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Sample records for high quality microcavities

  1. A high quality factor photonic crystal channel-drop filter with a linear gradient microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-qi; Fan, Qing-bin; Lu, Ye; Luo, De-jun; Kong, Yi-bu; Zhang, Dong-chuang

    2015-05-01

    We design a channel-drop filter (CDF) with a linear gradient microcavity in a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC). The model of three-port CDF with reflector is used to achieve high quality factor (Q-factor) and 100% channel-drop efficiency. The research indicates that adjusting the distance between reference plane and reflector can simultaneously influence the Q-factor due to coupling to a bus waveguide and the phase retardation occurring in the round trip between a microcavity and a reflector. The calculation results of 2D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method show that the designed filter can achieve the drop efficiency of 96.7% and ultra-high Q-factor with an ultra-small modal volume.

  2. Optically induced mode splitting in self-assembled, high quality-factor conjugated polymer microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Braam, Daniel; Kushida, Soh; Niemöller, Robert; Prinz, Günther M.; Saito, Hitoshi; Kanbara, Takaki; Kuwabara, Junpei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Lorke, Axel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of self-assembled single microspheres. They consist of a recently developed highly fluorescent π-conjugated copolymer and exhibit excellent optical properties with Q-factors up to 104. Under continuous laser irradiation, we observe a splitting of the highly degenerate spherical WGMs into a multiplet of lines. Comparison with the calculated spectral response of a weakly distorted sphere shows that the optical excitation induces a change of the optical path length in the microcavity so that it resembles a prolate spheroid. The separation of the lines is given by the ellipticity and the azimuthal mode number. Measurements in various gaseous environments suggest that the distortion is caused by light induced oxidation of the polymer. Our findings show that photooxidation can be a beneficial mechanism for in-situ tuning of optically active polymer structures. PMID:26781838

  3. Design and optimizations of quasiperiodic microcavity with high-quality factor and its application in quantum dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosallanezhad, Gholamreza; Keshavarz, Alireza

    2015-10-01

    We propose an optimized quasiperiodic microcavity with the aim of achieving the highest quality factor. The proposed structure consists of two quasicrystal rings with different geometries. By performing several optimizations on the structure, the highest quality factor of 8.16×107 for a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 1040 nm can be achieved. The quasiperiodic microcavity is used for a quantum dot laser application that obtained the highest output power of 3800 W/m2. The most important characteristics of this structure are the improvement of the quality factor and a simultaneously stable cavity wavelength.

  4. Hysteresis behavior of Kerr frequency comb generation in a high-quality-factor whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takumi; Chen-Jinnai, Akitoshi; Nagano, Takuma; Kobatake, Tomoya; Suzuki, Ryo; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2016-07-01

    A numerical and experimental study of Kerr frequency comb generation in a silica toroid microcavity is presented. We use a generalized mean-field Lugiato–Lefever equation and solve it with the split-step Fourier method. We observe that a stable mode-locked regime can be accessed when we reduce the input power after strong pumping due to the bistable nature of the nonlinear cavity system used. The experimental results agree well with the results of the numerical analysis, where we obtain a low-noise Kerr comb spectrum by gradually reducing the pumping input after strong pumping. This finding complements the results obtained by a previous wavelength scanning method and clarifies the procedure for achieving mode-locked states in such high-Q microcavity systems.

  5. Quality factor control in a lasing microcavity model

    PubMed

    Triandaf; Schwartz

    2000-04-01

    We consider a dynamics model of lasing microcavities, a class of optical resonators (1-10 &mgr;m in diameter) used in microlasers and for optical coupling of optical fibers. Inside such a cavity light circulates around the perimeter and is trapped by internal reflection. This is known as "whispering gallery" or high-Q modes. The cavity is a deformable cylindrical (or spherical) dielectric and at certain deformations light can escape by refraction. The quality of the resonator or Q factor, is defined as Q=omegatau, where tau is the escape time and omega is the frequency of light. We show that by appropriately deforming the cavity, the Q factor can be controlled by prolonging or shortening the average length of time spent by light trajectories inside the cavity. PMID:11088138

  6. High-temperature ultrafast polariton parametric amplification in semiconductor microcavities.

    PubMed

    Saba, M; Ciuti, C; Bloch, J; Thierry-Mieg, V; André, R; Dang, le S; Kundermann, S; Mura, A; Bongiovanni, G; Staehli, J L; Deveaud, B

