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Sample records for high power spallation

  1. Material issues relating to high power spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futakawa, M.

    2015-02-01

    Innovative researches using neutrons are being performed at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), in which a mercury target system is installed for MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. In order to produce neutrons by the spallation reaction, proton beams are injected into the mercury target. At the moment, when the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel, leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall, i.e. on the interface between liquid and solid metals. On the other hand, the structural materials are subjected to irradiation damage due to protons and neutrons, very high cycle fatigue damages and so-called "liquid metal embrittlement". That is, the structural materials must be said to be exposed to the extremely severe environments. In the paper, research and development relating to the material issues in the high power spallation neutron sources that has been performed so far at J-PARC is summarized.

  2. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE HIGH-POWER PROTECTION MODULE TEST STAND

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Crofford, Mark T; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Jones, Stacey L; Hardek, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) High-Power Protection Module (HPM) provides interlocks and fast shutdown for the radio frequency (RF) system to protect the accelerating structures and high power RF (HPRF) Distribution System. The HPM has required some functional upgrades since the start of beam operations and an upgrade to the HPM test stand was required to support these added features. The HPM test stand currently verifies functionality, RF channel calibration, and measurement of the speed of shutdown to ensure the specifications are met. The upgraded test stand was implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to allow for future growth and flexibility. Work is currently progressing on automation of the test stand to better perform the required module calibration schedule.

  3. Workshop: Research and development plans for high power spallation neutron testing at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-05

    This report consists of vugraphs from presentations at the meeting. The papers covered the following topics: (1) APS as a proton source; (2) target status for NSNS (National Spallation Neutron Source); (3) spallation neutron source in Japan; (4) liquid LiBi flow loop; and (5) research and development plans for high power tests at the AGS.

  4. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  5. Spallator: a new option for nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Grand, P.; Takahashi, H.; Powell, J.R.; Kouts, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The principles of the spallator reactor are reviewed. Advances in linear accelerator technology allow the design and construction of high current (hundreds of mA) continuous wave high energy (thousands of MeV) proton machines in the near term. Spallation neutronic calculations building on existing experimental results, indicate substantial neutron yields on uranium targets. Spallator target assembly designs based on water cooled reactor technology indicate operable efficient systems. Fuel cycles are presented which supply fissile material to thermal power reactors and reduce fission product waste. Preliminary comparative analysis indicates an economically competitive system in which a single purpose self-sufficient spallator supplies fuel to a number of LWRs. The spallator assures a long-term LWR power reactor economy. International interest in advancing the technology is indicated.

  6. A high power accelerator driver system for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.; Blind, B.; Channell, P.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For several years, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have provided a successful driver for the nearly 100-kW Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) source. The authors have studied an upgrade to this system. The goal of this effort was to establish a credible design for the accelerator driver of a next-generation source providing 1-MW of beam power. They have explored a limited subset of the possible approaches to a driver and have considered only the low 1-MW beam power. The next-generation source must utilize the optimum technology and may require larger neutron intensities than they now envision.

  7. Neutronic performance of the MEGAPIE spallation target under high power proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel-Sendis, F.; Chabod, S.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.; Zanini, L.

    2010-07-01

    The MEGAPIE project, aiming at the construction and operation of a megawatt liquid lead-bismuth spallation target, constitutes the first step in demonstrating the feasibility of liquid heavy metal target technologies as spallation neutron sources. In particular, MEGAPIE is meant to assess the coupling of a high power proton beam with a window-concept heavy liquid metal target. The experiment has been set at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland and, after a 4-month long irradiation, has provided unique data for a better understanding of the behavior of such a target under realistic irradiation conditions. A complex neutron detector has been developed to provide an on-line measurement of the neutron fluency inside the target and close to the proton beam. The detector is based on micrometric fission chambers and activation foils. These two complementary detection techniques have provided a characterization of the neutron flux inside the target for different positions along its axis. Measurements and simulation results presented in this paper aim to provide important recommendations for future accelerator driven systems (ADS) and neutron source developments.

  8. High-power linac for a US spallation-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Billen, J.; Jason, A. Krawczyk, F.; Nath, S.; Shafer, R.; Staples, J.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.

    1996-09-01

    We present status of high-power linac design studies for a proposed National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), based on a linac/accumulator-ring accelerator system. Overall project is a collaboration involving 5 national laboratories. ORNL will be responsible for the target, facilities, and conceptual design; BNL will be responsible for the ring; LBNL will be responsible for the injector, including the RFQ and a low-energy chopper in front of the RFQ; LANL will be responsible for the main linac; and ANL will be responsible for the instrumentation. The facility will be built at Oak Ridge. In the first phase, the dual-frequency linac with 402.5 and 805 MHz frequencies must deliver to the accumulator ring an H{sup -} beam near 1 GeV, with about 1 ms pulse length, a repetition rate 60 Hz, and average beam power {ge} 1 MW. The linac can be upgraded by a factor of 4 in beam power by increasing the dc injector current, and by funneling the beams from two 402.5 MHz low-energy linacs into the 805-MHz high-energy linac. Requirements for low beam loss in both linac and ring have important implications for linac design, including the requirement to provide efficient beam chopping to provide low-loss extraction for the ring. Linac design options and initial parameters are presented together with initial beam-dynamics simulation results.

  9. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2010-01-08

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  10. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2009-09-30

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  11. Spallation Neutron Source high-power Rf transmitter design for high availablility, ease of installation and cost containment

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J. T. , III; Rees, D. E.; Hardek, T. W.; Lynch, M. T.; Roybal, W. T.; Tallerico, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    The availability goals and installation schedule for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have driven the availability and installation of the SNS linac's high-power RF systems. This paper discusses how the high-power RF systems' availability and installation goals have been addressed in the RF transmitter design and procurement. Design features that allow R1; component failures to be quickly diagnosed and repaired are also presented. Special attention has been given lo interlocks, PLC fault logging and real-time interfaces to thc accelerator's Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) archive system. The availability and cost motivations for the use of different RF transmitter designs in the normalconducting and super-conducting sections of the linac are reviewed. Factory iicceptance tests used to insure fully functional equipment and thereby reduce the time spent on installation and cotnmissioning of the RF transmitters are discussed. Transmitter installation experience and klystron conditioning experience is used to show how these design features have helped and will continue to help the SNS linac to meet its availability and schedule goals.

  12. Technology and science at a high-power spallation source: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    These proceedings cover many aspects of the usefulness of spallation neutrons. Nine different areas are considered: surfaces and interfaces, engineering, materials science, polymers and complex fluids, chemistry, structural biology, nuclear engineering and radiation effects, condensed matter physics and fundamental physics.

  13. High power testing of the 402.5 MHZ and 805 MHZ RF windows for the spallation neutron source accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, K. A.; De Baca, J. M.; Harrison, J. S.; Rodriguez, M. B.; Torrez, P. A.; Warner, D. K.

    2003-01-01

    Hisorically, Radio Frequency (RF) windows have been a common point of failure in input power couplers; therefore, reliable RF windows are critical to the success of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project. The normal conducting part of the SNS accelerator requires six RF windows at 402.5 MHz and eight RF windows at 805 MHz[l]. Each RF window will transmit up to 180 kW of average power and 2.5 MW peak power at 60 Hz with 1.2 millisecond pulses. The RF windows, designed and manufactured by Thales, were tested at the full average power for 4 hours to ensure no problems with the high average power and then tested to an effective forward power level of 10 MW by testing at 2.5 MW forward power into a short and varying the phase of the standing wave. The sliding short was moved from 0 to 180 degrees to ensure no arcing or breakdown problems occur in any part of the window. This paper discusses the results of the high power testing of both the 402.5 MHz and the 805 MHz RF windows. Problems encountered during testing and the solutions for these problems are discussed.

  14. In-situ structural integrity evaluation for high-power pulsed spallation neutron source - Effects of cavitation damage on structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tao; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A double-wall structure mercury target will be installed at the high-power pulsed spallation neutron source in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Cavitation damage on the inner wall is an important factor governing the lifetime of the target-vessel. To monitor the structural integrity of the target vessel, displacement velocity at a point on the outer surface of the target vessel is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The measured signals can be used for evaluating the damage inside the target vessel because of cyclic loading and cavitation bubble collapse caused by pulsed-beam induced pressure waves. The wavelet differential analysis (WDA) was applied to reveal the effects of the damage on vibrational cycling. To reduce the effects of noise superimposed on the vibration signals on the WDA results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), statistical methods were applied. Results from laboratory experiments, numerical simulation results with random noise added, and target vessel field data were analyzed by the WDA and the statistical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the established in-situ diagnostic technique can be used to effectively evaluate the structural response of the target vessel.

  15. POWER SUPPLY CONTROL FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    LAMBIASE, R.F.; OERTER, B.; SMITH, J.

    2000-06-30

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently constructing an accumulator ring as part of a six laboratory collaboration to build the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) that will be located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Control of the power supplies will be implemented using a simple integrated system that provides all functions (setpoint, readback, control and status) with a single board at the power converter. Communication between the power supply interface and the VME control card is through a pair of fibers that also provides electrical isolation. This paper describes the power supply control system and it's impact on the SNS.

  16. Triple ion-beam studies of radiation damage effects in a 316LN austenitic alloy for a high power spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Rao, G.R.; Hunn, J.D.; Rice, P.M.; Lewis, M.B.; Cook, S.W.; Farrell, K.; Mansur, L.K.

    1997-09-01

    Austenitic 316LN alloy was ion-irradiated using the unique Triple Ion Beam Facility (TIF) at ORNL to investigate radiation damage effects relevant to spallation neutron sources. The TIF was used to simulate significant features of GeV proton irradiation effects in spallation neutron source target materials by producing displacement damage while simultaneously injecting helium and hydrogen at appropriately high gas/dpa ratios. Irradiations were carried out at 80, 200, and 350 C using 3.5 MeV Fe{sup ++}, 360 keV He{sup +}, and 180 keV H{sup +} to accumulate 50 dpa by Fe, 10,000 appm of He, and 50,000 appm of H. Irradiations were also carried out at 200 C in single and dual ion beam modes. The specific ion energies were chosen to maximize the damage and the gas accumulation at a depth of {approximately} 1 {micro}m. Variations in microstructure and hardness of irradiated specimens were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a nanoindentation technique, respectively. TEM investigation yielded varying damage defect microstructures, comprising black dots, faulted and unfaulted loops, and a high number density of fine bubbles (typically less than 1 nm in diameter). With increasing temperature, faulted loops had a tendency to unfault, and bubble microstructure changed from a bimodal size distribution to a unimodal distribution. Triple ion irradiations at the three temperatures resulted in similar increases in hardness of approximately a factor of two. Individually, Fe and He ions resulted in a similar magnitude of hardness increase, whereas H ions showed only a very small effect. The present study has yielded microstructural information relevant to spallation neutron source conditions and indicates that the most important concern may be radiation induced hardening and associated ductility loss.

  17. Testing Procedures and Results of the Prototype Fundamental Power Coupler for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbet, M; Campisi, I E; Daly, E F; Davis, G K; Drury, M; Kneisel, P; Myneni, G; Powers, T; Schneider, W J; Wilson, K M; Kang, Y; Cummings, K A; Hardek, T

    2001-06-01

    High-power RF testing with peak power in excess of 500 kW has been performed on prototype Fundamental Power Couplers (FPC) for the Spallation Neutron Source superconducting (SNS) cavities. The testing followed the development of procedures for cleaning, assembling and preparing the FPC for installation in the test stand. The qualification of the couplers has occurred for the time being only in a limited set of conditions (travelling wave, 20 pps) as the available RF system and control instrumentation are under improvement.

  18. TESTING PROCEDURES AND RESULTS OF THE PROTOTYPE FUNDAMENTAL POWER COUPLER FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    M. STIRBET; I.E. CAMPISI; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    High-power RF testing with peak power in excess of 500 kW has been performed on prototype Fundamental Power Couplers (FPC) for the Spallation Neutron Source superconducting (SNS) cavities. The testing followed the development of procedures for cleaning, assembling and preparing the FPC for installation in the test stand. The qualification of the couplers has occurred for the time being only in a limited set of conditions (travelling wave, 20 pps) as the available RF system and control instrumentation are under improvement.

  19. Spallator and APEX nuclear fuel cycle: a new option for nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    A new nuclear fuel cycle is described which provides a long term supply of nuclear fuel for the thermal LWR nuclear power reactors and eliminates the need for long-term storage of radioactive waste. Fissile fuel is produced by the Spallator which depends on the production of spallation neutrons by the interaction of high-energy (1 to 2 GeV) protons on a heavy-metal target. The neutrons are absorbed in a surrounding natural-uranium or thorium blanket in which fissile Pu-239 to U-233 is produced. Advances in linear accelerator technology makes it possible to design and construct a high-beam-current continuous-wave proton linac for production purposes. The target is similar to a sub-critical reactor and produces heat which is converted to electricity for supplying the linac. The Spallator is a self-sufficient fuel producer, which can compete with the fast breeder. The APEX fuel cycle depends on recycling the transuranics and long-lived fission products while extracting the stable and short-lived fission products when reprocessing the fuel. Transmutation and decay within the fuel cycle and decay of short-lived fission products external to the fuel cycle eliminates the need for long-term geological age shortage of fission-product waste.

  20. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  1. Spallation neutron source and other high intensity froton sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2003-02-06

    This lecture is an introduction to the design of a spallation neutron source and other high intensity proton sources. It discusses two different approaches: linac-based and synchrotron-based. The requirements and design concepts of each approach are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are compared. A brief review of existing machines and those under construction and proposed is also given. An R&D program is included in an appendix.

  2. Spallator - accelerator breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.

    1985-01-01

    The concept involves the use of spallation neutrons produced by interaction of a high energy proton (1 to 2 GeV) from a linear accelerator (LINAC) with a heavy metal target (uranium). The principal spallator concept is based on generating fissile fuel for use in LWR nuclear power plants. The spallator functions in conjunction with a reprocessing plant to regenerate and produce the Pu-239 or U-233 for fabrication into fresh LWR reactor fuel elements. Advances in proton accelerator technology has provided a solid base for predicting performance and optimizing the design of a reliable, continuous wave, high-current LINAC required by a fissile fuel production machine.

  3. The Spallation Neutron Source: A powerful tool for materials research

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Thom; Anderson, Ian S; Ankner, John Francis; Egami, Takeshi; Ekkebus, Allen E; Herwig, Kenneth W; Hodges, Jason P; Horak, Charlie M; Horton, Linda L; Klose, Frank Richard; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Myles, Dean A A; Ohl, M.; Zhao, Jinkui

    2006-01-01

    When completed in 2006, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will use an accelerator to produce the most intense beams of pulsed neutrons in the world. This unique facility is being built by a collaboration of six US Department of Energy laboratories and will serve a diverse community of users drawn from academia, industry, and government labs. The project continues on schedule and within budget, with commissioning and installation of all systems going well. Installation of 14 state-of-the-art instruments is under way, and design work is being completed for several others. These new instruments will enable inelastic and elastic-scattering measurements across a broad range of science such as condensed-matter physics, chemistry, engineering materials, biology, and beyond. Neutron Science at SNS will be complemented by research opportunities at several other facilities under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. Droop Compensation for the High Voltage Converter Modulators at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Gunjan P; Anderson, David E; Solley, Dennis J; Wezensky, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been in operation since 2006 and routinely operates at 1 MW of beam power. At 1 MW, the High Voltage Converter Modulators (HVCMs) are delivering 8-11 MW pulsed power to the Klystrons for up to 1185 us at 60 Hz. The pulsed output of the modulator has a substantial voltage droop operating in open-loop mode. Achieving 1.4 MW operations require an increase in the output pulse width of the HVCM, resulting in loss of LLRF control margin due to modulator voltage reduction at the end of the pulse. Initially, the HVCM was designed with a pulse width modulation scheme for droop compensation but early operations at full duty revealed this technique unreliable. Increasing the output voltage of the modulator would likely compromise system reliability. This paper proposes the use of alternate modulation schemes to address the voltage droop. The effect of frequency modulation and phase modulation on voltage droop is studied. Experimental results will also be presented.

  5. Physics and technology of spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G. S.

    2001-05-01

    A substantial body of research is necessary in order to be able to make reliable predictions on the performance and safety of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), in particular of their spallation targets. So far, practical experience has resulted from the development of research neutron sources only. Next to fission and fusion, spallation is an efficient process for releasing neutrons from nuclei. Unlike the other two reactions, it is an endothermal process and can, therefore, not be used per se in energy generation. In order to sustain a spallation reaction, an energetic beam of particles, most commonly protons, must be supplied onto a heavy target. Spallation can, however, play an important role as a source of neutrons whose flux can be easily controlled via the driving beam. Although sophisticated Monte Carlo codes exist to compute all aspects of a spallation facility, many features can be understood on the basis of simple physics arguments. Technically a spallation facility is very demanding, not only because a reliable and economic accelerator of high power is needed to drive the reaction, but also, and in particular, because high levels of radiation and heat are generated in the target which are difficult to cope with. Radiation effects in a spallation environment are different from those commonly encountered in a reactor and are probably even more temperature dependent than the latter because of the high gas production rate. A commonly favored solution is the use of molten heavy metal targets. While radiation damage is not a problem in this case, except for the container, other issues need to be considered. R&D carried out for the development of spallation neutron sources will thus be beneficial also directly for ADS.

  6. Production of Actinium-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of Thorium-232

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, James T.; Nolen, Jerry; Vandergrift, George; Gomes, Itacil; Kroc, Tom; Horwitz, Phil; McAlister, Dan; Bowers, Del; Sullivan, Vivian; Greene, John

    2011-12-30

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). Unfortunately, the worldwide supply of actinium-225 is limited to about 1,000mCi annually and most of that is currently spoken for, thus limiting the ability of this radioisotope pair to enter into research and subsequently clinical trials. The route proposed herein utilizes high energy protons to produce actinium-225 via spallation of a thorium-232 target. As part of previous R and D efforts carried out at Argonne National Laboratory recently in support of the proposed US FRIB facility, it was shown that a very effective production mechanism for actinium-225 is spallation of thorium-232 by high energy proton beams. The base-line simulation for the production rate of actinium-225 by this reaction mechanism is 8E12 atoms per second at 200 MeV proton beam energy with 50 g/cm2 thorium target and 100 kW beam power. An irradiation of one actinium-225 half-life (10 days) produces {approx}100 Ci of actinium-225. For a given beam current the reaction cross section increases slightly with energy to about 400 MeV and then decreases slightly for beam energies in the several GeV regime. The object of this effort is to refine the simulations at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 Ge

  7. High-pressure beamline (PLANET) at the spallation neutron source, J-PARC (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagi, H.; Hattori, T.; Arima, H.; Utsumi, W. S.; Komatsu, K.; Nagai, T.; Yagi, T.

    2009-12-01

    Material and Life Science experimental Facility (MLF) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) will be one of the most powerful spallation neutron facilities in the world. The pulsed neutron source with a liquid Hg target is designed to be running at 25 Hz with a power of 1 MW. We have started the construction of the powder diffractometer dedicated to high-pressure experiments (PLANET) on BL-11. PLANET aims to study structures of hydrogen-bearing materials including dense hydrous minerals of the Earth’s deep interior, magmas and light element liquids. The instrument will realize diffraction and radiography experiments for powder and liquid/glass samples at high pressures up to 20 GPa and 2000 K using a large sized multi-anvil hydraulic press that can apply forces of ˜1500 ton. The instrument views a decoupled liquid H2 moderator with a cross section of 100 × 100 mm2. The primary and secondary fight paths are 25 m and 1.5 m, respectively. The 11.5-m-long supermirror guide with elliptical shape starts at a distance of 11.5 m from the moderator. Design of elliptical geometry is optimized by means of incorporating several different grade mirrors and linear approximation with planar guide in order to save cost for production without degradation of the intensity performance. The guide has a rectangular cross-section and consists of four walls coated with supermirror material. Sample is placed at 2 m from the guide exit. The 90° detectors will be installed at 1.5 m from the sample position. For the powder diffraction measurements using a multi-anvil press, an incident neutron beam passes through the vertical anvil gaps and irradiates the sample in the pressure medium. Diffracted neutrons go through the other anvil gaps at 90° direction. Half inch 3He linear position sensitive detectors with 600 mm length will be arranged horizontally and form these detector banks, which cover the scattering angle of 79° ≤ 2θ ≤ 101° and -35° ≤ Φ ≤ +35°. The

  8. Neutron spallation sources in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, P. J.

    1996-11-01

    After a brief general and historical discussion, the main design features of spallation sources are described. At the present time, Europe not only has the world-leading pulsed neutron spallation source, the SNS-ISIS at RAL, UK, but it is on the point of commissioning a world-leading continuous cyclotron-driven source, the SINQ at PSI, Switzerland. Looking to the future, yet more powerful pulsed sources are actively under study and the difficult problem of high-power target design (>250 kW) is leading to a new technology for liquid targets. The accelerator designs, although basically classical, require custom-built solutions that are often at the limit of present day accelerator technology.

  9. Neutron spallation sources in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, P. J.

    1996-11-01

    After a brief general and historical discussion, the main design features of spallation sources are described. At the present time, Europe not only has the world-leading pulsed neutron spallation source, the SNS-ISIS at RAL, UK, but it is on the point of commissioning a world-leading continuous cyclotron-driven source, the SINQ at PSI, Switzerland. Looking to the future, yet more powerful pulsed sources are actively under study and the difficult problem of high-power target design (>250 kW) is leading to a new technology for liquid targets. The accelerator designs, although basically classical, require custom-built solutions that are often at the limit of presentday accelerator technology.

  10. Science opportunities at high power accelerators like APT

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents applications of high power RF proton linear accelerators to several fields. Radioisotope production is an area in which linacs have already provided new isotopes for use in medical and industrial applications. A new type of spallation neutron source, called a long-pulse spallation source (LPSS), is discussed for application to neutron scattering and to the production and use of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN). The concept of an accelerator-driven, transmutation of nuclear waste system, based on high power RF linac technology, is presented along with its impact on spent nuclear fuels.

  11. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  12. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  13. Further considerations of spallation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, C.

    1973-01-01

    Trapped photon and cosmic ray effects on spallation in the UK-5 (hard X ray telescope) central crystal were measured. Both low dose and high dose effects were considered. Decay results are presented in tables.

  14. BEAM LOSS MITIGATION IN THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator complex routinely delivers 1 MW of beam power to the spallation target. Due to this high beam power, understanding and minimizing the beam loss is an ongoing focus area of the accelerator physics program. In some areas of the accelerator facility the equipment parameters corresponding to the minimum loss are very different from the design parameters. In this presentation we will summarize the SNS beam loss measurements, the methods used to minimize the beam loss, and compare the design vs. the loss-minimized equipment parameters.

  15. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Rebecca; Kszos, Lynn A

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews

  16. GRAIN-SCALE FAILURE IN THERMAL SPALLATION DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, S C; Lomov, I; Roberts, J J

    2012-01-19

    Geothermal power promises clean, renewable, reliable and potentially widely-available energy, but is limited by high initial capital costs. New drilling technologies are required to make geothermal power financially competitive with other energy sources. One potential solution is offered by Thermal Spallation Drilling (TSD) - a novel drilling technique in which small particles (spalls) are released from the rock surface by rapid heating. While TSD has the potential to improve drilling rates of brittle granitic rocks, the coupled thermomechanical processes involved in TSD are poorly described, making system control and optimization difficult for this drilling technology. In this paper, we discuss results from a new modeling effort investigating thermal spallation drilling. In particular, we describe an explicit model that simulates the grain-scale mechanics of thermal spallation and use this model to examine existing theories concerning spalling mechanisms. We will report how borehole conditions influence spall production, and discuss implications for macro-scale models of drilling systems.

  17. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

  18. Spallation reactions: A successful interplay between modeling and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, J.-C.

    2015-06-01

    The spallation reactions are a type of nuclear reaction which occur in space by interaction of the cosmic rays with interstellar bodies. The first spallation reactions induced with an accelerator took place in 1947 at the Berkeley cyclotron (University of California) with 200MeV deuterons and 400MeV alpha beams. They highlighted the multiple emission of neutrons and charged particles and the production of a large number of residual nuclei far different from the target nuclei. In the same year, R. Serber described the reaction in two steps: a first and fast one with high-energy particle emission leading to an excited remnant nucleus, and a second one, much slower, the de-excitation of the remnant. In 2010 IAEA organized a workshop to present the results of the most widely used spallation codes within a benchmark of spallation models. If one of the goals was to understand the deficiencies, if any, in each code, one remarkable outcome points out the overall high-quality level of some models and so the great improvements achieved since Serber. Particle transport codes can then rely on such spallation models to treat the reactions between a light particle and an atomic nucleus with energies spanning from few tens of MeV up to some GeV. An overview of the spallation reactions modeling is presented in order to point out the incomparable contribution of models based on basic physics to numerous applications where such reactions occur. Validations or benchmarks, which are necessary steps in the improvement process, are also addressed, as well as the potential future domains of development. Spallation reactions modeling is a representative case of continuous studies aiming at understanding a reaction mechanism and which end up in a powerful tool.

  19. Ramping up the Spallation Neutron Source beam power with the H{sup -} source using 0 mg Cs/day

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, M. P.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2010-02-15

    This paper describes the ramp up of the beam power for the Spallation Neutron Source by ramping up the pulse length, the repetition rate, and the beam current emerging from the H{sup -} source. Starting out with low repetition rates ({<=}10 Hz) and short pulse lengths ({<=}0.2 ms), the H{sup -} source and low-energy beam transport delivered from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory exceeded the requirements with almost perfect availability. This paper discusses the modifications that were required to exceed 0.2 ms pulse length and 0.2% duty factor with acceptable availability and performance. Currently, the source is supporting neutron production at 1 MW with 38 mA linac beam current at 60 Hz and 0.9 ms pulse length. The pulse length will be increased to {approx}1.1 ms to meet the requirements for neutron production with a power between 1 and 1.4 MW. A medium-energy beam transport (MEBT) beam current of 46 mA with a 5.4% duty factor has been demonstrated for 32 h. A 56 mA MEBT beam current with a 4.1% duty factor has been demonstrated for 20 min at the conclusion of a 12-day production run. This is close to the 59 mA needed for 3 MW neutron productions. Also notable is the Cs{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} cesium system, which dispenses {approx}10 mg of Cs during the startup of the ion source, sufficient for producing the required 38 mA for 4 weeks without significant degradation.

  20. High-energy in-beam neutron measurements of metal-based shielding for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Björgvinsdóttir, H.; Kokai, Z.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-based shielding plays an important role in the attenuation of harmful and unwanted radiation at an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source. At the European Spallation Source, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, metal-based materials are planned to be used extensively as neutron guide substrates in addition to other shielding structures around neutron guides. The usage of metal-based materials in the vicinity of neutron guides however requires careful consideration in order to minimize potential background effects in a neutron instrument at the facility. Therefore, we have carried out a combined study involving high-energy neutron measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of metal-based shielding, both to validate the simulation methodology and also to investigate the benefits and drawbacks of different metal-based solutions. The measurements were carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden, using a 174.1 MeV neutron beam and various thicknesses of aluminum-, iron-, and copper-based shielding blocks. The results were compared to geant4 simulations and revealed excellent agreement. Our combined study highlights the particular situations where one type of metal-based solution may be preferred over another.

  1. European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshraqi, Mohammad; McGinnis, David; Lindroos, Mats

    The following sections are included: * Neutron usage and historical background * Spallation * History of spallation sources * The ESS facility * The ESS linac * Beam physics * The front-end and the normal conducting linac * Superconducting linac * RF sources * Summary * References

  2. Neutron scattering instrumentation for biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1994-12-31

    Conventional wisdom holds that since biological entities are large, they must be studied with cold neutrons, a domain in which reactor sources of neutrons are often supposed to be pre-eminent. In fact, the current generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources, such as LANSCE at Los Alamos and ISIS in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a capability for small angle scattering (SANS) - a typical cold- neutron application - that was not anticipated five years ago. Although no one has yet built a Laue diffractometer at a pulsed spallation source, calculations show that such an instrument would provide an exceptional capability for protein crystallography at one of the existing high-power spoliation sources. Even more exciting is the prospect of installing such spectrometers either at a next-generation, short-pulse spallation source or at a long-pulse spallation source. A recent Los Alamos study has shown that a one-megawatt, short-pulse source, which is an order of magnitude more powerful than LANSCE, could be built with today`s technology. In Europe, a preconceptual design study for a five-megawatt source is under way. Although such short-pulse sources are likely to be the wave of the future, they may not be necessary for some applications - such as Laue diffraction - which can be performed very well at a long-pulse spoliation source. Recently, it has been argued by Mezei that a facility that combines a short-pulse spallation source similar to LANSCE, with a one-megawatt, long-pulse spallation source would provide a cost-effective solution to the global shortage of neutrons for research. The basis for this assertion as well as the performance of some existing neutron spectrometers at short-pulse sources will be examined in this presentation.

  3. Testing Single Phase IGBT H-Bridge Switch Plates for the High Voltage Converter Modulator at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Peplov, Vladimir V; Anderson, David E; Solley, Dennis J

    2014-01-01

    Three IGBT H-bridge switching networks are used in each High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM) system at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to generate drive currents to three boost transformer primaries switching between positive and negative bus voltages at 20 kHz. Every switch plate assembly is tested before installing it into an operational HVCM. A Single Phase Test Stand has been built for this purpose, and it is used for adjustment, measurement and testing of different configurations of switch plates. This paper will present a description of the Test Stand configuration and discuss the results of testing switch plates with two different types of IGBT gate drivers currently in use on the HVCM systems. Comparison of timing characteristics of the original and new drivers and the resulting performance reinforces the necessity to replace the original H-bridge network drivers with the upgraded units.

  4. Post irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Ferguson, Phillip D; Mansur, Louis K

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of target vessel. Though mitigation of cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel will be a critical for successful high-power operation of the SNS facility, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  5. On the nucleon effective mass role to the high energy proton spallation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, B. M.; Pinheiro, A. R. C.; Gonçalves, M.; Duarte, S. B.; Cabral, R. G.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the effect of the nucleon effective mass to the dynamic evolution of the rapid phase of proton-nucleus spallation reactions. The analysis of the relaxation time for the non-equilibrium phase is studied by variations in the effective mass parameter. We determine the final excitation energy of the hot residual nucleus at the end of cascade phase and the de-excitation of the nuclear system is carried out considering the competition of particle evaporation and fission processes. It was shown that the excitation energy depends of the hot compound residual nucleus at the end of the rapid phase on the changing effective mass. The multiplicity of particles was also analyzed in cascade and evaporation phase of the reaction. The use of nucleon effective mass during cascade phase can be considered as an effect of the many-body nuclear interactions not included explicitly in a treatment to the nucleon-nucleon interaction inside the nucleus. This procedure represents a more realistic scenario to obtain the neutron multiplicity generated in this reaction, which is a benchmark for the calculation of the neutronic in the ADS reactors.

  6. High-current negative-ion sources for pulsed spallation neutron sources: LBNL workshop, October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1995-09-01

    The neutron scattering community has endorsed the need for a high-power (1 to 5 MW) accelerator-driven source of neutrons for materials research. Properly configured, the accelerator could produce very short (sub-microsecond) bursts of cold neutrons, said time structure offering advantages over the continuous flux from a reactor. The recent cancellation of the ANS reactor project has increased the urgency to develop a comprehensive strategy based on the best technological scenarios. Studies to date have built on the experience from ISIS (the 160 kW source in the UK), and call for a high-current (approx. 100 mA peak) H- source-linac combination injecting into one or more accumulator rings in which beam may be further accelerated. The I to 5 GeV proton beam is extracted in a single turn and brought to the target-moderator stations. The high current, high duty-factor, high brightness and high reliability required of the ion source present a very large challenge to the ion source community. The Workshop reported on here, held in Berkeley in October 1994, analyzed in detail the source requirements for proposed accelerator scenarios, the present performance capabilities of different H- source technologies, and identified necessary R&D efforts to bridge the gap.

  7. Recent advances in high pressure neutron scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulk, C.; dos Santos, A.; Klug, D.; Guthrie, M.; Machida, S.; Molaison, J.

    2012-12-01

    There have been significant improvements in the operation of the high pressure diffractometer, SNAP, at the Spallation Neutron Source over the past two years. This talk will highlight the current capacities which include low temperature systems, high temperature systems, and the introduction of new pressure cell technology that is based on supported diamond anvils and, with advances in software, is particularly suited for powder diffraction. Specific examples of our recent research will focus on high pressure transitions in hydrogen bonded systems such as methane and CO2 hydrate. The high pressure hexagonal phase of methane hydrate is studied to determine the nature of the hydrate cage loading, this provides detailed experimental data that will lead to better intermolecular potentials for methane - methane interactions, particularly when methane molecules are in close contact and strongly repelling. The high pressure structural systematics of carbon dioxide hydrate is reported. While the structural transformation sequence of most hydrates progress from sI (or sII) to the hexagonal form then to a flied ice structure, CO2 hydrate is an example of a system that skips the hexagonal phase and transforms directly into the filled ice structure. Finally examples of using SNAP to study disorder in amorphous systems will be given. Particularly amorphous vapor co-deposits of water, known as amorphous solid water, and clathrate forming molecules such as CO2, and the structural response of these systems to increased pressure at low temperature.

  8. VERITAS: a high-flux neutron reflectometer with vertical sample geometry for a long pulse spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattauch, S.; Ioffe, A.; Lott, D.; Menelle, A.; Ott, F.; Medic, Z.

    2016-04-01

    An instrument concept of a reflectometer with a vertical sample geometry fitted to the long pulse structure of a spallation source, called “VERITAS” at the ESS, is presented. It focuses on designing a reflectometer with high intensity at the lowest possible background following the users' demand to investigate thin layers or interfacial areas in the sub-nanometer length scale. The high intensity approach of the vertical reflectometer fits very well to the long pulse structure of the ESS. Its main goal is to deliver as much usable intensity as possible at the sample position and be able to access a reflectivity range of 8 orders of magnitude and more. The concept assures that the reflectivity measurements can be performed in its best way to maximize the flux delivered to the sample. The reflectometer is optimized for studies of (magnetic) layers having thicknesses down to 5Å and a surface area of 1x1cm2. With reflectivity measurements the depth-resolved, laterally averaged chemical and magnetic profile can be investigated. By using polarised neutrons, additional vector information on the in-plane magnetic correlations (off-specular scattering at the pm length scale, GISANS at the nm length scale) can be studied. The full polarisation analysis could be used for soft matter samples to correct for incoherent scattering which is presently limiting neutron reflectivity studies to a reflectivity range on the order of 10-6.

  9. Influence of Al2O3/YSZ micro-laminated coatings on high temperature oxidation and spallation resistance of MCrAlY alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junqi; He, Yedong; Wang, Deren

    2013-03-01

    Al2O3/YSZ micro-laminated coatings with different layers were prepared on MCrAlY alloys by magnetron sputtering and characterized by high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results indicated that the laminated structures of Al2O3 and YSZ layers were observed with compact microstructure and the thickness at sub-micron level each layer. High-temperature cyclic oxidation test at 1000°C in air was performed to investigate the oxidation and spallation resistance of the coatings on MCrAlY substrates. Result shows that the coatings exhibit more excellent oxidation and spallation resistance with the increase of the layers, which can be attributed to the increase of stress tolerance and fracture toughness in the laminated coatings by the thinner layers and crack deflection toughening.

  10. Dose measurements around spallation neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Manolopoulou, M; Krivopustov, M; Zamani, M

    2008-01-01

    Neutron dose measurements and calculations around spallation sources appear to be of great importance in shielding research. Two spallation sources were irradiated by high-energy proton beams delivered by the Nuclotron accelerator (JINR), Dubna. Neutrons produced by the spallation sources were measured by using solid-state nuclear track detectors. In addition, neutron dose was calculated after polyethylene and concrete, using a phenomenological model based on empirical relations applied in high-energy physics. The study provides an analytical and experimental neutron benchmark analysis using the transmission factor and a comparison between the experimental results and calculations. PMID:18957519

  11. Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Jeffrey L

    2009-05-22

    Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically

  12. HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP AND TARGET / ACCELERATOR INTERFACE PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Plum, Michael A; Peters, Charles C; Brown, David L; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Satisfying operational procedures and limits for the beam target interface is a critical concern for high power operation at spallation neutron sources. At the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) a number of protective measures are instituted to ensure that the beam position, beam size and peak intensity are within acceptable limits at the target and high power Ring Injection Dump (RID). The high power beam dump typically handles up to 50 100 kW of beam power and its setup is complicated by the fact that there are two separate beam components simultaneously directed to the dump. The beam on target is typically in the 800-1000 kW average power level, delivered in sub- s 60 Hz pulses. Setup techniques using beam measurements to quantify the beam parameters at the target and dump will be described. However, not all the instrumentation used for the setup and initial qualification is available during high power operation. Additional techniques are used to monitor the beam during high power operation to ensure the setup conditions are maintained, and these are also described.

  13. Determination of the ¹⁴C content in activated steel components from a neutron spallation source and a nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Dorothea; Stowasser, Tanja; Volmert, Benjamin; Günther-Leopold, Ines; Linder, Hanspeter; Wieland, Erich

    2014-06-01

    The (14)C content in activated steel components from the Swiss Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Gösgen and the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ at the Paul Scherrer Institute is determined using a wet chemistry digestion technique and liquid scintillation counting for (14)C activity measurements. The (14)C activity of an activated fuel assembly steel nut from the NPP is further compared with theoretical predictions made on the basis of a Monte Carlo reactor model for this NPP. Knowledge of the (14)C inventory in these activated steel materials is important in conjunction with future corrosion studies on these materials aimed at identifying the (14)C containing organic compounds possibly formed in the cement-based near field of a repository for radioactive waste. PMID:24810287

  14. Producing persistent, high-current, high-duty-factor H{sup -} beams for routine 1 MW operation of Spallation Neutron Source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Hardek, T. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R.

    2012-02-15

    Since 2009, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of {approx}50 mA H{sup -} ions from the ion source with a {approx}5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of {approx}3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to {approx}170 deg. C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H{sup -} beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 deg. C.

  15. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; et al

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elasticmore » and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).« less

  16. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).

  17. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (˜100 mg).

  18. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Vogt, A J; Derendorf, K S; Johnson, M L; Rustan, G E; Quirinale, D G; Kreyssig, A; Lokshin, K A; Neuefeind, J C; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A I; Egami, T; Kelton, K F

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg). PMID:26827330

  19. Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.

    1995-12-01

    The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.

  20. Water corrosion measurements on tungsten irradiated with high energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Scott Lillard, R.; Sommer, Walter F.; Butt, Darryl P.; Gac, Frank D.; Willcutt, Gordon J.; Louthan, McIntyre R.

    2012-12-01

    A detailed analysis was performed on the degradation of a tungsten target under water cooling while being exposed to a 761 MeV proton beam at an average current of 0.867 mA to a maximum fluence of 1.3 × 1021 protons/cm2. The target consisted of 3 mm diameter tungsten rods arranged in bundles and cooled with deionized water flowing over their length. Degradation of the tungsten was measured through analyzing water resistivity, tungsten concentration in water samples that were taken during irradiation and through dimensional measurements on the rods after irradiation. Chemical analysis of irradiated water samples showed W concentrations up to 35 μg/ml. Gamma analysis showed increases in concentrations of many isotopes including W-178, Lu-171, Tm-167, Tm-166, Yb-169 and Hf-175. Dimensional measurements performed after irradiation on the W rods revealed a decrease in diameter as a function of position that followed closely the Gaussian proton beam profile along the rod length and indicated a definite beam-effect. A general decrease in diameter, especially on the coolant-water entrance point where turbulent flow was likely, also suggests a chemically and mechanically-driven corrosion effect. A method to estimate the apparent corrosion rate based on proton fluence is presented and application of this method estimates the material loss rate at about 1.9 W atoms/incident proton. From this result, the corrosion rate of tungsten in a 761 MeV, 0.867 mA proton beam was calculated to be 0.073 cm/full power year. of irradiation.

  1. The high-strain-rate and spallation response of tantalum, Ta-10W, and T-111

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T. III; Rollett, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    The compressive true stress-true response of tantalum, Ta-10W, and T-111 were found to depend on the applied strain rate, in the range 0.001 to 7000 s{sup {minus}1}. The strain-rate sensitivities of the flow stress of tantalum, Ta-10W, and T-111 a 1% strain are 0.062, 0.031, and 0.024, respectively. The rates of strain hardening in Tantalum, Ta-10W, and T-111 are seen to exhibit differing behavior with increasing strain rate. The calculated average strain-hardening rate in tantalum, {Theta}, for the quasi-static (0.001 s{sup {minus}1}) data at 25{degrees}C is 2080 MPa/unit strain. The hardening rate at 3000s{sup {minus}1} at 25{degrees}C decreases to 846 MPa/unit strain. Normalizing the work hardening rate in tantalum with the Taylor Factor for a random polycrystal, ({Theta} / (3.07){sup 2}), yields work hardening rates of {mu}/276 at quasi-static strain rates and {mu}/680 at high-rates, assuming a shear modulus of 61 GPa for tantalum at room temperature. While the work hardening of all the tantalum-based materials are similar at quasi-static rates, alloying results in a small reduction in hardening rate. With increasing strain rate, the work hardening rate in tantalum decreases by approximately a factor of two compared to the alloys. Alloying tantalum with substitutional or interstitial elements is thought to result in increased edge dislocation storage and screw dislocation cross-slip due to interactions with the alloying elements at high strain rates. 28 refs.

  2. Production of ACTINIUM-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of THORIUM-232

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, James; Nolen, Jerry A.; Kroc, Thomas; Gomes, Itacil; Horwitz, E. Philip.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2010-06-01

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). The object of this effort is to refine the simulations for producing actinium-225 at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 GeV protons available at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Targets will be processed at Argonne National Laboratory to separate and purify the actinium-225 that will subsequently be transferred to NorthStar laboratory facilities for product quality testing and comparison to the product quality of ORNL produced actinium-225, which is currently the industry standard. The test irradiations at FNAL will produce 1-20 mCi per day which is more than sufficient for quantitative evaluation of the proposed production process.

  3. PERFORMING DIAGNOSTICS ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE VISION BEAM LINE TO ELIMINATE HIGH VIBRATION LEVELS AND PROVIDE A SUSTAINABLE OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoy, Blake W

    2014-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides variable energy neutrons for a variety of experiments. The neutrons proceed down beam lines to the experiment hall, which houses a variety of experiments and test articles. Each beam line has one or more neutron choppers which filter the neutron beam based on the neutron energy by using a rotating neutron absorbing material passing through the neutron beam. Excessive vibration of the Vision beam line, believed to be caused by the T0 chopper, prevented the Vision beam line from operating at full capacity. This problem had been addressed several times by rebalancing/reworking the T0 beam chopper but the problem stubbornly persisted. To determine the cause of the high vibration, dynamic testing was performed. Twenty-seven accelerometer and motor current channels of data were collected during drive up, drive down, coast down, and steady-state conditions; resonance testing and motor current signature analysis were also performed. The data was analyzed for traditional mechanical/machinery issues such as misalignment and imbalance using time series analysis, frequency domain analysis, and operating deflection shape analysis. The analysis showed that the chopper base plate was experiencing an amplified response to the excitation provided by the T0 beam chopper. The amplified response was diagnosed to be caused by higher than expected base plate flexibility, possibly due to improper grouting or loose floor anchors. Based on this diagnosis, a decision was made to dismantle the beam line chopper and remount the base plate. Neutron activation of the beam line components make modifications to the beam line especially expensive and time consuming due to the radiation handling requirements, so this decision had significant financial and schedule implications. It was found that the base plate was indeed loose because of improper grouting during its initial installation. The base plate was

  4. Spallation radiation effects in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Farrell, K.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1996-06-01

    Spallation refers to the process whereby particles (chiefly neutrons) are ejected from nuclei upon bombardment by high-energy protons. Spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) use these neutrons for neutron scattering and diffraction research, and SNS`s are proposed as the basis for systems for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Materials in SNS`s are exposed to the incident proton beam (energies typically about 1000 MeV) and to the spallation neutrons (spectrum of energies extending up to about 1000 MeV). By contrast the fission neutrons in nuclear reactors have an average energy of only about 2 MeV, and the neutrons in fusion reactors would have energies below about 14 MeV. Furthermore, the protons and neutrons in SNS`s for scattering and diffraction research are pulsed at frequencies of about 10 to 60 Hz, from which significant changes in the kinetics of point and extended defects may be expected. In addition, much higher transmutation rates occur in SNS-irradiated materials, On the whole, then, significant differences in microstructural development and macroscopic properties may result upon exposure in SNS systems, as compared with fission and fusion irradiations. In a more general sense, subjecting materials to new radiation environments has almost routinely led to new discoveries. To the extent that data are avaiable, however, the spallation environment appears to increase the degree of damage without introducing totally new effects. The first part of this presentation is an overview of radiation effects in materials, outlining essential concepts and property changes and their physical bases. This background is followed by a description of SNS irradiation environments and the effects on materials of exposure to these environments. A special discussion is given of the selection of target (e.g., liquid mercury), container (e.g., austenitic stainless steel or ferritic/martensitic steel), and structural materials in SNS systems.

