Science.gov

Sample records for high pressure helium

  1. 2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. Raman Scattering from Solid and Fluid Helium at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, George Henry, Jr.

    Raman spectra were measured in solid helium at two molar volumes: 7.74 cm('3) ("10 kbar") and 9.06 cm('3) ("5 kbar"). The Raman-active E(,2g) phonon has been observed in the hcp phase of each crystal. The volume dependence measured for this phonon frequency is well represented by the mode Gruneisen parameter (gamma) = 1.06 + 0.097 V. Conventional lattice dynamics, using modern helium potentials, predicts a frequency and volume dependence for the E(,2g) phonon in good agreement with the measurements over this range of volume. Temperature dependence of the E(,2g) phonon frequency and linewidth was measured under isochoric conditions. Over the limited range of temperature in which the hcp phase exists, the thermal shift of frequency was measured to be negative by an amount no more than 1 cm('-1). The phonon linewidth was observed to be non-zero at 0 K, increasing in width with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence is compatible with a strong interaction between the E(,2g) phonon and zone-edge phonons, where the optical phonon combines with a transverse acoustic phonon to create a longitudinal acoustic phonon. In addition, second-order Raman spectra were collected for both high-pressure solid phases, hcp and fcc. Structure has been observed in the two-phonon portion of the solid helium spectra and is remarkably similar in both phases. Significant intensity extends beyond the expected cut-off for two-phonon processes, though to a decreasing extent with increasing pressure. Thus multi-phonon processes remain important in helium even at high pressure. Raman scattering from dense fluid helium shows clear departure from the behavior of collision-induced scattering from the more classical fluids. Even at room temperature, a departure from the usual roughly-exponential behavior is observed at low frequency in helium at high pressure. The departure becomes even more pronounced near the freezing temperature, with a dramatic reduction in low-frequency intensity

  3. Experimental investigation on pressurization performance of cryogenic tank during high-temperature helium pressurization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wang; Yanzhong, Li; Yonghua, Jin; Yuan, Ma

    2015-03-01

    Sufficient knowledge of thermal performance and pressurization behaviors in cryogenic tanks during rocket launching period is of importance to the design and optimization of a pressurization system. In this paper, ground experiments with liquid oxygen (LO2) as the cryogenic propellant, high-temperature helium exceeding 600 K as the pressurant gas, and radial diffuser and anti-cone diffuser respectively at the tank inlet were performed. The pressurant gas requirements, axial and radial temperature distributions, and energy distributions inside the propellant tank were obtained and analyzed to evaluate the comprehensive performance of the pressurization system. It was found that the pressurization system with high-temperature helium as the pressurant gas could work well that the tank pressure was controlled within a specified range and a stable discharging liquid rate was achieved. For the radial diffuser case, the injected gas had a direct impact on the tank inner wall. The severe gas-wall heat transfer resulted in about 59% of the total input energy absorbed by the tank wall. For the pressurization case with anti-cone diffuser, the direct impact of high-temperature gas flowing toward the liquid surface resulted in a greater deal of energy transferred to the liquid propellant, and the percentage even reached up to 38%. Moreover, both of the two cases showed that the proportion of energy left in ullage to the total input energy was quite small, and the percentage was only about 22-24%. This may indicate that a more efficient diffuser should be developed to improve the pressurization effect. Generally, the present experimental results are beneficial to the design and optimization of the pressurization system with high-temperature gas supplying the pressurization effect.

  4. Compression of helium to high pressures and temperatures using a ballistic piston apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, B. P.; Rovel, G. P.; Lewis, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    Some preliminary experiments are described which were carried out in a high enthalpy laboratory to investigate the compression of helium, a typical shock-tube driver gas, to very high pressures and temperatures by means of a ballistic piston. The purpose of these measurements was to identify any problem areas in the compression process, to determine the importance of real gas effects duDC 47355s process, and to establish the feasibility of using a ballistic piston apparatus to achieve temperatures in helium in excess of 10,000 K.

  5. Quartz Tuning Fork Pressure Gauge for High-Pressure Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botimer, J.; Velasco, A.; Taborek, P.

    2016-08-01

    We have measured the quality factor Q and the frequency f of a 32-kHz quartz tuning fork immersed in liquid ^4 He between 0.9 and 3.0 K, over pressures ranging from the saturated vapor pressure to ≈ 25 atm. At constant pressure, as a function of temperature, the quality factor and frequency have strong features related to the temperature dependence of the superfluid fraction. At constant temperature, Q depends on the superfluid fraction, while the frequency is a smooth function of pressure. The behavior is explained using a simple hydrodynamic model. The liquid helium viscosity is obtained from measured values of Q, and together with tabulated values of the helium density as a function of pressure and temperature, the frequency shift can be parameterized as a function of temperature and pressure. The observed sensitivity is ≈ 7.8 Hz/atm. The quartz tuning fork provides a compact low power method of measuring the pressure in the bulk liquid.

  6. Hydrogen and helium under high pressure - A case for a classical theory of dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebonovic, Vladan

    1989-06-01

    When subject to high pressure, H2 and He-3 are expected to undergo phase transitions, and to become metallic at a sufficiently high pressure. Using a semiclassical theory of dense matter proposed by Savic and Kasanin, calculations of phase transition and metallization pressure have been performed for these two materials. In hydrogen, metallization occurs at p(M) = (3.0 + or - 0.2) Mbar, while for helium the corresponding value is (106 + or - 1) Mbar. A phase transition occurs in helium at p(tr) = (10.0 + or - 0.4) Mbar. These values are close to the results obtainable by more rigorous methods. Possibilities of experimental verification of the calculations are briefly discussed.

  7. Thermodynamics of hydrogen-helium mixtures at high pressure and finite temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    A technique is reviewed for calculating thermodynamic quantities for mixtures of light elements at high pressure, in the metallic state. Ensemble averages are calculated with Monte Carlo techniques and periodic boundary conditions. Interparticle potentials are assumed to be coulombic, screened by the electrons in dielectric function theory. This method is quantitatively accurate for alloys at pressures above about 10 Mbar. An alloy of equal parts hydrogen and helium by mass appears to remain liquid and mixed for temperatures above about 3000 K, at pressures of about 15 Mbar. The additive volume law is satisfied to within about 10%, but the Gruneisen equation of state gives poor results. A calculation at 1300 K shows evidence of a hydrogen-helium phase separation.

  8. Equilibrium separation in a high pressure helium plasma and its application to the determination of temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rodero, A.; Garcia, M.C.; Gamero, A.

    1995-12-31

    The spectroscopy method based on the Boltzmann-plot of emission lines has been usually employed for measuring the excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) in high pressure plasmas. In the present work, it is shown that this method can produce great errors in the temperature determination when equilibrium separation exists. In this way, the suitability of this determination is tested comparing with other alternative methods in a high pressure helium plasma and also studying its separation from the equilibrium situation, via the absolute population measurements of atomic levels and the estimation of its atomic state distribution function (ASDF). We have made this study using a new excitation structure, the axial injection torch (Torche A Injection Axiale or T.I.A.), which produces a high power microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure. The measurements were carried out at the beginning of the flame (the highest line intensity zone) for a 300-900 W power range at 2.45 GHz and 71/min. of helium gas flow.

  9. CO2-helium and CO2-neon mixtures at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Mallick, B; Ninet, S; Le Marchand, G; Munsch, P; Datchi, F

    2013-01-28

    The properties of mixtures of carbon dioxide with helium or neon have been investigated as a function of CO(2) concentration and pressure up to 30 GPa at room temperature. The binary phase diagrams of these mixtures are determined over the full range of CO(2) concentrations using visual observations and Raman scattering measurements. Both diagrams are of eutectic type, with a fluid-fluid miscibility gap for CO(2) concentrations in the range [5, 75] mol. % for He and [8, 55] mol. % for Ne, and a complete separation between the two components in the solid phase. The absence of alloys or stoichiometric compounds for these two binary systems is consistent with the Hume-Rothery rules of hard sphere mixtures. The Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns of solid CO(2) embedded in He or Ne for various initial concentrations have been measured up to 30 GPa and 12 GPa, respectively. The frequencies of the Raman modes and the volume of solid phase I are identical, within error bars, to those reported for 100% CO(2) samples, thus confirming the total immiscibility of CO(2) with He and Ne in the solid phase. These results demonstrate the possibility to perform high-pressure experiments on solid CO(2) under (quasi-)hydrostatic conditions using He or Ne as pressure transmitting medium. PMID:23387603

  10. Experimental study of forced convection heat transfer during upward and downward flow of helium at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco Valentin; Narbeh Artoun; Masahiro Kawaji; Donald M. McEligot

    2015-08-01

    Fundamental high pressure/high temperature forced convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. The experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced convection and natural circulation experiments. The test section has a single 16.8 mm ID flow channel in a 2.7 m long, 108 mm OD graphite column with four 2.3kW electric heater rods placed symmetrically around the flow channel. This experimental study presents the role of buoyancy forces in enhancing or reducing convection heat transfer for helium at high pressures up to 70 bar and high temperatures up to 873 degrees K. Wall temperatures have been compared among 10 cases covering the inlet Re numbers ranging from 500 to 3,000. Downward flows display higher and lower wall temperatures in the upstream and downstream regions, respectively, than the upward flow cases due to the influence of buoyancy forces. In the entrance region, convection heat transfer is reduced due to buoyancy leading to higher wall temperatures, while in the downstream region, buoyancyinduced mixing causes higher convection heat transfer and lower wall temperatures. However, their influences are reduced as the Reynolds number increases. This experimental study is of specific interest to VHTR design and validation of safety analysis codes.

  11. Use of a torsional pendulum as a high-pressure gage and determination of viscosity of helium gas at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maisel, J. E.; Webeler, R. W. H.; Grimes, H. H.

    1973-01-01

    Three torsional crystal parameters were examined for suitability in sensing pressure in gases up to 131 million newtons per square meter. The best parameters were found to be the change in crystal decrement at resonance and the change in crystal electrical resistance at resonance. The change in crystal resonant frequency did not appear to be a reliable pressure measuring parameter. Pure argon and pure helium gases were studied for use as working fluids. Helium functioned better over a wider pressure range. Calibration of the gage also provided a measure of the viscosity-density product of the gas as a function of pressure. These data, together with known extrapolated density data, permitted the determination of the viscosity of helium to 131 million N/square meter.

  12. 3D magnetohydrodynamic modelling of a dc low-current plasma arc batch reactor at very high pressure in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebouvier, A.; Iwarere, S. A.; Ramjugernath, D.; Fulcheri, L.

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with a three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model under peculiar conditions of very high pressures (from 2 MPa up to 10 MPa) and low currents (<1 A). Studies on plasma arc working under these unusual conditions remain almost unexplored because of the technical and technological challenges to develop a reactor able to sustain a plasma at very high pressures. The combined effect of plasma reactivity and high pressure would probably open the way towards new promising applications in various fields: chemistry, lightning, materials or nanomaterial synthesis. A MHD model helps one to understand the complex and coupled phenomena surrounding the plasma which cannot be understood by simply experimentation. The model also provides data which are difficult to directly determine experimentally. The model simulates an experimental-based batch reactor working with helium. The particular reactor in question was used to investigate the Fischer-Tropsch application, fluorocarbon production and CO2 retro-conversion. However, as a first approach in terms of MHD, the model considers the case for helium as a non-reactive working gas. After a detailed presentation of the model, a reference case has been fully analysed (P = 8 MPa, I = 0.35 A) in terms of physical properties. The results show a bending of the arc and displacement of the anodic arc root towards the top of the reactor, due to the combined effects of convection, gravity and electromagnetic forces. A parametric study on the pressure (2-10 MPa) and current (0.25-0.4 A) was then investigated. The operating pressure does not show an influence on the contraction of the arc but higher pressures involve a higher natural convection in the reactor, driven by the density gradients between the cold and hot gas.

  13. Stabilities of filled ice II structure of hydrogen and helium hydrates at low temperatures and high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, H.; Umeda, A.; Fujii, T.; Machida, S.; Shinozaki, A.; Kawamura, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yagi, T.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen hydrate is expected to be a hydrogen storage material, because it can contain relatively high hydrogen and its synthetic condition is mild comparable to industrial production. Three phases of hydrogen hydrate have been known so for. One is a clathrate hydrate sII [1], and others are filled ice II structure and filled ice Ic structure [2]. The ratio of water to hydrogen molecules for these phases are1:3, 1:6, 1:1, respectively. The clathrate sII containing only hydrogen molecules is stable only in a lower temperature region. At room temperature, above about 0.8 GPa filled ice II and above 2.5 GPa filled ice Ic are formed. The latter one survives at least up to 90 GPa [3]. However, investigations in low temperature and high pressure region have been limited. In this study, low temperature and high pressure experiments were performed by using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat in a region of 0.2 to 4.5 GPa and 130 to 300 K. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed a series of phase change from sII to filled ice Ic via filled ice II. For example, at 220K, sII transformed to filled ice II at approximately 0.7 GPa and further transformed to filled ice Ic structure at about 2.0 GPa. The present results experimentally confirmed the previously predicted phase boundaries. For filled ice II structure, Raman spectroscopy revealed that pressure dependency of vibration mode of guest hydrogen molecules and OH stretching mode of host water molecules changed at approximately 2.5 GPa. The XRD also showed change in axial ratio at the same pressure. These result suggested that state of filled ice II structure changed at about 2.5 GPa. Helium hydrate is known to form filled ice II structure [4], but high pressure study has not been yet fully performed. Similar experiments were carried out in a region of 0.2 to 5.0 GPa and 200 to 300 K. The results showed that the filled ice II structure did not transformed to filled ice Ic structure, but decomposed into helium

  14. Primary helium heater for propellant pressurization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichmuth, D. M.; Nguyen, T. V.; Pieper, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The primary helium heater is a unique design that provides direct heating of pressurant gas for large pressure fed propulsion systems. It has been conceptually designed to supply a heated (800-1000 R) pressurization gas to both a liquid oxygen and an RP-1 propellant tank. This pressurization gas is generated within the heater by mixing super critical helium (40-300 R and 3000-1600 psi) with an appropriate amount of combustion products from a 4:1 throttling stoichiometric LO2/LH2 combustor. This simple, low cost and reliable mixer utilizes the large quantity of helium to provide stoichiometric combustor cooling, extend the throttling limits and enhance the combustion stability margin. Preliminary combustion, thermal, and CFD analyses confirm that this low-pressure-drop direct helium heater can provide the constant-temperature pressurant suitable for tank pressurization of both fuel and oxidizer tanks of large pressure fed vehicles.

  15. A high-pressure van der Waals compound in solid nitrogen-helium mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, W. L.; Finger, L. W.; Hemley, R. J.; Hu, J. Z.; Mao, H. K.; Schouten, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed diamond anvil-cell study using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, and optical microscopy has been conducted for the He-N system, with a view to the weakly-bound van der Waals molecule interactions that can be formed in the gas phase. High pressure is found to stabilize the formation of a stoichiometric, solid van der Waals compound of He(N2)11 composition which may exemplify a novel class of compounds found at high pressures in the interiors of the outer planets and their satellites.

  16. Liquid Oxygen Thermodynamic Vent System Testing with Helium Pressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of several thermodynamic vent system (TVS) tests with liquid oxygen plus a test with liquid nitrogen. In all tests, the liquid was heated above its normal boiling point to 111 K for oxygen and 100 K for nitrogen. The elevated temperature was representative of tank conditions for a candidate lunar lander ascent stage. An initial test series was conducted with saturated oxygen liquid and vapor at 0.6 MPa. The initial series was followed by tests where the test tank was pressurized with gaseous helium to 1.4 to 1.6 MPa. For these tests, the helium mole fraction in the ullage was quite high, about 0.57 to 0.62. TVS behavior is different when helium is present than when helium is absent. The tank pressure becomes the sum of the vapor pressure and the partial pressure of helium. Therefore, tank pressure depends not only on temperature, as is the case for a pure liquid-vapor system, but also on helium density (i.e., the mass of helium divided by the ullage volume). Thus, properly controlling TVS operation is more challenging with helium pressurization than without helium pressurization. When helium was present, the liquid temperature would rise with each successive TVS cycle if tank pressure was kept within a constant control band. Alternatively, if the liquid temperature was maintained within a constant TVS control band, the tank pressure would drop with each TVS cycle. The final test series, which was conducted with liquid nitrogen pressurized with helium, demonstrated simultaneous pressure and temperature control during TVS operation. The simultaneous control was achieved by systematic injection of additional helium during each TVS cycle. Adding helium maintained the helium partial pressure as the liquid volume decreased because of TVS operation. The TVS demonstrations with liquid oxygen pressurized with helium were conducted with three different fluid-mixer configurations-a submerged axial jet mixer, a pair of spray hoops in the tank

  17. Helium leak testing of a radioactive contaminated vessel under high pressure in a contaminated environment

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, M.E.

    1996-10-01

    At ANL-W, with the shutdown of EBR-II, R&D has evolved from advanced reactor design to the safe handling, processing, packaging, and transporting spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. New methods of processing spent fuel rods and transforming contaminated material into acceptable waste forms are now in development. Storage of nuclear waste is a high interest item. ANL-W is participating in research of safe storage of nuclear waste, with the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site in New Mexico the repository. The vessel under test simulates gas generated by contaminated materials stored underground at the WIPP site. The test vessel is 90% filled with a mixture of contaminated material and salt brine (from WIPP site) and pressurized with N2-1% He at 2500 psia. Test acceptance criteria is leakage < 10{sup -7} cc/seconds at 2500 psia. The bell jar method is used to determine leakage rate using a mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD). The efficient MSLD and an Al bell jar replaced a costly, time consuming pressure decay test setup. Misinterpretation of test criterion data caused lengthy delays, resulting in the development of a unique procedure. Reevaluation of the initial intent of the test criteria resulted in leak tolerances being corrected and test efficiency improved.

  18. Phase separation in hydrogen-helium mixtures at Mbar pressures.

    PubMed

    Morales, Miguel A; Schwegler, Eric; Ceperley, David; Pierleoni, Carlo; Hamel, Sebastien; Caspersen, Kyle

    2009-02-01

    The properties of hydrogen-helium mixtures at Mbar pressures and intermediate temperatures (4000 to 10000 K) are calculated with first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. We determine the equation of state as a function of density, temperature, and composition and, using thermodynamic integration, we estimate the Gibbs free energy of mixing, thereby determining the temperature, at a given pressure, when helium becomes insoluble in dense metallic hydrogen. These results are directly relevant to models of the interior structure and evolution of Jovian planets. We find that the temperatures for the demixing of helium and hydrogen are sufficiently high to cross the planetary adiabat of Saturn at pressures approximately 5 Mbar; helium is partially miscible throughout a significant portion of the interior of Saturn, and to a lesser extent in Jupiter. PMID:19171896

  19. Phase separation in hydrogen–helium mixtures at Mbar pressures

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Miguel A.; Schwegler, Eric; Ceperley, David; Pierleoni, Carlo; Hamel, Sebastien; Caspersen, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    The properties of hydrogen–helium mixtures at Mbar pressures and intermediate temperatures (4000 to 10000 K) are calculated with first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. We determine the equation of state as a function of density, temperature, and composition and, using thermodynamic integration, we estimate the Gibbs free energy of mixing, thereby determining the temperature, at a given pressure, when helium becomes insoluble in dense metallic hydrogen. These results are directly relevant to models of the interior structure and evolution of Jovian planets. We find that the temperatures for the demixing of helium and hydrogen are sufficiently high to cross the planetary adiabat of Saturn at pressures ≈5 Mbar; helium is partially miscible throughout a significant portion of the interior of Saturn, and to a lesser extent in Jupiter. PMID:19171896

  20. Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) Gauging of an Isothermal Cryogenic Propellant Tank Pressurized with Gaseous Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging of a liquid oxygen/liquid nitrogen tank pressurized with gaseous helium that was supplied by a high-pressure cryogenic tank simulating a cold helium supply bottle on a spacecraft. The fluid inside the test tank was kept isothermal by frequent operation of a liquid circulation pump and spray system, and the propellant tank was suspended from load cells to obtain a high-accuracy reference standard for the gauging measurements. Liquid quantity gauging errors of less than 2 percent of the tank volume were obtained when quasi-steady-state conditions existed in the propellant and helium supply tanks. Accurate gauging required careful attention to, and corrections for, second-order effects of helium solubility in the liquid propellant plus differences in the propellant/helium composition and temperature in the various plumbing lines attached to the tanks. On the basis of results from a helium solubility test, a model was developed to predict the amount of helium dissolved in the liquid as a function of cumulative pump operation time. Use of this model allowed correction of the basic PVT gauging calculations and attainment of the reported gauging accuracy. This helium solubility model is system specific, but it may be adaptable to other hardware systems.

  1. Evaluation of candidate Stirling engine heater tube alloys after 3500 hours exposure to high pressure doped hydrogen or helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misencik, J. A.; Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The heater head tubes of current prototype automotive Stirling engines are fabricated from alloy N-155, an alloy which contains 20 percent cobalt. Because the United States imports over 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country and resource supplies could not meet the demand imposed by automotive applications of cobalt in the heater head (tubes plus cylinders and regenerator housings), it is imperative that substitute alloys free of cobalt be identified. The research described herein focused on the heater head tubes. Sixteen alloys (15 potential substitutes plus the 20 percent Co N-155 alloy) were evaluated in the form of thin wall tubing in the NASA Lewis Research Center Stirling simulator materials diesel fuel fired test rigs. Tubes filled with either hydrogen doped with 1 percent CO2 or with helium at a gas pressure of 15 MPa and a temperature of 820 C were cyclic endurance tested for times up to 3500 hr. Results showed that two iron-nickel base superalloys, CG-27 and Pyromet 901 survived the 3500 hr endurance test. The remaining alloys failed by creep-rupture at times less than 3000 hr, however, several other alloys had superior lives to N-155. Results further showed that doping the hydrogen working fluid with 1 vol % CO2 is an effective means of reducing hydrogen permeability through all the alloy tubes investigated.

  2. PTA1 Helium Pressurization System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steadman, Todd; Majumdar, Alok; Holt, Kimberly

    1999-01-01

    A transient model of the Propulsion Test Article 1 (PTA1) Helium Pressurization System was developed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The model included feed lines from the facility interface to the engine purge interface and Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1) tanks, the propellant tanks themselves including ullage space and propellant feed lines to their respective pump interfaces. GFSSPs capability was extended to model a control valve to maintain ullage pressure within a specified limit and pressurization processes such as heat transfer between ullage gas, propellant and the tank wall. The purpose of the model is to predict the flow system characteristics in the entire pressurization system during 80 seconds of pre-pressurization operation, 420 seconds of pressurization stand-by operation and 150 seconds of engine operation. Subsequent to the work presented here, the PTA1 model has been updated to include the LOX and RP-1 pumps, while the pressurization option itself has been modified to include the effects of mass transfer. This updated model will be compared with PTA1 test data as it becomes available.

