, A L; Baldis, H A

    2001-03-05

    The inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) interaction is studied both theoretically and numerically in the case where the drive laser intensity approaches the relativistic regime, and the pulse duration is only a few optical cycles long. We show that by using an ultrashort, ultrahigh-intensity drive laser pulse, the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased considerably, thus yielding large energy gains. Using a chirped pulse and negative dispersion focusing optics allows one to take further advantage of the laser optical bandwidth and produce a chromatic line focus maximizing the gradient. The combination of these novel ideas results in a compact vacuum laser accelerator capable of accelerating picosecond electron bunches with a high gradient (GeV/m) and very low energy spread. A computer code which takes into account the three-dimensional nature of the interaction is currently in development and results are expected this Spring.

  16. Probing vacuum birefringence using x-ray free electron and optical high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbstein, Felix; Sundqvist, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Vacuum birefringence is one of the most striking predictions of strong field quantum electrodynamics: Probe photons traversing a strong field region can indirectly sense the applied "pump" electromagnetic field via quantum fluctuations of virtual charged particles which couple to both pump and probe fields. This coupling is sensitive to the field alignment and can effectively result in two different indices of refraction for the probe photon polarization modes giving rise to a birefringence phenomenon. In this article, we perform a dedicated theoretical analysis of the proposed discovery experiment of vacuum birefringence at an x-ray free electron laser/optical high-intensity laser facility. Describing both pump and probe laser pulses realistically in terms of their macroscopic electromagnetic fields, we go beyond previous analyses by accounting for various effects not considered before in this context. Our study facilitates stringent quantitative predictions and optimizations of the signal in an actual experiment.

  17. High resolution simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R. D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. A.; Pogorelov, I. V.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we report on large-scale high resolution simulations of beam dynamics in electron linacs for the next-generation x-ray free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wakefields, coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wakefields, and treatment of radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. We present a study of the microbunching instability causing severe electron beam fragmentation in the longitudinal phase space which is a critical issue for future FELs. Using parameters for a proposed FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is generally needed to control the numerical macroparticle shot noise and avoid overestimating the microbunching instability. We explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We also study the effect of initial uncorrelated energy spread on the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam for the FEL linac.

  18. High-order harmonic generation enhanced by x rays from free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buth, Christian; Kohler, Markus C.; He, Feng; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Ullrich, Joachim; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2012-06-01

    We theoretically examine high-order harmonic generation (HHG), by an intense near-infrared (nir) laser, in the light of the emerging, intense x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) which have started to revolutionize x-ray science. We present two theories based on modified three-step models of HHG. Once, we combine HHG with resonant x-ray excitation of a core electron into the transient valence vacancy that is created in the course of the HHG process via tunnel ionization (first step of HHG) by the nir light. When the continuum electron is driven back to the parent ion, a recombination with the valence and the core hole may occur. Modified HHG spectra are determined and analyzed for krypton on the 3d ->4p resonance and for neon on the 1s ->2p resonance. Another time, we examine HHG where tunnel ionization by the nir light is replaced by direct x-ray ionization of a core electron. We use the boosted HHG radiation from 1s electrons of neon to predict single attosecond pulses in the kiloelectronvolt regime. For both presented schemes, we find substantial HHG yield from the recombination of the continuum electron with the core hole. Our research brings the capabilities of HHG-based sources to FELs.

  19. Free Electron Lasers - Proceedings of the Beijing Fel Seminar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaer; Xie, Jialin; Du, Xiangwan; Zhao, Kui

    1989-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface to the Series * Preface * Seminar Opening Speech * Seminar Closing Address * SECTION 1. RF LINAC BASED FEL * Richard H. Pantell * Free-Electron Lasers * Gas-Loading the FEL * High-Efficiency, High-Power Free-Electron Lasers * A Tunable Submillimeter-to-Far-Infrared Coherent Radiation Source * Kwok-Chi Dominic Chan * Recent Results from the Los Alamos Free Electron Laser * Short-Range Wakefield Effects in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * Long-Range Wakefield Effects in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * High-Brightness Injectors For RF-Driven Free-Electron Lasers * Computer Codes for Wakefield Analysis in RF-Based Free-Electron Laser * George R. Neil * The TRW RF Accelerator FEL Program * Superconducting Linac FEL Technology * Design Considerations of RF Oscillators * Chun-Ching Shih * Development of Multicomponent Wiggler Free Electron Lasers * Free Electron Laser Resonator * SECTION 2. INDUCTION LINAC BASED FEL * Richard J. Briggs * Overview of FEL Development with Induction Linacs at LLNL * Overview of Linear Induction Accelerators * High Current Electron-Beam Transport in Induction Linacs * Thaddeus J. Orzechowski * An Introduction to the Physics of High-Gain Free-Electron Lasers * Harmonics and Optical Guiding in Free Electron Lasers * The Electron Laser Facility: A millimeter Wave Free-Electron Laser Amplifier * The Electron Laser Facility: Measurement of Modes, Harmonics, Parametric Dependence, and Phase Shift * Paladin: A 10.6 μm Free-Electron Laser Amplifier * Aspects of Linear Induction Accelerator Technology * List of Participants

  20. An experimental analysis of the waveguide modes in a high-gain free-electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The presence, growth, and interaction of transverse waveguide modes in high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers has been observed and studied. Using the Electron Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a 3 MeV, 800 A electron beam generated by the Experimental Test Accelerator was injected into a planar wiggler. Power was then extracted and measured in the fundamental (TE{sub 01}) an higher-order modes (Te{sub 21} and TM{sub 21}) under various sets of operating conditions. Horizontal focusing through the wiggler was provided by external quadrupole magnets. There was no axial guide field. The input microwave signal for amplification was generated by a 100 kW magnetron operating at 34.6 Ghz. Power measurements were taken for both flat and tapered wigglers, for two sizes of waveguide, and for both flat and tapered wigglers, for two sizes of waveguide, and for both fundamental and higher mode injection. Mode content was determined by sampling the radiated signal at specific points in the radiation patter. For the flat wiggler and with the large waveguide (2.9 cm {times} 9.8 cm) the power in the higher modes was comparable to power in the fundamental. both exhibited gains greater than 30 dB/m prior to saturation and both reached powers in excess of 80 MW. Choice of injection mode had little effect on the operation of the system. Operation with the smaller guide (WR-229) provided much better mode selectivity. The fundamental mode continued to show optimum gain in excess of 30 dB/m while the higher-mode gain was of order 20 dB/m. As expected, power output increased significantly with the tapered wigglers. The relative mode content depended on the specific taper used.

  1. Free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

  2. High-resolution single-shot spectral monitoring of hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makita, M.; Karvinen, P.; Zhu, D.; Juranic, P. N.; Grünert, J.; Cartier, S.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Lemke, H. T.; Mozzanica, A.; Nelson, S.; et al

    2015-10-16

    We have developed an on-line spectrometer for hard x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation based on a nanostructured diamond diffraction grating and a bent crystal analyzer. Our method provides high spectral resolution, interferes negligibly with the XFEL beam, and can withstand the intense hard x-ray pulses at high repetition rates of >100 Hz. The spectrometer is capable of providing shot-to-shot spectral information for the normalization of data obtained in scientific experiments and optimization of the accelerator operation parameters. We have demonstrated these capabilities of the setup at the Linac Coherent Light Source, in self-amplified spontaneous emission mode at full energy ofmore » >1 mJ with a 120 Hz repetition rate, obtaining a resolving power of Ε/δΕ > 3 × 104. In conclusion, the device was also used to monitor the effects of pulse duration down to 8 fs by analysis of the spectral spike width.« less

  3. Obtaining high degree of circular polarization at x-ray free electron lasers via a reverse undulator taper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2013-11-01

    Baseline design of a typical x-ray free electron laser (FEL) undulator assumes a planar configuration which results in a linear polarization of the FEL radiation. However, many experiments at x-ray FEL user facilities would profit from using a circularly polarized radiation. As a cheap upgrade, one can consider an installation of a short helical (or cross-planar) afterburner, but then one should have an efficient method to suppress the powerful linearly polarized background from the main undulator. In this paper we propose a new method for such a suppression: an application of the reverse taper in the main undulator. We discover that in a certain range of the taper strength, the density modulation (bunching) at saturation is practically the same as in the case of a nontapered undulator while the power of linearly polarized radiation is suppressed by orders of magnitude. Then strongly modulated electron beam radiates at full power in the afterburner. Considering the SASE3 undulator of the European XFEL as a practical example, we demonstrate that soft x-ray radiation pulses with peak power in excess of 100 GW and an ultimately high degree of circular polarization can be produced. The proposed method is rather universal, i.e., it can be used at SASE FELs and seeded (self-seeded) FELs, with any wavelength of interest, in a wide range of electron beam parameters, and with any repetition rate. It can be used at different x-ray FEL facilities, in particular at Linac Coherent Light Source after installation of the helical afterburner in the near future.

  4. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  5. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stein, William E.

    1980-01-01

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  6. Combination free-electron and gaseous laser

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, C.A.; Rockwood, S.D.; Stein, W.E.

    1981-06-08

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages is described. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  7. Determination of the pulse duration of an x-ray free electron laser using highly resolved single-shot spectra.

    PubMed

    Inubushi, Yuichi; Tono, Kensuke; Togashi, Tadashi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Kameshima, Takashi; Togawa, Kazuaki; Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2012-10-01

    We determined the pulse duration of x-ray free electron laser light at 10 keV using highly resolved single-shot spectra, combined with an x-ray free electron laser simulation. Spectral profiles, which were measured with a spectrometer composed of an ultraprecisely figured elliptical mirror and an analyzer flat crystal of silicon (555), changed markedly when we varied the compression strength of the electron bunch. The analysis showed that the pulse durations were reduced from 31 to 4.5 fs for the strongest compression condition. The method, which is readily applicable to evaluate shorter pulse durations, provides a firm basis for the development of femtosecond to attosecond sciences in the x-ray region. PMID:23083249

  8. Evidence of High Harmonics from Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation for Seeding X-ray Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodle, M.; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    Echo-enabled harmonic generation free electron lasers hold great promise for the generation of fully coherent radiation in x-ray wavelengths. Here we report the first evidence of high harmonics from the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique in the realistic scenario where the laser energy modulation is comparable to the beam slice energy spread. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the seventh harmonic of the second seed laser is generated when the energy modulation amplitude is about 2-3 times the slice energy spread. The experiment confirms the underlying physics of echo-enabled harmonic generation and may have a strong impact on emerging seeded x-ray free electron lasers that are capable of generating laserlike x rays which will advance many areas of science.

  9. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.C. . Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  10. Circular free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Kurnit, Norman A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  11. Control of the polarization of a vacuum-ultraviolet, high-gain, free-electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Allaria, Enrico; Diviacco, Bruno; Callegari, Carlo; Finetti, Paola; Mahieu, Benoît; Viefhaus, Jens; Zangrando, Marco; De Ninno, Giovanni; Lambert, Guillaume; Ferrari, Eugenio; et al

    2014-12-02

    The two single-pass, externally seeded free-electron lasers (FELs) of the FERMI user facility are designed around Apple-II-type undulators that can operate at arbitrary polarization in the vacuum ultraviolet-to-soft x-ray spectral range. Furthermore, within each FEL tuning range, any output wavelength and polarization can be set in less than a minute of routine operations. We report the first demonstration of the full output polarization capabilities of FERMI FEL-1 in a campaign of experiments where the wavelength and nominal polarization are set to a series of representative values, and the polarization of the emitted intense pulses is thoroughly characterized by three independentmore » instruments and methods, expressly developed for the task. The measured radiation polarization is consistently >90% and is not significantly spoiled by the transport optics; differing, relative transport losses for horizontal and vertical polarization become more prominent at longer wavelengths and lead to a non-negligible ellipticity for an originally circularly polarized state. The results from the different polarimeter setups validate each other, allow a cross-calibration of the instruments, and constitute a benchmark for user experiments.« less

  12. Control of the polarization of a vacuum-ultraviolet, high-gain, free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Allaria, Enrico; Diviacco, Bruno; Callegari, Carlo; Finetti, Paola; Mahieu, Benoît; Viefhaus, Jens; Zangrando, Marco; De Ninno, Giovanni; Lambert, Guillaume; Ferrari, Eugenio; Buck, Jens; Ilchen, Markus; Vodungbo, Boris; Mahne, Nicola; Svetina, Cristian; Spezzani, Carlo; Di Mitri, Simone; Penco, Giuseppe; Trovó, Mauro; Fawley, William M.; Rebernik, Primoz R.; Gauthier, David; Grazioli, Cesare; Coreno, Marcello; Ressel, Barbara; Kivimäki, Antti; Mazza, Tommaso; Glaser, Leif; Scholz, Frank; Seltmann, Joern; Gessler, Patrick; Grünert, Jan; De Fanis, Alberto; Meyer, Michael; Knie, André; Moeller, Stefan P.; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Capotondi, Flavio; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Plekan, Oksana; Danailov, Miltcho B.; Demidovich, Alexander; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Abrami, Alessandro; Gautier, Julien; Lüning, Jan; Zeitoun, Philippe; Giannessi, Luca

    2014-12-02

    The two single-pass, externally seeded free-electron lasers (FELs) of the FERMI user facility are designed around Apple-II-type undulators that can operate at arbitrary polarization in the vacuum ultraviolet-to-soft x-ray spectral range. Furthermore, within each FEL tuning range, any output wavelength and polarization can be set in less than a minute of routine operations. We report the first demonstration of the full output polarization capabilities of FERMI FEL-1 in a campaign of experiments where the wavelength and nominal polarization are set to a series of representative values, and the polarization of the emitted intense pulses is thoroughly characterized by three independent instruments and methods, expressly developed for the task. The measured radiation polarization is consistently >90% and is not significantly spoiled by the transport optics; differing, relative transport losses for horizontal and vertical polarization become more prominent at longer wavelengths and lead to a non-negligible ellipticity for an originally circularly polarized state. The results from the different polarimeter setups validate each other, allow a cross-calibration of the instruments, and constitute a benchmark for user experiments.