    2001-12-13

    Cavity polaritons, the elementary optical excitations of semiconductor microcavities, may be understood as a superposition of excitons and cavity photons. Owing to their composite nature, these bosonic particles have a distinct optical response, at the same time very fast and highly nonlinear. Very efficient light amplification due to polariton-polariton parametric scattering has recently been reported in semiconductor microcavities at liquid-helium temperatures. Here we demonstrate polariton parametric amplification up to 120 K in GaAlAs-based microcavities and up to 220 K in CdTe-based microcavities. We show that the cut-off temperature for the amplification is ultimately determined by the binding energy of the exciton. A 5-micrometer-thick planar microcavity can amplify a weak light pulse more than 5,000 times. The effective gain coefficient of an equivalent homogeneous medium would be 107 cm-1. The subpicosecond duration and high efficiency of the amplification could be exploited for high-repetition all-optical microscopic switches and amplifiers. 105 polaritons occupy the same quantum state during the amplification, realizing a dynamical condensate of strongly interacting bosons which can be studied at high temperature. PMID:11742394

  7. High-temperature ultrafast polariton parametric amplification in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saba, M.; Ciuti, C.; Bloch, J.; Thierry-Mieg, V.; André, R.; Dang, Le Si; Kundermann, S.; Mura, A.; Bongiovanni, G.; Staehli, J. L.; Deveaud, B.

    2001-12-01

    Cavity polaritons, the elementary optical excitations of semiconductor microcavities, may be understood as a superposition of excitons and cavity photons. Owing to their composite nature, these bosonic particles have a distinct optical response, at the same time very fast and highly nonlinear. Very efficient light amplification due to polariton-polariton parametric scattering has recently been reported in semiconductor microcavities at liquid-helium temperatures. Here we demonstrate polariton parametric amplification up to 120K in GaAlAs-based microcavities and up to 220K in CdTe-based microcavities. We show that the cut-off temperature for the amplification is ultimately determined by the binding energy of the exciton. A 5-µm-thick planar microcavity can amplify a weak light pulse more than 5,000 times. The effective gain coefficient of an equivalent homogeneous medium would be 107cm-1. The subpicosecond duration and high efficiency of the amplification could be exploited for high-repetition all-optical microscopic switches and amplifiers. 105 polaritons occupy the same quantum state during the amplification, realizing a dynamical condensate of strongly interacting bosons which can be studied at high temperature.

  8. Relative intensity noise in high speed microcavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, F.; Wu, M. K.; Liu, M.; Feng, M.; Holonyak, N.

    2013-09-01

    We have fabricated a high speed single mode microcavity laser of the form of oxide-confined vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) and achieved an ultralow threshold current (ITH = 0.13 mA at 20 °C) with lasing wavelength at 837 nm. The optical spectrum of the microcavity VCSEL exhibits a mode spacing of 3.1 nm, which is corresponding to an optical modal cavity dimension of 2.5 μm. The device exhibits an enhanced modulation bandwidth of 22.6 GHz and a thermal noise limited laser intensity noise (electrical power spectral density of laser intensity noise below the thermal noise floor -174 dBm/Hz) as a consequence of low power laser operation and reduced mode competition in the microcavity.

  9. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Haider Ahmed, Rajib; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  10. Multiwall carbon nanotube microcavity arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rajib; Rifat, Ahmmed A.; Yetisen, Ali K.; Dai, Qing; Yun, Seok Hyun; Butt, Haider

    2016-03-01

    Periodic highly dense multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays can act as photonic materials exhibiting band gaps in the visible regime and beyond terahertz range. MWCNT arrays in square arrangement for nanoscale lattice constants can be configured as a microcavity with predictable resonance frequencies. Here, computational analyses of compact square microcavities (≈0.8 × 0.8 μm2) in MWCNT arrays were demonstrated to obtain enhanced quality factors (≈170-180) and narrow-band resonance peaks. Cavity resonances were rationally designed and optimized (nanotube geometry and cavity size) with finite element method. Series (1 × 2 and 1 × 3) and parallel (2 × 1 and 3 × 1) combinations of microcavities were modeled and resonance modes were analyzed. Higher order MWCNT microcavities showed enhanced resonance modes, which were red shifted with increasing Q-factors. Parallel microcavity geometries were also optimized to obtain narrow-band tunable filtering in low-loss communication windows (810, 1336, and 1558 nm). Compact series and parallel MWCNT microcavity arrays may have applications in optical filters and miniaturized optical communication devices.