  3. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in atmospheric pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, M.D.; van der Laan, G.; Flaherty, J.V.; Padmore, H.A. )

    1992-01-01

    We report on an environmental chamber, which is attached to a UHV beamline, in which soft x-ray measurements can be done at atmospheric pressure in helium. X-ray measurements in air can only be performed at energies above about 3 keV because of the strong absorption of soft x rays by oxygen and nitrogen. However, a low-{ital Z} scatterer such as helium has a long absorption length for soft x rays even at atmospheric pressure. Thus, this new chamber allows soft x-ray experiments to be performed on samples with physical properties that are incompatible with UHV conditions, e.g., liquid and frozen aqueous solutions, corrosive materials, etc. A helium-tight tank has been installed behind the vacuum experimental chamber of the double crystal beamline 3.4 at the Daresbury SRS. The tank is purged with helium at atmospheric pressure and the gas in the tank is isolated from the high vacuum of the rest of the beamline by a thin mylar window which is supported on a capillary array. The tank contains a sample stage, two ionization chambers and a parallel-plate gas proportional counter for fluorescence detection of dilute samples, which has produced good results on the {ital K} edges of Cl, S, and P.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of helium bubble pressure in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jiechao; Li, Min; Wang, Jun; Hou, Qing

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate the stress field in a tungsten matrix containing a nano-scale helium bubble. A helium bubble in tungsten is found to consist of a core and an interface of finite thickness of approximately 0.6 nm. The core contains only helium atoms that are uniformly distributed. The interface is composed of both helium and tungsten atoms. In the periphery region of the helium bubble, the stress filed is found to follow the stress formula based on the elasticity theory of solid. The pressure difference between both sides of the interface can be well described by the Young-Laplace equation for the core size of a helium bubble as small as 0.48 nm. A comparison was performed between the pressure in the helium bubble core and the pressure in pure helium. For a core size larger than 0.3 nm, the pressure in the core of a helium bubble is in good agreement with the pressure in pure helium of the same helium density. These results provide guidance to larger scale simulation methods, such as in kinetic Monte Carlo methods and rate theory.

  5. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  6. Thermodynamics of a solar mixture of molecular hydrogen and helium at high pressure. [for Jupiter atmospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, W. L.; Hubbard, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of a model molecular hydrogen and helium mixture are calculated in the strongly interacting region of 0.005 to 0.3 per cu cm for a range of temperatures that are of interest for the envelopes of the Jovian planets. Computed adiabats fit the gravity data and boundary conditions from model atmospheres of Jupiter.

  7. Pressurized helium II-cooled magnet test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.P.; Lambertson, G.R.; Gilbert, W.S.; Meuser, R.B.; Caspi, S.; Schafer, R.V.

    1980-06-01

    A facility for testing superconducting magnets in a pressurized bath of helium II has been constructed and operated. The cryostat accepts magnets up to 0.32 m diameter and 1.32 m length with current to 3000 A. In initial tests, the volume of helium II surrounding the superconducting magnet was 90 liters. Minimum temperature reached was 1.7 K at which point the pumping system was throttled to maintain steady temperature. Helium II reservoir temperatures were easily controlled as long as the temperature upstream of the JT valve remained above T lambda; at lower temperatures control became difficult. Positive control of the temperature difference between the liquid and cold sink by means of an internal heat source appears necessary to avoid this problem. The epoxy-sealed vessel closures, with which we have had considerable experience with normal helium vacuum, also worked well in the helium II/vacuum environment.

  8. Helium-cooled high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Trauger, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Experience with several helium cooled reactors has been favorable, and two commercial plants are now operating. Both of these units are of the High Temperature Graphite Gas Cooled concept, one in the United States and the other in the Federal Republic of Germany. The initial helium charge for a reactor of the 1000 MW(e) size is modest, approx.15,000 kg.

  9. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas at two pressures

    DOEpatents

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming, cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes the fluid from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium gas in an expander so as to be at different temperature ranges and pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a cool gas at a temperature range T.sub.2 to T.sub.3 in the go leg, then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a cooler gas at a reduced pressure and at a reduced temperature T.sub.4 and finally by circulating the cooler gas back again to the refrigerator in a return leg at a temperature range T.sub.4 to T.sub.5, while in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg, and in the same enclosure therewith for compression into a higher pressure gas at T.sub.2 in a closed cycle, where T.sub.2 >T.sub.3 and T.sub.5 >T.sub.4, the fluid leaves the enclosure in the go leg as a gas at its coldest point in the go leg, and the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature decreases along its length from the refrigerator due to the cooling from the gas in the return leg.

  10. A helium freeze-out cleaner operating at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauvergne, J. P.; Delikaris, D.; Haug, F.; Knoops, S.

    A low pressure helium purification system has been designed at CERN. The helium gas recovered by means of a set of vacuum pumps from subatmospheric cryogenic circuits is cleaned at purity levels permitting direct re-liquefaction into the main cryo-plant cycle. The gas to be cleaned is close to ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. It is cooled down to 33K by counterflow heat exchanger with the processed gas plus a small amount of cold helium gas derived from the main cryoplant. Impurities in the gas to be processed are condensed on the cold surfaces, and purification is secured by a filtering. The processed gas returns directly to the low pressure suction flow of the cryo-plant compressor. So far two freeze-out cleaners have been designed and built and are currently in operation at two independent cryo-plants with liquifaction capacities of approximately 3.5 g/s. The results obtained on purification performance and "lifetime" before subsequent regeneration of the device, pressure drop depending on impurity contents, cold gas requirements and heat exchanger performance compare well with theoretical predictions. Helium gas with impurity levels of up to close to 13000 ppm by weight have been treated. At 2300 ppm and a processed helium gas flow of 0.7 g/s life times of close to 24 hours could be obtained permitting the deposition of 135 g of solid air. Regeneration cycles with respect to life time are short (15 minutes).

  11. Calibrating the Helium Pressurization System for the Space Shuttle Liquid-Hydrogen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the results from the STS-114 tanking tests and subsequent launch called into question existing thermal and mass models of helium pressurization of the liquid hydrogen tank. This hydrogen tank, which makes up the bottom two-thirds of the External Tank, is pressurized prior to launch to avoid cavitation in the Shuttle Main Engine pumps. At about 2 minutes prior to launch, the main vent valve is closed, and pressurized helium flows into the tank ullage space to achieve set point pressure. As the helium gas cools, its pressure drops, calling for additional helium. Subsequent helium flows are provided in short, timed pulses. The number of pulses is taken as a rough leak indicator. An analysis of thermal models by Marshall Space Flight Center showed considerable uncertainty in the pressure-versus-time behavior of the helium ullage space and the ability to predict the number of pulses normally expected. Kennedy Space Center proposed to calibrate the dime-sized orifice, which together with valves, controls the helium flow quantity (Figure 1). Pressure and temperature sensors were installed to provide upstream and downstream measurements necessary to compute flow rate based on the orifice discharge coefficient. An assessment of flow testing with helium indicated an extremely costly use of this critical resource. In order to reduce costs, we proposed removing the orifices from each Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) and asking Colorado Engineering Experiment Station Inc. (CEESI) to calibrate the flow. CEESI has a high-pressure air flow system with traceable flow meters capable of handling the large flow rates. However, literature research indicated that square-edged orifices of small diameters often exhibit significant hysteresis and nonrepeatability in the vicinity of choked or sonic flow. Fortunately, the MLP orifices behaved relatively well in testing (Figure 2). Using curve fitting of the air-flow data, in conjunction with ASME orifice modeling equations, a

  12. Experimental study of ultracold neutron production in pressurized superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Bossy, J.; Farhi, E.; Fertl, M.; Leung, K. K. H.; Rahli, A.; Soldner, T.; Zimmer, O.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate experimentally the pressure dependence of the production of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in superfluid helium in the range from saturated vapor pressure to 20 bar. A neutron velocity selector allows the separation of underlying single-phonon and multiphonon processes by varying the incident cold neutron (CN) wavelength in the range from 3.5 to 10 Å. The predicted pressure dependence of UCN production derived from inelastic neutron scattering data is confirmed for the single-phonon excitation. For multiphonon-based UCN production we found no significant dependence on pressure, whereas calculations from inelastic neutron scattering data predict an increase of 43(6)% at 20 bar relative to saturated vapor pressure. From our data we conclude that applying pressure to superfluid helium does not increase the overall UCN production rate at a typical CN guide.

  13. 80. DETAIL OF TYPICAL PRESSURE GAUGE IN NITROGEN AND HELIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. DETAIL OF TYPICAL PRESSURE GAUGE IN NITROGEN AND HELIUM STORAGE AND TRANSFER CONTROL SKIDS ON NORTH END OF SLC-3W FUEL APRON - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Topala, Ionut; Grigoras, Constantin; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe

    2011-03-01

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  15. Heat transport of nitrogen in helium atmospheric pressure microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. F.; Zhong, X. X.

    2013-07-01

    Stable DC atmospheric pressure normal glow discharges in ambient air were produced between the water surface and the metallic capillary coupled with influx of helium gas. Multiple independent repeated trials indicated that vibrational temperature of nitrogen rises from 3200 to 4622 K, and rotational temperature of nitrogen decreases from 1270 to 570 K as gas flux increasing from 20 to 80 sccm and discharge current decreasing from 11 to 3 mA. Furthermore, it was found that the vibrational degree of the nitrogen molecule has priority to gain energy than the rotational degree of nitrogen molecule in nonequilibrium helium microplasma.

  16. A helium refrigerator with features for supercritical pressure cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, K. C.; Brown, D. P.; Schlafke, A. P.; Sondericker, J. H.

    1983-08-01

    The cold end of the helium refrigerator with features for supercritical pressure cooling where it deviates from a conventional refrigerator is described. Two methods of transporting cooling from the load are considered. The first uses a cold circulating pump to circulate helium around the load. The second simply uses the J-T flow from the refrigerator to transport cooling. Measurements have been performed to verify refrigerator capacity. The refrigerator configuration is illustrated, and results of the capacity of the refrigerator and performance data for the ejector and the circulating pump are presented. Operating experience is discussed.

  17. Modelling and Experimental Verification of Pressure Wave Following Gaseous Helium Storage Tank Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Jędrusyna, A.; Wach, J.

    Helium inventory in high energy accelerators, tokamaks and free electron lasers may exceed tens of tons. The gaseous helium is stored in steel tanks under a pressure of about 20 bar and at environment temperature. Accidental rupture of any of the tanks filled with the gaseous helium will create a rapid energy release in form of physical blast. An estimation of pressure wave distribution following the tank rupture and potential consequences to the adjacent research infrastructure and buildings is a very important task, critical in the safety aspect of the whole cryogenic system. According to the present regulations the TNT equivalent approach is to be applied to evaluate the pressure wave following a potential gas storage tank rupture. A special test stand was designed and built in order to verify experimentally the blast effects in controlled conditions. In order to obtain such a shock wave a pressurized plastic tank was used. The tank was ruptured and the resulting pressure wave was recorded using a spatially-distributed array of pressure sensors connected to a high-speed data acquisition device. The results of the experiments and the comparison with theoretical values obtained from thermodynamic model of the blast are presented. A good agreement between the simulated and measured data was obtained. Recommendations regarding the applicability of thermodynamic model of physical blast versus TNT approach, to estimate consequences of gas storage tank rupture are formulated. The laboratory scale experimental results have been scaled to ITER pressurized helium storage tanks.

  18. Production of carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and helium from a high-purity source

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Farris, Thomas Stephen

    2008-11-18

    The invention provides vacuum swing adsorption processes that produce an essentially carbon monoxide-free hydrogen or helium gas stream from, respectively, a high-purity (e.g., pipeline grade) hydrogen or helium gas stream using one or two adsorber beds. By using physical adsorbents with high heats of nitrogen adsorption, intermediate heats of carbon monoxide adsorption, and low heats of hydrogen and helium adsorption, and by using vacuum purging and high feed stream pressures (e.g., pressures of as high as around 1,000 bar), pipeline grade hydrogen or helium can purified to produce essentially carbon monoxide -free hydrogen and helium, or carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane-free hydrogen and helium.

  19. Design and Test of a Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Thruster with Cold Helium Pressurization Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    A liquid oxygen / liquid methane 2,000 lbf thruster was designed and tested in conjuction with a nozzle heat exchanger for cold helium pressurization. Cold helium pressurization systems offer significant spacecraft vehicle dry mass savings since the pressurant tank size can be reduced as the pressurant density is increased. A heat exchanger can be incorporated into the main engine design to provide expansion of the pressurant supply to the propellant tanks. In order to study the systems integration of a cold-helium pressurization system, a 2,000 lbf thruster with a nozzle heat exchanger was designed for integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle at NASA Johnson Space Center. The testing goals were to demonstrate helium loading and initial conditioning to low temperatures, high-pressure/low temperature storage, expansion through the main engine heat exchanger, and propellant tank injection/pressurization. The helium pressurant tank was an existing 19 inch diameter composite-overwrap tank, and the targert conditions were 4500 psi and -250 F, providing a 2:1 density advantage compared to room tempatrue storage. The thruster design uses like-on-like doublets in the injector pattern largely based on Project Morpheus main engine hertiage data, and the combustion chamber was designed for an ablative chamber. The heat exchanger was installed at the ablative nozzle exit plane. Stand-alone engine testing was conducted at NASA Stennis Space Center, including copper heat-sink chambers and highly-instrumented spoolpieces in order to study engine performance, stability, and wall heat flux. A one-dimensional thermal model of the integrated system was completed. System integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle is complete, and systems demonstrations will follow.

  20. Effect of high power CO2 and Yb:YAG laser radiation on the characteristics of TIG arc in atmospherical pressure argon and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shikai; Xiao, Rongshi

    2015-04-01

    The effects of laser radiation on the characteristics of the DC tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc were investigated by applying a high power slab CO2 laser and a Yb:YAG disc laser. Experiment results reveal that the arc voltage-current curve shifts downwards, the arc column expands, and the arc temperature rises while the high power CO2 laser beam vertically interacts with the TIG arc in argon. With the increase of the laser power, the voltage-current curve of the arc shifts downwards more significantly, and the closer the laser beam impingement on the arc to the cathode, the more the decrease in arc voltage. Moreover, the arc column expansion and the arc temperature rise occur mainly in the region between the laser beam incident position and the anode. However, the arc characteristics hardly change in the cases of the CO2 laser-helium arc and YAG laser-arc interactions. The reason is that the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption coefficients are greatly different due to the different electron densities of the argon and helium arcs and the different wave lengths of CO2 and YAG lasers.

  1. Explosive helium burning at constant pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M.-A.; Hanawa, T.; Sugimoto, D.

    The results of numerical calculations of nucleosynthesis under adiabatic conditions, i.e., when the only heat exchange with the external regions takes place through neutrinos, are reported. Attention is focused on explosive burning associated with shell flashes, assuming that nuclear energy is deposited in a mass element, followed by expansion and density decrease. Consideration is given to three cases, the shell flash near the surface of a degenerate star, to nuclear burning concentrated in a small region of a star, and to the heat energy being deposited in intermediate layers. A reaction network of 181 nuclear species was constructed and the thermodynamic evolution was calculated assuming constant pressure and adiabatic conditions. The final products of the reactions of H-1 to Cu-62 were projected to by O-16, Mg-24, Si-28, S-32, Ca-40, Ti-44, Cr-48, and Fe-52.

  2. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekasov, Vladimir; Kirsanov, Gennady; Eliseev, Stepan; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sisoev, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The calculation was based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharge. The system of equations is solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles, the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage, power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow predicting the temperature of the gases at the designing of atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources.

  3. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekasov, V.; Chirtsov, Alex; Demidova, Maria; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. Calculations were based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharges. The system of equations was solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles and the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage and power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow for the prediction of the temperature of the gases in atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources. This work was supported by Russian Science Foundation (project 14-19-00311).

  4. Genetic effects of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Wang, Li-Yan; Wang, Sen; Zhao, Hong-Xin; Sun, Wen-Ting; Xing, Xin-Hui; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2008-06-01

    Due to low gas temperatures and high densities of active species, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGDs) would have potential applications in the fields of plasma-based sterilization, gene mutation, etc. In this letter, the genetic effects of helium radio-frequency APGD plasmas with the plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide as the treated biomaterials are presented. The experimental results show that it is the chemically active species, instead of heat, ultraviolet radiation, intense electric field, and/or charged particles, that break the double chains of the plasmid DNA. The genetic effects depend on the plasma operating parameters, e.g., power input, helium flow rate, processing distance, time, etc.

  5. Genetic effects of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with helium

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guo; Li Heping; Wang Sen; Sun Wenting; Bao Chengyu; Wang Liyan; Zhao Hongxin; Xing Xinhui

    2008-06-02

    Due to low gas temperatures and high densities of active species, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGDs) would have potential applications in the fields of plasma-based sterilization, gene mutation, etc. In this letter, the genetic effects of helium radio-frequency APGD plasmas with the plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide as the treated biomaterials are presented. The experimental results show that it is the chemically active species, instead of heat, ultraviolet radiation, intense electric field, and/or charged particles, that break the double chains of the plasmid DNA. The genetic effects depend on the plasma operating parameters, e.g., power input, helium flow rate, processing distance, time, etc.

  6. Microwave capillary plasmas in helium at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Noël, C.; Belmonte, T.; Alves, L. L.

    2014-07-01

    This work uses both simulations and experiments to study helium plasmas (99.999% purity), sustained by surface-wave discharges (2.45 GHz frequency) in capillary tubes (3 mm in-radius) at atmospheric pressure. The simulations use a self-consistent homogeneous and stationary collisional-radiative model (CRM) that solves the rate balance equations for the different species present in the plasma (electrons, He+ and He_2^+ ions, He(n ⩽ 6) excited states and He_2^* excimers) and the gas thermal balance equation, coupled with the two-term electron Boltzmann equation (including direct and stepwise inelastic and superelastic collisions as well as electron-electron collisions). The experiments use optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to measure the electron density ne (from the Hβ Stark broadening), the gas temperature Tg (from the ro-vibrational transitions of OH, present at trace concentrations) and the populations of excited states in the energy region 22.7-24.2 eV, whose spectrum allows determining the excitation temperature Texc. Measurements yield ne ≃ (2.45 ± 1.4) × 1013 cm-3, Tg ≃ 1700 ± 100 K and Texc ≃ 2793 ± 116 K, for a ˜180 ± 10 W power coupled and ˜1 cm length plasma column. The model predictions at ne = 1.7 × 1013 cm-3 are in very good agreement with measurements yielding Tg = 1800 K, Texc = 2792 K (for ˜30% average relative error between calculated and measured excited-state densities), and a power absorbed by the plasma per unit length of 165 W cm-1. The model results depend strongly on ne, and hence on the plasma conductivity and on the power coupled to the plasma. The coupling of a thermal module to the CRM has been shown to be crucial. Increasing the electron density leads to very high gas temperature values, which limits the variation range of (ne, Tg) as input parameters to the model.

  7. Pressure drop measurements on supercritical helium cooled cable in conduit conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, M. A.; Huang, Y.; Vansciver, S. W.

    1988-08-01

    Forced flow cable-in-conduit conductors with large cooled surface areas provide excellent stability margins at the price of high frictional losses and large pumping power requirements. For extensive projects such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design cooperation, it is essential to know the pressure drops to be expected from different conductor geometries and operating conditions. To measure these pressure drops a flow loop was constructed to circulate supercritical helium through different conductors. The loop is surrounded by a 5 K radiation shield to allow for stable operation at the required temperatures. A coil heat exchanger immersed in a helium bath is used to remove the heat generated by the pump. Pressure drops are measured across 1 meter lengths of the conductors for various mass flow rates. Friction factor versus Reynolds number plots are used to correlate the data.

  8. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version High Blood Pressure Overview What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the amount of force that your ... called your blood pressure. What is high blood pressure? High blood pressure (also called hypertension) occurs when your blood ...

  9. Lightweight Liquid Helium Dewar for High-Altitude Balloon Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan; James, Bryan; Fixsen, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical observations at millimeter wavelengths require large (2-to-5- meter diameter) telescopes carried to altitudes above 35 km by scientific research balloons. The scientific performance is greatly enhanced if the telescope is cooled to temperatures below 10 K with no emissive windows between the telescope and the sky. Standard liquid helium bucket dewars can contain a suitable telescope for telescope diameter less than two meters. However, the mass of a dewar large enough to hold a 3-to-5-meter diameter telescope would exceed the balloon lift capacity. The solution is to separate the functions of cryogen storage and in-flight thermal isolation, utilizing the unique physical conditions at balloon altitudes. Conventional dewars are launched cold: the vacuum walls necessary for thermal isolation must also withstand the pressure gradient at sea level and are correspondingly thick and heavy. The pressure at 40 km is less than 0.3% of sea level: a dewar designed for use only at 40 km can use ultra thin walls to achieve significant reductions in mass. This innovation concerns new construction and operational techniques to produce a lightweight liquid helium bucket dewar. The dewar is intended for use on high-altitude balloon payloads. The mass is low enough to allow a large (3-to-5-meter) diameter dewar to fly at altitudes above 35 km on conventional scientific research balloons without exceeding the lift capability of the balloon. The lightweight dewar has thin (250- micron) stainless steel walls. The walls are too thin to support the pressure gradient at sea level: the dewar launches warm with the vacuum space vented continuously during ascent to eliminate any pressure gradient across the walls. A commercial 500-liter storage dewar maintains a reservoir of liquid helium within a minimal (hence low mass) volume. Once a 40-km altitude is reached, the valve venting the vacuum space of the bucket dewar is closed to seal the vacuum space. A vacuum pump then

  10. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After compression, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as measured using the Helium leak test.

  11. High pressure mechanical seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Fuson, Phillip L. (Inventor); Chickles, Colin D. (Inventor); Jones, Cherie A. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting, prior to swaging the fitting onto the tube. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, nickel, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After swaging, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as meaured using the Helium leak test.

  12. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  13. Evaluation of candidate Stirling engine heater tube alloys after 3500 hours exposure to high pressure doped hydrogen or helium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Misencik, J.A.; Titran, R.H.

    1984-10-01

    Sixteen commercial tubing alloys were endurance tested at 820/sup 0/ C, 15 MPa in a diesel-fuel fired Stirling engine simulator materials test rig: iron-base N-155, A-286, Incoloy 800, 19-9DL, CG-27, W-545, 12RN72, 253MA, Sanicro 31H and Sanicro 32; nickel-base Inconel 601, Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Inconel 750 and Pyromet 901; and cobalt-base HS-188. The iron-nickel alloys CG-27 and Pyromet 901 exhibited superior oxidation/corrosion resistance to the diesel-fuel combustion products and surpassed the design criterias' 3500 h creep-rupture endurance life. Three other alloys, Inconel 625, W-545, and 12RN72, had creep-rupture failures after 2856, 2777, and 1598 h, respectively. Hydrogen permeability coefficients determined after 250 h of rig exposure show that Pyromet 901 had the lowest Phi value, 0.064x10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s MPa/sup 1///sup 2/. The next five hairpin tubes, CG-27, Inconel 601, Inconel 718(wd), Inconel 750, and 12RN72(cw) all had Phi values below 0.2x10/sup -6/ more than a decade lower than the design criteria. Based upon its measured high strength and low hydrogen permeation, CG-27 was selected for 3500 h endurance testing at 21 MPa gas pressure and 820/sup 0/C. Results of the high pressure, 21 MPa, CG-27 endurance test demonstrated that the 1.0 vol % C0/sub 2/ dopant is an effective deterrent to hydrogen permeation. The 21 MPa hydrogen gas pressure apparent permeability coefficient at 820/sup 0/C approached 0.1x10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2/sec MPa/sup 1///sup 2/ after 500 hr, the same as the 15 MPa test. Even at this higher gas pressure and comparable permeation rate, CG-27 passed the 3500 hr endurance test without creep-rupture failures. It is concluded that the CG-27 alloy, in the form of thin wall tubing is suitable for Stirling engine applications at 820/sup 0/C and gas pressures up to 21 MPa.