  13. Design overview of a highly stable infrared free electron laser at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Berz, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Gough, R.; Kim, C.; Kung, A.H.; Xie, M. ); Edighoffer, J. ); Stein, W. )

    1990-11-01

    An infrared free electron laser (IRFEL) is being designed for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL) at LBL. The FEL is based on a 50 MeV RF linac operating in synchronization to the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and will produce intense (100 {mu}J per micropulse), narrow bandwidth (narrower than 0.1%) radiation between 3 {mu} and 50 {mu}. In the design, we pay particular attention to the FEL stability issues and require that the fluctuations in electron beam energy and in timing be less then 0.05% and 0.1 ps respectively. The FEL spectrum can then be stabilized to about 10{sup {minus}3}, or if grating is used, to 10{sup {minus}4}. We discuss various sources of fluctuations in the gun, the bunchers and the accelerator sections, as well as the feedback and feedforward schemes to reduce these fluctuations. The accelerator structure is chosen to be of the side coupled, standing wave type for easier control. The beam transport is made isochronous to avoid the coupling between the energy and the timing fluctuations. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Requirements and design of a high stable infrared free electron laser at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Berz, M.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Gough, R.; Kim, C.; Kung, A.H.; Xie, M. ); Edighoffer, J. ); Stein, W. )

    1990-06-01

    An infrared free electron laser (IRFEL) is being designed for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL) at LBL. The FEL is based on a 50 MeV RF linac operating in synchronization to the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and will produce intense (100 {mu}J per micropulse), narrow bandwidth (narrower than 0.1%) radiation between 3 {mu} and 50 {mu}. In the design, we pay particular attention to the FEL stability issues and require that the fluctuations in electron beam energy and in timing be less than 0.05% and 0.1 ps, respectively. The FEL spectrum can then be stabilized to about 10{sup {minus}3}, or if grating is used, to 10{sup {minus}4}. We discuss various sources of fluctuations in the gun, the bunchers and the accelerator sections, as well as the feedback and feedforward schemes to reduce these fluctuations. The accelerator structure is chosen to be of the side coupled, standing wave type for easier control. The beam transport is made isochronous to avoid the coupling between the energy and the timing fluctuations. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  15. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, W.B.; Sessler, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) uses a high quality relativistic beam of electrons passing through a periodic magnetic field to amplify a copropagating optical wave (1-4). In an oscillator configuration, the light is stored between the mirrors of an open optical resonator as shown in Figure 1. In an amplifier configuration, the optical wave and an intense electron beam pass through the undulator field to achieve high gain. In either case, the electrons must overlap the optical mode for good coupling. Typically, the peak electron beam current varies from several amperes to many hundreds of amperes and the electron energy ranges from a few MeV to a few GeV. The electrons are the power source in an FEL, and provide from a megawatt to more than a gigawatt flowing through the resonator or amplifier system. The undulator resonantly couples the electrons to the transverse electrical field of the optical wave in vacuum. The basic mechanism of the coherent energy exchange is the bunching of the electrons at optical wavelengths. Since the power source is large, even small coupling can result in a powerful laser. Energy extraction of 5% of the electron beam energy has already been demonstrated. The electron beam quality is crucial in maintaining the coupling over a significant interaction distance and of central importance to all FEL systems is the magnetic undulator. The peak undulator field strength is usually several kG and can be constructed from coil windings or permanent magnets. In the top part of Figure 2, the Halbach undulator design is shown for one period. The field can be achieved, to a good approximation, using permanent magnets made out of rare earth compounds; a technique developed by K. Halbach (5), and now employed in most undulators. The undulator wavelength is in the range of a few centimeters and the undulator length extends for a few meters, so that there are several hundred periods for the interaction (6-8). The polarization of the undulator can be either

  16. Transverse and temporal characteristics of a high-gain free-electron laser in the saturation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je

    2002-05-01

    The transverse and the temporal characteristics of a high-gain free-electron laser are governed by refractive guiding and sideband instability, respectively. Using the self-consistent Vlasov-Maxwell equations, we explicitly determine the effective index of refraction and the guided radiation mode for an electron beam with arbitrary transverse size. Electrons trapped by the guided radiation execute synchrotron oscillation and hence are susceptible to the sideband instability. We explain the spectral evolution and determine the sideband growth rate. These theoretical predictions agree well with GINGER simulation results.

  17. Criterion of transverse coherence of self-amplified spontaneous emission in high gain free electron laser amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.; Kim, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    In a high gain free electron laser amplifier based on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) the spontaneous radiation generated by an electron beam near the undulator entrance is amplified many orders of magnitude along the undulator. The transverse coherence properties of the amplified radiation depends on both the amplification process and the coherence of the seed radiation (the undulator radiation generated in the first gain length or so). The evolution of the transverse coherence in the amplification process is studied based on the solution of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations including higher order transverse modes. The coherence of the seed radiation is determined by the number of coherent modes in the phase space area of the undulator radiation. We discuss the criterion of transverse coherence and identify governing parameters over a broad range of parameters. In particular we re-examine the well known emittance criterion for the undulator radiation, which states that full transverse coherence is guaranteed if the rms emittance is smaller than the wavelength divided by 4{pi}. It is found that this criterion is modified for SASE because of the different optimization conditions required for the electron beam. Our analysis is a generalization of the previous study by Yu and Krinsky for the case of vanishing emittance with parallel electron beam. Understanding the transverse coherence of SASE is important for the X-ray free electron laser projects now under consideration at SLAC and DESY.

  18. Interplay of the Chirps and Chirped Pulse Compression in a High-gain Seeded Free-electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Murphy, J.B.; Emma, P.J.; Wang, X.J.; Watanabe, T.; Zhong, Xinming; /Beijing Normal U.

    2007-01-03

    In a seeded high-gain Free-electron Laser (FEL), where a coherent laser pulse interacts with an ultra-relativistic electron beam, the seed laser pulse can be frequency chirped, and the electron beam can be energy chirped. Besides these two chirps, the FEL interaction introduces an intrinsic frequency chirp in the FEL even if the above mentioned two chirps are absent. In this paper we examine the interplay of these three chirps. The problem is formulated as an initial value problem, and solved via a Green function approach. Besides the chirp evolution, we also give analytical expressions for the pulse duration and bandwidth of the FEL, which remains fully longitudinally coherent in the high gain exponential growth regime. Because the chirps are normally introduced for a final compression of the FEL pulse, some conceptual issues are discussed. We show that in order to get a short pulse duration, an energy chirp in the electron beam is necessary.

  19. Measurements of the temporal and spatial phase variations of a 33 GHz pulsed free electron laser amplifier and application to high gradient RF acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Volfbeyn, P.; Bekefi, G.

    1995-12-31

    We report the results of temporal and spatial measurements of phase of a pulsed free electron laser amplifier (FEL) operating in combined wiggler and axial guide magnetic fields. The 33 GHz FEL is driven by a mildly relativistic electron beam (750 kV, 90-300 A, 30 ns) and generates 61 MW of radiation with a high power magnetron as the input source. The phase is measured by an interferometric technique from which frequency shifting is determined. The results are simulated with a computer code. Experimental studies on a CERN-CLIC 32.98 GHz 26-cell high gradient accelerating section (HGA) were carried out for input powers from 0.1 MW to 35 MW. The FEL served as the r.f. power source for the HGA. The maximum power in the transmitted pulse was measured to be 15 MW for an input pulse of 35 MW. The theoretically calculated shunt impedance of 116 M{Omega}/m predicts a field gradient of 65 MeV/m inside the HGA. For power levels >3MW the pulse transmitted through the HGA was observed to be shorter than the input pulse and pulse shortening became more serious with increasing power input. At the highest power levels the output pulse length (about 5 nsec) was about one quarter of the input pulse length. Various tests suggest that these undesirable effects occur in the input coupler to the HGA. Light and X-ray production inside the HGA have been observed.

  20. Eigenmode analysis of a high-gain free-electron laser based on a transverse gradient undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxevanis, Panagiotis; Huang, Zhirong; Ruth, Ronald; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a transverse gradient undulator (TGU) is viewed as an attractive option for free-electron lasers (FELs) driven by beams with a large energy spread. By suitably dispersing the electron beam and tilting the undulator poles, the energy spread effect can be substantially mitigated. However, adding the dispersion typically leads to electron beams with large aspect ratios. As a result, the presence of higher-order modes in the FEL radiation can become significant. To investigate this effect, we study the eigenmode properties of a TGU-based, high-gain FEL, using both an analytically-solvable model and a variational technique. Our analysis, which includes the fundamental and the higher-order FEL eigenmodes, can provide an estimate of the mode content for the output radiation. This formalism also enables us to study the trade-off between FEL gain and transverse coherence. Numerical results are presented for a representative soft X-ray, TGU FEL example.

  1. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.; Vaughan, D.

    1986-04-01

    We can now produce intense, coherent light at wavelengths where no conventional lasers exist. The recent successes of devices known as free-electron lasers mark a striking confluence of two conceptual developments that themselves are only a few decades old. The first of these, the laser, is a product of the fifties and sixties whose essential characteristics have made it a staple resource in almost every field of science and technology. In a practical sense, what defines a laser is its emission of monochromatic, coherent light (that is, light of a single wavelength, with its waves locked in step) at a wavelength in the infrared, visible, or ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A second kind of light, called synchrotron radiation, is a by-product of the age of particle accelerators and was first observed in the laboratory in 1947. As the energies of accelerators grew in the 1960s and 70s, intense, incoherent beams of ultraviolet radiation and x--rays became available at machines built for high-energy physics research. Today, several facilities operate solely as sources of synchrotron light. Unlike the well-collimated monochromatic light emitted by lasers, however, this incoherent radiation is like a sweeping searchlight--more accurately, like the headlight of a train on a circular track--whose wavelengths encompass a wide spectral band. Now, in several laboratories around the world, researchers have exploited the physics of these two light sources and have combined the virtues of both in a single contrivance, the free-electron laser, or FEL (1). The emitted light is laserlike in its narrow, sharply peaked spectral distribution and in its phase coherence, yet it can be of a wavelength unavailable with ordinary lasers. Furthermore, like synchrotron radiation, but unlike the output of most conventional lasers, the radiation emitted by free-electron lasers can be tuned, that is, its wavelength can be easily varied across a wide range. The promise of this

  2. A method of forming a high-quality electron beam for free electron masers

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonov, S.V.; Bratman, V.L.; Manuilov, V.N.

    1995-12-31

    A large number of electron microwave devices require initially rectilinear high-quality electron beams for effective operation. In FEMS such beams are pumped up to sufficiently high operating-oscillation velocity and small initial particle oscillations (cyclotron oscillations if the beam is focused by an axial magnetic field) can lead to a rather large transverse velocity spread and, correspondingly, axial velocity spread. Thus, an acute problem for these devices (essentially more important than for Cherenkov-type devices) is the formation of a beam in which electrons initially move along the axis with minimum oscillations. A new method to form such a beam by a two-electrode axially-symmetrical gun of simple configuration immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field is discussed in this paper. This method allows to improve the quality of an electron beam passing through a narrow anode outlet. It is well-known that the anode aperture acts as an electrostatic lens and disperses the electron beam. In the presence of an axial magnetic field this unwanted dispersing action can be compensated simultaneously for all electrons of the paraxial electron beam by means of a magnetic field generated by a small additional coil placed down-stream from the anode aperture. If the coil length is equal to half the electron Larmor step, then the action of the border cod fields comes to two kicks which, being correctly phased, compensate the spurious rotary electron velocities. Computer simulations using the EPOSR-code intended for the calculation of electron guns both for the temperature- and space-charge-limited regimes prove the effectiveness of this method. In particular, for a version of field-emission gun the correcting coil reduces about five times the maximum transverse velocity in the beam. Positive effect from applying this method was proved at a realization of a high-efficiency CARM-oscillator.

  3. RADIATION SPECTRUM STATISTICS IN A HIGH-GAIN FREE-ELECTRON LASER AT 266NM.

    SciTech Connect

    STAFTAN, T.; SHEEHY, B.; LOOS, H.; YU, L.H.; MURPHY, J.B.; KRINSKY, S.; ROSE, J.; WATANABE, T.; LIU, D.; WANG, X.J.

    2005-08-21

    High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL is in operations at the DUV-FEL facility (BNL). During HGHG FEL characterization we have measured a set of data demonstrating basic properties of the FEL radiation and compared them with analytic calculations [1]. This paper describes continuation of characterization of the HGHG FEL radiation output, based on the spectral measurements. We discuss analysis of an experiment at which the tunability concept of a seeded FEL with a fixed seed wavelength has been verified [2]. During the experiment we recorded about 200 radiation spectra corresponding to different energy chirps in the electron beam. We have analyzed this set of spectral data to obtain statistical properties of HGHG radiation. Correlations and trends in the radiation spectrum at 266 nm have been observed and studied.

  4. Catalac free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  5. Catalac free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-12-12

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac is described. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator, or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  6. Physics design of the high brightness linac for the advanced free-electron laser initiative at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, R. L.; Browman, M. J.; Carlsten, B. E.; Young, L. M.

    1992-07-01

    Free-electron lasers and high energy physics accelerators have increased the demand for very high brightness electron-beam sources. This paper describes the design of an accelerator that can produce beams of greater than 7×1011A/m2 (brightness equal to 21/ɛ2, with ɛ = 90% normalized emittance, equivalent to four times the rms emittance). The beam emittance growth in the accelerator is minimized by: producing a short electron bunch in a high gradient rf cavity, using a focusing solenoid to correct the emittance growth caused by space charge, and designing the coupling slots between accelerator cavities to minimize quadrupole effects. The simulation code PARMELA was modified for this design effort. This modified version uses SUPERFISH output files for the accelerator cavity fields, MAFIA output files for the 3-D perturbation fields caused by the coupling slots in the accelerator cells, and POISSON output files for the solenoid field in the gun region. The results from simulations are, at 2.3 nC, a peak current of 180 A and a 90% emittance of 6.4π mm mrad, and, at 4 nC a peak current of 300 A and a 90% emittance of 9.4π mrad. The exit energy from the linac is 20 MeV for both cases. A magnetic pulse compressor can be used to further increase the peak current.

  7. Physics design of the high brightness linac for the advanced free-electron laser initiative at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, R. L.; Browman, M. J.; Carlsten, B. E.; Young, L. M.

    Free electron lasers and high energy physics accelerators have increased the demand for very high brightness electron beam sources. This paper describes the design of an accelerator which can produce beams of greater than 7 x 10(exp 11) A/m(exp 2) (brightness equals 2 asterisk 1/(var epsilon)(sup 2), with (var epsilon) equals 90 percent normalized emittance equals 4 asterisk rms emittance). The beam emittance growth in the accelerator is minimized by the following: producing a short electron bunch in a high gradient RF cavity, using a focusing solenoid to correct the emittance growth due to space charge, and designing the coupling slots between accelerator cavities to minimize quadruple effects. The simulation code PARMELA was modified for this design effort. This modified version uses SUPERFISH output files for the accelerator cavity field, MAFIA output files for the 3-D perturbation fields due to the coupling slots in the accelerator cells, and POISSON output files for the solenoid field in the gun region. The results from simulations are, at 2.3 nC, a peak current of 180 A and a 90 percent emittance of 9.4 (pi) mm-mmrad. The exit energy from the linac is 20 MeV for both cases. A magnetic pulse compressor can be used to further increase the peak current.