  11. Numerical investigation of high-contrast ultrafast all-optical switching in low-refractive-index polymeric photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zi-Ming; Zhong, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Chen; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2012-06-01

    With the development of micro- or nano-fabrication technologies, great interest has been aroused in exploiting photonic crystal nanobeam structures. In this article the design of high-quality-factor (Q) polymeric photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities suitable for realizing ultrafast all-optical switching is presented based on the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. Adopting the pump-probe technique, the ultrafast dynamic response of the all-optical switching in a nanobeam microcavity with a quality factor of 1000 and modal volume of 1.22 (λ/n)3 is numerically studied and a switching time as fast as 3.6 picoseconds is obtained. Our results indicate the great promise of applying photonic crystal nanobeam microcavities to construct integrated ultrafast tunable photonic devices or circuits incorporating polymer materials with large Kerr nonlinearity and ultrafast response speed.

  12. Slow light engineering for high Q high sensitivity photonic crystal microcavity biosensors in silicon

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Ray T.

    2012-01-01

    Current trends in photonic crystal microcavity biosensors in silicon-on-insulator (SOI), that focus on small and smaller sensors have faced a bottleneck trying to balance two contradictory requirements of resonance quality factor and sensitivity. By simultaneous control of the radiation loss and optical mode volumes, we show that both requirements can be satisfied simultaneously. Microcavity sensors are designed in which resonances show highest Q ~9,300 in the bio-ambient phosphate buffered saline (PBS) as well as highest sensitivity among photonic crystal biosensors. We experimentally demonstrated mass sensitivity 8.8 atto-grams with sensitivity per unit area of 0.8 picograms/mm2 Highest sensitivity, irrespective of the dissociation constant Kd, is demonstrated among all existing label-free optical biosensors in silicon at the concentration of 0.1μg/ml. PMID:22748964

  13. Silicon on-chip bandpass filters for the multiplexing of high sensitivity photonic crystal microcavity biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hai Zou, Yi; Yang, Chun-Ju; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Wang, Zheng; Tang, Naimei; Chen, Ray T.; Fan, Donglei

    2015-03-23

    A method for the dense integration of high sensitivity photonic crystal (PC) waveguide based biosensors is proposed and experimentally demonstrated on a silicon platform. By connecting an additional PC waveguide filter to a PC microcavity sensor in series, a transmission passband is created, containing the resonances of the PC microcavity for sensing purpose. With proper engineering of the passband, multiple high sensitivity PC microcavity sensors can be integrated into microarrays and be interrogated simultaneously between a single input and a single output port. The concept was demonstrated with a 2-channel L55 PC biosensor array containing PC waveguide filters. The experiment showed that the sensors on both channels can be monitored simultaneously from a single output spectrum. Less than 3 dB extra loss for the additional PC waveguide filter is observed.

  14. Magneto-exciton-polariton condensation in a sub-wavelength high contrast grating based vertical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Brodbeck, S.; Worschech, L.; Kamp, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Zhang, B.; Wang, Z.; Deng, H.

    2014-03-03

    We comparably investigate the diamagnetic shift of an uncoupled quantum well exciton with a microcavity exciton-polariton condensate on the same device. The sample is composed of multiple GaAs quantum wells in an AlAs microcavity, surrounded by a Bragg reflector and a sub-wavelength high contrast grating reflector. Our study introduces an independent and easily applicable technique, namely, the measurement of the condensate diamagnetic shift, which directly probes matter contributions in polariton condensates and hence discriminates it from a conventional photon laser.

  15. Abnormal high-Q modes of coupled stadium-shaped microcavities.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jung-Wan; Lee, Soo-Young; Kim, Inbo; Choi, Muhan; Hentschel, Martina; Kim, Sang Wook

    2014-07-15

    It is well known that the strongly deformed microcavity with fully chaotic ray dynamics cannot support high-Q modes due to its fast chaotic diffusion to the critical line of refractive emission. Here, we investigate how the Q factor is modified when two chaotic cavities are coupled, and show that some modes, whose Q factor is about 10 times higher than that of the corresponding single cavity, can exist. These abnormal high-Q modes are the result of an optimal combination of coupling and cavity geometry. As an example, in the coupled stadium-shaped microcavities, the mode pattern extends over both cavities such that it follows a whispering-gallery-type mode at both ends, whereas a big coupling spot forms at the closest contact of the two microcavities. The pattern of such a "rounded bow tie" mode allows the mode to have a high-Q factor. This mode pattern minimizes the leakage of light at both ends of the microcavities as the pattern at both ends is similar to the whispering gallery mode. PMID:25121685