  5. High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert; Tverdokhlebov, Sergery; Manzella, David

    1999-01-01

    The development of Hall thrusters with powers ranging from tens of kilowatts to in excess of one hundred kilowatts is considered based on renewed interest in high power. high thrust electric propulsion applications. An approach to develop such thrusters based on previous experience is discussed. It is shown that the previous experimental data taken with thrusters of 10 kW input power and less can be used. Potential mass savings due to the design of high power Hall thrusters are discussed. Both xenon and alternate thruster propellant are considered, as are technological issues that will challenge the design of high power Hall thrusters. Finally, the implications of such a development effort with regard to ground testing and spacecraft intecrati'on issues are discussed.

  6. CSTI High Capacity Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Jerry M.

    1989-01-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY-86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY-88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA's new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  7. CSTI high capacity power

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  8. The European scene regarding spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    In Europe, a short pulse spallation neutron source, ISIS, has been operating for over 10 years, working its way up to a beam power level of 200 kW. A continuous source, SINQ, designed for a beam power of up to 1 MW, is scheduled to start operating at the end of 1996, and a detailed feasibility study has been completed for a 410 kW short pulse source, AUSTRON. Each of these sources seems to have settled for a target concept which is at or near the limits of its feasibility: The ISIS depleted uranium plate targets, heavy water cooled and Zircaloy clad, have so far not shown satisfactory service time and operation is likely to continue with a Ta-plate target, which, in the past has been used successfully for the equivalent of one full-beam-year before it was taken out of service due to degrading thermal properties. SINQ will initially use a rod target, made of Zircaloy only, but plans exist to move on to clad lead rods as quickly as possible. Apart from the not yet explored effect of hydrogen and helium production, there are also concerns about the generation of 7-Be in the cooling water from the spallation of oxygen, which might result in undesirably high radioactivity in the cooling plant room. A Liquid metal target, also under investigation for SINQ, would not only reduce this problem to a level of about 10 %, but would also minimize the risk of radiolytic corrosion in the beam interaction zone. Base on similar arguments, AUSTRON has been designed for edge cooled targets, but thermal and stress analyses show, that this concept is not feasible at higher power levels.

  9. Spallation modeling in tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.; Hixson, R.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.

    1997-09-01

    A gas gun plate impact spallation experiment has been performed on commercial purity rolled tantalum. The shock pressure achieved was about 7 Gpa and was sufficient to induce incipient spallation. The particle velocity was measured at the free surface of the spalled plate, and the spalled sample was recovered and examined metallographically using image analysis. The quantitative image analysis results are being used to develop a damage model. The model is micromechanically based and involves novel void growth and coalescence processes. The 1D characteristics code CHARADE has been used in a preliminary simulation of the VISAR free surface particle velocity record. Implications for ductile damage modeling will be discussed.

  10. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  11. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  12. Characteristics of high-energy neutrons estimated using the radioactive spallation products of Au at the 500-MeV neutron irradiation facility of KENS.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakao, Noriaki; Wang, Qingbin; Toyoda, Akihiro; Kawai, Masayoshi; Aze, Takahiro; Fujimura, Masatsugu

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a shielding experiment of high-energy neutrons, generated from a tungsten target bombarded with primary 500-MeV protons at KENS, which penetrated through a concrete shield in the zero-degree direction. We propose a new method to evaluate the spectra of high-energy neutrons ranging from 8 to 500 MeV. Au foils were set in a concrete shield, and the reaction rates for 13 radionuclides produced by the spallation reactions on the Au targets were measured by radiochemical techniques. The experimental results were compared with those obtained by the MARS14 Monte-Carlo code. A good agreement (between them) was found for energies beyond 100 MeV. The profile of the neutron spectrum, ranging from 8 to 500 MeV, does not depend on the thickness of the concrete shield. PMID:16604584

  13. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.

  14. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Abraham, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Allen, C.; Alonso, J.; Anderson, D.; Arenius, D.; Arthur, T.; Assadi, S.; Ayers, J.; Bach, P.; Badea, V.; Battle, R.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Blind, B.; Blokland, W.; Bookwalter, V.; Borovina, D.; Bowling, S.; Bradley, J.; Brantley, C.; Brennan, J.; Brodowski, J.; Brown, S.; Brown, R.; Bruce, D.; Bultman, N.; Cameron, P.; Campisi, I.; Casagrande, F.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Champion, M.; Champion, M.; Chen, Z.; Cheng, D.; Cho, Y.; Christensen, K.; Chu, C.; Cleaves, J.; Connolly, R.; Cote, T.; Cousineau, S.; Crandall, K.; Creel, J.; Crofford, M.; Cull, P.; Cutler, R.; Dabney, R.; Dalesio, L.; Daly, E.; Damm, R.; Danilov, V.; Davino, D.; Davis, K.; Dawson, C.; Day, L.; Deibele, C.; Delayen, J.; DeLong, J.; Demello, A.; DeVan, W.; Digennaro, R.; Dixon, K.; Dodson, G.; Doleans, M.; Doolittle, L.; Doss, J.; Drury, M.; Elliot, T.; Ellis, S.; Error, J.; Fazekas, J.; Fedotov, A.; Feng, P.; Fischer, J.; Fox, W.; Fuja, R.; Funk, W.; Galambos, J.; Ganni, V.; Garnett, R.; Geng, X.; Gentzlinger, R.; Giannella, M.; Gibson, P.; Gillis, R.; Gioia, J.; Gordon, J.; Gough, R.; Greer, J.; Gregory, W.; Gribble, R.; Grice, W.; Gurd, D.; Gurd, P.; Guthrie, A.; Hahn, H.; Hardek, T.; Hardekopf, R.; Harrison, J.; Hatfield, D.; He, P.; Hechler, M.; Heistermann, F.; Helus, S.; Hiatt, T.; Hicks, S.; Hill, J.; Hill, J.; Hoff, L.; Hoff, M.; Hogan, J.; Holding, M.; Holik, P.; Holmes, J.; Holtkamp, N.; Hovater, C.; Howell, M.; Hseuh, H.; Huhn, A.; Hunter, T.; Ilg, T.; Jackson, J.; Jain, A.; Jason, A.; Jeon, D.; Johnson, G.; Jones, A.; Joseph, S.; Justice, A.; Kang, Y.; Kasemir, K.; Keller, R.; Kersevan, R.; Kerstiens, D.; Kesselman, M.; Kim, S.; Kneisel, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kuneli, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Kustom, R.; Kwon, S.; Ladd, P.; Lambiase, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Lewis, S.; Liaw, C.; Lionberger, C.; Lo, C. C.; Long, C.; Ludewig, H.; Ludvig, J.; Luft, P.; Lynch, M.; Ma, H.; MacGill, R.; Macha, K.; Madre, B.; Mahler, G.; Mahoney, K.; Maines, J.; Mammosser, J.; Mann, T.; Marneris, I.; Marroquin, P.; Martineau, R.; Matsumoto, K.; McCarthy, M.; McChesney, C.; McGahern, W.; McGehee, P.; Meng, W.; Merz, B.; Meyer, R.; Meyer, R.; Miller, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mize, J.; Monroy, M.; Munro, J.; Murdoch, G.; Musson, J.; Nath, S.; Nelson, R.; Nelson, R.; O`Hara, J.; Olsen, D.; Oren, W.; Oshatz, D.; Owens, T.; Pai, C.; Papaphilippou, I.; Patterson, N.; Patterson, J.; Pearson, C.; Pelaia, T.; Pieck, M.; Piller, C.; Plawski, T.; Plum, M.; Pogge, J.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Prokop, M.; Pruyn, J.; Purcell, D.; Rank, J.; Raparia, D.; Ratti, A.; Reass, W.; Reece, K.; Rees, D.; Regan, A.; Regis, M.; Reijonen, J.; Rej, D.; Richards, D.; Richied, D.; Rode, C.; Rodriguez, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Rohlev, A.; Rose, C.; Roseberry, T.; Rowton, L.; Roybal, W.; Rust, K.; Salazer, G.; Sandberg, J.; Saunders, J.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, W.; Schrage, D.; Schubert, J.; Severino, F.; Shafer, R.; Shea, T.; Shishlo, A.; Shoaee, H.; Sibley, C.; Sims, J.; Smee, S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K.; Spitz, R.; Staples, J.; Stein, P.; Stettler, M.; Stirbet, M.; Stockli, M.; Stone, W.; Stout, D.; Stovall, J.; Strelo, W.; Strong, H.; Sundelin, R.; Syversrud, D.; Szajbler, M.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Tang, J.; Tanke, E.; Tepikian, S.; Thomae, R.; Thompson, D.; Thomson, D.; Thuot, M.; Treml, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tuzel, W.; Vassioutchenko, A.; Virostek, S.; Wallig, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Wangler, T.; Warren, D.; Wei, J.; Weiss, D.; Welton, R.; Weng, J.; Weng, W.-T.; Wezensky, M.; White, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, D.; Williams, E.; Wilson, K.; Wiseman, M.; Wood, R.; Wright, P.; Wu, A.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Young, K.; Young, L.; Yourd, R.; Zachoszcz, A.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ~100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ~400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ~400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ~100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  15. NOBLE GAS PRODUCTION FROM MERCURY SPALLATION AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DeVore, Joe R; Lu, Wei; Schwahn, Scott O

    2013-01-01

    Calculations for predicting the distribution of the products of spallation reactions between high energy protons and target materials are well developed and are used for design and operational applications in many projects both within DOE and in other arenas. These calculations are based on theory and limited experimental data that verifies rates of production of some spallation products exist. At the Spallation Neutron Source, a helium stream from the mercury target flows through a system to remove radioactivity from this mercury target offgas. The operation of this system offers a window through which the production of noble gases from mercury spallation by protons may be observed. This paper describes studies designed to measure the production rates of twelve noble gas isotopes within the Spallation Neutron Source mercury target.

  16. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  17. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S; Eshraqi, M; Hahn, H; Jansson, A; Lindroos, M; Ponton, A; Rathsman, K; Trahern, G; Bousso, S; Calaga, R; Devanz, G; Duperrier, R D; Eguia, J; Gammino, S; Moller, S P; Oyon, C; Ruber, R.J.M.Y.; Satogata, T

    2011-03-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a 5 MW, 2.5 GeV long pulse proton linac, to be built and commissioned in Lund, Sweden. The Accelerator Design Update (ADU) project phase is under way, to be completed at the end of 2012 by the delivery of a Technical Design Report. Improvements to the 2003 ESS design will be summarised, and the latest design activities will be presented.

  18. High power connection system

    DOEpatents

    Schaefer, Christopher E.; Beer, Robert C.; McCall, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    A high power connection system adapted for automotive environments which provides environmental and EMI shielding includes a female connector, a male connector, and a panel mount. The female connector includes a female connector base and a snap fitted female connector cover. The male connector includes a male connector base and a snap fitted male connector cover. The female connector base has at least one female power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective female power terminal. The male connector base has at least one male power terminal cavity for seatably receiving a respective male power terminal. The female connector is covered by a cover seal and a conductive shroud. A pair of lock arms protrude outward from the front end of the male connector base, pass through the panel mount and interface with a lever of a lever rotatably connected to the shroud to thereby mechanically assist mating of the male and female connectors. Safety terminals in the male and female connectors provide a last-to-connect-first-to-break connection with an HVIL circuit.

  19. Post-irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, D. A.; Ferguson, P. D.; Mansur, L. K.

    2010-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of the target module. Though cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel are expected to dictate its lifetime, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  20. Decay heat calculations for a 500 kW W-Ta spallation target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Quanzhi; Lu, Youlian; Hu, Zhiliang; Zhou, Bin; Yin, Wen; Liang, Tianjiao

    2015-05-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a short-pulsed neutron scattering facility. The beam power is designed to be 100 kW in Phase I, with the capability of upgrading to 500 kW. Tantalum (Ta)-cladded tungsten (W) was chosen as the spallation target due to its high neutron yield. Ta claddings can solve the problem of the corrosiveness of W plates, although they produce high decay heat after intense irradiation. This paper presents the decay heat distributions and evolutions for the future upgraded 500 kW W-Ta spallation target. The calculations are performed using the MCNPX2.5 Monte Carlo code and the CINDER'90 activation code. The decay heat distributions show that for the W plates, decay heat is mainly produced via the spallation reaction process, whereas for the Ta claddings, it is mainly produced via the neutron capture process. An effective method of reducing the decay heat in the W-Ta target is also presented and discussed.

  1. STATUS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE SUPERCONDUCTING RF FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, Daniel S; Assadi, Saeed; Campisi, Isidoro E; Casagrande, Fabio; Crofford, Mark T; DeVan, Bill; Hardek, Thomas W; Henderson, Stuart D; Howell, Matthew P; Kang, Yoon W; Geng, Xiaosong; Stone Jr, William C; Strong, William Herb; Williams, Derrick C; Wright, Paul Alan

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project was completed with only limited superconducting RF (SRF) facilities installed as part of the project. A concerted effort has been initiated to install the infrastructure and equipment necessary to maintain and repair the superconducting Linac, and to support power upgrade research and development (R&D). Installation of a Class10/100/10,000 cleanroom and outfitting of the test cave with RF, vacuum, controls, personnel protection and cryogenics systems is underway. A horizontal cryostat, which can house a helium vessel/cavity and fundamental power coupler for full power, pulsed testing, is being procured. Equipment for cryomodule assembly and disassembly is being procured. This effort, while derived from the experience of the SRF community, will provide a unique high power test capability as well as long term maintenance capabilities. This paper presents the current status and the future plans for the SNS SRF facilities.

  2. High power arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goelz, T. M.; Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Kurtz, H. L.; Schrade, H. O.

    1992-01-01

    In this period a new mass flow controller was brought into the gas supply system, so that the upper limit for the mass flow rate could be increased up to 500 mg/s with hydrogen. A maximum specific impulse of 1500 s could be achieved with the high powered arcjet (HIPARC) at an efficiency of slightly better than 20 percent. Different nozzle throat diameters had been tested. The 100 kilo-watt input power limit was reached with the 4 mm nozzle throat diameter at a mass flow rate of 400 mg/s. Tests were carried out with different cathode gaps and with three different cathodes. In addition measurements of pressure and gas temperature were taken in the feed line in order to determine the pressure drop in the propellant injectors.

  3. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  4. High voltage power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruitberg, A. P.; Young, K. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage power supply is formed by three discrete circuits energized by a battery to provide a plurality of concurrent output signals floating at a high output voltage on the order of several tens of kilovolts. In the first two circuits, the regulator stages are pulse width modulated and include adjustable ressistances for varying the duty cycles of pulse trains provided to corresponding oscillator stages while the third regulator stage includes an adjustable resistance for varying the amplitude of a steady signal provided to a third oscillator stage. In the first circuit, the oscillator, formed by a constant current drive network and a tuned resonant network included a step up transformer, is coupled to a second step up transformer which, in turn, supplies an amplified sinusoidal signal to a parallel pair of complementary poled rectifying, voltage multiplier stages to generate the high output voltage.

  5. High Power Density Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  6. High power microwave generator

    SciTech Connect

    Minich, Roger W.

    1988-01-01

    A device (10) for producing high-powered and coherent microwaves is described. The device comprises an evacuated, cylindrical, and hollow real cathode (20) that is driven to inwardly field emit relativistic electrons. The electrons pass through an internally disposed cylindrical and substantially electron-transparent cylindrical anode (24), proceed toward a cylindrical electron collector electrode (26), and form a cylindrical virtual cathode (32). Microwaves are produced by spatial and temporal oscillations of the cylindrical virtual cathode (32), and by electrons that reflex back and forth between the cylindrical virtual cathode (32) and the cylindrical real cathode (20).

  7. Linac-driven spallation-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.J.

    1995-05-01

    Strong interest has arisen in accelerator-driven spallation-neutron sources that surpass existing facilities (such as ISIS at Rutherford or LANSCE at Los Alamos) by more than an order of magnitude in beam power delivered to the spallation target. The approach chosen by Los Alamos (as well as the European Spallation Source) provides the full beam energy by acceleration in a linac as opposed to primary acceleration in a synchrotron or other circular device. Two modes of neutron production are visualized for the source. A short-pulse mode produces 1 MW of beam power (at 60 pps) in pulses, of length less than 1 ms, by compression of the linac macropulse through multi-turn injection in an accumulator ring. A long-pulse mode produces a similar beam power with 1-ms-long pulses directly applied to a target. This latter mode rivals the performance of existing reactor facilities to very low neutron energies. Combination with the short-pulse mode addresses virtually all applications.

  8. The European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, M.; Bousson, S.; Calaga, R.; Danared, H.; Devanz, G.; Duperrier, R.; Eguia, J.; Eshraqi, M.; Gammino, S.; Hahn, H.; Jansson, A.; Oyon, C.; Pape-Møller, S.; Peggs, S.; Ponton, A.; Rathsman, K.; Ruber, R.; Satogata, T.; Trahern, G.

    2011-12-01

    In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

  9. High power coaxial ubitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkcum, Adam J.

    In the ubitron, also known as the free electron laser, high power coherent radiation is generated from the interaction of an undulating electron beam with an electromagnetic signal and a static periodic magnetic wiggler field. These devices have experimentally produced high power spanning the microwave to x-ray regimes. Potential applications range from microwave radar to the study of solid state material properties. In this dissertation, the efficient production of high power microwaves (HPM) is investigated for a ubitron employing a coaxial circuit and wiggler. Designs for the particular applications of an advanced high gradient linear accelerator driver and a directed energy source are presented. The coaxial ubitron is inherently suited for the production of HPM. It utilizes an annular electron beam to drive the low loss, RF breakdown resistant TE01 mode of a large coaxial circuit. The device's large cross-sectional area greatly reduces RF wall heat loading and the current density loading at the cathode required to produce the moderate energy (500 keV) but high current (1-10 kA) annular electron beam. Focusing and wiggling of the beam is achieved using coaxial annular periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stacks without a solenoidal guide magnetic field. This wiggler configuration is compact, efficient and can propagate the multi-kiloampere electron beams required for many HPM applications. The coaxial PPM ubitron in a traveling wave amplifier, cavity oscillator and klystron configuration is investigated using linear theory and simulation codes. A condition for the dc electron beam stability in the coaxial wiggler is derived and verified using the 2-1/2 dimensional particle-in-cell code, MAGIC. New linear theories for the cavity start-oscillation current and gain in a klystron are derived. A self-consistent nonlinear theory for the ubitron-TWT and a new nonlinear theory for the ubitron oscillator are presented. These form the basis for simulation codes which, along

  10. Towards detectors for next generation spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, B.

    2004-12-01

    Neutron scattering and diffraction methods are of utmost importance for probing the structure and dynamics of condensed matter at an atomic, molecular and mesoscopic level. However, today's experiments, using either wavelength-selected cw beams from steady-state reactor or spallation sources or, on the other hand, comparatively weak pulsed spallation source beams (with the exception of the pulsed IBR-2 reactor in Dubna), suffer from relatively low source strengths, e.g. compared to synchrotron-radiation investigations. Therefore, neutron scattering methods can greatly benefit from next generation pulsed spallation neutron sources with 1-10 MW average proton beam power, which will allow analyzing wavelengths by time-of-flight (TOF) and thus utilizing in an experiment simultaneously a large fraction of the full wavelength band. However, the improved instantaneous flux will pose great challenges on the detection systems, since for instance for ESS, the strongest of the projected sources, the peak thermal neutron flux will be higher by nearly two orders of magnitude than at the presently strongest sources. Owing to current improvements in neutron optics and spectrometer design, the fluxes impinging on the samples will be further enhanced by another factor 5-10; however, this will be compensated for by the tendency to investigate smaller samples becoming accessible due to smaller foci and higher beam fluxes. Hence, thermal neutron detectors with up to two orders of magnitude higher peak count rate capacity in conjunction with microsecond TOF and for some applications sub-millimeter position resolutions are required, in addition to other characteristics like e.g. high long-term stability and low sensitivity to photon background. In this review article an overview will be given on the current state-of-the-art and on currently investigated novel solutions for thermal neutron detectors for very high rate and resolution time-resolved experiments, comprising silicon

  11. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.L.; CAMERON,P.R.; SHEA,T.J.; CONNOLLY,R.C.; KESSELMAN,M.

    1999-03-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be constructed by a multi-laboratory collaboration with BNL responsible for the transfer lines and ring. [1] The 1 MW beam power necessitates careful monitoring to minimize un-controlled loss. This high beam power will influence the design of the monitors in the high energy beam transport line (HEBT) from linac to ring, in the ring, and in the ring-to-target transfer line (RTBT). The ring instrumentation must cover a 3-decade range of beam intensity during accumulation. Beam loss monitoring will be especially critical since un-controlled beam loss must be kept below 10{sup -4}. A Beam-In-Gap (BIG) monitor is being designed to assure out-of-bucket beam will not be lost in the ring.

  12. CONSTRUCTION STATUS AND ISSUES OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.

    2004-07-05

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring is designed to accumulate beam pulses of 1.5 x 10{sup 14} protons of 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity and power, key design challenges include control of beam loss and radio-activation, construction of high-quality large-aperture magnets and power supplies, design of robust injection and extraction systems, minimization of beam-coupling impedances, and mitigation of electron-cloud effects. This paper discusses the status of the ring systems with emphasis on technical challenges and issues, and presents future perspectives towards a next-generation high-intensity facility.

  13. HEIMDAL: A thermal neutron powder diffractometer with high and flexible resolution combined with SANS and neutron imaging - Designed for materials science studies at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Sonja L.; Lefmann, Kim; Henry, Paul F.; Bertelsen, Mads; Schefer, Jürg; Christensen, Mogens

    2016-08-01

    HEIMDAL will be a multi length scale neutron scattering instrument for the study of structures covering almost nine orders of magnitude from 0.01 nm to 50 mm. The instrument is accepted for construction at the European Spallation Source (ESS) and features a variable resolution thermal neutron powder diffractometer (TNPD), combined with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron imaging (NI). The instrument uses a novel combination of a cold and a thermal guide to fulfill the diverse requirements for diffraction and SANS. With an instrument length of 170 m, HEIMDAL will take advantage of the high neutron flux of the long pulse at ESS, whilst maintaining a high q-resolution due to the long flight path. The q-range coverage is up to 20 Å-1 allowing low-resolution PDF analysis. With the addition of SANS, HEIMDAL will be able to cover a uniquely broad length scale within a single instrumental set-up. HEIMDAL will be able to accommodate modern materials research in a broad variety of fields, and the task of the instrument will be to study advanced functional materials in action, as in situ and in operandi at multiple length scales (0.01-100 nm) quasi simultaneously. The instrument combines state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques (TNPD, SANS, and NI) with the goal of studying real materials, in real time, under real conditions. This article describes the instrument design ideas, calculations and results of simulations and virtual experiments.

  14. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  15. A Family of L-band SRF Cavities for High Power Proton Driver Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer, Frank Marhauser

    2009-05-01

    Recent global interest in high duty factor or CW superconducting linacs with high average beam power highlights the need for robust and reliable SRF structures capable of delivering high average RF power to the beam with moderate HOM damping, low interception of halo and good efficiency. Potential applications include proton or H- drivers for spallation neutron sources, neutrino physics, waste transmutation, subcritical reactors, and high-intensity high-energy physics experiments. We describe a family of SRF cavities with a range of Betas capable of transporting beam currents in excess of 10 mA CW with large irises for minimal interception of halo and HOM and power couplers capable of supporting high average power operation. Goals include an efficient cell shape, high packing factor for efficient real-estate gradient and strong HOM damping to ensure stable beam operation,

  16. Calculation of improved spallation cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, C. H.; Silberberg, R.; Letaw, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Several research groups have recently carried out highly precise measurements (to about 10 percent) of high-energy nuclear spallation cross sections. These measurements, above 5 GeV, cover a broad range of elements: V, Fe, Cu, Ag, Ta and Au. Even the small cross sections far off the peak of the isotopic distribution curves have been measured. The semiempirical calculations are compared with the measured values. Preliminary comparisons indicate that the parameters of our spallation relations (Silberberg and Tsao, 1973) for atomic numbers 20 to 83 need modifications, e.g. a reduced slope of the mass yield distribution, broader isotopic distributions, and a shift of the isotopic distribution toward the neutron-deficient side. The required modifications are negligible near Fe and Cu, but increase with increasing target mass.

  17. INJECTION CHOICE FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRODOWSKI,J.; FEDOTOV,A.; GARDNER,C.; LEE,Y.Y.; RAPARIA,D.; DANILOV,V.; HOLMES,J.; PRIOR,C.; REES,G.; MACHIDA,S.

    2001-06-18

    Injection is key in the low-loss design of high-intensity proton facilities like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). During the design of both the accumulator and the rapid-cycling-synchrotron version of the SNS, extensive comparison has been made to select injection scenarios that satisfy SNS's low-loss design criteria. This paper presents issues and considerations pertaining to the final choice of the SNS injection systems.

  18. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  19. High-Efficiency Power Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    One or more embodiments of the present invention pertain to an all solid-state microwave power module. The module includes a plurality of solid-state amplifiers configured to amplify a signal using a low power stage, a medium power stage, and a high power stage. The module also includes a power conditioner configured to activate a voltage sequencer (e.g., bias controller) when power is received from a power source. The voltage sequencer is configured to sequentially apply voltage to a gate of each amplifier and sequentially apply voltage to a drain of each amplifier.

  20. The thermal spallation drilling process

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Holes can be produced in very hard rock more easily and less expensively by thermal spallation than by conventional means. This drilling process has been used for producing blast holes in the taconite iron mines and for quarrying granite. It is potentially valuable for drilling holes in very hard rock for the exploitation of geothermal energy and the storage of various commodities. However, investigation and development of the thermal spallation drilling process is proceeding slowly.

  1. A National Spallation Neutron Source for neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Appleton, B.R.

    1996-10-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source is a collaborative project or perform the conceptual design for a next generation neutron source for the Department of Energy. This paper reviews the need and justification for a new neutron source, the origins and structure of the collaboration formed to address this need, and the community input leading up to the current design approach. A reference design is presented for an accelerator based spallation neutron source that would begin operation at about 1 megawatt of power but designed so that it could be upgraded to significantly higher powers in the future. The technology approach, status, and progress on the conceptual design to date are presented.

  2. Rate-dependent spallation properties of tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.; Hixson, R.S.; Tonks, D.L.; Zurek, A.K.

    1995-09-01

    Spallation experiments are conducted on high-purity tantalum using VISAR instrumentation for impact stresses of 9.5 GPa and 6.0 GPa. The high-amplitude experiment exhibits very rapid initial spall separation, while the low-amplitude shot is only slightly above the threshold for void growth and thus exhibits distinct rate-dependent spallation behavior. These experiments are analyzed in terms of simple tensile fracture criteria, a standard rate-dependent void-growth model, and a rate-dependent void growth model in which the expected plastic volume strain makes no contribution to the relaxation of the mean stress. Recovery tests and VISAR measurements suggest an additional resistance to spallation that follows the rapid coalescence of voids; this effect is termed the secondary spall resistance and is due to the convoluted nature of the spall plane and the resulting interlocking fracture pattern that is developed and for which the stress remains unrelieved until the spall planes have separated several hundred microns.

  3. High power ultrasound standard.

    PubMed

    Wong, George S K; Wu, Lixue

    2002-04-01

    A sensitive radiation force balance for laboratory measurement of ultrasonic power is presented. The principle of the system is based on measuring the ultrasonic radiation force exerted on a conical float suspended in water. Technical details of the implementation of the economically attractive system are described. The operation of the system is automated with the aid of the IEEE-488 bus and a desktop computer. Design aspects that affect measurement uncertainty are investigated. A theoretical model for the measurement of ultrasonic power with a conical reflector target is discussed. The expanded uncertainty (95% confidence level) of the above radiation force conical float system is estimated to be between 5% to 10%. PMID:12002863

  4. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties and microstructural development of Alloy 718 irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Garner, F. A.; Hamilton, M. L.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    Alloy 718 is a γ '(Ni 3(Al,Ti))-γ″(Ni 3Nb) hardenable superalloy with attractive strength, and corrosion resistance. This alloy is a candidate material for use in accelerator production of tritium (APT) target and blanket applications, where it would have to withstand low-temperature irradiation by high-energy protons and spallation neutrons. The existing data base, relevant to such irradiation conditions, is very limited. Alloy 718 has therefore been exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), closely matching those expected in the APT target and blanket applications. The yield stress of Alloy 718 increases with increasing dose up to ˜0.5 dpa, and then decreases with further increase in dose. The uniform elongation, however, drastically decreases with increasing dose at very low doses (<0.5 dpa), and does not recover when the alloy later softens somewhat. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of Alloy 718 shows that superlattice spots corresponding to the age-hardening precipitate phases γ ' and γ″ are lost from the diffraction patterns for Alloy 718 by only 0.6 dpa, the lowest proton-induced dose level achieved in this experiment. Examination of samples that were neutron irradiated to doses of only ˜0.1 dpa showed that precipitates are faintly visible in diffraction patterns but are rapidly becoming invisible. It is proposed that the γ ' and γ″ first become disordered (by <0.6 dpa), but remain as solute-rich aggregates that still contribute to the hardness at relatively low dpa levels, and then are gradually dispersed at higher doses.

  5. Spallation neutron source saddle antenna H{sup -} ion source project

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Dudnikova, Galina; Stockli, Martin; Welton, Robert

    2010-02-15

    In this project we are developing an H{sup -} source which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high current, high brightness, good lifetime, high reliability, and high power efficiency. We describe two planned modifications to the present spallation neutron source external antenna source in order to increase the plasma density near the output aperture: (1) replacing the present 2 MHz plasma-forming solenoid antenna with a 13 MHz saddle-type antenna and (2) replacing the permanent multicusp magnetic system with a weaker electromagnet.

  6. High power phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, B.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Makarov, A.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    One of the approaches to power distribution system of a superconducting proton linac under discussion at FNAL requires development of a fast-action, megawatt-range phase shifter. Using a couple of this kind of devices with a waveguide hybrid junction can allow independent control of phase and amplitude of RF power at the input of each superconducting cavity, which will result in significant saving in number of klystrons and modulators required for the accelerator. A prototype of a waveguide version of the shifter that uses Yttrium-Iron Garnet (YIG) blocks was developed and tested. This report presents design concept of the device, and main results of simulation and proof-of-principle tests.

  7. Simulation of a beam rotation system for a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Tibor; Reggiani, Davide; Seidel, Mike; Talanov, Vadim; Wohlmuther, Michael

    2015-04-01

    With a nominal beam power of nearly 1 MW on target, the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ), ranks among the world's most powerful spallation neutron sources. The proton beam transport to the SINQ target is carried out exclusively by means of linear magnetic elements. In the transport line to SINQ the beam is scattered in two meson production targets and as a consequence, at the SINQ target entrance the beam shape can be described by Gaussian distributions in transverse x and y directions with tails cut short by collimators. This leads to a highly nonuniform power distribution inside the SINQ target, giving rise to thermal and mechanical stresses. In view of a future proton beam intensity upgrade, the possibility of homogenizing the beam distribution by means of a fast beam rotation system is currently under investigation. Important aspects which need to be studied are the impact of a rotating proton beam on the resulting neutron spectra, spatial flux distributions and additional—previously not present—proton losses causing unwanted activation of accelerator components. Hence a new source description method was developed for the radiation transport code MCNPX. This new feature makes direct use of the results from the proton beam optics code TURTLE. Its advantage to existing MCNPX source options is that all phase space information and correlations of each primary beam particle computed with TURTLE are preserved and transferred to MCNPX. Simulations of the different beam distributions together with their consequences in terms of neutron production are presented in this publication. Additionally, a detailed description of the coupling method between TURTLE and MCNPX is provided.

  8. High Power Pulsed Gas Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witteman, W. J.

    1987-09-01

    Gas lasers have shown to be capable of delivering tens of terrawatt aspeak power or tens of kilowatt as average power. The efficiencies of most high power gas lasers are relatively high compared with other types of lasers. For instance molecular lasers, oscillating on low lying vibrational levels, and excimer lasers may have intrinsic efficiencies above 10%.The wavelengths of these gas lasers cover the range from the far infrared to the ultra-violet region, say from 12000 to 193 nm. The most important properties are the scalability, optical homogeneity of the excited medium, and the relatively low price per watt of output power. The disadvantages may be the large size of the systems and the relatively narrow line width with limited tunability compared with solid state systems producing the same peak power. High power gas lasers group into three main categories depending on the waste-heat handling capacity.

  9. The Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Geoffrey; Cianciolo, Vince; Koehler, Paul; Allen, Richard; Snow, William Michael; Huffman, Paul; Gould, Chris; Bowman, David; Cooper, Martin; Doyle, John

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), currently under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with an anticipated start-up in early 2006, will provide the most intense pulsed beams of cold neutrons in the world. At a projected power of 1.4 MW, the time averaged fluxes and fluences of the SNS will approach those of high flux reactors. One of the flight paths on the cold, coupled moderator will be devoted to fundamental neutron physics. The fundamental neutron physics beamline is anticipated to include two beam-lines; a broad band cold beam, and a monochromatic beam of 0.89 nm neutrons for ultracold neutron (UCN) experiments. The fundamental neutron physics beamline will be operated as a user facility with experiment selection based on a peer reviewed proposal process. An initial program of five experiments in neutron decay, hadronic weak interaction and time reversal symmetry violation have been proposed. PMID:27308112

  10. China Spallation Neutron Source: Design, R&D, and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie; Chen, Hesheng; Chen, Yanwei; Chen, Yuanbo; Chi, Yunlong; Deng, Changdong; Dong, Haiyi; Dong, Lan; Fang, Shouxian; Feng, Ji; Fu, Shinian; He, Lunhua; He, Wei; Heng, Yuekun; Huang, Kaixi; Jia, Xuejun; Kang, Wen; Kong, Xiangcheng; Li, Jian; Liang, Tianjiao; Lin, Guoping; Liu, Zhenan; Ouyang, Huafu; Qin, Qing; Qu, Huamin; Shi, Caitu; Sun, Hong; Tang, Jingyu; Tao, Juzhou; Wang, Chunhong; Wang, Fangwei; Wang, Dingsheng; Wang, Qingbin; Wang, Sheng; Wei, Tao; Xi, Jiwei; Xu, Taoguang; Xu, Zhongxiong; Yin, Wen; Yin, Xuejun; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zong; Zhang, Zonghua; Zhou, Min; Zhu, Tao

    2009-02-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an accelerator based multidiscipline user facility planned to be constructed in Dongguan, Guangdong, China. The CSNS complex consists of an negative hydrogen linear accelerator, a rapid cycling proton synchrotron accelerating the beam to 1.6 GeV energy, a solid tungsten target station, and instruments for spallation neutron applications. The facility operates at 25 Hz repetition rate with an initial design beam power of 120 kW and is upgradeable to 500 kW. The primary challenge is to build a robust and reliable user's facility with upgrade potential at a fraction of "world standard" cost. We report the status, design, R&D, and upgrade outlook including applications using spallation neutron, muon, fast neutron, and proton, as well as related programs including medical therapy and accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor (ADS) programs for nuclear waste transmutation.

  11. Materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.; Daemen, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    The Workshop on Materials for Spallation Neutron Sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, February 6 to 10, 1995, gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss areas in which work is needed, successful designs and use of materials, and opportunities for further studies. During the first day of the workshop, speakers presented overviews of current spallation neutron sources. During the next 3 days, seven panels allowed speakers to present information on a variety of topics ranging from experimental and theoretical considerations on radiation damage to materials safety issues. An attempt was made to identify specific problems that require attention within the context of spallation neutron sources. This proceedings is a collection of summaries from the overview sessions and the panel presentations.

  12. High Power Proton Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the capabilities and challenges of high intensity proton accelerators, such as J-PARC, Fermilab MI, SNS, ISIS, PSI, ESS (in the future) and others. The presentation will focus on lessons learned, new concepts, beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate them.

  13. TRANSISTOR HIGH VOLTAGE POWER SUPPLY

    DOEpatents

    Driver, G.E.

    1958-07-15

    High voltage, direct current power supplies are described for use with battery powered nuclear detection equipment. The particular advantages of the power supply described, are increased efficiency and reduced size and welght brought about by the use of transistors in the circuit. An important feature resides tn the employment of a pair of transistors in an alternatefiring oscillator circuit having a coupling transformer and other circuit components which are used for interconnecting the various electrodes of the transistors.

  14. Compact High Power THz Source

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2003-08-01

    In this paper a new type of THz radiation source, based on recirculating an electron beam through a high gradient superconducting radio frequency cavity, and using this beam to drive a standard electromagnetic undulator, is discussed. Because the beam is recirculated, short bunches may be produced that radiate coherently in the undulator, yielding high average THz power for relatively low average beam power. Deceleration from the coherent emission, and the detuning it causes is discussed.

  15. High power solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following subjects: trends in materials processing with laser radiation; slabs and high power systems; glasses and new crystals; solid state lasers at HOYA Corp.; lamps, resonators and transmission; glasses as active materials for high average power solid state lasers; flashlamp pumped GGG-crystals; alexandrite lasers; designing telescope resonators; mode operation of neodymium: YAG lasers; intracavity frequency doubling with KTP crystal and thermal effects in cylinder lasers.

  16. High average power pockels cell

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A high average power pockels cell is disclosed which reduces the effect of thermally induced strains in high average power laser technology. The pockels cell includes an elongated, substantially rectangular crystalline structure formed from a KDP-type material to eliminate shear strains. The X- and Y-axes are oriented substantially perpendicular to the edges of the crystal cross-section and to the C-axis direction of propagation to eliminate shear strains.

  17. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  18. Split-target neutronics and the MLNSC spallation target system

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; Pitcher, E.J.; Court, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is one of four operating Short-Pulse Spallation Sources worldwide. The MLNSC target system (composed of targets, moderators, and reflectors) was first installed in 1985. The target system employs a split tungsten spallation target with a void space in between (the flux-trap gap); this target system will be upgraded in 1998. The ability to efficiently split a spallation target allowed us to introduce the concept of flux-trap moderators and ultimately the notion of backscattering and upstream moderators. The upgraded MLNSC target system will employ both flux-trap and upstream/backscattering moderators to simultaneously service 16 neutron flight paths with high-intensity neutron beams for materials science research.

  19. Modeling of water radiolysis at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Daemen, L.L.; Kanner, G.S.; Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Brun, T.O.; Sommer, W.F.

    1998-12-01

    In spallation neutron sources neutrons are produced when a beam of high-energy particles (e.g., 1 GeV protons) collides with a (water-cooled) heavy metal target such as tungsten. The resulting spallation reactions produce a complex radiation environment (which differs from typical conditions at fission and fusion reactors) leading to the radiolysis of water molecules. Most water radiolysis products are short-lived but extremely reactive. When formed in the vicinity of the target surface they can react with metal atoms, thereby contributing to target corrosion. The authors will describe the results of calculations and experiments performed at Los Alamos to determine the impact on target corrosion of water radiolysis in the spallation radiation environment. The computational methodology relies on the use of the Los Alamos radiation transport code, LAHET, to determine the radiation environment, and the AEA code, FACSIMILE, to model reaction-diffusion processes.

  20. Status Report on the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1998-10-12

    The purpose of the Spallation Neutron Source Project (SNS) is to generate low-energy neutrons (ambient [{approximately}200 meV] and cold [{approximately}50 meV]) which can be used by up to 18 neutron beam lines to study the structure and functionality of materials. The neutrons are generated by the spallation process initiated by the interactions of 1-GeV protons with a Hg target. These neutrons are reflected by a Pb reflector and are moderated by 2 water (ambient) and 2 super critical hydrogen (cryogenic) moderators. The pulse structure for the 1 MW proton beam is 60 Hertz and < 0.7 {micro}s/pulse. The facility must be upgradable to higher power levels (2- and 4- MW) with minimal operational interruptions. Although not included in the current funding or baseline, a second target station and associated support structure which will be designed to utilize cold neutrons is also considered to be an upgrade that must be incorporated with minimal impact on operations.

  1. High Power Amplifier and Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Johnny; Stride, Scot; Harvey, Wayne; Haque, Inam; Packard, Newton; Ng, Quintin; Ispirian, Julie Y.; Waian, Christopher; Janes, Drew

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the creation of a high-voltage power supply (HVPS) that is able to contain voltages up to -20 kV, keep electrical field strengths to below 200 V/mil (approximately equal to 7.87 kV/mm), and can provide a 200-nanosecond rise/fall time focus modulator swinging between cathode potential of 16.3 kV and -19.3 kV. This HVPS can protect the 95-GHz, pulsed extended interaction klystron (EIK) from arcs/discharges from all sources, including those from within the EIK fs vacuum envelope. This innovation has a multi-winding pulse transformer design, which uses new winding techniques to provide the same delays and rise/fall times (less than 10 nanoseconds) at different potential levels ranging from -20 kV to -16 kV. Another feature involves a high-voltage printed-wiring board that was corona-free at -20 kV DC with a 3- kV AC swing. The corona-free multilayer high-voltage board is used to simulate fields of less than 200 V/mil (approximately equal to 7.87 kV/mm) at 20 kV DC. Drive techniques for the modulator FETs (field-effect transistors) (four to 10 in a series) were created to change states (3,000-V swing) without abrupt steps, while still maintaining required delays and transition times. The packing scheme includes a potting mold to house a ten-stage modulator in the space that, in the past, only housed a four-stage modulator. Problems keeping heat down were solved using aluminum oxide substrate in the high-voltage section to limit temperature rise to less than 10 while withstanding -20 kV DC voltage and remaining corona-free.

  2. Integrated high power VCSEL systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Holger; Conrads, Ralf; Gronenborn, Stephan; Gu, Xi; Miller, Michael; Pekarski, Pavel; Pollmann-Retsch, Jens; Pruijmboom, Armand; Weichmann, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    High power VCSEL systems are a novel laser source used for thermal treatment in industrial manufacturing. These systems will be applied in many applications, which have not used a laser source before. This is enabled by the unique combination of efficiency, compactness and robustness. High power VCSEL system technology encompasses elements far beyond the VCSEL chip itself: i.e. heat sinks, bonding technology and integrated optics. This paper discusses the optimization of these components and processes specifically for building high-power laser systems with VCSEL arrays. New approaches help to eliminate components and process steps and make the system more robust and easier to manufacture. New cooler concepts with integrated electrical and mechanical interfaces have been investigated and offer advantages for high power system design. The bonding process of chips on sub-mounts and coolers has been studied extensively and for a variety of solder materials. High quality of the interfaces as well as good reliability under normal operation and thermal cycling have been realized. A viable alternative to soldering is silver sintering. The very positive results which have been achieved with a variety of technologies indicate the robustness of the VCSEL chips and their suitability for high power systems. Beam shaping micro-optics can be integrated on the VCSEL chip in a wafer scale process by replication of lenses in a polymer layer. The performance of VCSEL arrays with integrated collimation lenses has been positively evaluated and the integrated chips are fully compatible with all further assembly steps. The integrated high power systems make the application even easier and more robust. New examples in laser material processing and pumping of solid state lasers are presented.

  3. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operationa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operation with ~38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ~1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: 1) inconsistent dependence of the post-RFQ beam current on the ion source tilt angle, and 2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  4. Pulsed high-power beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1988-06-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. A 70-Mev, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability. 6 figs.

  5. High power excimer laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Ludolf; Paetzel, Rainer

    2006-02-01

    Today's excimer lasers are well-established UV laser sources for a wide variety of micromachining applications. The excimer's high pulse energy and average power at short UV wavelengths make them ideal for ablation of various materials, e. g., polyimide, PMMA, copper, and diamond. Excimer micromachining technology, driven by the ever-shrinking feature sizes of micro-mechanical and micro-electronic devices, is used for making semiconductor packaging microvias, ink jet nozzle arrays, and medical devices. High-power excimer laser systems are capable of processing large areas with resolution down to several microns without using wet chemical processes. For instance, drilling precise tapered holes and reel-to-reel manufacturing of disposable sensors have proven to be very cost-effective manufacturing techniques for volume production. Specifically, the new industrial excimer laser-the LAMBDA SX 315C-easily meets the high demands of cost-effective production. The stabilized output power of 315 watts at 300 Hz (308 nm) and its outstanding long-term stability make this laser ideal for high-duty-cycle, high-throughput micromachining. In this paper, high-power excimer laser technology, products, applications, and beam delivery systems will be discussed.