  14. Noncavitating Pump For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael; Swift, Walter; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1996-01-01

    Immersion pump features high efficiency in cryogenic service. Simple and reliable centrifugal pump transfers liquid helium with mass-transfer efficiency of 99 percent. Liquid helium drawn into pump by helical inducer, which pressurizes helium slightly to prevent cavitation when liquid enters impeller. Impeller then pressurizes liquid. Purpose of pump to transfer liquid helium from supply to receiver vessel, or to provide liquid helium flow for testing and experimentation.

  15. Effects of discharge current and voltage on the high density of metastable helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xian-Ping; Andruczyk, D.; James, B. W.; Takiyama, K.; Namba, S.; Oda, T.

    2003-05-01

    Both hollow-cathode and Penning-type discharges were adopted to excite helium atoms to a metastable state. Experimental data indicate that Penning discharge is more suitable for generating high fractions of metastables in a low-density helium beam for laser-induced fluorescence technique in measuring electric fields at the edge of a plasma. The metastable density increases with increasing helium gas pressure in the range of 1.33×10-2-66.7Pa. The highest metastable density of 3.8×1016m-3 is observed at a static gas pressure of 66.7Pa. An approximately linear relationship between the density of metastable helium atoms and the plasma discharge current is observed. Magnetic field plays a very important role in producing a high density of metastable atoms in Penning discharge.

  16. Applying Chemical Potential and Partial Pressure Concepts to Understand the Spontaneous Mixing of Helium and Air in a Helium-Inflated Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jee-Yon Lee; Hee-Soo Yoo; Jong Sook Park; Kwang-Jin Hwang; Jin Seog Kim

    2005-01-01

    The spontaneous mixing of helium and air in a helium-inflated balloon is described in an experiment in which the partial pressure of the gases in the balloon are determined from the mole factions and the total pressure measured in the balloon. The results described provide a model for teaching concepts of partial pressure, chemical potential, and…

  17. 75 FR 53353 - Notice of Availability of Final Interim Staff Guidance Document No. 25 “Pressure and Helium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Availability of Final Interim Staff Guidance Document No. 25 ``Pressure and Helium... Guidance Document No. 25 (ISG-25) ``Pressure and Helium Leakage Testing of the Confinement Boundary of... helium leakage testing and ASME Code required pressure (hydrostatic/pneumatic) testing that is...

  18. Multiple (eight) plasma bullets in helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet and the role of nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sanghoo; Youn Moon, Se; Choe, Wonho

    2013-11-01

    As many as eight multiple plasma bullets produced at atmospheric pressure were observed in one voltage period in a capillary helium dielectric barrier plasma jet. We found that the number of the bullets strongly depends on the nitrogen fraction added to the helium supply gas. Using optical emission spectroscopy and ionization rate calculation, this study demonstrates that nitrogen gas plays an important role in the generation and dynamics of multiple plasma bullets through Penning ionization of nitrogen by helium metastables.

  19. Operation of a THGEM-based detector in low-pressure Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, M.; Yurkon, J.; Stolz, A.

    2015-02-01

    In view of a possible application as a charge-particle track readout for an Active Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC), the operating properties of THick Gaseous Electron Multipliers (THGEM) in pure low-pressure Helium were investigated. This paper includes the effective gain dependence on pressure for different detector configurations (single-, double-, triple-cascade setup), long-term gain stability and energy resolution from tracks of 5.5 MeV alpha particles. Stable operational conditions and maximum detector gains of 104-107 have been achieved in pure Helium at pressure ranging from 100 torr up to 760 torr. Energy resolution of 6.65% (FWHM) for 690 keV of energy deposited by 5.5 MeV alpha particles at 350 torr was measured. The expected energy resolution for the full track is around 2.4% (FWHM). These results, together with the robustness of THGEM electrodes against spark damage, make THGEM structures highly competitive compared to other technologies considered for TPC applications in an active target operating with pure noble gases, requiring a high dynamic range and a wide operating pressure range down to few hundred torr.

  20. Low temperature plasma RF capacitive discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakki, A.; Fayrushin, I.; Kashapov, N.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes Low temperature plasma RF capacitive discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The circuit has been done, to obtain output currentabout 90mA,and the maximum power was 100W, The frequency of the discharging was f = 40MHz.Twolamps (ГУ-50) were used in power supply. Helium consumption was about 1.5l/m.

  1. Simplified Methodology to Estimate the Maximum Liquid Helium (LHe) Cryostat Pressure from a Vacuum Jacket Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    tool, final verification of the dewar pressure vessel design requires a complete, detailed real fluid compressible flow model of the vent stack. The wall heat flux resulting from a loss of vacuum insulation increases the dewar pressure, which actuates the pressure relief mechanism and results in high-speed flow through the dewar vent stack. At high pressures, the flow can be choked at the vent stack inlet, at the exit, or at an intermediate transition or restriction. During previous SOFIA analyses, it was observed that there was generally a readily identifiable section of the vent stack that would limit the flow – e.g., a small diameter entrance or an orifice. It was also found that when the supercritical helium was approximated as an ideal gas at the dewar condition, the calculated mass flow rate based on choking at the limiting entrance or transition was less than the mass flow rate calculated using the detailed real fluid model2. Using this lower mass flow rate would yield a conservative prediction of the dewar’s wall heat flux capability. The simplified method of the current work was developed by building on this observation.

  2. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  3. High efficiency pump for space helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael G.; Swift, Walter L.; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    A centrifugal pump was developed for the efficient and reliable transfer of liquid helium in space. The pump can be used to refill cryostats on orbiting satellites which use liquid helium for refrigeration at extremely low temperatures. The pump meets the head and flow requirements of on-orbit helium transfer: a flow rate of 800 L/hr at a head of 128 J/kg. The overall pump efficiency at the design point is 0.45. The design head and flow requirements are met with zero net positive suction head, which is the condition in an orbiting helium supply Dewar. The mass transfer efficiency calculated for a space transfer operation is 0.99. Steel ball bearings are used with gas fiber-reinforced teflon retainers to provide solid lubrication. These bearings have demonstrated the longest life in liquid helium endurance tests under simulated pumping conditions. Technology developed in the project also has application for liquid helium circulation in terrestrial facilities and for transfer of cryogenic rocket propellants in space.

  4. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. The fourth report on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. Pediatrics . ...

  5. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  6. SHOOT flowmeter and pressure transducers. [for Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A.; Wilcox, R. A.; Spivak, A. L.; Daney, D. E.; Woodhouse, C. E.

    1990-01-01

    A venturi flowmeter has been designed and constructed for the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment. The calibration results obtained from the SHOOT venturi demonstrate the ability of the flowmeter to meet the requirements of the SHOOT experiment. Flow rates as low as 20 cu dm/h and as high as 800 cu dm/h have been measured. Performances of the SHOOT differential and absolute pressure transducers, which have undergone calibration and vibration tests, are also included. Throughout the tests, the responses of the transducers remained linear and repeatable to within + or - 1 percent of the full scales of the transducers.

  7. Miscibility of hydrogen and helium mixtures at megabar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Klepeis, J.E.; Schafer, K.J.; Barbee, T.W. III; Ross, M.

    1991-09-01

    Models of Jupiter and Saturn postulate a central rock core surrounded by a fluid mixture of hydrogen and helium. These models suggest that the mixture is undergoing phase separation in Saturn but not Jupiter. State-of-the-art total energy calculations of the enthalpy of mixing for ordered alloys of hydrogen and helium confirm that at least partial phase separation has occurred in Saturn and predict that this process has also begun in Jupiter. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Plasma formation in atmospheric pressure helium discharges under different background air pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yaoge; Hao Yanpeng; Zheng Bin

    2012-09-15

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges generated between parallel-plate electrodes in helium have been characterized using temporally resolved emission spectra. The variation of typical spectral lines over time has been analyzed. In helium with a low concentration of N{sub 2}, the emission of He at 706.5 nm is dominant and appears 500 ns earlier than N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative bands, indicating low reaction rates of Penning ionization and charge transfer in the initial stage. During the decay, it is the Penning ionization caused by He metastables with a long lifetime rather than the charge transfer reaction that leads to the long decay of N{sub 2}{sup +} emissions. When helium contains a higher concentration of N{sub 2} molecules, the N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative bands become the most intense, and emissions from He, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and O exhibit similar behavior as they increase. The emissions last for a shorter time under such conditions because of rapid consumption of He metastables and He{sub 2}{sup +}.

  9. Helium recovery at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M.; Kynoch, J.

    2015-12-01

    Helium conservation is becoming increasingly important as helium availability is on the decline and prices are on the rise. The Florida State University National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has taken several steps over the past five years to increase the percentage of helium recovered. These include the installation of a standalone purifier, recovery flow meters, contamination meters, and a new piping system. The improvements to the recovery system have reduced the amount of helium purchased by the Mag Lab by 60% while helium usage has increased by roughly 40%. This article will provide details about the recovery system as a whole and describe some of the main components. There will also be some examples of the problems we've had to overcome, and some that we are still working on. Finally, there will be an update on the current status of the recovery system and a description of our plans for the future.

  10. Active-mirror-laser-amplifier thermal management with tunable helium pressure at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lucianetti, Antonio; Albach, Daniel; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-06-20

    We illustrate the benefits of a thin, low pressure helium cell for efficient and safe heat removal in cryogenically-cooled active mirror laser amplifiers operating in the [100 J-1 kJ]/[1-10 Hz] range. A homogeneous gain medium temperature distribution averaging 160 K is obtained with a sub-mm helium-filled gap between the gain medium and a copper plate at 77 K. A significant degree of flexibility for tuning the temperature in the amplifier can be achieved by varying the pressure of the helium gas in the 10(2) to 10(5) Pa range. PMID:21716519

  11. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... the heart, kidneys, brain, and eyes. Types of High Blood Pressure There are two main types of high blood ...

  12. High blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000468.htm High blood pressure To use the sharing features on ... body. Hypertension is the term used to describe high blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are given as ...

  13. Helium-3 and Helium-4 acceleration by high power laser pulses for hadron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.; Bulanov, S. V.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.; Haberer, T.

    2015-06-24

    The laser driven acceleration of ions is considered a promising candidate for an ion source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases. Though proton and carbon ion sources are conventionally used for therapy, other light ions can also be utilized. Whereas carbon ions require 400 MeV per nucleon to reach the same penetration depth as 250 MeV protons, helium ions require only 250 MeV per nucleon, which is the lowest energy per nucleon among the light ions. This fact along with the larger biological damage to cancer cells achieved by helium ions, than that by protons, makes this species an interesting candidate for the laser driven ion source. Two mechanisms (Magnetic Vortex Acceleration and hole-boring Radiation Pressure Acceleration) of PW-class laser driven ion acceleration from liquid and gaseous helium targets are studied with the goal of producing 250 MeV per nucleon helium ion beams that meet the hadron therapy requirements. We show that He3 ions, having almost the same penetration depth as He4 with the same energy per nucleon, require less laser power to be accelerated to the required energy for the hadron therapy.

  14. Modeling the pressure increase in liquid helium cryostats after failure of the insulating vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidt, C.; Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-01

    The pressure relief system of liquid helium cryostats requires a careful design, due to helium's low enthalpy of vaporization and due to the low operating temperature. Hazard analyses often involve the failure of the insulating vacuum in the worst-case scenario. The venting of the insulating vacuum and the implications for the pressure increase in the helium vessel, however, have not yet been fully analyzed. Therefore, the dimensioning of safety devices often requires experience and reference to very few experimental data. In order to provide a better foundation for the design of cryogenic pressure relief systems, this paper presents an analytic approach for the strongly dynamic process induced by the loss of insulating vacuum. The model is based on theoretical considerations and on differential equation modeling. It contains only few simplifying assumptions, which will be further investigated in future experiments. The numerical solutions of example calculations are presented with regard to the heat flux into the helium vessel, the helium pressure increase and the helium flow rate through the pressure relief device. Implications concerning two-phase flow and the influence of kinetic energy are discussed.

  15. Modeling the pressure increase in liquid helium cryostats after failure of the insulating vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Heidt, C.; Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-29

    The pressure relief system of liquid helium cryostats requires a careful design, due to helium's low enthalpy of vaporization and due to the low operating temperature. Hazard analyses often involve the failure of the insulating vacuum in the worst-case scenario. The venting of the insulating vacuum and the implications for the pressure increase in the helium vessel, however, have not yet been fully analyzed. Therefore, the dimensioning of safety devices often requires experience and reference to very few experimental data. In order to provide a better foundation for the design of cryogenic pressure relief systems, this paper presents an analytic approach for the strongly dynamic process induced by the loss of insulating vacuum. The model is based on theoretical considerations and on differential equation modeling. It contains only few simplifying assumptions, which will be further investigated in future experiments. The numerical solutions of example calculations are presented with regard to the heat flux into the helium vessel, the helium pressure increase and the helium flow rate through the pressure relief device. Implications concerning two-phase flow and the influence of kinetic energy are discussed.

  16. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Description of High Blood Pressure Español High blood pressure is a common disease ... defines high blood pressure severity levels. Stages of High Blood Pressure in Adults Stages Systolic (top number) Diastolic (bottom ...

  17. Analysis of trace halocarbon contaminants in ultra high purity helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    This study describes the analysis of ultra high purity helium. Purification studies were conducted and containment removal was effected by the utilization of solid adsorbent purge-trap systems at cryogenic temperatures. Volatile organic compounds in ultra high purity helium were adsorbed on a solid adsorbent-cryogenic trap, and thermally desorbed trace halocarbon and other contaminants were analyzed by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  18. CFD Modeling of Helium Pressurant Effects on Cryogenic Tank Pressure Rise Rates in Normal Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, Gary; Lopez, Alfredo; Chandler, Frank; Hastings, Leon; Hedayat, Ali; Brethour, James

    2007-01-01

    A recently developed computational fluid dynamics modeling capability for cryogenic tanks is used to simulate both self-pressurization from external heating and also depressurization from thermodynamic vent operation. Axisymmetric models using a modified version of the commercially available FLOW-3D software are used to simulate actual physical tests. The models assume an incompressible liquid phase with density that is a function of temperature only. A fully compressible formulation is used for the ullage gas mixture that contains both condensable vapor and a noncondensable gas component. The tests, conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, include both liquid hydrogen and nitrogen in tanks with ullage gas mixtures of each liquid's vapor and helium. Pressure and temperature predictions from the model are compared to sensor measurements from the tests and a good agreement is achieved. This further establishes the accuracy of the developed FLOW-3D based modeling approach for cryogenic systems.

  19. Thermodynamic Vent System Performance Testing with Subcooled Liquid Methane and Gaseous Helium Pressurant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Tucker, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its high specific impulse and favorable thermal properties for storage, liquid methane (LCH4) is being considered as a candidate propellant for exploration architectures. In order to gain an -understanding of any unique considerations involving micro-gravity pressure control with LCH4, testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the performance of a spray-bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with subcooled LCH4 and gaseous helium (GHe) pressurant. Thirteen days of testing were performed in November 2006, with total tank heat leak conditions of about 715 W and 420 W at a fill level of approximately 90%. The TVS system was used to subcool the LCH4 to a liquid saturation pressure of approximately 55.2 kPa before the tank was pressurized with GHe to a total pressure of 165.5 kPa. A total of 23 TVS cycles were completed. The TVS successfully controlled the ullage pressure within a prescribed control band but did not maintain a stable liquid saturation pressure. This was likely. due to a TVS design not optimized for this particular propellant and test conditions, and possibly due to a large artificially induced heat input directly into the liquid. The capability to reduce liquid saturation pressure as well as maintain it within a prescribed control band, demonstrated that the TVS could be used to seek and maintain a desired liquid inlet temperature for an engine (at a cost of propellant lost through the TVS vent). One special test was conducted at the conclusion of the planned test activities. Reduction of the tank ullage pressure by opening the Joule-Thomson valve (JT) without operating the pump was attempted. The JT remained open for over 9300 seconds, resulting in an ullage pressure reduction of 30 kPa. The special test demonstrated the feasibility of using the JT valve for limited ullage pressure reduction in the event of a pump failure.

  20. 3. SOUTHWEST REAR, WITH RAILROAD LINE AT RIGHT. HIGH PRESSURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTHWEST REAR, WITH RAILROAD LINE AT RIGHT. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. Helium pressures in RHIC vacuum cryostats and relief valve requirements from magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the RHIC magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, would pressurize the insulating vacuum in the magnet and transfer line cryostats. Insufficient relief valves on the cryostats could cause a structural failure. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the vacuum cryostat and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed to calculate the helium pressure inside the cryostat. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces were included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Existing relief valve sizes were reviewed to make sure that the maximum stresses, caused by the calculated maximum pressures inside the cryostats, did not exceed the allowable stresses, based on the ASME Code B31.3 and ANSYS results. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The S/F simulation results show that the highest internal pressure in the cryostats, due to the magnet line failure, is {approx}37 psig (255115 Pa); (2) Based on the simulation, the temperature on the cryostat chamber, INJ Q8-Q9, could drop to 228 K, which is lower than the material minimum design temperature allowed by the Code; (3) Based on the ASME Code and ANSYS results, the reliefs on all the cryostats inside the RHIC tunnel are adequate to protect the vacuum chambers when the magnet cooling lines fail; and (4) In addition to the pressure loading, the thermal deformations, due to the temperature decrease on the cryostat chambers, could also cause a high stress on the chamber, if not properly supported.

  2. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  3. High-pressure cryogenic seals for pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggele, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    This investigation of the problems associated with reliably containing gaseous helium pressurized to 1530 bars (22 500 psi) between 4.2 K and 150 K led to the following conclusions: (1) common seal designs used in existing elevated-temperature pressure vessels are unsuitable for high-pressure cryogenic operation, (2) extrusion seal-ring materials such as Teflon, tin, and lead are not good seal materials for cryogenic high-pressure operation; and (3) several high-pressure cryogenic seal systems suitable for large-pressure vessel applications were developed; two seals required prepressurization, and one seal functioned repeatedly without any prepressurization. These designs used indium seal rings, brass or 304 stainless-steel anvil rings, and two O-rings of silicone rubber or Kel-F.

  4. Filament wound pressure vessels - Effects of using liner tooling of low pressure vessels for high pressure vessels development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Krishna M.

    High performance pressure vessels have been recently demanded for aerospace and defense applications. Filament wound pressure vessels consist of a metallic thin liner, which also acts as a mandrel, and composite/epoxy overwrap. Graphite/epoxy overwrapped vessels have been developed to obtain the performance ratio, PV/W, as high as one million inches. Under very high pressure the isotropic metallic liner deforms elasto-plastically, and orthotropic composite fibers deform elastically. Sometimes, for the development of ultra high pressure vessels, composite pressure vessels industry uses the existing liner tooling developed for low burst pressure capacity composite vessels. This work presents the effects of various design variables including the low pressure liner tooling for the development of the high burst pressure capacity Brilliant Pebbles helium tanks. Advance stress analysis and development of an ultra high pressure helium tank.

  5. Simulation of the mantle and crustal Helium isotope signature in the Mediterranean Sea using a high resolution regional circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, Mohamed; Dutay, Jean-claude; Jean-baptiste, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Helium isotopes (3He, 4He) are useful tracers for investigating the deep ocean circulation and for evaluating ocean general circulation models, because helium is a stable and conservative nuclide that does not take part in any chemical or biological processes. Helium in the ocean originates from three different sources: namely, (i) gas dissolution in equilibrium with atmospheric helium, (ii) helium-3 addition by radioactive decay of tritium (called tritiugenic helium), and (iii) injection of helium-3 and helium-4 by the submarine volcanic activity which occurs mainly at plate boundaries, and also addition of helium-4 from the crust and sedimentary cover by α-decay of uranium and thorium contained in various minerals (called terrigenic helium). Here we present the first simulation of the helium isotope distribution in the whole Mediterranean Sea, using a high resolution model (NEMO-MED12). The simulation was produced by building a simple source function for helium produced by submarine volcanic degassing in the main active areas of the Mediterranean, and by crustal degassing at sea bottom, based on previous estimates of the total flux of helium into the oceans. In addition to providing constraints on the degassing flux, our work provides information on the variability of the thermohaline circulation and the ventilation of the deep waters to constrain the degree to which the NEMO-MED12 can reproduce correctly the main hydrographic features of the Mediterranean Sea circulation. This study is part of the work carried out to assess the robustness of the NEMO-MED12 model, which will be used to study the evolution of the climate and its effect on the biogeochemical cycles in the Mediterranean Sea, and to improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the Mediterranean Sea under the increasing anthropogenic pressure.

  6. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - infants ... and blood vessels The health of the kidneys High blood pressure in infants may be due to kidney or ... Bronchopulmonary dysplasia Renal artery stenosis In newborn babies, high blood pressure is often caused by a blood clot in ...

  7. Electric field development in γ-mode radiofrequency atmospheric pressure glow discharge in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navrátil, Zdeněk; Josepson, Raavo; Cvetanović, Nikola; Obradović, Bratislav; Dvořák, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Time development of electric field strength during radio-frequency sheath formation was measured using Stark polarization spectroscopy in a helium γ-mode radio-frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) atmospheric pressure glow discharge at high current density (3 A cm-2). A method of time-correlated single photon counting was applied to record the temporal development of spectral profile of He I 492.2 nm line with a sub-nanosecond temporal resolution. By fitting the measured profile of the line with a combination of pseudo-Voigt profiles for forbidden (2 1P-4 1F) and allowed (2 1P-4 1D) helium lines, instantaneous electric fields up to 32 kV cm-1 were measured in the RF sheath. The measured electric field is in agreement with the spatially averaged value of 40 kV cm-1 estimated from homogeneous charge density RF sheath model. The observed rectangular waveform of the electric field time development is attributed to increased sheath conductivity by the strong electron avalanches occurring in the γ-mode sheath at high current densities.

  8. Tunable high pressure lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.

    1976-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy CO2 lasers is considerably improved by high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening, permits tuning the laser lines off atmospheric absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. Applications of tunable high pressure CO2 lasers to energy transmission and to remote sensing are discussed along with initial efforts in tuning high pressure CO2 lasers.

  9. A Study on the Heat Transfer Properties of Pressurized Helium II through Fine Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, N.; Nakai, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Murakami, M.; Shintomi, T.

    2006-04-27

    An experimental study was carried out on the heat transfer properties of pressurized superfluid helium in the Gorter-Mellink heat transfer region. By using channels of hydraulic diameter from 5.6 x 10- through 4.81 x 10-3 m, the heat transfer properties of pressurized superfluid helium were measured in the experiment. The temperature dependence of Gorter-Mellink parameter, AGM, is revealed from the experimental results. It is also proven that AGM depend only on temperature, and not on the channel size and shape. The effect of quantized vortices on heat transfer of pressurized superfluid helium is discussed in comparison of the channel diameter with the mean vortex line spacing.

  10. Freezing and Pressure-Driven Flow of Solid Helium in Vycor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James; Herman, Tobias; Beamish, John

    2005-07-01

    The recent torsional oscillator results of Kim and Chan suggest a supersolid phase transition in solid 4He confined in Vycor. We have used a capacitive technique to directly monitor density changes for helium confined in Vycor at low temperature and have used a piezoelectrically driven diaphragm to study the pressure-induced flow of solid helium into the Vycor pores. Our measurements showed no indication of a mass redistribution in the Vycor that could mimic supersolid decoupling and put an upper limit of about 0.003 μm/s on any pressure-induced supersolid flow in the pores of Vycor.