  16. Analysis of ultra-high sensitivity configuration in chip-integrated photonic crystal microcavity bio-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan; Zhu, Liang; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the contributions of quality factor, fill fraction, and group index of chip-integrated resonance microcavity devices, to the detection limit for bulk chemical sensing and the minimum detectable biomolecule concentration in biosensing. We analyze the contributions from analyte absorbance, as well as from temperature and spectral noise. Slow light in two-dimensional photonic crystals provide opportunities for significant reduction of the detection limit below 1 × 10-7 RIU (refractive index unit) which can enable highly sensitive sensors in diverse application areas. We demonstrate experimentally detected concentration of 1 fM (67 fg/ml) for the binding between biotin and avidin, the lowest reported till date.

  17. Laser-Machined Microcavities for Simultaneous Measurement of High-Temperature and High-Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Zengling; Liu, Shan; Liu, Qin; Huang, Ya; Bao, Haihong; Wang, Yanjun; Luo, Shucheng; Yang, Huiqin; Rao, Yunjiang

    2014-01-01

    Laser-machined microcavities for simultaneous measurement of high-temperature and high-pressure are demonstrated. These two cascaded microcavities are an air cavity and a composite cavity including a section of fiber and an air cavity. They are both placed into a pressure chamber inside a furnace to perform simultaneous pressure and high-temperature tests. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the short air cavity are ∼0.0779 nm/°C and ∼1.14 nm/MPa, respectively. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the composite cavity are ∼32.3 nm/°C and ∼24.4 nm/MPa, respectively. The sensor could be used to separate temperature and pressure due to their different thermal and pressure coefficients. The excellent feature of such a sensor head is that it can withstand high temperatures of up to 400 °C and achieve precise measurement of high-pressure under high temperature conditions. PMID:25106018

  18. The role of group index engineering in series-connected photonic crystal microcavities for high density sensor microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yi Zhu, Liang; Chen, Ray T.; Chakravarty, Swapnajit

    2014-04-07

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient and robust method for series connection of photonic crystal microcavities that are coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in the slow light transmission regime. We demonstrate that group index taper engineering provides excellent optical impedance matching between the input and output strip waveguides and the photonic crystal waveguide, a nearly flat transmission over the entire guided mode spectrum and clear multi-resonance peaks corresponding to individual microcavities that are connected in series. Series connected photonic crystal microcavities are further multiplexed in parallel using cascaded multimode interference power splitters to generate a high density silicon nanophotonic microarray comprising 64 photonic crystal microcavity sensors, all of which are interrogated simultaneously at the same instant of time.

  19. Diamond based photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Tomljenovic-Hanic, S; Steel, M J; de Sterke, C Martijn; Salzman, J

    2006-04-17

    Diamond based technologies offer a material platform for the implementation of qubits for quantum computing. The photonic crystal architecture provides the route for a scalable and controllable implementation of high quality factor (Q) nanocavities, operating in the strong coupling regime for cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we compute the photonic band structures and quality factors of microcavities in photonic crystal slabs in diamond, and compare the results with those of the more commonly-used silicon platform. We find that, in spite of the lower index contrast, diamond based photonic crystal microcavities can exhibit quality factors of Q=3.0x10(4), sufficient for proof of principle demonstrations in the quantum regime. PMID:19516502

  20. Recent Progress in the Growth of Highly Reflective Nitride-Based Distributed Bragg Reflectors and Their Use in Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butté, R.; Feltin, E.; Dorsaz, J.; Christmann, G.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Ilegems, M.

    2005-10-01

    The growth of highly-reflective nitride-based distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and their use in vertical cavity structures is reviewed. We discuss the various nitride material systems employed to design Bragg mirrors and microcavities, namely the Alx(Ga)1-xN/(Al)yGa1-yN and the lattice-matched Al1-xInxN/GaN (xIn˜ 18%)-based systems. An emphasis on particular issues such as strain management, internal absorption, alloy morphology and contribution of leaky modes is carried out. Specific properties of the poorly known AlInN alloy such as the bandgap variation with In content close to lattice-matched conditions to GaN are reported. The superior optical quality of the lattice-matched AlInN/GaN system for the realization of nitride-based DBRs is demonstrated. The properties of nitride-based vertical cavity devices are also described. Forthcoming challenges such as the realization of electrically pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers and strongly coupled quantum microcavities are discussed as well, and in particular critical issues such as vertical current injection.