  8. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A. )

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  9. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A. ); Sandweiss, J. )

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  10. An accelerator scenario for a hard X-ray free electron laser combined with high energy electron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Li, Yiding; Yang, Guojun; Pang, Jian; Li, Yuhui; Li, Peng; Pflueger, Joachim; He, Xiaozhong; Lu, Yaxin; Wang, Ke; Long, Jidong; Zhang, Linwen; Wu, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    In order to study the dynamic response of the material and the physical mechanism of fluid dynamics, an accelerator scenario which can be applied to both hard X-ray free electron laser and high energy electron radiography is proposed. This accelerator is mainly composed of a 12 GeV linac, an undulator branch and an eRad beamline. In order to characterize a sample’s dynamic behavior in situ and real-time with XFEL and eRad simultaneously, the linac should be capable of accelerating the two kinds of beam within the same operation mode. Combining in-vacuum and tapering techniques, the undulator branch can produce more than 1011 photons per pulse in 0.1% bandwidth at 42 keV. Finally, an eRad amplifying beamline with 1:10 ratio is proposed as an important complementary tool for the wider view field and density identification ability. Supported by China Academy of Engineering Physics (2014A0402016) and Institute of Fluid Physics (SFZ20140201)

  11. Hydrogenation of Zr0.9Ti0.1CrxFe2-x Intermetallic Compounds: Free Electron Model for Magnetic Susceptibility and Thermoelectric Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyomsoan, S.; Termsuksawad, P.; Goldfarb, R. B.; Olson, D. L.; Mishra, B.; Kaydanov, V.; Gavra, Z.

    2008-02-01

    The magnetic susceptibility and thermoelectric power of Zr0.9Ti0.1CrxFe2-x intermetallic compounds were investigated as functions of hydrogen content. The alloys are paramagnetic, with magnetic susceptibility and Seebeck coefficient increasing with the amount of stored hydrogen. The susceptibility is proportional to the Seebeck coefficient and to the d-electron concentration, consistent with a free-electron model. The susceptibility of alloys with lower iron concentration suggests exchange-enhanced Pauli paramagnetism. However, Curie-Weiss paramagnetism likely coexists in alloys with higher iron content. Magnetic and electronic measurements may be used to assess the ability of an alloy to store hydrogen.

  12. Multi-level quantum electrodynamic calculation of spontaneous emission and small signal gain in high voltage free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. S.; Fluhler, H. U.

    1991-12-01

    Using the Weisskopf-Wigner technique, a self consistent quantum electrodynamic (SCQED) theory of spontaneous emission of radiation and single photon small signal gain is developed for high voltage free electron lasers (FEL). Excellent agreement is obtained simultaneously to our knowledge for the first time between the predictions and the experimental observations for lineshift, linewidth and gain. The SCQED theory predicts lineshift and broadening due to quantum mechanical effects for linear, helical and tapered undulator FELs which are not predicted by the classical/conventional FEL theories, but which have been observed 4,5,18,22,23,45,46. Excellent agreement is obtained between the SCQED theory predicted spontaneous emission spectra and the 1980?81 ACO FEL4,18, ACO Optical Klystron FEL45,46, Stanford 10.6 ?m FEL22 and Stanford 3.4 ?m FEL23 experimental spectra. This agreement is much better than the prediction from the classical/conventional FEL theory which gives errors of many tens of percent. We show that the spontaneous emission spectrum obtained from classical/conventional FEL theories is valid only in the limit of a short undulator containing a small number of periods. The small signal gain derived from the SCQED theory is shown to reduce to Colson's gain formula12,34 in the classical limit. However, the SCQED theory predicts significant reductions in the small signal gain which agree well with the ACO gain data5, and are not predicted well by Colson's formula. Due to the non-neglible finite electron state lifetime, it is discovered that a fundamental physical gain limit exists which is universal to all types of FELs within the limits of the single photon transition scheme considered (i.e. if multiphoton effects are ignored). Finally, the implications of the theoretically obtained results are discussed for practical conditions of experimental interest. It is shown that under practical experimental conditions quantum effects can be quite important in the

  13. Free-Electron Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brau, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of free-electron lasers as a source of coherent radiation over a broad range of wavelengths from the far-infrared to the far-ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. Discusses some applications of these lasers, including medicine and strategic defense. (TW)

  14. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Vansteenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e(-) beam and the 10(exp 11) Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a approximately 1.5 percent/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power CW CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  15. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e- beam and the 1011 Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a ≊1.5%/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  16. A compact high-gradient 25 MeV 17 GHz RF linac for free-electron laser research

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, B.G.; Chen, S.C.; Kreischer, K.E.

    1995-12-31

    A new compact high-gradient (60 MeV/m) high-frequency (17.136 GHz) RF linac is presently under construction by Haimson Research Corp. (HRC) for installation at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center in the High-Gradient Accelerator and High Power Microwave Laboratory. This accelerator will utilize an existing traveling-wave relativistic klystron (TWRK) which is now operation at MIT with 25 MW power, 67 dB gain, and 52% efficiency at 17.136 GHz.

  17. Synthesis of highly oriented TiN coatings by free electron laser processing of titanium in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ettore Carpene; Michelle D. Shinn; Peter Schaaf

    2004-11-01

    Titanium was irradiated in pure nitrogen gas by means of a free electron laser. The treatment resulted in the formation of -TiNx layers, with surface stoichiometry of x {approx} 1. Under certain circumstances the nitride phase showed an almost perfect crystallographic texture with the delta-TiNx(200) planes parallel to the irradiated surface, and well aligned dendrites growing normal to the surface. The mechanism of the dendritic alignment and the origin of the texture correlate with the existence of a solidification front starting at the surface, which is very peculiar for laser surface treatments. This phenomenon is explained with the help of numerical simulations.

  18. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e{sup {minus}} beam and the 10{sup 11} Watt CO{sub 2} laser beam of BNL`s Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a {approximately} 1.5 %/cm tapered period configuration. The CO{sub 2} laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO{sub 2} laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  19. Electronic stopping power calculation method for molecular dynamics simulations using local Firsov and free electron-gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, J.; Nordlund, K.; Keinonen, J.

    2006-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be accurate in predicting depth distributions of low-energy ions implanted in materials. Free parameters adjusted for every ion-target combination are conventionally used to obtain depth profiles in accordance with the experimental ones. We have previously developed a model for predicting depth profiles in crystalline Si without free parameters. The electronic stopping power was calculated using local total electron density. The model underestimated the stopping in the < 1 1 0 > channeling direction. We have now taken a new approach to calculate the electronic stopping power. We use the local valence (3p(2)) electron density to account for the electronic energy loss between collisions and the Firsov model to account for the electronic energy loss during collision. The lowest electron densities are adjusted with a parametrization that is same for all ions in all implanting directions to correct the problems in the < 1 1 0 > channeling direction.

  20. High-gain lasing and polarization switch with a distributed optical-klystron free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y K; Vinokurov, N A; Mikhailov, S; Li, J; Popov, V

    2006-06-01

    This Letter reports the first experimental results from the world's first distributed optical-klystron (DOK) free-electron laser (FEL), the DOK-1 FEL, at Duke University. The DOK-1 FEL is a hybrid system, comprised of four wigglers: two horizontal and two helical. With the DOK-1 FEL, we have obtained the highest FEL gain among all storage ring based FELs at 47.8% (+/-2.7%) per pass. We have also demonstrated that the FEL gain can be enhanced by increasing electron bunching using wigglers with a different polarization. Furthermore, we have realized controlled polarization switches of the FEL beam by a nonoptical means through the manipulation of a buncher magnet. PMID:16803315

  1. Free electron laser physical process code (FELPPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Schmitt, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    Even at the conceptual level, the strong coupling between subsystem elements complicates the understanding and design of a free electron laser (FEL). Given the requirements for high-performance FELS, the coupling between subsystems must be included to obtain a realistic picture of the potential operational capability. The concept of an Integrated Numerical Experiment (INEX) was implemented to accurately calculate the coupling between the FEL subsystems. During the late 1980`s, the INEX approach was successfully applied to a large number of accelerator and FEL experiments. Unfortunately, because of significant manpower and computational requirements, the integrated approach is difficult to apply to trade-off and initial design studies. However, the INEX codes provided a base from which realistic accelerator, wiggler, optics, and control models could be developed. The Free Electron Laser Physical Process Code (FELPPC) includes models developed from the INEX codes, provides coupling between the subsystem models, and incorporates application models relevant to a specific study. In other words, FELPPC solves the complete physical process model using realistic physics and technology constraints. FELPPC can calculate complex FEL configurations including multiple accelerator and wiggler combinations. When compared with the INEX codes, the subsystem models have been found to be quite accurate over many orders-of-magnitude. As a result, FELPPC has been used for the initial design studies of a large number of FEL applications: high-average-power ground, space, plane, and ship based FELS; beacon and illuminator FELS; medical and compact FELS; and XUV FELS.

  2. The TESLA Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossbach, Jörg

    1997-05-01

    The TESLA Free Electron Laser makes use of the high quality electron beam that can be provided by the superconducting TESLA linac to drive a single pass free electron laser (FEL) at wavelengths far below the visible. To reach a wavelength of 6 nanometers, the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY will be extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Because there are no mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, the principle of Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) will be employed. A first test of both the principle and technical components is foreseen at a photon wavelength larger than 42 nanometers. With respect to linac technology, the key prerequisite for such single-pass, high-gain FELs is a high intensity, diffraction limited, electron beam to be generated and accelerated without degradation. Key components are RF guns with photocathodes, bunch compressors, and related diagnostics. The status of design and construction as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. Once proven in the micrometer to nanometer regime, the SASE FEL scheme is considered applicable down to Angstrom wavelengths. It is pointed out that this latter option is particularly of interest in context with the construction of a linear collider, which requires very similar beam parameters. The status of conceptual design work on such a coherent X-ray user facility integrated into the TESLA linear collider design will be briefly sketched.

  3. X-ray fluorescence spectrum of highly charged Fe ions driven by strong free-electron-laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkina, Natalia S.; Cavaletto, Stefano M.; Keitel, Christoph H.; Harman, Zoltán

    2016-05-01

    The influence of nonlinear dynamical effects is analyzed on the observed spectra of controversial 3C and 3D astrophysically relevant x-ray lines in neonlike Fe{}16+ and the A, B, and C lines in natriumlike Fe{}15+ ions. First, a large-scale configuration-interaction calculation of oscillator strengths is performed with the inclusion of higher-order electron-correlation effects. Also, quantum-electrodynamic corrections to the transition energies are calculated. Further considered dynamical effects provide a possible resolution of the discrepancy between theory and experiment found by recent x-ray free-electron-laser measurements of these controversial lines. We find that, for strong x-ray sources, the modeling of the spectral lines by a peak with an area proportional to the oscillator strength is not sufficient and nonlinear dynamical effects have to be taken into account. Thus, we advocate the use of light–matter-interaction models also valid for strong light fields in the analysis and interpretation of the associated astrophysical and laboratory spectra. We investigate line-strength ratios distinguishing between the coherent and incoherent parts of the emission spectrum. In addition, the spectrum of Fe{}15+, an autoionizing ion which was also present in the recent laboratory experiment, is analyzed as well.

  4. Free-electron laser simulations on the MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonlaven, Scott A.; Liebrock, Lorie M.

    1987-01-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) are of interest because they provide high power, high efficiency, and broad tunability. FEL simulations can make efficient use of computers of the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) class because most of the processing consists of applying a simple equation to a set of identical particles. A test version of the KMS Fusion FEL simulation, which resides mainly in the MPPs host computer and only partially in the MPP, has run successfully.

  5. Z-discharge free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schep, T.J.; Bazylev, V.A.; Tulupov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A new kind of plasma based free-electron laser is proposed. An electromagnetic wave is generated by a relativistic electron beam moving along a stabilised z-discharge. The radiation wavelength is determined by the discharge current and the relativistic factor of the beam. It is shown that the interaction is based on two bunching mechanisms. One is due to the dependency of the longitudinal beam velocity on the energy of the electrons (inertial bunching). The second mechanism leads to azimuthal bunching and is related to the energy dependence of the oscillation frequency of electrons in the magnetic field of the discharge. At certain conditions both bunching mechanisms tend to compensate their mutual action and the system has an autoresonance. Near these conditions a high efficiency and, therefore, a high output power can be reached.

  6. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  7. Asymmetric ZnO panel-like hierarchical architectures with highly interconnected pathways for free-electron transport and photovoltaic improvements.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yantao; Zhu, Chao; Wang, Lin; Li, Wei; Fung, Kwok Kwong; Wang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Through a rapid and template-free precipitation approach, we synthesized an asymmetric panel-like ZnO hierarchical architecture (PHA) for photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The two sides of the PHA are constructed differently using densely interconnected, mono-crystalline and ultrathin ZnO nanosheets. By mixing these PHAs with ZnO nanoparticles (NPs), we developed an effective and feasible strategy to improve the electrical transport and photovoltaic performance of the composite photoanodes of DSCs. The highly crystallized and interconnected ZnO nanosheets largely minimized the total grain boundaries within the composite photoanodes and thus served as direct pathways for the transport and effective collection of free electrons. Through low-temperature (200 °C) annealing, these novel composite photoanodes achieved high conversion efficiencies of up to 5.59% for ZnO-based quasi-solid DSCs. PMID:23197439

  8. The theory and design of a chirped-pulse inverse free-electron laser: An innovative, compact, high-energy, vacuum-based, electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troha, Anthony Lawrence

    As current high-energy accelerator facilities continue to increase in both size and cost, there is a growing need for a relatively small and inexpensive alternative. Numerous experiments over the past decade have shown the inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) to be a feasible laser-driven particle accelerator. In the present work, a new variant of the IFEL is proposed, which uses a short-duration, chirped laser pulse to greatly increase the energy exchange from the drive-laser pulse to the electron bunch. An extensive investigation is then conducted, starting with analytical and numerical studies of the dynamics of an electron interacting with a high-intensity, focused laser pulse. Following a review of the physics behind a free-electron laser (FEL), a detailed analysis of several variants of the IFEL is performed, from which it is determined that an IFEL driven by a chirped laser pulse will not suffer the detrimental effects experienced by other IFEL schemes. The design specifications for the chirped-pulse inverse free-electron laser (CPIFEL) are then obtained from theoretical and computational models of the interaction, which culminates in a device that has an acceleration gradient approaching 1 GeV/m over an interaction distance of less than 5 cm. The acceleration mechanism is very efficient, providing a nearly uniform acceleration to a picosecond-duration charge bunch. The demands on laser technology are stringent, but not extreme. The laser must produce chirped-pulse durations only a few optical cycles long and intensities near 9 x 1016 W/cm2 at the focal plane. The IFEL is also an appealing choice, because it is essentially an FEL functioning in a different operational mode. FEL's are a well-established, familiar technology, routinely and reliably employed in a variety of research facilities throughout the world. Thus, the development of the IFEL has a strong foundation upon which to build, a heritage that will hopefully hasten the realization of a CPIFEL

  9. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  10. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  11. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  12. Diagnostics and electron-optics of a high current electron beam in the TANDEM free electron laser - status report

    SciTech Connect

    Arensburg, A.; Avramovich, A.; Chairman, D.