  6. High-Average Power Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Power, John G.; /Argonne

    2012-09-05

    There has been significant progress in the development of high-power facilities in recent years yet major challenges remain. The task of WG4 was to identify which facilities were capable of addressing the outstanding R&D issues presently preventing high-power operation. To this end, information from each of the facilities represented at the workshop was tabulated and the results are presented herein. A brief description of the major challenges is given, but the detailed elaboration can be found in the other three working group summaries.

  7. High-power proton linac for transmuting the long-lived fission products in nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    High power proton linacs are being considered at Los Alamos as drivers for high-flux spallation neutron sources that can be used to transmute the troublesome long-lived fission products in defense nuclear waste. The transmutation scheme being studied provides a high flux (> 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2}{minus}s) of thermal neutrons, which efficiently converts fission products to stable or short-lived isotopes. A medium-energy proton linac with an average beam power of about 110 MW can burn the accumulated Tc99 and I129 inventory at the DOE's Hanford Site within 30 years. Preliminary concepts for this machine are described. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  9. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  10. High power fast ramping power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Marneris,I.; Bajon, E.; Bonati, R.; Sandberg, J.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04

    Hundred megawatt level fast ramping power converters to drive proton and heavy ion machines are under research and development at accelerator facilities in the world. This is a leading edge technology. There are several topologies to achieve this power level. Their advantages and related issues will be discussed.

  11. High power, high frequency helix TWT's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloley, H. J.; Willard, J.; Paatz, S. R.; Keat, M. J.

    The design and performance characteristics of a 34-GHz pulse tube capable of 75 W peak power output at 30 percent duty cycle and a broadband CW tube are presented. Particular attention is given to the engineering problems encountered during the development of the tubes, including the suppression of backward wave oscillation, the design of electron guns for small-diameter high-current beams, and the thermal capability of small helix structures. The discussion also covers the effects of various design parameters and choice of engineering materials on the ultimate practical limit of power and gain at the operating frequencies. Measurements are presented for advanced experimental tubes.

  12. Investigation of GEV Proton-Induced Spallation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilscher, D.; Herbach, C.-M.; Jahnke, U.; Tishchenko, V. G.; Galin, J.; Lott, B.; Letourneau, A.; Peghaire, A.; Filges, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Nünighoff, K.; Schaal, H.; Sterzenbach, G.; Wohlmuther, M.; Pienkowski, L.; Schröder, W. U.; Toke, J.

    2004-09-01

    A reliable modeling of GeV proton-induced spallation reactions is indispensable for the design of the spallation module and the target station of future accelerator driven hybrid reactors (ADS) or spallation neutron sources (ESS), in particular, to provide precise predictions for the neutron production, the radiation damage of materials (window), and the production of radioactivity (3H, 7Be etc.) in the target medium. Detailed experimental nuclear data are needed for sensitive validations and improvements of the models, whose predictive power is strongly dependent on the correct physical description of the three main stages of a spallation reaction: (i) the Intra-Nuclear-Cascade (INC) with the fast heating of the target nucleus, (ii) the de-excitation due to pre-equilibrium emission including the possibility of multi-fragmentation, and (iii) the statistical decay of thermally excited nuclei by evaporation of light particles and fission in the case of heavy nuclei. Key experimental data for this endeavor are absolute production cross sections and energy spectra for neutrons and light charged-particles (LCPs), emission of composite particles prior and post to the attainment of an equilibrated system, distribution of excitation energies deposited in the nuclei after the INC, and fission probabilities. Systematic measurements of such data are furthermore needed over large ranges of target nuclei and incident proton energies. Such data has been measured with the NESSI detector. An overview of new and previous results will be given.

  13. A model for astrophysical spallation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, W. F.; Ayres, C. L.; Merker, M.; Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo model (RENO) for spallation reactions is described which can treat both the spallations induced by a free nucleon and those induced by a complex nucleus. It differs from other such models in that it employs a discrete-nucleon representation of the nucleus and allows clusters of nucleons to form and to participate in the reaction. The RENO model is particularly suited for spallations involving the relatively light nuclei of astrophysical and cosmic-ray interest.

  14. Spallation studies on shock loaded uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.; Hixson, R.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Vorthman, J.E.; Kelly, A.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissel, W.R.

    1997-12-31

    Uranium samples at two different purity levels were used for spall strength measurements at three different stress levels. A 50 mm single-stage gas-gun was used to produce planar impact conditions using Z-cut quartz impactors. Samples of depleted uranium were taken from very high purity material and from material that had 300 ppm of carbon added. A pair of shots was done for each impact strength, one member of the pair with VISAR diagnostics and the second with soft recovery for metallographical examination. A series of increasing final stress states were chosen to effectively freeze the microstructural damage at three places in the development to full spall separation. This allowed determination of the dependence of spall mechanisms on stress level and sample purity. This report will discuss both the results of the metallurgical examination of soft recovered samples and the modeling of the free surface VISAR data. The micrographs taken from the recovered samples show brittle cracking as the spallation failure mechanism. Deformation induced twins are plentiful and obviously play a role in the spallation process. The twins are produced in the initial shock loading and, so, are present already before the fracture process begins. The 1 d characteristics code CHARADE has been used to model the free surface VISAR data.

  15. High power linear accelerators for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1990-01-01

    Proton linacs driving high-flux spallation neutron sources are being considered for transmutation of nuclear waste and production of tritium. Advances in high-current linac technology have provided a basis for the development of credible designs for the required accelerator, which has a nominal 1.6-GeV energy, and a 250-mA cw current. A beam with these parameters incident on a liquid lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi) target can generate a thermal neutron flux of up to 5 {times} 10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}-s in a cylindrical blanket surrounding the spallation source. This high flux can produce tritium through the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha})T or {sup 3}He(n,{gamma})T reactions, or can burn long-lived actinides and fission products from nuclear waste through capture and fission processes. In some system scenarios, waste actinides and/or other fissile materials in the blanket can produce sufficient fission energy to power the accelerator.

  16. New high power 200 MHz RF system for the LANSCE drift tube linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.; Friedrichs, C.; Lynch, M.

    1998-12-31

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linac provides an 800 MeV direct H{sup +} proton beam, and injects H{sup {minus}} to the upgraded proton storage ring for charge accumulation for the Short Pulse Spallation Source. Accelerating these interlaced beams requires high average power from the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac (DTL) RF system. Three power amplifiers have operated at up to three Megawatts with 12% duty factor. The total number of electron power tubes in the RF amplifiers and their modulators has been reduced from fifty-two to twenty-four. The plant continues to utilize the original design of a tetrode driving a super power triode. Further increases in the linac duty factor are limited, in part, by the maximum dissipation ratings of the triodes. A description of the system modifications proposed to overcome these limitations includes new power amplifiers using low-level RF modulation for tank field control. The first high power Diacrode{reg_sign} is being delivered and a new amplifier cavity is being designed. With only eight power tubes, the new system will deliver both peak power and high duty factor, with lower mains power and cooling requirements. The remaining components needed for the new RF system will be discussed.

  17. Spallation UCN Production for nEDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Yasuhiro; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Jeong, Sun-Chan; Kawasaki, Shinsuke; Matsumiya, Ryohei; Matsuta, Kensaku; Mihara, Mototsugu; Watanabe, Yutaka

    A new superthermal UCN production in He-II, which is placed in a spallation neutron source, is discussed. In the new UCN source, the production rate is expected to be 200 UCN/cm3/s at a proton beam power of 500 MeV×40 μA and the UCN maximum energy of Ec = 210 neV. The γ heating in the He-II can be removed by means of 3He pumping according to calculations. For an EDM measurement, UCN are extracted from a He-II bottle through an aluminum window by using a superconducting magnet. The possibility of a 129Xe magnetometer for the EDM measurement is also discussed.

  18. Target designs for the Brookhaven National Laboratory 5-MW pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Powell, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    A feasibility study of a compact high power density target for a spallation neutron source was under-taken. The target arrangement consists primarily of heavy metal, with appropriate cooling passages. A high intensity proton beam of intermediate energy is directed at the target, where it interacts with the heavy metal nuclei. The subsequent spallation reactions produce several neutrons per proton resulting in an intense neutron source. The proton beam is assumed to havean energy of 5 MW, and to be cyclic with a repetition rate of 10Hz and 50Hz. The study was divided into two broad sections. First, an analysis of preliminary target designs was undertaken to ensure the overall feasibility of the concepts involved in the design and eventual construction of such a high power density target. Second, two proposed target designs, based on the first set of analyses, are investigated in more detail. Special care is taken to ensure that the neutron fluxes in the moderator are at the desired level no material compatibility problems exist,and the target is able to operate in a reliable and safe manner. Several target materials, coolant types, and target arrangements are investigated in the first section. The second section concentrates on a single target material and geometric arrangement. However, several structural material choices continue to be investigated with the aim of minimizing the effects of structural heating, and associated thermally induced stresses. In the final section the conclusions of this preliminary study are summarized.

  19. High-power fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Cesar; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    Fibre lasers are now associated with high average powers and very high beam qualities. Both these characteristics are required by many industrial, defence and scientific applications, which explains why fibre lasers have become one of the most popular laser technologies. However, this success, which is largely founded on the outstanding characteristics of fibres as an active medium, has only been achieved through researchers around the world striving to overcome many of the limitations imposed by the fibre architecture. This Review focuses on these limitations, both past and current, and the creative solutions that have been proposed for overcoming them. These solutions have enabled fibre lasers to generate the highest diffraction-limited average power achieved to date by solid-state lasers.

  20. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  1. High power gas laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Leland, Wallace T.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1981-01-01

    A high power output CO.sub.2 gas laser amplifier having a number of sections, each comprising a plurality of annular pumping chambers spaced around the circumference of a vacuum chamber containing a cold cathode, gridded electron gun. The electron beam from the electron gun ionizes the gas lasing medium in the sections. An input laser beam is split into a plurality of annular beams, each passing through the sections comprising one pumping chamber.

  2. High-Power Rf Load

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Vlieks, Arnold E.

    1998-09-01

    A compact high-power RF load comprises a series of very low Q resonators, or chokes [16], in a circular waveguide [10]. The sequence of chokes absorb the RF power gradually in a short distance while keeping the bandwidth relatively wide. A polarizer [12] at the input end of the load is provided to convert incoming TE.sub.10 mode signals to circularly polarized TE.sub.11 mode signals. Because the load operates in the circularly polarized mode, the energy is uniformly and efficiently absorbed and the load is more compact than a rectangular load. Using these techniques, a load having a bandwidth of 500 MHz can be produced with an average power dissipation level of 1.5 kW at X-band, and a peak power dissipation of 100 MW. The load can be made from common lossy materials, such as stainless steel, and is less than 15 cm in length. These techniques can also produce loads for use as an alternative to ordinary waveguide loads in small and medium RF accelerators, in radar systems, and in other microwave applications. The design is easily scalable to other RF frequencies and adaptable to the use of other lossy materials.

  3. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  4. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  5. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics for the Spallation Neutron Source liquid mercury target

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, M.W.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1998-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high-power accelerator-based pulsed spallation source being designed by a multilaboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used to analyze the SNS design. The liquid-mercury target is subjected to the neutronic (internal) heat generation that results from the proton collisions with the mercury nuclei. The liquid mercury simultaneously serves as the neutronic target medium, transports away the heat generated within itself, and cools the metallic target structure. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots. These zones exist because the most feasible target designs include a complete U-turn flow redirection. Although the primary concern is that the target is adequately cooled, the pressure drop from inlet to outlet must also be considered because pressure drop directly affects structural loading and required pumping power. Based on the current design, a three-dimensional CFD model has been developed that includes the stainless steel target structure, the liquid-mercury target flow, and the liquid-mercury cooling jacket that wraps around the nose of the target.

  6. High Power Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2004-04-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high pulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. User programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few. Recently the incorporation of energy recovery systems has permitted extension of the average power capabilities to the kW level and beyond. Development of substantially higher power systems with applications in defense and security is believed feasible with modest R&D efforts applied to a few technology areas. This paper will discuss at a summary level the physics of such devices, survey existing and planned facilities, and touch on the applications that have driven the development of these popular light sources.

  7. High voltage DC power supply

    DOEpatents

    Droege, T.F.

    1989-12-19

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively. 7 figs.

  8. High voltage DC power supply

    DOEpatents

    Droege, Thomas F.

    1989-01-01

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively.

  9. High power cladding light strippers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, Alexandre; Faucher, Mathieu; Sévigny, Benoit

    2008-02-01

    The ability to strip cladding light from double clad fiber (DCF) fibers is required for many different reasons, one example is to strip unwanted cladding light in fiber lasers and amplifiers. When removing residual pump light for example, this light is characterized by a large numerical aperture distribution and can reach power levels into the hundreds of watts. By locally changing the numerical aperture (N.A.) of the light to be stripped, it is possible to achieve significant attenuation even for the low N.A. rays such as escaped core modes in the same device. In order to test the power-handling capability of this device, one hundred watts of pump and signal light is launched from a tapered fusedbundle (TFB) 6+1x1 combiner into a high power-cladding stripper. In this case, the fiber used in the cladding stripper and the output fiber of the TFB was a 20/400 0.06/0.46 N.A. double clad fiber. Attenuation of over 20dB in the cladding was measured without signal loss. By spreading out the heat load generated by the unwanted light that is stripped, the package remained safely below the maximum operating temperature internally and externally. This is achieved by uniformly stripping the energy along the length of the fiber within the stripper. Different adhesive and heat sinking techniques are used to achieve this uniform removal of the light. This suggests that these cladding strippers can be used to strip hundreds of watts of light in high power fiber lasers and amplifiers.

  10. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  11. Spallation performance of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation tubing.

    PubMed

    Peek, G J; Thompson, A; Killer, H M; Firmin, R K

    2000-09-01

    During the prolonged roller pump use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), tubing wear generates spallation. The spallation performance of Tygon S-65-HL was measured and compared with a potential new ECMO tubing, LVA (Portex 800-500-575). Spallation was measured by on-line laser diode particle counting (HIAC) during simulated ECMO. The effects of differing levels of occlusion and pump speed were examined, as was the effect of spallation over time. The spallation produced by Tygon S-65-HL was less than that seen with LVA during 24 h of simulated ECMO (p < 0.001), and after 72 h had fallen almost to zero. Spallation with Tygon tubing increases with increasing pump speed and decreases over time. There appears to be only a weak correlation with occlusion, which is surprising. The spallation performance of Tygon S-65-HL was variable and under some conditions exceeded that of LVA. Overall, however, Tygon S-65-HL produced less spallation than LVA. Therefore, LVA cannot be recommended for clinical ECMO use. PMID:11001170

  12. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.R.

    1993-03-23

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counter bores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counter bores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  13. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, Brian; McDaniel, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  14. Synchrotron based spallation neutron source concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.

    1998-07-01

    During the past 20 years, rapid-cycling synchrotrons (RCS) have been used very productively to generate short-pulse thermal neutron beams for neutron scattering research by materials science communities in Japan (KENS), the UK (ISIS) and the US (IPNS). The most powerful source in existence, ISIS in the UK, delivers a 160-kW proton beam to a neutron-generating target. Several recently proposed facilities require proton beams in the MW range to produce intense short-pulse neutron beams. In some proposals, a linear accelerator provides the beam power and an accumulator ring compresses the pulse length to the required {approx} 1 {micro}s. In others, RCS technology provides the bulk of the beam power and compresses the pulse length. Some synchrotron-based proposals achieve the desired beam power by combining two or more synchrotrons of the same energy, and others propose a combination of lower and higher energy synchrotrons. This paper presents the rationale for using RCS technology, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of synchrotron-based spallation sources.

  15. Heterodyne Velocimetry measurements on solids shock driven by high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Patrick; Benier, Jacky; Frugier, Pierre-Antoine; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilen; Cuq-Lelandais, Jean-Paul; Gay, Elise; de Resseguier, Thibaut; Berthe, Laurent; Boustie, Michel; Nivard, Mariette; Claverie, Alain; Rabec Le Gloahec, Marc

    2009-06-01

    A new Heterodyne Velocimeter (PDV) is under development at CEA for high explosive experimentations. Recently, we used it onto metallic target shock driven by high power laser. The aim is to test the ability of this means to reveal the propagation and the effects of shocks into materials, at extremely high strain rate and fast variations into the loading evolution. Spallation and fragmentation experiments carried out on aluminum samples, were performed on the LULI lasers at the Ecole Polytechnique, with both VISAR and HV diagnostics. Comparisons reveal a very good consistency of both experimental results. In addition, HV diagnostic evidence several levels of velocity in the experiment of fragmentation. Interpretation of these measurements is supported by transverse shadowgraphy analysis.

  16. Improved Programmable High-Voltage Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castell, Karen; Rutberg, Arthur

    1994-01-01

    Improved dc-to-dc converter functions as programmable high-voltage power supply with low-power-dissipation voltage regulator on high-voltage side. Design of power supply overcomes deficiencies of older designs. Voltage regulation with low power dissipation provided on high-voltage side.

  17. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  18. High power microwave source development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, James N.; Miller, Gabriel; Potter, Seth; Ashby, Steve; Smith, Richard R.

    1995-05-01

    The requirements of this project have been to: (1) improve and expand the sources available in the facility for testing purposes and (2) perform specific tasks under direction of the Defense Nuclear Agency about the applications of high power microwaves (HPM). In this project the HPM application was power beaming. The requirements of this program were met in the following way: (1) We demonstrated that a compact linear induction accelerator can drive HPM sources at repetition rates in excess of 100 HZ at peak microwave powers of a GW. This was done for the relativistic magnetron. Since the conclusion of this contract such specifications have also been demonstrated for the relativistic klystron under Ballistic Missile Defense Organization funding. (2) We demonstrated an L band relativistic magnetron. This device has been used both on our single pulse machines, CAMEL and CAMEL X, and the repetitive system CLIA. (3) We demonstrated that phase locking of sources together in large numbers is a feasible technology and showed the generation of multigigawatt S-band radiation in an array of relativistic magnetrons.

  19. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2008-05-12

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Pm and 84{<=}Z{<=}99 elements) at the surface of the magnetic star HD101065, also known as Przybylski's star. This star is know to be a chemically peculiar star and its anomalous 38spallation processes resulting from the interaction of the stellar material with stellar energetic particle can by themselves only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of HD101065. We show that specific parametric simulations can explain many different observational aspects, and in particular that a significant production of Z>30 heavy elements can be achieved. In this nucleosynthesis process, the secondary-neutron captures play a crucial role. The most attractive feature of the spallation process is the systematic production of Pm and Tc and the possible synthesis of actinides and sub-actinides.Based on such a parametric model, it is also shown that intense fluences of accelerated charged-particles interacting with surrounding material can efficiently produce elements heavier than iron. Different regimes are investigated and shown to be at the origin of p- and s-nuclei in the case of high-fluence low-flux events and r-nuclei for high-fluence high-flux irradiations. The possible existence of such irradiation events need to be confirmed by hydrodynamics simulations, but most of all by spectroscopic observations through the detection of short-lived radio-elements.

  20. Materials Compatibility Studies for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high power facility for producing neutrons that utilizes flowing liquid mercury inside an austenitic stainless steel container as the target for a 1.0 GeV proton beam. The energy deposited in the target is transported by two separate mercury flow streams: one to transport heat in the interior target region and one to cool the stainless steel container. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations have been performed to predict temperature, velocity, and pressure distributions in the target. Results have generally shown that the power deposited in the bulk mercury can be effectively transported with reasonable flow rates and the bulk mercury temperature should not exceed 160{deg}C. Assuming good thermal contact, the maximum stainless steel wall temperature should be 130 {deg}C. Type 316 SS has been selected as the container material for the mercury and consequences of exposure of 316 SS to radiation, thermal shock, thermal stress, cavitation and hot, flowing mercury are all being addressed by R&D programs. In addition, corrosion studies include evaluation of Inconel 718 because it has been successfully used in previous water cooled spallation neutron systems as a window material. With type 316 SS selected to contain the mercury target of the SNS, two types of compatibility issues have been examined: LME and temperature gradient mass transfer. Studies have shown that mercury does not easily wet type 316 SS below 275{deg}C. In the LME experiments, attempts were made to promote wetting of the steel by mercury either by adding gallium to the mercury or coating the specimen with a tin-silver solder that the mercury easily wets. The latter proved more reliable in establishing wetting, but there was no evidence of LME in any of the constant extension rate tensile tests either at 23 or 100 {deg}C. Inconel 718 also showed no change in room temperature properties when tested in mercwy or mercury-gallium. However, there

  1. Target Operational Experience at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Janney, Jim G; Kaminskas, Saulius; McClintock, David A; Rosenblad, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated at unprecedented power levels for a short-pulse spallation source. Target operations have been successful but not without difficulties. Three targets out of the eight used to date have ended life unexpectedly causing interruptions to the neutron science users. The first of a kind mercury target design experiences beam-pulse induced cavitation damage that is suspected in one of the target leaks. The two other targets suffered early failures due to defective welds. Diagnosing the causes of target leaks and understanding of the progression of cavitation erosion and radiation damage effects has made use of post-irradiation examination (PIE) capabilities. As a result of PIE, review of quality assurance practices and related investigations, design changes are being implemented and manufacturing oversight improved. This paper describes SNS target operating experience, including the more important observations and lessons learned.

  2. Strain rate effects for spallation of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häussler-Combe, Ulrich; Panteki, Evmorfia; Kühn, Tino

    2015-09-01

    Appropriate triaxial constitutive laws are the key for a realistic simulation of high speed dynamics of concrete. The strain rate effect is still an open issue within this context. In particular the question whether it is a material property - which can be covered by rate dependent stress strain relations - or mainly an effect of inertia is still under discussion. Experimental and theoretical investigations of spallation of concrete specimen in a Hopkinson Bar setup may bring some evidence into this question. For this purpose the paper describes the VERD model, a newly developed constitutive law for concrete based on a damage approach with included strain rate effects [1]. In contrast to other approaches the dynamic strength increase is not directly coupled to strain rate values but related to physical mechanisms like the retarded movement of water in capillary systems and delayed microcracking. The constitutive law is fully triaxial and implemented into explicit finite element codes for the investigation of a wide range of concrete structures exposed to impact and explosions. The current setup models spallation experiments with concrete specimen [2]. The results of such experiments are mainly related to the dynamic tensile strength and the crack energy of concrete which may be derived from, e.g., the velocity of spalled concrete fragments. The experimental results are compared to the VERD model and two further constitutive laws implemented in LS-Dyna. The results indicate that both viscosity and retarded damage are required for a realistic description of the material behaviour of concrete exposed to high strain effects [3].

  3. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel; John Brawley; Richard Bundy; Gianluigi Ciovati; Kurt Macha; Danny Machie; John Mammosser; Ron Sundelin; Larry Turlington; Katherine Wilson; J. Sekutowicz; D. Barni; C. Pagani; R. Parodi; P. Pierini; D. Schrage; M. Doleans; S.H. Kim; D. Mangra; P. Ylae-Oijala

    2001-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 192 MeV to 1000 MeV. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical beta - values of beta = 0.61 and beta = 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jlab, which calls for fabricating and testing of four beta = 0.61 cavities and two beta = 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler of the TESLA type on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four beta = 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test at the end of the year 2001. At this time two cavities of each type have been fabricated and the first tests on the beta = 0.61 cavity exceeded the design values for gradient and Q - value: Eacc = 10.3 MV/m and Q = 6.5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K. This paper will describe the cavity design with respect to electrical and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of the conference.

  4. Computer simulations for rf design of a Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Goulding, Richard Howell; Kang, Yoon W; Shin, Ki; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    Electromagnetic modeling of the multicusp external antenna H ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source SNS has been performed in order to optimize high-power performance. During development of the SNS external antenna ion source, antenna failures due to high voltage and multicusp magnet holder rf heating concerns under stressful operating conditions led to rf characteristics analysis. In rf simulations, the plasma was modeled as an equivalent lossy metal by defining conductivity as . Insulation designs along with material selections such as ferrite and Teflon could be included in the computer simulations to compare antenna gap potentials, surface power dissipations, and input impedance at the operating frequencies, 2 and 13.56 MHz. Further modeling and design improvements are outlined in the conclusion.

  5. High Power, High Voltage Electric Power System for Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aintablian, Harry; Kirkham, Harold; Timmerman, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the 30 KW, 600 V MRHE power subsystem. Descriptions of the power subsystem elements, the mode of power transfer, and power and mass estimates are presented. A direct-drive architecture for electric propulsion is considered which reduces mass and complexity. Solar arrays with concentrators are used for increased efficiency. Finally, the challenges due to the environment of a hypothetical lunar mission as well as due to the advanced technologies considered are outlined.

  6. RF Distribution System for High Power Test of the SNS Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Kang, Yoon W; Broyles, Michael R; Crofford, Mark T; Geng, Xiaosong; Kim, Sang-Ho; Phibbs, Curtis L; Strong, William Herb; Peglow, Robert C; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V

    2012-01-01

    A four-way waveguide RF power distribution system for testing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) multi-cavity cryomodule to investigate the collective behavior has been developed. A single klystron operating at 805MHz for 1.3 msec at 60Hz powers the 4-way waveguide splitter to deliver up to 400 kW to individual cavities. Each cavity is fed through a combination of waveguide splitters and vector modulators (VM) to provide independent magnitude and phase controls. The waveguide vector modulator consists of two quadrature hybrids and two motorized waveguide phase shifters. The phase shifters and the assembled waveguide vector modulators were individually tested and characterized for low power and high RF power in the SNS RF test facility. Precise calibrations of magnitude and phase were performed to generate the look up tables (LUTs) to provide operational references during the cryomodule test. An I-Q demodulator module was developed and utilized to measure relative phases in pulsed high RF power operation. PLC units were developed for mechanical control of the phase shifters. Initial low/high power measurements were made using LabVIEW. An operation algorithm has been implemented into EPICS control for the cryomodule test stand.

  7. Spallation and fracture resulting from reflected and intersecting stress waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinslow, R.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of stress waves produced in solid by explosions or high-velocity impacts. These waves rebound from free surfaces in the form of tensile waves that are capable of causing internal fractures or spallation of the material. The high-speed framing camera is shown to be an important tool for observing the stress waves and fracture in transparent targets, and its photographs provide valuable information on the mechanics of fracture.

  8. High power density spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Donald E.; Pais, Martin R.; Chow, Louis C.

    1989-07-01

    The research reported describes experimental and theoretical investigations of high power density evaporative spray cooling. Preliminary experiments demonstrating heat fluxes greater than 1,000 W/sq cm were conducted. Extensive laser phase Doppler measurements of spray characteristics were also taken. These measurements provided valuable insight into the heat transfer process. An in-depth analysis was conducted to determine the mechanisms responsible for critical heat flux. Theoretical modeling was also conducted to determine the most desirable heat transfer conditions. After analysis of these results, an improved experimental apparatus was designed and fabricated. The new apparatus provided greater experimental control and improve accuracy. New tests were conducted in which the critical heat flux was increased, and the heat transfer efficiency was greatly improved. These results are compared to those of previous researchers, and indicated substantial improvement.

  9. Optics assembly for high power laser tools

    DOEpatents

    Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-06-07

    There is provided a high power laser rotational optical assembly for use with, or in high power laser tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the optical assembly finds applications in performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations. The optical assembly has rotational seals and bearing configurations to avoid contamination of the laser beam path and optics.

  10. High power laser apparatus and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A high-power, continuous-wave laser was designed for use in power transmission and energy-collecting systems, and for producing incoherent light for pumping a laser material. The laser has a high repetitive pulsing rate per unit time, resulting in a high-power density beam. The laser is composed of xenon flash tubes powered by fast-charging capacitors flashed in succession by a high-speed motor connected to an automobile-type distributor.

  11. A proposal for a long-pulse spallation source at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Weinacht, D.

    1995-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is proposing a new spallation neutron source that will provide the US with an internationally competitive facility for neutron science and technology that can be built in approximately three years for less than $100 million. The establishment of a 1-MW, long-pulse spallation source (LPSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) will meet many of the present needs of scientists in the neutron scattering community and provide a significant boost to neutron research in the US. The new facility will support the development of a future, more intense spallation neutron source, that is planned by DOE`s Office of Energy Research. Together with the existing short pulse spallation source (SPSS) at the Manual Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) at Los Alamos, the new LPSS will provide US scientists with a complementary pair of high-performance neutron sources to rival the world`s leading facilities in Europe.

  12. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of mercury target concepts for a pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.; Haines, J.

    1996-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) is a high-power, accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The ORSNS is projected to have a 1 MW proton beam upgradable to 5 MW. About 60% of the beam power (1-5 MW, 17-83 kJ/pulse in 0.5 microsec at 60 cps) is deposited in the liquid metal (mercury) target having the dimensions of 65x30x10 cm (about 19.5 liter). Peak steady state power density is about 150 and 785 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW and 5 MW beam respectively, whereas peak pulsed power density is as high as 5.2 and 26.1 GW/m{sup 3}, respectively. The peak pulse temperature rise rate is 14 million C/s (for 5 MW beam) whereas the total pulse temperature rise is only 7 C. In addition to thermal shock and materials compatibility, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. This includes proper flow distribution, flow reversals, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles throughout the mercury volume or other concepts. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFDS-FLOW3D was used to simulate the thermal and flow distribution in three preliminary concepts of the mercury target. Very initial CFD simulation of He bubbles injection demonstrates some potential for simulating behavior of He bubbles in flowing mercury. Much study and development will be required to be able to `predict`, even in a crude way, such a complex phenomena. Future direction in both design and R&D is outlined.

  13. High power ion thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The ion thruster is one of several forms of space electric propulsion being considered for use on future SP-100-based missions. One possible major mission ground rule is the use of a single Space Shuttle launch. Thus, the mass in orbit at the reactor activation altitude would be limited by the Shuttle mass constraints. When the spacecraft subsystem masses are subtracted from this available mass limit, a maximum propellant mass may be calculated. Knowing the characteristics of each type of electric thruster allows maximum values of total impulse, mission velocity increment, and thrusting time to be calculated. Because ion thrusters easily operate at high values of efficiency (60 to 70%) and specific impulse (3000 to 5000 sec), they can impart large values of total impulse to a spacecraft. They also can be operated with separate control of the propellant flow rate and exhaust velocity. This paper presents values of demonstrated and projected performance of high power ion thrusters used in an analysis of electric propulsion for an SP-100 based mission.

  14. New head picked for European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The UK physicist John Womersley is to become the next director-general of the €1.8bn European Spallation Source (ESS), which is currently being built in Lund, Sweden, by a 17-member consortium of European countries.

  15. Simplified High-Power Inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. B.; Rippel, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solid-state inverter simplified by use of single gate-turnoff device (GTO) to commutate multiple silicon controlled rectifiers (SCR's). By eliminating conventional commutation circuitry, GTO reduces cost, size and weight. GTO commutation applicable to inverters of greater than 1-kilowatt capacity. Applications include emergency power, load leveling, drives for traction and stationary polyphase motors, and photovoltaic-power conditioning.

  16. Rotary high power transfer apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Peter E. (Inventor); Porter, Ryan S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for reducing terminal-to-terminal circuit resistance and enhancing heat transfer in a rotary power transfer apparatus of the roll ring type comprising a connecting thimble for attaching an external power cable to a cone shaped terminal which is attached to a tab integral to an outer ring. An inner ring having a spherical recess mates with the spherical end of a tie connector. A cone shaped terminal is fitted to a second connecting thimble for attaching a second external power cable.

  17. Neutronics performance and decay heat calculation of a solid target for a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nio, D.; Ooi, M.; Takenaka, N.; Furusaka, M.; Kawai, M.; Mishima, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.

    2005-08-01

    A solid target is expected to give higher neutron intensity than a liquid target of mercury at a spallation neutron source with a power of around 1 MW. We have studied the neutronic performance of a target-moderator-reflector assembly with a tungsten solid target. It is found that the neutron intensities from moderators were higher in the solid target system than in the mercury liquid target. However, the tungsten target required cladding to prevent tungsten from the corrosion of cooling water. A tungsten target with tantalum cladding has been already developed although tantalum has high decay heat. Therefore, we estimated the decay heat of the target and found that the decay heat of 0.5 mm thick tantalum was still high. We need a thinner tantalum or new cladding materials. It was revealed that adoption of a thinner tantalum or new cladding material such as chrome nitride reduced the decay heat effectively.

  18. Department of Energy review of the National Spallation Neutron Source Project

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) review of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) was conducted. The NSNS will be a new high-power spallation neutron source; initially, it will operate at 1 megawatt (MW), but is designed to be upgradeable to significantly higher power, at lower cost, when accelerator and target technologies are developed for higher power. The 53-member Review Committee examined the projected cost, schedule, technical scope, and management structure described in the CDR. For each of the major components of the NSNS, the Committee determined that the project team had produced credible designs that can be expected to work well. What remains to be done is to integrate the design of these components. With the exception of the liquid mercury target, the NSNS Project will rely heavily on proven technologies and, thus, will face a relatively low risk to successful project completion. The Total Project Cost (TPC) presented to the Committee in the CDR was $1.266 billion in as-spent dollars. In general, the Committee felt that the laboratory consortium had presented a credible estimate for each of the major components but that value engineering might produce some savings. The construction schedule presented to the Committee covered six years beginning in FY 1999. The Committee questioned whether all parts of the project could be completed according to this schedule. In particular, the linac and the conventional facilities appeared to have overly optimistic schedules. The NSNS project team was encouraged to reexamine these activities and to consider a more conservative seven-year schedule. Another concern of the Committee was the management structure. In summary, the Committee felt that this Conceptual Design Report was a very credible proposal, and that there is a high probability for successful completion of this major project within the proposed budget, although the six-year proposed schedule may be optimistic.

  19. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  20. A very intense neutrino super beam experiment for leptonic CP violation discovery based on the European spallation source linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baussan, E.; Blennow, M.; Bogomilov, M.; Bouquerel, E.; Caretta, O.; Cederkäll, J.; Christiansen, P.; Coloma, P.; Cupial, P.; Danared, H.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Dracos, M.; Ekelöf, T.; Eshraqi, M.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gaudiot, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Lindroos, M.; Loveridge, P.; Matev, R.; McGinnis, D.; Mezzetto, M.; Miyamoto, R.; Mosca, L.; Ohlsson, T.; Öhman, H.; Osswald, F.; Peggs, S.; Poussot, P.; Ruber, R.; Tang, J. Y.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Wurtz, J.

    2014-08-01

    Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few μs with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground Water Cherenkov detector located in existing mines 300-600 km from Lund will make it possible to discover leptonic CP violation at 5 σ significance level in up to 50% of the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase range. This experiment could also determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a significance level of more than 3 σ if this issue will not already have been settled by other experiments by then. The mass hierarchy performance could be increased by combining the neutrino beam results with those obtained from atmospheric neutrinos detected by the same large volume detector. This detector will also be used to measure the proton lifetime, detect cosmological neutrinos and neutrinos from supernova explosions. Results on the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy are presented.

  1. Investigation of the optimal material type and dimension for spallation targets using simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Accelerator-driven systems are extensively developed to generate neutron sources for research, industrial, and medical plans. Different heavy elements are utilized as spallation targets to produce spallation neutrons. Computational methods are efficiently utilized to simulate neutronic behavior of a spallation target. MCNPX 2.6.0 is used as a powerful code based on Monte Carlo stochastic techniques for spallation process computation. This code has the ability to transport different particles using different physical models. In this paper, MCNPX has been utilized to calculate the leaked neutron yield from Pb, lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), W, Ta, Hg, U, Th, Sn, and Cu cylindrical heavy targets. The effects of the target thickness and diameter on neutron yield value have been investigated via the thickness and diameter variations between 5 to 30 cm and 5 to 20 cm, respectively. Proton-induced radionuclide production into the targets as well as leaked neutron spectra from the targets has been calculated for the targets of an optimum determined dimension. The 1-GeV proton particle has been selected to induce spallation process inside the targets. The 2-mm spatial FWHM distribution has been considered for the 1-mA proton beam. Uranium target produced the highest leaked neutron yield with a 1.32 to 3.7 factor which overweighs the others. A dimension of 15 × 60 cm is suggested for all the cylindrical studied spallation targets. Th target experienced the highest alpha emitter radionuclide production while lighter elements such as Cu and Sn bore the lowest radiotoxicity. LBE liquid spallation target competes with the investigated solid targets in neutronic point of view while has surpass than volatile liquid Hg target.

  2. Investigation of the optimal material type and dimension for spallation targets using simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feghhi, S. A. H.; Gholamzadeh, Z.; Tenreiro, C.

    2014-03-01

    Accelerator-driven systems are extensively developed to generate neutron sources for research, industrial and medical plans. Different heavy elements are utilized as spallation targets to produce spallation neutrons. Computational methods are efficiently utilized to simulate neutronic behavior of a spallation target. MCNPX 2.6.0 is used as a powerful code based on Monte Carlo stochastic techniques for spallation process computation. This code has the ability to transport different particles using different physical models. In this paper, MCNPX has been utilized to calculate the leaked neutron yield from Pb, LBE, W, Ta, Hg, U, Th, Sn and Cu cylindrical heavy targets. Effects of the target thickness and diameter on neutron yield value have been investigated via the thickness and diameter variations between 5-30 and 5-20 cm, respectively. Proton-induced radionuclide production into the targets as well as leaked neutron spectra from the targets has been calculated for the targets of an optimum determined dimension. 1 GeV proton particle has been selected to induce spallation process inside the targets. 2 mm spatial FWHM distribution has been considered for the 1 mA proton beam. Uranium target produced the highest leaked neutron yield with a 1.32-3.7 factor overweigh the others. Dimension of 15 × 60 cm is suggested for all the cylindrical studied spallation targets. Th target experienced the highest alpha-emitter radionuclide production while lighter elements such as Cu and Sn bore the lowest radio-toxicity. LBE liquid spallation target competes with the investigated solid targets in neutronic point of view while has surpass than volatile liquid Hg target.

  3. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R; Roseberry, Ron T; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  4. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ˜38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ˜90%. H- beam pulses (˜1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ˜60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ˜0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ˜99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ˜75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ˜100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  5. Status of high power electric propulsion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, David C.; Stone, James R.

    1988-01-01

    The growing emphasis on very challenging missions and the anticipated availability of high power levels in space have led to renewed interest in high power electric propulsion. The status of high power electric propulsion technology and its applicability to various missions are reviewed. The major thruster and system technology issues are identified which must be addressed in a focussed program in order to assure technology readiness for these missions.

  6. High-Power Electromagnetic Thruster Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Mikellides, Pavlos G.

    2001-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several bold new interplanetary and deep-space missions. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center designs, develops, and tests high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. Two high-power thruster concepts currently under investigation by Glenn are the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT).

  7. High average power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Swingle, J.C.

    1985-10-01

    The induction accelerator is discussed with respect to general background and concept, beam transport, scaling, pulse power technology, and the electron beam injector. A discussion of the factors which affect the scaling of the intensity of the beam is given. Limiting factors include collective forces in the beam, virtual cathode formation, surroundings, and beam breakup instability. 24 refs., 11 figs. (WRF)

  8. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING-DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.

    2005-05-16

    After six years, the delivery of components for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring (AR) and the transport lines was completed in Spring 2005. Designed to deliver 1.5 MW beam power (1.5 x 10{sup 14} protons of 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz), stringent measures were implemented in the fabrication, test, and assembly to ensure the quality of the accelerator systems. This paper summarizes the design, R&D, and construction of the ring and transport systems.

  9. AN ALTERNATIVE LATTICE FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER,C.J.; LEE,Y.Y.; TSOUPAS,N.; WEI,J.

    1999-03-29

    As a key component of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project, the Accumulator Ring will collect the proton beam from the SNS LINAC at an intensity of 2 x 10{sup 14} per pulse at 60 Hz for a total power of 2 MW, exceeding present performance value of existing facilities. Requirements of minimum beam loss for hands-on maintenance and flexibility for future upgrade are essential for the lattice design. In this paper, we study an alternative lattice emphasizing various injection schemes and flexibility for future upgrade. Working points, sextupole families for chromaticity control, and alternate extraction schemes are also considered.

  10. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2001-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 186 MeV to 1000 MeV. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical {beta} values of {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jefferson Lab, which calls for fabricating and testing four {beta} = 0.61 cavities and two {beta} = 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four {beta} = 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q value: E{sub acc} = 10.1 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for the {beta} = 0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1 K for the {beta} = 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static Lorentz force detuning have been done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper describes the cavity design with respect to electromagnetic and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop.

  11. R&D-needs and opportunities to broaden the data base on materials and technology for liquid metal spallation targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    Liquid metals have so far only been used to a very limited extent as spallation targets, notably at the ISOLDE-facility at CERN (Pb and La) to produce radioactive isotopes. Virtually no systematic studies have been carried out so far. The available data base is by no means sufficient to answer conclusively very important questions such as predicting reliably the service time of medium-to-high power target systems or determining precisely what technological measures are required and appropriate to maintain an optimum coolant quality, to mitigate the effects of pressure waves in short pulse sources and others. During the workshop several areas have been identified, where there exists an urgent need for improved knowledge and reliable data, and opportunities have been presented to acquire such knowledge and to generate such data. Opportunities to do such research and pertinent know-how, although scarce, are spread over institutions in several countries, and efforts to use these opportunities often require substantial resources both in man power and money. The workshop participants therefore unanimously supported the view that a coordinated and internationally concerted effort should be undertaken to make the best possible use of existing opportunities and available resources in order to develop the knowledge and technology necessary for the deployment and safe operation of target systems suitable for pulsed spallation neutron sources in the multi-megawatt range of beam power.

  12. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert J.; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the development of a high power 780 nm laser suitable for space applications of laser cooling. A possible solution is to use frequency doubling of high power 1560 nm telecom lasers. The presentation shows a diagram of the frequency conversion, and a graph of the second harmonic generation in one crystal, and the use of the cascading crystals. Graphs show the second harmonic power as a function of distance between crystals, second harmonic power vs. pump power, tunability of laser systems.

  13. Dynamics of uncaught foil-stripped electrons in the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source accumulator ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousineau, S.; Holmes, J. A.; Plum, M. A.; Lu, W.

    2011-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator utilizes H- charge exchange injection to merge a 1 GeV, 1 MW beam from a linac into an accumulator ring. The design calls for the 545 keV foil-stripped electrons to be absorbed by an electron catcher located below the foil. However, multiple observations of hardware damage caused by stripped electrons indicate that at least a fraction of the electrons are reflected back into the vacuum chamber. This paper presents the results of a 3D computational model employed to simulate the dynamics of foil-stripped electrons, including a surface interaction model for the catcher. Simulation results are compared with experimental observations, and the implications for high power beam operations are discussed.

  14. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  15. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R

    2012-01-01

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  16. High Average Power Yb:YAG Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L E; Beach, R J; Payne, S A

    2001-05-23

    We are working on a composite thin-disk laser design that can be scaled as a source of high brightness laser power for tactical engagement and other high average power applications. The key component is a diffusion-bonded composite comprising a thin gain-medium and thicker cladding that is strikingly robust and resolves prior difficulties with high average power pumping/cooling and the rejection of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). In contrast to high power rods or slabs, the one-dimensional nature of the cooling geometry and the edge-pump geometry scale gracefully to very high average power. The crucial design ideas have been verified experimentally. Progress this last year included: extraction with high beam quality using a telescopic resonator, a heterogeneous thin film coating prescription that meets the unusual requirements demanded by this laser architecture, thermal management with our first generation cooler. Progress was also made in design of a second-generation laser.

  17. An explosively driven high-power microwave pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M. A.; Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.; Walter, J. W.; Kristiansen, M.; Altgilbers, L. L.

    2012-02-01

    The increased popularity of high power microwave systems and the various sources to drive them is the motivation behind the work to be presented. A stand-alone, self-contained explosively driven high power microwave pulsed power system has been designed, built, and tested at Texas Tech University's Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics. The system integrates four different sub-units that are composed of a battery driven prime power source utilizing capacitive energy storage, a dual stage helical flux compression generator as the main energy amplification device, an integrated power conditioning system with inductive energy storage including a fast opening electro-explosive switch, and a triode reflex geometry virtual cathode oscillator as the microwave radiating source. This system has displayed a measured electrical source power level of over 5 GW and peak radiated microwaves of about 200 MW. It is contained within a 15 cm diameter housing and measures 2 m in length, giving a housing volume of slightly less than 39 l. The system and its sub-components have been extensively studied, both as integrated and individual units, to further expand on components behavior and operation physics. This report will serve as a detailed design overview of each of the four subcomponents and provide detailed analysis of the overall system performance and benchmarks.

  18. Test facilities for high power electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Vetrone, Robert H.; Grisnik, Stanley P.; Myers, Roger M.; Parkes, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Electric propulsion has applications for orbit raising, maneuvering of large space systems, and interplanetary missions. These missions involve propulsion power levels from tenths to tens of megawatts, depending upon the application. General facility requirements for testing high power electric propulsion at the component and thrust systems level are defined. The characteristics and pumping capabilities of many large vacuum chambers in the United States are reviewed and compared with the requirements for high power electric propulsion testing.