  11. Numerical Investigation of Thermal Distribution and Pressurization Behavior in Helium Pressurized Cryogenic Tank by Introducing a Multi-component Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wang; Yanzhong, Li; Zhan, Liu; Kang, Zhu

    An improved CFD model involving a multi-component gas mixturein the ullage is constructed to predict the pressurization behavior of a cryogenic tank considering the existence of pressurizing helium.A temperature difference between the local fluid and its saturation temperature corresponding to the vapor partial pressure is taken as the phase change driving force. As practical application of the model, hydrogen and oxygen tanks with helium pressurization arenumerically simulated by using themulti-component gas model. The results presentthat the improved model produce higher ullage temperature and pressure and lower wall temperaturethan those without multi-component consideration. The phase change has a slight influence on thepressurization performance due to the small quantities involved.

  12. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  13. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure to live. Without it, blood can't flow through our bodies and carry oxygen to our vital organs. But when blood pressure gets too high — a condition called hypertension — it can lead to ...

  14. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Health Information Center High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy What Is High Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is ... Are the Effects of High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy? Although many pregnant women with high blood pressure ...

  15. Controlled Chemistry Helium High Temperature Materials Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Richard N. WRight

    2005-08-01

    A system to test aging and environmental effects in flowing helium with impurity content representative of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has been designed and assembled. The system will be used to expose microstructure analysis coupons and mechanical test specimens for up to 5,000 hours in helium containing potentially oxidizing or carburizing impurities controlled to parts per million levels. Impurity levels in the flowing helium are controlled through a feedback mechanism based on gas chromatography measurements of the gas chemistry at the inlet and exit from a high temperature retort containing the test materials. Initial testing will focus on determining the nature and extent of combined aging and environmental effects on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of alloys proposed for structural applications in the NGNP, including Inconel 617 and Haynes 230.

  16. Cermet coating tribological behavior in high temperature helium

    SciTech Connect

    CACHON, Lionel; ALBALADEJO, Serge; TARAUD, Pascal; LAFFONT, G.

    2006-07-01

    As the CEA is highly involved in the Generation IV Forum, a comprehensive research and development program has been conducted for several years, in order to establish the feasibility of Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) technology projects using helium as a cooling fluid. Within this framework, a tribology program was launched in order to select and qualify coatings and materials, and to provide recommendations for the sliding components operating in GCRs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the CEA Helium tribology study on several GCR components (thermal barriers, control rod drive mechanisms, reactor internals, ..) requiring protection against wear and bonding. Tests in helium atmosphere are necessary to be fully representative of tribological environments and to assess the material or coating candidates which can provide a reliable answer to these situations. This paper focuses on the tribology tests performed on CERMET (Cr{sub 3}C-2- NiCr) coatings within a temperature range of between 800 and 1000 deg C.

  17. Thermophysical properties of helium-4 from 4 to 3000 R with pressures to 15000 psia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Data on many of the properties of helium commonly used in engineering calculations are compiled over as wide a temperature and pressure range as is practical. These properties are presented in a form which is convenient to the engineer. All of these properties have been critically evaluated and represent the best values for that property at this time.

  18. Pressure Gradients and Annealing Effects in Solid Helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhel, Md. Abdul Halim

    The Kim and Chan experiment in 2004 gave the first experimental evidence of a possible supersolid state. Even though the origin of this state is not clear yet, several experimental and theoretical investigations suggest defects are responsible for this curious phase. We have used heat pulses and thermal quenching to study pressure gradients and annealing mechanisms in solid 4He crystals. Large pressure gradients exist in crystals grown at constant volume. These can be enhanced by phase transitions, thermal quenching or by partial melting. Annealing reduces defect densities and hence pressure gradients in crystals. Our measurements show that the pressure at different points in a crystal can behave differently, even if there is little change in the crystal's average pressure. We measured the activation energy that is associated with the annealing process.

  19. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  20. Calculation of the pressure rise in the CHL 5000-gallon liquid-helium dewar

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.

    1983-01-04

    The writing of a computer program to calculate the pressure rise in the CHL 5000-gallon dewar was motivated by the writing of a Fermilab engineering note on the safety of the dewar which is presently being installed at the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier. The calculation is intended to verify that the pressure in the inner vessel will not rise above a safe level in a catastrophic venting situation.

  1. Three electrode atmospheric pressure plasma jet in helium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletic, Dejan; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma jets are widely used in various types of applications and lately more and more in the field of plasma medicine. However, it is not only their applicability that distinguishes them from other atmospheric plasma sources, but also the behavior of the plasma. It was shown that plasma plume is not continuous, but discrete set of plasma packages. Here we present iCCD images and current voltage characteristics of a three electrode plasma jet. Our plasma jet has a simple design with body made of glass tube and two transparent electrodes wrapped around it. The additional third metal tip electrode was positioned at 10 and 25 mm in front of the jet nozzle and connected to the same potential as the powered electrode. Power transmitted to the plasma was from 0.5 W to 4.0 W and the helium flow rate was kept constant at 4 slm. For the 10 mm configuration plasma is ignited on the metal tip in the whole period of the excitation signal and in the positive half cycle plasma ``bullet'' is propagating beyond the metal tip. In contrast to that, for the 25 mm configuration at the tip electrode plasma can be seen only in the minimum and maximum of the excitation signal, and there is no plasma ``bullet'' formation. This research has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Republic of Serbia, under projects ON171037 and III41011.

  2. Thermophysical properties of Helium-4 from 0. 8 to 1500 K with pressures to 2000 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, V.D.; Mccarty, R.D.

    1989-11-01

    Tabular summary data of the thermophysical properties of fluid helium are given for temperatures from 0.8 to 1500 K, with pressures to 2000 MPa between 75 and 300 K, or to 100 MPa outside of this temperature band. Properties include density, specific heats, enthalpy, entropy, internal energy, sound velocity, expansivity, compressibility, thermal conductivity, and viscosity. The data are calculated from a computer program which is available from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The computer program is based on carefully fitted state equations for both normal and superfluid helium.

  3. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Norberg, Seth A. Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-07

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O{sub 2} = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  4. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  5. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  6. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  7. Development of a high vacuum sample preparation system for helium mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Das, N. K.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    A high vacuum sample preparation system for the 3He/4He ratio mass spectrometer (Helix SFT) has been developed to remove all the gaseous constituents excluding helium from the field gases. The sample preparation system comprises of turbo molecular pump, ion pump, zirconium getter, pipettes and vacuum gauges with controller. All these are fitted with cylindrical SS chamber using all metal valves. The field samples are initially treated with activated charcoal trap immersed in liquid nitrogen to cutoff major impurities and moisture present in the sample gas. A sample of 5 ml is collected out of this stage at a pressure of 10-2 mbar. This sample is subsequently purified at a reduced pressure of 10-7 mbar before it is injected into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. The sample pressure was maintained below 10-7 mbar with turbo molecular vacuum pumps and ion pumps. The sample gas passes through several getter elements and a cold finger with the help of manual high vacuum valves before it is fed to the mass spectrometer. Thus the high vacuum sample preparation system introduces completely clean, dry and refined helium sample to the mass spectrometer for best possible analysis of isotopic ratio of helium.

  8. Transport simulations of the ignited ITER with high helium fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1994-04-01

    Computer simulations with special versions of the one dimensional BALDUR predictive transport code are carried out to investigate the particle confinement of helium and hydrogen, the energy confinement and the burn control in the high density scenario of the ITER (CDA) physics phase. The code uses empirical transport coefficients for ELMy H mode plasmas, an improved model of the scrape-off layer (SOL), an impurity radiation model for helium and iron, and fast burn control by neutral beam injection feedback. A self-sustained thermonuclear burn is achieved for hundreds of seconds. The necessary radiation corrected energy confinement time τE is found to be 4.2 s, which is attainable according to the ITER H mode scaling. In the ignited ITER, a significant dilution of the DT fuel by helium takes place. Steady state helium fractions of up to 8% are obtained, which are found to be compatible with self-sustained burn. The SOL model yields self-consistent electron densities and temperatures at the separatrix (ne = 5.8 × 1019 m-3, Te = 80 eV)

  9. Testing the Effects of Helium Pressurant on Thermodynamic Vent System Performance with Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S.; Tucker, S.

    2006-01-01

    In support of the development of a zero gravity pressure control capability for liquid hydrogen, testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the effects of helium pressurant on the performance of a spray bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS). Fourteen days of testing was performed in August - September 2005, with an ambient heat leak of about 70-80 watts and tank fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%. The TVS successfully controlled the tank pressure within a +/- 3.45 kPa (+/- 0.5 psi) band with various helium concentration levels in the ullage. Relative to pressure control with an "all hydrogen" ullage, the helium presence resulted in 10 to 30 per cent longer pressure reduction durations, depending on the fill level, during the mixing/venting phase of the control cycle. Additionally, the automated control cycle was based on mixing alone for pressure reduction until the pressure versus time slope became positive, at which time the Joule-Thomson vent was opened. Testing was also conducted to evaluate thermodynamic venting without the mixer operating, first with liquid then with vapor at the recirculation line inlet. Although ullage stratification was present, the ullage pressure was successfully controlled without the mixer operating. Thus, if vapor surrounded the pump inlet in a reduced gravity situation, the ullage pressure can still be controlled by venting through the TVS Joule Thomson valve and heat exchanger. It was evident that the spray bar configuration, which extends almost the entire length of the tank, enabled significant thermal energy removal from the ullage even without the mixer operating. Details regarding the test setup and procedures are presented in the paper. 1

  10. The Role of Helium Metastable States in Radio-Frequency Helium-Oxygen Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets: Measurement and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Kari; Waskoenig, Jochen; Sadeghi, Nader; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    Absolute densities of metastable He atoms were measured line-of sight integrated along the plasma channel of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in helium oxygen mixtures by tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy. Dependencies of the He metastable density with oxygen admixtures up to 1 percent were investigated. Results are compared to a 1-d numerical simulation, which includes a semi-kinetical treatment of the electron dynamics and the complex plasma chemistry (20 species, 184 reactions), and very good agreement is found. The main formation mechanisms for the helium metastables are identified and analyzed, including their pronounced spatio-temporal dynamics. Penning ionization through helium metastables is found to be significant for plasma sustainment, while it is revealed that helium metastables are not an important energy carrying species into the jet effluent and therefore will not play a direct role in remote surface treatments.

  11. Floating Pressure Conversion of Two 3.5 KW, 20 K, Helium Refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, J.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Creel, J.; Norton, R.; Linza, R.; Vargas, G.; Lauterbach, J.; Urbin, J.; Howe, D.

    2010-04-01

    Two helium refrigerators, each rated for 3.5 KW at 20 K, are used at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Building No. 32 to provide cryogenic-pumping within two large thermal-vacuum chambers. These refrigerators were originally commissioned in 1996. New changes to the controls of these refrigerators were recently completed. This paper describes some of the control issues that necessitated the controls change-over. It will describe the modifications and the new process control which allows the refrigerators to take advantage of the Ganni Cycle "floating pressure" control technology. The controls philosophy change-over to the floating pressure control technology was the first application on a helium gas refrigeration system. Previous implementations of the floating pressure technology have been on 4 K liquefaction and refrigeration systems, which have stored liquid helium volumes that have level indications used for varying the pressure levels (charge) in the system for capacity modulation. The upgrades have greatly improved the performance, stability, and efficiency of these two refrigerators. The upgrades have also given the operators more information and details about the operational status of the main components (compressors, expanders etc.) of the refrigerators at all operating conditions (i.e. at various loads in the vacuum chambers). The performance data of the two systems, pre and post upgrading are presented.

  12. Anomalously high retention of radiogenic helium in native platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakubovich, O. V.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.; Mochalov, A. G.; Kotov, A. B.; Korneev, S. I.

    2012-04-01

    Relatively quick migration of helium from crystal structures has been known for a long time. However there is a group of minerals - native metals - where stability of radiogenic helium is essentially high [1]. Helium, due to its very low solubility in metals, assembles in atomic clusters - "bubbles" of nanometer size. Migration of helium "bubbles" as a whole from the crystal structures needs relatively high temperature near the melting point of metals. On that ground of special interest are platinoids with melting points (and, consequently, temperatures of "explosion-like" release of radiogenic helium) of more than 1550 oC In this respect we believe that the method based on natural radioactivity of platinum is promising. To verify the idea of anomalously high retention of radiogenic helium in native platinum and to check the efficiency of the proposed 190Pt-4He method of isotope geochronology, we studied independent mineral aggregates of native platinum from chromite-bearing dunites of Galmoenan plutonic complex (10 individual samples) (Koryak-Kamchatka belt, Russia) and Konder massif (5 individual samples) (Khabarovsk district,Russia). Because native platinum always has admixture of Fe, Cu etc. for reliable determination of concentration of platinum in the samples in our study we used electron microscope JSM-6510LA with JED 2200 add-on. Amount of 4He in native platinum was determinate on mass-spectrometer complex MSU-G-01-M. Native platinum consists of 6 isotopes. Among them two isotopes are α-radioactive and decay according to following schemes: 190Pt →4He+186Os→4He+182W 192Pt →4He+188Os Presumably, in native platinum there is always a certain amount of uranium and thorium, absorbed in the process of crystallization. However influence of helium generation from uranium becomes more marked at growing of 238U/Pt ratio and beginning with 238U/Pt ≈ 10-5 should be taken into consideration. For the same reason helium produced by the decay of 192Pt and 186Os can

  13. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  14. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... to major health problems. Make a point of learning what blood pressure should be. And, remember: High ...

  15. Helium gas bubble trapped in liquid helium in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, H. Hannahs, S. T.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Weijers, H. W.

    2014-03-31

    High magnetic field magnets are used widely in the area of the condensed matter physics, material science, chemistry, geochemistry, and biology at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. New high field magnets of state-of-the-art are being pursued and developed at the lab, such as the current developing 32 T, 32 mm bore fully superconducting magnet. Liquid Helium (LHe) is used as the coolant for superconducting magnets or samples tested in a high magnetic field. When the magnetic field reaches a relatively high value the boil-off helium gas bubble generated by heat losses in the cryostat can be trapped in the LHe bath in the region where BzdBz/dz is less than negative 2100 T{sup 2}/m, instead of floating up to the top of LHe. Then the magnet or sample in the trapped bubble region may lose efficient cooling. In the development of the 32 T magnet, a prototype Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide coil of 6 double pancakes with an inner diameter of 40 mm and an outer diameter of 140 mm was fabricated and tested in a resistive magnet providing a background field of 15 T. The trapped gas bubble was observed in the tests when the prototype coil was ramped up to 7.5 T at a current of 200 A. This letter reports the test results on the trapped gas bubble and the comparison with the analytical results which shows they are in a good agreement.

  16. FLOATING PRESSURE CONVERSION AND EQUIPMENT UPGRADES OF TWO 3.5KW, 20K, HELIUM REFRIGERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Homan, V. Ganni, A. Sidi-Yekhlef, J. Creel, R. Norton, R. Linza, G. Vargas, J. Lauterbach, J. Urbin, D. Howe

    2010-04-01

    Two helium refrigerators, each rated for 3.5 KW at 20 K, are used at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Building No. 32 to provide cryogenic-pumping within two large thermal-vacuum chambers. These refrigerators were originally commissioned in 1996. New changes to the controls of these refrigerators were recently completed. This paper describes some of the control issues that necessitated the controls change-over. It will describe the modifications and the new process control which allows the refrigerators to take advantage of the Ganni Cycle “floating pressure” control technology. The controls philosophy change-over to the floating pressure control technology was the first application on a helium gas refrigeration system. Previous implementations of the floating pressure technology have been on 4 K liquefaction and refrigeration systems, which have stored liquid helium volumes that have level indications used for varying the pressure levels (charge) in the system for capacity modulation. The upgrades have greatly improved the performance, stability, and efficiency of these two refrigerators. The upgrades have also given the operators more information and details about the operational status of the main components (compressors, expanders etc.) of the refrigerators at all operating conditions (i.e. at various loads in the vacuum chambers). The performance data of the two systems, pre and post upgrading are presented.

  17. Analytical model of atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive Penning discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive discharges have wide applications. An analytic equilibrium solution is developed based on a homogeneous, current-driven discharge model that includes sheath and electron multiplication effects and contains two electron populations. A simplified chemistry is used with four unknown densities: hot electrons, warm electrons, positive ions and metastables. The dominant electron-ion pair production is Penning ionization, and the dominant ion losses are to the walls. The equilibrium particle balances are used to determine a single ionization balance equation for the warm electron temperature, which is solved, both approximately within the α- and γ-modes, and exactly by conventional root-finding techniques. All other discharge parameters are found, the extinction and α-γ transitions are determined, and a similarity law is given, in which the equilibrium for a short gap at high pressure can be rescaled to a longer gap at lower pressure. Within the α-mode, we find the scaling of the discharge parameters with current density, frequency, gas density and gap width. The analytic results are compared to hybrid and particle-in-cell (PIC) results for He/0.1%N2, and to hybrid results for He/0.1%H2O. For nitrogen, a full reaction set is used for the hybrid calculations and a simplified reaction set for the PIC simulations. For the chemically complex water trace gas, a set of 209 reactions among 43 species is used. The analytic results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the more elaborate hybrid and PIC calculations.

  18. High pressure nitriding

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Hoffmann, F.T.; Mayr, P.; Minarski, P.

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the presented research project is the development of a new high pressure nitriding process, which avoids disadvantages of conventional nitriding processes and allows for new applications. Up to now, a nitriding furnace has been constructed and several investigations have been made in order to characterize the influence of pressure on the nitriding process. In this paper, connections between pressure in the range of 2 to 12 atm and the corresponding nitride layer formation for the steel grades AISI 1045, H11 and a nitriding steel are discussed. Results of the nitride layer formation are presented. For all steel grades, a growth of nitride layers with increasing pressure was obtained. Steels with passive layers, as the warm working steel H11, showed a better nitriding behavior at elevated pressure.

  19. A computational modeling study on the helium atmospheric pressure plasma needle discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Mu-Yang; Yang, Cong-Ying; Liu, San-Qiu; Wang, Zhen-Dong; Lv, Yan; Wang, De-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    A two-dimensional coupled model of neutral gas flow and plasma dynamics is employed to investigate the streamer dynamics in a helium plasma needle at atmospheric pressure. A parametric study of the streamer propagation as a function of needle tip curvature radius and helium gas flow rate is presented. The key chemical reactions at the He/air mixing layer which drive the streamer propagation are the direct ionization via collision with electrons, the Penning effect being not so crucial. With increasing the gas flow rate from 0.2 standard liter per minute (SLM) to 0.8 SLM, however, the emissions resulting from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species change from a solid circle to a hollow profile and the average streamer propagation velocity decreases. Air impurities (backdiffusion from ambient air) in the helium jet result in a significant increase in the streamer propagation velocity. Besides, with decreasing the tip curvature radiusfrom 200 μm to 100 μm, the electron avalanche process around the near-tip region is more pronounced. However, the spatially resolved plasma parameters distributions (electron, helium metastables, ground state atomic oxygen, etc.) remain almost the same, except that around the near-tip region where their peak values are more than doubled. Project supported partly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11465013), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20151BAB212012), and in part by the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2015DFA61800).

  20. Use of Heated Helium to Simulate Surface Pressure Fluctuations on the Launch Abort Vehicle During Abort Motor Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; James, George H.; Burnside, Nathan J.; Fong, Robert; Fogt, Vincent A.

    2011-01-01

    The solid-rocket plumes from the Abort motor of the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV, also know as Orion) were simulated using hot, high pressure, Helium gas to determine the surface pressure fluctuations on the vehicle in the event of an abort. About 80 different abort situations over a wide Mach number range, (0.3< or =M< or =1.2) and vehicle attitudes (+/-15deg) were simulated inside the NASA Ames Unitary Plan, 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. For each abort case, typically two different Helium plume and wind tunnel conditions were used to bracket different flow matching critera. This unique, yet cost-effective test used a custom-built hot Helium delivery system, and a 6% scale model of a part of the MPCV, known as the Launch Abort Vehicle. The test confirmed the very high level of pressure fluctuations on the surface of the vehicle expected during an abort. In general, the fluctuations were found to be dominated by the very near-field hydrodynamic fluctuations present in the plume shear-layer. The plumes were found to grow in size for aborts occurring at higher flight Mach number and altitude conditions. This led to an increase in the extent of impingement on the vehicle surfaces; however, unlike some initial expectations, the general trend was a decrease in the level of pressure fluctuations with increasing impingement. In general, the highest levels of fluctuations were found when the outer edges of the plume shear layers grazed the vehicle surface. At non-zero vehicle attitudes the surface pressure distributions were found to become very asymmetric. The data from these wind-tunnel simulations were compared against data collected from the recent Pad Abort 1 flight test. In spite of various differences between the transient flight situation and the steady-state wind tunnel simulations, the hot-Helium data were found to replicate the PA1 data fairly reasonably. The data gathered from this one-of-a-kind wind-tunnel test fills a gap in the manned-space programs

  1. Measurement of the First Townsend's Ionization Coefficients in Helium, Air, and Nitrogen at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Junxia; Luo, Haiyun; Yue, Yang; Wang, Xinxin

    2014-07-01

    In the past the first Townsend’s ionization coefficient α could only be measured with Townsend discharge in gases at low pressure. After realizing Townsend discharge in some gases at atmospheric pressure by using dielectric barrier electrodes, we had developed a new method for measuring α coefficient at atmospheric pressure, a new optical method based on the discharge images taken with ICCD camera. With this newly developed method α coefficient in helium, nitrogen and air at atmospheric pressure were measured. The results were found to be in good agreement with the data obtained at lower pressure but same reduced field E/p by other groups. It seems that the value of α coefficient is sensitive to the purity of the working gas.

  2. Numerical Modeling and Test Data Comparison of Propulsion Test Article Helium Pressurization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Kimberly; Majumdar, Alok; Steadman, Todd; Hedayat, Ali; Fogle, Frank R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A transient model of the propulsion test article (PTA) helium pressurization system was developed using the generalized fluid system simulation program (GFSSP). The model included pressurization lines from the facility interface to the engine purge interface and liquid oxygen (lox) and rocket propellant-1 (RP-1) tanks, the propellant tanks themselves including ullage space, and propellant feed lines to their respective pump interfaces. GFSSP's capability was extended to model a control valve to maintain ullage pressure within a specified limit and pressurization processes such as heat transfer between ullage gas, propellant, and the tank wall as well as conduction in the tank wall. The purpose of the model is to predict the flow system characteristics in the entire pressurization system during 80 sec of lower feed system priming, 420 sec of fuel and lox pump priming, and 150 sec of engine firing.

  3. Columnar discharge mode between parallel dielectric barrier electrodes in atmospheric pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yanpeng; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Yaoge

    2014-01-15

    Using a fast-gated intensified charge-coupled device, end- and side-view photographs were taken of columnar discharge between parallel dielectric barrier electrodes in atmospheric pressure helium. Based on three-dimensional images generated from end-view photographs, the number of discharge columns increased, whereas the diameter of each column decreased as the applied voltage was increased. Side-view photographs indicate that columnar discharges exhibited a mode transition ranging from Townsend to glow discharges generated by the same discharge physics as atmospheric pressure glow discharge.