    1995-12-31

    In the construction of the Israeli TANDEM FEL the major task is to develop a high quality electron optic system. The goal is to focus the e-beam to a minimal radius (1 mm) in the interaction region (the wiggler). Furthermore, good focusing throughout the accelerator is essential in order to achieve high transport efficiency avoiding discharge and voltage drop of the high voltage terminal. We have completed the electron optical design and component procurement, including 8 quadrupole lenses 4 steering coils and an electrostatic control system. All are being assembled into the high voltage terminal and controlled by a fiber optic link. Diagnostic means based on fluorescent screens and compact CCD camera cards placed at the HV terminal and at the end of the e-gun injector have been developed. We report first measurements of the beam emittance at the entrance to the Tandem accelerator tube using the {open_quote}pepper pot{close_quote} technique. The experiment consists of passing the 0.5 Amp beam through a thin plate which is perforated with an army of 0.5 mm holes. The spots produced on a fluorescent screen placed 90 cm from the pepper pot were recorded with a CCD camera and a frame grabber. The measured normalized emittance is lower than 10{pi} mm mR which is quite close to the technical limit of dispenser cathode e-guns of the kind we have. Recent results of the measured transport efficiency and the diagnostics of the high current (1A, 1.5MV) electron-optical system will be reported.

  13. Study of the output pulse stability of a cascaded high-gain harmonic generation free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Feng, Chao; Gu, Qiang; Zhao, Zhentang

    2016-06-01

    Cascading stages of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) have been demonstrated to be a promising candidate for producing fully coherent soft X-ray radiation directly from UV seed sources. However, the large shot-to-shot output pulse energy fluctuation may still be a serious problem for its user applications. In this paper, we study the effects of various electron beam parameters jitters on the output pulse energy fluctuations of a two-stage HGHG. Theoretical calculations and intensive simulations have been performed and the results demonstrate that the relative timing jitter between the electron bunch and the seed laser pulse is mainly responsible for the large output pulse energy fluctuation. Several methods that may be helpful to improve the FEL stability have also been discussed.

  14. High-gradient C-band linac for a compact x-ray free-electron laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, T.; Kondo, C.; Maesaka, H.; Ohshima, T.; Otake, Y.; Sakurai, T.; Shirasawa, K.; Shintake, T.

    2014-08-01

    An electron linac using a C-band rf frequency, 5.712 GHz, has enabled us to obtain an acceleration gradient of more than 35 MV/m reliably. A C-band accelerator system has been developed and constructed for the compact x-ray FEL facility, SACLA, in order to fit within the available site length at SPring-8, and to reduce construction costs. An accelerator unit consists of two 1.8 m-long accelerator structures, a cavity-type rf pulse compressor and a 50 MW pulsed klystron. In order to achieve a compact rf source and to obtain extremely stable rf fields in the accelerator structures, an oil-filled, high-voltage pulse modulator combined with an extremely stable, inverter-type, high voltage charger was developed. SACLA uses 64 sets of these accelerator units in order to achieve a final beam energy of 8.5 GeV. After rf conditioning for 1 700 hours, the maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 38 MV/m. The typical trip rate for each accelerator unit at 35 MV/m and 30 pps is about once per day. Dark current from the accelerator structures is less than 5 pC, which causes a negligible effect on the beam monitors. The phase and amplitude stability of the rf fields were measured to be 0.03 degree and 0.01% rms, respectively, which is sufficient for the XFEL operation of SACLA. Since the first beam commissioning in 2011, the C-band accelerator has demonstrated fairly stable performance under continuous operation for 20 000 hours.

  15. High-Gain Thompson-Scattering X-Ray Free-Electron Laser by Time-Synchronic Laterally Tilted Optical Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao; Tang, Chuanxiang; Wu, Juhao

    2013-02-01

    A novel approach to generating coherent x rays with 109-1010 photons and femtoseconds duration per laser pulse is proposed. This high intensity x-ray source is realized first by the pulse front tilt of a lateral fed laser to extend the electron-laser synchronic interaction time by several orders, which accomplishes the high-gain free-electron-laser-type exponential growth process and coherent emission with highly microbunched electron beam. Second, two methods are presented to enhance the effective optical undulator strength parameter. One is to invoke lenses to focus two counterpropagating lasers that are at normal incidence to the electron beam as a transverse standing wave; the other is to invent a periodic microstructure that can significantly enhance the center electromagnetic field realized by a resonant standing wave and the quadrupole waveguides. The energy coupling efficiency between the electron beam and laser is therefore greatly improved to generate the high brightness x rays, which is demonstrated by analytical and simulation results.

  16. Mode competition effects in free electron lasers and gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Levush, B.; Antonsen, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    In many cases in high frequency, high power coherent radiation generators (such as free electron laser and gyrotrons) the linear gain is positive for many modes and therefore these modes will grow and compete for the beam energy. The questions related to mode competition, coherency of the radiation and maximization of the interaction efficiency are of great importance. To address these issues simple multi-mode models have been formulated. This paper is a short review of the recent results from both simulation and analyses of these models. 3 figs.

  17. W-band free-electron masers

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H. P.; Jackson, R. H.; Danly, B. G.; Levush, B.

    1999-05-07

    Theoretical analyses of high power W-band (i.e., {approx_equal}94 GHz) free-electron maser amplifiers are presented for a helical wiggler/cylindrical waveguide configuration using the three-dimensional slow-time-scale ARACHNE simulation code [9]. The geometry treated by ARACHNE is that of an electron beam propagating through the cylindrical waveguide subject to a helical wiggler and an axial guide magnetic field. Two configurations are discussed. The first is the case of a reversed-guide field geometry where the guide field is oriented antiparallel to the helicity of the wiggler field. Using a 330 kV/20 A electron beam, efficiencies of the order of 7% are calculated with a bandwidth (FWHM) of 5 GHz. The second example employs a strong guide field of 20 kG oriented parallel to the helicity of the wiggler. Here, efficiencies of greater than 8% are possible with a FWHM bandwidth of 4.5 GHz using a 300 kV/20 A electron beam. A normalized emittance of 95 mm-mrad is assumed in both cases, and no beam losses are observed for either case. Both cases assume interaction with the fundamental TE{sub 11} mode, which has acceptably low losses in the W-band.

  18. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  19. Long range coherence in free electron lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The simple free electron laser (FEL) design uses a static, periodic, transverse magnetic field to undulate relativistic electrons traveling along its axis. This allows coupling to a co-propagating optical wave and results in bunching to produce coherent radiation. The advantages of the FEL are continuous tunability, operation at wavelengths ranging from centimeters to angstroms, and high efficiency resulting from the fact that the interaction region only contains light, relativistic electrons, and a magnetic field. Theoretical concepts and operational principles are discussed.

  20. E-beam accelerator cavity development for the ground-based free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, N. K.; Spalek, G.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing and developing four prototype accelerator cavities for high power testing on the Modular Component Technology Development (MCTD) test stand at Boeing. These cavities provide the basis for the e-beam accelerator hardware that will be used in the Ground Based Free Electron Laser (GBFEL) to be sited at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in New Mexico.

  1. Free-electron laser challenges in the low-voltage limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jerby, E.; Drori, R.; Shahadi, A.

    1995-12-31

    Based on the experimental results of our low-voltage (1-10 kV) free-electron- and cyclotron-resonance-maser experiments, we present in this talk several goals for our future studies. These include new compact schemes of low-voltage high-power masers, and of two-stage maser-law devices.

  2. Storage ring free electrons laser on super-ACO, ELETTRA and SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Brunie, C.; Garzella, D.; Nahon, L.; de Ninno, G.; Nutarelli, D.; Marsi, M.

    2002-06-01

    We present here the state of the art of Storage Ring Free Electron Lasers under operation in Europe. Free electrons Lasers (FELs) are coherent, high power and tuneable radiation sources, obtained by the interaction of an optical wave with a bunch of ultrarelavistic electrons wiggling in a periodical permanent magnetic structure. The developments and the results obtained recently in the UV domain by the FELs operating in Europe on Synchrotron Facilities, Super ACO and ELETTRA, offer new opportunities for using these sources in several scientific domains, and foresee uniques performances for the proposed FEL on the third generation french Synchrotron SOLEIL.

  3. Free electron laser for a mildly relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    One of the most basic instabilities which characterize a relativistic electron beam propagating through a helical wiggler (or undulator) magnetic field is the free electron laser instability. This instability has been extensively investigated in recent years with particular emphasis on applications involving high power microwave radiation. Previous theoretical studies of this instability have tended to result in the conclusion that high energy beams with a relativistic factor much greater than 1 are required to generate high frequency microwave radiation. Beams with this high a relativistic factor have proven to be highly unsuited, however, to compact and practical microwave tubes. To this end, for a relativistic electron beam propagating through a dielectric loaded waveguide, this paper presents a method for the bandwidth and frequency enhancement of the free electron laser instability which makes use of a mild (less than 1.5) relativistic factor. It demonstrates that the instability bandwidth and frequency can be greatly enhanced for specified values of the beam energy and wiggler wavelength if the dielectric constant and the thickness of the dielectric material are appropriately selected. The paper also presents a new scheme for a broad bandwidth microwave amplifier.

  4. Experimental and analytical study of a high gain self amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser operating in a large spectral bandwidth regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andonian, Gerard Cosmos

    The drive to create and measure ultra-short pulses in the x-ray regime advances the ongoing development of free electron lasers (FEL). Several proposed schemes, to shorten the pulse length of the radiation, involve driving the FEL with a chirped (linear longitudinal phase space correlation) electron beam in the self amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode. This dissertation examines the experiments conducted under such conditions, canvassing analytical and numerical studies of beam dynamics and radiation properties, experimental observations, and descriptions of the development of novel diagnostics. The VISA (Visible-Infrared SASE Amplifier) program has achieved saturation at 840 nm within a 4 m long undulator. A novel bunch compression mechanism during transport was discovered and ultimately responsible for the high peak current required to drive the FEL. Start-to-end simulations, detailing the dynamics from electron beam inception at the photocathode to the FEL radiation properties at the undulator, were successfully benchmarked to observable data. The VISA II experiment is an extension of this SASE FEL operating under different experimental conditions. Driving the SASE FEL with a chirped electron beam requires maintaining the chirp throughout transport by the use of sextupole magnets to correct for second-order compression effects. The emitted radiation is frequency chirped, diagnosed via a modified frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) technique. Specific numerical simulations and diagnostic developments are presented. A set of measurements, without sextupole corrections, displays anomalous features, namely large spectral bandwidth of the radiation at stable and sustained high gain lasing. The bandwidth has an rms value of 21 nm (12% full width), previously unobserved in a FEL. In addition, the far-field angular distribution yields a hollow mode structure, similar to earlier results yet more pronounced in angle. Start-to-end simulations reproduced the

  5. Proceedings of the free-electron generators of coherent radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, C.A.; Jacobs, S.F.; Scully, M.O.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the evolution of long pulses in a tapered wiggler Free Electron Laser (FEL), linear gain, and stable pulse propagation in an FEL oscillator, FEL injection locking by an alexandrite laser, accelerator technology for a high power, short wavelength FEL, an acoustooptic output coupler for FELs, second harmonic generation with high power short pulses from an IR FEL, the Los Alamos FEL project's experimental and developmental results to date, the Lawson-Penner limit and FEL operation by single pass devices, and the radially resolved simulation of a high gain FEL amplifier. Also covered are FEL amplifier performance in the Compton regime, unstable FEL resonators, the operation of a storage ring-free FEL, chaotic optical modes in FELs, bright electron beams for FELs, the three-dimensional theory of the Raman FEL, Cerenkov lasers in the Compton regime, and prospects for an X-ray FEL.

  6. Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Zholents, Alexander; Zolotorev, Max

    2001-01-01

    An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

  7. Progress toward the Wisconsin Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, Joseph; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Jacobs, K; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J; Rogers, G C; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R

    2011-03-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison/Synchrotron Radiation Center is advancing its design for a seeded VUV/soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility called WiFEL. To support this vision of an ultimate light source, we are pursuing a program of strategic R&D addressing several crucial elements. This includes development of a high repetition rate, VHF superconducting RF electron gun, R&D on photocathode materials by ARPES studies, and evaluation of FEL facility architectures (e.g., recirculation, compressor scenarios, CSR dechirping, undulator technologies) with the specific goal of cost containment. Studies of high harmonic generation for laser seeding are also planned.

  8. Recent Developments in Superconducting RF Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lia Merminga

    2001-09-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) Free Electron Lasers (FELs) worldwide are reviewed. Two examples of high performance SRF FELs are discussed in detail: First, the Tesla Test Facility (TTF) FEL at DESY, which recently demonstrated Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) saturation at the wavelength of 98 nm, an important milestone towards X-ray FELs in the {angstrom} regime. Second, the Jefferson Lab IR FEL, which recently lased with 2.1 kW of average power while energy recovering 5 mA of average current, an important milestone towards high average power FELs and towards Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) in general. We discuss the scientific potential and accelerator physics challenges of both classes of SRF-driven FELs.

  9. A new beam source for free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.C.; Wang, Z.J.; Zhu, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    A high power, high current density and high voltage electron beam was generated with the pseudospark discharge (PS), this is a new beam source for free electron lasers. The design and construction of the pseudospark discharge was described, the device has low cost and is easy to fabricate. The experiments are presented, the configuration parameters of the modified pulse line accelerator (PLA) are as follows. The PS hollow cavity has a 3 cm diameter and 4.1 cm long. The discharge chamber consists of planar cathode with hollow cavity, sets of intermediate electrodes and insulators with a common channel, and a planar anode. The electrodes are made of brass and the insulators are made of Plexiglas. The diameter of the channel is 3.2 mm. The anode-cathode gap distance is varied in 10-100 mm. The electron beams have voltage of 200 KeV, current of 2 KA and beam diameter of 1mm. The beam penetrated a 0.3 mm hole on a copper foil of 0.05 mm thick at the distance of 5 cm from the anode and penetrated a 0.6 mm hole on an acid-sensitive film at the distance of 15 cm. A compact free electron laser with a table size is discussed.

  10. Radiofrequency superconductivity applied to free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.; Benson, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    Low wall losses and low wakefields inherent in superconducting radiofrequency (srf) cavities make them attractive candidates for accelerators that operate efficiently at high continuous-wave (cw) gradients. Such accelerators are desirable for free-electron lasers (FELs) that extract high-power cw light from a high-average-current electron beam, or that produce ultrashort-wavelength light from a high-energy electron beam. Efficiency is a prime consideration in the former case, while high electron-beam quality is a prime consideration in the latter case. This paper summarizes the status of FEL projects involving srf accelerators. It also introduces Jefferson Lab`s srf FEL and surveys its design because it is a new machine, with commissioning having commenced in October 1997. Once commissioning is complete, this FEL should produce tunable, cw, kW-level light at 3-6 {mu}m wavelength.