  19. Deexcitation Modes in Spallation Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, F. G.; Guzmán, F.; Rodriguez, O.; Tumbarell, O.; Souza, D. A.; Samana, A. R.; Andrade-II, E.; Bernal Castillo, J. L.; Deppman, A.

    2016-08-01

    Spallation nuclear reactions in the range of 0.2 to 1.2 GeV are studied using the CRISP code. A new approach for the deexcitation stage of the compound nucleus was introduced. For the calculations of the level densities, this approach is based on the Back-shifted Fermi gas model (BSFG), which takes into account pairing effects and shell corrections, whereas the calculation of the fission barriers were performed by means of the Extended Thomas-Fermi plus Strutinsky Integral (ETFSI) method, which is a high-speed approximation to the Hartree-Fock method with pairing correlations treated as in the usual BCS plus blocking approach. This procedure is more appropriate to calculate level densities for exotic nuclei. Satisfactory results were obtained and compared with experimental data obtained in the GSI experiments. As another important result, we highlight some directions for the development of a qualitatively superior version of the CRISP code with the implementation of more realistic and suitable physical models to be applied in stable and exotic nuclei that participate in the process. This new version of the code includes several substantial changes in the decay of the hot compound nucleus which allow satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and a reduction of the adjustment parameters.

  20. European Spallation Source and Neutron Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeck, James

    2014-03-01

    International collaborations in large-scale scientific projects can link Sciences and Society. Following this goal, the European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries. Scandinavia is providing 50 percent of the construction cost whilst the other member states are providing financial support mainly via in-kind contribution from institutes, laboratories or industries of the given countries. Scientists and engineers from 35 different countries are members of the workforce in Lund who participate in its design and construction. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics by producing very high flux neutrons to study condensed matter physics, chemistry, biology, nuclear physics and materials science. The ESS will be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. A tungsten target and a 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator, composed mainly of superconducting Radio-Frequency components, are used to achieve these goals.

  1. High efficiency solar photovoltaic power module concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.

    1978-01-01

    The investigation of a preliminary concept for high efficiency solar power generation in space is presented. The concept was a synergistic combination of spectral splitting, tailored bandgap cells, high concentration ratios, and cool cell areas.

  2. High power laser perforating tools and systems

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-04-22

    ystems devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser perforation of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perforate such boreholes.

  3. Photoconductive switching for high power microwave generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M.D.; Hofer, W.W.

    1990-10-01

    Photoconductive switching is a technology that is being increasingly applied to generation of high power microwaves. Two primary semiconductors used for these devices are silicon and gallium arsenide. Diamond is a promising future candidate material. This paper discusses the important material parameters and switching modes, critical issues for microwave generation, and future directions for this high power, photoconductive switching technology.

  4. Automated System Tests High-Power MOSFET's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, Steven W.; Wendt, Isabel O.

    1994-01-01

    Computer-controlled system tests metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's) at high voltages and currents. Measures seven parameters characterizing performance of MOSFET, with view toward obtaining early indication MOSFET defective. Use of test system prior to installation of power MOSFET in high-power circuit saves time and money.

  5. High temperature power electronics for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  6. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-06-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  7. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  8. A high power TWT power processing system. [for communication satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farber, B. F.; Goldin, D. S.; Siegert, C.; Gourash, F.

    1974-01-01

    A power processing system (PPS) is designed for a space-type high power (200W RF) multi-collector traveling-wave tube (TWT). The basic power circuit is presented along with the simplified block diagram and the input, output, and general requirements for the PPS design are tabulated. The paper covers the PPS design as to critical TWT/PPS interface requirements, high voltage cathode/collector supply, high voltage components material, packaging, grounding and isolation, and electrical performance. The use of a single two loop control system for the regulation of cathode and collector voltages is shown to give high efficiency, excellent steady-state and transient performance characteristics, and complete protection for TWT and PPS components under transient conditions.

  9. High Density Power Converters for Photovoltaic Power Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwan, Rahul

    In typical photovoltaic systems, PV cells are connected in series to achieve high output voltages, which decreases conduction losses and helps the downstream power electronics operate at higher efficiencies. A series connection means that the current through the string is limited by the worst case cell, substring, or module, which can result in suboptimal operation of the rest of the string. Given how even small shading can have a large effect on performance, there has been growing interest in the use of distributed power management architectures to mitigate losses from variation in PV systems. In particular, partial power processing converters have gained traction as a means to improve the performance of PV arrays with small, distributed converters that configure in parallel with PV cells. These converters can use low voltage components, only process a fraction of the total power allowing them to achieve higher efficiencies and power density and also have higher reliability. This work details the design and operation of a partial power processing converter implemented as a Resonant Switched Capacitor (ReSC) converter. An integrated circuit (IC) is designed in 0.18 mum CMOS process. Operation at high frequencies (20-50 MHz) allows high levels of integration with air core inductors directly attached to the die through a gold bump, solder reflow process. Test results for the IC are presented with power density and efficiency metrics. The IC is then used as a partial power processing converter to implement equalization with a specially constructed PV panel. The converter is shown to mitigate power loss due to mismatch.

  10. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Schmitz, P.; Vandersande, J.

    1992-01-01

    The elements of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. The overall project will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements are presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  11. High power radial klystron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Arman, M.J.

    1995-11-01

    The advantages of the radial klystron amplifier over the conventional klystron amplifier have been reported by Arman et al. Briefly, the radial structure of this design allows for much smaller impedances and thus higher power, the beam-cavity coupling is stronger because the beam travels inside the cavity, and the source is much more compact because there is no need for external magnetic fields. Here the author reports on possible advantages of the radial klystron oscillator over the radial klystron amplifier. The amplifying nature of certain HPM sources is often mandated by the requirement for synchronization and phase-locking of a number of sources in specific applications. In situations where amplification is solely adhered to for the purpose of achieving higher powers, the oscillator will be a better choice if a mechanism can be found to grow the desired mode at the required frequency. By switching to the oscillator mode there will be no need for priming the cavity or maintaining the phase. This simplifies the design and reduces the operational and maintenance cost of the source. Here he reports that an oscillator version of the radial klystron is possible and in fact more suitable for many applications. The mechanism for exciting and growing the mode will be transit-time effects thus providing all the beneficial features of the transit-time oscillators. The complications due to the presence of thin foils in the radial design still persist and will be dealt with in subsequent works. Numerical simulations using the PIC codes MAGIC and SOS indicate the radial klystron oscillator is a viable and efficient means of rf generation.

  12. High-Temperature Passive Power Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In many future NASA missions - such as deep-space exploration, the National AeroSpace Plane, minisatellites, integrated engine electronics, and ion or arcjet thrusters - high-power electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in high-temperature environments. The high-temperature power electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating material research, the development and characterization of high-temperature components, and the integration of the developed components into a demonstrable 200 C power system - such as an inverter. NASA Lewis has developed high-temperature power components through collaborative efforts with the Air Force Wright Laboratory, Northrop Grumman, and the University of Wisconsin. Ceramic and film capacitors, molypermalloy powder inductors, and a coaxially wound transformer were designed, developed, and evaluated for high-temperature operation.

  13. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  14. VESPA: The vibrational spectrometer for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedrigo, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Bertelsen, Mads; Hartl, Monika; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P.; Strobl, Markus; Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    VESPA, Vibrational Excitation Spectrometer with Pyrolytic-graphite Analysers, aims to probe molecular excitations via inelastic neutron scattering. It is a thermal high resolution inverted geometry time-of-flight instrument designed to maximise the use of the long pulse of the European Spallation Source. The wavelength frame multiplication technique was applied to provide simultaneously a broad dynamic range (about 0-500 meV) while a system of optical blind choppers allows to trade flux for energy resolution. Thanks to its high flux, VESPA will allow the investigation of dynamical and in situ experiments in physical chemistry. Here we describe the design parameters and the corresponding McStas simulations.

  15. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  16. High power solid state switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundersen, Martin

    1991-11-01

    We have successfully produced an optically triggered thyristor based in Gallium Arsenide, developed a model for breakdown, and are developing two related devices, including a Gallium Arsenide based static inductor thyristor. We are getting at the basic limitations of Gallium Arsenide for these applications, and are developing models for the physical processes that will determine device limitations. The previously supported gas phase work - resulting in the back-lighted thyratron (BLT) - has actually resulted in a very changed view of how switching can be accomplished, and this is impacting the design of important machines. The BLT is being studied internationally: in Japan for laser fusion and laser isotope separation. ITT has built a BLT that has switched 30 kA at 60 kV in testing at NSWC Dahlgren and the device is being commercialized by another American company. Versions of the switch are now being tested for excimer laser and other applications. Basically, the switch, which arose from pulse power physics studies at USC, can switch more current faster (higher di/dt), with less housekeeping, and with other advantageous properties. There are a large number of other new applications, include kinetic energy weapons, pulsed microwave sources and R.F. accelerators.

  17. HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, ILAN, DAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-08-21

    Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department.

  18. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  19. NASA GRC High Power Electromagnetic Thruster Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Pensil, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several bold new interplanetary and deep-space missions. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center designs, develops, and tests high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. Two high-power thruster concepts currently under investigation by Glenn are the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT). This paper describes the MPD thruster and the test facility.

  20. High voltage photovoltaic power converter

    DOEpatents

    Haigh, Ronald E.; Wojtczuk, Steve; Jacobson, Gerard F.; Hagans, Karla G.

    2001-01-01

    An array of independently connected photovoltaic cells on a semi-insulating substrate contains reflective coatings between the cells to enhance efficiency. A uniform, flat top laser beam profile is illuminated upon the array to produce electrical current having high voltage. An essentially wireless system includes a laser energy source being fed through optic fiber and cast upon the photovoltaic cell array to prevent stray electrical signals prior to use of the current from the array. Direct bandgap, single crystal semiconductor materials, such as GaAs, are commonly used in the array. Useful applications of the system include locations where high voltages are provided to confined spaces such as in explosive detonation, accelerators, photo cathodes and medical appliances.

  1. High Power Co-Axial Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Dudas, A.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Guo, Jiquan; Williams, R. Scott

    2013-12-01

    A very high power Coax RF Coupler (MW-Level) is very desirable for a number of accelerator and commercial applications. For example, the development of such a coupler operating at 1.5 GHz may permit the construction of a higher-luminosity version of the Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) being planned at JLab. Muons, Inc. is currently funded by a DOE STTR grant to develop a 1.5-GHz high-power doublewindowcoax coupler with JLab (about 150 kW). Excellent progress has been made on this R&D project, so we propose an extension of this development to build a very high power coax coupler (MW level peak power and a max duty factor of about 4%). The dimensions of the current coax coupler will be scaled up to provide higher power capability.

  2. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  3. High-power red VCSEL arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seurin, Jean-Francois; Khalfin, Viktor; Xu, Guoyang; Miglo, Alexander; Li, Daizong; Zhou, Delai; Sundaresh, Mukta; Zou, Wei-Xiong; Lu, Chien-Yao; Wynn, James D.; Ghosh, Chuni

    2013-03-01

    High-power red laser sources are used in many applications such as cosmetics, cancer photodynamic therapy, and DNA sequencing in the medical field, laser-based RGB projection display, and bar-code scanning to name a few. Verticalcavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be used as high-power laser sources, as efficient single devices can be configured into high-power two-dimensional arrays and scaled into modules of arrays. VCSELs emit in a circular, uniform beam which can greatly reduce the complexity and cost of optics. Other advantages include a narrow and stable emission spectrum, low speckle of the far-field emission, and good reliability. However, developing efficient red VCSEL sources presents some challenges because of the reduced quantum-well carrier confinement and the increased Aluminum content (to avoid absorption) which increases thermal impedance, and also decreases the DBR index contrast resulting in increased penetration length and cavity losses. We have recently developed VCSEL devices lasing in the visible 6xx nm wavelength band, and reaching 30% power conversion efficiency. We fabricated high-power 2D arrays by removing the GaAs substrate entirely and soldered the chips on high thermal conductivity submounts. Such arrays have demonstrated several Watts of output power at room temperature, in continuous-wave (CW) operation. Several tens of Watts are obtained in QCW operation. Results and challenges of these high-power visible VCSEL arrays will be discussed.

  4. Computer simulations for rf design of a Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Shin, K.; Welton, R. F.; Goulding, R. H.

    2010-02-15

    Electromagnetic modeling of the multicusp external antenna H{sup -} ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been performed in order to optimize high-power performance. During development of the SNS external antenna ion source, antenna failures due to high voltage and multicusp magnet holder rf heating concerns under stressful operating conditions led to rf characteristics analysis. In rf simulations, the plasma was modeled as an equivalent lossy metal by defining conductivity as {sigma}. Insulation designs along with material selections such as ferrite and Teflon could be included in the computer simulations to compare antenna gap potentials, surface power dissipations, and input impedance at the operating frequencies, 2 and 13.56 MHz. Further modeling and design improvements are outlined in the conclusion.

  5. High Power Amplifier Harmonic Output Level Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Khan, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented for the measurement of the harmonic output power of high power klystron amplifiers, involving coherent hemispherical radiation pattern measurements of the radiated klystron output. Results are discussed for the operation in saturated and unsaturated conditions, and with a waveguide harmonic filter included.

  6. High-power VCSEL systems and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Holger; Conrads, Ralf; Deppe, Carsten; Derra, Guenther; Gronenborn, Stephan; Gu, Xi; Heusler, Gero; Kolb, Johanna; Miller, Michael; Pekarski, Pavel; Pollmann-Retsch, Jens; Pruijmboom, Armand; Weichmann, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    Easy system design, compactness and a uniform power distribution define the basic advantages of high power VCSEL systems. Full addressability in space and time add new dimensions for optimization and enable "digital photonic production". Many thermal processes benefit from the improved control i.e. heat is applied exactly where and when it is needed. The compact VCSEL systems can be integrated into most manufacturing equipment, replacing batch processes using large furnaces and reducing energy consumption. This paper will present how recent technological development of high power VCSEL systems will extend efficiency and flexibility of thermal processes and replace not only laser systems, lamps and furnaces but enable new ways of production. High power VCSEL systems are made from many VCSEL chips, each comprising thousands of low power VCSELs. Systems scalable in power from watts to multiple ten kilowatts and with various form factors utilize a common modular building block concept. Designs for reliable high power VCSEL arrays and systems can be developed and tested on each building block level and benefit from the low power density and excellent reliability of the VCSELs. Furthermore advanced assembly concepts aim to reduce the number of individual processes and components and make the whole system even more simple and reliable.

  7. Driver Circuit For High-Power MOSFET's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letzer, Kevin A.

    1991-01-01

    Driver circuit generates rapid-voltage-transition pulses needed to switch high-power metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) modules rapidly between full "on" and full "off". Rapid switching reduces time of overlap between appreciable current through and appreciable voltage across such modules, thereby increasing power efficiency.

  8. Test results of high-voltage, high-power, solid-state remote power controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Yvette Binford; Kapustka, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the results of testing high-voltage, high-power, solid-state remote power controllers (RPC) using RPCs designed and built by John C. Sturman at the Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, and utilizing the Autonomously Managed Power Systems (AMPS) breadboard/test facility. These test results are used to determine usefulness of the RPCs for future applications in high-voltage direct-current space power.

  9. High-Speed, high-power, switching transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, D.; Ohu, C. K.; Hower, P. L.

    1979-01-01

    Silicon transistor rate for 200 angstroms at 400 to 600 volts combines switching speed of transistors with ruggedness, power capacity of thyristor. Transistor introduces unique combination of increased power-handling capability, unusally low saturation and switching losses, and submicrosecond switching speeds. Potential applications include high power switching regulators, linear amplifiers, chopper controls for high frequency electrical vehicle drives, VLF transmitters, RF induction heaters, kitchen cooking ranges, and electronic scalpels for medical surgery.

  10. A time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, BASIS

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, E.; Herwig, K. W.

    2011-08-15

    We describe the design and current performance of the backscattering silicon spectrometer (BASIS), a time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer built at the spallation neutron source (SNS) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). BASIS is the first silicon-based backscattering spectrometer installed at a spallation neutron source. In addition to high intensity, it offers a high-energy resolution of about 3.5 {mu}eV and a large and variable energy transfer range. These ensure an excellent overlap with the dynamic ranges accessible at other inelastic spectrometers at the SNS.

  11. Coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guolin; Shu Ting; Yuan Chengwei; Zhang Jun; Yang Jianhua; Jin Zhenxing; Yin Yi; Wu Dapeng; Zhu Jun; Ren Heming; Yang Jie

    2010-12-15

    The coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves is a promising technique for the development of high power microwave technologies, as it can enhance the output capacities of presently studied devices. According to the investigations on the spatial filtering method and waveguide filtering method, the hybrid filtering method is proposed for the coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves. As an example, a specific structure is designed for the coupling output of S/X/X band three-channel high power microwaves and investigated with the hybrid filtering method. In the experiments, a pulse of 4 GW X band beat waves and a pulse of 1.8 GW S band microwave are obtained.

  12. High power millimeter wave source development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. V.

    1989-01-01

    High power millimeter wave sources for fusion program; ECH source development program strategy; and 1 MW, 140 GHz gyrotron experiment design philosophy are briefly outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  13. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  14. Very high power THz radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Jordan, K.; Neil, George R.; Williams, G.P.

    2002-10-31

    We report the production of high power (20 watts average, {approx} 1 Megawatt peak) broadband THz light based on coherent emission from relativistic electrons. Such sources are ideal for imaging, for high power damage studies and for studies of non-linear phenomena in this spectral range. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. For clarity we compare this source to one based on ultrafast laser techniques.

  15. Spacecraft high-voltage power supply construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. F.; Stern, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The design techniques, circuit components, fabrication techniques, and past experience used in successful high-voltage power supplies for spacecraft flight systems are described. A discussion of the basic physics of electrical discharges in gases is included and a design rationale for the prevention of electrical discharges is provided. Also included are typical examples of proven spacecraft high-voltage power supplies with typical specifications for design, fabrication, and testing.

  16. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, J.L.; Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.

    1994-02-08

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse. 7 figures.

  17. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John L.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  18. High Voltage Power Transmission for Wind Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young il

    The high wind speeds and wide available area at sea have recently increased the interests on offshore wind farms in the U.S.A. As offshore wind farms become larger and are placed further from the shore, the power transmission to the onshore grid becomes a key feature. Power transmission of the offshore wind farm, in which good wind conditions and a larger installation area than an onshore site are available, requires the use of submarine cable systems. Therefore, an underground power cable system requires unique design and installation challenges not found in the overhead power cable environment. This paper presents analysis about the benefit and drawbacks of three different transmission solutions: HVAC, LCC/VSC HVDC in the grid connecting offshore wind farms and also analyzed the electrical characteristics of underground cables. In particular, loss of HV (High Voltage) subsea power of the transmission cables was evaluated by the Brakelmann's theory, taking into account the distributions of current and temperature.

  19. Multiple-Scale Geomechanical Models for Thermal Spallation Drilling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, I.; Walsh, S. D.; Roberts, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread adoption of geothermal energy will require access to deeply buried geothermal sources in granitic basement rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Exploiting these resources necessitates novel methods for drilling, stimulation, and maintenance, under operating conditions difficult or impossible to test in laboratory settings. Physically rigorous numerical modeling tools are vital to highlight potential risks, guide process optimization and reduce the uncertainties involved in these developing technologies. In this presentation, we discuss a numerical modeling effort investigating the multiscale mechanics of thermal spallation drilling (TSD) - a technique in which rock is fragmented into small flakes by a high temperature fluid jet. This process encompasses interconnected phenomena on several length and time scales: from system-scale fluid dynamics to grain-scale thermomechanics of spallation. Here we describe how these disperate scales are simulated using GEODYN, a parallel Eulerian compressible solid and fluid dynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capabilities. GEODYN is able to simulate materials under extremely large deformations, resolve details of wave propagation within grains, and uses a continuum damage mechanics approach to represent fracture. We will present results from both system- and grain-scale simulations describing the transfer of heat from the high temperature jet to the rock face, and the effect of grain-scale properties such as incipient flaw distribution, grain size and grain size distribution, heat flux, applied temperature and material heterogeneity on the onset of spallation. Detailed computer modeling helps to address several of the uncertainties surrounding TSD: 1) What rock compositions are drillable with TSD? 2) How do grain size and grain size distribution affect TSD and drilling rates? 3) What combination of macroscopic (Poisson ratio, heat capacity and thermal conductivity) and microscopic (flaw distribution

  20. Spallation neutron source target station design, development, and commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, J. R.; McManamy, T. J.; Gabriel, T. A.; Battle, R. E.; Chipley, K. K.; Crabtree, J. A.; Jacobs, L. L.; Lousteau, D. C.; Rennich, M. J.; Riemer, B. W.

    2014-11-01

    The spallation neutron source target station is designed to safely, reliably, and efficiently convert a 1 GeV beam of protons to a high flux of about 1 meV neutrons that are available at 24 neutron scattering instrument beam lines. Research and development findings, design requirements, design description, initial checkout testing, and results from early operation with beam are discussed for each of the primary target subsystems, including the mercury target, neutron moderators and reflector, surrounding vessels and shielding, utilities, remote handling equipment, and instrumentation and controls. Future plans for the mercury target development program are also briefly discussed.

  1. Optical model methods of predicting nuclide production from spallation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, C. R.; Townsend, L. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Quantum mechanical optical model methods for calculating isotope production cross sections from the spallation of heavy nuclei by high-energy protons are developed from a modified abrasion-ablation collision formalism. The abrasion step is treated quantum-mechanically as a knockout process which leaves the residual prefragment nucleus in an excited state. In ablation the prefragment deexcites to produce the final fragment. The excitation energies of the prefragments are estimated from a combination of liquid drop and frictional-spectator interaction considerations. Estimates of elemental and isotopic production cross sections are in good agreement with recently published cross section measurements.

  2. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  3. Moisture-Induced TBC Spallation on Turbine Blade Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Delayed failure of TBCs is a widely observed laboratory phenomenon, although many of the early observations went unreported. "The weekend effect" or "DeskTop Spallation" (DTS) is characterized by initial survival of a TBC after accelerated laboratory thermal cycling, then failure by exposure to ambient humidity or water. Once initiated, failure can occur quite dramatically in less than a second. To this end, the water drop test and digital video recordings have become useful techniques in studies at NASA (Smialek, Zhu, Cuy), DECHMA (Rudolphi, Renusch, Schuetze), and CNRS Toulouse/SNECMA (Deneux, Cadoret, Hervier, Monceau). In the present study the results for a commercial turbine blade, with a standard EB-PVD 7YSZ TBC top coat and Pt-aluminide diffusion bond monitored by weight change and visual appearance. Failures were distributed widely over a 5-100 hr time range, depending on temperature. At some opportune times, failure was captured by video recording, documenting the appearance and speed of the moisture-induced spallation process. Failure interfaces exhibited alumina scale grains, decorated with Ta-rich oxide particles, and alumina inclusions as islands and streamers. The phenomenon is thus rooted in moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of the alumina scale formed on the bond coat. In that regard, many studies show the susceptibility of alumina scales to moisture, as long as high strain energy and a partially exposed interface exist. The latter conditions result from severe cyclic oxidation conditions, which produce a highly stressed and partially damaged scale. In one model, it has been proposed that moisture reacts with aluminum in the bond coat to release hydrogen atoms that 'embrittle' the interface. A negative synergistic effect with interfacial sulfur is also invoked.

  4. Moisture-Induced TBC Spallation on Turbine Blade Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James

    2011-01-01

    Delayed failure of TBCs is a widely observed laboratory phenomenon, although many of the early observations went unreported. The weekend effect or DeskTop Spallation (DTS) is characterized by initial survival of a TBC after accelerated laboratory thermal cycling, then failure by exposure to ambient humidity or water. Once initiated, failure can occur quite dramatically in less than a second. To this end, the water drop test and digital video recordings have become useful techniques in studies at NASA (Smialek, Zhu, Cuy), DECHMA (Rudolphi, Renusch, Schuetze), and CNRS Toulouse/SNECMA (Deneux, Cadoret, Hervier, Monceau). In the present study the results for a commercial turbine blade, with a standard EB-PVD 7YSZ TBC top coat and Pt-aluminide diffusion bond coat are reported. Cut sections were intermittently oxidized at 1100, 1150, and 1200 C and monitored by weight change and visual appearance. Failures were distributed widely over a 5-100 hr time range, depending on temperature. At some opportune times, failure was captured by video recording, documenting the appearance and speed of the moisture-induced spallation process. Failure interfaces exhibited alumina scale grains, decorated with Ta-rich oxide particles, and alumina inclusions as islands and streamers. The phenomenon is thus rooted in moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of the alumina scale formed on the bond coat. In that regard, many studies show the susceptibility of alumina scales to moisture, as long as high strain energy and a partially exposed interface exist. The latter conditions result from severe cyclic oxidation conditions, which produce a highly stressed and partially damaged scale. In one model, it has been proposed that moisture reacts with aluminum in the bond coat to release hydrogen atoms that embrittle the interface. A negative synergistic effect with interfacial sulfur is also invoked.

  5. Optical power splitter for splitting high power light

    DOEpatents

    English, Jr., Ronald E.; Christensen, John J.

    1995-01-01

    An optical power splitter for the distribution of high-power light energy has a plurality of prisms arranged about a central axis to form a central channel. The input faces of the prisms are in a common plane which is substantially perpendicular to the central axis. A beam of light which is substantially coaxial to the central axis is incident on the prisms and at least partially strikes a surface area of each prism input face. The incident beam also partially passes through the central channel.

  6. Optical power splitter for splitting high power light

    DOEpatents

    English, R.E. Jr.; Christensen, J.J.

    1995-04-18

    An optical power splitter for the distribution of high-power light energy has a plurality of prisms arranged about a central axis to form a central channel. The input faces of the prisms are in a common plane which is substantially perpendicular to the central axis. A beam of light which is substantially coaxial to the central axis is incident on the prisms and at least partially strikes a surface area of each prism input face. The incident beam also partially passes through the central channel. 5 figs.

  7. High Power Particle Beams and Pulsed Power for Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, Hansjoachim; An, Wladimir; Engelko, Wladimir; Giese, Harald; Frey, Wolfgang; Heinzel, Annette; Hoppé, Peter; Mueller, Georg; Schultheiss, Christoph; Singer, Josef; Strässner, Ralf; Strauß, Dirk; Weisenburger, Alfons; Zimmermann, Fritz

    2002-12-01

    Several industrial scale projects with economic and ecologic potential are presently emanating from research and development in the fields of high power particle beams and pulsed power in Europe. Material surface modifications with large area pulsed electron beams are used to protect high temperature gas turbine blades and steel structures in Pb/Bi cooled accelerator driven nuclear reactor systems against oxidation and corrosion respectively. Channel spark electron beams are applied to deposit bio-compatible or bio-active layers on medical implants. Cell membranes are perforated with strong pulsed electric fields to extract nutritive substances or raw materials from the cells and to kill bacteria for sterilization of liquids. Eletrodynamic fragmentation devices are developed to reutilize concrete aggregates for the production of high quality secondary concrete. All activities have a large potential to contribute to a more sustainable economy.

  8. High power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Brenning, N.; Lundin, D.; Helmersson, U.

    2012-05-15

    The high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge is a recent addition to plasma based sputtering technology. In HiPIMS, high power is applied to the magnetron target in unipolar pulses at low duty cycle and low repetition frequency while keeping the average power about 2 orders of magnitude lower than the peak power. This results in a high plasma density, and high ionization fraction of the sputtered vapor, which allows better control of the film growth by controlling the energy and direction of the deposition species. This is a significant advantage over conventional dc magnetron sputtering where the sputtered vapor consists mainly of neutral species. The HiPIMS discharge is now an established ionized physical vapor deposition technique, which is easily scalable and has been successfully introduced into various industrial applications. The authors give an overview of the development of the HiPIMS discharge, and the underlying mechanisms that dictate the discharge properties. First, an introduction to the magnetron sputtering discharge and its various configurations and modifications is given. Then the development and properties of the high power pulsed power supply are discussed, followed by an overview of the measured plasma parameters in the HiPIMS discharge, the electron energy and density, the ion energy, ion flux and plasma composition, and a discussion on the deposition rate. Finally, some of the models that have been developed to gain understanding of the discharge processes are reviewed, including the phenomenological material pathway model, and the ionization region model.

  9. High-Power, High-Temperature Superconductor Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.

    2005-01-01

    Since the first discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) 10 years ago, the most promising areas for their applications in microwave systems have been as passive components for communication systems. Soon after the discovery, experiments showed that passive microwave circuits made from HTS material exceeded the performance of conventional devices for low-power applications and could be 10 times as small or smaller. However, for superconducting microwave components, high-power microwave applications have remained elusive until now. In 1996, DuPont and Com Dev Ltd. developed high-power superconducting materials and components for communication applications under a NASA Lewis Research Center cooperative agreement, NCC3-344 "High Power High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Technology Development." The agreement was cost shared between the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Technology Reinvestment Program Office and the two industrial partners. It has the following objectives: 1) Material development and characterization for high-power HTS applications; 2) Development and validation of generic high-power microwave components; 3) Development of a proof-of-concept model for a high-power six-channel HTS output multiplexer.

  10. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Titran, R.; Schmitz, P.; Vandersande, J.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop technology for military and civil applications. Starting in 1986, NASA has funded a technology program to maintain the momentum of promising aerospace technology advancement started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the changes for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for a wide range of future space applications. The elements of the CSTI High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. Technology advancement in all elements is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall project with develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements will be presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  11. The NASA CSTI high capacity power project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Titran, R.; Schmitz, P.; Vandersande, J.

    1992-01-01

    The SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop technology for military and civil applications. Starting in 1986, NASA has funded a technology program to maintain the momentum of promising aerospace technology advancement started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for a wide range of future space applications. The elements of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. Technology advancement in all elements is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall project will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements will be presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  12. Small high cooling power space cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E.

    2014-01-29

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  13. The Spallation Neutron Source Beam Commissioning and Initial Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Stuart; Aleksandrov, Alexander V.; Allen, Christopher K.; Assadi, Saeed; Bartoski, Dirk; Blokland, Willem; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Chu, C.; Cousineau, Sarah M.; Crofford, Mark T.; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Deibele, Craig E.; Dodson, George W.; Feshenko, A.; Galambos, John D.; Han, Baoxi; Hardek, T.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.; Holtkamp, N.; Howell, Matthew P.; Jeon, D.; Kang, Yoon W.; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kravchuk, L.; Long, Cary D.; McManamy, T.; Pelaia, II, Tom; Piller, Chip; Plum, Michael A.; Pogge, James R.; Purcell, John David; Shea, T.; Shishlo, Andrei P; Sibley, C.; Stockli, Martin P.; Stout, D.; Tanke, E.; Welton, Robert F; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2015-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator delivers a one mega-Watt beam to a mercury target to produce neutrons used for neutron scattering materials research. It delivers ~ 1 GeV protons in short (< 1 us) pulses at 60 Hz. At an average power of ~ one mega-Watt, it is the highest-powered pulsed proton accelerator. The accelerator includes the first use of superconducting RF acceleration for a pulsed protons at this energy. The storage ring used to create the short time structure has record peak particle per pulse intensity. Beam commissioning took place in a staged manner during the construction phase of SNS. After the construction, neutron production operations began within a few months, and one mega-Watt operation was achieved within three years. The methods used to commission the beam and the experiences during initial operation are discussed.

  14. Target station shielding issues at the spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, P D; Gallmeier, F X; Iverson, E B; Popova, I I

    2005-01-01

    Recent spallation neutron source shielding activities in support of the neutron beam shutters and the hot cell walls are presented. Existing neutron beam shutters can be replaced with concrete at low power or with concrete and steel at approximately 500 kW of beam power. Potential voids in the hot cell walls are analysed to determine the impact on dose rates as a function of void size. A change in the type of shielding work is noted as the project moved from the early design stages as a 'green field' site to the current stage as a construction project nearing completion, where issues to be addressed are approaching retrofit-type analyses. PMID:16381707

  15. Control system for the Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} source test facility Allison scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C. D.; Stockli, M. P.; Gorlov, T. V.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.

    2010-02-15

    Spallation Neutron Source is currently in progress of a multiyear plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H{sup -} ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source in the test facility to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplies the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial personal computer to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LABVIEW, and consists of two parts: a data acquisition program to control the hardware and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis.

  16. Tapered fiber based high power random laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwei; Du, Xueyuan; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xu, Xiaojun

    2016-04-18

    We propose a novel high power random fiber laser (RFL) based on tapered fiber. It can overcome the power scaling limitation of RFL while maintaining good beam quality to a certain extent. An output power of 26.5 W has been achieved in a half-open cavity with one kilometer long tapered fiber whose core diameter gradually changes from 8 μm to 20 μm. The steady-state light propagation equations have been modified by taking into account the effective core area to demonstrate the tapered RFL through numerical calculations. The numerical model effectively describes the power characteristics of the tapered fiber based RFL, and both the calculating and experimental results show higher power exporting potential compared with the conventional single mode RFL. PMID:27137338

  17. A long-wavelength target station for the spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J. M.; Mason, T. E.

    2005-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), a major new user facility for studies of the structure and dynamics of materials, funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Details about the project are available in a recent paper and on the SNS Web site [MRS Bull. 28 (12) (2003) 923]. A Long-Wavelength Target Station (LWTS) [Technical Concepts for a Long-Wavelength Target Station for the Spallation Neutron Source, Argonne National Laboratory Report ANL-02/16, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Report ORNL/SNS-TM-2001/163, November 2002. See also www.pns.anl.gov/related/] will complement the High-Power Target Station (HPTS) facility of the SNS and will build upon the significant investment in the remainder of the installation by providing important new scientific opportunities. For areas of science using the optimized long-wavelength beam lines, the LWTS will at least double the overall scientific capability of the SNS and provide for up to an order of magnitude performance gain over the initial HPTS. The fully equipped SNS has the prospect to offer capabilities for neutron-scattering studies of the structure and dynamics of materials with sensitivity, resolution, dynamic range, and speed that are unparalleled in the world. Preliminary assessments of the performance of the several instruments treated in detail in the body of the paper bear out this expectation. The LWTS concept has been developed in close consultation with the scientific community through a series of workshops and conferences jointly sponsored by DOE's Office of Basic Energy Science and the National Science Foundation. We describe the principal features of the LWTS concept, and provide a preliminary summary of some neutron scattering instruments suited to exploit the unique features of the LWTS. It remains to develop concepts and designs for a full suite of instruments that exploit the capabilities of LWTS, a process that has begun in collaboration

  18. High-torque power wrench, a concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, E. F.

    1968-01-01

    High-torque power wrench is small enough to be handled by one or two men yet has sufficient torque to remove 1-1/2- to 4-inch nuts from high-pressure tanks and valves. The action can be made automatic by use of solenoid-operated valves and suitable switches.

  19. CLIC RF High Power Production Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Syratchev, I.; Riddone, G.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and generate RF power for the main linac accelerating structure. The demands on the high power production ({approx} 150 MW) and the needs to transport the 100 A drive beam for about 1 km without losses, makes the PETS design rather unique and the operation very challenging. In the coming year, an intense PETS testing program will be implemented. The target is to demonstrate the full performance of the PETS operation. The testing program overview and test results available to date are presented.

  20. ATF2 High Availability Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Bellomo, A; Lira, C.de; Lam, B.; MacNair, D.; White, G.; /SLAC

    2008-06-27

    ATF2 is an accelerator test facility modeled after the final focus beamline envisioned for the ILC. By the end of 2008, KEK plans to commission the ATF2 [1]. SLAC and OCEM collaborated on the design of 38 power systems for beamline magnets. The systems range in output power from 1.5 kW to 6 kW. Since high availability is essential for the success of the ILC, Collaborators employed an N+1 modular approach, allowing for redundancy and the use of a single power module rating. This approach increases the availability of the power systems. Common power modules reduces inventory and eases maintenance. Current stability requirements are as tight as 10 ppm. A novel, SLAC designed 20-bit Ethernet Power Supply Controller provides the required precision current regulation. In this paper, Collaborators present the power system design, the expected reliability, fault immunity features, and the methods for satisfying the control and monitoring challenges. Presented are test results and the status of the power systems.

  1. Initial tests of the Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} ion source with an external antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R.F.; Stockli, M.P.; Murray, S.N.; Kang, Y.; Peters, J.

    2006-03-15

    The ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a radio-frequency (rf) multicusp source designed to deliver H{sup -} beam pulses of 40 mA to the SNS accelerator with a normalized root-mean-square emittance of less than 0.2{pi} mm mrad, with a pulse length of 1 ms and a repetition rate of 60 Hz. In order to achieve this performance the source must operate with both high-pulse rf power, {approx}50 kW, and high average rf power, {approx}3.5 kW, over a continuous operational period of 3 weeks. During operation at these power levels the plasma-immersed, porcelain-coated rf antenna is susceptible to damage, limiting source lifetime. We are therefore developing an ion source where the plasma is separated from the Cu antenna by an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} discharge chamber. This article describes the ion source, presents initial beam extraction measurements, and details our ongoing effort to develop this concept into a suitable ion source for the SNS.

  2. High Power Third Gyroharmonic Frequency Multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, M. A.; Ganguly, A. K.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao; Yoder, R. B.; Wang, Mei

    1998-11-01

    A high power freqeuncy multplier which uses a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA)(M.A. LaPointe, R.B. Yoder, Changbiao Wang, A.K. Ganguly and J.L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. Lett., 76), 2718 (1996) and a third harmonic, TE_311 cavity is being tested. Primary power at 2.856 GHz is used to accelerate a 20--30 A, 75--96kV electron beam up to 320 kV in a CARA. The prepared beam interacts with the TE_311 cavity tuned to the third harmonic of the drive frequency. Simulations show that conversion efficiencies from beam power to microwave power can be as high as 48% producing up to 4.5 MW of 8.568 GHz power. Experiments to date have shown under certain conditions only third harmonic radiation has been generated with a FWHM of 350 kHz, the Fourier limit for the length of the radiation pulse. High power experiments are underway to measure the efficiency of the device.

  3. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Dylla, H.F. III

    1997-11-04

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost. 5 figs.

  4. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen-Tuong, Viet; Dylla, III, Henry Frederick

    1997-01-01

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

  5. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  6. High power infrared QCLs: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2012-01-01

    QCLs are becoming the most important sources of laser radiation in the midwave infrared (MWIR) and longwave infrared (LWIR) regions because of their size, weight, power and reliability advantages over other laser sources in the same spectral regions. The availability of multiwatt RT operation QCLs from 3.5 μm to >16 μm with wall plug efficiency of 10% or higher is hastening the replacement of traditional sources such as OPOs and OPSELs in many applications. QCLs can replace CO2 lasers in many low power applications. Of the two leading groups in improvements in QCL performance, Pranalytica is the commercial organization that has been supplying the highest performance QCLs to various customers for over four year. Using a new QCL design concept, the non-resonant extraction [1], we have achieved CW/RT power of >4.7 W and WPE of >17% in the 4.4 μm - 5.0 μm region. In the LWIR region, we have recently demonstrated QCLs with CW/RT power exceeding 1 W with WPE of nearly 10 % in the 7.0 μm-10.0 μm region. In general, the high power CW/RT operation requires use of TECs to maintain QCLs at appropriate operating temperatures. However, TECs consume additional electrical power, which is not desirable for handheld, battery-operated applications, where system power conversion efficiency is more important than just the QCL chip level power conversion efficiency. In high duty cycle pulsed (quasi-CW) mode, the QCLs can be operated without TECs and have produced nearly the same average power as that available in CW mode with TECs. Multiwatt average powers are obtained even in ambient T>70°C, with true efficiency of electrical power-to-optical power conversion being above 10%. Because of the availability of QCLs with multiwatt power outputs and wavelength range covering a spectral region from ~3.5 μm to >16 μm, the QCLs have found instantaneous acceptance for insertion into multitude of defense and homeland security applications, including laser sources for infrared

  7. High power diode laser Master Oscillator-Power Amplifier (MOPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, John R.; Mouroulis, P.; Wicks, G.

    1994-01-01

    High power multiple quantum well AlGaAs diode laser master oscillator - power amplifier (MOPA) systems were examined both experimentally and theoretically. For two pass operation, it was found that powers in excess of 0.3 W per 100 micrometers of facet length were achievable while maintaining diffraction-limited beam quality. Internal electrical-to-optical conversion efficiencies as high as 25 percent were observed at an internal amplifier gain of 9 dB. Theoretical modeling of multiple quantum well amplifiers was done using appropriate rate equations and a heuristic model of the carrier density dependent gain. The model gave a qualitative agreement with the experimental results. In addition, the model allowed exploration of a wider design space for the amplifiers. The model predicted that internal electrical-to-optical conversion efficiencies in excess of 50 percent should be achievable with careful system design. The model predicted that no global optimum design exists, but gain, efficiency, and optical confinement (coupling efficiency) can be mutually adjusted to meet a specific system requirement. A three quantum well, low optical confinement amplifier was fabricated using molecular beam epitaxial growth. Coherent beam combining of two high power amplifiers injected from a common master oscillator was also examined. Coherent beam combining with an efficiency of 93 percent resulted in a single beam having diffraction-limited characteristics. This beam combining efficiency is a world record result for such a system. Interferometric observations of the output of the amplifier indicated that spatial mode matching was a significant factor in the less than perfect beam combining. Finally, the system issues of arrays of amplifiers in a coherent beam combining system were investigated. Based upon experimentally observed parameters coherent beam combining could result in a megawatt-scale coherent beam with a 10 percent electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency.

  8. High-Performance Power-Semiconductor Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, David; Hansen, Irving; Berman, Albert

    1989-01-01

    A 600-V, 50-A transistor and 1,200-V, 50-A diode in rugged, compact, lightweight packages intended for use in inverter-type power supplies having switching frequencies up to 20 kHz. Packages provide low-inductance connections, low loss, electrical isolation, and long-life hermetic seal. Low inductance achieved by making all electrical connections to each package on same plane. Also reduces high-frequency losses by reducing coupling into inherent shorted turns in packaging material around conductor axes. Stranded internal power conductors aid conduction at high frequencies, where skin effect predominates. Design of packages solves historical problem of separation of electrical interface from thermal interface of high-power semiconductor device.

  9. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Program

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil applications. During 1986 and 1987, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was responsible for maintaining the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In 1988, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA advanced technology project, and provides a bridge to the NASA exploration technology programs. The elements of CSTI high capacity power development include conversion systems - Stirling and thermoelectric, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 years lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems while minimizing the impact of day/night operation as well as attitudes and distance from the Sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the program elements will be discussed, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  10. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Jerry M.

    1991-01-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil applications. During 1986 and 1987, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was responsible for maintaining the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In 1988, the NASA Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA's new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA advanced technology project, and provides a bridge to the NASA exploration technology programs. The elements of CSTI high capacity power development include conversion systems: Stirling and thermoelectric, thermal management, power management, system diagnostics, and environmental interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability, and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems while minimizing the impact of day/night operations as well as attitudes and distance from the Sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the program elements will be discussed, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  11. NASA GRC High Power Electromagnetic Thruster Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.; Pencil, Eric J.

    2004-02-01

    Interest in high power electromagnetic propulsion has been revived to support a variety of future space missions, such as platform maneuvering in low earth orbit, cost-effective cargo transport to lunar and Mars bases, asteroid and outer planet sample return, deep space robotic exploration, and piloted missions to Mars and the outer planets. Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters have demonstrated, at the laboratory level, the capacity to process megawatts of electrical power while providing higher thrust densities than current electric propulsion systems. The ability to generate higher thrust densities permits a reduction in the number of thrusters required to perform a given mission and alleviates the system complexity associated with multiple thruster arrays. The specific impulse of an MPD thruster can be optimized to meet given mission requirements, from a few thousand seconds with heavier gas propellants up to 10,000 seconds with hydrogen propellant. In support of NASA space science and human exploration strategic initiatives, Glenn Research Center is developing and testing pulsed, MW-class MPD thrusters as a prelude to long-duration high power thruster tests. The research effort includes numerical modeling of self-field and applied-field MPD thrusters and experimental testing of quasi-steady MW-class MPD thrusters in a high power pulsed thruster facility. This paper provides an overview of the GRC high power electromagnetic thruster program and the pulsed thruster test facility.