  4. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... prevent high blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  5. The breakdown process in an atmospheric pressure nanosecond parallel-plate helium/argon mixture discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bang-Dou; Takashima, Keisuke; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2016-02-01

    The breakdown process in an atmospheric pressure nanosecond helium/argon mixture discharge with parallel-plate electrodes is investigated by temporally and spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The spatially resolved electric field is obtained from the Stark splitting of the He i 492.1 nm line. Using the emissions from the He ii 468.6 nm, He i 667.8 nm, and Ar i 750.4 nm lines and a collisional-radiative model, the spatially resolved T e, high and T e, low (representing the effective T e in the high energy and low energy part of the EEDF, respectively) are obtained. It is found that, compared with the average electric field provided by the external pulser, the electric field is greatly enhanced at certain location and is significantly weakened at other places. This observation shows the effect of the ionization wave propagation, as predicted in [1, 2]. The value of T e, high is much larger than that of T e, low, which indicates that an elevated high energy tail in the EEDF is built up under the influence of strong electric field during the breakdown process. Initially, the spatial distribution of the T e, low and the T e, high generally follows that of the electric field. However, at the end of the breakdown period, the location of the highest T e, low and T e, high is shifted away from the cathode sheath, where the electric field is strongest. This indicates the existence of a non-local effect and is supported by the result from a simple Monte-Carlo simulation.

  6. Benchmarking density functionals for hydrogen-helium mixtures with quantum Monte Carlo: Energetics, pressures, and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, Raymond C.; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.; Morales, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate understanding of the phase diagram of dense hydrogen and helium mixtures is a crucial component in the construction of accurate models of Jupiter, Saturn, and Jovian extrasolar planets. Though density-functional-theory-based first-principles methods have the potential to provide the accuracy and computational efficiency required for this task, recent benchmarking in hydrogen has shown that achieving this accuracy requires a judicious choice of functional, and a quantification of the errors introduced. In this work, we present a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) -based benchmarking study of a wide range of density functionals for use in hydrogen-helium mixtures at thermodynamic conditions relevant for Jovian planets. Not only do we continue our program of benchmarking energetics and pressures, but we deploy QMC-based force estimators and use them to gain insight into how well the local liquid structure is captured by different density functionals. We find that TPSS, BLYP, and vdW-DF are the most accurate functionals by most metrics, and that the enthalpy, energy, and pressure errors are very well behaved as a function of helium concentration. Beyond this, we highlight and analyze the major error trends and relative differences exhibited by the major classes of functionals, and we estimate the magnitudes of these effects when possible.

  7. Benchmarking density functionals for hydrogen-helium mixtures with quantum Monte Carlo: Energetics, pressures, and forces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clay, Raymond C.; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.; Morales, Maguel A.

    2016-01-19

    An accurate understanding of the phase diagram of dense hydrogen and helium mixtures is a crucial component in the construction of accurate models of Jupiter, Saturn, and Jovian extrasolar planets. Though DFT based rst principles methods have the potential to provide the accuracy and computational e ciency required for this task, recent benchmarking in hydrogen has shown that achieving this accuracy requires a judicious choice of functional, and a quanti cation of the errors introduced. In this work, we present a quantum Monte Carlo based benchmarking study of a wide range of density functionals for use in hydrogen-helium mixtures atmore » thermodynamic conditions relevant for Jovian planets. Not only do we continue our program of benchmarking energetics and pressures, but we deploy QMC based force estimators and use them to gain insights into how well the local liquid structure is captured by di erent density functionals. We nd that TPSS, BLYP and vdW-DF are the most accurate functionals by most metrics, and that the enthalpy, energy, and pressure errors are very well behaved as a function of helium concentration. Beyond this, we highlight and analyze the major error trends and relative di erences exhibited by the major classes of functionals, and estimate the magnitudes of these e ects when possible.« less

  8. The influence of high grain boundary density on helium retention in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, G.; González, C.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Iglesias, R.; Perlado, J. M.; Rivera, A.

    2015-02-01

    In order to study the influence of a high grain boundary density on the amount, size and distribution of defects produced by pulsed helium (625 keV) irradiation in tungsten, we have carried out Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations in both monocrystalline and nanocrystalline tungsten. The parameterization of the OKMC code (MMonCa) includes binding energies obtained with our in-house Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. In the interior of a grain in nanocrystalline tungsten the mixed HenVm clusters are larger and have a lower He/V ratio. Thus, they are less pressurized clusters. The total elastic strain energy remains almost constant with the increasing number of pulses, contrary to its increase in monocrystalline tungsten. A better response to helium irradiation is therefore expected in nanocrystalline tungsten, opening a new path to investigate these nanostructured materials for fusion purposes.

  9. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What is High Blood Pressure? Updated:Aug 26,2016 High blood pressure, also ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  10. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1993-09-14

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

  11. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  12. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  13. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1992-07-14

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

  14. Simulation of Oxygen Disintegration and Mixing With Hydrogen or Helium at Supercritical Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Taskinoglu, Ezgi

    2012-01-01

    The simulation of high-pressure turbulent flows, where the pressure, p, is larger than the critical value, p(sub c), for the species under consideration, is relevant to a wide array of propulsion systems, e.g. gas turbine, diesel, and liquid rocket engines. Most turbulence models, however, have been developed for atmospheric-p turbulent flows. The difference between atmospheric-p and supercritical-p turbulence is that, in the former situation, the coupling between dynamics and thermodynamics is moderate to negligible, but for the latter it is very significant, and can dominate the flow characteristics. The reason for this stems from the mathematical form of the equation of state (EOS), which is the perfect-gas EOS in the former case, and the real-gas EOS in the latter case. For flows at supercritical pressure, p, the large eddy simulation (LES) equations consist of the differential conservation equations coupled with a real-gas EOS. The equations use transport properties that depend on the thermodynamic variables. Compared to previous LES models, the differential equations contain not only the subgrid scale (SGS) fluxes, but also new SGS terms, each denoted as a correction. These additional terms, typically assumed null for atmospheric pressure flows, stem from filtering the differential governing equations, and represent differences between a filtered term and the same term computed as a function of the filtered flow field. In particular, the energy equation contains a heat-flux correction (q-correction) that is the difference between the filtered divergence of the heat flux and the divergence of the heat flux computed as a function of the filtered flow field. In a previous study, there was only partial success in modeling the q-correction term, but in this innovation, success has been achieved by using a different modeling approach. This analysis, based on a temporal mixing layer Direct Numerical Simulation database, shows that the focus in modeling the q

  15. High pressure gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-01

    Compact, high pressure, high current gas target features all metal construction and semi-automatic window assembly change. The unique aspect of this target is the domed-shaped window. The Havar alloy window is electron beam welded to a metal ring, thus forming one, interchangeable assembly. The window assembly is sealed by knife-edges locked by a pneumatic toggle allowing a quick, in situ window change.

  16. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  17. Simulation of the mantle and crustal helium isotope signature in the Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution regional circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, M.; Dutay, J.-C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Fourré, E.

    2015-12-01

    Helium isotopes (3He, 4He) are useful tracers for investigating the deep ocean circulation and for evaluating ocean general circulation models, because helium is a stable and conservative nuclide that does not take part in any chemical or biological process. Helium in the ocean originates from three different sources, namely, (i) gas dissolution in equilibrium with atmospheric helium, (ii) helium-3 addition by radioactive decay of tritium (called tritiugenic helium), and (iii) injection of terrigenic helium-3 and helium-4 by the submarine volcanic activity which occurs mainly at plate boundaries, and also addition of (mainly) helium-4 from the crust and sedimentary cover by α-decay of uranium and thorium contained in various minerals. We present the first simulation of the terrigenic helium isotope distribution in the whole Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution model (NEMO-MED12). For this simulation we build a simple source function for terrigenic helium isotopes based on published estimates of terrestrial helium fluxes. We estimate a hydrothermal flux of 3.5 mol3 He yr-1 and a lower limit for the crustal flux at 1.6 × 10-7 4He mol m-2 yr-1. In addition to providing constraints on helium isotope degassing fluxes in the Mediterranean, our simulations provide information on the ventilation of the deep Mediterranean waters which is useful for assessing NEMO-MED12 performance. This study is part of the work carried out to assess the robustness of the NEMO-MED12 model, which will be used to study the evolution of the climate and its effect on the biogeochemical cycles in the Mediterranean Sea, and to improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the Mediterranean Sea under the increasing anthropogenic pressure.

  18. Simulation of the mantle and crustal helium isotope signature in the Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution regional circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, M.; Dutay, J.-C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Fourré, P. E.

    2015-08-01

    Helium isotopes (3He, 4He) are useful tracers for investigating the deep ocean circulation and for evaluating ocean general circulation models, because helium is a stable and conservative nuclide that does not take part in any chemical or biological process. Helium in the ocean originates from three different sources: namely, (i) gas dissolution in equilibrium with atmospheric helium, (ii) helium-3 addition by radioactive decay of tritium (called tritiugenic helium), and (iii) injection of terrigenic helium-3 and helium-4 by the submarine volcanic activity which occurs mainly at plate boundaries, and also addition of (mainly) helium-4 from the crust and sedimentary cover by α-decay of uranium and thorium contained in various minerals. We present the first simulation of the terrigenic helium isotope distribution in the whole Mediterranean Sea, using a high-resolution model (NEMO-MED12). For this simulation we build a simple source function for terrigenic helium isotopes based on published estimates of terrestrial helium fluxes. We estimate a hydrothermal flux of 3.5 mol 3He yr-1 and a lower limit for the crustal flux at 1.6 10-7 mol 4He mol m-2 yr-1. In addition to providing constraints on helium isotope degassing fluxes in the Mediterranean, our simulations provide information on the ventilation of the deep Mediterranean waters which are useful for assessing NEMO-MED12 performance. This study is part of the work carried out to assess the robustness of the NEMO-MED12 model, which will be used to study the evolution of the climate and its effect on the biogeochemical cycles in the Mediterranean Sea, and to improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the Mediterranean Sea under the increasing anthropogenic pressure.

  19. High capacity 30 K remote helium cooling loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trollier, T.; Tanchon, J.; Icart, Y.; Ravex, A.

    2014-01-01

    Absolut System has built several 50 K remote helium cooling loops used as high capacity and very low vibration cooling source into large wavelength IR detectors electro-optical characterization test benches. MgB2 based superconducting electro-technical equipment's under development require also distributed high cooling power in the 20-30 K temperature range. Absolut System has designed, manufactured and tested a high capacity 30 K remote helium cooling loop. The equipment consists of a CRYOMECH AL325 type cooler, a CP830 type compressor package used as room temperature circulator and an intermediate LN2 bath cooling used between two recuperator heat exchangers (300 K-77 K and 77 K-20 K). A cooling capacity of 30 W @ 20 K or 80 W @ 30 K has been demonstrated on the application heat exchanger, with a 4-meter remote distance ensured by a specifically designed gas circulation flexible line. The design and the performance will be reported in this paper.

  20. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Cartigny, A.; Blakely, E.A.; Lyman, J.T.; Zink, S.R.

    1985-02-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons.

  1. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... health of you and your baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle ... Some pregnant women with high blood pressure develop preeclampsia. It's a sudden increase in blood pressure after ...

  2. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Modelling of streamer propagation in atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidis, G. V.

    2010-10-01

    The results of a two-dimensional numerical simulation of positive streamer propagation in atmospheric-pressure helium jets injected into ambient air are presented. It is shown that depending on the jet width and the initial radial distribution of electron number density streamer structures of two types can be formed: one with maxima of electric field and electron density at the jet axis and another with maxima of these parameters near the boundary between the jet and surrounding air. The latter structure is similar to the observed ring-shaped structures of plasma bullets.

  3. Ionization of highly excited helium atoms in an electric field

    SciTech Connect

    van de Water, W.; Mariani, D.R.; Koch, P.M.

    1984-11-01

    We present detailed measurements of ionization of highly excited triplet helium atoms in a static electric field. The atoms were prepared in states with energy E close to the saddle-point threshold E = -2(F(a.u.))/sup 1/2/. The electric field F was sufficiently strong for the states to be characterized by total spin S and absolute value of the magnetic quantum number M/sub L/. For M/sub L/ = 0 states the experiments measured ionization properties of adiabatic states. In another case, Vertical BarM/sub L/Vertical Bar = 2, they predominantly measured those of diabatic states. In both cases the ionization rate was found to be a highly nonmonotonic function of the field strength. The observations are analyzed in terms of a theory of the helium density of states in an electric field. A companion paper (D. A. Harmin, Phys. Rev. A 30, 2413 (1984)) develops in detail the general theory, which uses quantum defects to parametrize the effect of the core interaction. The agreement between measured and calculated ionization curves is good, indicating that the field ionization of a nonhydrogenic atom can now be understood in a detailed, quantitative, and predictive sense.

  4. Optical properties of the atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet generated by alternative current (a.c.) power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilik, Erkan; Akan, Tamer

    2016-05-01

    In this work, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was produced to generate cold flowing post-discharge plasma of pure helium gas. The main aim of this study was to generate cold flowing APPJ of pure helium gas and to determine how their optical emission spectrum change influences varying different flow rates. Lengths of early, middle, and late post-discharge plasma (jet) regions and their fluctuations were determined, respectively. Then, ignition condition dependence of the post-discharge plasma for flow rate was specified at a constant voltage. Spectroscopic studies of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet of helium were presented via analyzing OH, N2, N2+, oxygen, and helium intensities for various flow rates.

  5. Production of water mist from electrolyte surface in contact with atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, K.; Ishigame, H.; Nishiyama, S.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a new subject which has been opened by developments of atmospheric-pressure plasma sources. In this work, we adopted laser Mie scattering to examine an atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasma in contact with NaCl solution. The plasma was produced by applying a dc voltage between a stainless-steel gas nozzle and the electrolyte via a register of 100 k Ω. The gap distance between the electrolyte surface and the electrode was 4 mm. Helium as a working gas was fed from the nozzle toward the electrolyte surface. The discharge space was illuminated using a cw laser beam at a wavelength of 457 nm, and the scattered laser light was captured using a high-speed camera with an image intensifier via an interference filter at the laser wavelength. The scattered laser light told us the existence of particulates or water mists in the discharge space. The water mists were produced from the electrolyte surface explosively as well as randomly. The trajectories of the mists were basically parabolic. We sometimes observed the expansion of the mist size in the gas phase. The expansion was followed by the disappearance of the mist. This may be due to the evaporation of the mist, and is considered to be the production mechanism of Na in the gas phase.

  6. Pressure distributions on a 0.02-scale Space Shuttle orbiter nose at Mach 21.5 in helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Bernot, Peter T.; Woods, William C.

    1994-01-01

    Pressure distributions on a 0.02-scale model of the Space Shuttle orbiter forward fuselage were obtained in the 22-inch aerodynamic leg of the Langley Hypersonic Helium Tunnel Facility at a nominal free-stream Mach number of 21.5 and a ratio of specific heats of 1.67 for inclusion in the database of the Shuttle entry air data system (SEADS). The data were measured at model angles of attack of 0 deg to 50 deg in 5 deg increments for zero sideslip angle and at model sideslip angles of -5 deg to 5 deg for angles of attack equal to 5, 20, 35, and 40 deg. These data displayed trends similar to those observed in other wind tunnels at Mach 6 and 10 in air. Specifically noted is a shift in the location of the stagnation point at angles of attack above 15 deg; this effect did not, however, occur in flight. By comparison, the data obtained at Mach 6 in the Langley Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel, corresponding to a lower ratio of specific heats in the postshock region than those in helium and air, showed some reduction of the stagnation point shift at the higher angles of attack. The differences between flight and wind tunnel pressure distributions are believed due primarily to high-temperature gas chemistry effects in flight, which include lower effective specific heat ratios but which were not completely duplicated in the wind tunnels.

  7. Very high-resolution heat-capacity measurements near the lambda point of helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1983-01-01

    New measurements of the heat capacity of a sample of helium 3-mm high are reported, which extend to within 5 x 10 to the -8th deg of the lambda transition at the vapor pressure. From an analysis of the results allowing for the effect of gravity, the values -0.0127 + or - 0.0026 (2 sigma) for the exponent alpha (= alpha-prime) and 1,058 + or - 0.004 for the leading singularity ratio A/A-prime are obtained. These values are in closer agreement with the theoretical predictions than those reported previously.

  8. Living with High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With High Blood Pressure If you have high blood pressure, the best thing to do is to talk ... help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for mother and baby. High ...

  9. Electronic Structure of Crystalline 4He at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, H.K.; Cai, Y.; Shirley, E.L.; Ding, Y.; Eng, P.; Chow, P.; Xiao, Y.; Shu, J.; Hemley, R.J.; Kao, C.C.; Mao, W.L.

    2010-10-29

    Using inelastic x-ray scattering techniques, we have succeeded in probing the high-pressure electronic structure of helium at 300 K. Helium has the widest known valence-conduction band gap of all materials a property whose high-pressure response has been inaccessible to direct measurements. We observed a rich electron excitation spectrum, including a cutoff edge above 23 eV, a sharp exciton peak showing linear volume dependence, and a series of excitations and continuum at 26 to 45 eV. We determined the electronic dispersion along the {Gamma}-M direction over two Brillouin zones, and provided a quantitative picture of the helium exciton beyond the simplified Wannier-Frenkel description.

  10. Cold Helium Pressurization for Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Propulsion Systems: Fully-Integrated Initial Hot-Fire Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, R. L.; Atwell, M. J.; Melcher, J. C.; Hurlbert, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype cold helium active pressurization system was incorporated into an existing liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) prototype planetary lander and hot-fire tested to collect vehicle-level performance data. Results from this hot-fire test series were used to validate integrated models of the vehicle helium and propulsion systems and demonstrate system effectiveness for a throttling lander. Pressurization systems vary greatly in complexity and efficiency between vehicles, so a pressurization performance metric was also developed as a means to compare different active pressurization schemes. This implementation of an active repress system is an initial sizing draft. Refined implementations will be tested in the future, improving the general knowledge base for a cryogenic lander-based cold helium system.

  11. Production of stable, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasmas using gases other than helium or neon

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jaeyoung; Henins, Ivars

    2005-06-21

    The present invention enables the production of stable, steady state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive .alpha.-mode plasmas using gases other than helium and neon. In particular, the current invention generates and maintains stable, steady-state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas using pure argon or argon with reactive gas mixtures, pure oxygen or air. By replacing rare and expensive helium with more readily available gases, this invention makes it more economical to use atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas for various materials processing applications.

  12. Operating characteristics of the Langley Mach 10 high Reynolds number helium tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. D.; Morris, D. J.; Fischer, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    Operating characteristics of the Langley Mach 10 high Reynolds number helium tunnel are presented for stagnation pressures from 138 N/sq cm to 1655 N/sq cm. The characteristics include detailed Mach number surveys in the test section from which usable core size and regions of disturbed flow were determined, preliminary blockage test results, and maximum run time to be expected at various stagnation pressures. Important tunnel dimensions including details of the model mounting apparatus are given. Measurements show the variation in average core Mach number in the test section to be between 9.4 and 10 for the present range of test conditions. The core radius is from 23 cm to 31.5 cm, depending on stagnation pressure and axial location in the test section.

  13. Instrument Development for High Reynolds Numer Pipe Flow in Helium I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Chris J.; Donnelly, Russell J.

    1997-03-01

    We report on the development of instrumentation for the study of high Reynolds number turbulence in pipe flow. We have developed a flowmeter and pressure transducer for use in liquid helium I. Both of these instruments have been tested in a half inch diameter flow tube in which we were able to achieve a maximum Reynolds number of 1.5 million. The flowmeter measures the average velocity of flow in a pipe by determining the variations of the time of flight of an ultrasonic sound burst. It is capable of measuring velocities from 0.1 cm/sec to over 1 m/s to an accuracy of 0.05 cm/sec without obstructing the flow. The pressure transducer is a parallel plate capacitance manometer using a flexible plastic membrane as one of the plates. The transducer is capable of resolving pressures from 0.05 Pa up to 200 Pa.

  14. Cryogenic High Pressure Sensor Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  15. Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Tank Sub-Surface Pressurization with Gaseous Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Cartagena, W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of a propellant tank pressurization system with the pressurant diffuser intentionally submerged beneath the surface of the liquid. Propellant tanks and pressurization systems are typically designed with the diffuser positioned to apply pressurant gas directly into the tank ullage space when the liquid propellant is settled. Space vehicles, and potentially propellant depots, may need to conduct tank pressurization operations in micro-gravity environments where the exact location of the liquid relative to the diffuser is not well understood. If the diffuser is positioned to supply pressurant gas directly to the tank ullage space when the propellant is settled, then it may become partially or completely submerged when the liquid becomes unsettled in a microgravity environment. In such case, the pressurization system performance will be adversely affected requiring additional pressurant mass and longer pressurization times. This series of tests compares and evaluates pressurization system performance using the conventional method of supplying pressurant gas directly to the propellant tank ullage, and then supplying pressurant gas beneath the liquid surface. The pressurization tests were conducted on the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) located at Test Stand 300 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). EDU is a ground based Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) test article supported by Glenn Research Center (GRC) and MSFC. A 150 ft3 propellant tank was filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2). The pressurization system used regulated ambient helium (GHe) as a pressurant, a variable position valve to maintain flow rate, and two identical independent pressurant diffusers. The ullage diffuser was located in the forward end of the tank and was completely exposed to the tank ullage. The submerged diffuser was located in the aft end of the tank and was completely submerged when the tank liquid level was 10% or greater

  16. Stroke and High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Stroke and High Blood Pressure Updated:Jan 6,2015 Stroke is a leading ... to heart disease and stroke. Start exploring today ! High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  17. Modeling the dynamic response of pressures in a distributed helium refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, J.C.

    1997-12-01

    A mathematical model is created of the dynamic response of pressures caused by flow inputs to an existing distributed helium refrigeration system. The dynamic system studied consists of the suction and discharge pressure headers and compressor portions of the refrigeration system used to cool the superconducting magnets of the Tevatron accelerator at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The modeling method involves identifying the system from data recorded during a series of controlled tests, with effort made to detect locational differences in pressure response around the four mile accelerator circumference. A review of the fluid mechanics associated with the system indicates linear time invariant models are suitable for the identification, particularly since the governing equations of one dimensional fluid flow are approximated by linear differential equations. An outline of the experimental design and the data acquisition system are given, followed by a detailed description of the modeling, which utilized the Matlab programming language and associated System Identification Toolbox. Two representations of the system are presented. One, a black box model, provides a multi-input, multi-output description assembled from the results of single input step function testing. This description indicates definite variation in pressure response with distance from the flow input location, and also suggests subtle differences in response with the input location itself. A second system representation is proposed which details the relation between continuous flow changes and pressure response, and provides explanation of a previously unappreciated pressure feedback internal to the system.

  18. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom

  19. Gas Breakdown of Radio Frequency Glow Discharges in Helium at near Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinkun; Xu, Jinzhou; Cui, Tongfei; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Jianjun

    2013-07-01

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was developed for radio frequency glow discharge in helium at near atmospheric pressure, and was employed to study the gas breakdown characteristics in terms of breakdown voltage. The effective secondary electron emission coefficient and the effective electric field for ions were demonstrated to be important for determining the breakdown voltage of radio frequency glow discharge at near atmospheric pressure. The constant of A was estimated to be 64±4 cm-1Torr-1, which was proportional to the first Townsend coefficient and could be employed to evaluate the gas breakdown voltage. The reduction in the breakdown voltage of radio frequency glow discharge with excitation frequency was studied and attributed to the electron trapping effect in the discharge gap.

  20. High-heat-flux testing of helium-cooled heat exchangers for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, D.L.; Izenson, M.G.; Baxi, C.B.; Rosenfeld, J.H.