  11. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  12. Storage ring two-color free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Hao, H.; Li, J. Y.; Mikhailov, S. F.; Popov, V. G.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Huang, S.; Wu, J.; Günster, S.; Wu, Y. K.

    2016-07-01

    We report a systematic experimental study of a storage ring two-color free-electron laser (FEL) operating simultaneously in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength regions. The two-color FEL lasing has been realized using a pair of dual-band high-reflectivity FEL mirrors with two different undulator configurations. We have demonstrated independent wavelength tuning in a wide range for each lasing color, as well as harmonically locked wavelength tuning when the UV lasing occurs at the second harmonic of the IR lasing. Precise power control of two-color lasing with good power stability has also been achieved. In addition, the impact of the degradation of FEL mirrors on the two-color FEL operation is reported. Furthermore, we have investigated the temporal structures of the two-color FEL beams, showing simultaneous two-color micropulses with their intensity modulations displayed as FEL macropulses.

  13. High power coaxial ubitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkcum, Adam J.

    In the ubitron, also known as the free electron laser, high power coherent radiation is generated from the interaction of an undulating electron beam with an electromagnetic signal and a static periodic magnetic wiggler field. These devices have experimentally produced high power spanning the microwave to x-ray regimes. Potential applications range from microwave radar to the study of solid state material properties. In this dissertation, the efficient production of high power microwaves (HPM) is investigated for a ubitron employing a coaxial circuit and wiggler. Designs for the particular applications of an advanced high gradient linear accelerator driver and a directed energy source are presented. The coaxial ubitron is inherently suited for the production of HPM. It utilizes an annular electron beam to drive the low loss, RF breakdown resistant TE01 mode of a large coaxial circuit. The device's large cross-sectional area greatly reduces RF wall heat loading and the current density loading at the cathode required to produce the moderate energy (500 keV) but high current (1-10 kA) annular electron beam. Focusing and wiggling of the beam is achieved using coaxial annular periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stacks without a solenoidal guide magnetic field. This wiggler configuration is compact, efficient and can propagate the multi-kiloampere electron beams required for many HPM applications. The coaxial PPM ubitron in a traveling wave amplifier, cavity oscillator and klystron configuration is investigated using linear theory and simulation codes. A condition for the dc electron beam stability in the coaxial wiggler is derived and verified using the 2-1/2 dimensional particle-in-cell code, MAGIC. New linear theories for the cavity start-oscillation current and gain in a klystron are derived. A self-consistent nonlinear theory for the ubitron-TWT and a new nonlinear theory for the ubitron oscillator are presented. These form the basis for simulation codes which, along

  14. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: A new cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy study under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-Rong; Che, Rong-Zheng; Liu, Jing; Du, Yong-Hua; Zhou, Ying-Li; Hu, Tian-Dou

    2009-08-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the investigation of the local environment around selected atoms in condensed matter. XAFS under pressure is an important method for the synchrotron source. We design a cell for a high pressure XAFS experiment. Sintered boron carbide is used as the anvils of this high pressure cell in order to obtain a full XAFS spectrum free from diffraction peaks. In addition, a hydraulic pump was adopted to make in-suit pressure modulation. High quality XAFS spectra of ZrH2 under high pressure (up to 13 GPa) were obtained by this cell.

  15. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    SciTech Connect

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Free electron laser with small period wiggler and sheet electron beam: A study of the feasibility of operation at 300 GHz with 1 MW CW output power

    SciTech Connect

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Destler, W.W.; Finn, J.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Radack, D.; Rodgers, J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of a small period wiggler (/ell//sub ..omega../ < 1 cm) together with a sheet electron beam has been proposed as a low cost source of power for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in magnetic fusion plasmas. Other potential applications include space-based radar systems. We have experimentally demonstrated stable propagation of a sheet beam (18 A. 1 mm /times/ 20 mm) through a ten-period wiggler electromagnet with peak field of 1.2 kG. Calculation of microwave wall heating and pressurized water cooling have also been carried out, and indicate the feasibility of operating a near-millimeter, sheet beam FEL with an output power of 1 MW CW (corresponding to power density into the walls of 2 kW/cm/sup 2/). Based on these encouraging results, a proof-of-principle experiment is being assembled, and is aimed at demonstrating FEL operating at 120 GHz with 300 kW output power in 1 ..mu..s pulses: electron energy would be 410 keV. Preliminary design of a 300 GHz 1 MW FEL with an untapered wiggler is also presented. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Conceptual design of industrial free electron laser using superconducting accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N.

    1995-12-31

    Paper presents conceptual design of free electron laser (FEL) complex for industrial applications. The FEL complex consists of three. FEL oscillators with the optical output spanning the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) wave-lengths ({lambda} = 0.3...20 {mu}m) and with the average output power 10 - 20 kW. The driving beam for the FELs is produced by a superconducting accelerator. The electron beam is transported to the FELs via three beam lines (125 MeV and 2 x 250 MeV). Peculiar feature of the proposed complex is a high efficiency of the. FEL oscillators, up to 20 %. This becomes possible due to the use of quasi-continuous electron beam and the use of the time-dependent undulator tapering.

  18. A free-electron laser at the Orsay storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elleaume, P.

    1984-12-01

    The design and operation of the free-electron-laser (FEL) apparatus installed at the Orsay storage-ring particle accelerator are characterized and illustrated with diagrams, graphs, and oscilloscope trades of the output. The history and fundamental physics of FELs are reviewed; the electron beam of the Orsay ring, the optical klystron (used instead of a wiggler due to the low gain klystron available), and the optical cavity (using a high-reflectance mirror) of the Orsay FEL are described; and experimental data on the spectrum, microtemporal and macrotemporal structure, and mean power of the FEL output are presented. The performance of the Orsay FEL is found to be in good agreement with the predictions of a classical theory based on the Lorentz force and the Maxwell equations.

  19. Polarization in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Papadichev, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  20. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-01-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm−1 spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm−1 are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s−1 in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS. PMID:26917127

  1. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm(-1) spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm(-1) are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10(12) photons s(-1) in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS. PMID:26917127

  2. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-02-12

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm₋1spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm₋1are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seedingmore » and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s₋1in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. Ultimately, this will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.« less

  3. Induction linac driven free-electron lasers for microwave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, William A.

    1992-03-01

    The recent development of highly reliable components for linear induction accelerators (LIA) and free-electron lasers (FEL) enable one to use these devices as economical sources of microwave power to drive magnetic fusion reactors and high gradient, rf linear accelerators. Based on the specifications and costs of the recently designed and fabricated LIA components at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Science Research Laboratory, Inc., and Pulse Sciences, Inc., this paper reviews the present technology of linear induction accelerators and presents an algorithm for scaling the cost of LIA-driven microwave sources to the high average power regime of interest for the next generation of fusion research machines and linear electorn-positron colliders at TeV energies. The algorithm allows one to optimize the output power of the sources with respect to cost (or other figure of merit) by varying he characteristics (pulse length, driven current, repetition rate, etc.) of the linear induction accelerator. It also allows one to explore cost sensitivities as a guide to formulating research strategies for developing advanced accelerator technologies.

  4. Induction accelerators and free-electron lasers at LLNL: Beam Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, R.J.

    1989-02-15

    Linear induction accelerators have been developed to produce pulses of charged particles at voltages exceeding the capabilities of single-stage, diode-type accelerators and at currents too high rf accelerators. In principle, one can accelerate charged particles to arbitrarily high voltages using a multistage induction machine. The advent of magnetic pulse power systems makes sustained operation at high repetition rates practical, and high-average-power capability is very likely to open up many new applications of induction machines. In Part A of this paper, we survey the US induction linac technology, emphasizing electron machines. We also give a simplified description of how induction machines couple energy to the electron beam to illustrate many general issues that designers of high-brightness and high-average-power induction linacs must consider. We give an example of the application of induction accelerator technology to the relativistic klystron, a power source for high-gradient accelerators. In Part B we address the application of LIAs to free-electron lasers. The multikiloampere peak currents available from linear induction accelerators make high-gain, free-electron laser amplifier configurations feasible. High extraction efficiencies in a single mass of the electron beam are possible if the wiggler parameters are appropriately ''tapered'', as recently demonstrated at millimeter wavelengths on the 4-MeV ELF facility. Key issues involved in extending the technology to shorter wavelengths and higher average powers are described. Current FEL experiments at LLNL are discussed. 5 refs., 16 figs.

  5. Short wavelength optics for future free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.T.

    1984-04-01

    Although much free-electron laser work is directed toward achieving sufficient single-pass gain to be useful for research purposes, the availability of mirrors of high reflectance for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime would make resonant cavities a possibility. In addition, as in ordinary synchrotron radiation work, mirrors are required for the construction of realistic experiments and for beam manipulation purposes such as folding and extraction. The Working Group discussed a number of approaches to reflecting optics for free electron lasers, which are summarized here, and described in some detail. 16 references, 2 figures.

  6. A Brief Technology Survey of High-Power Microwave Sources

    SciTech Connect

    BACON,LARRY D.; RINEHART,LARRY F.

    2001-04-01

    This report provides a brief summary of the characteristics of contemporary high-power microwave sources. The focus is on their physical and operational characteristics and regions of application rather than their theory of operation. Magnetrons, linear beam tubes, split-cavity oscillators, virtual cathode oscillators, gyrotrons, free-electron lasers, and orbitron microwave masers are described. Power supply requirements and engineering issues of the application of HPM devices are addressed.

  7. Rippled beam free-electron laser amplifier using the axial free-electron laser interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-05-01

    A new microwave generation mechanism involving a scalloping annular electron beam is discussed. The beam interacts with the axial electric field of a TM{sub 0n} mode in a smooth circular waveguide through the axial free-electron laser interaction, in which the beam ripple period is synchronous with the phase slippage of the rf mode relative to the electron beam. In this paper, we analyze the ripple motion of the electron beam and derive the dispersion relation describing the exponential growth of the rf mode. We calculate the gain for a nominal design and as a function of beam current and ripple amplitude, and show that power gain on the order of 30 dB/m of interaction is achievable. We additionally demonstrate that, under the right conditions, the interaction is autoresonant. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Synchrotron Facilities and Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Vaclav, Vylet; Liu, James; /SLAC

    2007-12-21

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle travels along a curved trajectory. Initially encountered as a nuisance around orbits of high energy synchrotron accelerators, it gradually became an indispensable research tool in many applications: crystallography, X-ray lithography, micromechanics, structural biology, microprobe X-ray experiments, etc. So-called first generation SR sources were exploiting SR in parasitic mode at electron accelerators built to study particle collisions. The second generation of SR sources was the first facilities solely devoted to SR production. They were optimized to achieve stable high currents in the accelerator ring to achieve substantially higher photon flux and to provide a large number of SR beam lines for users. Third generation sources were further optimized for increased brilliance, i.e. with photons densely packed into a beam of very small cross-sectional area and minimal angular divergence (see the Appendix for more detailed definitions of flux, brightness and brilliance) and makes extensive use of the insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators. Free Electron Lasers (FELs), the fourth generation SR sources, open new research possibilities by offering extremely short pulses of extremely bright and coherent radiation. The number of SR sources around the world now probably exceeds 100. These facilities vary greatly in size, energy of the electron (or positron) beams, range of photon energies and other characteristics of the photon beams produced. In what follows we will concentrate on describing some common aspects of SR facilities, their operation modes and specific radiation protection aspects.

  9. A free-electron laser for cyclotron resonant heating in magnetic fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, H. P.; Read, M. E.; Jackson, R. H.; Pershing, D. E.; Taccetti, J. M.

    1995-05-01

    A G-band free-electron laser designed for plasma heating is described using a coaxial hybrid iron (CHI) wiggler formed by insertion into a solenoid of a central rod and an outer ring of alternating ferrite and nonferrite spacers positioned so that the central ferrite (nonferrite) spacers are opposite the outer nonferrite (ferrite) spacers. The CHI wiggler provides for enhanced beam focusing and the ability to handle intense beams and high-power continuous wave radiation. Simulations indicate that a power/efficiency of 3.5 MW/13% are possible using a 690 kV/40 A beam. No beam loss was found in simulation.

  10. An Inverse Free-Electron-Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C.; van Steenbergen, A.; Ulc, S.; Woodle, M.; Sandweiss, J.; Fang, Jyan-Min

    1993-08-01

    Recent work at BNL on electron acceleration using the Inverse Free-Electron Laser (IFEL) has considered a low-energy, high-gradient, multi-stage linear accelerator. Experiments are planned at BNL`s Accelerator Test Facility using its 50-MeV linac and 100-GW CO{sub 2} laser. We have built and tested a fast-excitation wiggler magnet with constant field, tapered period, and overall length of 47 cm. Vanadium-Permendur ferromagnetic laminations are stacked in alternation with copper, eddy-current-induced, field reflectors to achieve a 1.4-T peak field with a 4-mm gap and a typical period of 3 cm. The laser beam will pass through the wiggler in a low-loss, dielectric-coated stainless-steel, rectangular waveguide. The attenuation and transverse mode has been measured in waveguide sections of various lengths, with and without the dielectric. Results of 1-D and 3-D IFEL simulations, including wiggler errors, will be presented for several cases: the initial, single-module experiment with {Delta}E = 39 MeV, a four-module design giving {Delta}E = 100 MeV in a total length of 2 m, and an eight-module IFEL with {Delta}E = 210 MeV.

  11. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Feldhaus, J.; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  12. The physics of x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Marinelli, A.; Reiche, S.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (x-ray FELs) give us for the first time the possibility to explore structures and dynamical processes of atomic and molecular systems at the angstrom-femtosecond space and time scales. They generate coherent photon pulses with time duration of a few to 100 fs, peak power of 10 to 100 GW, over a wavelength range extending from about 100 nm to less than 1 Å. Using these novel and unique capabilities new scientific results are being obtained in atomic and molecular sciences, in areas of physics, chemistry, and biology. This paper reviews the physical principles, the theoretical models, and the numerical codes on which x-ray FELs are based, starting from a single electron spontaneous undulator radiation to the FEL collective instability of a high density electron beam, strongly enhancing the electromagnetic radiation field intensity and its coherence properties. A short review is presented of the main experimental properties of x-ray FELs, and the results are discussed of the most recent research to improve their longitudinal coherence properties, increase the peak power, and generate multicolor spectra.

  13. High gain amplifiers: Power oscillations and harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Ottaviani, P. L.; Pagnutti, S.