  12. Impact spallation processes on the Moon: A case study from the size and shape analysis of ejecta boulders and secondary craters of Censorinus crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, N.; Kumar, P. Senthil

    2016-01-01

    Impact spallation is a fundamental process responsible for formation of ejecta boulders from impact craters. Although theoretical spallation models were developed about three decades ago, only limited geological observations have been made so far to test these models. The 3.8 km Censorinus crater on the Moon provides an excellent opportunity for studying the impact spallation processes associated with a fresh simple crater formed by oblique impact. Using the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Narrow Angle Camera images, we prepared the ejecta boulder distribution map of Censorinus crater and measured the boulder sizes and shapes. Mapping of about 242,000 ejecta boulders enabled us to document the size distribution of boulders both radial and concentric to the impact crater. Larger size boulders dominate the crater rim areas, while they become smaller away from the crater. The boulder distribution exhibits a radial asymmetry suggesting Censorinus is a oblique impact, in which the uprange ejecta have smaller ranges with larger concentration of boulders near the southwestern crater rim, while the downrange ejecta are in general characterized by smaller boulders with high spatial dispersion. The cumulative size-frequency distribution (CSFD) of boulders shows a highly variable fragmentation history in which the uprange boulders suffered more complex fragmentation. The ejecta boulders also exhibit a variety of shapes that are gleaned from their axial ratios and edge angle characteristics. There is a general decrease of axial ratios away from the crater rim. Rectangular boulders dominate the crater rim and they become more equant away from the crater. In addition to the boulder sizes, the boulder shape distribution also exhibits a mild asymmetry in response to the oblique impact. Small size fresh impact craters (84,000 craters) are abundant on the Censorinus ejecta and post-date Censorinus. These craters are found in two morphologic types in which a large majority of craters

  13. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  14. Heat Deposit Calculation in Spallation Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmanov, F. I.; Travleev, A. A.; Latysheva, L. N.; Vecchi, M.

    2001-11-01

    The present study concerns the calculation of the heat deposition in one of the EAP-80 basic units - the spallation module including the beam window, lead-bismuth spallation target and primary liquid metal cooling system. It is assumed that the model of sub-critical reactor under investigation is based on ANSALDO-INFN-ENEA-CRS4 reference configuration1. The calculation have been done by means of a couple computer codes: INCC 2 and GEANT3.21 3. These codes have been preliminary tested on the experimental data obtained in 4 for the case of interaction of proton beam and lead-bismuth targets at the energy Ep= 800MeV which is close to energy range relevant for ADS configuration.

  15. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati; P. Kneisel; K. Davis; K. Macha; J. Mammosser

    2002-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 186 MeV to 1000 MeV operating at a frequency of 805 MHz at 2.1 K. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical Beta-values of Beta=0.61 and Beta=0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at JLab, which calls for fabricating and testing of four Beta=0.61 cavities and two Beta=0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler of the TESLA type on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four Beta=0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time, four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed and tested at JLab. In addition, the three medium beta cavities for the prototype cryomodule have been equipped with the integrated Ti-Helium vessel, successfully retested and will be assembled into a cavity string. Results from the cryo-module test should be available by the time of the conference. The tests on the Beta=0.61 cavity and the Beta=0.81 cavity exceeded the design values for gradient and Q - value: E{sub acc} =10.1 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for Beta=0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q=5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for Beta = 0.81. The medium beta cavities reached gradients between E{sub acc} = 15 MV/m and 21 MV/m. This paper will describe the test results obtained with the various cavities, some aspects of the HOM damping at cryogenic temperatures, results from microphonics and Lorentz force detuning tests and the cavity string assembly at the time of this workshop.

  16. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, P. Kneisel , J. Brawley, R. Bundy, I. Campisi, K. Davis; K. Macha; D. Machie; J. Mammosser; S. Morgan; R. Sundelin; L. Turlington; K. Wilson; M. Doleans; S.H. Kim; D. Barni; C. Pagani; P. Pierini; K. Matsumoto; R. Mitchell; D. Schrage; R. Parodi; J. Sekutowicz; P. Ylae-Oijala

    2001-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 192 MeV to 1000 MeV, operating at a frequency of 805 MHz at 2.1 K. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical beta - values of beta= 0.61 and beta= 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jlab, which calls for fabricating and testing of four beta= 0.61 cavities and two beta= 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four beta= 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the beta=0.61 cavity and the beta= 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q - value: E{sub acc} = 1 0.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for beta= 0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for beta= 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning will be done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper will describe the cavity design with respect to electrical and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop.

  17. High-frequency-link based power electronics in power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sree, Hari

    Power quality has become a serious concern to many utility customers in recent times. Among the many power quality problems, voltage sags are one of the most common and most mischievous, affecting industrial and commercial customers. They are primarily caused by power system faults at the transmission and distribution level, and thus, are mostly unavoidable. Their effect depends on the equipment sensitivities to the magnitude and duration of these sags and each can cost an industry up to few million dollars. To counter these limitations, many solutions at the customer end have been proposed which include Constant Voltage Transformers (CVT's), UPS and line frequency transformer based Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR). These approaches have their respective limitations with regard to capabilities, size and cost. This research proposes a new approach to mitigating these voltage sags involving the use of high frequency transformer link. Suitable switching logic and control strategies have been implemented. The proposed approach in a one-phase application is verified with computer simulations and by a hardware proof-of-concept prototype. Application to three-phase system is verified through simulations. Application of high frequency transformers in other utility applications such as active filters and static compensators is also looked at.

  18. Deep Space C3: High Power Uplinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodis, Mary Anne; Abraham, Douglas S.; Morabito, David D.

    2003-12-01

    The uplink transmitters of the Deep Space Network (DSN) perform three key functions in support of space missions: navigation, command uplink, and emergency recovery. The transmitters range in frequency from S-band to Ka-band, and range in RF transmit power from 200W to 400kW. Future improvements to the uplink transmitters will focus on higher frequency transmitters for high data rate communications, high power X-band uplinks for emergency recovery, and/or in-phase uplink arraying for either application.

  19. Technology development for high power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1985-06-11

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  20. COHERENT at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybern, Justin; Scholberg, Kate

    2015-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense isotropic flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure which is beneficial for background rejection. This talk will describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS), the physics reach of such a measurement, and the status of COHERENT, the planned experimental program.

  1. COHERENT at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate; Coherent Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense isotropic flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure which is beneficial for background rejection. This talk will describe aspects of COHERENT, the experimental program underway to measure CEvNS (Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering) using low-energy nuclear recoil detectors.

  2. High efficiency low cost solar cell power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.; Blocker, W.

    1978-01-01

    A concept for generating high-efficiency, low-cost, solar-cell power is outlined with reference to solar cell parameters, optical concentrators, and thermal control procedures. A design for a 12.5-kw power module for space operation is discussed noting the optical system, spectrum splitter, light conversion system, cell cooling, power conditioner, and tracking mechanism. It is found that for an unconcentrated array, efficiency approaches 60% when ten or more bandgaps are used. For a 12-band system, a computer program distributed bandgaps for maximum efficiency and equal cell currents. Rigid materials and thin films have been proposed for optical components and prisms, gratings, and dichroic mirrors have been recommended for spectrum splitting. Various radiator concepts are noted including that of Weatherston and Smith (1960) and Hedgepeth and Knapp (1978). The concept may be suitable for the Solar Power Satellite.

  3. Xenon spallation systematics in Angra dos Reis. [meteoritic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, C. M.; Hudson, B.; Kennedy, B. M.; Podosek, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    Literature Xe data for the Angra dos Reis meteorite have been resolved into constituent spallation, fission and trapped components. The spallation Xe compositions vary over a range wider than observed in any other samples, including lunar samples. These variations are due to the mixing of spallation Xe from Ba and rare earth element targets. It is possible to infer the Ba and rare earth spallation Xe compositions. Angra dos Reis spallation Xe compositions are systematically different from those observed in lunar samples, possibly because of differences in the irradiation conditions (geometry and shielding). Thus the Angra dos Reis data appear to be superior to lunar data for predicting spallation Xe compositions in other meteorites.

  4. High-power microwave development in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Sylvain

    1995-03-01

    This is a survey of Russian research and development in high-power microwave (HPM) sources. It emphasizes those sources of nanoseconds pulse duration time which have potential weapon as well as radar applications. It does not cover the whole range of Russian HPM research and development but concentrates on those aspects which may lead to military applications. Russian investigators have achieved many world firsts in HPM generation; for example, a multiwave Cerenkov generator with a peak output power of 15 gigawatts. Their successes are based on their impressive capability in pulsed power technology which has yielded high-current generators of terawatt peak power. They have transformed the energy of these currents into microwave radiation using tubes of both conventional and novel designs exploiting relativistic electron beams. Recently, the development of high-current mini-accelerators has moved relativistic electron-beam (REB) HPM generation out of the laboratory and enabled the development of deployable military systems with peak powers in the gigawatt range. As a result, they now see development of a REB-based radar systems as one of the most promising directions in radar systems. Details of such a system are described and the implications for HPM weapons are considered.

  5. Fundamental neutron physics at a 1 MW long pulse spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    Modern neutron sources and modern neutron science share a common origin in mid twentieth century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for the study of condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and primarily justified) as tools for condensed matter research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities carried out at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for the continuation of this program of research.

  6. Active beam position stabilization of pulsed lasers for long-distance ion profile diagnostics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Robert A; Liu, Yun; Long, Cary D; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Blokland, Willem

    2011-01-01

    A high peak-power Q-switched laser has been used to monitor the ion beam profiles in the superconducting linac at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The laser beam suffers from position drift due to movement, vibration, or thermal effects on the optical components in the 250-meter long laser beam transport line. We have designed, bench-tested, and implemented a beam position stabilization system by using an Ethernet CMOS camera, computer image processing and analysis, and a piezo-driven mirror platform. The system can respond at frequencies up to 30 Hz with a high position detection accuracy. With the beam stabilization system, we have achieved a laser beam pointing stability within a range of 2 rad (horizontal) to 4 rad (vertical), corresponding to beam drifts of only 0.5 mm 1 mm at the furthest measurement station located 250 meters away from the light source.

  7. Power Budget Analysis for High Altitude Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Elliott, James R.; King, Glen C.

    2006-01-01

    The High Altitude Airship (HAA) has various potential applications and mission scenarios that require onboard energy harvesting and power distribution systems. The energy source considered for the HAA s power budget is solar photon energy that allows the use of either photovoltaic (PV) cells or advanced thermoelectric (ATE) converters. Both PV cells and an ATE system utilizing high performance thermoelectric materials were briefly compared to identify the advantages of ATE for HAA applications in this study. The ATE can generate a higher quantity of harvested energy than PV cells by utilizing the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE in a tandem mode configuration. Assuming that each stage of ATE material has the figure of merit of 5, the cascaded efficiency of a three-staged ATE system approaches the overall conversion efficiency greater than 60%. Based on this estimated efficiency, the configuration of a HAA and the power utility modules are defined.

  8. High Power Disk Loaded Guide Load

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; /SLAC

    2006-02-22

    A method to design a matching section from a smooth guide to a disk-loaded guide, using a variation of broadband matching, [1, 2] is described. Using this method, we show how to design high power loads. The load consists of a disk-loaded coaxial guide operating in the TE{sub 01}-mode. We use this mode because it has no electric field terminating on a conductor, has no axial currents, and has no current at the cylinder-disk interface. A high power load design that has -35 dB reflection and a 200 MHz, -20 dB bandwidth, is presented. It is expected that it will carry the 600 MW output peak power of the pulse compression network. We use coaxial geometry and stainless steel material to increase the attenuation per cell.

  9. Spallation target cryogenic cooling design challenges at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurns, J.; Ringnér, J.; Quack, H.; Arnold, P.; Weisend, J. G., II; Lyngh, D.

    2015-12-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) project is a neutron spallation source research facility currently being designed and built outside of Lund, Sweden. A linear accelerator delivers a 5 MW, 2.0 GeV, 62.5 mA proton beam to a spallation target to generate fast neutrons. Supercritical hydrogen circulates through two moderators surrounding the target, and transforms the fast neutrons emitted into slow neutrons, which are the final form of useful radiation. The supercritical hydrogen is in turn cooled from a helium cryogenic plant operating at 15-20 K. The supercritical cryogenic hydrogen circuit is a dynamic system, subject to significant changes in heat load. Proper pressure control of this system is critical to assure safe operation. The interaction between the hydrogen system and helium cryoplant poses unique challenges. This paper investigates the impact of the hydrogen system constraints on operation and control of the helium cryoplant, and suggests design options for the helium circuit.

  10. Targets for high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs.

  11. CHALLENGES FACING HIGH POWER PROTON ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges of high power proton accelerators such as SNS, J-PARC, etc., and what we have learned from recent experiences. Beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate beam loss will also be discussed.

  12. High Power 35GHz Gyroklystron Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin; McCurdy, A.; Wood, F.; Kyser, R.; Danly, B.; Levush, B.; Parker, R.

    1997-05-01

    High power coherent radiation sources at 35GHz are attractive for next generation high gradient particle accelerators. A multi-cavity gyroklystron amplifier is considered a promising candidate for high power millimeter wave generation. Experiments on two-cavity and three cavity gyroklystron amplifiers are underway to demonstrate a 140kW, 35GHz coherent radiation amplification. Though this power is low compared with that needed for colliders, many of the issues associated with the bandwidth of such devices can be addressed in the present experiments. High bandwidth is important to permit the rapid phase shifts required for RF pulse compression schemes presently under investigation. Large signal calculations (P.E. Latham, W. Lawson, V. Irwin, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 804-817, 1994.) predict that the two-cavity gyroklystron produces a peak power of 140kW, corresponding to 33% efficiency. Calculations also show that a stagger tuned three cavity circuit increases a bandwidth to more than 0.7%. Experimental results of the amplifier will be presented and compared with the theory.

  13. THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE CRYOMODULE TEST STAND RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Crofford, Mark T; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Hardek, Thomas W; Heidenreich, Dale A; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kang, Yoon

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has recently commissioned a cryomodule test facility for the repair and testing of the super-conducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. This facility utilizes the original 402.5/805 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) Klystron Test Stand as its power source along with dual Low Level RF (LLRF) control systems. One control system is based on the standard SNS Linac LLRF controls with a second system for open-loop only control. The system is designed to allow simultaneous testing of devices in the test cave and other devices which can be tested outside of the enclosure. Initial tests have shown good results; some improvements are yet to be implemented.

  14. Electron-cloud mitigation in the spallation neutron source ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, D.; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; Furman, M.; Pivi, M.; Macek, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H- injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation.

  15. COMMISSIONING OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H- front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. The linac was commissioned in five discrete runs, starting in 2002 and completed in 2005. The accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines were commissioned in two runs from January to April 2006. With the completed commissioning of the SNS accelerator, the facility has begun initial low-power operations. In the course of beam commissioning, most beam performance parameters and beam intensity goals have been achieved at low duty factor. A number of beam dynamics measurements have been performed, including emittance evolution, transverse coupling in the ring, beam instability thresholds, and beam distributions on the target. The commissioning results, achieved beam performance and initial operating experience of the SNS will be discussed

  16. Electron Cloud Mitigation in the Spallation Neutron Source Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brodowski, J.; Cameron, P.; Davino, Daniele; Fedotov, A.; He, P.; Hseuh, H.; Lee, Y.Y.; Ludewig, H.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Macek, R.J.; Furman, Miguel A.; Aleksandrov, A.; Cousineau, S.; Danilov, V.; Henderson, S.; /Brookhaven /CERN /LANL, Ctr. for Nonlinear Studies /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring is designed to accumulate, via H{sup -} injection, protons of 2 MW beam power at 1 GeV kinetic energy at a repetition rate of 60 Hz [1]. At such beam intensity, electron-cloud is expected to be one of the intensity-limiting mechanisms that complicate ring operations. This paper summarizes mitigation strategy adopted in the design, both in suppressing electron-cloud formation and in enhancing Landau damping, including tapered magnetic field and monitoring system for the collection of stripped electrons at injection, TiN coated beam chamber for suppression of the secondary yield, clearing electrodes dedicated for the injection region and parasitic on BPMs around the ring, solenoid windings in the collimation region, and planning of vacuum systems for beam scrubbing upon operation.

  17. Spallation neutron source cryomodule heat loads and thermal design

    SciTech Connect

    E. F. Daly; V. Ganni; C. H. Rode; W. J. Schneider; K. M. Wilson; M. A. Wiseman

    2002-05-10

    When complete, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide a 1 GeV, 2 MW beam for experiments. One portion of the machine's linac consists of over 80 Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) 805 MHz cavities housed in a minimum of 23 cryomodules operating at a saturation temperature of 2.1 K. Minimization of the total heat load is critical to machine performance and for efficient operation of the system. The total heat load of the cryomodules consists of the fixed static load and the dynamic load, which is proportional to the cavity performance. The helium refrigerator supports mainly the cryomodule loads and to a lesser extent the distribution system loads. The estimated heat loads and calculated thermal performance are discussed along with two unique features of this design: the helium heat exchanger housed in the cryomodule return end can and the helium gas cooled fundamental power coupler.

  18. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  19. Operation of Power Grids with High Penetration of Wind Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Awami, Ali Taleb

    The integration of wind power into the power grid poses many challenges due to its highly uncertain nature. This dissertation involves two main components related to the operation of power grids with high penetration of wind energy: wind-thermal stochastic dispatch and wind-thermal coordinated bidding in short-term electricity markets. In the first part, a stochastic dispatch (SD) algorithm is proposed that takes into account the stochastic nature of the wind power output. The uncertainty associated with wind power output given the forecast is characterized using conditional probability density functions (CPDF). Several functions are examined to characterize wind uncertainty including Beta, Weibull, Extreme Value, Generalized Extreme Value, and Mixed Gaussian distributions. The unique characteristics of the Mixed Gaussian distribution are then utilized to facilitate the speed of convergence of the SD algorithm. A case study is carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Then, the SD algorithm is extended to simultaneously optimize the system operating costs and emissions. A modified multi-objective particle swarm optimization algorithm is suggested to identify the Pareto-optimal solutions defined by the two conflicting objectives. A sensitivity analysis is carried out to study the effect of changing load level and imbalance cost factors on the Pareto front. In the second part of this dissertation, coordinated trading of wind and thermal energy is proposed to mitigate risks due to those uncertainties. The problem of wind-thermal coordinated trading is formulated as a mixed-integer stochastic linear program. The objective is to obtain the optimal tradeoff bidding strategy that maximizes the total expected profits while controlling trading risks. For risk control, a weighted term of the conditional value at risk (CVaR) is included in the objective function. The CVaR aims to maximize the expected profits of the least profitable scenarios, thus

  20. High-Power, High-Thrust Ion Thruster (HPHTion)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Peter Y.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-power photovoltaic technology have enabled the possibility of reasonably sized, high-specific power solar arrays. At high specific powers, power levels ranging from 50 to several hundred kilowatts are feasible. Ion thrusters offer long life and overall high efficiency (typically greater than 70 percent efficiency). In Phase I, the team at ElectroDynamic Applications, Inc., built a 25-kW, 50-cm ion thruster discharge chamber and fabricated a laboratory model. This was in response to the need for a single, high-powered engine to fill the gulf between the 7-kW NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) system and a notional 25-kW engine. The Phase II project matured the laboratory model into a protoengineering model ion thruster. This involved the evolution of the discharge chamber to a high-performance thruster by performance testing and characterization via simulated and full beam extraction testing. Through such testing, the team optimized the design and built a protoengineering model thruster. Coupled with gridded ion thruster technology, this technology can enable a wide range of missions, including ambitious near-Earth NASA missions, Department of Defense missions, and commercial satellite activities.

  1. High power Ka band TWT amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Golkowski, C.; Ivers, J.D.; Nation, J.A.; Wang, P.; Schachter, L.

    1999-07-01

    Two high power 35 GHz TWT amplifiers driven by a relativistic pencil, 850 kV, 200A electron beam have been assembled and tested. The first had a dielectric slow wave structure and was primarily used to develop diagnostics, and to gain experience in working with high power systems in Ka band. The source of the input power for the amplifier was a magnetron producing a 30 kW, 200ns long pulse of which 10 kW as delivered to the experiment. The 30 cm long dielectric (Teflon) amplifier produced output power levels of about 1 MW with a gain of about 23 dB. These results are consistent with expectations from PIC code simulations for this arrangement. The second amplifier, which is a single stage disk loaded slow wave structure, has been designed. It consists of one hundred uniform cells with two sets of ten tapered calls at the ends to lower the reflection coefficient. The phase advance per cell is {pi}/2. The amplifier passband extends from 28 to 40 GHz. It is designed to increase the output power to about 20 MW. The amplifier is in construction and will be tested in the near future. Details of the design of both systems will be provided and initial results from the new amplifier presented.

  2. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  3. MI high power operation and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, Ioanis; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Fermilab's Main Injector on acceleration cycles to 120 GeV has been running a mixed mode operation delivering beam to both the antiproton source for pbar production and to the NuMI[1] target for neutrino production since 2005. On January 2008 the slip stacking process used to increase the beam to the pbar target was expanded to include the beam to the NuMI target increasing both the beam intensity and power. The current high power MI operation will be described along with the near future plans.

  4. High-power Ka-band amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.

    1993-01-01

    Development of a high-power tube suitable to power a Ka-band (34.5-GHz) antenna transmitter located at the Goldstone, California, tracking station is continuing. The University of Maryland Laboratory for Plasma Research and JPL are conducting a joint effort to test the feasibility of phase locking a second-harmonic gyrotron both by direct injection at the output cavity and by using a priming cavity to bunch the electrons in the beam. This article describes several design options and the results of computer simulation testing.

  5. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert

    2004-01-01

    This paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  6. High power bipolar lead-acid batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald; Attia, Alan

    1991-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), with interest in advanced energy storage systems, is involved in the development of a unique lead acid battery design. This battery utilizes the same combination of lead and lead dioxide active materials present in the automobile starting battery. However, it can provide 2 to 10 times the power while minimizing volume and weight. The typical starting battery is described as a monopolar type using one current collector for both the positive and negative plate of adjacent cells. Specific power as high as 2.5 kW/kg was projected for 30 second periods with as many as 2000 recharge cycles.

  7. High Power MPD Thruster Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Strzempkowski, Eugene; Pencil, Eric

    2004-01-01

    High power magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters are being developed as cost effective propulsion systems for cargo transport to lunar and Mars bases, crewed missions to Mars and the outer planets, and robotic deep space exploration missions. Electromagnetic MPD thrusters have demonstrated, at the laboratory level, the ability to process megawatts of electrical power while providing significantly higher thrust densities than electrostatic electric propulsion systems. The ability to generate higher thrust densities permits a reduction in the number of thrusters required to perform a given mission, and alleviates the system complexity associated with multiple thruster arrays. The specific impulse of an MPD thruster can be optimized to meet given mission requirements, from a few thousand seconds with heavier gas propellants up to 10,000 seconds with hydrogen propellant. In support of programs envisioned by the NASA Office of Exploration Systems, Glenn Research Center is developing and testing quasi-steady MW-class MPD thrusters as a prelude to steady state high power thruster tests. This paper provides an overview of the GRC high power pulsed thruster test facility, and presents preliminary performance data for a quasi-steady baseline MPD thruster geometry.

  8. High power disk lasers: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, David; Holzer, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Though the genesis of the disk laser concept dates to the early 90's, the disk laser continues to demonstrate the flexibility and the certain future of a breakthrough technology. On-going increases in power per disk, and improvements in beam quality and efficiency continue to validate the genius of the disk laser concept. As of today, the disk principle has not reached any fundamental limits regarding output power per disk or beam quality, and offers numerous advantages over other high power resonator concepts, especially over monolithic architectures. With well over 1000 high power disk lasers installations, the disk laser has proven to be a robust and reliable industrial tool. With advancements in running cost, investment cost and footprint, manufacturers continue to implement disk laser technology with more vigor than ever. This paper will explain important details of the TruDisk laser series and process relevant features of the system, like pump diode arrangement, resonator design and integrated beam guidance. In addition, advances in applications in the thick sheet area and very cost efficient high productivity applications like remote welding, remote cutting and cutting of thin sheets will be discussed.

  9. MULTIPULSE - high resolution and high power in one TDEM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianyou; Hodges, Greg; Miles, Philip

    2015-09-01

    An airborne time domain electromagnetic (TEM) system with high resolution and great depth of exploration is desired for geological mapping as well as for mineral exploration. The MULTIPULSE technology enables an airborne TEM system to transmit a high power pulse (a half-sine, for instance) and one or multiple low power pulse(s) (trapezoid or square) within a half-cycle. The high power pulse ensures good depth of exploration and the low power pulse allows a fast transmitter current turn off and earlier off-time measurement thus providing higher frequency signals, which allows higher near-surface resolution and better sensitivity to weak conductors. The power spectrum of the MULTIPULSE waveform comprising a half-sine and a trapezoid pulse clearly shows increased power in the higher frequency range (> ~2.3 kHz) compared to that of a single half-sine waveform. The addition of the low power trapezoid pulse extends the range of the sensitivity 10-fold towards the weak conductors, expanding the geological conductivity range of a system and increasing the scope of its applications. The MULTIPULSE technology can be applied to standard single-pulse airborne TEM systems on both helicopter and fixed-wing. We field tested the HELITEM MULTIPULSE system over a wire-loop in Iroquois Falls, demonstrating the different sensitivity of the high and low power pulses to the overburden and the wire-loop. We also tested both HELITEM and GEOTEM MULTIPULSE systems over a layered oil sand geologic setting in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. The results show comparable shallow geologic resolution of the MULTIPULSE to that of the RESOLVE system while maintaining superior depth of exploration, confirming the increased geological conductivity range of a system employing MULTIPULSE compared to the standard single-pulse systems.

  10. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the liquid mercury target for the national spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.W.; Haines, J.R.; Rogers, M.

    1997-04-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) is a high-energy, accelerator-based spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The NSNS is proposed to have a 1 MW beam of high-energy ({approximately}1 GeV) protons upgradable to 5 MW and operating at 60 Hz with a pulse duration of 0.5 {mu}s. Peak steady-state power density in the target is about 640 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW, whereas the pulse instantaneous peak power density is as high as 22,000 GW/m{sup 3}. The local peak temperature rise for a single pulse over it`s time-averaged value is only 6{degrees}C, but the rate of this temperature rise during the pulse is extremely fast ({approximately}12 million {degrees}C/s). In addition to the resulting thermal shock and materials compatibility concerns, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. These include proper flow distribution, flow reversals and stagnation zones, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes}, cooling of the beam {open_quotes}window{close_quotes}, and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles. An analytic approach was used on the PC spreadsheet EXCEL to evaluate target design options and to determine the global T/H parameters in the current concept. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX was used to simulate the detailed time-averaged two-dimensional thermal and flow distributions in the liquid mercury. In this paper, an overview of the project and the results of this preliminary work are presented. Heat transfer characteristics of liquid mercury under wetting and non-wetting conditions are discussed, and future directions of the program in T/H analysis and R&D are outlined.

  11. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  12. High power performance limits of fiber components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holehouse, Nigel; Magné, Julien; Auger, Mathieu

    2015-03-01

    High power combiners are essential for practical fiber lasers, recent developments in pump technology has increased the available brightness and power of pumps significantly, enabling multi kW lasers and pushing combiner designs to new limits. I will present the challenges, measurements and some solutions to these issues. Traditional calculations for combiners underestimate the issues associated with the `tails' of the pump NA distribution, losses in fully filled combiners increase rapidly as pump NA blooms, and subsequent heating effects dominate the combiner's power handling. Acrylate coated pump fibers are reaching their limits and devices and measurements on double clad pump combiners with losses <0.05dB, will be presented enabling multi kW operation, The use of triple clad fibers in the gain section will discussed as a solution for multi kW applications. Results on ultra-low background loss FBG's will be presented, along with developed measurement techniques.

  13. Precompound emission of energetic light fragments in spallation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, Leslie Marie

    Emission of light fragments (LF) from nuclear reactions is an open question. Different reaction mechanisms contribute to their production; the relative roles of each, and how they change with incident energy, mass number of the target, and the type and emission energy of the fragments is not completely understood. None of the available models are able to accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the ability to describe production of LF (especially at energies ~ 30 MeV) from many reactions is important for different applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced Single Event Upsets (SEUs), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) version 03.03 and the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) version 03.03 event generators in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code version 6 (MCNP6) describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to 4He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies (up to ~ 5 GeV for CEM and up to ~1 TeV/A for LAQGSM). However, they do not predict the high-energy tails of LF spectra heavier than 4He well. Most LF with energies above several tens of MeV are emitted during the precompound stage of a reaction. The current versions of the CEM and LAQGSM event generators do not account for precompound emission of LF larger than 4He. The aim of our work is to extend the precompound model in them to include such processes, leading to an increase of predictive power of LF-production in MCNP6. This entails upgrading the Modified Exciton Model currently used at the preequilibrium stage in CEM and LAQGSM. It also includes expansion and examination of the coalescence and Fermi break-up models used in the precompound stages of spallation reactions within CEM and LAQGSM. Extending our models to include emission of fragments heavier than 4He at the precompound stage has indeed provided results that have much better

  14. Dissertation: Precompound Emission of Energetic Light Fragments in Spallation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2015-08-04

    Emission of light fragments (LF) from nuclear reactions is an open question. Different reaction mechanisms contribute to their production; the relative roles of each, and how they change with incident energy, mass number of the target, and the type and emission energy of the fragments is not completely understood. None of the available models are able to accurately predict emission of LF from arbitrary reactions. However, the ability to describe production of LF (especially at energies ≳ 30 MeV) from many reactions is important for different applications, such as cosmic-ray-induced Single Event Upsets (SEUs), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and heavy-ion beams, to name just a few. The Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) version 03.03 and the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) version 03.03 event generators in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code version 6 (MCNP6) describe quite well the spectra of fragments with sizes up to ⁴He across a broad range of target masses and incident energies (up to ~ 5 GeV for CEM and up to ~ 1 TeV/A for LAQGSM). However, they do not predict the high energy tails of LF spectra heavier than ⁴He well. Most LF with energies above several tens of MeV are emitted during the precompound stage of a reaction. The current versions of the CEM and LAQGSM event generators do not account for precompound emission of LF larger than ⁴He. The aim of our work is to extend the precompound model in them to include such processes, leading to an increase of predictive power of LF-production in MCNP6. This entails upgrading the Modified Exciton Model currently used at the preequilibrium stage in CEM and LAQGSM. It also includes expansion and examination of the coalescence and Fermi break-up models used in the precompound stages of spallation reactions within CEM and LAQGSM. Extending our models to include emission of fragments heavier than ⁴He at the precompound stage has indeed provided results that have much

  15. High-power ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, Vladimir I.; Buyanov, Yuri I.; Koval'chuk, Boris M.; Andreev, Yuri A.; Belichenko, Victor P.; Efremov, Anatoly M.; Plisko, Vyacheslav V.; Sukhushin, Konstantin N.; Vizir, Vadim A.; Zorin, Valery B.

    1997-10-01

    Basing on energetic processes studying in the near-field radiator zone, a new concept of antenna synthesizing for ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse radiation has been suggested. The results of experimental investigations of the antennae developed with using of this concept for high-power applications are presented. The antennae have small dimensions, high electrical strength, cardioid pattern with linear polarization of the pulse radiated and they are ideally adapted to be used as a steering antenna array element. A high-voltage nanosecond bipolar pulse generator design to excite antennae is described.

  16. Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

  17. Spallation Neutron Source Operating Experience and Outlook for Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Stuart

    2010-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a MW-class accelerator-driven pulsed neutron source. The SNS began formal operations in October 2006. Since then, the beam power has been increased to 1 MW, the number of operating hours per year has increased to nearly 5000, the availability has increased to 85%, and the number of operating neutron scattering instruments has increased to 13. Plans are in place to increase the beam power and availability to their design values of 1.4 MW and 90% over the next two years, and to continue the build-out of instruments to 16 by 2012. Two upgrade projects are in the planning stages. In the first, the beam power of the SNS is increased to at least 2 MW by raising the beam energy from 1.0 to 1.3 GeV and the beam current by 60%. In the second, a Second Target Station is constructed, and is powered by sharing beam pulses with the first target station. The operating experience will be described, as will the challenges that have been met along the path toward 1 MW beam power. The strategy for upgrades will also be presented.

  18. High-altitude solar power platform

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, M.D.; Bower, M.V.

    1992-04-01

    Solar power is a preeminent alternative to conventional aircraft propulsion. With the continued advances in solar cells, fuel cells, and composite materials technology, the solar powered airplane is no longer a simple curiosity constrained to flights of several feet in altitude or minutes of duration. A high altitude solar powered platform (HASPP) has several potential missions, including communications and agriculture. In remote areas, a HASPP could be used as a communication link. In large farming areas, a HASPP could perform remote sensing of crops. The impact of HASPP in continuous flight for one year on agricultural monitoring mission is presented. This mission provides farmers with near real-time data twice daily from an altitude which allows excellant resolution on water conditions, crop diseases, and insect infestation. Accurate, timely data will enable farmers to increase their yield and efficiency. A design for HASPP for the foregoing mission is presented. In the design power derived from solar cells covering the wings is used for propulsion, avionics, and sensors. Excess power produced midday will be stored in fuel cells for use at night to maintain altitude and course.

  19. On life assessment of high reliability high power optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuanjian; Chu, Peter

    2014-09-01

    High data rate and long range free space lasercom links require multi-watt optical transmitter power, which creates a need for high power redundancy switches to ensure high payload reliability. A high power optical switch (HPOS) with less than 0.15 dB loss and capable of switching more than 40 watts of optical power in a single mode fiber has been previously demonstrated in the Transformational Satellite Communication System program. Prototype switches, in either 1x2 or 2x2 configuration, have been subjected to pyro-shock test, vibration test, and vacuum operation. These switches showed no performance degradation as a result of these tests. Three prototypes went through 60,000 35-watt switching cycles and over 30 million low power switching cycles, and the switches showed no mechanical failure. The HPOS life is about 3.2 million switching cycles with a definition of 3-dB degradation in on/off extinction ratio, which is well suited for space applications.

  20. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  1. High power THz sources for nonlinear imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tekavec, Patrick F.; Kozlov, Vladimir G.

    2014-02-18

    Many biological and chemical compounds have unique absorption features in the THz (0.1 - 10 THz) region, making the use of THz waves attractive for imaging in defense, security, biomedical imaging, and monitoring of industrial processes. Unlike optical radiation, THz frequencies can pass through many substances such as paper, clothing, ceramic, etc. with little attenuation. The use of currently available THz systems is limited by lack of highpower, sources as well as sensitive detectors and detector arrays operating at room temperature. Here we present a novel, high power THz source based on intracavity downconverison of optical pulses. The source delivers 6 ps pulses at 1.5 THz, with an average power of >300 μW and peak powers >450 mW. We propose an imaging method based on frequency upconverison that is ideally suited to use the narrow bandwidth and high peak powers produced by the source. By upconverting the THz image to the infrared, commercially available detectors can be used for real time imaging.

  2. High speed micromachining with high power UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rajesh S.; Bovatsek, James M.

    2013-03-01

    Increasing demand for creating fine features with high accuracy in manufacturing of electronic mobile devices has fueled growth for lasers in manufacturing. High power, high repetition rate ultraviolet (UV) lasers provide an opportunity to implement a cost effective high quality, high throughput micromachining process in a 24/7 manufacturing environment. The energy available per pulse and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of diode pumped solid state (DPSS) nanosecond UV lasers have increased steadily over the years. Efficient use of the available energy from a laser is important to generate accurate fine features at a high speed with high quality. To achieve maximum material removal and minimal thermal damage for any laser micromachining application, use of the optimal process parameters including energy density or fluence (J/cm2), pulse width, and repetition rate is important. In this study we present a new high power, high PRF QuasarR 355-40 laser from Spectra-Physics with TimeShiftTM technology for unique software adjustable pulse width, pulse splitting, and pulse shaping capabilities. The benefits of these features for micromachining include improved throughput and quality. Specific example and results of silicon scribing are described to demonstrate the processing benefits of the Quasar's available power, PRF, and TimeShift technology.

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on ion source issues relevant to a pulsed spallation neutron source: Part 1: Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, L.; Leung, K.N.; Alonso, J.

    1994-10-01

    The workshop reviewed the ion-source requirements for high-power accelerator-driven spallation neutron facilities, and the performance of existing ion sources. Proposals for new facilities in the 1- to 5-MW range call for a widely differing set of ion-source requirements. For example, the source peak current requirements vary from 40 mA to 150 mA, while the duty factor ranges from 1% to 9%. Much of the workshop discussion centered on the state-of-the-art of negative hydrogen ion source (H{sup {minus}}) technology and the present experience with Penning and volume sources. In addition, other ion source technologies, for positive ions or CW applications were reviewed. Some of these sources have been operational at existing accelerator complexes and some are in the source-development stage on test stands.

  4. High power, high efficiency diode pumped Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Yaakov; Fromzel, Viktor; Zhang, Jun; Dahan, Asaf; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay; Pattnaik, Radha K.; Dubinskii, Mark

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a high power high efficiency Raman fiber laser pumped directly by a laser diode module at 976 nm. 80 Watts of CW power were obtained at a wavelength of 1020 nm with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 53%. When working quasi-CW, at a duty cycle of 30%, 85 W of peak power was produced with an efficiency of 60%. A commercial graded-index (GRIN) core fiber acts as the Raman fiber in a power oscillator configuration, which includes spectral selection to prevent generation of the 2nd Stokes. In addition, significant brightness enhancement of the pump beam is attained due to the Raman gain distribution profile in the GRIN fiber. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power Raman fiber laser directly pumped by laser diodes, which also exhibits a record efficiency for such a laser. In addition, it is the highest power Raman fiber laser (regardless of pumping source) demonstrated based on a GRIN fiber.

  5. High power steady state MPD thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, Monika; Habiger, Harald; Kurtz, Helmut; Schrade, Herbert; Sleziona, Cristian

    1993-04-01

    At the Institut fuer Raumfahrtsysteme (IRS) rotation symmetric magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters with self induced magnetic fields are investigated at high current levels in a steady state operation mode. MPD thrusters with different geometrics were compared, and the influence of mass flow rate and power input on the operating conditions of the thrusters explored. By optical and probe measurements, a systematic investigation of the plasma plume has been started. The investigation of the various instabilities of the arc and the plasma flow appearing at high power levels was continued. The computer code development for the geometry optimization of continuous self-field MPD thrusters, running with argon, was modified by considering higher degrees of ionization, which showed better agreement with the experiment.

  6. Industrial Applications of High Power Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patist, Alex; Bates, Darren

    Since the change of the millennium, high-power ultrasound has become an alternative food processing technology applicable to large-scale commercial applications such as emulsification, homogenization, extraction, crystallization, dewatering, low-temperature pasteurization, degassing, defoaming, activation and inactivation of enzymes, particle size reduction, extrusion, and viscosity alteration. This new focus can be attributed to significant improvements in equipment design and efficiency during the late 1990 s. Like most innovative food processing technologies, high-power ultrasonics is not an off-the-shelf technology, and thus requires careful development and scale-up for each and every application. The objective of this chapter is to present examples of ultrasonic applications that have been successful at the commercialization stage, advantages, and limitations, as well as key learnings from scaling up an innovative food technology in general.

  7. Halo formation in high-power klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pakter, R.; Chen, C.

    1999-07-01

    Beam losses and radio-frequency (rf) pulse shortening are important issues in the development of high-power microwave (HPM) sources such as high-power klystrons and relativistic magnetrons. In this paper, the authors explore the formation and characteristics of halos around intense relativistic electron beams in a Periodic Permanent Magnet focusing klystron as well as in a uniform solenoidal focusing klystron. A self-consistent electrostatic model is used to investigate intense relativistic electron beam transport as an rf field induced mismatch between the electron beam and the focusing field develops. To model the effect of such mismatch in the PPM klystron experiment, they initialize the beam with an envelope mismatch. For zero canonical angular momentum and an initial mismatch of 100 percent, for example, the preliminary results show halo particles with a maximum radius extending up to several core radii at the rf output section. Transient effects and the influence of finite canonical angular momentum are being studied.

  8. Feedthrough terminal for high-power cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1982-05-28

    A feedthrough terminal for a high power electrochemical storage cell providing low resistance coupling to the conductive elements therein while isolating the terminal electrode from the highly corrosive environment within the cell is disclosed. A large diameter, cylindrical copper electrode is enclosed in a stainless steel tube with a BN powder feedthrough seal maintained around the stainless steel tube by means of facing insulative bushings and an outer sleeve. One end of the copper conductor is silver-brazed directly to a flat, butterfly bus bar within the cell, with the adjacent end of the surrounding outer feedthrough sleeve welded to the bus bar. A threaded seal is fixedly positioned on a distal portion of the stainless steel tube immediately adjacent the distal insulative bushing so as to compress the feedthrough seal in tight fitting relation around the stainless steel tube in providing a rugged, leak-proof electrical feedthrough terminal for the power cell.

  9. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  10. The high-power iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brederlow, G.; Fill, E.; Witte, K. J.

    The book provides a description of the present state of the art concerning the iodine laser, giving particular attention to the design and operation of pulsed high-power iodine lasers. The basic features of the laser are examined, taking into account aspects of spontaneous emission lifetime, hyperfine structure, line broadening and line shifts, stimulated emission cross sections, the influence of magnetic fields, sublevel relaxation, the photodissociation of alkyl iodides, flashlamp technology, excitation in a direct discharge, chemical excitation, and questions regarding the chemical kinetics of the photodissociation iodine laser. The principles of high-power operation are considered along with aspects of beam quality and losses, the design and layout of an iodine laser system, the scalability and prospects of the iodine laser, and the design of the single-beam Asterix III laser.

  11. New high power linacs and beam physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.; Crandall, K.R.; Hasegawa, K.

    1997-08-01

    New high-power proton linacs must be designed to control beam loss, which can lead to radioactivation of the accelerator. The threat of beam loss is increased significantly by the formation of beam halo. Numerical simulation studies have identified the space-charge interactions, especially those that occur in rms mismatched beams, as a major concern for halo growth. The maximum-amplitude predictions of the simulation codes must be subjected to independent tests to confirm the validity of the results. Consequently, the authors compare predictions from the particle-core halo models with computer simulations to test their understanding of the halo mechanisms that are incorporated in the computer codes. They present and discuss scaling laws that provide guidance for high-power linac design.

  12. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  13. Gate Drive For High Speed, High Power IGBTs

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Cassel, R.L.; de Lamare, J.E.; Pappas, G.C.; /SLAC

    2007-06-18

    A new gate drive for high-voltage, high-power IGBTs has been developed for the SLAC NLC (Next Linear Collider) Solid State Induction Modulator. This paper describes the design and implementation of a driver that allows an IGBT module rated at 800A/3300V to switch up to 3000A at 2200V in 3{micro}S with a rate of current rise of more than 10000A/{micro}S, while still being short circuit protected. Issues regarding fast turn on, high de-saturation voltage detection, and low short circuit peak current will be presented. A novel approach is also used to counter the effect of unequal current sharing between parallel chips inside most high-power IGBT modules. It effectively reduces the collector-emitter peak current, and thus protects the IGBT from being destroyed during soft short circuit conditions at high di/dt.

  14. Moisture-Induced Spallation and Interfacial Hydrogen Embrittlement of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal expansion mismatch stresses and interfacial sulfur activity are the major factors producing primary Al2O3 scale spallation on high temperature alloys. However, moisture-induced delayed spallation appears as a secondary, but often dramatic, illustration of an additional mechanistic detail. A historical review of delayed failure of alumina scales and TBC s on superalloys is presented herein. Similarities with metallic phenomena suggest that hydrogen embrittlement from ambient humidity, resulting from the reaction Al+3H2O=Al(OH)3+3H(+)+3e(-), is the operative mechanism. This proposal was tested by standard cathodic hydrogen charging in 1N H2SO4, applied to Rene N5 pre-oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 1-hr cycles, and monitored by weight change, induced current, and microstructure. Here cathodic polarization at -2.0 V abruptly stripped mature Al2O3 scales at the oxide-metal interface. Anodic polarization at +2.0 V, however, produced alloy dissolution. Finally, with no applied voltage, the electrolyte alone produced neither scale spallation nor alloy dissolution. These experiments thus highlight the detrimental effects of hydrogen charging on alumina scale adhesion. It is proposed that interfacial hydrogen embrittlement is produced by moist air and is the root cause of both moisture-induced, delayed scale spallation and desktop TBC failures.

  15. Effect of Substrate Thickness on Oxide Scale Spallation for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the effect of the ferritic substrate's thickness on the delamination/spallation of the oxide scale was investigated experimentally and numerically. At the high-temperature oxidation environment of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a combination of growth stress with thermal stresses may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation during SOFC stack cooling, even leading to serious degradation of cell performance. The growth stress is induced by the growth of the oxide scale on the scale/substrate interface, and thermal stress is induced by a mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide scale and the substrate. The numerical results show that the interfacial shear stresses, which are the driving force of scale delamination between the oxide scale and the ferritic substrate, increase with the growth of the oxide scale and also with the thickness of the ferritic substrate; i.e., the thick ferritic substrate can easily lead to scale delamination and spallation. Experimental observation confirmed the predicted results of the delamination and spallation of the oxide scale on the ferritic substrate.