    1996-07-01

    High-heat-flux experiments on three types of helium-cooled divertor mock-ups were performed on the 30-kW electron beam test system and its associated helium flow loop at Sandia National Laboratories. A dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (DSCu) was used in the manufacture of all the mock-ups. The first heat exchanger provides for enhanced heat transfer at relatively low flow rates and much reduced pumping requirements. The Creare sample was tested to a maximum absorbed heat flux of 5.8 MW/m{sup 2}. The second used low pressure drops and high mass flow rates to achieve good heat removal. The GA specimen was tested to a maximum absorbed heat flux of 9 MW/m{sup 2} while maintaining a surface temperature below 400{degree}C. A second experiment resulted in a maximum absorbed heat flux of 34 MW/m{sup 2} and surface temperatures near 533{degree}C. The third specimen was a DSCu, axial flow, helium-cooled divertor mock-up filled with a porous metal wick which effectively increases the available heat transfer area. Low mass flow and high pressure drop operation at 4.0 MPa were characteristic of this divertor module. It survived a maximum absorbed heat flux of 16 MW/m{sup 2} and reached a surface temperature of 740{degree}C. Thermacore also manufactured a follow-on, dual channel porous metal-type heat exchanger, which survived a maximum absorbed heat flux of 14 MW/m{sup 2} and reached a maximum surface temperature of 690{degree}C. 11refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. The role of helium metastable states in radio-frequency driven helium-oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jets: measurement and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, K.; Waskoenig, J.; Sadeghi, N.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-10-01

    Absolute densities of metastable He(23S1) atoms were measured line-of-sight integrated along the discharge channel of a capacitively coupled radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in technologically relevant helium-oxygen mixtures by tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy. The dependences of the He(23S1) density in the homogeneous-glow-like α-mode plasma with oxygen admixtures up to 1% were investigated. The results are compared with a one-dimensional numerical simulation, which includes a semi-kinetical treatment of the pronounced electron dynamics and the complex plasma chemistry (in total 20 species and 184 reactions). Very good agreement between measurement and simulation is found. The main formation mechanisms for metastable helium atoms are identified and analyzed, including their pronounced spatio-temporal dynamics. Penning ionization through helium metastables is found to be significant for plasma sustainment, while it is revealed that helium metastables are not an important energy carrying species into the jet effluent and therefore will not play a direct role in remote surface treatments.

  2. HIGH PRESSURE DIES

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, W.B.

    1960-05-31

    A press was invented for subjecting specimens of bismuth, urania, yttria, or thoria to high pressures and temperatures. The press comprises die parts enclosing a space in which is placed an electric heater thermally insulated from the die parts so as not to damage them by heat. The die parts comprise two opposed inner frustoconical parts and an outer part having a double frustoconical recess receiving the inner parts. The die space decreases in size as the inner die parts move toward one another against the outer part and the inner parts, though very hard, do not fracture because of the mode of support provided by the outer part.

  3. High-voltage electrical apparatus utilizing an insulating gas of sulfur hexafluoride and helium

    DOEpatents

    Wootton, Roy E.

    1980-01-01

    High-voltage electrical apparatus includes an outer housing at low potential, an inner electrode disposed within the outer housing at high potential with respect thereto, and support means for insulatably supporting the inner electrode within the outer housing. Conducting particles contaminate the interior of the outer housing, and an insulating gas electrically insulates the inner electrode from the outer housing even in the presence of the conducting particles. The insulating gas is comprised of sulfur hexafluoride at a partial pressure of from about 2.9 to about 3.4 atmospheres absolute, and helium at a partial pressure from about 1.1 to about 11.4 atmospheres absolute. The sulfur hexafluoride comprises between 20 and 65 volume percent of the insulating gas.

  4. Chromium at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  5. Laser diagnostics on atmospheric-pressure low-temperature helium pulsed plasmas in room- and cryogenic-temperature environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Noritaka; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Yasui, Ryoma; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    In atmospheric-pressure low- temperature plasmas, the control of the plasma gas temperature (Tg) by a few kelvin is considered to be crucial for their applications to novel materials processing such as bio-materials. However, there have been only few studies that focused on the influence of Tg on the plasma characteristics. On the other hand, it was reported that helium metastables played a key role in the dependency of chemical reactions on Tg in helium-nitrogen plasmas. In this study, laser diagnostics were carried out in atmospheric-pressure helium pulsed plasmas near or below room temperature, at 340 -100 K. Parallel electrodes of copper rods (diameter: 2 mm) with a gap distance of 535 μm were used and pulsed discharges with a pulse width of a few hundred nanoseconds were generated inside a reactor. The density and lifetime of helium metastables were estimated by laser absorption spectroscopy measurements and Tg was evaluated by near-infrared laser heterodyne interferometry measurements. At 300 K, the helium metastable density was 1.5 × 1013 cm-3 while the lifetime was 3.1 μs, and increase in Tg was up to 70 K. Dependency of the density and lifetime of helium metastables on Tg was observed and also discussed.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Helium Pressurization System of Propulsion Test Article (PTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steadman, Todd; Majumdar, Alok; Holt, Kimberly

    2001-01-01

    A transient model of the Propulsion Test Article (PTA) Helium Pressurization System was developed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The model included feed lines from the facility interface to the engine purge interface and Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1) tanks, the propellant tanks themselves including ullage space and propellant feed lines to their respective pump interfaces. GFSSP's capability was extended to model a control valve to maintain ullage pressure within a specified limit and pressurization processes such as heat transfer between ullage gas, propellant and the tank wall. The purpose of the model is to predict the flow system characteristics in the entire pressurization system during 80 seconds of lower feed system priming, 420 seconds of fuel and LOX pump priming and 150 seconds of engine firing. Subsequent to the work presented here, the PTA model has been updated to include the LOX and RP-1 pumps, while the pressurization option itself has been modified to include the effects of mass transfer. This updated model will be compared with PTA test data as it becomes available.

  7. Liquid Hydrogen Regulated Low Pressure High Flow Pneumatic Panel AFT Arrow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kelley, M.

    2013-01-01

    Project Definition: Design a high flow pneumatic regulation panel to be used with helium and hydrogen. The panel will have two circuits, one for gaseous helium (GHe) supplied from the GHe Movable Storage Units (MSUs) and one for gaseous hydrogen (GH2) supplied from an existing GH2 Fill Panel. The helium will supply three legs; to existing panels and on the higher pressure leg and Simulated Flight Tanks (SFTs) for the lower pressure legs. The hydrogen line will pressurize a 33,000 gallon vacuum jacketed vessel.

  8. Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved barrier discharge produced in trapped helium gas at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chiper, Alina Silvia; Popa, Gheorghe

    2013-06-07

    Experimental study was made on induced effects by trapped helium gas in the pulsed positive dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operating in symmetrical electrode configuration at atmospheric pressure. Using fast photography technique and electrical measurements, the differences in the discharge regimes between the stationary and the flowing helium are investigated. It was shown experimentally that the trapped gas atmosphere (TGA) has notable impact on the barrier discharge regime compared with the influence of the flowing gas atmosphere. According to our experimental results, the DBD discharge produced in trapped helium gas can be categorized as a multi-glow (pseudo-glow) discharge, each discharge working in the sub-normal glow regime. This conclusion is made by considering the duration of current pulse (few {mu}s), their maximum values (tens of mA), the presence of negative slope on the voltage-current characteristic, and the spatio-temporal evolution of the most representative excited species in the discharge gap. The paper focuses on the space-time distribution of the active species with a view to better understand the pseudo-glow discharge mechanism. The physical basis for these effects was suggested. A transition to filamentary discharge is suppressed in TGA mode due to the formation of supplementary source of seed electrons by surface processes (by desorption of electrons due to vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules, originated from barriers surfaces) rather than volume processes (by enhanced Penning ionisation). Finally, we show that the pseudo-glow discharge can be generated by working gas trapping only; maintaining unchanged all the electrical and constructive parameters.

  9. Diamond-anvil high-pressure cell for optical spectroscopy at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Toshihiko

    1985-02-01

    A diamond-anvil high-pressure cell is described which allows optical studies at low temperatures and variable pressure to 260 kbar and higher. A bellows assembly has been designed to drive diamond anvils and connected helium gas pressure source. The sample pressure can be changed remotely while the sample is maintained at operating temperature. Examples of the application to the optical absorption in InP under high pressure are shown. Tests using different pressure transmitting fluids are reported.

  10. DC negative corona discharge in atmospheric pressure helium: transition from the corona to the ‘normal’ glow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Nusair; Antao, Dion S.; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2014-06-01

    Direct current (dc) negative corona discharges in atmospheric pressure helium are simulated via detailed numerical modeling. Simulations are conducted to characterize the discharges in atmospheric helium for a pin plate electrode configuration. A self-consistent two-dimensional hybrid model is developed to simulate the discharges and the model predictions are validated with experimental measurements. The discharge model considered consists of momentum and energy conservation equations for a multi-component (electrons, ions, excited species and neutrals) gas mixture, conservation equations for each component of the mixture and state relations. A drift-diffusion approximation for the electron and the ion fluxes is used. A model for the external circuit driving the discharge is also considered and solved along with the discharge model. Many of the key features of a negative corona discharge, namely non-linear current-voltage characteristics, spatially flat cathode current density and glow-like discharge in the high current regime are displayed in the predictions. A transition to the ‘normal’ glow discharge from the corona discharge regime is also observed. The transition is identified from the calculated current-voltage characteristic curve and is characterized by the radial growth of the negative glow and the engulfment of the cathode wire.

  11. A comparison between characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained by nanosecond- and microsecond-pulse generators in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao Wang, Ruixue; Yan, Ping; Zhou, Zhongsheng; Zhou, Yixiao

    2014-10-15

    Power source is an important parameter that can affect the characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs), because it can play a key role on the discharge characteristics and ionization process of APPJs. In this paper, the characteristics of helium APPJs sustained by both nanosecond-pulse and microsecond-pulse generators are compared from the aspects of plume length, discharge current, consumption power, energy, and optical emission spectrum. Experimental results showed that the pulsed APPJ was initiated near the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, and then the stable helium APPJ could be observed when the applied voltage increased. Moreover, the discharge current of the nanosecond-pulse APPJ was larger than that of the microsecond-pulse APPJ. Furthermore, although the nanosecond-pulse generator consumed less energy than the microsecond-pulse generator, longer plume length, larger instantaneous power per pulse and stronger spectral line intensity could be obtained in the nanosecond-pulse excitation case. In addition, some discussion indicated that the rise time of the applied voltage could play a prominent role on the generation of APPJs.

  12. High pressure capillary connector

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2005-08-09

    A high pressure connector capable of operating at pressures of 40,000 psi or higher is provided. This connector can be employed to position a first fluid-bearing conduit that has a proximal end and a distal end to a second fluid-bearing conduit thereby providing fluid communication between the first and second fluid-bearing conduits. The connector includes (a) an internal fitting assembly having a body cavity with (i) a lower segment that defines a lower segment aperture and (ii) an interiorly threaded upper segment, (b) a first member having a first member aperture that traverses its length wherein the first member aperture is configured to accommodate the first fluid-bearing conduit and wherein the first member is positioned in the lower segment of the internal fitting assembly, and (c) a second member having a second member aperture that traverses its length wherein the second member is positioned in the upper segment of the fitting assembly and wherein a lower surface of the second member is in contact with an upper surface of the first member to assert a compressive force onto the first member and wherein the first member aperture and the second member aperture are coaxial.

  13. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure with the development of a practical method to measure it. Physicians began to note associations between hypertension and risk of heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure. Although scientists had yet to prove that lowering blood pressure ...

  14. High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Web Sites with More Information About High Blood Pressure ...

  15. What Causes High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Causes of High Blood Pressure Changes, either from genes or the environment, in ... and blood vessel structure and function. Biology and High Blood Pressure Researchers continue to study how various changes in ...

  16. Helium permeability of different structure pyrolytic carbon coatings on graphite prepared at low temperature and atmosphere pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinliang; Zhao, Yanling; Zhang, Wenting; He, Xiujie; Zhang, Dongsheng; He, Zhoutong; Gao, Yantao; Jin, Chan; Xia, Huihao; Wang, Jianqiang; Huai, Ping; Zhou, Xingtai

    2016-01-01

    Low density isotropic pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) and high density anisotropic pyrolytic carbon (APyC) coatings have been prepared at low temperature and atmosphere pressure. Helium gas permeabilities of nuclear graphite coated with IPyC and APyC of different thickness are studied using a vacuum apparatus. Both the permeation rates of the treated graphite gradually decrease with the increasing thickness of the coatings. The IPyC and APyC coatings can reduce the gas permeability coefficient of the samples by three and five orders of magnitude, respectively. The permeability difference is related to the microscopic structure, i.e., pores, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, mercury injection and X-ray tomography experiments. The changes of the permeability owing to heat cycles are observed to be negligible.

  17. High pressure, high temperature transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrolyk, John J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The pressure measurement system utilizes two bourdon tubes with an active side connected to a test specimen and a reference side connected to an outside source. The tubes are attached to a single extensometer measuring relative displacement. The active side deflects when gases vent a specimen failure. The reference side is independently pressurized to a test pressure and provides a zero reference while providing a pressure calibration reference for the active side. The deflection noted by the active side at specimen failure is duplicated on the reference side by venting until an appropriate magnitude of pressure versus deflection is determined. In this way the pressure which existed inside the specimen prior to failure can be determined.

  18. Density distributions of OH, Na, water vapor, and water mist in atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasmas in contact with NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Ishigame, Hiroaki; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the density distributions of OH, Na, water vapor and water mist in atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasmas in contact with NaCl solution. The densities of OH, Na and H2O had different spatial distributions, while the Na density had a similar distribution to mist, suggesting that mist is the source of Na in the gas phase. When the flow rate of helium toward the electrolyte surface was increased, the distributions of all the species densities concentrated in the neighboring region to the electrolyte surface more significantly. The densities of all the species were sensitive to the electric polarity of the power supply. In particular, we never detected Na and mist when the electrolyte worked as the anode of the dc discharge. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  19. [High Pressure Gas Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, Rolando

    2002-01-01

    Four high-pressure gas tanks, the basis of this study, were especially made by a private contractor and tested before being delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In order to insure 100% reliability of each individual tank the staff at KSC decided to again submit the four tanks under more rigorous tests. These tests were conducted during a period from April 10 through May 8 at KSC. This application further validates the predictive safety model for accident prevention and system failure in the testing of four high-pressure gas tanks at Kennedy Space Center, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM). It is apparent from the variety of barriers available for a hazard control that some barriers will be more successful than others in providing protection. In order to complete the Barrier Analysis of the system, a Task Analysis and a Biomechanical Study were performed to establish the relationship between the degree of biomechanical non-conformities and the anomalies found within the system on particular joints of the body. This relationship was possible to obtain by conducting a Regression Analysis to the previously generated data. From the information derived the body segment with the lowest percentage of non-conformities was the neck flexion with 46.7%. Intense analysis of the system was conducted including Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), and Barrier Analysis. These analyses resulted in the identification of occurrences of conditions, which may be becoming hazardous in the given system. These conditions, known as dendritics, may become hazards and could result in an accident, system malfunction, or unacceptable risk conditions. A total of 56 possible dendritics were identified. Work sampling was performed to observe the occurrence each dendritic. The out of control points generated from a Weighted c control chart along with a Pareto analysis indicate that the dendritics "Personnel not

  20. Helium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet: Diagnostics and Application for Burned Wounds Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topala, Ionut; Nastuta, Andrei

    A new field of plasma applications developed in the last years, entitled plasma medicine, has focused the attention of many peoples from plasma ­community on biology and medicine. Subjects that involve plasma physics and technology (e.g. living tissue treatment or wound healing, cancer cell apoptosis, blood coagulation, sterilization and decontamination) are nowadays in study in many laboratories. In this paper we present results on optical and electrical diagnosis of a helium ­atmospheric pressure plasma jet designed for medical use. This type of plasma jet was used for improvement of the wound healing process. We observed a more rapid macroscopic healing of the plasma treated wounds in comparison with the control group.

  1. Three-dimensional simulation of microwave-induced helium plasma under atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. L.; Hua, W.; Guo, S. Y.; Liu, Z. L.

    2016-07-01

    A three-dimensional model is presented to investigate helium plasma generated by microwave under atmospheric pressure in this paper, which includes the physical processes of electromagnetic wave propagation, electron and heavy species transport, gas flow, and heat transfer. The model is based on the fluid approximation calculation and local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. The simulation results demonstrate that the maxima of the electron density and gas temperature are 4.79 × 1017 m-3 and 1667 K, respectively, for the operating conditions with microwave power of 500 W, gas flow rate of 20 l/min, and initial gas temperature of 500 K. The electromagnetic field distribution in the plasma source is obtained by solving Helmholtz equation. Electric field strength of 2.97 × 104 V/m is obtained. There is a broad variation on microwave power, gas flow rate, and initial gas temperature to obtain deeper information about the changes of the electron density and gas temperature.

  2. Electron dynamics and plasma jet formation in a helium atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge jet

    SciTech Connect

    Algwari, Q. Th.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-09-19

    The excitation dynamics within the main plasma production region and the plasma jets of a kHz atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet operated in helium was investigated. Within the dielectric tube, the plasma ignites as a streamer-type discharge. Plasma jets are emitted from both the powered and grounded electrode end; their dynamics are compared and contrasted. Ignition of these jets are quite different; the jet emitted from the powered electrode is ignited with a slight time delay to plasma ignition inside the dielectric tube, while breakdown of the jet at the grounded electrode end is from charging of the dielectric and is therefore dependent on plasma production and transport within the dielectric tube. Present streamer theories can explain these dynamics.

  3. Helium/oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment for hydrophilicity improvement of grey cotton knitted fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Liqiang; Nie, Huali; Chatterton, Nicholas P.; Branford-White, Christopher J.; Qiu, Yiping; Zhu, Limin

    2011-06-01

    The influence of atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) treatment on the hydrophilicity of grey cotton knitted fabric (GCKF) was investigated. For comparison, specimens which had undergone different treatments were tested by contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fourier-transform infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results imply that helium/oxygen APPJ could improve the hydrophilicity of GCKF by modifying the surface properties. In addition, combining dewaxing processes with He/O 2 APPJ treatment was found to tremendously improve the hydrophilicity of GCKF. The mechanism of this was also confirmed by Ruthenium Red staining which showed most of pectic substances inside the cotton fiber existed beneath the waxy layer and on top of the cellulose microfibril.

  4. Methods used to investigate and resolve the Space Shuttle helium pressure regulator instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; Abe, Jimi T.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Shuttle main propulsion system (MPS) has seven 750-psia regulators used to purge the Space Shuttle main engines to prevent mixture between oxygen and hydrogen and to pneumatically actuate the propellant valves. Methods used to investigate the instability of the MPS regulators which caused a failure of the 750-psia regulator during a test in 1986 are discussed, with special attention given to the analytical tools and the facilities. As a result of this investigation, a well-understood regulator was designed, with excellent stability over a wide range of inlet pressures from 900 to 4500 psia, flow rates from 1 to 2000 scfm, very fast response, minimal overshoot and undershoot, and durable cycle life. Diagrams of the MPS helium system and of a new -0006 fail-safe improved-stability regulator are presented.

  5. Practical and highly sensitive elemental analysis for aqueous samples containing metal impurities employing electrodeposition on indium-tin oxide film samples and laser-induced shock wave plasma in low-pressure helium gas.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Lahna, Kurnia; Idris, Nasrullah; Jobiliong, Eric; Suyanto, Hery; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Tjia, May On; Lie, Tjung Jie; Lie, Zener Sukra; Kurniawan, Davy Putra; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2015-09-01

    We have conducted an experimental study exploring the possible application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for practical and highly sensitive detection of metal impurities in water. The spectrochemical measurements were carried out by means of a 355 nm Nd-YAG laser within N2 and He gas at atmospheric pressures as high as 2 kPa. The aqueous samples were prepared as thin films deposited on indium-tin oxide (ITO) glass by an electrolysis process. The resulting emission spectra suggest that concentrations at parts per billion levels may be achieved for a variety of metal impurities, and it is hence potentially feasible for rapid inspection of water quality in the semiconductor and pharmaceutical industries, as well as for cooling water inspection for possible leakage of radioactivity in nuclear power plants. In view of its relative simplicity, this LIBS equipment offers a practical and less costly alternative to the standard use of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for water samples, and its further potential for in situ and mobile applications. PMID:26368882

  6. Breakdown in helium in high-voltage open discharge with subnanosecond current front rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Alexandrov, A. L.; Bokhan, P. A.; Zakrevskiy, Dm. E.

    2016-07-01

    Investigations of high-voltage open discharge in helium have shown a possibility of generation of current pulses with subnanosecond front rise, due to ultra-fast breakdown development. The open discharge is ignited between two planar cathodes with mesh anode in the middle between them. For gas pressure 6 Torr and 20 kV applied voltage, the rate of current rise reaches 500 A/(cm2 ns) for current density 200 A/cm2 and more. The time of breakdown development was measured for different helium pressures and a kinetic model of breakdown in open discharge is presented, based on elementary reactions for electrons, ions and fast atoms. The model also includes various cathode emission processes due to cathode bombardment by ions, fast atoms, electrons and photons of resonant radiation with Doppler shift of frequency. It is shown, that the dominating emission processes depend on the evolution of the discharge voltage during the breakdown. In the simulations, two cases of voltage behavior were considered: (i) the voltage is kept constant during the breakdown; (ii) the voltage is reduced with the growth of current. For the first case, the exponentially growing current is maintained due to photoemission by the resonant photons with Doppler-shifted frequency. For the second case, the dominating factor of current growth is the secondary electron emission. In both cases, the subnanosecond rise of discharge current was obtained. Also the effect of gas pressure on breakdown development was considered. It was found that for 20 Torr gas pressure the time of current rise decreases to 0.1 ns, which is in agreement with experimental data.

  7. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  8. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  9. Measurement of O and OH radical produced by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet nearby rat skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemori, Seiya; Ono, Ryo

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet is getting much attention because it enables many kinds of plasma applications including biomedical application such as sterilization and cancer treatment. In biomedical plasma applications, it is though that active species like ions and radicals play important role. Especially, OH radical and O atom is very chemically reactive that they are deemed as major factors in cancer treatment. In this study, O and OH density distribution and its temporal behavior nearby rat skin were measured to demonstrate actual application. Plasma discharge was under AC10 kVp-p, 10 kHz with 1.5 slm (standard litter per minute) of helium gas flow. OH density was around 1 ppm and O atom density was around 10 ppm at maximum. We also measured time-evolution of OH and O atom density. Both OH and O density was almost constant between discharge pulses because lifetime of active species could be prolonged in helium. And density distribution of both species varied depending on helium flow rate and water concentration on the surface; on rat skin or on the grass surface. Those results suggest the production mechanisms and provision mechanisms of O atom and OH radical by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet. This work is partially supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Science Research by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  10. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  11. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  12. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless and can be done ... provider’s office or clinic. To prepare for the test: Don’t drink coffee or smoke cigarettes for ...

  13. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the baby. Controlling your blood pressure during pregnancy and getting regular prenatal care are important for ... your baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle ...

  14. The diffusion of cesium in the graphitic matrix A3-3 in the presence of helium at pressures up to 10 7 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensel, W.; Hoinkis, E.

    1995-07-01

    The migration of 137CS in the graphitic matrix A3-3 was studied at helium pressures of 4 × 10 6 and 10 7 Pa by use of the thin film technique with vapor deposited carrier-free 137Cs. The penetration profiles did not satisfy Fick's second law, but we applied successfully the solution of the diffusion equation with terms for trapping and re-emission derived by Gaus. Compared to 137Cs migration in a vacuum a high helium pressure lead to a decrease in the coefficient D for diffusion of mobile 137Cs and an increase in the activation energies for diffusion and trapping. D and the trapping coefficient μ are given by D = 10.3 exp (-1.76/kT) cm 2s -1 and μ = 2.2 × 10 3 exp(-1.63/kT) s -1 in the temperature range 1073-1273 K at a helium pressure of 4 × 10 6 Pa, where k = 8.618 × 10 -5 eV/K.