    2007-08-01

    We discuss the power oscillations in saturated high gain free electron laser amplifiers and show that the relevant period can be written in terms of the gain length. We use simple arguments following from the solution of the pendulum equation in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Nontrivial effects due to nonlinear harmonic generation and inhomogeneous broadening are discussed too, as well as the saturated dynamics of short pulses.

  14. Proceedings of the Workshop Prospects for a 1 Angstrom Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, J. C.

    Papers are presented on the following topics: free electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups.

  15. Proceedings of the workshop prospects for a 1 angstrom free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics free-electron laser theory, scaling relations and simulations; micro-wigglers; photocathode and switched power gun; applications; and summary of working groups.

  16. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.; Fazio, M.; Haynes, W.

    1995-12-31

    Free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that will make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that (1) the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and (2) such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. The axial FEL interaction is with a fast wave and does involve axial bunching of the electron beam, so the results found for this device also apply to transverse-coupling FELs. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. By changing the annulus radius, exact cancellation can be found for a variety of beam voltages and currents in the ranges of 0.5-1.0 MV and 1-5 kA. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons.

  17. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Fortgang, C.M.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; May, L.M.; Potter, J.M.

    1995-09-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Present-day pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that win make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling-wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons. Detailed particle-in-cell simulations are included to demonstrate the transverse wiggling of the rf mode and the axial FEL interaction.

  18. Structure of the spontaneous emission spectra of high-{gamma} free electron lasers as measured at the Darmstadt (S-Dalinac) FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Renz, G.; Spindler, G.; Schlott, V.

    1995-12-31

    Recent spontaneous emission measurements at the Darmstadt infrared FEL indicate a relatively broad (down-shifted) spectrum with several intensity maxima. The typical features of the measured spectrum can be well reproduced by a numerical simulation comprising the 3-d electron dynamics in a realizable planar wiggler field, the spontaneous radiation according to the well-known Jackson formula, as well as the detection of the radiation with a finite aperture detector. An analytical consideration attributes the observed down-shift to the reduced Doppler up-shift of the radiation as observed under a finite angle with respect to the axis. The intensity peaks appear as a consequence of a modulation of the transverse velocity amplitudes of the electrons due to the betatron oscillation. The spectral spacing of these {open_quote}sidebands{close_quote} are roughly given by the Doppler up-shifted betatron frequency. Consequences for very high energy FELs will be discussed.

  19. Space elevator: an ideal application for the free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Bradley C.

    2002-06-01

    All space activities rely completely on rockets to get into space. Advanced propulsion systems are being examined by NASA and others but few if any of these technologies, even if perfected, can provide the high-volume, low-cost transportation system required for future space activities mankind hopes for. A system with the required traits is the space elevator. The space elevator, a cable that can be ascended by mechanical means from Earth to space, would reduce the cost of getting into space by a factor 100 or more while increasing launch capabilities dramatically. Under a NIAC grant we have laid the technical groundwork by examining all aspects of a first elevator. For a cost of $40B the first space elevator could provide low-risk, inexpensive access to space within the next 15 years. A free-electron laser power beaming system is critical to the success of the space elevator, no other system has the performance required to provide power to the climbers. Using the free-electron laser power beaming system the space elevator could efficiently provide inexpensive access to space for placing satellites, human colonization and placement of space-based solar power satellites that could provide large quantities of renewable clean power.

  20. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, A; Coffee, R; Vetter, S; Hering, P; West, G N; Gilevich, S; Lutman, A A; Li, S; Maxwell, T; Galayda, J; Fry, A; Huang, Z

    2016-06-24

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes. PMID:27391728

  1. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, A.; Coffee, R.; Vetter, S.; Hering, P.; West, G. N.; Gilevich, S.; Lutman, A. A.; Li, S.; Maxwell, T.; Galayda, J.; Fry, A.; Huang, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes.

  2. Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Claudio

    2011-03-02

    During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

  3. Free Electron Laser Theory Using Two Times Green Function Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, we present a quatum theory for free electron laser obtained by firstly using the Two time's Green Function method developed by Matsubara for solid physics theory. The dispersion relation for the laser photon obtained is limited to the case of low intensity of the laser due to the decoupling the correlation function in low order. For the analysis of the self-amplified emission (SASE), the high intensity laser radiation which strongly affect the trajectory of the free electron is involved, the use of the classical approximation for laser can formulate the laser radiation with multiple frequency. To get the quantum effects in the high intensity laser, use of the perturbation theory, and the expansion methods of state function using the coherent, squeeze and super-radiant states have discussed.

  4. Simulation of free-electron lasers seeded with broadband radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bajlekov, Svetoslav; Fawley, William; Schroeder, Carl; Bartolini, Riccardo; Hooker, Simon

    2011-03-10

    The longitudinal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL) radiation can be enhanced by seeding the FEL with high harmonics of an optical laser pulse. The radiation produced by high-harmonic generation (HHG), however, has a fast-varying temporal profile that can violate the slowly varying envelope approximation and limited frequency window that is employed in conventional free-electron laser simulation codes. Here we investigate the implications of violating this approximation on the accuracy of simulations. On the basis of both analytical considerations and 1D numerical studies, it is concluded that, for most realistic scenarios, conventional FEL codes are capable of accurately simulating the FEL process even when the seed radiation violates the slowly varying envelope approximation. We additionally discuss the significance of filtering the harmonic content of broadband HHG seeds.

  5. Applications of the Jefferson Lab free-electron laser for photobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dylla, H. Frederick; Benson, Stephen V.; Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Austin, Robert H.; Sutherland, John C.

    2000-04-01

    A versatile free electron laser (FEL) user facility has recently come on line at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) providing high average (kilowatt-level) power laser light in the infrared. A planned upgrade of the FEL in this facility will extend the wavelength range through the visible to the deep UV and provide the photobiology community with a unique light source for a variety of studies. Planned and potential applications of this FEL include: IR studies of energy flow in biomolecules, IR and visible imaging of biomedical systems, IR and visible studies of photodynamic effects and UV and near visible studies of DNA photodamage.

  6. First Demonstration of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation Technique for Short-Wavelength Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Pernet, P.-L.; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne

    2010-08-25

    We report the first experimental demonstration of the echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) technique which holds great promise for generation of high power, fully coherent short-wavelength radiation. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the 3rd and 4th harmonic of the second seed laser is generated from the so-called beam echo effect. The experiment confirms the physics behind this technique and paves the way for applying the EEHG technique for seeded x-ray free electron lasers.

  7. Nonlinear pulse evolution in seeded free-electron laser amplifiers and in free-electron laser cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Giannessi, L.; Musumeci, P.; Spampinati, S.

    2005-08-15

    The advances in laser technology have made available very short and intense laser pulses which can be used to seed a high-gain single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier. With these seed pulses, a regime of the FEL interaction where the radiation evolution is simultaneously dominated by nonlinear effects (saturation) and time-dependent effects (slippage) can be explored. This regime is characterized by the propagation of a solitary wavelike pulse where the power of the optical wave grows quadratically with time, its pulse length decreases and the spectral bandwidth increases. We analyze the interplay between the field and particle dynamics of this propagation regime which was studied before and termed super-radiance. Furthermore we analyze the properties of the strong higher-order harmonic emission from this wave and its behavior when propagating in a cascade FEL. The super-radiant pulse is indeed capable of passing through the stages of a cascade FEL and to regenerate itself at the wavelength of the higher-order harmonic. The optical pulse obtained is shorter than a cooperation length and is strongly chirped in frequency, thus allowing further longitudinal compression down to the attosecond time scale.

  8. An inverse free electron laser accelerator: Experiment and theoretical interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jyan-Min

    1997-06-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of the Inverse Free Electron Laser using a GW-level 10.6 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser have been carried out at Brookhaven`s Accelerator Test Facility. An energy gain of 2.5 % ({Delta}E/E) on a 40 MeV electron beam has been observed E which compares well with theory. The effects on IFEL acceleration with respect to the variation of the laser electric field, the input electron beam energy, and the wiggler magnetic field strength were studied, and show the importance of matching the resonance condition in the IFEL. The numerical simulations were performed under various conditions and the importance of the electron bunching in the IFEL is shown. The numerical interpretation of our IFEL experimental results was examined. Although good numerical agreement with the experimental results was obtained, there is a discrepancy between the level of the laser power measured in the experiment and used in the simulation, possibly due to the non-Gaussian profile of the input high power laser beam. The electron energy distribution was studied numerically and a smoothing of the energy spectrum by the space charge effect at the location of the spectrometer was found, compared with the spectrum at the exit of the wiggler. The electron bunching by the IFEL and the possibility of using the IFEL as an electron prebuncher for another laser-driven accelerator were studied numerically. We found that bunching of the electrons at 1 meter downstream from the wiggler can be achieved using the existing facility. The simulation shows that there is a fundamental difference between the operating conditions for using the IFEL as a high gradient accelerator, and as a prebuncher for another accelerator.

  9. Inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; Campisi, R.

    1982-01-01

    We first describe the basic physical properties of an inverse free-electron laser and make an estimate of the order of magnitude of the accelerating field obtainable with such a system; then apply the general ideas to the design of an actual device and through this example we give a more accurate evaluation of the fundamental as well as the technical limitations that this acceleration scheme imposes.

  10. Gas-Monitor Detector for Intense and Pulsed VUV/EUV Free-Electron Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Bobashev, S. V.; Feldhaus, J.; Gerth, Ch.; Gottwald, A.; Hahn, U.; Kroth, U.; Richter, M.; Shmaenok, L. A.; Steeg, B.; Tiedtke, K.; Treusch, R.

    2004-05-01

    In the framework of current developments of new powerful VUV and EUV radiation sources, like VUV free-electron-lasers or EUV plasma sources for 13-nm lithography, we developed a gas-monitor detector in order to measure the photon flux of highly intense and extremely pulsed VUV and EUV radiation in absolute terms. The device is based on atomic photoionization of a rare gas at low particle density. Therefore, it is free of degradation and almost transparent, which allows the detector to be used as a continuously working beam-intensity monitor. The extended dynamic range of the detector allowed its calibration with relative standard uncertainties of 4% in the Radiometry Laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron-storage ring BESSY II in Berlin using spectrally dispersed synchrotron radiation at low photon intensities and its utilization for absolute photon flux measurements of high power sources. In the present contribution, we describe the design of the detector and its application for the characterization of VUV free-electron-laser radiation at the TESLA test facility in Hamburg. By first pulse resolved measurements, a peak power of more than 100 MW at a wavelength of 87 nm was detected.

  11. Induction linac-driven free-electron lasers: Status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Prosnitz, D.

    1987-01-11

    The high repetition rate and low single-pass gain inherent in an rf-driven Free Electron Laser (FEL) dictate that the laser system be configured as an oscillator. This allows the laser's electric field to build up over many passes around a high Q cavity. By way of contrast, the high-current capability of the Induction Linac (IL) system permits high single-pass optical gain, but the relatively low duty factor precludes oscillator operation; the pulses are neither long enough nor often enough to permit a field to accumulate in a cavity. The IL is thus configured as a MOPA (master oscillator/power amplifier) with a conventional laser serving as the MO. This report concentrates on the status of IL-driven FEL research at LLNL and gives a description of several applications for the high-peak-power radiation produced by an induction linac FEL.

  12. Three-dimensional simulation analysis of the standing-wave free- electron laser two beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Sessler, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have modified a two-dimensional relativistic klystron code, developed by Ryne and Yu, to simulate both the standing-wave free- electron laser two-beam accelerator and the relativistic klystron two- beam accelerator. In this paper, the code is used to study a standing-wave free-electron laser with three cavities. The effect of the radius of the electron beam on the RF output power; namely, a three-dimensional effect is examined.

  13. Operation of higher harmonic oscillations in free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Sei, N; Ogawa, H; Yamada, K

    2012-01-01

    We report for the first time the experimental achievement of a seventh-harmonic free-electron laser (FEL) oscillation. The measured FEL gains and average FEL powers for higher harmonics were identical to those calculated by a one-dimensional FEL theory. The measured linewidths of the higher-harmonic FELs were narrower than that of the fundamental FEL owing to the narrower spectral widths of the spontaneous emissions. By applying the higher-harmonic FEL oscillation to a resonator-type FEL with an advanced accelerator, an x-ray FEL oscillator can be realized at lower electron-beam energy. PMID:22274354

  14. A local theory of effect of beam pre-modulation on gain and efficiency in a surface wave pumped free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Jyotsna; Sharma, Suresh C.; Bhasin, Anuradha; Jain, V. K.

    2014-08-01

    A pre-modulated relativistic electron beam (REB) counter propagating to the surface wave in the vacuum region Compton backscatters the surface wave into a high frequency radiation. The surface wave extends into the vacuum region and can be employed as a wiggler for the generation of sub-millimeter waves. The growth rate and gain were evaluated for a typical FEL (Free Electron Laser) parameters and It is found that the growth rate and gain of the surface wave pumped free electron laser increases with the modulation index. Moreover, the growth rate of the FEL (Free electron Laser) instability scales as one-third power of the beam density in the Compton regime.

  15. Quantum free-electron laser: A fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, L. F.; Serbeto, A.; Tsui, K. H.

    2012-02-01

    Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) are today a very important area of research. Such devices can generate short pulses of high-power coherent radiation in wavelengths that are unreachable to conventional molecular lasers, such as X-Rays, and are based on the radiation emitted by a relativistic electron beam that performs a waving movement induced by an alternating electromagnetic field. They can be described by classical or quantum models. Classical models are simpler than the last, but they are valid only if the one-photon momentum recoil is not greater than the beam momentum spread, where the FEL operates in a new Quantum regime, and quantum models should be used. It is the case for high-energy fotons and low-energy electron beams. In this work we present a hydrodynamical model which incorporates quantum effects. Starting from Poisson equation and a Schrödinger-like equation deduced from the total relativistic energy of the electron under the action of a ponderomotive potential V associated with the combined wiggle and radiation fields, we obtain, by performing a Madelung transformation to the electron wave function, a set of fluid equations (continuity and momentum) to the beam dynamics, where a Bohm potential accumulates the quantum information. By coupling the wave equation, under the SVEA hypothesis, we get a set of nonlinear PDE system which describes the quantum-FEL as a three-wave interaction phenomena, where the amplified radiation is seen as Compton or Raman backscattered radiation. Our model is simpler than previous quantum models, and can be used in laser amplification theory as well.