  1. ZnO-Based Microcavities Sculpted by Focus Ion Beam Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsu-Chi; Hong, Kuo-Bin; Lai, Ying-Yu; Chou, Yu-Hsun; Wang, Shing-Chung; Lu, Tien-Chang

    2016-06-01

    We reported an easy fabrication method to realize ZnO-based microcavities with various cavity shapes by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The optical characteristics of different shaped microcavities have been systematically carried out and analyzed. Through comprehensive studies of cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence spectra, the whispering gallery mode (WGM) was observed in different shaped microcavities. Up further increasing excitation, the lasing action was dominated by these WGMs and matched very well to the simulated results. Our experiment shows that ZnO microcavities with different shapes can be made with high quality by FIB milling for specific applications of microlight sources and optical devices.

  2. ZnO-Based Microcavities Sculpted by Focus Ion Beam Milling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsu-Chi; Hong, Kuo-Bin; Lai, Ying-Yu; Chou, Yu-Hsun; Wang, Shing-Chung; Lu, Tien-Chang

    2016-12-01

    We reported an easy fabrication method to realize ZnO-based microcavities with various cavity shapes by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The optical characteristics of different shaped microcavities have been systematically carried out and analyzed. Through comprehensive studies of cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence spectra, the whispering gallery mode (WGM) was observed in different shaped microcavities. Up further increasing excitation, the lasing action was dominated by these WGMs and matched very well to the simulated results. Our experiment shows that ZnO microcavities with different shapes can be made with high quality by FIB milling for specific applications of microlight sources and optical devices. PMID:27364999

  3. Ultra-high Q one-dimensional hybrid PhC-SPP waveguide microcavity with large structure tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Zhang, Lingxuan; Lu, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Weiqiang; Wang, Leiran; Wang, Guoxi; Zhang, Wenfu; Zhao, Wei

    2016-07-01

    A photonic crystal - surface plasmon-polaritons hybrid transverse magnetic mode waveguide based on a one-dimensional optical microcavity is designed to work in the communication band. A Gaussian field distribution in a stepping heterojunction taper is designed by band engineering, and a silica layer compresses the mode field to the subwavelength scale. The designed microcavity possesses a resonant mode with a quality factor of 1609 and a modal volume of 0.01 cubic wavelength. The constant period and the large structure tolerance make it realizable by current processing techniques.

  4. Analysis of ultra-high sensitivity configuration in chip-integrated photonic crystal microcavity bio-sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit Hosseini, Amir; Xu, Xiaochuan; Zhu, Liang; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-05-12

    We analyze the contributions of quality factor, fill fraction, and group index of chip-integrated resonance microcavity devices, to the detection limit for bulk chemical sensing and the minimum detectable biomolecule concentration in biosensing. We analyze the contributions from analyte absorbance, as well as from temperature and spectral noise. Slow light in two-dimensional photonic crystals provide opportunities for significant reduction of the detection limit below 1 × 10{sup −7} RIU (refractive index unit) which can enable highly sensitive sensors in diverse application areas. We demonstrate experimentally detected concentration of 1 fM (67 fg/ml) for the binding between biotin and avidin, the lowest reported till date.

  5. Titanium-enhanced Raman microcavity laser.

    PubMed

    Deka, Nishita; Maker, Ashley J; Armani, Andrea M

    2014-03-15

    Whispering gallery mode microcavities are ideally suited to form microlaser devices because the high circulating intensity within the cavity results in ultralow lasing thresholds. However, to achieve low-threshold Raman lasing in silica devices, it is necessary to have quality factors above 100 million. One approach to circumvent this restriction is to intercalate a sensitizer into the silica, which increases the Raman gain. In the present work, we demonstrate a Raman laser based on a titanium sensitized silica solgel coated toroidal microcavity. By tuning the concentration of the Ti, the Raman efficiency improves over 3× while maintaining sub-mW thresholds. PMID:24690786

  6. Narrowband thermal radiation from closed-end microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kohiyama, Asaka; Shimizu, Makoto; Iguchi, Fumitada; Yugami, Hiroo

    2015-10-07

    High spectral selectivity of thermal radiation is important for achieving high-efficiency energy systems. In this study, intense, narrowband, and low directional absorption/radiation were observed in closed-end microcavity which is a conventional open-end microcavity covered by a semi-transparent thin metal film. The quality factor (Q factor) of optical absorption band strongly depended on the film electrical conductivity. Asymmetric and narrow absorption band with a Q factor of 25 at 1.28 μm was obtained for a 6-nm-thick Au film. Numerical simulations suggest that the formation of a fixed-end mode at the cavity aperture contributes to the narrowband optical absorption. The closed-end microcavity filled with SiO{sub 2} exhibits intense and isotropic thermal radiation over a wide solid angle according to numerical simulation. The narrow and asymmetric absorption spectrum was experimentally confirmed in a model of closed-end microcavity.