  15. Helium-Recycling Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

  16. On the dynamic response of pressure transmission lines in the research of helium-charged free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric L.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The signal distortion inherent to pressure transmission lines in free-piston Stirling engine research is discussed. Based on results from classical analysis, guidelines are formulated to describe the dynamic response properties of a volume-terminated transmission tube for applications involving the helium-charged free-piston Stirling engines. The underdamped flow regime is described, the primary resonance frequency is derived, and the pressure phase and amplitude distortion are discussed. The scope and limitation of the dynamic response analysis are considered.

  17. Pulsed Discharge Helium Ionization Detector for Highly Sensitive Aquametry.

    PubMed

    Mowry, Curtis D; Pimentel, Adam S; Sparks, Elizabeth S; Moorman, Matthew W; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Manginell, Ronald P

    2016-01-01

    Trace moisture quantitation is crucial in medical, civilian and military applications. Current aquametry technologies are limited by the sample volume, reactivity, or interferences, and/or instrument size, weight, power, cost, and complexity. We report for the first time on the use of a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (PDHID-D2) (∼196 cm(3)) for the sensitive (limit of detection, 0.047 ng; 26 ppm), linear (r(2) >0.99), and rapid (< 2 min) quantitation of water using a small (0.2 - 5.0 μL) volume of liquid or gas. The relative humidity sensitivity was 0.22% (61.4 ppmv) with a limit of detection of less than 1 ng moisture with gaseous samples. The sensitivity was 10 to 100 to fold superior to competing technologies without the disadvantages inherent to these technologies. The PDHID-D2, due to its small footprint and low power requirement, has good size, weight, and power-portability (SWAPP) factors. The relatively low cost (∼$5000) and commercial availability of the PDHID-D2 makes our technique applicable to highly sensitive aquametry. PMID:26860562

  18. Thermophysical properties of Helium-4 from 0.8 to 1500 K with pressures to 2000 MPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arp, Vincent D.; Mccarty, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Tabular summary data of the thermophysical properties of fluid helium are given for temperatures from 0.8 to 1500 K, with pressures to 2000 MPa between 75 and 300 K, or to 100 MPa outside of this temperature band. Properties include density, specific heats, enthalpy, entropy, internal energy, sound velocity, expansivity, compressibility, thermal conductivity, and viscosity. The data are calculated from a computer program which is available from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The computer program is based on carefully fitted state equations for both normal and superfluid helium.

  19. Protein destruction by a helium atmospheric pressure glow discharge: Capability and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, X. T.; Shi, J. J.; Kong, M. G.

    2007-04-01

    Biological sterilization represents one of the most exciting applications of atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD). Despite the fact that surgical instruments are contaminated by both microorganisms and proteinaceous matters, sterilization effects of APGD have so far been studied almost exclusively for microbial inactivation. This work presents the results of a detailed investigation of the capability of a helium-oxygen APGD to inactivate proteins deposited on stainless-steel surfaces. Using a laser-induced fluorescence technique for surface protein measurement, a maximum protein reduction of 4.5 logs is achieved by varying the amount of the oxygen admixture into the background helium gas. This corresponds to a minimum surface protein of 0.36 femtomole/mm2. It is found that plasma reduction of surface-borne protein is through protein destruction and degradation, and that its typically biphasic reduction kinetics is influenced largely by the thickness profile of the surface protein. Also presented is a complementary study of possible APGD protein inactivation mechanisms. By interplaying the protein inactivation kinetics with optical emission spectroscopy, it is shown that the main protein-destructing agents are excited atomic oxygen (via the 777 and 844 nm emission channels) and excited nitride oxide (via the 226, 236, and 246 nm emission channels). It is also demonstrated that the most effective protein reduction is achieved possibly through a synergistic effect between atomic oxygen and nitride oxide. This study is a useful step toward a full confirmation of the efficacy of APGD as a sterilization technology for surgical instruments contaminated by prion proteins.

  20. Protein destruction by a helium atmospheric pressure glow discharge: Capability and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X. T.; Shi, J. J.; Kong, M. G.

    2007-04-01

    Biological sterilization represents one of the most exciting applications of atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD). Despite the fact that surgical instruments are contaminated by both microorganisms and proteinaceous matters, sterilization effects of APGD have so far been studied almost exclusively for microbial inactivation. This work presents the results of a detailed investigation of the capability of a helium-oxygen APGD to inactivate proteins deposited on stainless-steel surfaces. Using a laser-induced fluorescence technique for surface protein measurement, a maximum protein reduction of 4.5 logs is achieved by varying the amount of the oxygen admixture into the background helium gas. This corresponds to a minimum surface protein of 0.36 femtomole/mm{sup 2}. It is found that plasma reduction of surface-borne protein is through protein destruction and degradation, and that its typically biphasic reduction kinetics is influenced largely by the thickness profile of the surface protein. Also presented is a complementary study of possible APGD protein inactivation mechanisms. By interplaying the protein inactivation kinetics with optical emission spectroscopy, it is shown that the main protein-destructing agents are excited atomic oxygen (via the 777 and 844 nm emission channels) and excited nitride oxide (via the 226, 236, and 246 nm emission channels). It is also demonstrated that the most effective protein reduction is achieved possibly through a synergistic effect between atomic oxygen and nitride oxide. This study is a useful step toward a full confirmation of the efficacy of APGD as a sterilization technology for surgical instruments contaminated by prion proteins.

  1. Features of the temperature dependence of pressure of solid helium at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisunov, A. A.; Maidanov, V. A.; Rubanskii, V. Y.; Rubets, S. P.; Rudavskii, E. Y.; Rybalko, A. S.; Syrkin, E. S.

    2012-06-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to investigate the conditions of formation of a disordered (glass-like) state in crystals of 3He. With the help of precise measurements of pressure at constant volume it has been established that a glass phase is formed easily in rapidly cooled crystals grown under homogeneous temperature conditions in the presence of large numbers of nucleation centers. This phase can be removed only by careful annealing. This result has been found in both 3He and 4He, and is independent of type of quantum statistics and determined mainly by crystal growth conditions. An analysis of similar measurements has been performed using a different cell where during the crystal growth a directed temperature gradient was created. In this case, additional defects created as a result of deformation of the crystal were necessary to form a glass-like phase. The degree of deformation of a crystal, achievable in the experiment, was sufficient to form a glass-like phase in solid 4He, but not in a crystal of 3He where the atoms have a large amplitude of zero-point oscillations. Analyzing a temperature dependence of pressure, a study of the features of a phonon contribution to the pressure was also carried out. It was found that in both crystals 3He and 4He at different thicknesses of samples the phonon pressure differs by several times. This effect is qualitatively explained by that that in thin samples an interaction among layers of atoms becomes stronger. This leads to decreasing the phonon contribution to the thermodynamic properties of the helium crystal at low temperatures.

  2. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet emission (λ  =  60-120 nm) from a high pressure DBD-excited helium plasma: formation mechanisms of the fast component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carman, R. J.; Ganesan, R.; Kane, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    We report time and wavelength resolved studies of the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) emission from a windowless dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in helium. Short-pulse voltage excitation is utilised to clearly resolve the fast and slow temporal components of the Hopfield continuum between λ  =  60-120 nm. Experimental results and theoretical modelling of the spectral distributions indicate that the two components of the VUV emission must originate from the same radiating molecular state—\\text{He}2\\ast≤ft({{\\text{A}}1}Σ\\text{u}+\\right) , and that two distinct pumping mechanisms populate this state. The time evolution of the fast component is found to correlate with that from the (0,0) molecular transition \\text{He}2\\ast≤ft({{\\text{E}}1}{{\\Pi}\\text{g}}-~{{\\text{A}}1}Σ\\text{u}+\\right) (λ  =  513.4 nm). Thus the \\text{He}2\\ast≤ft({{\\text{A}}1}{}Σ\\text{u}+\\right) state is initially rapidly pumped via radiative cascade from higher \\text{He}2\\ast(n=3) molecular states. In addition, the observed band emissions from the molecular \\text{He}2\\ast≤ft({{\\text{E}}1}{{\\Pi}\\text{g}}\\right) v=0 and \\text{He}2\\ast≤ft({{\\text{F}}1}Σ\\text{u}+\\right) v=0 states and the line emissions from the atomic He*(n  =  3) states all exhibit similar temporal behaviour during the discharge excitation period. Our results are consistent with the recent report of Frost et al (J. Phys. B 34 1569 2001) concerning the existence of a so-called ‘neglected channel’ to fast \\text{He}2\\ast production from He*(n  =  3) atomic state precursors.

  3. Influence of dielectric materials on radial uniformity in non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akinori; Komori, Kyohei

    2015-09-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma has been utilized for various technological applications such as surface treatment, materials processing, bio-medical and bio-logical applications. For optimum control of the plasma for the above applications, numerous experimental and theoretical investigations on the plasma have been reported. Especially, controlling radial uniformity of the plasma are very important for utilizing materials processing. In this paper, an axially-symmetric three-dimensional fluid model, which is composed of the continuity equation for charged and neutral species, the Poisson equation, and the energy conservation equation for electrons, of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure helium plasma has been developed. Then, influence of dielectric properties (e.g. relative permittivity, secondary electron emission coefficient, etc.) of dielectric materials on radial plasma uniformity (i.e. radial distributions of electron density, ion density, electric field in the plasma) was examined. This work was partly supported by KAKENHI (No. 26420247), and a ``Grant for Advanced Industrial Technology Development (No. 11B06004d)'' in 2011 from the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan.

  4. Floating Pressure Conversion and Equipment Upgrades of Two 3.5kw, 20k, Helium Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, Jonathan; Linza, Robert; Garcia, Sam; Vargas, Gerardo; Lauterbach, John; Ganni, Venkatarao (Rao); Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Creel, Jonathan; Norton, Robert; Urbin, John; Howe, Don

    2008-01-01

    Two helium refrigerators, each rated for 3.5KW at 20K, are used at NASA s Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Building No. 32 to provide cryo-pumping within two large thermal-vacuum chambers. These refrigerators were originally commissioned in 1996. Equipment refurbishment and upgrades to the controls of these refrigerators were recently completed. This paper describes some of the mechanical and control issues that necessitated the equipment refurbishment and controls change-over. It will describe the modifications and the new process control which allows the refrigerators to take advantage of the Ganni Cycle "floating pressure" control technology. The upgrades -- the controls philosophy change-over to the floating pressure control technology and the newly refurbished equipment -- have greatly improved the performance, stability, and efficiency of these two refrigerators. The upgrades have also given the operators more information and details about the operational status of the main components (compressors, expanders etc.) of the refrigerators at all operating conditions (i.e.: at various loads in the vacuum chambers). Capabilities, configuration, and performance data pre, and post, upgrading will be presented.

  5. Quantitative deuterium analysis of titanium samples in ultraviolet laser-induced low-pressure helium plasma.

    PubMed

    Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Lie, Zener Sukra; Niki, Hideaki; Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Lie, Tjung Jie; Jobiliong, Eric; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Fukumoto, Ken-Ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Tjia, May On

    2010-04-01

    An experimental study of ultraviolet (UV) laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) on Ti samples with low-pressure surrounding He gas has been carried out to demonstrate its applicability to quantitative micro-analysis of deuterium impurities in titanium without the spectral interference from the ubiquitous surface water. This was achieved by adopting the optimal experimental condition ascertained in this study, which is specified by 5 mJ laser energy, 10 Torr helium pressure, and 1-50 mus measurement window, which resulted in consistent D emission enhancement and effective elimination of spectral interference from surface water. As a result, a linear calibration line exhibiting a zero intercept was obtained from Ti samples doped with various D impurity concentrations. An additional measurement also yielded a detection limit of about 40 ppm for D impurity, well below the acceptable threshold of damaging H concentration in Ti and its alloys. Each of these measurements was found to produce a crater size of only 25 mum in diameter, and they may therefore qualify as nondestructive measurements. The result of this study has therefore paved the way for conducting further experiments with hydrogen-doped Ti samples and the technical implementation of quantitative micro-analysis of detrimental hydrogen impurity in Ti metal and its alloys, which is the ultimate goal of this study. PMID:20412619

  6. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements of 1-propanol in helium: the effect of carrier gas pressure.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Stratmann, Frank

    2006-04-28

    Kinetics of homogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapor of 1-propanol was studied using an upward thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Helium was used as a noncondensable carrier gas and the influence of its pressure on observed nucleation rates was investigated. The isothermal nucleation rates were determined by a photographic method that is independent on any nucleation theory. In this method, the trajectories of growing droplets are recorded using a charge coupled device camera and the distribution of local nucleation rates is determined by image analysis. The nucleation rate measurements of 1-propanol were carried out at four isotherms 260, 270, 280, and 290 K. In addition, the pressure dependence was investigated on the isotherms 290 K (50, 120, and 180 kPa) and 280 K (50 and 120 kPa). The isotherm 270 K was measured at 25 kPa and the isotherm 260 K at 20 kPa. The experiments confirm the earlier observations from several thermal diffusion chamber investigations that the homogeneous nucleation rate of 1-propanol tends to increase with decreasing total pressure in the chamber. In order to reduce the possibility that the observed phenomenon is an experimental artifact, connected with the generally used one-dimensional description of transfer processes in the chamber, a recently developed two-dimensional model of coupled heat, mass, and momentum transfer inside the chamber was used and results of both models were compared. It can be concluded that the implementation of the two-dimensional model does not explain the observed effect. Furthermore the obtained results were compared both to the predictions of the classical theory and to the results of other investigators using different experimental devices. Plotting the experimental data on the so-called Hale plot shows that our data seem to be consistent both internally and also with the data of others. Using the nucleation theorem the critical cluster sizes were obtained from the slopes of the individual isotherms

  7. First-principles modeling of three-body interactions in highly compressed solid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, Claudio; Boronat, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    We present a set of three-body interaction models based on the Slater-Kirkwood (SK) potential that are suitable for the study of the energy, structural, and elastic properties of solid 4He at high pressure. Our effective three-body potentials are obtained from the fit to total energies and atomic forces computed with the van der Waals density functional theory method due to Grimme, and represent an improvement with respect to previously reported three-body interaction models. In particular, we show that some of the introduced SK three-body potentials reproduce closely the experimental equation of state and bulk modulus of solid helium up to a pressure of ˜60 GPa, when used in combination with standard pairwise interaction models in diffusion Monte Carlo simulations. Importantly, we find that recent predictions reporting a surprisingly small variation of the kinetic energy and Lindeman ratio on quantum crystals under increasing pressure are likely to be artifacts deriving from the use of incomplete interaction models. Also, we show that the experimental variation of the shear modulus, C44, at pressures 0 ≤P ≤25 GPa can be quantitatively described by our set of SK three-body potentials. At higher compression, however, the agreement between our C44 calculations and experiments deteriorates and thus we argue that higher order many-body terms in the expansion of the atomic interactions probably are necessary in order to better describe elasticity in very dense solid 4He.

  8. Collisional-radiative model of helium microwave discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Alves, L. L.; Gadonna, K.; Belmonte, T.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a stationary collisional-radiative model to describe the behavior of helium microwave discharges (2.45 GHz), produced in cylindrical geometry (1 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. The model couples the rate balance equations for the charged particles (electrons, He+ and He2+ions), the He(n <= 6) excited states and the He2*excimers, to the two-term homogeneous and stationary electron Boltzmann equation,. The latter is solved using a coherent set of electron cross sections, adjusted to ensure good predictions of the swarm parameters and the Townsend ionization coefficient. The model was solved for typical 5x1014 cm-3 electron density and 2500 K gas temperature, yielding [He2+]/[He+] ~ 0.92 and [He2*]/[He] ~ 3.4x10-8. Results show also that the He2+ions are produced mainly from the 3-body conversion of He+ ions and lost by the corresponding reverse reaction together with diffusion and dissociative recombination. The He2*is produced by a 3-body reaction involving the 23P states and by the electron-stabilized recombination of He2+and is lost by electron dissociation. This paper presents a stationary collisional-radiative model to describe the behavior of helium microwave discharges (2.45 GHz), produced in cylindrical geometry (1 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. The model couples the rate balance equations for the charged particles (electrons, He+ and He2+ions), the He(n <= 6) excited states and the He2*excimers, to the two-term homogeneous and stationary electron Boltzmann equation,. The latter is solved using a coherent set of electron cross sections, adjusted to ensure good predictions of the swarm parameters and the Townsend ionization coefficient. The model was solved for typical 5x1014 cm-3 electron density and 2500 K gas temperature, yielding [He2+]/[He+] ~ 0.92 and [He2*]/[He] ~ 3.4x10-8. Results show also that the He2+ions are produced mainly from the 3-body conversion of He+ ions and lost by the corresponding reverse reaction together

  9. Parametric Investigations of an Atmospheric pressure Uniform Glow Discharge in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Gadri, Rami

    1997-11-01

    In the cold plasma processing field, applications of the atmospheric pressure uniform glow discharge are numerous. Among them one can mention the increase of the surface energy of materials, the cleaning and etching of surfaces, and the decontamination and sterilization. The development of the glow regime at atmospheric pressure permits to avoid the technical and economical drawbacks of low pressure glow discharge systems. It also increases the efficiency of the surface treatment as compared to the corona discharge. In these conditions, a glow regime is obtained and studied in particular experimental conditions. The working gas is helium, the frequency in the range 1-20 kHz, the gap distance of some mm and the metallic electrodes are covered by a dielectric layer. The current is characterized by one peak per half cycle and is typically in the range of a few tens of mA. Since this discharge involves complex nonlinear processes and is sensitive to the variation of its parameters, detailed experimental (Ph. Decomps (1996), PhD thesis, Universite Paul Sabatier Toulouse France, No d'ordre 2538.) and numerical studies, covering wide ranges of system parameters, were required. These investigations allowed the determination of the optimal operating conditions for which the discharge remains of the glow type, and therefore induces a better surface treatment. In this paper the detailed theory ( Ben Gadri R., Rabehi A., Massines F. and Segur P. (1994), XIIth Eur. Sect. Conf. on the At. & Mol. Phy. of Ionized Gases, The Netherlands, 23-26 August, pp. 228-229.) of the one dimensional f luid model and a parametric study of the discharge characteristics are presented. A particular attention will be given to the influence of the different system parameters on the operational mode of the discharge.

  10. High pressure storage vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiang

    2013-08-27

    Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

  11. On the dynamic response of pressure transmission lines in the research of helium-charged free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric L.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1989-01-01

    In free piston Stirling engine research the integrity of both amplitude and phase of the dynamic pressure measurements is critical to the characterization of cycle dynamics and thermodynamics. It is therefore necessary to appreciate all possible sources of signal distortion when designing pressure measurement systems for this type of research. The signal distortion inherent to pressure transmission lines is discussed. Based on results from classical analysis, guidelines are formulated to describe the dynamic response properties of a volume-terminated transmission tube for applications involving helium-charged free piston Stirling engines. The scope and limitations of the dynamic response analysis are considered.

  12. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2005-11-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  13. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2002-01-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  14. Controlling your high blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Controlling hypertension ... when you wake up. For people with very high blood pressure, this is when they are most at risk ... 2014 evidence-based guideline for the management of high blood pressure in adults: report from the panel members appointed ...

  15. The Influence of Polymer Film on an Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge in Helium*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nersisyan, Gagik; Graham, William

    2004-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) have potential in polymer surface modification. Here the affect of low density polyethylene (LDPE) film, placed on the electrodes and in the inter-electrode gap, on the development and the uniformity of pulsed APGDs in helium has been studied using short exposure time images and emission spectroscopy of the gap. The APGD was generated between two parallel, glass-ceramic plates, covering metallic mesh electrodes driven by a sinusoidal (5 kV peak to peak) voltage at a frequency of 30 kHz. The build-up of the APGD started from a weak luminous region near the anode followed by the formation of a bright negative glow. When the film was tightly pressed to one of the dielectric plates the intensity of the negative glow decreased and after about 5 minutes the discharge became spatially non-uniform. When the film was stretched through the middle of the gap, it behaved like a dielectric barrier splitting the gap into two APGD regions i.e. with a negative glow on both sides. The affect of the film on the emission spectroscopy and on the electric characteristics will be discussed.

  16. Helium Pressure Shift of the Hyperfine Clock Transition in Hg-201(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larigani, S. Taghavi; Burt, E. A.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    There are two stable odd isotopes of mercury with singly ionized hyperfine structure suitable for a microwave atomic clock: Hg-199(+) and Hg-201(+). We are investigating the viability of a trapped ion clock based on Hg-201(+) in a configuration that uses a buffer gas to increase ion loading efficiency and counter ion heating from rf trapping fields. Traditionally, either helium or neon is used as the buffer gas at approx. 10(exp -5) torr to confine mercury ions near room temperature. In addition to the buffer gas, other residual background gasses such as H2O, N2, O2, CO, CO2, and CH2 may be present in trace quantities. Collisions between trapped ions and buffer gas or background gas atoms/molecules produce a momentary shift of the ion clock transition frequency and constitute one of the largest systematic effects in this type of clock. Here we report an initial measurement of the He pressure shift in Hg-201(+) and compare this to Hg-199(+).

  17. Crater effects on H and D emission from laser induced low-pressure helium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pardede, Marincan; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Maruyama, Tadashi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Tjia, May On

    2009-09-15

    An experimental study has been performed on the effects of crater depth on the hydrogen and deuterium emission intensities measured from laser plasmas generated in low-pressure helium ambient gas from zircaloy-4 samples doped with different H and D impurity concentrations as well as a standard brass sample for comparison. The results show that aside from emission of the host atom, the emission intensities of other ablated atoms of significantly smaller masses as well as that of the He atom generally exhibit relatively rapid initial decline with increasing crater depth. This trend was found to have its origin in the decreasing laser power density arriving at the crater bottom and thereby weakened the shock wave generated in the crater. As the crater deepened, the declining trend of the intensity appeared to level off as a result of compensation of the decreasing laser power density by the enhanced plasma confinement at increasing crater depth. Meanwhile, the result also reveals the significant contribution of the He-assisted excitation process to the doped hydrogen and deuterium emission intensities, leading to similar crater-depth dependent variation patterns in contrast to that associated with the surface water, with growing dominance of this common feature at the later stage of the plasma expansion. Therefore, a carefully chosen set of gate delay and gate width which are properly adapted to the crater-depth dependent behavior of the emission intensity may produce the desired intrinsic emission data for quantitative depth profiling of H impurity trapped inside the zircaloy wall.

  18. Array of surface-confined glow discharges in atmospheric pressure helium: Modes and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Liu, D. X. E-mail: mglin5g@gmail.com; Nie, Q. Y.; Li, H. P.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G. E-mail: mglin5g@gmail.com

    2014-05-19

    Array of atmospheric pressure surface discharges confined by a two-dimensional hexagon electrode mesh is studied for its discharge modes and temporal evolution so as to a theoretical underpinning to their growing applications in medicine, aerodynamic control, and environmental remediation. Helium plasma surface-confined by one hexagon-shaped rim electrode is shown to evolve from a Townsend mode to a normal and abnormal glow mode, and its evolution develops from the rim electrodes as six individual microdischarges merging in the middle of the hexagon mesh element. Within one hexagon element, microdischarges remain largely static with the mesh electrode being the instantaneous cathode, but move towards the hexagon center when the electrode is the instantaneous anode. On the entire array electrode surface, plasma ignition is found to beat an unspecific hexagon element and then spreads to ignite surrounding hexagon elements. The spreading of microdischarges is in the form of an expanding circle at a speed of about 3 × 10{sup 4} m/s, and their quenching starts in the location of the initial plasma ignition. Plasma modes influence how input electrical power is used to generate and accelerate electrons and as such the reaction chemistry, whereas plasma dynamics are central to understand and control plasma instabilities. The present study provides an important aspect of plasma physics of the atmospheric surface-confined discharge array and a theoretical underpinning to its future technological innovation.