  16. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, K.J.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The term Smith-Purcell free electron laser can be employed generally to describe any coherent radiation source in which a diffraction grating is used to couple an electron beam with the electromagnetic field. To date, most practical developments of this concept have focused on devices which operate in the millimeter spectral regime. In this paper construction of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser operating in the far-infrared (FIR) region using a novel resonator cavity design and the electron beam from a low energy (0.5-5 MeV) radio-frequency accelerator will be discussed. A tunable source in this region would have many applications and since the beam energy is low, the small size and low overall cost of such a device would make it a laboratory instrument. Current projects which are progressing towards developing a FIR source are the programs at Stanford and CREOL. Both of these projects are using permanent magnet undulators to couple the electron beam with the electromagnetic field. An alternative approach is to use an electron beam passing over a diffraction grating as the radiating mechanism. This phenomenon is known as Smith-Purcell radiation and was first demonstrated for incoherent emission at visible wavelengths. The addition of feedback enhances the stimulated component of the emission which leads to the growth of coherence. Recent calculations for spontaneous emission have shown that the wiggler parameter and the grating efficiency are analogous. This result has important implications for the development of a Smith-Purcell FEL because a grating based free-electron laser would offer a greater range of tunability at a lower cost than its wiggler based counterpart.

  17. Rippled-beam free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-10-01

    The authors describe a new microwave generation mechanism involving a scalloping annular electron beam. The beam interacts with the axial electric field of a TM{sub 0n} mode in a smooth circular waveguide through the axial free-electron laser interaction, in which the beam ripple period is synchronous with the phase slippage of the rf mode relative to the electron beam. Due to nonlinearities in the orbit equation, the interaction can be made autoresonant, where the phase and amplitude of the gain is independent of the beam energy.

  18. Free electron laser with masked chicane

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) is provided with an accelerator for outputting electron beam pulses; a buncher for modulating each one of the electron beam pulses to form each pulse into longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons; and a wiggler for generating coherent light from the longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons. The electron beam buncher is a chicane having a mask for physically modulating the electron beam pulses to form a series of electron beam bunches for input to the wiggler. In a preferred embodiment, the mask is located in the chicane at a position where each electron beam pulse has a maximum dispersion.

  19. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  20. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hafizi, B.; Roberson, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  1. The free electron laser: conceptual history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madey, John; Scully, Marlan O.; Sprangle, Phillip

    2016-08-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has lived up to its promise as given in (Madey 1971 J. Appl. Phys. 42 1906) to wit: ‘As shall be seen, finite gain is available …from the far-infrared through the visible region …with the further possibility of partially coherent radiation sources in the x-ray region’. In the present paper we review the history of the FEL drawing liberally (and where possible literally) from the original sources. Coauthors, Madey, Scully and Sprangle were involved in the early days of the subject and give a first hand account of the subject with an eye to the future.

  2. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW`s) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  3. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW's) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  4. Microbunching-instability-induced sidebands in a seeded free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Lindberg, Ryan; Fawley, William M.; Huang, Zhirong; Krzywinski, Jacek; Lutman, Alberto; Marcus, Gabriel; Marinelli, Agostino

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of the multishot-averaged, soft x-ray, self-seeding spectrum at the LCLS free-electron laser often have a pedestal-like distribution around the seeded wavelength, which limits the spectral purity and can negatively affect some user applications not employing a post-undulator monochromator. In this paper, we study the origins of such pedestals, focusing on longitudinal phase space modulations produced by the microbunching instability upstream of the free-electron laser (FEL) undulator. We show from theory and numerical simulation that both energy and density modulations can induce sidebands in a high-gain, seeded FEL whose fractional strength typically grows as the square of the undulator length. The results place a tight constraint on the longitudinal phase space uniformity of the electron beam for a seeded FEL, possibly requiring the amplitude of long-wavelength modulations to be much smaller than the typical incoherent energy spread if the output sideband power is to remain only a couple percent or less of the amplified seed power.

  5. Free electron terahertz wave radiation source with two-section periodical waveguide structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Weihao; Gong Sen; Zhang Yaxin; Zhou Jun; Zhang Ping; Liu Shenggang

    2012-03-15

    We analyze a free electron terahertz wave radiation source with two-section periodical waveguide structure (PWS), where the first section (section-I) is used to pre-modulate the electron beam and the second section (section-II) is for terahertz wave generation. By means of theoretical analysis and numerical simulations, we demonstrate that the starting current density of the beam-wave interaction in section-II can be significantly reduced provided that the operation frequency is the harmonic of electron beam's pre-modulation frequency. This kind of source can generate relatively high power terahertz wave radiation but only need moderate beam current density. And it may have great potential application in developing the compact and high power terahertz wave radiation source.

  6. Prospects for the FEL (Free Electron Laser)

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1989-04-01

    The future for FELs depends upon the very large number of applications which is envisioned for them. These grow out of the FEL extensive range of wavelengths, tunability, and high power capability. High power requires demonstration of optical guiding. Tunability has already been demonstrated. And the effort to extend the range of wavelengths is ever ongoing. The future will also bring more work on gas-loaded FELs, on electromagnetic wigglers, and on harmonic generation. We can, also, look forward to observation of various new effects, a few of which will be described. Finally, a list of various FEL projects around the world will be given. 12 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  8. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  9. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-04-17

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention as a method for producing transform-limited pulses in the soft x-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality and impede production of transform-limited pulses. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  10. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Hutton, Andrew

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  11. Modelling elliptically polarised free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, J. R.; Campbell, L. T.; Freund, H. P.; McNeil, B. W. J.

    2016-06-01

    A model of a free electron laser (FEL) operating with an elliptically polarised undulator is presented. The equations describing the FEL interaction, including resonant harmonic radiation fields, are averaged over an undulator period and generate a generalised Bessel function scaling factor, similar to that of planar undulator FEL theory. Comparison between simulations of the averaged model with those of an unaveraged model show very good agreement in the linear regime. Two unexpected results were found. Firstly, an increased coupling to harmonics for elliptical rather than planar polarisarised undulators. Secondly, and thought to be unrelated to the undulator polarisation, a significantly different evolution between the averaged and unaveraged simulations of the harmonic radiation evolution approaching FEL saturation.

  12. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  13. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  14. Rippled beam free electron Laser Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1998-04-21

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a T{sub 0n} mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and . A solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  15. The Galactic distribution of free electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Ryan, M.; Weisberg, J. M.; Frail, D. A.; Spangler, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    Various radioastronomical measurements are synthesized here to derive a large-scale Galactic model for the distribution of free electrons and for microstructure in the distribution that seems to be caused by turbulence in the ISM. A two-component axisymmetric model fitted on all scales from 100 km to a few pc, accounts for most of the data. A population of dense, discrete clouds is also needed, and there is some evidence for spiral structure. The model allows better distance estimates for pulsars to be made. The implications of the model for the structure and ionization of the ISM and for the distribution of interstellar turbulence and the diffusion of cosmic rays are discussed.

  16. High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert; Tverdokhlebov, Sergery; Manzella, David

    1999-01-01

    The development of Hall thrusters with powers ranging from tens of kilowatts to in excess of one hundred kilowatts is considered based on renewed interest in high power. high thrust electric propulsion applications. An approach to develop such thrusters based on previous experience is discussed. It is shown that the previous experimental data taken with thrusters of 10 kW input power and less can be used. Potential mass savings due to the design of high power Hall thrusters are discussed. Both xenon and alternate thruster propellant are considered, as are technological issues that will challenge the design of high power Hall thrusters. Finally, the implications of such a development effort with regard to ground testing and spacecraft intecrati'on issues are discussed.

  17. Thermal effect on prebunched two-beam free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mirian, N. S.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-08-15

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the two-beam free electron laser. The fundamental resonance of the fast electron beam coincides with the fifth harmonic of the slow electron beam in order to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation. Thermal effect in the form of the longitudinal velocity spread is included in the analysis. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, prebunched slow electron beam is considered. The evaluation of the radiation power, bunching parameter, distribution function of energy, and the distribution function of the pondermotive phase is studied. Sensitivity of the power of the fifth harmonic to the jitter in the energy difference between the two beams is also studied. A phase space is presented that shows the trapped electrons at the saturation point.

  18. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-09-08

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  19. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Hongxiu; Neil, George R.

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  20. CSTI High Capacity Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Jerry M.

    1989-01-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY-86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY-88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA's new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  1. CSTI high capacity power

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  2. Undulator beamline optimization with integrated chicanes for X-ray free-electron-laser facilities.

    PubMed

    Prat, Eduard; Calvi, Marco; Ganter, Romain; Reiche, Sven; Schietinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    An optimization of the undulator layout of X-ray free-electron-laser (FEL) facilities based on placing small chicanes between the undulator modules is presented. The installation of magnetic chicanes offers the following benefits with respect to state-of-the-art FEL facilities: reduction of the required undulator length to achieve FEL saturation, improvement of the longitudinal coherence of the FEL pulses, and the ability to produce shorter FEL pulses with higher power levels. Numerical simulations performed for the soft X-ray beamline of the SwissFEL facility show that optimizing the advantages of the layout requires shorter undulator modules than the standard ones. This proposal allows a very compact undulator beamline that produces fully coherent FEL pulses and it makes possible new kinds of experiments that require very short and high-power FEL pulses. PMID:27359133

  3. Status of the Northrop Grumman Compact Infrared Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, I.S.; Krishnaswamy, J.; Hartley, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Compact Infrared Free Electron Laser (CIRFEL) was built as part of a joint collaboration between the Northrop Grumman Corporation and Princeton University to develop FEL`s for use by researchers in the materials, medical and physical sciences. The CIRFEL was designed to lase in the Mid-IR and Far-IR regimes with picosecond pulses, megawatt level peak powers and an average power of a few watts. The micropulse separation is 7 nsec which allows a number of relaxation phenomenon to be observed. The CIRFEL utilizes an RF photocathode gun to produce high-brightness time synchronized electron bunches. The operational status and experimental results of the CERFEL will be presented.

  4. RF Stability in Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lia Merminga

    2001-08-01

    Phenomena that result from the interaction of the beam with the rf fields in superconducting cavities, and can potentially limit the performance of high average power Energy Recovery Free Electron Lasers (FELs), are reviewed. These phenomena include transverse and longitudinal multipass, multibunch Beam Breakup, longitudinal beam-loading types of instabilities and their interaction with the FEL, Higher Order Mode power dissipation, emittance growth and energy spread due to short range wakefields, and rf control issues. We present experimental data obtained at the Jefferson Lab IR FEL with average current up to 5 mA, compare with analytic calculations and simulations and extrapolate the performance of Energy Recovery FELs to much higher average currents, up to approximately 100 mA. This work supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-84ER40150, the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Laser Processing Consortium.

  5. Production of high power femtosecond terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil, George R.; Carr, G.L.; Gubeli III, Joseph F.; Jordan, K.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Shinn, Michelle; Tani, Masahiko; Williams, G.P.; Zhang, X.-C.

    2003-07-11

    The terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum is attracting interest for a broad range of applications ranging from diagnosing electron beams to biological imaging. Most sources of short pulse THz radiation utilize excitation of biased semiconductors or electro-optic crystals by high peak power lasers. For example, this was done by using an un-doped InAs wafer irradiated by a femtosecond free-electron laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Microwatt levels of THz radiation were detected when excited with FEL pulses at 1.06 mm wavelength and 10W average power. Recently substantially higher powers of femtosecond THz pulses produced by synchrotron emission were extracted from the electron beamline. Calculations and measurements confirm the production of coherent broadband THz radiation from relativistic electrons with an average power of nearly 20W, a world record in this wavelength range by a factor of 10,000. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. Potential applications of this exciting new source include driving new non-linear phenomena, performing pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of novel materials, and studying molecular vibrations and rotations, low frequency protein motions, phonons, superconductor band gaps, electronic scattering, collective electronic excitations (e.g., charge density waves), and spintronics.

  6. Production of high power femtosecond terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, George R.; Carr, G. L.; Gubeli, Joseph F.; Jordan, K.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Shinn, Michelle; Tani, Masahiko; Williams, G. P.; Zhang, X.-C.

    2003-07-01

    The terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum is attracting interest for a broad range of applications ranging from diagnosing electron beams to biological imaging. Most sources of short pulse THz radiation utilize excitation of biased semiconductors or electro-optic crystals by high peak power lasers. For example, this was done by using an un-doped InAs wafer irradiated by a femtosecond free-electron laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Microwatt levels of THz radiation were detected when excited with FEL pulses at 1.06 μm wavelength and 10 W average power. Recently substantially higher powers of femtosecond THz pulses produced by synchrotron emission were extracted from the electron beamline. Calculations and measurements confirm the production of coherent broadband THz radiation from relativistic electrons with an average power of nearly 20 W, a world record in this wavelength range by a factor of 10,000. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. Potential applications of this exciting new source include driving new non-linear phenomena, performing pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of novel materials, and studying molecular vibrations and rotations, low frequency protein motions, phonons, superconductor bandgaps, electronic scattering, collective electronic excitations (e.g., charge density waves), and spintronics.

  7. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    SciTech Connect

    Baptiste, Kenneth; Corlett, John; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Lidia, Steven; Qiang, Ji; Sannibale, Fernando; Sonnad, Kiran; Staples, John; Virostek, Steven; Wells, Russell

    2008-10-08

    Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to {approx} 1 nC bunch charges with less than 1 mmmrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than {approx} 1 MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.

  8. Start-to-end simulations for a seeded harmonic generation free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorin, S.; Brandin, M.; Werin, S.; Goldammer, K.; Bahrdt, J.

    2007-11-01

    This paper shows how the MAX linac injector and transport system can be efficiently retuned to suit free electron laser (FEL) performance. In a collaboration between MAX-lab and BESSY, a seeded harmonic generation free electron laser is being constructed at MAX-lab. The setup uses the existing MAX-lab facility upgraded with a new low emittance photocathode gun, a Ti∶Sa 266 nm laser system used for both the gun and seeding and an FEL undulator system. To produce the high quality electron beam needed, it is shown how the magnet optics in an achromatic dogleg can be tuned to create an optimum bunch compression and how a good quality beam can be maintained through the beam transport and delivered to the FEL undulators. In extensive start-to-end simulations from the cathode of the gun to the generation of photons in the undulators, FEL performance and stability has been calculated using simulation tools like ASTRA, ELEGANT, and GENESIS. This has been done for both the third and fifth harmonic of the seed laser. The results from the calculation are 30 fs light pulses with a power of 11 MW at 88 nm and 1.4 MW at 53 nm.

  9. Propagation of gamma rays and production of free electrons in air

    SciTech Connect

    Dimant, Y. S.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Granatstein, V. L.; Sprangle, P.; Penano, J.

    2012-10-15

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of production of free electrons in air by gamma-rays leaking from radioactive materials. A model based on the Klein-Nishina scattering theory is used to calculate scattering cross sections and approximate the electron production rate. The model includes the effects of primary gamma-quanta radiated by the source as well as that scattered in air. Comparison of the model with the mcnpx kinetic code (http://mcnpx.lanl.gov/) in a sample problem shows excellent agreement. The motivation for this research comes from the recently proposed concept of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials [V. L. Granatstein and G. S. Nusinovich, J. Appl. Phys. 108, 063304 (2010)]. The concept is based on the breakdown in air at the focal point of a high-power beam of electromagnetic waves produced by a THz gyrotron with a 10-20 {mu}s pulse. The presence of a radioactive material can greatly exceed the production rate of free electrons over the natural background rate. Additional electrons act as seeds to initiate the breakdown and create sufficiently dense plasma at the focal region. The dense plasma can then be remotely detected as an unambiguous effect of the concealed radioactive material.