  16. High peak power diode stacks for high energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, Viorel C.; Vethake, Thilo; Jiang, John; Roff, Robert; Shih, Ming; Duck, Richard; Bauer, Marc; Mite, Roberto; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2015-02-01

    High energy solid state lasers are being developed for fusion experiments and other research applications where high energy per pulse is required but the repetition rate is rather low, around 10Hz. We report our results on high peak power diode laser stacks used as optical pumps for these lasers. The stacks are based on 10 mm bars with 4 mm cavity length and 55% fill factor, with peak power exceeding 500 W per bar. These bars are stacked and mounted on a cooler which provides backside cooling and electrical insulation. Currently we mount 25 bars per cooler for a nominal peak power of 12.5 kW, but in principle the mounting scheme can be scaled to a different number of devices depending on the application. Pretesting of these bars before soldering on the cooler enables us to select devices with similar wavelength and thus we maintain tight control of the spectral width (FWHM less than 6 nm). Fine adjustments of the centroid wavelength can be done by means of temperature of the cooling fluid or bias current. The available wavelength range spans from 880 nm to 1000 nm, and the wavelength of the entire assembly of stacks can be controlled to within 0.5 nm of the target value, which makes these stacks suitable for pumping a variety of gain media. The devices are fast axis collimated, with over 95% power being collimated in 6 mrad (full angle). The slow axis divergence is 9° (full angle) for 95% power content.

  17. VESPA: The vibrational spectrometer for the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Fedrigo, Anna; Colognesi, Daniele; Bertelsen, Mads; Hartl, Monika; Lefmann, Kim; Deen, Pascale P; Strobl, Markus; Grazzi, Francesco; Zoppi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    VESPA, Vibrational Excitation Spectrometer with Pyrolytic-graphite Analysers, aims to probe molecular excitations via inelastic neutron scattering. It is a thermal high resolution inverted geometry time-of-flight instrument designed to maximise the use of the long pulse of the European Spallation Source. The wavelength frame multiplication technique was applied to provide simultaneously a broad dynamic range (about 0-500 meV) while a system of optical blind choppers allows to trade flux for energy resolution. Thanks to its high flux, VESPA will allow the investigation of dynamical and in situ experiments in physical chemistry. Here we describe the design parameters and the corresponding McStas simulations. PMID:27370491

  18. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  19. Basic physics with spallation-neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Michaudon, A.F.

    1994-05-01

    The neutron has unique intrinsic properties widely used in basic and applied sciences. The neutron plays a well-known role in applied sciences and technology and is a unique probe well suited for the exploration of condensed-matter properties. But the neutron is also used for many other basic-physics studies, including nuclear physics, particle physics, fundamental physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. These last studies are briefly reviewed in this paper. Spallation-neutron sources today have unmatched neutron-beam properties for such studies and have great potential in future technological developments whereby these studies could be carried out under much improved conditions.

  20. Surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Elizabeth V; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning; Stevenson, Jeffry W; Surdoval, Wayne; Khaleel, Mohammad A

    2013-07-16

    A surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation is disclosed. The surface modification includes a ferritic stainless steel substrate having a modified surface. A cross-section of the modified surface exhibits a periodic morphology. The periodic morphology does not exceed a critical buckling length, which is equivalent to the length of a wave attribute observed in the cross section periodic morphology. The modified surface can be created using at least one of the following processes: shot peening, surface blasting and surface grinding. A coating can be applied to the modified surface.

  1. Spallation neutron source beam loss monitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassner, D.; Witkover, R.; Cameron, P.; Power, J.

    2000-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source facility to be built at ORNL is designed to accumulate 2×1014 protons at 1.0 GeV and deliver them to the experimental target in one bunch at 60 Hz. To achieve this goal and protect the machine from excessive radiation activation, an uncontrolled loss criteria of 1 part in 104 (1 W/m) has been specified. Measured losses will be conditioned to provide machine tuning data, a beam abort trigger, and logging of loss history. The design of the distributed loss monitor system utilizing argon-filled glass ionization chambers and scintillator-photomultipliers will be presented.

  2. The future of high power laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poprawe, Reinhart; Loosen, Peter; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-05-01

    High Power Lasers have been used for years in corresponding applications. Constantly new areas and new processes have been demonstrated, developed and transferred to fruitful use in industry. With the advent of diode pumped solid state lasers in the multi-kW-power regime at beam qualities not far away from the diffraction limit, a new area of applicability has opened. In welding applications speeds could be increased and systems could be developed with higher efficiently leading also to new perspectives for increased productivity, e.g. in combined processing. Quality control is increasingly demanded by the applying industries, however applications still are rare. Higher resolution of coaxial process control systems in time and space combined with new strategies in signal processing could give rise to new applications. The general approach described in this paper emphasizes the fact, that laser applications can be developed more efficiently, more precisely and with higher quality, if the laser radiation is tailored properly to the corresponding application. In applying laser sources, the parameter ranges applicable are by far wider and more flexible compared to heat, mechanical or even electrical energy. The time frame ranges from several fs to continuous wave and this spans approximately 15 orders of magnitude. Spacewise, the foci range from several µm to cm and the resulting intensities suitable for materials processing span eight orders of magnitude from 10 3 to 10 11 W/cm2. In addition to space (power, intensity) and time (pulse) the wavelength can be chosen as a further parameter of optimization. As a consequence, the resulting new applications are vast and can be utilized in almost every market segment of our global economy (Fig. 1). In the past and only partly today, however, this flexibility of laser technology is not exploited in full in materials processing, basically because in the high power regime the lasers with tailored beam properties are not

  3. Calculation of astrophysical spallation reactions using the RENO model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, C. L.; Schmitt, W. F.; Merker, M.; Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    The RENO model for the Monte-Carlo treatment of astrophysical spallation reactions has been used to generate preliminary cross-sections for the purpose of illustrating the discrete-nucleon approach to spallation modeling and to exhibit differences between two versions of RENO. Comparisons with experimental, theoretical, and semiempirical data demonstrate the practicability of the discrete-nucleon approach.-

  4. Piezoelectric transformer and modular connections for high power and high voltage power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez Carazo, Alfredo (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular design for combining piezoelectric transformers is provided for high voltage and high power conversion applications. The input portions of individual piezoelectric transformers are driven for a single power supply. This created the vibration and the conversion of electrical to electrical energy from the input to the output of the transformers. The output portions of the single piezoelectric transformers are combining in series and/or parallel to provide multiple outputs having different rating of voltage and current.

  5. Production of high power femtosecond terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil, George R.; Carr, G.L.; Gubeli III, Joseph F.; Jordan, K.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Shinn, Michelle; Tani, Masahiko; Williams, G.P.; Zhang, X.-C.

    2003-07-11

    The terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum is attracting interest for a broad range of applications ranging from diagnosing electron beams to biological imaging. Most sources of short pulse THz radiation utilize excitation of biased semiconductors or electro-optic crystals by high peak power lasers. For example, this was done by using an un-doped InAs wafer irradiated by a femtosecond free-electron laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Microwatt levels of THz radiation were detected when excited with FEL pulses at 1.06 mm wavelength and 10W average power. Recently substantially higher powers of femtosecond THz pulses produced by synchrotron emission were extracted from the electron beamline. Calculations and measurements confirm the production of coherent broadband THz radiation from relativistic electrons with an average power of nearly 20W, a world record in this wavelength range by a factor of 10,000. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. Potential applications of this exciting new source include driving new non-linear phenomena, performing pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of novel materials, and studying molecular vibrations and rotations, low frequency protein motions, phonons, superconductor band gaps, electronic scattering, collective electronic excitations (e.g., charge density waves), and spintronics.

  6. Production of high power femtosecond terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, George R.; Carr, G. L.; Gubeli, Joseph F.; Jordan, K.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Shinn, Michelle; Tani, Masahiko; Williams, G. P.; Zhang, X.-C.

    2003-07-01

    The terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum is attracting interest for a broad range of applications ranging from diagnosing electron beams to biological imaging. Most sources of short pulse THz radiation utilize excitation of biased semiconductors or electro-optic crystals by high peak power lasers. For example, this was done by using an un-doped InAs wafer irradiated by a femtosecond free-electron laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Microwatt levels of THz radiation were detected when excited with FEL pulses at 1.06 μm wavelength and 10 W average power. Recently substantially higher powers of femtosecond THz pulses produced by synchrotron emission were extracted from the electron beamline. Calculations and measurements confirm the production of coherent broadband THz radiation from relativistic electrons with an average power of nearly 20 W, a world record in this wavelength range by a factor of 10,000. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. Potential applications of this exciting new source include driving new non-linear phenomena, performing pump-probe studies of dynamical properties of novel materials, and studying molecular vibrations and rotations, low frequency protein motions, phonons, superconductor bandgaps, electronic scattering, collective electronic excitations (e.g., charge density waves), and spintronics.

  7. High-Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Williams H.

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency power amplifier that operates in the S band (frequencies of the order of a few gigahertz) utilizes transistors operating under class-D bias and excitation conditions. Class-D operation has been utilized at lower frequencies, but, until now, has not been exploited in the S band. Nominally, in class D operation, a transistor is switched rapidly between "on" and "off" states so that at any given instant, it sustains either high current or high voltage, but not both at the same time. In the ideal case of zero "on" resistance, infinite "off" resistance, zero inductance and capacitance, and perfect switching, the output signal would be a perfect square wave. Relative to the traditional classes A, B, and C of amplifier operation, class D offers the potential to achieve greater power efficiency. In addition, relative to class-A amplifiers, class-D amplifiers are less likely to go into oscillation. In order to design this amplifier, it was necessary to derive mathematical models of microwave power transistors for incorporation into a larger mathematical model for computational simulation of the operation of a class-D microwave amplifier. The design incorporates state-of-the-art switching techniques applicable only in the microwave frequency range. Another major novel feature is a transmission-line power splitter/combiner designed with the help of phasing techniques to enable an approximation of a square-wave signal (which is inherently a wideband signal) to propagate through what would, if designed in a more traditional manner, behave as a more severely band-limited device (see figure). The amplifier includes an input, a driver, and a final stage. Each stage contains a pair of GaAs-based field-effect transistors biased in class D. The input signal can range from -10 to +10 dBm into a 50-ohm load. The table summarizes the performances of the three stages

  8. Design and development of a prototype 25 kV, 10 A long pulse Marx modulator for high power klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-02-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are in progress at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of 25 kV, 10 A, 1 ms Marx modulator at repetition rate of 1 Hz has been designed and developed which serves as a proof of principle and technology assessment stage for further development of high repetition rate high voltage high average power modulators. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) based modules of 2.8 kV switching capability have been used as main modules. The modulator had 8.2% droop in output voltage pulse without any droop compensation circuit. A droop compensation involving 15 corrector modules has been used to reduce the droop up to 1%. We have used IGBT based 250 V switches to realize the corrector module. A microcontroller based control unit was designed and developed for triggering the main and corrector modules. With this control unit, programmable output pulse has been achieved. Electrical isolation between high voltage circuits and control circuit has been achieved by the use of fiber optic based control signal transmission. Output pulses of 1 ms pulse width, 800 ns rise time, and 5 μs fall time have been achieved. The modulator has advantages of modular design, adjustable pulse width, adjustable rise time, and fall time.

  9. Design and development of a prototype 25 kV, 10 A long pulse Marx modulator for high power klystron.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-02-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are in progress at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of 25 kV, 10 A, 1 ms Marx modulator at repetition rate of 1 Hz has been designed and developed which serves as a proof of principle and technology assessment stage for further development of high repetition rate high voltage high average power modulators. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) based modules of 2.8 kV switching capability have been used as main modules. The modulator had 8.2% droop in output voltage pulse without any droop compensation circuit. A droop compensation involving 15 corrector modules has been used to reduce the droop up to 1%. We have used IGBT based 250 V switches to realize the corrector module. A microcontroller based control unit was designed and developed for triggering the main and corrector modules. With this control unit, programmable output pulse has been achieved. Electrical isolation between high voltage circuits and control circuit has been achieved by the use of fiber optic based control signal transmission. Output pulses of 1 ms pulse width, 800 ns rise time, and 5 μs fall time have been achieved. The modulator has advantages of modular design, adjustable pulse width, adjustable rise time, and fall time. PMID:26931898

  10. High-power LEDs for plant cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Duchovskis, Pavelas; Bliznikas, Zenius; Breive, Kestutis; Ulinskaite, Raimonda; Brazaityte, Ausra; Novickovas, Algirdas; Zukauskas, Arturas; Shur, Michael S.

    2004-10-01

    We report on high-power solid-state lighting facility for cultivation of greenhouse vegetables and on the results of the study of control of photosynthetic activity and growth morphology of radish and lettuce imposed by variation of the spectral composition of illumination. Experimental lighting modules (useful area of 0.22 m2) were designed based on 4 types of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with emission peaked in red at the wavelengths of 660 nm and 640 nm (predominantly absorbed by chlorophyll a and b for photosynthesis, respectively), in blue at 455 nm (phototropic function), and in far-red at 735 nm (important for photomorphology). Morphological characteristics, chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under lighting with different spectral composition of the LED-based illuminator and under illumination by high pressure sodium lamps with an equivalent photosynthetic photon flux density were compared. A well-balanced solid-state lighting was found to enhance production of green mass and to ensure healthy morphogenesis of plants compared to those grown using conventional lighting. We observed that the plant morphology and concentrations of morphologically active phytohormones is strongly affected by the spectral composition of light in the red region. Commercial application of the LED-based illumination for large-scale plant cultivation is discussed. This technology is favorable from the point of view of energy consumption, controllable growth, and food safety but is hindered by high cost of the LEDs. Large scale manufacturing of high-power red AlInGaP-based LEDs emitting at 650 nm and a further decrease of the photon price for the LEDs emitting in the vicinity of the absorption peak of chlorophylls have to be achieved to promote horticulture applications.

  11. Monitoring method for neutron flux for a spallation target in an accelerator driven sub-critical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang, He, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Cui, Wen-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a monitoring method for neutron flux for the spallation target used in an accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, where a spallation target located vertically at the centre of a sub-critical core is bombarded vertically by high-energy protons from an accelerator. First, by considering the characteristics in the spatial variation of neutron flux from the spallation target, we propose a multi-point measurement technique, i.e. the spallation neutron flux should be measured at multiple vertical locations. To explain why the flux should be measured at multiple locations, we have studied neutron production from a tungsten target bombarded by a 250 MeV-proton beam with Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the neutron flux at the central location is up to three orders of magnitude higher than the flux at lower locations. Secondly, we have developed an effective technique in order to measure the spallation neutron flux with a fission chamber (FC), by establishing the relation between the fission rate measured by FC and the spallation neutron flux. Since this relation is linear for a FC, a constant calibration factor is used to derive the neutron flux from the measured fission rate. This calibration factor can be extracted from the energy spectra of spallation neutrons. Finally, we have evaluated the proposed calibration method for a FC in the environment of an ADS system. The results indicate that the proposed method functions very well. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03010000 and XDA03030000) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China(91426301).

  12. Laser wire beam profile monitor in the spallation neutron source (SNS) superconducting linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Aleksandrov, A.; Assadi, S.; Blokland, W.; Deibele, C.; Grice, W.; Long, C.; Pelaia, T.; Webster, A.

    2010-01-01

    The spallation neutron source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based, neutron-scattering facility. SNS uses a large-scale, high-energy superconducting linac (SCL) to provide high beam power utilizing hydrogen ion (H -) beams. For the diagnostics of high-brightness H - beams in the SCL, nonintrusive methods are preferred. This paper describes design, implementation, theoretical analysis, and experimental demonstration of a nonintrusive profile monitor system based on photodetachment, also known as laser wire, installed in the SNS SCL. The SNS laser wire system is the world's largest of its kind with a capability of measuring horizontal and vertical profiles of an operational H - beam at each of the 23 cryomodule stations along the SCL beam line by employing a single light source. Presently 9 laser wire stations have been commissioned that measure profiles of the H - beam at energy levels from 200 MeV to 1 GeV. The laser wire diagnostics has no moving parts inside the beam pipe, causes no contamination on the superconducting cavity, and can be run parasitically on an operational neutron production H - beam.

  13. Coherently coupled high-power fiber arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, Jesse; Brosnan, Stephen; Cheung, Eric; Epp, Paul; Hammons, Dennis; Komine, Hiroshi; Weber, Mark; Wickham, Michael

    2006-02-01

    A four-element fiber array has demonstrated 470 watts of coherently phased, linearly polarized light energy in a single far-field spot. Each element consists of a single-mode fiber-amplifier chain. Phase control of each element is achieved with a Lithium-Niobate phase modulator. A master laser provides a linearly polarized, narrow linewidth signal that is split into five channels. Four channels are individually amplified using polarization maintaining fiber power amplifiers. The fifth channel is used as a reference arm. It is frequency shifted and then combined interferometrically with a portion of each channel's signal. Detectors sense the heterodyne modulation signal, and an electronics circuit measures the relative phase for each channel. Compensating adjustments are then made to each channel's phase modulator. This effort represents the results of a multi-year effort to achieve high power from a single element fiber amplifier and to understand the important issues involved in coherently combining many individual elements to obtain sufficient optical power for directed energy weapons. Northrop Grumman Corporation and the High Energy Laser Joint Technology Office jointly sponsored this work.

  14. High-power LED package requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Frank; Martin, Paul S.; Harbers, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    Power LEDs have evolved from simple indicators into illumination devices. For general lighting applications, where the objective is to light up an area, white LED arrays have been utilized to serve that function. Cost constraints will soon drive the industry to provide a discrete lighting solution. Early on, that will mean increasing the power densities while quantum efficiencies are addressed. For applications such as automotive headlamps & projection, where light needs to be tightly collimated, or controlled, arrays of die or LEDs will not be able to satisfy the requirements & limitations defined by etendue. Ultimately, whether a luminaire requires a small source with high luminance, or light spread over a general area, economics will force the evolution of the illumination LED into a compact discrete high power package. How the customer interfaces with this new package should be an important element considered early on in the design cycle. If an LED footprint of adequate size is not provided, it may prove impossible for the customer, or end user, to get rid of the heat in a manner sufficient to prevent premature LED light output degradation. Therefore it is critical, for maintaining expected LED lifetime & light output, that thermal performance parameters be defined, by design, at the system level, which includes heat sinking methods & interface materials or methdology.

  15. Initial observations of cavitation-induced erosion of liquid metal spallation target vessels at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Riemer, Bernie; Ferguson, Phillip D; Carroll, Adam J; Dayton, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    During operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory the mechanical properties of the AISI 316L target module are altered by high-energy neutron and proton radiation. The interior surfaces of the target vessel are also damaged by cavitation-induced erosion, which results from repetitive rapid heating of the liquid mercury by high-energy proton beam pulses. Until recently no observations of cavitation-induced erosion were possible for conditions prototypical to the SNS. Post irradiation examination (PIE) of the first and second operational SNS targets was performed to gain insight into the radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of the 316L target material and the extent of cavitation-induced erosion to the target vessel inner surfaces. Observations of cavitation-induced erosion of the first and second operational SNS target modules are presented here, including images of the target vessel interiors and specimens removed from the target beam-entrance regions.

  16. Digitally Controlled High Availability Power Supply

    SciTech Connect

    MacNair, David; /SLAC

    2008-09-25

    This paper reports the design and test results on novel topology, high-efficiency, and low operating temperature, 1,320-watt power modules for high availability power supplies. The modules permit parallel operation for N+1 redundancy with hot swap capability. An embedded DSP provides intelligent start-up and shutdown, output regulation, general control and fault detection. PWM modules in the DSP drive the FET switches at 20 to 100 kHz. The DSP also ensures current sharing between modules, synchronized switching, and soft start up for hot swapping. The module voltage and current have dedicated ADCs (>200 kS/sec) to provide pulse-by-pulse output control. A Dual CAN bus interface provides for low cost redundant control paths. Over-rated module components provide high reliability and high efficiency at full load. Low on-resistance FETs replace conventional diodes in the buck regulator. Saturable inductors limit the FET reverse diode current during switching. The modules operate in a two-quadrant mode, allowing bipolar output from complimentary module groups. Controllable, low resistance FETs at the input and output provide fault isolation and allow module hot swapping.

  17. Pulse shortening in high power microwave sources

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, J.; Benford, G.

    1996-12-31

    The authors review the current state of understanding of the universal phenomena that high power microwave pulses are shorter than the applied electrical pulse. Higher power reduces pulse duration, limiting present-day sources to a few hundred joules. Is this limitation fundamental, or are there means to avoid it entirely? There is no reason to think that only one mechanism is responsible. Rather, there are layers of effects which may need to be addressed separately. The authors categories experimental observations in terms of candidate pulse shortening mechanisms such as gap closure, primary and secondary electron bombardment of walls, and RF breakdown. Pulse shortening mechanism theory (microwave field interaction with the beam, resistive filamentation, enhanced closure, etc.) is summarized and compared to observations. They make suggestions for additional experiments and diagnostics to help separate out causes. Finally, means of reducing or eliminating pulse shortening are reviewed.

  18. Deformable mirror for high power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrň; a, Libor; Sarbort, Martin; Hola, Miroslava

    2015-01-01

    The modern trend in high power laser applications such as welding, cutting and surface hardening lies in the use of solid-state lasers. The output beam of these lasers is characterized by a Gaussian intensity distribution. However, the laser beams with different intensity distributions, e.g. top-hat, are preferable in various applications. In this paper we present a new type of deformable mirror suitable for the corresponding laser beam shaping. The deformation of the mirror is achieved by an underlying array of actuators and a pressurized coolant that also provides the necessary cooling. We describe the results of the surface shape measurement using a 3D scanner for different settings of actuators. Further, we show the achieved intensity distributions measured by a beam profiler for a low power laser beam reflected from the mirror.

  19. The JLab high power ERL light source

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

    2005-03-19

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the discoveries we have made

  20. The JLab high power ERL light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, G. R.; Behre, C.; Benson, S. V.; Bevins, M.; Biallas, G.; Boyce, J.; Coleman, J.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Douglas, D.; Dylla, H. F.; Evans, R.; Grippo, A.; Gruber, D.; Gubeli, J.; Hardy, D.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Jordan, K.; Kelley, M. J.; Merminga, L.; Mammosser, J.; Moore, W.; Nishimori, N.; Pozdeyev, E.; Preble, J.; Rimmer, R.; Shinn, M.; Siggins, T.; Tennant, C.; Walker, R.; Williams, G. P.; Zhang, S.

    2006-02-01

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz ˜ half cycle pulse whose average brightness is >5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted [Carr, et al., Nature 420 (2002) 153]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [Neil, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 662]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 μm in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 ms long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the

  1. Earthquake Triggering by High Power Electric Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Victor; Konev, Yuri; Zeigarnik, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    The study carried out by the Joint Institute for High Temperatures in cooperation with the Institute of Physics of the Earth and the Research Station in Bishkek of Russian Academy of Sciences in 1999-2008 showed a response of weak seismicity at field experiments with electric pulsed power systems, as well as acoustic emission of rock specimens under laboratory conditions on high-power electric current pulses applied to the rocks. It was suggested that the phenomenon discovered may be used in practice for partial release of tectonic stresses in the Earth crust for earthquake hazard mitigation. Nevertheless, the mechanism of the influence of man-made electromagnetic field on the regional seismicity is not clear yet. One of possible cause of the phenomenon may be pore fluid pressure increase in the rocks under stressed conditions due to Joule heat generation by electric current injected into the Earth crust. It is known that increase of pore fluid pressure in the fault zone over a critical pressure of about 0.05 MPa is sufficient to trigger an earthquake if the fault is near the critical state due to accumulated tectonic deformations. Detailed 3D-calculaton of electric current density in the Earth crust of the Northern Tien Shan provided by pulsed electric high-power system connected to grounded electric dipole showed that at the depth of earthquake epicenters (over 5 km) the electric current density is lower than 10-7 A/m2 that is not sufficient for increase of pressure in the fluid-saturated porous geological medium due to Joule heat generation, which may provide formation of cracks resulting in the fault propagation and release of tectonic stresses in the Earth crust. Nevertheless, under certain conditions, when electric current will be injected into the fault through the casing pipes of two deep wells with preliminary injection of conductive fluid into the fault, the current density may be high enough for significant increase of mechanic pressure in the porous two

  2. Prototype Spallation Neutron Source Rotating Target Assembly Final Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, Thomas J; Graves, Van; Garmendia, Amaia Zarraoa; Sorda, Fernando; Etxeita, Borja; Rennich, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    A full-scale prototype of an extended vertical shaft, rotating target assembly based on a conceptual target design for a 1 to 3-MW spallation facility was built and tested. Key elements of the drive/coupling assembly implemented in the prototype include high integrity dynamic face seals, commercially available bearings, realistic manufacturing tolerances, effective monitoring and controls, and fail-safe shutdown features. A representative target disk suspended on a 3.5 meter prototypical shaft was coupled with the drive to complete the mechanical tests. Successful operation for 5400 hours confirmed the overall mechanical feasibility of the extended vertical shaft rotating target concept. The prototype system showed no indications of performance deterioration and the equipment did not require maintenance or relubrication.

  3. Preliminary Numerical and Experimental Analysis of the Spallation Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Panerai, Francesco; Davuluri, Raghava S. C.; Vazsonyi, Alexander R.; Zhang, Huaibao; Lippay, Zachary S.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Bathel, Brett F.; Splinter, Scott C.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The spallation phenomenon was studied through numerical analysis using a coupled Lagrangian particle tracking code and a hypersonic aerothermodynamics computational fluid dynamics solver. The results show that carbon emission from spalled particles results in a significant modification of the gas composition of the post shock layer. Preliminary results from a test-campaign at the NASA Langley HYMETS facility are presented. Using an automated image processing of high-speed images, two-dimensional velocity vectors of the spalled particles were calculated. In a 30 second test at 100 W/cm2 of cold-wall heat-flux, more than 1300 particles were detected, with an average velocity of 102 m/s, and most frequent observed velocity of 60 m/s.

  4. Using spallation neutron sources for defense research

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Sterbenz, S.M.; Weinacht, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced characterization techniques and accelerated simulation are the cornerstones of the Energy Department`s science-based program to maintain confidence in the safety, reliability, and performance of the US nuclear deterrent in an era of no nuclear testing. Neutrons and protons provided by an accelerator-based facility have an important role to play in this program, impacting several of the key stockpile stewardship and management issues identified by the Department of Defense. Many of the techniques used for defense research at a spallation source have been used for many years for the basic research community, and to a lesser extent by industrial scientists. By providing access to a broad spectrum of researchers with different backgrounds, a spallation source such as the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is able to promote synergistic interaction between defense, basic and industrial researchers. This broadens the scientific basis of the stockpile stewardship program in the short term and will provide spin-off to industrial and basic research in the longer term.

  5. Management of tritium European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ene, D.; Andersson, K.; Jensen, M.; Nielsen, S.; Severin, G.

    2015-03-15

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) will produce tritium via spallation and activation processes during operational activities. Within the location of ESS facility in Lund, Sweden site it is mandatory to demonstrate that the management strategy of the produced tritium ensures the compliance with the country regulation criteria. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the different aspects of the tritium management in ESS facility. Besides the design parameter study of the helium coolant purification system of the target the consequences of the tritium releasing into the environment were also analyzed. Calculations show that the annual release of tritium during the normal operations represents a small fraction from the estimated total dose. However, more refined calculations of migration of activated-groundwater should be performed for higher hydraulic conductivities, with the availability of the results on soil examinations. With the assumption of 100% release of tritium to the atmosphere during the occurring of the extreme accidents, it was found as well that the total dose complies with the constraint. (authors)

  6. Low power, scalable multichannel high voltage controller

    DOEpatents

    Stamps, James Frederick; Crocker, Robert Ward; Yee, Daniel Dadwa; Dils, David Wright

    2006-03-14

    A low voltage control circuit is provided for individually controlling high voltage power provided over bus lines to a multitude of interconnected loads. An example of a load is a drive for capillary channels in a microfluidic system. Control is distributed from a central high voltage circuit, rather than using a number of large expensive central high voltage circuits to enable reducing circuit size and cost. Voltage is distributed to each individual load and controlled using a number of high voltage controller channel switches connected to high voltage bus lines. The channel switches each include complementary pull up and pull down photo isolator relays with photo isolator switching controlled from the central high voltage circuit to provide a desired bus line voltage. Switching of the photo isolator relays is further controlled in each channel switch using feedback from a resistor divider circuit to maintain the bus voltage swing within desired limits. Current sensing is provided using a switched resistive load in each channel switch, with switching of the resistive loads controlled from the central high voltage circuit.

  7. Low power, scalable multichannel high voltage controller

    DOEpatents

    Stamps, James Frederick; Crocker, Robert Ward; Yee, Daniel Dadwa; Dils, David Wright

    2008-03-25

    A low voltage control circuit is provided for individually controlling high voltage power provided over bus lines to a multitude of interconnected loads. An example of a load is a drive for capillary channels in a microfluidic system. Control is distributed from a central high voltage circuit, rather than using a number of large expensive central high voltage circuits to enable reducing circuit size and cost. Voltage is distributed to each individual load and controlled using a number of high voltage controller channel switches connected to high voltage bus lines. The channel switches each include complementary pull up and pull down photo isolator relays with photo isolator switching controlled from the central high voltage circuit to provide a desired bus line voltage. Switching of the photo isolator relays is further controlled in each channel switch using feedback from a resistor divider circuit to maintain the bus voltage swing within desired limits. Current sensing is provided using a switched resistive load in each channel switch, with switching of the resistive loads controlled from the central high voltage circuit.

  8. High power microwave hazard facing smart ammunitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohl, J.

    1995-03-01

    The battle field of the present and even more the one in future will be characterized by the use of weapon systems with a high degree of electronics, computers, and sensors, designed and built to keep not only the man out of the loop. But the higher the technology used for smart weapon systems, the more these systems are endangered by numerous sources of hazard. One of those sources is the threat caused by induced or natural electromagnetic fields. These threat factors can be generated by natural, civil and military environment. In principle there are two main applications which must be considered in military applications: Firstly, weapon systems, that is, high power microwave sources as well as intelligent electromagnetic radiation systems to defeat ammunition on the battle field and secondly, the hardening of the own smart ammunition systems and missiles against the interference sources created by the different types of electromagnetic fields. This report will discuss the possible electromagnetic coupling effects on smart ammunition and missiles and their typical interference caused on the electronics and sensor level. Real time 6-DOF simulations show the flight mission which may be compromised depending on the coupled electromagnetic fields. The German MOD has established a research program where smart ammunitions with different seeker systems are investigated in respect of the coupling effects on smart ammunition caused by high power microwaves. This program considers all available resources and know how in Germany. The systems are investigated by analytical, numerical, and experimental methods with passive and activated missiles.

  9. High power pulsed magnicon at 34-GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Nezhevenko, O.A.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Ganguly, A.K.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1999-05-01

    A high efficiency, high power magnicon amplifier at 34.272 GHz has been designed as a radiation source to drive multi-TeV electron-positron linear colliders. Simulations show peak output power of 45 MW in a 1.5 microsecond wide pulse with an efficiency of 45{percent} and gain of 55 dB. The repetition rate is 10 Hz. The amplifier is a frequency tripler, or third harmonic amplifier, in that the output frequency of 34.272 GHz is three times the input drive frequency of 11.424 GHz. Thus the rotating TM{sub 110} modes in the drive cavity, 3 gain cavities and double decoupled penultimate cavities are resonant near 11.424 GHz; and the rotating TM{sub 310} mode in the output cavity is resonant at 34.272 GHz. A 500 kV, 200 A high area compression electron gun will provide a low emittance electron beam with a diameter of about 0.8 mm. A superconducting solenoid magnet will provide a magnetic field of 13 kG in the deflection system and 22 kG in the output cavity. A collector for the spent beam has also been designed. Detailed simulation results for the operation of the entire magnicon amplifier (gun, magnetic system, rf system and collector) will be given. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  11. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  12. THERMAL HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF A LIQUID-METAL-COOLED NEUTRON SPALLATION TARGET

    SciTech Connect

    W. GREGORY; R. MARTIN; T. VALACHOVIC

    2000-07-01

    We have carried out numerical simulations of the thermal hydraulic behavior of a neutron spallation target where liquid metal lead-bismuth serves as both coolant and as a neutron spallation source. The target is one of three designs provided by the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) in Russia. This type of target is proposed for Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste (ATW) to eliminate plutonium from hazardous fission products. The thermal hydraulic behavior was simulated by use of a commercial CFD computer code called CFX. Maximum temperatures in the diaphragm window and in the liquid lead were determined. In addition the total pressure drop through the target was predicted. The results of the CFX analysis were close to those results predicted by IPPE in their preliminary analysis.

  13. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y. W.; Fuja, R.; Goulding, R. H.; Hardek, T.; Lee, S.-W.; McCarthy, M. P.; Piller, M. C.; Shin, K.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering ˜38 mA H- beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier.

  14. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H-ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Fuja, Raymond E; Goulding, Richard Howell; Hardek, Thomas W; Lee, Sung-Woo; McCarthy, Mike; Piller, Chip; Shin, Ki; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering 38 mA H beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride AlN plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  15. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion source.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y W; Fuja, R; Goulding, R H; Hardek, T; Lee, S-W; McCarthy, M P; Piller, M C; Shin, K; Stockli, M P; Welton, R F

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering approximately 38 mA H(-) beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. PMID:20192394

  16. High power distributed x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frutschy, Kris; Neculaes, Bogdan; Inzinna, Lou; Caiafa, Antonio; Reynolds, Joe; Zou, Yun; Zhang, Xi; Gunturi, Satish; Cao, Yang; Waters, Bill; Wagner, Dave; De Man, Bruno; McDevitt, Dan; Roffers, Rick; Lounsberry, Brian; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2010-04-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a distributed x-ray source with up to 60kW demonstrated instantaneous power. Component integration and test results are shown for the dispenser cathode electron gun, fast switching controls, high voltage stand-off insulator, brazed anode, and vacuum system. The current multisource prototype has been operated for over 100 hours without failure, and additional testing is needed to discover the limiting component. Example focal spot measurements and x-ray radiographs are included. Lastly, future development opportunities are highlighted.

  17. High power radio frequency attenuation device

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Quentin A.; Miller, Harold W.

    1984-01-01

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  18. High power local ECH in CHS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, S.; Idei, H.; Iwase, M.; Ohkubo, K.; Minami, T.; Yamada, I.; Narihara, K.; Tanaka, K.; Wilgen, J.B.; Murakami, M.; Rasumussen, D.A.; Nishimura, K.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K.

    1996-02-01

    Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) experiments with 200 kW and 400 kW gyrotrons at the frequency of 53.2 GHz have been performed in Compact Helical System (CHS). Microwave power from both gyrotrons is transmitted with quasi-optical transmission line and highly focused on the mid-plane of CHS. The main purpose of these experiments is to understand the heating and energy transport mechanisms in CHS at the low collisional regime. The combination of the magnetic field, focal position and polarization enables the investigation of the on/off axis local heating effect with fundamental and second harmonic ECH. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Recent progress in high power ultrafast MIXSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfieri, C. G. E.; Waldburger, D.; Link, S. M.; Gini, E.; Golling, M.; Tilma, B. W.; Mangold, M.; Keller, U.

    2016-03-01

    The modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting laser (MIXSEL) is the most compact technology of ultrafast semiconductor disk laser, combining in the same epitaxial structure an active region and a saturable absorber for stable and self-starting passive modelocking in a linear straight cavity. Here we present the first MIXSEL structure able to produce sub-300-fs pulses at an average output power of 235 mW and 3.35 GHz pulse repetition rate, resulting in a record-high peak power of 240 W. At 10 GHz repetition rate the same MIXSEL generated 279-fs pulses with 310 mW of average output power. An optimized antireflection coating for dispersion minimization together with a reduced field enhancement inside the structure enabled the sensible improvement and the record performances of this novel MIXSEL. Furthermore, thanks to the development of suitable saturable absorbers with fast recovery dynamics and low saturation fluence, we demonstrate the first entirely MOVPE-grown MIXSEL.

  20. Photovoltaics for high capacity space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, D.J.

    1988-10-01

    The anticipated energy requirements of future space missions will grow by factors approaching 100 or more, particularly as a permanent manned presence is established in space. The advances that can be expected in solar array performance and lifetime, when coupled with advanced, high energy density storage batteries and/or fuel cells, will continue to make photovoltaic energy conversion a viable power generating option for the large systems of the future. The specific technologies required to satisfy any particular set of power requirements will vary from mission to mission. Nonetheless, in almost all cases the technology push will be toward lighter weight and higher efficiency, whether of solar arrays or storage devices. This paper will describe the content and direction of the current NASA program in space photovoltaic technology. The paper will also discuss projected system level capabilities of photovoltaic power systems in the context of some of the new mission opportunities under study by NASA, such as a manned lunar base, and a manned visit to Mars.

  1. Photovoltaics for high capacity space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.

    1988-01-01

    The anticipated energy requirements of future space missions will grow by factors approaching 100 or more, particularly as a permanent manned presence is established in space. The advances that can be expected in solar array performance and lifetime, when coupled with advanced, high energy density storage batteries and/or fuel cells, will continue to make photovoltaic energy conversion a viable power generating option for the large systems of the future. The specific technologies required to satisfy any particular set of power requirements will vary from mission to mission. Nonetheless, in almost all cases the technology push will be toward lighter weight and higher efficiency, whether of solar arrays of storage devices. This paper will describe the content and direction of the current NASA program in space photovoltaic technology. The paper will also discuss projected system level capabilities of photovoltaic power systems in the context of some of the new mission opportunities under study by NASA, such as a manned lunar base, and a manned visit to Mars.

  2. Photovoltaics for high capacity space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.

    1988-01-01

    The anticipated energy requirements of future space missions will grow by factors approaching 100 or more, particularly as a permanent manned presence is established in space. The advances that can be expected in solar array performance and lifetime, when coupled with advanced, high energy density storage batteries and/or fuel cells, will continue to make photovoltaic energy conversion a viable power generating option for the large systems of the future. The specific technologies required to satisfy any particular set of power requirements will vary from mission to mission. Nonetheless, in almost all cases the technology push will be toward lighter weight and higher efficiency, whether of solar arrays or storage devices. This paper will describe the content and direction of the current NASA program in space photovoltaic technology. The paper will also discuss projected system level capabilities of photovoltaic power systems in the context of some of the new mission opportunities under study by NASA, such as a manned lunar base, and a manned visit to Mars.

  3. Mercury target R&D for the Oak Ridge spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, J.R.; DiStefano, J.; Farrell, K.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) incorporates liquid mercury as its reference target material. A flowing liquid target was selected mainly because of the increased power handling capability possible with the convective transport process. The major reasons for choosing mercury as the liquid target material are because it: (1) is a liquid at room temperature, (2) has good heat transport properties, and (3) has a high atomic number and mass density resulting in high neutron yield and source brightness. Since liquid targets are not widely utilized in presently operating accelerator targets and because of the challenges posed by the intense, pulsed thermal energy deposition ({approximately}20-100 kJ deposited during each 1-10 {mu}s pulse), considerable R&D is planned for the mercury target concept. The key feasibility issue that will be addressed in early R&D efforts are the effects of the thermal shock environment, which will include development and testing of approaches to mitigate these effects. Materials compatiblity and ES&H issues associated with the use of liquid mercury are also of major importance in early R&D efforts. A brief description of the mercury target design concept, results of initial evaluations of its performance characteristics, identification of its critical issues, and an outline of the R&D program aimed at addressing these issues will be presented.

  4. Design and Testing of a Prototype Spallation Neutron Source Rotating Target Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, Mark J; McManamy, Thomas J; Graves, Van; Garmendia, Amaia Zarraoa; Sorda, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical aspects of an extended vertical shaft rotating target have been evaluated in a full-scale mockup test. A prototype assembly based on a conceptual target design for a 1 to 3-MW spallation facility was built and tested. Key elements of the drive/coupling assembly implemented in the prototype include high integrity dynamic face seals, commercially available bearings, realistic manufacturing tolerances, effective monitoring and controls, and fail-safe shutdown features. A representative target disk suspended on a 3.5 meter prototypical shaft was coupled with the drive to complete the mechanical tests. After1800 hours of operation the test program has confirmed the overall mechanical feasibility of the extended vertical shaft rotating target concept. Precision alignment of the suspended target disk; successful containment of the water and verification of operational stability over the full speed range of 30 to 60 rpm were primary indications the proposed mechanical design is valid for use in a high power target station.

  5. Distribution and surface enrichment of radionuclides in lead-bismuth eutectic from spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer-Rotzler, Bernadette; Neuhausen, Jörg; Boutellier, Viktor; Wohlmuther, Michael; Zanini, L.; David, J.-C.; Türler, Andreas; Schumann, Dorothea

    2016-07-01

    With the development of new high-power neutron spallation sources --both for scientific application and as neutron production tool for accelerator-driven systems-- the demand for experimentally obtained nuclear data on the residue nuclei production in the target is constantly increasing. In the present work, we examined two lead-bismuth-eutectic targets, irradiated with high-energy protons, concerning their radionuclide content and the spatial distribution of selected isotopes. The first one was the so-called ISOLDE target, being irradiated with 1-1.4GeV protons at CERN-ISOLDE, the second one was the MEGAPIE target, irradiated at PSI with 590MeV protons. In particular, we investigated the phenomenon of radionuclide enrichment on free surfaces in both targets. It turned out that considerable accumulation can be found especially in the case of lanthanides. The depletion process is enhanced at increased temperatures. The results are compared with theoretical predictions; some possible consequences of the findings are illustrated.

  6. Improved cooling design for high power waveguide system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. C. J.; Hartop, R.

    1981-01-01

    Testing of X band high power components in a traveling wave resonator indicates that this improved cooling design reduces temperature in the waveguide and flange. The waveguide power handling capability and power transmission reliability is increased substantially.

  7. High-Power Options for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    The LANSCE linear accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory has a long history of successful beam operations at 800 kW. We have recently studied options for restoration of high-power operations including approaches for increasing the performance to multi-MW levels. In this paper we will discuss the results of this study including the present limitations of the existing accelerating structures at LANSCE, and the high-voltage and RF systems that drive them. Several options will be discussed and a preferred option will be presented that will enable the first in a new generation of scientific facilities for the materials community. The emphasis of this new facility is 'Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes' (MaRIE) which will be used to discover and design the advanced materials needed to meet 21st century national security and energy security challenges.

  8. SIMULATING ACCELERATOR STRUCTURE OPERATION AT HIGH POWER

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V

    2004-09-15

    The important limiting factors in high-gradient accelerator structure operation are dark current capture, RF breakdown and electron multipacting. These processes involve both primary and secondary electron field emission and produce plasma and X-rays. To better understand these phenomena, they have simulated dark current generation and transport in a linac structure and a square-bend waveguide, both high power tested at SLAC. For these simulations, they use the parallel, time-domain, unstructured-grid code Tau3P and the particle tracking module Track3P. In this paper, they present numerical results and their comparison with measurements on energy spectrum of electrons transmitted in a 30-cell structure and of X-rays emitted from the square-bend waveguide.

  9. Digitally Controlled High Availability Power Supply

    SciTech Connect

    MacNair, David; /SLAC

    2009-05-07

    This paper will report on the test results of a prototype 1320 watt power module for a high availability power supply. The module will allow parallel operation for N+1 redundancy with hot swap capability. The two quadrant output of each module allows pairs of modules to provide a 4 quadrant (bipolar) operation. Each module employs a novel 4 FET buck regulator arranged in a bridge configuration. Each side of the bridge alternately conducts through a small saturable ferrite that limits the reverse current in the FET body diode during turn off. This allows hard switching of the FETs with low switching losses. The module is designed with over-rated components to provide high reliability and better then 97% efficiency at full load. The modules use a Microchip DSP for control, monitoring, and fault detection. The switching FETS are driven by PWM modules in the DSP at 60 KHz. A Dual CAN bus interface provides for low cost redundant control paths. The DSP will also provide current sharing between modules, synchronized switching, and soft start up for hot swapping. The input and output of each module have low resistance FETs to allow hot swapping and isolation of faulted units.

  10. High-Power Ion Thruster Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Matossian, J. N.

    1996-01-01

    Performance data are presented for the NASA/Hughes 30-cm-diam 'common' thruster operated over the power range from 600 W to 4.6 kW. At the 4.6-kW power level, the thruster produces 172 mN of thrust at a specific impulse of just under 4000 s. Xenon pressure and temperature measurements are presented for a 6.4-mm-diam hollow cathode operated at emission currents ranging from 5 to 30 A and flow rates of 4 sccm and 8 sccm. Highly reproducible results show that the cathode temperature is a linear function of emission current, ranging from approx. 1000 C to 1150 C over this same current range. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements obtained from a 30-cm-diam thruster are presented, suggesting that LIF could be a valuable diagnostic for real-time assessment of accelerator-arid erosion. Calibration results of laminar-thin-film (LTF) erosion badges with bulk molybdenum are presented for 300-eV xenon, krypton, and argon sputtering ions. Facility-pressure effects on the charge-exchange ion current collected by 8-cm-diam and 30-cm-diam thrusters operated on xenon propellant are presented to show that accel current is nearly independent of facility pressure at low pressures, but increases rapidly under high-background-pressure conditions.