  19. Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L.

    2009-12-15

    High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

  20. High pressure ices

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Andreas; Ashcroft, N. W.; Hoffmann, Roald

    2012-01-01

    H2O will be more resistant to metallization than previously thought. From computational evolutionary structure searches, we find a sequence of new stable and meta-stable structures for the ground state of ice in the 1–5 TPa (10 to 50 Mbar) regime, in the static approximation. The previously proposed Pbcm structure is superseded by a Pmc21 phase at p = 930 GPa, followed by a predicted transition to a P21 crystal structure at p = 1.3 TPa. This phase, featuring higher coordination at O and H, is stable over a wide pressure range, reaching 4.8 TPa. We analyze carefully the geometrical changes in the calculated structures, especially the buckling at the H in O-H-O motifs. All structures are insulating—chemistry burns a deep and (with pressure increase) lasting hole in the density of states near the highest occupied electronic levels of what might be component metallic lattices. Metallization of ice in our calculations occurs only near 4.8 TPa, where the metallic C2/m phase becomes most stable. In this regime, zero-point energies much larger than typical enthalpy differences suggest possible melting of the H sublattice, or even the entire crystal. PMID:22207625

  1. High-Pressure Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maeno, Akihiro; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The combination of fluorescence and pressure perturbation is a widely used technique to study the effect of pressure on a protein system to obtain thermodynamic, structural and kinetic information on proteins. However, we often encounter the situation where the available pressure range up to 400 MPa of most commercial high-pressure fluorescence spectrometers is insufficient for studying highly pressure-stable proteins like inhibitors and allergenic proteins. To overcome the difficulty, we have recently developed a new high-pressure fluorescence system that allows fluorescence measurements up to 700 MPa. Here we describe the basic design of the apparatus and its application to study structural and thermodynamic properties of a couple of highly stable allergenic proteins, hen lysozyme and ovomucoid, using Tryptophan and Tyrosine/Tyrosinate fluorescence, respectively. Finally, we discuss the utility and the limitation of Trp and Tyr fluorescence. We discuss pitfalls of fluorescence technique and importance of simultaneous use of other high-pressure spectroscopy, particularly high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26174405

  2. Electronic Structure of Crystalline 4He at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Ho Kwang; Shirley, Eric L.; Ding, Yang; Eng, Peter; Cai, Yong Q.; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Jinfu Shu, A=Kao, Chi-Chang; Hemley, Russell J.; Kao, Chichang; Mao, Wendy L.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC

    2011-01-10

    Using inelastic X-ray scattering techniques, we have succeeded in probing the high-pressure electronic structure of helium crystal at 300 K which has the widest known electronic energy bandgap of all materials, that was previously inaccessible to measurements due to the extreme energy and pressure range. We observed rich electron excitation spectrum, including a cut-off edge above 23 eV, a sharp exciton peak showing linear volume dependence, and a series of excitations and continuum at 26 to 45 eV. We determined electronic dispersion along the {Gamma}-M direction over two Brillouin zones, and provided a quantitative picture of the helium exciton beyond the simplified Wannier-Frenkel description.

  3. Corrosion behavior of zirconia-coated Hastelloy X in a high-temperature helium environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Y.; Fukaya, K.

    1989-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of Hastelloy X coated with (NiCrAl)/(ZrO/sub 2/-CaC/sub 2/) was examined, after serving as the liner tube of helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL) hot gas duct. The Hastelloy X with the ceramic coating system was exposed to high-temperature helium gas for --6000 h. The compositions of oxide films formed on Hastelloy X were entirely different between the noncoated and ceramic-coated tubes.

  4. High pressure studies of superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, Narelle Jayne

    Superconductivity has been studied extensively since it was first discovered over 100 years ago. High pressure studies, in particular, have been vital in furthering our understanding of the superconducting state. Pressure allows researchers to enhance the properties of existing superconductors, to find new superconductors, and to test the validity of theoretical models. This thesis presents a series of high pressure measurements performed in both He-gas and diamond anvil cell systems on various superconductors and on materials in which pressure-induced superconductivity has been predicted. Under pressure the alkali metals undergo a radical departure from the nearly-free electron model. In Li this leads to a superconducting transition temperature that is among the highest of the elements. All alkali metals have been predicted to become superconducting under pressure. Pursuant to this, a search for superconductivity has been conducted in the alkali metals Na and K. In addition, the effect of increasing electron concentration on Li1-xMgx alloys has been studied. Metallic hydrogen and hydrogen-rich compounds are believed to be good candidates for high temperature superconductivity. High pressure optical studies of benzene (C6H6) have been performed to 2 Mbar to search for pressure-induced metallization. Finally, cuprate and iron-based materials are considered high-Tc superconductors. These layered compounds exhibit anisotropic behavior under pressure. Precise hydrostatic measurements of dTc/dP on HgBa2CuO 4+delta have been carried out in conjunction with uniaxial pressure experiments by another group. The results obtained provide insight into the effect of each of the lattice parameters on Tc. Finally, a series of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic measurements on LnFePO (Ln = La, Pr, Nd) reveal startling evidence that the superconducting state in the iron-based superconductors is highly sensitive to lattice strain.

  5. Effects of metastable species in helium and argon atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) on inactivation of periodontopathogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Seol, Yang-Jo; Kim, Su-Jeong; Bae, Byeongjun; Huh, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2016-05-01

    The helium and argon have been widely used as discharge gases in atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) for bacteria inactivation. The APPJs show apparent different in bullet propagation speed and bacteria inactivation rate apparently vary with discharge gas species. This work shows that these two distinctive features of APPJs can be linked through one factor, the metastable energy level. The effects of helium and argon metastable species on APPJ discharge mechanism for reactive oxygen nitrogen species (RONS) generation in APPJs are investigated by experiments and numerical estimation. The discharge mechanism is investigated by using the bullet velocity from the electric field which is obtained with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurement. The measured electric field also applied on the estimation of RONS generation, as electron energy source term in numerical particle reaction. The estimated RONS number is verified by comparing NO and OH densities to the inactivation rate of periodontitis bacteria. The characteristic time for bacteria inactivation of the helium-APPJ was found to be 1.63 min., which is significantly less than that of the argon-APPJ, 12.1 min. In argon-APPJ, the argon metastable preserve the energy due to the lack of the Penning ionization. Thus the surface temperature increase is significantly higher than helium-APPJ case. It implies that the metastable energy plays important role in both of APPJ bullet propagation and bacteria inactivation mechanism.

  6. Steam Oxidation at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Carney, Casey

    2013-07-19

    A first high pressure test was completed: 293 hr at 267 bar and 670{degrees}C; A parallel 1 bar test was done for comparison; Mass gains were higher for all alloys at 267 bar than at 1 bar; Longer term exposures, over a range of temperatures and pressures, are planned to provide information as to the commercial implications of pressure effects; The planned tests are at a higher combination of temperatures and pressures than in the existing literature. A comparison was made with longer-term literature data: The short term exposures are largely consistent with the longer-term corrosion literature; Ferritic steels--no consistent pressure effect; Austenitic steels--fine grain alloys less able to maintain protective chromia scale as pressure increases; Ni-base alloys--more mass gains above 105 bar than below. Not based on many data points.

  7. High School Press Pressures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Luella P.

    History shows that the high school press suffers through cycles that reflect economic factors and cultural climates within communities, states, and the nation. The direction of that cycle in the 1960s and early 1970s was toward more open, free-flowing information by a vigorous student press, but those economic and cultural signs now are pointing…

  8. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure Anyone can develop high blood pressure; however, age, ... can increase your risk for developing high blood pressure. Age Blood pressure tends to rise with age. About 65 ...

  9. Helium-flow measurement using ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondericker, J. H.

    1983-08-01

    The ideal cryogenic instrumentation for the colliding beam accelerator helium distribution system does not add pressure drop to the system, functions over the entire temperature range, has high resolution, and delivers accurate mass flow measurement data. The design and testing of an ultrasonic flowmeter which measures helium flow under different temperatures are described.

  10. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  11. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  12. Medications for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Medications for High Blood Pressure Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Hypertension tends to worsen with age and you cannot ...

  13. High blood pressure and diet

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - diet ... diet is a proven way to help control high blood pressure . These changes can also help you lose weight ... DIET The low-salt Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is proven to help lower blood ...

  14. Afterglow chemistry of atmospheric-pressure helium-oxygen plasmas with humid air impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Niemi, Kari; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Graham, William G.

    2014-04-01

    The formation of reactive species in the afterglow of a radio-frequency-driven atmospheric-pressure plasma in a fixed helium-oxygen feed gas mixture (He+0.5%O2) with humid air impurity (a few hundred ppm) is investigated by means of an extensive global plasma chemical kinetics model. As an original objective, we explore the effects of humid air impurity on the biologically relevant reactive species in an oxygen-dependent system. After a few milliseconds in the afterglow environment, the densities of atomic oxygen (O) decreases from 1015 to 1013 cm-3 and singlet delta molecular oxygen (O2(1D)) of the order of 1015 cm-3 decreases by a factor of two, while the ozone (O3) density increases from 1014 to 1015 cm-3. Electrons and oxygen ionic species, initially of the order of 1011 cm-3, recombine much faster on the time scale of some microseconds. The formation of atomic hydrogen (H), hydroxyl radical (OH), hydroperoxyl (HO2), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitric acid (HNO3) resulting from the humid air impurity as well as the influence on the afterglow chemistry is clarified with particular emphasis on the formation of dominant reactive oxygen species (ROS). The model suggests that the reactive species predominantly formed in the afterglow are major ROS O2(1D) and O3 (of the order of 1015 cm-3) and rather minor hydrogen- and nitrogen-based reactive species OH, H2O2, HNO3 and NO2/NO3, of which densities are comparable to the O-atom density (of the order of 1013 cm-3). Furthermore, the model quantitatively reproduces the experimental results of independent O and O3 density measurements.

  15. Alveolar partial pressures of carbon dioxide and oxygen measured by a helium washout technique.

    PubMed Central

    Jordanoglou, J; Tatsis, G; Danos, J; Gougoulakis, S; Orfanidou, D; Gaga, M

    1990-01-01

    A non-invasive technique was developed for measuring alveolar carbon dioxide and oxygen tension during tidal breathing. This was achieved by solving the Bohr equations for mean alveolar carbon dioxide and oxygen tensions (PACO2, PAO2) from known values of the dead-space:tidal volume ratio measured by helium washout, and from the mixed expired partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen. The derived values of wPACO2 and wPAO2 were compared with PaCO2 obtained from arterial gas analysis and PAO2 calculated from the ideal air equation. Four normal subjects and 58 patients were studied. Calculated and measured PCO2 values agreed closely with a difference in mean values (wPACO2 - PaCO2) of 0.01 kPa; the SD of the differences was 0.7 kPa. The difference in mean values between wPAO2 and PAO2 was 0.02 kPa; the SD of the differences was 0.93 kPa. The method is simple and not time consuming, and requires no special cooperation from the patients. It can be applied in the laboratory or at the bedside to any subject breathing tidally. Physiological deadspace:tidal volume ratio, PAO2 and PACO2, static lung volumes, respiratory exchange ratio, carbon dioxide production, oxygen uptake, tidal volume, and total ventilation can be measured with acceptable accuracy and reproducibility in one test. An arterial blood sample is needed initially to provide an independent measure of PaCO2 and for measurement of the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference. Subsequently, PaCO2 can be estimated from wPACO2 sufficiently well for clinical purposes and PaO2 or SaO2 can be monitored by non-invasive methods. Images PMID:2118690

  16. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  17. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.

    2000-01-01

    A compact high pressure hydraulic pump having no moving mechanical parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force. The electrokinetic pump, which can generate hydraulic pressures greater than 2500 psi, can be employed to compress a fluid, either liquid or gas, and manipulate fluid flow. The pump is particularly useful for capillary-base systems. By combining the electrokinetic pump with a housing having chambers separated by a flexible member, fluid flow, including high pressure fluids, is controlled by the application of an electric potential, that can vary with time.

  18. A comparison of polypropylene-surface treatment by filamentary, homogeneous and glow discharges in helium at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massines, F.; Gouda, G.

    1998-12-01

    Three different dielectric barrier-controlled discharge regimes in helium at atmospheric pressure under sinusoidal excitation have been obtained by varying the excitation frequency or the gas chemical composition: the filamentary discharge, which is the discharge that is usually obtained; the glow discharge, which is controlled by cathode secondary emission; and the homogeneous discharge, which is of a nature in between those of the filamentary and the glow discharges. All the characteristics that have been studied, such as the discharge current, the emission spectrum, the wettability and the chemical transformations of a polypropylene film, are related to the discharge-regime variation. The glow discharge is clearly more efficient than the others as a means of increasing the polypropylene-surface energy. Values as high as 62 mJ 0022-3727/31/24/003/img1 are obtained with this discharge whereas the maximum value after interaction with the filamentary one is 45 mJ 0022-3727/31/24/003/img1. This improvement in wettability is due to there being more O atoms implanted at the surface as well as to the addition of N atoms. The differences among in surface transformations have been correlated to the characteristics of these different discharges and more specifically to the localization of the electrical energy transfer into the gas and to the nature of the ions created during the discharge.

  19. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2003-06-03

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based system. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  20. Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Rakestraw, David J.; Arnold, Don W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Neyer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based systems. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (Microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

  1. Influence of nitrogen impurities on the population of plasma species in atmospheric-pressure helium microwave plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, J.; Margot, J.; Benhacene-Boudam, M. K.

    2012-02-01

    The characteristics of a helium microwave plasma produced at atmospheric pressure have been studied by means of laser induced fluorescence and emission spectroscopy. The influence of nitrogen impurities on discharge parameters (electron density and gas temperature) has been studied together with the variation of the He metastable (23S and 21S) populations. A strong decrease of the He metastable densities for nitrogen concentrations as small as 1% was found. The dependence of the populations of nitrogen molecular and atomic species has been examined as a function of the electron density and nitrogen concentration in helium. Comparison with a theoretical model accounting for the presence of nitrogen in the discharge shows that Penning ionization by both atomic and molecular nitrogen play an important role on the metastable quenching.

  2. High-pressure creep tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Lamoureux, J.; Hales, C.

    1986-01-01

    The automotive Stirling engine, presently being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and NASA, uses high-pressure hydrogen as a working fluid; its long-term effects on the properties of alloys are relatively unknown. Hence, creep-rupture testing of wrought and cast high-temperature alloys in high-pressure hydrogen is an essential part of the research supporting the development of the Stirling cycle engine. Attention is given to the design, development, and operation of a 20 MPa hydrogen high-temperature multispecimen creep-rupture possessing high sensitivity. This pressure vessel allows for the simultaneous yet independent testing of six specimens. The results from one alloy, XF-818, are presented to illustrate how reported results are derived from the raw test data.

  3. Pressurized high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas D.

    Acoustic heat engines show much promise for converting waste heat to electricity. Since most applications require high power levels, high frequency thermoacoustic engines can reach such performance by operating with a pressurized working gas. Results on a 3 kHz prime mover, consisting of a quarter-wave resonator and a random stack material between two heat exchangers, show that the acoustic power from such a device is raised substantially as the working gas is pressurized. At pressures up to approximately 10 bar, the increase in acoustic power is approximately linear to the increase in pressure, and thus is an effective way to increase the power output of thermoacoustic engines. Since the heat input was not changed during the experiments, the increases in acoustic power translate directly to increases in engine efficiency which is calculated as the output acoustic power divided by the input heat power. In most experiments run in this study, the engine efficiency increased by a factor of at least 4 as the pressure was increased from 2 bar up to about 10 bar. Further increases in pressure lead to acoustic power saturation and eventual attenuation. This is most likely due to a combination of several factors including the shrinking thermal penetration depth, and the fact that the losses increase faster with pressure in a random stack material than in traditional parallel plates. Pressurization also leads to a lower DeltaT for onset of oscillations in the range of 10 bar of mean pressure, potentially opening up even more heat sources that can power a thermoacoustic engine. Results from another 3 kHz engine, one that was pressurized itself as opposed to being placed in a pressurized chamber, are also presented. The configuration of this engine solves the problem of how to simultaneously pressurize the engine and inject heat into the hot heat exchanger. It was also noted that the geometry of the resonator cavity in the quarter wavelength pressurized engine plays an

  4. Progress on Electrode Designs and Tests to Generate High Electric Field in Superfluid Liquid Helium-4 for the SNS nEDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wanchun; Beck, Douglas; Cianciolo, Vince; Clayton, Steven; Crawford, Christopher; Currie, Scott; Griffith, William; Ito, Takeyasu; Ramsey, John; Roberts, Amy; Schmid, Richardo; Seidel, George; Wagner, Daniel; Williamson, Steven; Yao, Weijun; SNS nEDM Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The SNS nEDM experiment is aiming to search for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) with ultracold neutrons (UCNs) stored in superfluid liquid helium-4 at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with a goal sensitivity of 3×10-28e-cm, an improvement of two orders of magnitude over the current limit. To achieve the goal sensitivity of the EDM searches,it relies on the stable application of a 75 kV/cm electric field across the UCN storage space without breakdowns in superfluid liquid helium-4. The electrode designs and tests on various geometries and coating materials are undergoing. The high voltage tests in superfluid helium-4 are performed in a specially-designed apparatus at temperatures as low as 0.4 K and pressures between saturated vapor pressure (SVP) of liquid helium and 1 atm. These tests would help in a better understanding of the electric breakdown phenomenon in liquid helium-4. In this talk, we will present the latest progress on electrode designs and tests,and their implications of findings that affect the design of the SNS nEDM experiment.

  5. A theoretical and experimental study of pressure broadening of the oxygen A-band by helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grimminck, Dennis L. A. G.; Spiering, Frans R.; Janssen, Liesbeth M. C.; Avoird, Ad van der; Zande, Wim J. van der; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.

    2014-05-28

    The rotationally resolved magnetic dipole absorption spectrum of the oxygen A-band b{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}(v=0)←X{sup 3}Σ{sub g}{sup −}(v=0) perturbed by collisions with helium was studied theoretically using the impact approximation. To calculate the relaxation matrix, scattering calculations were performed on a newly computed helium-oxygen (b{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) interaction potential as well as on a helium-oxygen (X{sup 3}Σ{sub g}{sup −}) interaction potential from the literature. The calculated integrated line cross sections and broadening coefficients are in good agreement with experimental results from the literature. Additionally, cavity ring-down experiments were performed in the wings of the spectral lines for a quantitative study of line-mixing, i.e., the redistribution of rotational line intensities by helium-oxygen collisions. It is shown that inclusion of line-mixing in the theory is required to reproduce the experimentally determined absolute absorption strengths as a function of the density of the helium gas.

  6. Flux of OH and O radicals onto a surface by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet measured by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemori, Seiya; Ono, Ryo

    2014-03-01

    The atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet is of emerging interest as a cutting-edge biomedical device for cancer treatment, wound healing and sterilization. Reactive oxygen species such as OH and O radicals are considered to be major factors in the application of biological plasma. In this study, density distribution, temporal behaviour and flux of OH and O radicals on a surface are measured using laser-induced fluorescence. A helium plasma jet is generated by applying pulsed high voltage of 8 kV with 10 kHz using a quartz tube with an inner diameter of 4 mm. To evaluate the relation between the surface condition and active species production, three surfaces are used: dry, wet and rat skin. When the helium flow rate is 1.5 l min-1, radial distribution of OH density on the rat skin surface shows a maximum density of 1.2 × 1013 cm-3 at the centre of the plasma-mediated area, while O atom density shows a maximum of 1.0 × 1015 cm-3 at 2.0 mm radius from the centre of the plasma-mediated area. Their densities in the effluent of the plasma jet are almost constant during the intervals of the discharge pulses because their lifetimes are longer than the pulse interval. Their density distribution depends on the helium flow rate and the surface humidity. With these results, OH and O production mechanisms in the plasma jet and their flux onto the surface are discussed.

  7. Electronic phenomena at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    High pressure research is undertaken either to investigate intrinsically high pressure phenomena or in order to get a better understanding of the effect of the chemical environment on properties or processes at one atmosphere. Studies of electronic properties which fall in each area are presented. Many molecules and complexes can assume in the excited state different molecular arrangements and intermolecular forces depending on the medium. Their luminescence emission is then very different in a rigid or a fluid medium. With pressure one can vary the viscosity of the medium by a factor of 10/sup 7/ and thus control the distribution and rate of crossing between the excited state conformations. In rare earth chelates the efficiency of 4f-4f emission of the rare earth is controlled by the feeding from the singlet and triplet levels of the organic ligand. These ligand levels can be strongly shifted by pressure. A study of the effect of pressure on the emission efficiency permits one to understand the effect of ligand chemistry at one atmosphere. At high pressure electronic states can be sufficiently perturbed to provide new ground states. In EDA complexes these new ground states exhibit unusual chemical reactivity and new products.

  8. High cycle fatigue behavior of Incoloy 800H in a simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium environment

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, P.; Sabatini, R.L.; Epel, L.G.; Hare, J.R. Sr.

    1980-01-01

    The current study was an attempt to evaluate the high cycle fatigue strength of Incoloy 800H in a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor helium environment containing significant quantities of moisture. As-heat-treated and thermally-aged materials were tested to determine the effects of long term corrosion in the helium test gas. Results from in-helium tests were compared to those from a standard air environment. It was found that the mechanisms of fatigue failure were very complex and involved recovery/recrystallization of the surface ground layer on the specimens, sensitization, hardness changes, oxide scale integrity, and oxidation at the tips of propagation cracks. For certain situations a corrosion-fatigue process seems to be controlling. However, for the helium environment studied, there was usually no aging or test condition for which air gave a higher fatigue strength.

  9. High accuracy heat capacity measurements through the lambda transition of helium with very high temperature resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, W. M.; Lipa, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement of the heat capacity singularity of helium at the lambda transition was performed with the aim of improving tests of the Renormalization Group (RG) predictions for the static thermodynamic behavior near the singularity. The goal was to approach as closely as possible to the lambda-point while making heat capacity measurements of high accuracy. To do this, a new temperature sensor capable of unprecedented resolution near the lambda-point, and two thermal control systems were used. A short description of the theoretical background and motivation is given. The initial apparatus and results are also described.

  10. High-pressure well design

    SciTech Connect

    Krus, H.; Prieur, J.M. )

    1991-12-01

    Shell U.K. E and P (Shell Expro), operator in the U.K. North Sea on behalf of Shell and Esso, plans to drill 20 high-pressure oil and gas wells during the next 2 years. This paper reports that the well design is based on new standards developed after the U.K. Dept. of Energy restriction on high-pressure drilling in the autumn of 1988. Studies were carried out to optimize casing design and drilling performance on these wells. Several casing schemes, including a slim-hole option, were analyzed. The material specifications for casing and drillpipe were reviewed to ensure that they met the loads imposed during drilling, well- control, and well-testing operations. The requirement for sour-service material was weighted against possible H{sub 2}S adsorption by the mud film. As a result, a new drillstring and two high-pressure casing schemes have been specified. The high-pressure casing scheme used depends on the maximum expected surface pressure.