  10. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  11. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1997-01-01

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  12. Generation of subterawatt-attosecond pulses in a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Senlin; Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Marcus, Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel scheme to generate attosecond soft x rays in a self-seeded free-electron laser (FEL) suitable for enabling attosecond spectroscopic investigations. A time-energy chirped electron bunch with additional sinusoidal energy modulation is adopted to produce a short seed pulse through a self-seeding monochromator. This short seed pulse, together with high electron current spikes and a cascaded delay setup, enables a high-efficiency FEL with a fresh bunch scheme. Simulations show that using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) parameters, soft x-ray pulses with a FWHM of 260 attoseconds and a peak power of 0.5 TW can be obtained. This scheme also has the feature of providing a stable central wavelength determined by the self-seeding monochromator.

  13. Boiling the Vacuum with AN X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringwald, A.

    2004-10-01

    X-ray free electron lasers will be constructed in this decade, both at SLAC in the form of the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source as well as at DESY, where the so-called TESLA XFEL laboratory uses techniques developed for the design of the TeV energy superconducting electron-positron linear accelerator TESLA. Such X-ray lasers may allow also for high-field science applications by exploiting the possibility to focus their beams to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. We consider here the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production) and review the prospects to verify this non-perturbative production mechanism for the first time in the laboratory.

  14. Performance and design concepts of a free electron laser operating in the x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.

    1997-03-01

    We report on the Design Study of a Free-Electron-Laser experiment designed to produce coherent radiation at the wavelength of 1.5 {Angstrom} and longer. The proposed experiment utilizes 1/3 of the SLAC linac to accelerate electrons to 15 GeV. The high brightness electron beam interacts with the magnetic field of a long undulator and generates coherent radiation by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). The projected output peak power is about, 10 GW. The project presents several challenges in the realization of a high brightness electron beam, in the construction and tolerances of the undulator and in the transport, of the x-ray radiation. The technical solutions adopted for the design are discussed. Numerical simulations are used to show the performance as a function of system parameters.

  15. A single-shot transmissive spectrometer for hard x-ray free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Diling; Cammarata, Marco; Feldkamp, Jan M.; Fritz, David M.; Hastings, Jerome B.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Robert, Aymeric; Turner, James L.; Feng Yiping

    2012-07-16

    We report hard x-ray single-shot spectral measurements of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The spectrometer is based on a 10 {mu}m thick cylindrically bent Si single crystal operating in the symmetric Bragg geometry to provide dispersion and high transmission simultaneously. It covers a spectral range >1% using the Si(111) reflection. Using the Si(333) reflection, it reaches a resolving power of better than 42 000 and transmits >83% of the incident flux at 8.3 keV. The high resolution enabled the observation of individual spectral spikes characteristic of a self-amplified spontaneous emission x-ray free electron laser source. Potential applications of the device are discussed.

  16. Čerenkov free-electron laser with side walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Yashvir; Kumar, Vinit

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a Čerenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) with metallic side walls, which are used to confine an electromagnetic surface mode supported by a thin dielectric slab placed on top of a conducting surface. This leads to an enhancement in coupling between the optical mode and the co-propagating electron beam, and consequently, performance of the CFEL is improved. We set up coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with an undulator based conventional FEL, and obtain formulas for the small-signal gain and growth rate. It is shown that small signal gain and growth rate in this configuration are larger compared to the configuration without the side walls. In the nonlinear regime, we solve the coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations numerically and study the saturation behaviour of the system. It is found that the Čerenkov FEL with side walls saturates quickly, and produces powerful coherent terahertz radiation.

  17. Free-electron laser as a laboratory instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.F.; Lewellen, J.W.; Huang, Y.C.; Feinstein, J.; Pantell, R.H.

    1995-06-01

    A free-electron laser (FEL), with a component cost, including the accelerator, of approximately $300,000, has a laser at a wavelength of 85 microns with approx. 12 ps micropulse duration, achieving a power growth four orders of magnitude greater than the coherent spontaneous emission, and with a small-signal, single-pass gain of 21%. The price is about an order of magnitude less than other FELs for the far infrared, and transforms the device from the role of a national facility to that of a laboratory instrument. Cost reduction was achieved by employing several novel features: a microwave cavity gun for the accelerator, a staggered-array wiggler, and an on-axis hole in the upstream cavity mirror for electron ingress and radiation egress.

  18. Beam Conditioning for Free Electron Lasers:Consequences and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, A.; Penn, G.; Sessler, A.; Wurtele, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

    2010-12-14

    The consequences of beam conditioning in four example cases [VISA, a soft x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), LCLS, and a 'Greenfield' FEL] are examined. It is shown that in emittance limited cases, proper conditioning reduces sensitivity to the transverse emittance and, furthermore, allows for stronger focusing in the undulator. Simulations show higher saturation power, with gain lengths reduced by a factor of 2 or more. The beam dynamics in a general conditioning system are studied, with 'matching conditions' derived for achieving conditioning without growth in the effective emittance. Various conditioning lattices are considered, and expressions derived for the amount of conditioning provided in each case when the matching conditions are satisfied. These results show that there is no fundamental obstacle to producing beam conditioning, and that the problem can be reduced to one of proper lattice design. Nevertheless, beam conditioning will not be easy to implement in practice.

  19. Beam conditioning for free electron lasers: Consequences and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolski, A.; Penn, G.; Sessler, A.; Wurtele, J.

    2004-08-01

    The consequences of beam conditioning in four example cases [VISA, a soft x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), LCLS, and a “Greenfield” FEL] are examined. It is shown that in emittance limited cases, proper conditioning reduces sensitivity to the transverse emittance and, furthermore, allows for stronger focusing in the undulator. Simulations show higher saturation power, with gain lengths reduced by a factor of2 or more. The beam dynamics in a general conditioning system are studied, with “matching conditions” derived for achieving conditioning without growth in the effective emittance. Various conditioning lattices are considered, and expressions derived for the amount of conditioning provided in each case when the matching conditions are satisfied. These results show that there is no fundamental obstacle to producing beam conditioning, and that the problem can be reduced to one of proper lattice design. Nevertheless, beam conditioning will not be easy to implement in practice.

  20. The European XFEL Free Electron Laser at DESY

    ScienceCinema

    Weise, Hans [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Germany

    2009-09-01

    The European X-ray Free-Electron laser Facility (XFEL) is going to be built in an international collaboration at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Germany, and the Technical Design Report was published in 2006. The official project is expected for summer 2007. This new facility will offer photon beams at wavelengths as short as 1 angstrom with highest peak brilliance being more than 100 million times higher than present day synchrotron radiation sources. The radiation has a high degree of transverse coherence and the pulse duration is reduced from {approx}100 picoseconds (typ. for SR light sources) down to the {approx}10 femtosecond time domain. The overall layout of the XFEL will be described. This includes the envisaged operation parameters for the linear accelerator using superconducting TESLA technology. The complete design is based on the actually operated FLASH free-electron laser at DESY. Experience with the operation during first long user runs at wavelengths from 30 to 13 nm will be described in detail.

  1. The Medical Free Electron Laser Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Charles L.

    1989-08-01

    We owe the development of the free electron laser (FEL) to Dr. John M.J. Madey, formerly of Stanford University, and now at Duke University. In the early years of the research that lead ultimately to the device that actually produced coherent light, Dr. Madey had to work diligently to procure adequate funding for his FEL project. Sometimes it is much more difficult to find the appropriate funding source then it is to actually perform the research. After working with various basic research organizations, the Office of Naval Research, the Army Research Organization, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and others, to develop and test the basic scientific principles of the FEL, Dr. Madey looked to the future of the device. The FEL is indeed one of the principal defensive directed energy weapons under development in the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). However, Dr. Madey felt that the FEL could and should be used in the medical arena. The unique capabilities of the FEL certainly lend themselves to enhancing the practice of medicine which already uses lasers in the treatment of disease and in surgery. Dr. Madey and several physicians who also felt that the FEL belonged at least in medical research traveled to Washington, D.C., to visit the Congress and acquaint them with the potential of the FEL.

  2. Free electron lasers with small period wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Booske, J. H.; Destler, W. W.; Granatstein, V. L.; Mayergoyz, I. D.; Ott, E.

    1989-05-01

    Progress of research on a short period wiggler (SPW) free electron laser (FEL) with a sheet electron beam is reviewed. Most of the recent work has concentrated on addressing thermal engineering issued in the device. This particular emphasis was particularly stimulated by an evaluation by Panel XXI for the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee which stated that there are serious thermal management engineering uncertainties in the electron gun, the microwave cavity, and the wiggler that will need to be addressed for CW operation. In the panel's judgment, these thermal problems are likely to be insurmountable for fusion applications. In fact, recent experimental and theoretical results challenge this judgment. For example, our most recent conceptual designs involve small-to-negligible RF losses in the cavity walls. In addition, we have convincingly established that for electron beams of quality achievable with thermionic Pierce guns, body currents should be negligible to nonexistent, thus ensuring a thermally stable cavity. These discoveries, as well as other research progress, are reviewed in detail in the following report. Plans are described for a pulsed (100 ns) proof-of-principle lasing experiment to be conducted during the remainder of this fiscal year. In addition, we present a revised statement of work and budget for the follow-on year of the current grant. These proposed tasks will address the remaining risk issues for an ERCH source based on the SPW sheet-beam FEL. Upon the completion of those tasks, sufficient information will exist to confidently assess the feasibility of the proposed concept.

  3. Biophysics applications of free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert H.

    1993-07-01

    There has been a significant financial effort poured into the technology of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) over the last 15 years or so. Much of that money was spent in the hopes that the FEL would be a key element in the Strategic Defense Initiative, but a small fraction of money was allocated for the Medical FEL program. The Medical FELs program was aimed at exploring how the unique capabilities of the FEL could be utilized in medical applications. Part of the Medical FEl effort has been in clinical applications, but some of the effort has also been put into exploring applications of the FEL for fundamental biological physics. It is the purpose of this brief text to outline some of the fundamental biophysics I have done, and some plans we have for the future. Since the FEL is (still) considered to be an avant garde device, the reader should not be surprised to find that much of the work proposed here is also rather radical and avant garde.

  4. Nearly free electron states in MXenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaei, Mohammad; Ranjbar, Ahmad; Ghorbani-Asl, Mahdi; Arai, Masao; Sasaki, Taizo; Liang, Yunye; Yunoki, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    Using a set of first-principles calculations, we studied the electronic structures of two-dimensional transition metal carbides and nitrides, so called MXenes, functionalized with F, O, and OH. Our projected band structures and electron localization function analyses reveal the existence of nearly free electron (NFE) states in a variety of MXenes. The NFE states are spatially located just outside the atomic structure of MXenes and are extended parallel to the surfaces. Moreover, we found that the OH-terminated MXenes offer the NFE states energetically close to the Fermi level. In particular, the NFE states in some of the OH-terminated MXenes, such as T i2C (OH) 2,Z r2C (OH) 2,Z r2N (OH) 2,H f2C (OH) 2,H f2N (OH) 2,N b2C (OH) 2 , and T a2C (OH) 2 , are partially occupied. This is in remarkable contrast to graphene, graphane, and Mo S2 , in which their NFE states are located far above the Fermi level and thus they are unoccupied. As a prototype of such systems, we investigated the electron transport properties of H f2C (OH) 2 and found that the NFE states in H f2C (OH) 2 provide almost perfect transmission channels without nuclear scattering for electron transport. Our results indicate that these systems might find applications in nanoelectronic devices. Our findings provide new insights into the unique electronic band structures of MXenes.

  5. Optical Undulators for Free Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, James; Bisognano, Joseph; Bosch, Robert; Green, Michael; Jacobs, Kenneth; Yavuz, Deniz

    2014-05-01

    Free Electron Lasers (FELs) in the x-ray region are opening new research directions in AMO physics and other fields, but beam time is quite limited at these expensive facilities. There are conceptual designs for much less expensive soft x-ray FELs using sheared pulses from Table Top Terawatt (T3) lasers as optical undulators. A nearly co-propagating laser pulse can be angle tuned to yield soft x-rays, and shearing the pulse can optimize use of the laser photons. Undulator K values near unity are available from T3 lasers, and angle tuning provides almost arbitrary effective undulator periods. A combination of these optical undulator ideas with pre-``micro-bunching'' at a photocathode followed by electron beam emittance exchange can reduce the energy needed from the T3 laser. A combination of a nearly co-propagating optical undulator with a Bragg-reflection diamond mirror cavity may lower the cost of an x-ray frequency comb for metrology.

  6. Soviet free-electron laser research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassel, S.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate free-electron laser (FEL) research and development in the Soviet Union and to compare it with the corresponding activity in the U.S. In presenting this material, the intention is to acquaint U.S. researchers with the objectives, techniques, and results of their Soviet counterparts, as well as to provide the broad context of this area of Soviet R&D that consists of the organization, facilities, personalities, and leadership involved. The U.S. Soviet comparison has focused on the experimental programs, the most important area of this new technology. Section 2 compares individual experiments conducted by the USSR and the United States. In Section 3 the history of the theoretical development of FEL is presented, providing an insight into the conceptual issues that shaped FEL research in both countries. The remainder of the report is devoted primarily to the Soviet side of FEL research. Section 4 describes the organizational features of this research in terms of the performer institutes and leadership, focusing on the role of the Academy of Sciences, USSR. Section 5 analyzes the scientific objectives of Soviet FEL research, for the most part as discussed by Soviet reviewers of their research program. Section 6 presents conclusions.

  7. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  8. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  9. Diffraction Properties of Periodic Lattices under Free Electron Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajkovic, I.; Busse, G.; Hallmann, J.; More, R.; Petri, M.; Quevedo, W.; Krasniqi, F.; Rudenko, A.; Tschentscher, T.; Stojanovic, N.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Tolkiehn, M.; Techert, S.

    2010-03-26

    In this Letter, we report the pioneering use of free electron laser radiation for the investigation of periodic crystalline structures. The diffraction properties of silver behenate single nanocrystals (5.8 nm periodicity) with the dimensions of 20 nmx20 nmx20 {mu}m and as powder with grain sizes smaller than 200 nm were investigated with 8 nm free electron laser radiation in single-shot modus with 30 fs long free electron laser pulses. This work emphasizes the possibility of using soft x-ray free electron laser radiation for these crystallographic studies on a nanometer scale.

  10. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.