  11. Fibrous zinc anodes for high power batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Gregory

    This paper introduces newly developed solid zinc anodes using fibrous material for high power applications in alkaline and large size zinc-air battery systems. The improved performance of the anodes in these two battery systems is demonstrated. The possibilities for control of electrode porosity and for anode/battery design using fibrous materials are discussed in light of experimental data. Because of its mechanical integrity and connectivity, the fibrous solid anode has good electrical conductivity, mechanical stability, and design flexibility for controlling mass distribution, porosity and effective surface area. Experimental data indicated that alkaline cells made of such anodes can have a larger capacity at high discharging currents than commercially available cells. It showed even greater improvement over commercial cells with a non-conventional cell design. Large capacity anodes for a zinc-air battery have also been made and have shown excellent material utilization at various discharge rates. The zinc-air battery was used to power an electric bicycle and demonstrated good results.

  12. High Power Microwave Production by Gyroharmonic Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, M. A.; Ganguly, A. K.; Yoder, R. B.; Wang, Changbiao; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1996-11-01

    Recent progress on the production of third and fourth harmonic microwave radiation from a high power, axis-encircling beam will be presented. The 4--10 MW beam is produced by cyclotron autoresonance acceleration (CARA) which is described in detail elsewhere.(M. A. LaPointe, R. B. Yoder, C. Wang, A. K. Ganguly and J. L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 2718 (1996); J. L. Hirshfield, M. A. LaPointe, A. K. Ganguly, R. B. Yoder and C. Wang, Phys. Plasmas 3, 2163 (1996). The output section consists of an open cylindrical cavity whose radius is beyond cutoff at the third harmonic of the drive frequency in the TE_31 mode but resonant in the TE_41 mode. Results to date have shown strong third harmonic but only weak fourth harmonic output. One explanation for the presence of the third harmonic could be reactive pulling of the TE_31 cutoff by the high current (25--30 A) beam. Descriptions of the output cavities as well as frequency spectra and calorimetric power measurements will be presented.

  13. Early history of high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, George W.

    2002-02-01

    This paper gives the history of the invention and development of early high power lasers, to which the author contributed and had personal knowledge. The earliest hint that a high power laser could be built came from the electric CO2-N2-He laser of Javan. It happened that the director of the Avco-Everett Research Laboratory had written his Ph.D. dissertation on the deactivation of the vibrational excitation of N2 in an expanding flow under Edward Teller, then at Columbia Univ. The director then started an in-house project to determine if gain could be achieved in a mixture similar to Javan's by means of a shock tunnel where a shock heated mixture of N2, CO2, and He gas was expanded through a supersonic nozzle into a cavity. This concept was named by the author as the gasdynamic laser (GDL). The paper traces the history of the initial gain measurements, the Mark II laser, the RASTA laser, the Tri-Service laser, its troubles and solutions, the United Technology's XLD gasdynamic laser, and their ALL laser. The history of the coastal Crusader will also be mentioned. Also discussed are the early experiments on a combustion-driven chemical laser, and its subsequent rejection by the director.

  14. High Power ECR Ion Thruster Discharge Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Carpenter, Christian; Williams, George W.

    2006-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) based ion thrusters with carbon based ion optics can potentially satisfy lifetime requirements for long duration missions (approximately 10 years) because grid erosion and cathode insert depletion issues are virtually eliminated. Though the ECR plasma discharge has been found to typically operate at slightly higher discharge losses than conventional DC ion thrusters (for high total thruster power applications), the discharge power fraction is small (less than 1 percent at 25 kW). In this regard, the benefits of increased life, low discharge plasma potentials, and reduced complexity are welcome tradeoffs for the associated discharge efficiency decrease. Presented here are results from discharge characterization of a large area ECR plasma source for gridded ion thruster applications. These measurements included load matching efficacy, bulk plasma properties via Langmuir probe, and plasma uniformity as measured using current probes distributed at the exit plane. A high degree of plasma uniformity was observed (flatness greater than 0.9). Additionally, charge state composition was qualitatively evaluated using emission spectroscopy. Plasma induced emission was dominated by xenon ion lines. No doubly charged xenon ions were detected.

  15. High power singlemode edge-emitting master oscillator power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, S.; Parke, R.; Welch, D. F.; Mehuys, D.; Scifres, D.

    1992-01-01

    An edge-emitting monolithically integrated master oscillator power amplifier (M-MOPA) has been fabricated by integrating a distributed Bragg reflector laser with a 500 microns long single mode amplifier. The M-MOPA contains a strained InGaAs quantum well in the active region and operates at about 981.5 nm in an edge-emitting fashion with maximum powers in excess of 175 mW. Single longitudinal and transverse mode operation is maintained to powers in excess of 110 mW CW.

  16. Dark current induced in large CCD arrays by proton-induced elastic reactions and single to multiple-event spallation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; McNulty, P.J.; Larson, S. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Thompson, D.A.; Miller, T.L.; Lee, T. )

    1994-12-01

    Computer simulations of the non-ionizing energy loss deposited in sensitive volumes as a result of proton-induced spallation reactions agree with analytic models for large sensitive volumes exposed to high fluence. They predict unique features for small volumes and low-fluence exposures which are observed in exposures of large arrays of CCD pixels. Calculations of the number of spallation reactions per pixel correlate with the recently reported relative frequency of switching dark-current states.

  17. High-temperature alloys for high-power thermionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Kwang S.; Jacobson, D.L.; D'cruz, L.; Luo, Anhua; Chen, Bor-Ling.

    1990-08-01

    The need for structural materials with useful strength above 1600 k has stimulated interest in refractory-metal alloys. Tungsten possesses an extreme high modulus of elasticity as well as the highest melting temperature among metals, and hence is being considered as one of the most promising candidate materials for high temperature structural applications such as space nuclear power systems. This report is divided into three chapters covering the following: (1) the processing of tungsten base alloys; (2) the tensile properties of tungsten base alloys; and (3) creep behavior of tungsten base alloys. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter. (SC)

  18. High-Voltage, High-Power Gaseous Electronics Switch For Electric Grid Power Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerer, Timothy J.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing a high-voltage, high-power gas switch for use in low-cost power conversion terminals on the electric power grid. Direct-current (dc) power transmission has many advantages over alternating current (ac) transmission, but at present the high cost of ac-dc power interconversion limits the use of dc. The gas switch we are developing conducts current through a magnetized cold cathode plasma in hydrogen or helium to reach practical current densities > 1 A/cm2. Thermal and sputter damage of the cathode by the incident ion flux is a major technical risk, and is being addressed through use of a ``self-healing'' liquid metal cathode (eg, gallium). Plasma conditions and cathode sputtering loss are estimated by analyzing plasma spectral emission. A particle-in-cell plasma model is used to understand various aspects of switch operation, including the conduction phase (where plasma densities can exceed 1013 cm-3), the switch-open phase (where the high-voltage must be held against gas breakdown on the left side of Paschen's curve), and the switching transitions (especially the opening process, which is initiated by forming an ion-matrix sheath adjacent to a control grid). The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000298.

  19. Critical design issues of high intensity proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1994-08-01

    Medium-energy proton linear accelerators are being studied as drivers for spallation applications requiring large amounts of beam powder. Important design factors for such high-intensity linacs are reviewed, and issues and concerns specific to this unprecedented power regime are discussed.

  20. Sulfur and Moisture Effects on Alumina Scale and TBC Spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2007-01-01

    cause is related to a hydrogen embrittlement reaction: Al alloy + 3 H2O = Al(OH)3 + 3H(+) + 3e(-). This mechanism is derived from an analogous moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement mechanism originally shown for Ni3Al and FeAl intermetallics. Consequently, a cathodic hydrogen charging technique was used to demonstrate that electrolytic de-scaling occurs for these otherwise adherent alumina scales formed on Y-doped Rene'N5, in support of hydrogen effects. Finally, some TBC observations are discussed in light of all of the above. Plasma sprayed 8YSZ coatings, produced on PWA1484 without a bond coat, were found to survive more than 1000 1-hr cycles at 1100 C when desulfurized to below 0.1 ppmw. At higher sulfur (1.2 ppmw) levels, moisture sensitivity and delayed TBC failure, referred to as Desk Top Spallation, occurred at just 200 hr. Despite a large degree of scatter, a factor of 5 in life improvement is indicated for desulfurized samples in cyclic furnace tests, confirming the beneficial effect of low sulfur alloys on model TBC systems. (DTS and moisture effects are also observed on commercially applied PVD 7YSZ coatings on Rene'N5+Y with Pt-aluminide bond coats). These types of catastrophic failure were subverted on the model system by segmenting the substrate into a network of 0.010 high ribs, spaced in. apart, prior to plasma spraying. No failures occurred after 1000 cycles at 1150 C or after 2000 cycles at 1100 C, even after water immersion. The benefit is described in terms of elasticity models and a critical buckling stress.

  1. Determination of spallation neutron flux through spectral adjustment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, M. A.; Engle, J. W.; Jackman, K. R.; Nortier, F. M.; Birnbaum, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) creates medical isotopes using a proton beam impinged on a target stack. Spallation neutrons are created in the interaction of the beam with target. The use of these spallation neutrons to produce additional radionuclides has been proposed. However, the energy distribution and magnitude of the flux is not well understood. A modified SAND-II spectral adjustment routine has been used with radioactivation foils to determine the differential neutron fluence for these spallation neutrons during a standard IPF production run.

  2. SPALLATION STUDIES ON SHOCK LOADED U-6 WT PCT NB.

    SciTech Connect

    D. TONKS; ET AL

    2001-01-10

    Several spallation experiments have been performed on the 6 wt pct alloy of uranium using gas gun driven normal plate impacts with VISAR instrumentation and soft recovery. The nominal shock pressures achieved were 28, 34, 42, 50, 55, and 82 kbar. This paper will focus on spallation modeling, e.g. using the 1 D characteristics code CHARADE to simulate the free surface particle velocity. The spallation model involves the ductile growth and coalescence of voids. Metallographical examination of recovered samples and details of the experimental apparatus are discussed in a separate paper.

  3. High-Power Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several of the bold new interplanetary and deep space missions envisioned by the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Strategic Enterprise. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center is actively involved in the design, development, and testing of high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. One concept of particular interest is the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster, shown schematically in the preceding figure. In its basic form, the MPD thruster consists of a central cathode surrounded by a concentric cylindrical anode. A high-current arc is struck between the anode and cathode, which ionizes and accelerates a gas (plasma) propellant. In the self-field version of the thruster, an azimuthal magnetic field generated by the current returning through the cathode interacts with the radial discharge current flowing through the plasma to produce an axial electromagnetic body force, providing thrust. In applied field-versions of the thruster, a magnetic field coil surrounding the anode is used to provide additional radial and axial magnetic fields that can help stabilize and accelerate the plasma propellant. The following figure shows an experimental megawatt-class MPD thruster developed at Glenn. The MPD thruster is fitted inside a magnetic field coil, which in turn is mounted on a thrust stand supported by thin metal flexures. A calibrated position transducer is used to determine the force provided by the thruster as a function of thrust stand displacement. Power to the thruster is supplied by a 250-kJ capacitor bank, which provides up to 30- MW to the thruster for a period of 2 msec. This short period of time is sufficient to establish thruster performance similar to steady-state operation, and it allows a number of thruster designs to be quickly and economically evaluated. In concert

  4. RISE/FALL TIME ENHANCEMENT OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE LINAC LEBT CHOPPER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Peplov, Vladimir V; Saethre, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Linac Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) chopper system provides fast chopping of the H- ion beam in the LEBT structure. Four identical pulsed power supplies (pulsers) create a series of 2.5 kV pulses to the four deflection electrodes floating on the focusing voltage of -50 kV. Each pulser is connected to the electrode through the network which consists of high voltage (HV) cables, a blocking capacitor, HV feed-through connectors, current-limiting resistors and transient voltage suppressors. Effective beam chopping requires minimal rise/fall time of the rectangular HV pulses on the load. In the present configuration these values are approximately 100 ns. Methods of reducing rise/fall time on the LEBT electrodes are discussed. Results of simulation and comparative measurements of the original and upgraded system on the test stand are presented. Furthermore, the effect of these changes on reliability degradation caused by arcing in the LEBT structure is discussed.

  5. Mechanical Engineering of the Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bultman, N.K.; Chen, Z.; Collier, M.; Erickson, J.L.; Guthrie, A.; Hunter, W.T.; Ilg, T.; Meyer, R.K.; Snodgrass, N.L.

    1999-03-29

    The linac for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project will accelerate an average current of 1 mA of H{sup {minus}} ions from 20 MeV to 1GeV for injection into an accumulator ring. The linac will be an intense source of H{sup {minus}} ions and as such requires advanced design techniques to meet project technical goals as well as to minimize costs. The DTL, CCDTL and CCL are 466m long and operate at 805 MHz with a maximum H{sup {minus}} input current of 28 mA and 7% rf duty factor. The Drift Tube Linac is a copper-plated steel structure using permanent magnetic quadrupoles. The Coupled-Cavity portions are brazed copper structures and use electromagnetic quads. RF losses in the copper are 80 MW, with total rf power supplied by 52 klystrons. Additionally, the linac is to be upgraded to the 2- and 4-MW beam power levels with no increase in duty factor. The authors give an overview of the linac mechanical engineering effort and discuss the special challenges and status of the effort.

  6. The cryomodule test stand at the European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hees, W.; Weisend II, J. G.; Wang, X. L.; Köttig, T.

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is an intergovernmental project building a multidisciplinary research laboratory based upon the world's most powerful neutron source to be built in Lund, Sweden. The ESS will use a linear accelerator which will deliver protons with 5 MW of power to the target at 2.5 GeV with a nominal current of 50 mA. The superconducting part of the linac consists of over 150 niobium cavities cooled with superfluid helium at 2 K. A dedicated cryoplant will supply the cryomodules with single phase helium through an external cryogenic transfer line. The elliptical cavity cryomodules will undergo their site acceptance tests at the ESS cryomodule test stand in Lund. This test stand will use a 4.5 K cryoplant and warm sub-atmospheric compression to supply the 2 K helium. We will show the requirements for the test stand, a layout proposal and discuss the factors determining the required cryogenic capacity, test sequence and schedule.

  7. Innovations in high power fiber laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Eckhard; Mahrle, Achim; Lütke, Matthias; Standfuss, Jens; Brückner, Frank

    2012-02-01

    Diffraction-limited high power lasers represent a new generation of lasers for materials processing, characteristic traits of which are: smaller, cost-effective and processing "on the fly". Of utmost importance is the high beam quality of fiber lasers which enables us to reduce the size of the focusing head incl. scanning mirrors. The excellent beam quality of the fiber laser offers a lot of new applications. In the field of remote cutting and welding the beam quality is the key parameter. By reducing the size of the focusing head including the scanning mirrors we can reach scanning frequencies up to 1.5 kHz and in special configurations up to 4 kHz. By using these frequencies very thin and deep welding seams can be generated experienced so far with electron beam welding only. The excellent beam quality of the fiber laser offers a high potential for developing new applications from deep penetration welding to high speed cutting. Highly dynamic cutting systems with maximum speeds up to 300 m/min and accelerations up to 4 g reduce the cutting time for cutting complex 2D parts. However, due to the inertia of such systems the effective cutting speed is reduced in real applications. This is especially true if complex shapes or contours are cut. With the introduction of scanner-based remote cutting systems in the kilowatt range, the effective cutting speed on the contour can be dramatically increased. The presentation explains remote cutting of metal foils and sheets using high brightness single mode fiber lasers. The presentation will also show the effect of optical feedback during cutting and welding with the fiber laser, how those feedbacks could be reduced and how they have to be used to optimize the cutting or welding process.

  8. Spallation Neutrons and Pressure SNAP DE-FG02-03ER46085 CLOSE-OUT MAY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, John B

    2009-05-22

    The purpose of the grant was to build a community of scientist and to draw upon their expertise to design and build the world's first dedicated high pressure beamline at a spallation source - the so called Spallation Neutron And Pressure (SNAP) beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at OAk Ridge NAtional LAboratory. . Key to this endeavor was an annual meeting attended by the instrument design team and the executive committee. The discussions at those meeting set an ambitious agenda for beamline design and construction and highlighted key science areas of interest for the community. This report documents in 4 appendices the deliberations at the annual SNAP meetings and the evolution of the beamline optics from concept to construction. The appendices also contain key science opportunities for extreme conditions research.

  9. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect

    KESSELMAN,M.; DAWSON,W.C.

    2002-05-06

    This paper will discuss the present electronics design for the beam current monitor system to be used throughout the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The beam is composed of a micro-pulse structure due to the 402.5MHz RF, and is chopped into mini-pulses of 645ns duration with a 300ns gap, providing a macro-pulse of 1060 mini-pulses repeating at a 60Hz rate. Ring beam current will vary from about 15ma peak during studies, to about 50Amps peak (design to 100 amps). A digital approach to droop compensation has been implemented and initial test results presented.

  10. BNL feasibility studies of spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Van Steenbergen, A.; Weng, W.T.

    1995-12-01

    This paper is the summary of conceptual design studies of a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS) conducted by an interdepartmental study group at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The study was made of two periods. First, a scenario based on the use of a 600 MeV Linac followed by two fast-cycling 3.6 GeV Synchrotrons was investigated. Then, in a subsequent period, the attention of the study was directed toward an Accumulator scenario with two options: (1) a 1.25 GeV normal conducting Linac followed by two Accumulator Rings, and (2) a 2.4 GeV superconducting Linac followed by a single Accumulator Ring. The study did not make any reference to a specific site.

  11. Laser-Induced Spallation of Microsphere Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Morgan; Stossel, Melicent; Khanolkar, Amey; Wang, Junlan; Boechler, Nicholas

    2016-08-01

    The detachment of a semiordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres adhered to an aluminum-coated glass substrate is studied using a laser-induced spallation technique. The microsphere-substrate adhesion force is estimated from substrate surface displacement measurements obtained using optical interferometry, and a rigid-body model that accounts for the inertia of the microspheres. The estimated adhesion force is compared with estimates obtained using an adhesive contact model together with interferometric measurements of the out-of-plane microsphere contact resonance, and with estimated work of adhesion values for the polystyrene-aluminum interface. Scanning electron microscope images of detached monolayer regions reveal a unique morphology, namely, partially detached monolayer flakes composed of single hexagonal close packed crystalline domains. This work contributes to the fields of microsphere adhesion and contact dynamics, and demonstrates a unique monolayer delamination morphology. PMID:27409715

  12. Bidirectional pumped high power Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Q; Yan, P; Li, D; Sun, J; Wang, X; Huang, Y; Gong, M

    2016-03-21

    This paper presents a 3.89 kW 1123 nm Raman all-fiber laser with an overall optical-to-optical efficiency of 70.9%. The system consists of a single-wavelength (1070nm) seed and one-stage bidirectional 976 nm non-wavelength-stabilized laser diodes (LDs) pumped Yb-doped fiber amplifier. The unique part of this system is the application of non-wavelength-stabilized LDs in high power bidirectional pumping configuration fiber amplifier via refractive index valley fiber combiners. This approach not only increases the pump power, but also shortens the length of fiber by avoiding the usage of multi-stage amplifier. Through both theoretical research and experiment, the bidirectional pumping configuration presented in this paper proves to be able to convert 976 nm pump laser to 1070 nm laser via Yb3+ transfer, which is then converted into 1123 nm Raman laser via the first-order Raman effect without the appearance of any higher-order Raman laser. PMID:27136862

  13. Improved Collectors for High Power Gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Singh, Amarjit; Read, Michael; Borchard, Phillipp; Neilson, Jeff

    2009-05-20

    High power gyrotrons are used for electron cyclotron heating, current drive and parasitic mode suppression in tokamaks for fusion energy research. These devices are crucial for successful operation of many research programs around the world, including the ITER program currently being constructed in France. Recent gyrotron failures resulted from cyclic fatigue of the copper material used to fabricated the collectors. The techniques used to collect the spent beam power is common in many gyrotrons produced around the world. There is serious concern that these tubes may also be at risk from cyclic fatigue. This program addresses the cause of the collector failure. The Phase I program successfully demonstrated feasibility of a mode of operation that eliminates the cyclic operation that caused the failure. It also demonstrated that new material can provide increased lifetime under cyclic operation that could increase the lifetime by more than on order of magnitude. The Phase II program will complete that research and develop a collector that eliminates the fatigue failures. Such a design would find application around the world.

  14. High Power Flex-Propellant Arcjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2011-01-01

    implied nearly frozen flow in the nozzle and yielded performance ranges of 800-1100 sec for hydrogen and 400-600 sec for ammonia. Inferred thrust-to-power ratios were in the range of 30-10 lbf/MWe for hydrogen and 60-20 lbf/MWe for ammonia. Successful completion of this test series represents a fundamental milestone in the progression of high power arcjet technology, and it is hoped that the results may serve as a reliable touchstone for the future development of MW-class regeneratively-cooled flex-propellant plasma rockets.

  15. Multiphoton imaging with high peak power VECSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhanov, Shamil; Quarterman, Adrian H.; Swift, Samuel; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Smyth, Conor J. C.; Wilcox, Keith G.

    2016-03-01

    Multiphoton imaging (MMPI) has become one of thee key non-invasive light microscopy techniques. This technique allows deep tissue imaging with high resolution and less photo-damage than conventional confocal microscopy. MPI is type of laser-scanning microscopy that employs localized nonlinear excitation, so that fluorescence is excited only with is scanned focal volume. For many years, Ti: sapphire femtosecond lasers have been the leading light sources for MPI applications. However, recent developments in laser sources and new types of fluorophores indicate that longer wavelength excitation could be a good alternative for these applications. Mode-locked VECSEELs have the potential to be low cost, compact light sources for MPI systems, with the additional advantage of broad wavelength coverage through use of different semiconductor material systems. Here, we use a femtosecond fibber laser to investigate the effect average power and repetition rate has on MPI image quality, to allow us to optimize our mode-locked VVECSELs for MPI.

  16. Highly symmetric POVMs and their informational power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słomczyński, Wojciech; Szymusiak, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the dependence of the Shannon entropy of normalized finite rank-1 POVMs on the choice of the input state, looking for the states that minimize this quantity. To distinguish the class of measurements where the problem can be solved analytically, we introduce the notion of highly symmetric POVMs and classify them in dimension 2 (for qubits). In this case, we prove that the entropy is minimal, and hence, the relative entropy (informational power) is maximal, if and only if the input state is orthogonal to one of the states constituting a POVM. The method used in the proof, employing the Michel theory of critical points for group action, the Hermite interpolation, and the structure of invariant polynomials for unitary-antiunitary groups, can also be applied in higher dimensions and for other entropy-like functions. The links between entropy minimization and entropic uncertainty relations, the Wehrl entropy, and the quantum dynamical entropy are described.

  17. High power solid state laser modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Ball, Don G.; Cook, Edward G.

    2004-04-27

    A multi-stage magnetic modulator provides a pulse train of .+-.40 kV electrical pulses at a 5-7 kHz repetition rate to a metal vapor laser. A fractional turn transformer steps up the voltage by a factor of 80 to 1 and magnetic pulse compression is used to reduce the pulse width of the pulse train. The transformer is fabricated utilizing a rod and plate stack type of construction to achieve a high packing factor. The pulses are controlled by an SCR stack where a plurality of SCRs are electrically connected in parallel, each SCR electrically connected to a saturable inductor, all saturable inductors being wound on the same core of magnetic material for enhanced power handling characteristics.

  18. PREFACE: Neutrino physics at spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avignone, F. T.; Chatterjee, L.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Strayer, M.

    2003-11-01

    Unique because of their super-light masses and tiny interaction cross sections, neutrinos combine fundamental physics on the scale of the miniscule with macroscopic physics on the scale of the cosmos. Starting from the ignition of the primal p-p chain of stellar and solar fusion reactions that signal star-birth, these elementary leptons (neutrinos) are also critical players in the life-cycles and explosive deaths of massive stars and the production and disbursement of heavy elements. Stepping beyond their importance in solar, stellar and supernova astrophysics, neutrino interactions and properties influence the evolution, dynamics and symmetries of the cosmos as a whole. Further, they serve as valuable probes of its material content at various levels of structure from atoms and nuclei to valence and sea quarks. In the light of the multitude of physics phenomena that neutrinos influence, it is imperative to enhance our understanding of neutrino interactions and properties to the maximum. This is accentuated by the recent evidence of finite neutrino mass and flavour mixing between generations that reverberates on the plethora of physics that neutrinos influence. Laboratory experiments using intense neutrino fluxes would allow precision measurements and determination of important neutrino reaction rates. These can then complement atmospheric, solar and reactor experiments that have enriched so valuably our understanding of the neutrino and its repertoire of physics applications. In particular, intermediate energy neutrino experiments can provide critical information on stellar and solar astrophysical processes, along with advancing our knowledge of nuclear structure, sub-nuclear physics and fundamental symmetries. So where should we look for such intense neutrino sources? Spallation neutron facilities by their design are sources of intense neutrino pulses that are produced as a by-product of neutron spallation. These neutrino sources could serve as unique laboratories

  19. Design Considerations for High Temperature Power Inductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2005-01-01

    A uniform B-field approximation model is used to develop design formulas for single-layer wound, toroidal core, ac power inductors that must handle a specified current. Such a geometry is well suited for high temperature, high frequency inductors, where removal of heat from the core becomes critical. Explicit expressions are derived for core radii, core and winding volumes, winding turns and core permeability as functions of a dimensional scaling ratio (S). A limit on the maximum allowed core B-field leads to the result that the minimum core volume is proportional to the permeability, which has a lower bound. Plots versus S are provided for a specific case, to show that good designs can be picked in the overlap regions around the minima in mass and overall size, where the mass and size are relatively flat. Data to 250 C are presented for an MPP core based inductor to show that a quasi-linear, high temperature inductor can be constructed with available materials. A similar development is applied to a toroidal air-core geometry, showing that for the same ratings, such an inductor is considerably bigger and more massive, at least in the single-layer version.

  20. SPACS: A semi-empirical parameterization for isotopic spallation cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Kelić-Heil, A.

    2014-12-01

    A new semi-empirical parameterization for residue cross sections in spallation reactions is presented. The prescription named SPACS, for spallation cross sections, permits calculating the fragment production in proton- and neutron-induced collisions with light up to heavy non-fissile partners from the Fermi regime to ultra-relativistic energies. The model is fully analytical, based on a new parameterization of the mass yields, accounting for the dependence on bombarding energy. The formalism for the isobaric distribution consists of a commonly used functional form, borrowed from the empirical parameterization of fragmentation cross sections EPAX, with the observed suited adjustments for spallation, and extended to the charge-pickup channel. Structural and even-odd staggering related to the last stage of the primary-residue deexcitation process is additionally explicitly introduced with a new prescription. Calculations are benchmarked with recent data collected at GSI, Darmstadt as well as with previous measurements employing various techniques. The dependences observed experimentally on collision energy, reaction-partner mass, and proton-neutron asymmetry are well described. A fast analytical parameterization, such as SPACS, can be relevant to be implemented in complex simulations as used for practical issues at nuclear facilities and plants. Its predictive power also makes it useful for cross-section estimates in astrophysics and biophysics.

  1. Calculations of helium production in materials irradiated at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Corzine, R.K.; Dudziak, D.J.; Wechsler, M.S.; Barnett, M.H.; Mansur, L.K.

    1998-09-01

    Experience with materials irradiated in fission reactor neutron environments has shown that radiation-produced helium can exacerbate the degradation of properties caused by radiation-produced defects and defect clusters. Whereas fission-reactor neutron energies extend up to {approximately}10 MeV, the neutrons and protons at spallation neutron sources reach up to 1,000 to 2,000 MeV, and He production is much greater. For example, calculations have shown for the innermost shell of the containment vessel of the spallation neutron source, under collaborative design by several national laboratories led by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, that full-power displacement and He production rates are {approximately}20 displacements per atom (dpa)/yr and 1,000 atomic parts per million (appm) He/yr, which corresponds to 50 appm He/dpa. By contrast, materials in fission reactor cores usually experience <1 appm He/dpa. In this paper, the authors summarize methods and results for the calculation of He production cross sections appropriate to the neutron and proton energies to which target and containment materials are exposed at spallation neutron sources. The principal calculational tool is LAHET or, more broadly, the LAHET code system (LCS).

  2. Titanium spallation cross sections between 30 and 584 MeV and Ar-39 activities on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrunn, F.; Fireman, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    The production cross sections of Ar-39 for Ti spallation at 45-, 319-, 433-, and 584-MeV proton energies were measured to be 0.37 + or - 09, 12.4 + or - 3.7, 9.1 + or - 2.7, and 17.8 + or - 6.2 mb, respectively. Normalized Ar-39 production rates and activities are also derived for protons above 40 Mev and for three differential proton spectra. It is concluded that even for samples of high-Ti content, Ti spallation by solar protons below 200-MeV energy does not contribute significantly to their Ar-39 radioactivity.

  3. High Power High Efficiency Ka-Band Power Combiners for Solid-State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2006-01-01

    Wide-band power combining units for Ka-band are simulated for use as MMIC amplifier applications. Short-slot couplers as well as magic-tees are the basic elements for the combiners. Wide bandwidth (5 GHz) and low insertion (approx.0.2 dB) and high combining efficiencies (approx.90 percent) are obtained.

  4. High average power switching in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, W.W.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1992-06-01

    Diamond has many properties which make it ideal for a high power solid-state switch. The crystal structure of diamond is relatively well characterized. It is a semiconductor with a band-gap of 5.5 eV at 300{degree}K. The high band-gap of diamond results in a small dark current compared to Si or GaAs. As a result the breakdown field or holding voltage is very high, 1--10 MV/cm. The electron and hole mobility are approximately 2000 cm{sup 2}/v-sec. At room temperature, diamond has the highest thermal conductivity of any solid, 20 W/{degree}K -cm, about five times that of copper. This is ideal for switching because heat dissipation and thermal runaway problems are greatly mitigated. Our switch concept uses a low current (high power on-off switch. Steady advancements in CVD polycrystalline and single crystal diamond help make this possible.

  5. High average power switching in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, W.W. ); Schoenbach, K.H. )

    1992-06-01

    Diamond has many properties which make it ideal for a high power solid-state switch. The crystal structure of diamond is relatively well characterized. It is a semiconductor with a band-gap of 5.5 eV at 300[degree]K. The high band-gap of diamond results in a small dark current compared to Si or GaAs. As a result the breakdown field or holding voltage is very high, 1--10 MV/cm. The electron and hole mobility are approximately 2000 cm[sup 2]/v-sec. At room temperature, diamond has the highest thermal conductivity of any solid, 20 W/[degree]K -cm, about five times that of copper. This is ideal for switching because heat dissipation and thermal runaway problems are greatly mitigated. Our switch concept uses a low current (high power on-off switch. Steady advancements in CVD polycrystalline and single crystal diamond help make this possible.

  6. Electric Power Demand and Emerging Technology in Highly-sophisticated Electric Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Hikita, Masayuki

    In the last few years, the increase of the electric power demand has been remarkable, especially in Asia district. In such trend, the electric power system of Japan has been supplied with high quality, high reliability and highly-stabilized electric power. This is supported by highly-sophisticated electric power system which prides oneself on high voltage and large capacity. In this paper, outlines of these technologies are described. And, newest technology trends such as electric power liberalization, innovation of dispersed power source, effective utilization of natural energy are also explained. In addition, the global standards are important to make the technological level of Japan to be the world one in future.

  7. Switching transients in high-frequency high-power converters using power MOSFET's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloane, T. H.; Owen, H. A., Jr.; Wilson, T. G.

    1979-01-01

    The use of MOSFETs in a high-frequency high-power dc-to-dc converter is investigated. Consideration is given to the phenomena associated with the paralleling of MOSFETs and to the effect of stray circuit inductances on the converter circuit performance. Analytical relationships between various time constants during the turning-on and turning-off intervals are derived which provide estimates of plateau and peak levels during these intervals.

  8. State of the art in high power lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenebault, P.; Planchat, J. P.

    The features of liquid cathode systems used in high-power lithium batteries are reviewed. Practical examples representing the state of the art in the field of high-power lithium batteries are presented, illustrating the advantages and limitations of high-power lithium batteries. Other potentially substitute systems are examined. It is concluded that the high-rate lithium/sulfur oxychloride couples remain the most interesting systems in terms of energy density and specific power, especially in the reserve configuration.

  9. Method and apparatus for improved high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2013-11-05

    A high power impulse magnetron sputtering apparatus and method using a vacuum chamber with a magnetron target and a substrate positioned in the vacuum chamber. A field coil being positioned between the magnetron target and substrate, and a pulsed power supply and/or a coil bias power supply connected to the field coil. The pulsed power supply connected to the field coil, and the pulsed power supply outputting power pulse widths of greater that 100 .mu.s.

  10. Proceedings of the international workshop on spallation materials technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Ullmaier, H.

    1996-10-01

    This document contains papers which were presented at the International Workshop on Spallation Materials Technology. Topics included: overviews and thermal response; operational experience; materials experience; target station and component design; particle transport and damage calculations; neutron sources; and compatibility.

  11. Compact high-power microwave divider and combiner.

    PubMed

    Guo, L T; Chang, C; Huang, W H; Liu, Y S; Cao, Y B; Liu, C L; Sun, J

    2016-02-01

    A novel, compact, TM01-TE10 mode power divider and a novel, compact, four-way TE10-TM01 mode power combiner were theoretically designed and experimentally tested as a proof of principle. The theoretical and experimental S parameters are consistent with each other. High-power experiments show that their power capacities are no less than 1.5 GW and 3 GW, respectively. The devices have the merits of high power capacities and low insertion losses. PMID:26931874

  12. Reliability of high-power QCW arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeler, Ryan; Junghans, Jeremy; Remley, Jennifer; Schnurbusch, Don; Stephens, Ed

    2010-02-01

    Northrop Grumman Cutting Edge Optronics has developed a family of arrays for high-power QCW operation. These arrays are built using CTE-matched heat sinks and hard solder in order to maximize the reliability of the devices. A summary of a recent life test is presented in order to quantify the reliability of QCW arrays and associated laser gain modules. A statistical analysis of the raw lifetime data is presented in order to quantify the data in such a way that is useful for laser system designers. The life tests demonstrate the high level of reliability of these arrays in a number of operating regimes. For single-bar arrays, a MTTF of 19.8 billion shots is predicted. For four-bar samples, a MTTF of 14.6 billion shots is predicted. In addition, data representing a large pump source is analyzed and shown to have an expected lifetime of 13.5 billion shots. This corresponds to an expected operational lifetime of greater than ten thousand hours at repetition rates less than 370 Hz.

  13. High power linear pulsed beam annealer

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, Michael D.; Sadana, Devendra K.; True, Richard B.

    1983-01-01

    A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.

  14. On reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) technique that is particularly promising for reactive sputtering applications. However, there are few issues that have to be resolved before the full potential of this technique can be realized. Here we give an overview of the key experimental findings for the reactive HiPIMS discharge. An increase in the discharge current is commonly observed with increased partial pressure of the reactive gas or decreased repetition pulse frequency. There are somewhat conflicting claims regarding the hysteresis effect in the reactive HiPIMS discharge as some report reduction or elimination of the hysteresis effect while others claim a feedback control is essential. The ion energy distribution of the metal ion and the atomic ion of the reactive gas are similar and extend to very high energies while the ion energy distribution of the working gas and the molecular ion of the reactive gas are similar and are much less energetic.

  15. Development of a 33 kV, 20 A long pulse converter modulator for high average power klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reghu, T.; Mandloi, V.; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2014-05-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power, long pulse modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are underway at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of long pulse modulator capable of delivering 33 kV, 20 A at 5 Hz repetition rate has been designed and developed. Three Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT) based switching modules driving high frequency, high voltage transformers have been used to generate high voltage output. The IGBT based switching modules are shifted in phase by 120° with respect to each other. The switching frequency is 25 kHz. Pulses of 1.6 ms pulse width, 80 μs rise time, and 70 μs fall time have been achieved at the modulator output. A droop of ±0.6% is achieved using a simple segmented digital droop correction technique. The total fault energy transferred to the load during fault has been measured by conducting wire burn tests and is found to be within 3.5 J.

  16. Development of a 33 kV, 20 A long pulse converter modulator for high average power klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Reghu, T.; Mandloi, V.; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2014-05-15

    Research, design, and development of high average power, long pulse modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are underway at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of long pulse modulator capable of delivering 33 kV, 20 A at 5 Hz repetition rate has been designed and developed. Three Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT) based switching modules driving high frequency, high voltage transformers have been used to generate high voltage output. The IGBT based switching modules are shifted in phase by 120° with respect to each other. The switching frequency is 25 kHz. Pulses of 1.6 ms pulse width, 80 μs rise time, and 70 μs fall time have been achieved at the modulator output. A droop of ±0.6% is achieved using a simple segmented digital droop correction technique. The total fault energy transferred to the load during fault has been measured by conducting wire burn tests and is found to be within 3.5 J.

  17. Development of a 33 kV, 20 A long pulse converter modulator for high average power klystron.

    PubMed

    Reghu, T; Mandloi, V; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2014-05-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power, long pulse modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are underway at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of long pulse modulator capable of delivering 33 kV, 20 A at 5 Hz repetition rate has been designed and developed. Three Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT) based switching modules driving high frequency, high voltage transformers have been used to generate high voltage output. The IGBT based switching modules are shifted in phase by 120° with respect to each other. The switching frequency is 25 kHz. Pulses of 1.6 ms pulse width, 80 μs rise time, and 70 μs fall time have been achieved at the modulator output. A droop of ±0.6% is achieved using a simple segmented digital droop correction technique. The total fault energy transferred to the load during fault has been measured by conducting wire burn tests and is found to be within 3.5 J. PMID:24880410

  18. Challenges and design solutions of the liquid hydrogen circuit at the European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gallimore, S.; Nilsson, P.; Sabbagh, P.; Takibayev, A.; Weisend II, J. G.; Beßler, Y.; Klaus, M.

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS), Lund, Sweden will be a 5MW long-pulse neutron spallation research facility and will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. Neutrons are produced by accelerating a high-energy proton beam into a rotating helium-cooled tungsten target. These neutrons pass through moderators to reduce their energy to an appropriate range (< 5 meV for cold neutrons); two of which will use liquid hydrogen at 17 K as the moderating and cooling medium. There are several technical challenges to overcome in the design of a robust system that will operate under such conditions, not least the 20 kW of deposited heat. These challenges and the associated design solutions will be detailed in this paper.

  19. Generation of negative pressures and spallation phenomena in diamond exposed to a picosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Abrosimov, S A; Bazhulin, A P; Bol'shakov, A P; Konov, V I; Krasyuk, I K; Pashinin, P P; Ral'chenko, V G; Semenov, A Yu; Sovyk, D N; Stuchebryukhov, I A; Khomich, A A; Fortov, V E; Khishchenko, K V

    2014-06-30

    The spallation phenomena in poly- and single-crystal synthetic diamonds have been experimentally investigated. A shockwave impact on a target was implemented using a 70-ps laser pulse in the Kamerton-T facility. The ablation pressure of 0.66 TPa on the front target surface was formed by pulsed radiation of a neodymium phosphate glass laser (second harmonic λ = 0.527 mm, pulse energy 2.5 J) with an intensity as high as 2 × 10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}. The maximum diamond spall strength σ* ≈ 16.5 GPa is found to be 24% of the theoretical ultimate strength. Raman scattering data indicate that a small amount of crystalline diamond in the spallation region on the rear side of the target is graphitised. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  20. Concept of electric propulsion realization for high power space tug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenkov, L. E.; Semenkin, A. V.; Solodukhin, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Popular at the beginning of the Space Age, ambitious projects aimed at Moon, Mars, and other space objects exploration, have returned with new technology and design level. High power space tug with electric propulsion system (EPS) is mainly considered as a transport vehicle for such missions. Modern high power space tugs projects as well as their spacecraft (SC) power and propulsion systems are reviewed in the paper. The main technologies and design solutions needed for high-power EPS realization are considered.

  1. Spallative production of Li, Be and B in superbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parizot, Etienne

    We investigate the spallative production of the light elements (Li, Be and B) associated with the evolution of a superbubble (SB) blown by repeated supernova explosions in an OB association. It is shown that if about ten percent of the SN energy can power the acceleration of particles from the material inside the SB, the observed abundances of LiBeB in halo stars, as a function of O, can be explained in a fully consistent way over several decades of metallicity. We investigate two different energy spectra for the EPs: the standard cosmic ray source spectrum and a specific `SB spectrum' as results from Bykov's SB acceleration mechanism. We find that the latter spectrum is more efficient in producing LiBeB, and that the SNR spectrum can be reconciled with the observational data if an imperfect mixing of the SN ejecta with the rest of the SB material and/or a selective acceleration is invoked (enhancing the C and O abundance amongst the EPs by a factor of ˜ 6). One consequence of the model is that the observed linear growth of Be and B abundances as a function of the metallicity expresses a dilution line rather than a continuous, monotonic increase throughout the Galaxy. We also find that the recent 6 Li observations in halo stars fit equally well in the framework of the SB model (see Parizot & Drury, 1999c, for more details).

  2. Spallation Neutron Source Accident Terms for Environmental Impact Statement Input

    SciTech Connect

    Devore, J.R.; Harrington, R.M.

    1998-08-01

    This report is about accidents with the potential to release radioactive materials into the environment surrounding the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). As shown in Chap. 2, the inventories of radioactivity at the SNS are dominated by the target facility. Source terms for a wide range of target facility accidents, from anticipated events to worst-case beyond-design-basis events, are provided in Chaps. 3 and 4. The most important criterion applied to these accident source terms is that they should not underestimate potential release. Therefore, conservative methodology was employed for the release estimates. Although the source terms are very conservative, excessive conservatism has been avoided by basing the releases on physical principles. Since it is envisioned that the SNS facility may eventually (after about 10 years) be expanded and modified to support a 4-MW proton beam operational capability, the source terms estimated in this report are applicable to a 4-MW operating proton beam power unless otherwise specified. This is bounding with regard to the 1-MW facility that will be built and operated initially. See further discussion below in Sect. 1.2.

  3. Anode arc motion in high power arcjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, W. J.; O'Hair, E. A.; Hatfield, L. L.; Kristiansen, M.; Mankins, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The long-term operational lifetime of most medium to high power arcjets is currently limited by the rapid deterioration of the arcjet electrodes. To a large extent, the rate of this deterioration is related to the motion of the arc discharge on the electrode surfaces. This paper details a series of experiments aimed at studying the temporal behavior of dc arcs on a water-cooled radially-segmented 30 kW class arcjet anode. The experimental anode used for these tests was made of copper, and was divided into four equivalent radial segments which were electrically isolated with aluminum oxide gaskets. The current carried by each segment was measured independently using four calibrated resistive shunts, and was analyzed by digital computer. The tests were limited to nitrogen propellant over a current range of 100-250 A dc. Results show that for the range of total currents considered here, the current distribution in the segmented arcjet anode is generally asymmetric, exhibiting random fluctuations over a wide range of frequencies.

  4. Radiation of long and high power arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Bauchire, J. M.; Hong, D.; Rabat, H.; Riquel, G.; Sanchez, F.; Gleizes, A.

    2015-10-01

    The operators working on electrical installations of low, medium and high voltages can be accidentally exposed to short-circuit arcs ranging from a few kA to several tens of kA. To protect them from radiation, according to the exposure limits, we need to characterize the radiation emitted by the powerful arc. Therefore, we have developed a general experimental and numerical study in order to estimate the spectral irradiance received at a given distance from the arc. The experimental part was based on a very long arc (up to 2 m) with high ac current (between 4 and 40 kA rms, duration 100 ms) using 3 kinds of metallic contacts (copper, steel and aluminium). We measured the irradiance received 10m from the axis of the arc, and integrated on 4 spectral intervals corresponding to the UV, visible, IRA  +  B and IRC. The theoretical part consisted of calculating the radiance of isothermal plasmas in mixtures of air and metal vapour, integrated over the same spectral intervals as defined in the experiments. The comparison between the theoretical and experimental results has allowed the defining of three isothermal radiation sources whose combination leads to a spectral irradiation equivalent to the experimental one. Then the calculation allowed the deduction of the spectral description of the irradiance over all the wavelength range, between 200 nm and 20 μm. The final results indicate that the influence of metal is important in the visible and UVA ranges whereas the IR radiation is due to the air plasma and surrounding hot gas and fumes.

  5. Complete low power controller for high voltage power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, R.; Blanar, G.

    1997-12-31

    The MHV100 is a custom CMOS integrated circuit, developed for the AMS experiment. It provides complete control for a single channel high voltage (HV) generator and integrates all the required digital communications, D to A and A to D converters, the analog feedback loop and output drivers. This chip has been designed for use in both distributed high voltage systems or for low cost single channel high voltage systems. The output voltage and current range is determined by the external components.

  6. Advanced Gunn diode as high power terahertz source for a millimetre wave high power multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, F.; Mitchell, C.; Farrington, N.; Missous, M.

    2009-09-01

    An advanced step-graded Gunn diode is reported, which has been developed through joint modelling-experimental work. The ~ 200 GHz fundamental frequency devices have been realized to test GaAs based Gunn oscillators at sub-millimetre wave for use as a high power (multi mW) Terahertz source in conjunction with a mm-wave multiplier, with novel Schottky diodes. The epitaxial growth of both the Gunn diode and Schottky diode wafers were performed using an industrial scale Molecular Beam Epitaxy (V100+) reactor. The Gunn diodes were then manufactured and packaged by e2v Technologies (UK) Plc. Physical models of the high power Gunn diode sources, presented here, are developed in SILVACO.

  7. High-power converters for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. N.; Cooper, Randy

    1991-01-01

    Phase 1 was a concept definition effort to extend space-type dc/dc converter technology to the megawatt level with a weight of less than 0.1 kg/kW (220 lb./MW). Two system designs were evaluated in Phase 1. Each design operates from a 5 kV stacked fuel cell source and provides a voltage step-up to 100 kV at 10 A for charging capacitors (100 pps at a duty cycle of 17 min on, 17 min off). Both designs use an MCT-based, full-bridge inverter, gaseous hydrogen cooling, and crowbar fault protection. The GE-CRD system uses an advanced high-voltage transformer/rectifier filter is series with a resonant tank circuit, driven by an inverter operating at 20 to 50 kHz. Output voltage is controlled through frequency and phase shift control. Fast transient response and stability is ensured via optimal control. Super-resonant operation employing MCTs provides the advantages of lossless snubbing, no turn-on switching loss, use of medium-speed diodes, and intrinsic current limiting under load-fault conditions. Estimated weight of the GE-CRD system is 88 kg (1.5 cu ft.). Efficiency of 94.4 percent and total system loss is 55.711 kW operating at 1 MW load power. The Maxwell system is based on a resonance transformer approach using a cascade of five LC resonant sections at 100 kHz. The 5 kV bus is converted to a square wave, stepped-up to a 100 kV sine wave by the LC sections, rectified, and filtered. Output voltage is controlled with a special series regulator circuit. Estimated weight of the Maxwell system is 83.8 kg (4.0 cu ft.). Efficiency is 87.2 percent and total system loss is 146.411 kW operating at 1 MW load power.

  8. Power Law Decay in High Intensity Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, Timothy; Puga, Alejandro; Nguyen, Baolong; Larue, John

    2015-11-01

    In the study reported herein, the region where the power decay law is applicable for active grid generated turbulence is found by an iterative approach which determines the largest range where the ratio of the dissipation from the power law and the dissipation from the temporal velocity derivative are unity. The square of the Taylor microscale, as noted by Batchelor (1953), is linearly related to downstream distance relative to the virtual origin and can be used in a straightforward manner to find the virtual origin. The fact that the decay of downstream velocity variance is described by a power law is shown to imply power law behavior for various other parameters such as the dissipation, the integral length scale, the Taylor microscale, the Kolmogorov microscale and the Taylor Reynolds number and that there is an algebraic relationship between the various power law exponents. Results are presented for various mean velocities to show the decay exponent as a function of the Taylor Reynolds number.

  9. Demystifying new generation silicon high power FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, S.

    1984-04-01

    In the early 70s, an American company developed a shadow-masked version of a power FET which delivered approximately 5 watts at 2 GHz. By 1975, there was considerable interest in the 'V' groove FET. VMOS was particularly suited for RF work. The ISOFET combines today the short channel and low capacitance of the first developments with some of the process techniques developed for the VMOS structure. Similarities and differences between current ISOFET and bipolar power transistors are examined. It is pointed out that, with good power and gain up through 500 MHz, the power FET can be an excellent choice for the RF designer, especially for wideband exciters. Attention is given to dc biasing, RF FET models, coaxial transformers for wideband matching, wideband circuit design, a 40 watt ISOFET amplifier, power FETs in a pulse amplifier, and developments and remaining challenges for the near future.

  10. High-dispersive mirrors for high power applications.

    PubMed

    Pervak, V; Pronin, O; Razskazovskaya, O; Brons, J; Angelov, I B; Trubetskov, M K; Tikhonravov, A V; Krausz, F

    2012-02-13

    We report on the development and manufacturing of two different types of high-dispersive mirrors (HDM). One of them provides a record value for the group delay dispersion (GDD) of -4000 fs2 and covers the wavelength range of 1027-1033 nm, whereas the other one provides -3000 fs2 over the wavelength range of 1020-1040 nm. Both of the fabricated mirrors exhibit a reflectance of >99.9% and are well suited for intracavity applications. Mirrors of the second type have been successfully employed in a Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:YAG thin-disk oscillator for the generation of 200-fs pulses with multi-10-W average power. PMID:22418209

  11. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs) offer important and unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing. And they are well suited to serve together synergistically. TEC and MFHPs operate through working-fluid vaporization, condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures. TEC and MFHPs have apparently simple, isolated performance mechanisms that are somewhat similar. And they also have obviously difficult, complected material problems that again are somewhat similar. Intensive investigation reveals that aspects of their operating cycles and material problems tend to merge: high-temperature material effects determine the level and lifetime of performance. Simplified equations verify the preceding statement for TEC and MFHPs. Material properties and interactions exert primary influences on operational effectiveness. And thermophysicochemical stabilities dictate operating temperatures which regulate the thermoemissive currents of TEC and the vaporization flow rates of MFHPs. Major high-temperature material problems of TEC and MFHPs have been solved. These solutions lead to productive, cost-effective applications of current TEC and MFHPs - and point to significant improvements with anticipated technological gains.

  12. Laboratory Astrophysics on High Power Lasers and Pulsed Power Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2002-02-05

    Over the past decade a new genre of laboratory astrophysics has emerged, made possible by the new high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as large lasers, z-pinch generators, and high current particle accelerators. (Remington, 1999; 2000; Drake, 1998; Takabe, 2001) On these facilities, macroscopic collections of matter can be created in astrophysically relevant conditions, and its collective properties measured. Examples of processes and issues that can be experimentally addressed include compressible hydrodynamic mixing, strong shock phenomena, radiative shocks, radiation flow, high Mach-number jets, complex opacities, photoionized plasmas, equations of state of highly compressed matter, and relativistic plasmas. These processes are relevant to a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as supernovae and supernova remnants, astrophysical jets, radiatively driven molecular clouds, accreting black holes, planetary interiors, and gamma-ray bursts. These phenomena will be discussed in the context of laboratory astrophysics experiments possible on existing and future HED facilities.

  13. High-power microwaves for defense and accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Manheimer, W. )

    1992-03-11

    This paper discusses high-power microwaves for application to the Defense Department and to the powering of large accelerators. The microwave sources discussed are the SLAC klystron, the relativistic klystron, the magnetron and the vircator.

  14. High power density molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, I.; Johnson, S.A.; Geyer, H.K.; Roche, M.F.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1995-07-01

    Our results to date indicate that the specific power of the MCFC can be increased from 1200 W/m{sup 2} to above 2000W/m{sup 2} through the use of advanced components such as the double doped LiFeO{sub 2} cathode and pressurized operation. Its volumetric power density can also be increased by an additional 60% by multiple manifolding. Therefore, MCFCs with two to three times the power density of the current generation of MCFCs are possible.

  15. NON-DESTRUCTIVE THERMAL BARRIER COATING SPALLATION PREDICTION BY A LOADBASED MICRO-INDENTATION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Tannenbaum; K. Lee; B. S.-J. Kang; M.A. Alvin

    2010-11-18

    Currently, the durability and life cycle of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) applied to gas turbine blades and combustor components are limiting the maximum temperature and subsequent efficiency at which gas turbine engines operate. The development of new materials, coating technologies and evaluation techniques is required if enhanced efficiency is to be achieved. Of the current ceramic coating materials used in gas turbine engines, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is most prevalent, its low thermal conductivity, high thermal expansion coefficient and outstanding mechanical strength make it ideal for use in TBC systems. However, residual stresses caused by coefficients of thermal expansion mismatches within the TBC system and unstable thermally grown oxides are considered the primary causes for its premature and erratic spallation failure. Through finite element simulations, it is shown that the residual stresses generated within the thermally grown oxide (TGO), bond coat (BC), YSZ and their interfaces create slight variations in indentation unloading surface stiffness response prior to spallation failure. In this research, seven air plasma sprayed and one electron beam physical vapor deposition yttria partially stabilized zirconia TBCs were subjected to isothermal and cyclic loadings at 1100°C. The associated coating degradation was evaluated using a non-destructive multiple partial unloading micro-indentation procedure. The results show that the proposed non-destructive micro-indentation evaluation technique can be an effective and specimenindependent TBC failure prediction tool capable of determining the location of initial spallation failure prior to its actual occurrence.

  16. Cryogenics at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisend, J. G., II; Arnold, P.; Hees, J. Fydrych. W.; Jurns, J. M.; Wang, X. L.

    Cryogenics plays an important role at the European Spallation Source, a world class neutron science center, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. Three principal applications of cryogenics are found at ESS. The SRF cryomodules of the ESS proton linac require cooling at 2 K, 4.5 K and 40 K; the hydrogenmoderator surrounding the target that produces neutrons, requires cooling via 16.5 K helium and LHe is required for many of the scientific instruments. These needs will be met by a set of three cryogenic refrigeration/liquefaction plants and an extensive cryogenic distribution system. Significant progress has been made on the ESS cryogenic system in preparation for the expected first beam on target in 2019. This work includes: funding of industry studies for the accelerator cryoplant, preliminary design of the cryogenic distribution system, investigation of possible in kind contributors and release of the invitation to tender for the accelerator cryoplant.This paper describes the requirements, design solutions and current status of the ESS cryogenic system. The planned recovery of waste heat from the cryogenic plants, a unique aspect of ESS, is described. The procurement of the cryogenic system, expected to be done via a combination of purchase via competitive bids and in kind contributions is also discussed.

  17. H{sup -} radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-15

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  18. A High Power Frequency Doubled Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Rob; Tu, Meirong; Aveline, Dave; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the power frequencies for the doubled fiber laser. It includes information on the 780 nm laser, second harmonic generation in one crystal, cascading crystals, the tenability of laser systems, laser cooling, and directions for future work.

  19. Test Results From a High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Hervol, David S.; Gardner, Brent G.

    2010-01-01

    Stirling cycle power conversion is an enabling technology that provides high thermodynamic efficiency but also presents unique challenges with regard to electrical power generation, management, and distribution. The High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig (HPLATR) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio is a demonstration test bed that simulates electrical power generation from a Stirling engine driven alternator. It implements the high power electronics necessary to provide a well regulated DC user load bus. These power electronics use a novel design solution that includes active rectification and power factor control, active ripple suppression, along with a unique building block approach that permits the use of high voltage or high current alternator designs. This report describes the HPLATR, the test program, and the operational results.

  20. Test Results from a High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Hervol, David S.; Gardner, Brent G.

    2010-01-01

    Stirling cycle power conversion is an enabling technology that provides high thermodynamic efficiency but also presents unique challenges with regard to electrical power generation, management, and distribution. The High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig (HPLATR) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH is a demonstration test bed that simulates electrical power generation from a Stirling engine driven alternator. It implements the high power electronics necessary to provide a well regulated DC user load bus. These power electronics use a novel design solution that includes active rectification and power factor control, active ripple suppression, along with a unique building block approach that permits the use of high voltage or high current alternator designs. This presentation describes the HPLATR, the test program, and the operational results.

  1. High-voltage, high-power, solid-state remote power controllers for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Two general types of remote power controller (RPC) that combine the functions of a circuit breaker and a switch were developed for use in direct-current (dc) aerospace systems. Power-switching devices used in these designs are the relatively new gate-turnoff thyristor (GTO) and poweer metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). The various RPC's can switch dc voltages to 1200 V and currents to 100 A. Seven different units were constructed and subjected to comprehensive laboratory and thermal vacuum testing. Two of these were dual units that switch both positive and negative voltages simultaneously. The RPC's using MOSFET's have slow turnon and turnoff times to limit voltage spiking from high di/dt. The GTO's have much faster transition times. All RPC's have programmable overload tripout and microsecond tripout for large overloads. The basic circuits developed can be used to build switchgear limited only by the ratings of the switching device used.

  2. Stabilized operation of the improvement of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Crofford, Mark T; Galambos, John D; Gibson, Paul E; Hardek, Thomas W; Henderson, Stuart D; Kang, Yoon W; Kasemir, Kay; Peters, Charles C; Thompson, David H; Stockli, Martin P; Williams, Derrick C

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) had resonance control instabilities at duty factors higher than approximately four percent. Systematic investigations have been carried out to understand the cause of the instability and to ensure the operational stability of the RFQ. The most critical source of the instability is revealed to be an interaction between hydrogen released by beam bombardments and the RFQ RF field resulting in a discharge, which consumes additional RF power and could cause the RFQ to operate in an unstable region. This paper reports improvement of the SNS RFQ operational stability based on the findings during the SNS operation.

  3. POWOW: A Modular, High Power Spacecraft Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A robust space infrastructure encompasses a broad range of mission needs along with an imperative to reduce costs of satellites meeting those needs. A critical commodity for science, commercial and civil satellites is power at an affordable cost. The POWOW (POwer WithOut Wires) spacecraft concept was created to provide, at one end of the scale, multi-megawatts of power yet also be composed of modules that can meet spacecraft needs in the kilowatt range. With support from the NASA-sponsored Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology Program, the POWOW spacecraft concept was designed to meet Mars mission needs - while at the same time having elements applicable to a range of other missions. At Mars, the vehicle would reside in an aerosynchronous orbit and beam power to a variety of locations on the surface. It is the purpose of this paper to present the latest concept design results. The Space Power Institute along with four companies: Able Engineering, Inc., Entech, Inc., Primex Aerospace Co., and TECSTAR have produced a modular, power-rich electrically propelled spacecraft design that meets these requirements. In addition, it also meets a range of civil and commercial needs. The spacecraft design is based on multijunction Ill-V solar cells, the new Stretched Lens Aurora (SLA) module, a lightweight array design based on a multiplicity of 8 kW end-of-life subarrays and electric thrusters. The solar cells have excellent radiation resistance and efficiencies above 30%. The SLA has a concentration ratio up to 15x while maintaining an operating temperature of 80 C. The design of the 8 kW array building block will be presented and its applicability to commercial and government missions will be discussed. Electric propulsion options include Hall, MPD and ion thrusters of various power levels and trade studies have been conducted to define the most advantageous options. The present baseline spacecraft design providing 900 kW using technologies expected to be

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF HIGH POWER RF VECTOR MODULATORS*

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Wilson, Joshua L; Champion, Mark; Hardek, Thomas W; Kim, Sang-Ho; McCarthy, Mike; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V

    2007-01-01

    A fan-out RF power distribution system can allow many accelerating cavities to be powered by a single high-power klystron amplifier. High-power vector modulators can perform independent control of amplitudes and phases of RF voltages at the cavities without changing the klystron signal. A prototype highpower RF vector modulator employing a quadrature hybrid and two ferrite phase shifters in coaxial TEM transmission lines has been built and tested for 402.5 MHz. RF properties of the design and results of high power testing are presented.

  5. Switchable nonlinear metasurfaces for absorbing high power surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanghoon; Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Rushton, Jeremiah J.; Sievenpiper, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a concept of a nonlinear metamaterial that provides power dependent absorption of incident surface waves. The metasurface includes nonlinear circuits which transform it from a low loss to high loss state when illuminated with high power waves. The proposed surface allows low power signals to propagate but strongly absorbs high power signals. It can potentially be used on enclosures for electric devices to protest against damage. We experimentally verify that the nonlinear metasurface has two distinct states controlled by the incoming signal power. We also demonstrate that it inhibits the propagation of large signals and dramatically decreases the field that is leaked through an opening in a conductive enclosure.

  6. High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier: From the Lab to Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Bell, Joseph L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the beginnings of space travel, various microwave power amplifier designs have been employed. These included Class-A, -B, and -C bias arrangements. However, shared limitation of these topologies is the inherent high total consumption of input power associated with the generation of radio frequency (RF)/microwave power. The power amplifier has always been the largest drain for the limited available power on the spacecraft. Typically, the conversion efficiency of a microwave power amplifier is 10 to 20%. For a typical microwave power amplifier of 20 watts, input DC power of at least 100 watts is required. Such a large demand for input power suggests that a better method of RF/microwave power generation is required. The price paid for using a linear amplifier where high linearity is unnecessary includes higher initial and operating costs, lower DC-to-RF conversion efficiency, high power consumption, higher power dissipation and the accompanying need for higher capacity heat removal means, and an amplifier that is more prone to parasitic oscillation. The first use of a higher efficiency mode of power generation was described by Baxandall in 1959. This higher efficiency mode, Class-D, is achieved through distinct switching techniques to reduce the power losses associated with switching, conduction, and gate drive losses of a given transistor.

  7. High power single-frequency Innoslab amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Ke-Zhen; Ning, Jian; Zhang, Bai-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Hai-Kun; Nie, Hong-Kun; Sun, Xiao-Li; He, Jing-Liang

    2016-07-10

    A laser diode array (LDA) end-pumped continuous-wave single-frequency Innoslab amplifier has been demonstrated. The Gaussian ray bundle method was used to model the light propagation in the Innoslab amplifier for the first time to the best of our knowledge. With discrete reflectors, the maximum output of 60 W with a linewidth of 44 MHz was achieved under the pump power of 245 W, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 24.5%. The beam quality factor M2 at the output power of 51 W in the horizontal and vertical direction was measured to be 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. The long-term power instability in 2 h was less than 0.25%. PMID:27409308

  8. High power W-band klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, George; Scheitrum, Glenn; Jongewaard, Erik; Vlieks, Arnold; Fowkes, Randy; Li, Jeff

    1999-05-01

    The development of W-band klystrons is discussed. Modeling of the klystron performance predicts 100 kW output power from a single klystron. The permanent magnet focusing and small size of the circuit permit combination of multiple klystrons in a module. A six-klystron module in a single vacuum envelope is expected to produce 500 kW peak power and up to 5 kW average power. The critical issues in the W-band klystron development are the electron beam transport and the fabrication of the klystron circuit. Two microfabrication techniques, EDM and LIGA, are being evaluated to produce the W-band circuit. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Tagging spallation backgrounds with showers in water Cherenkov detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shirley Weishi; Beacom, John F.

    2015-11-01

    Cosmic-ray muons and especially their secondaries break apart nuclei ("spallation") and produce fast neutrons and beta-decay isotopes, which are backgrounds for low-energy experiments. In Super-Kamiokande, these beta decays are the dominant background in 6-18 MeV, relevant for solar neutrinos and the diffuse supernova neutrino background. In a previous paper, we showed that these spallation isotopes are produced primarily in showers, instead of in isolation. This explains an empirical spatial correlation between a peak in the muon Cherenkov light profile and the spallation decay, which Super-Kamiokande used to develop a new spallation cut. However, the muon light profiles that Super-Kamiokande measured are grossly inconsistent with shower physics. We show how to resolve this discrepancy and how to reconstruct accurate profiles of muons and their showers from their Cherenkov light. We propose a new spallation cut based on these improved profiles and quantify its effects. Our results can significantly benefit low-energy studies in Super-Kamiokande, and will be especially important for detectors at shallower depths, like the proposed Hyper-Kamiokande.

  10. Utilization of Monte Carlo Calculations in Radiation Transport Analyses to Support the Design of the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    2000-10-23

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has given the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project approval to begin Title I design of the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and construction is scheduled to commence in FY01 . The SNS initially will consist of an accelerator system capable of delivering an {approximately}0.5 microsecond pulse of 1 GeV protons, at a 60 Hz frequency, with 1 MW of beam power, into a single target station. The SNS will eventually be upgraded to a 2 MW facility with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). The radiation transport analysis, which includes the neutronic, shielding, activation, and safety analyses, is critical to the design of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed SNS, and the Monte Carlo method is the cornerstone of the radiation transport analyses.

  11. Vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuo

    2015-02-01

    High power CO2 laser is widely used in various scientific, industrial and military applications. Vibration is a common phenomenon during laser working process, it will affect the working performance of high power CO2 laser, vibration must be strictly controlled in the condition where the laser pointing is required. This paper proposed a method to investigate the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser. An experiment device with vibration acceleration sensor was established to measure vibration signal of CO2 laser, the measured vibration signal was mathematically treated using space-frequency conversion, and then the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser can be obtained.

  12. Initial observations of cavitation-induced erosion of liquid metal spallation target vessels at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, D. A.; Riemer, B. W.; Ferguson, P. D.; Carroll, A. J.; Dayton, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    During operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory the mechanical properties of the AISI 316L target module are altered by high-energy neutron and proton radiation. The interior surfaces of the target vessel are also damaged by cavitation-induced erosion, which results from repetitive rapid heating of the liquid mercury by high-energy proton beam pulses. Until recently no observations of cavitation-induced erosion were possible for conditions fully prototypic to the SNS. Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the first and second operational SNS targets was performed to gain insight into the radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of the 316L target material and the extent of cavitation-induced erosion to the mercury vessel inner surfaces. Observations of cavitation-induced erosion of the first and second operational SNS target modules are presented here, including images of the target vessel interiors and specimens removed from the target beam-entrance regions.

  13. High Power PCU For Alphabus: PSR100V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubrier, L.; Trehet, E.

    2011-10-01

    Astrium, supported by ESA, has developed and qualified a new Power Conditioning Unit (PCU) in the frame of the Alphabus development for high power communications satellites. Thanks to its modular architecture, the PSR100V is able to supply 100 V power bus from 8kW to 20kW with optimized recurring costs.

  14. High power synchronous altitude satellite system

    SciTech Connect

    Keigler, J.E.

    1981-12-01

    The design and attitude control system of the illustrated momentum stabilized synchronous altitude spacecraft are such that relatively large amounts of electrical power may be derived from its sun oriented planar solar array. The system is illustrated and the control of the spacecraft to stabilize it about all three axes with respect to the sun is described.

  15. Radio Sounding Science at High Powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Reinisch, B. W.; Song, P.; Fung, S. F.; Benson, R. F.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L.; Markus, T.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Future space missions like the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) planned to orbit Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa can fully utilize a variable power radio sounder instrument. Radio sounding at 1 kHz to 10 MHz at medium power levels (10 W to kW) will provide long-range magnetospheric sounding (several Jovian radii) like those first pioneered by the radio plasma imager instrument on IMAGE at low power (less than l0 W) and much shorter distances (less than 5 R(sub E)). A radio sounder orbiting a Jovian icy moon would be able to globally measure time-variable electron densities in the moon ionosphere and the local magnetospheric environment. Near-spacecraft resonance and guided echoes respectively allow measurements of local field magnitude and local field line geometry, perturbed both by direct magnetospheric interactions and by induced components from subsurface oceans. JIMO would allow radio sounding transmissions at much higher powers (approx. 10 kW) making subsurface sounding of the Jovian icy moons possible at frequencies above the ionosphere peak plasma frequency. Subsurface variations in dielectric properties, can be probed for detection of dense and solid-liquid phase boundaries associated with oceans and related structures in overlying ice crusts.

  16. A highly linear power amplifier for WLAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Jin; Jia, Shi; Baoli, Ai; Xuguang, Zhang

    2016-02-01

    A three-stage power amplifier (PA) for WLAN application in 2.4-2.5 GHz is presented. The proposed PA employs an adaptive bias circuit to adjust the operating point of the PA to improve the linearity of the PA. Two methods to short the 2nd harmonic circuit are compared in the area of efficiency and gain of the PA. The PA is taped out in the process of 2 μm InGaP/GaAs HBT and is tested by the evaluation board. The measured results show that 31.5 dB power gain and 29.3 dBm P1dB with an associated 40.4% power added efficiency (PAE) under the single tone stimulus. Up to 26.5 dBm output power can be achieved with an error vector magnitude (EVM) of lower than 3% under the 64QAM/OFDM WLAN stimulus. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61201244) and the Natural Science Fund of SUES (No. E1-0501-14-0168).

  17. Review of high-power microwave source research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Steven H.; Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    1997-11-01

    This article reviews the state-of-the-art in high-power microwave source research. It begins with a discussion of the concepts involved in coherent microwave generation. The main varieties of microwave tubes are classified into three groups, according to the fundamental radiation mechanism involved: Cherenkov, transition, or bremsstrahlung radiation. This is followed by a brief discussion of some of the technical fundamentals of high-power microwave sources, including power supplies and electron guns. Finally, the history and recent developments of both high-peak power and high-average power sources are reviewed in the context of four main areas of application: (1) plasma resonance heating and current drive; (2) rf acceleration of charged particles; (3) radar and communications systems; and (4) high-peak power sources for weapons-effect simulation and exploratory development.

  18. High power gas laser - Applications and future developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.

    1977-01-01

    Fast flow can be used to create the population inversion required for lasing action, or can be used to improve laser operation, for example by the removal of waste heat. It is pointed out that at the present time all lasers which are capable of continuous high-average power employ flow as an indispensable aspect of operation. High power laser systems are discussed, taking into account the gasdynamic laser, the HF supersonic diffusion laser, and electric discharge lasers. Aerodynamics and high power lasers are considered, giving attention to flow effects in high-power gas lasers, aerodynamic windows and beam manipulation, and the Venus machine. Applications of high-power laser technology reported are related to laser material working, the employment of the laser in controlled fusion machines, laser isotope separation and photochemistry, and laser power transmission.

  19. Simulation of impact/explosive driven spallation in metals: comparative study of damage and dynamic strength models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2012-07-01

    Spallation refers to fracture occurring in materials due to tensile loading. This paper presents an overview of our extensive one- and two-dimensional simulations done to study spallation in impact/explosive loaded Copper or Mild Steel targets, using an Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode. Three methods of computing the spall strength and spall thickness have been employed. The computed spall parameters have been compared with Russian spall experiments. In impact loaded targets, due to a square shock wave, only one scab has been observed. In the case of explosive loading, as the rarefaction associated with the incoming shock wave is triangular, there occur many high-tension regions leading to the formation of multiple scabs (typically 2-3 scabs). Effect of flier velocity and target temperature on spallation has been studied. These trends match with experiments. Edge effects due to finite diameter of the target attenuate the incoming shock wave by lateral release, resulting in more marked damage near the axis than on the periphery. Four damage models and three dynamic strength models have been examined to determine the best-suited model for spallation studies. It is found that the Void Growth (VG) damage model and Zerilli-Armstrong strength model yield spall parameters close to experiments.

  20. Analysis of radiation environmental safety for China's Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing-Bin; Wu, Qing-Biao; Ma, Zhong-Jian; Zhang, Qing-Jiang; Li, Nan; Wu, Jing-Min; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Gang

    2010-07-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is going to be located in Dalang Town, Dongguan City in the Guangdong Province. In this paper we report the results of the parameters related with environment safety based on experiential calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. The main project of the accelerator is an under ground construction. On top there is a 0.5 m concrete and 5.0 m soil covering for shielding, which can reduce the dose out of the tunnel's top down to 0.2 μSv/h. For the residents on the boundary of the CSNS, the dose produced by skyshine, which is caused by the penetrated radiation leaking from the top of the accelerator, is no more than 0.68 μSv/a. When CSNS is operating normally, the maximal annual effective dose due to the emission of gas from the tunnel is 2.40×10-3 mSv/a to the public adult, and 2.29×10-3 mSv/a to a child, both values are two orders of magnitude less than the limiting value for control and management. CSNS may give rise to an activation of the soil and groundwater in the nearest tunnels, where the main productions are 3H, 7Be, 22Na, 54Mn, etc. But the specific activity is less than the exempt specific activity in the national standard GB13376-92. So it is safe to say that the environmental impact caused by the activation of soil and groundwater is insignificant. To sum up, for CSNS, as a powerful neutron source device, driven by a high-energy high-current proton accelerator, a lot of potential factors affecting the environment exist. However, as long as effective shieldings for protection are adopted and strict rules are drafted, the environmental impact can be kept under control within the limits of the national standard.

  1. Neutron diffractometers for structural biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Pitcher, E.

    1994-12-31

    Spallation neutron sources are ideal for diffraction studies of proteins and oriented molecular complexes. With spoliation neutrons and their time dependent wavelength structure, it is easy to electronically select data with an optimal wavelength bandwidth and cover the whole Laue spectrum as time (wavelength) resolved snapshots. This optimized data quality with best peak-to-background ratios and provides adequate spatial and energy resolution to eliminate peak overlaps. The application of this concept will use choppers to select the desired Laue wavelength spectrum and employ focusing optics and large cylindrical {sup 3}He detectors to optimize data collection rates. Such a diffractometer will cover a Laue wavelength range from 1 to 5{Angstrom} with a flight path length of 10m and an energy resolution of 0.25{Angstrom}. Moderator concepts for maximal flux distribution within this energy range will be discussed using calculated flux profiles. Since the energy resolution required for such timed data collection in this super Laue techniques is not very high, the use of a linac only (LAMPF) spoliation target is an exciting possibility with an order of magnitude increase in flux.

  2. High Performance Power Module for Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Peterson, Peter Y.; Bowers, Glen E.

    2002-01-01

    Previous efforts to develop power electronics for Hall thruster systems have targeted the 1 to 5 kW power range and an output voltage of approximately 300 V. New Hall thrusters are being developed for higher power, higher specific impulse, and multi-mode operation. These thrusters require up to 50 kW of power and a discharge voltage in excess of 600 V. Modular power supplies can process more power with higher efficiency at the expense of complexity. A 1 kW discharge power module was designed, built and integrated with a Hall thruster. The breadboard module has a power conversion efficiency in excess of 96 percent and weighs only 0.765 kg. This module will be used to develop a kW, multi-kW, and high voltage power processors.

  3. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, Daniel W.; Lange, Arnold C.

    1996-01-01

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage put under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules.

  4. E-beam high voltage switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Shimer, D.W.; Lange, A.C.

    1996-10-15

    A high-power power supply produces a controllable, constant high voltage output under varying and arcing loads. The power supply includes a voltage regulator, an inductor, an inverter for producing a high frequency square wave current of alternating polarity, an improved inverter voltage clamping circuit, a step up transformer, an output rectifier for producing a dc voltage at the output of each module, and a current sensor for sensing output current. The power supply also provides dynamic response to varying loads by controlling the voltage regulator duty cycle and circuitry is provided for sensing incipient arc currents at the output of the power supply to simultaneously decouple the power supply circuitry from the arcing load. The power supply includes a plurality of discrete switching type dc--dc converter modules. 5 figs.

  5. High Efficiency Thermoelectric Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed; Saber, Hamed; Caillat, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    The work performed and whose results presented in this report is a joint effort between the University of New Mexico s Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies (ISNPS) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. In addition to the development, design, and fabrication of skutterudites and skutterudites-based segmented unicouples this effort included conducting performance tests of these unicouples for hundreds of hours to verify theoretical predictions of the conversion efficiency. The performance predictions of these unicouples are obtained using 1-D and 3-D models developed for that purpose and for estimating the actual performance and side heat losses in the tests conducted at ISNPS. In addition to the performance tests, the development of the 1-D and 3-D models and the development of Advanced Radioisotope Power systems for Beginning-Of-Life (BOM) power of 108 We are carried out at ISNPS. The materials synthesis and fabrication of the unicouples are carried out at JPL. The research conducted at ISNPS is documented in chapters 2-5 and that conducted at JP, in documented in chapter 5. An important consideration in the design and optimization of segmented thermoelectric unicouples (STUs) is determining the relative lengths, cross-section areas, and the interfacial temperatures of the segments of the different materials in the n- and p-legs. These variables are determined using a genetic algorithm (GA) in conjunction with one-dimensional analytical model of STUs that is developed in chapter 2. Results indicated that when optimized for maximum conversion efficiency, the interfacial temperatures between various segments in a STU are close to those at the intersections of the Figure-Of-Merit (FOM), ZT, curves of the thermoelectric materials of the adjacent segments. When optimizing the STUs for maximum electrical power density, however, the interfacial temperatures are different from those at the intersections of the ZT curves, but

  6. High pressure and high flowrate induction pumps with permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucenieks, I. E.

    2003-12-01

    Theoretical evaluations and modelling experiments demonstrated a rather high efficiency of electromagnetic induction pumps (EMIP) basing on permanent magnets, in which an alternating travelling magnetic field, inducing electromagnetic dragging forces in liquid metal, is generated by a system of rotating permanent magnets with alternating polarity. Basing on the gained experience at producing real pumps for pure Pb and eutectic alloy Pb-Bi, the evaluation of parameters of much more powerful pumps for mercury developing a head pressure over 5 bars and so providing flow rates over 10 L/s, had been carried out to show their reliability. These powerful pumps are supposed to be used in the proposed European Spallation neutron Source (ESS), in which mercury will be operated as a spallation target material and a cooling fluid at the same time. Tables 2, Figs 5, Refs 8.

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of spallation targets containing uranium and americium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkin, Yury; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2014-09-01

    Neutron production and transport in spallation targets made of uranium and americium are studied with a Geant4-based code MCADS (Monte Carlo model for Accelerator Driven Systems). A good agreement of MCADS results with experimental data on neutron- and proton-induced reactions on 241Am and 243Am nuclei allows to use this model for simulations with extended Am targets. It was demonstrated that MCADS model can be used for calculating the values of critical mass for 233,235U, 237Np, 239Pu and 241Am. Several geometry options and material compositions (U, U + Am, Am, Am2O3) are considered for spallation targets to be used in Accelerator Driven Systems. All considered options operate as deep subcritical targets having neutron multiplication factor of k∼0.5. It is found that more than 4 kg of Am can be burned in one spallation target during the first year of operation.

  8. Ductile-to-brittle transition in spallation of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Ling, Z.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-10-14

    In this paper, the spallation behavior of a binary metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. With increasing the impact velocity, micro-voids induced by tensile pulses become smaller and more concentrated. The phenomenon suggests a ductile-to-brittle transition during the spallation process. Further investigation indicates that the transition is controlled by the interaction between void nucleation and growth, which can be regarded as a competition between tension transformation zones (TTZs) and shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale. As impact velocities become higher, the stress amplitude and temperature rise in the spall region increase and micro-structures of the material become more unstable. Therefore, TTZs are prone to activation in metallic glasses, leading to a brittle behavior during the spallation process.

  9. Output beam analysis of high power COIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deli; Sang, Fengting; Jin, Yuqi; Sun, Yizhu

    2003-03-01

    As the output power of a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) increases, the output laser beam instability appears as the far-field beam spot drift and deformation for the large Fresnel number unstable resonator. In order to interpret this phenomenon, an output beam mode simulation code was developed with the fast Fourier transform method. The calculation results show that the presence of the nonuniform gain in COIL produces a skewed output intensity distribution, which causes the mirror tilt and bulge due to the thermal expansion. With the output power of COIL increases, the mirror surfaces, especially the back surface of the scraper mirror, absorb more and more heat, which causes the drift and deformation of far field beam spot seriously. The initial misalignment direction is an important factor for the far field beam spot drifting and deformation.

  10. High-power hydrogen arcjet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.; Curran, Francis M.

    1991-01-01

    A hydrogen arcjet was operated at power levels ranging from 5 to 30 kW with three different nozzle geometries. Test results using all three nozzle geometries are reported and include variations of specific impulse with flow rate, and thrust with power. Geometric variables investigated included constrictor diameter, length, and diverging exit angle. The nozzle with a constrictor diameter of 1.78 mm and divergence angle of 20 degrees was found to give the highest performance. A specific impulse of 1460 s was attained with this nozzle at a thrust efficiency of 29.8 percent. The best efficiency measured was 34.4 percent at a specific impulse of 1045 s. Post test examination of the cathode showed erosion after 28 hours of operation to be small, and limited to the conical tip where steady state arc attachment occurred. Each nozzle was tested to destruction.

  11. High-power hydrogen arcjet performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.; Curran, Francis M.

    1991-01-01

    A hydrogen arcjet was operated at power levels ranging from 5 to 30 kW with three different nozzle geometries. Test results using all three nozzle geometries are reported and include variations of specific impulse with flow rate, and thrust with power. Geometric variables investigated included constrictor diameter, length, and diverging exit angle. The nozzle with a constrictor diameter of 1.78 mm and divergence angle of 20 deg was found to give the highest performance. A specific impulse of 1460 s was attained with this nozzle at a thrust efficiency of 29.8 percent. The best efficiency measured was 34.4 percent at a specific impulse of 1045 s. Post test examination of the cathode showed erosion after 28 hours of operation to be small, and limited to the conical tip where steady state arc attachment occurred. Each nozzle was tested to destruction.

  12. High Power Co-Axial Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2013-08-14

    A superconducting RF (SRF) power coupler capable of handling 500 kW CW RF power at 750 MHz is required for present and future storage rings and linacs. There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Coupler windows vary from cylinders to cones to disks and RF power couplers will always be limited by the ability of ceramic windows and their matching systems to withstand the stresses due to non-uniform heating from dielectric and wall losses, multipactor, and mechanical flexure. In the Phase II project, we built a double window coaxial system with materials that would not otherwise be useable due to individual VSWRs. Double window systems can be operated such that one is cold (LN2) and one is warm. They can have different materials and still have a good match without using matching elements that create problematic multipactor bands. The match of the two windows will always result from the cancellation of the two window’s reflections when they are located approximately a quarter wavelength apart or multiples of a quarter wavelength. The window assemblies were carefully constructed to put the window material and its braze joint in compression at all times. This was done using explosion bonding techniques which allow for inexpensive fabrication of the vacuum / compression ring out of stainless steel with copper plating applied to the inner surface. The EIA 3-1/8” double window assembly was then successfully baked out and tested to 12 kW in a 3-1/8” co-axial system. The thermal gradient across the window was measured to be 90 C which represents about 15 ksi tensile stress in an uncompressed window. In our design the compression was calculated to be about 25 ksi, so the net compressive force was 5 ksi at full power.

  13. Power affects performance when the pressure is on: evidence for low-power threat and high-power lift.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sonia K; Galinsky, Adam D; Kray, Laura J; Shirako, Aiwa

    2015-05-01

    The current research examines how power affects performance in pressure-filled contexts. We present low-power-threat and high-power-lift effects, whereby performance in high-stakes situations suffers or is enhanced depending on one's power; that is, the power inherent to a situational role can produce effects similar to stereotype threat and lift. Three negotiations experiments demonstrate that role-based power affects outcomes but only when the negotiation is diagnostic of ability and, therefore, pressure-filled. We link these outcomes conceptually to threat and lift effects by showing that (a) role power affects performance more strongly when the negotiation is diagnostic of ability and (b) underperformance disappears when the low-power negotiator has an opportunity to self-affirm. These results suggest that stereotype threat and lift effects may represent a more general phenomenon: When the stakes are raised high, relative power can act as either a toxic brew (stereotype/low-power threat) or a beneficial elixir (stereotype/high-power lift) for performance. PMID:25888684

  14. High power X-band TWT amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.; Kuang, E.; Kerslick, G.S.; Nation, J.A.; Schaechter, L.

    1995-12-31

    The recent research into multi-stage X-Band TWT`s producing output powers of 100--200 MW has shown that it is essential to minimize the reflections in each stage of the amplifier in order to avoid sideband development. These reflections also cause fluctuations in the RF output power envelope. Following extensive MAGIC code simulations they have designed tapers that adiabatically increase the iris diameter in the output sections of the amplifier to provide a smooth, broad-band transition from the slow-wave structure to cylindrical waveguide. They report results, extracting in the TM{sub 01} mode, showing smooth output pulses in the range 30--50 MW, with no evidence of sidebands. A second approach seeks to isolate the first amplifier stage with a drift tube beyond cutoff. The second stage and output section are quasi-periodic structures designed to minimize reflections, and allow the radial or longitudinal RF power extraction to be distributed over an extended region. The first stage of this system has been developed and initial operation results using an 0.8--1.0 MV, 0.5--1.0 kA, 50 ns cylindrical beam will be reported.

  15. The effects of shockwave profile shape and shock obliquity on spallation in Cu and Ta: kinetic and stress-state effects on damage evolution(u)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, George T

    2010-12-14

    Widespread research over the past five decades has provided a wealth of experimental data and insight concerning shock hardening and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. Less quantitative data have been gathered on the effect of direct, in-contact, high explosive (HE)-driven Taylor wave (or triangular-wave) loading profile shock loading on the shock hardening, damage evolution, or spallation response of materials. Explosive loading induces an impulse dubbed a 'Taylor Wave'. This is a significantly different loading history than that achieved by a square-topped impulse in terms of both the pulse duration at a fixed peak pressure, and a different unloading strain rate from the peak Hugoniot state achieved. The goal of this research is to quantify the influence of shockwave obliquity on the spallation response of copper and tantalum by subjecting plates of each material to HE-driven sweeping detonation-wave loading and quantify both the wave propagation and the post-mortem damage evolution. This talk will summarize our current understanding of damage evolution during sweeping detonation-wave spallation loading in Cu and Ta and show comparisons to modeling simulations. The spallation responses of Cu and Ta are both shown to be critically dependent on the shockwave profile and the stress-state of the shock. Based on variations in the specifics of the shock drive (pulse shape, peak stress, shock obliquity) and sample geometry in Cu and Ta, 'spall strength' varies by over a factor of two and the details of the mechanisms of the damage evolution is seen to vary. Simplistic models of spallation, such as P{sub min} based on 1-D square-top shock data lack the physics to capture the influence of kinetics on damage evolution such as that operative during sweeping detonation loading. Such considerations are important for the development of predictive models of damage evolution and spallation in metals and alloys.

  16. Multi-Kilowatt Power Module for High-Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Bowers, Glen E.

    2005-01-01

    Future NASA missions will require high-performance electric propulsion systems. Hall thrusters are being developed at NASA Glenn for high-power, high-specific impulse operation. These thrusters operate at power levels up to 50 kW of power and discharge voltages in excess of 600 V. A parallel effort is being conducted to develop power electronics for these thrusters that push the technology beyond the 5kW state-of-the-art power level. A 10 kW power module was designed to produce an output of 500 V and 20 A from a nominal 100 V input. Resistive load tests revealed efficiencies in excess of 96 percent. Load current share and phase synchronization circuits were designed and tested that will allow connecting multiple modules in parallel to process higher power.

  17. A portable high power microwave source with permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Zhi-qiang; Yang, Jian-Hua

    2016-06-01

    A high power microwave source with permanent magnets is proposed in this paper. The source has the length 330 mm, maximum diameter 350 mm, and total weight 50 kg, including 25 kg of permanent magnets. 1 GW of microwave power with Gaussian radiation pattern and 24% of microwave power generation efficiency in a pulse duration of 75 ns are obtained in the experiment. Operating frequency of the source is 2.32 GHz. Such a small size, light weight, and highly stable in operation source will be used in portable repetitive high power microwave generation systems.

  18. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources - a nominal 300-Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28-Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power supplies that provide power to the thruster auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300-Volts to 500-Volts to the thruster discharge supply. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Thruster. The performance of unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate the exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97. With a space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power device, this design could evolve into a flight design for future missions that require high power electric propulsion systems.

  19. Development of high coherence high power 193nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Arakawa, Masaki; Fuchimukai, Atsushi; Sasaki, Yoichi; Onose, Takashi; Kamba, Yasuhiro; Igarashi, Hironori; Qu, Chen; Tamiya, Mitsuru; Oizumi, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinji; Kakizaki, Koji; Xuan, Hongwen; Zhao, Zhigang; Kobayashi, Yohei; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2016-03-01

    We have been developing a hybrid 193 nm ArF laser system that consists of a solid state seeding laser and an ArF excimer laser amplifier for power-boosting. The solid state laser consists of an Yb-fiber-solid hybrid laser system and an Er-fiber laser system as fundamentals, and one LBO and three CLBO crystals for frequency conversion. In an ArF power amplifier, the seed laser passes through the ArF gain media three times, and an average power of 110 W is obtained. As a demonstration of the potential applications of the laser, an interference exposure test is performed.

  20. VITESS 3 - Virtual Instrumentation Tool for the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Lieutenant, K.; Nekrassov, D.; Fromme, M.

    2014-07-01

    VITESS is a software widely used for simulation of neutron scattering experiments. Although originally motivated by instrument design for the European Spallation Source, all major neutron sources are available. Existing as well as future instruments on reactor or spallation sources can be designed and optimized, or simulated in a virtual experiment to prepare a measurement, including basic data evaluation. This note gives an overview of the VITESS software concept and usage. New developments are presented, including a 3D visualization of instruments and neutron trajectories, a numerical optimization routine and a parallelization tool allowing to split VITESS simulations on a computer cluster.