  7. Photonic crystal microcavity engineering and high-density bio-patterning for chip-integrated microarray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2012-01-01

    While Q ~ 1million has been demonstrated in freely suspended photonic crystal (PC) membranes, the reduced refractive index contrast when PC microcavities are immersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), a typical ambient for biomolecules, reduces Q by more than 2 orders of magnitude. We experimentally demonstrate photonic crystal microcavity based resonant sensors coupled to photonic crystal waveguides in silicon on insulator for chemical and bio-sensing. Linear L-type microcavities are considered. In contrast to cavities with small modes volumes but low quality factors for bio-sensing, we show that increasing the length of the microcavity enhances the quality factor of the resonance by an order of magnitude and also increases the resonance wavelength shift while still retaining compact device characteristics. Q~26,760 and sensitivity down to 7.5ng/ml and ~9pg/mm2 in bio-sensing was experimentally demonstrated in SOI devices for goat anti-rabbit IgG antibodies with Kd~10-6M. The increase in cavity length follows from fundamental engineering limitations in ink-jet printing or microfluidic channels when unique receptor biomolecules are coated on separate adjacent sensors in a microarray.

  8. Optical Microcavity: Sensing down to Single Molecules and Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Yoshie, Tomoyuki; Tang, Lingling; Su, Shu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q) factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments), microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling. PMID:22319393

  9. Strong exciton-photon coupling with colloidal quantum dots in a high-Q bilayer microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, Noel C; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate evanescently coupled bilayer microcavities with Q -factors exceeding 250 fabricated by a simple spin-coating process. The cavity architecture consists of a slab waveguide lying upon a low refractive index spacer layer supported by a glass substrate. For a lossless guide layer, the cavity Q depends only on the thickness of the low index spacer and in principle can reach arbitrarily high values. We demonstrate the versatility of this approach by constructing cavities with a guide layer incorporating CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots, where we observe strong coupling and hybridization between the 1S(e)-1S{sub 3/2} (h) and 1S(e)-2S{sub 3/2} (h) exciton states mediated by the cavity photon. This technique greatly simplifies the fabrication of high-Q planar microcavities for organic and inorganic quantum dot thin films and opens up new opportunities for the study of nonlinear optical phenomena in these materials.

  10. Detection of Single Nanoparticles Using the Dissipative Interaction in a High-Q Microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bo-Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Chong; Zhi, Yanyan; Wang, Li; Kim, Donghyun; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasensitive optical detection of nanometer-scaled particles is highly desirable for applications in early-stage diagnosis of human diseases, environmental monitoring, and homeland security, but remains extremely difficult due to ultralow polarizabilities of small-sized, low-index particles. Optical whispering-gallery-mode microcavities, which can enhance significantly the light-matter interaction, have emerged as promising platforms for label-free detection of nanoscale objects. Different from the conventional whispering-gallery-mode sensing relying on the reactive (i.e., dispersive) interaction, here we propose and demonstrate to detect single lossy nanoparticles using the dissipative interaction in a high-Q toroidal microcavity. In the experiment, detection of single gold nanorods in an aqueous environment is realized by monitoring simultaneously the linewidth change and shift of the cavity mode. The experimental result falls within the theoretical prediction. Remarkably, the reactive and dissipative sensing methods are evaluated by setting the probe wavelength on and off the surface plasmon resonance to tune the absorption of nanorods, which demonstrates clearly the great potential of the dissipative sensing method to detect lossy nanoparticles. Future applications could also combine the dissipative and reactive sensing methods, which may provide better characterizations of nanoparticles.

  11. Three-Dimensional Microcavity Array Electrodes for High-Capacitance All-Solid-State Flexible Microsupercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Jimin; Kim, Young-Joon; Meng, Chuizhou; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2016-06-01

    We report novel three-dimensional (3D) microcavity array electrodes for high-capacitance all-solid-state microsupercapactiors. The microcavity arrays are formed in a polymer substrate via a plasma-assisted reactive ion etching (RIE) process and provide extra sidewall surface areas on which the active materials are grown in the form of nanofibers. This 3D structure leads to an increase in the areal capacitance by a factor of 2.56 for a 15-μm-deep cavity etching, agreeing well with the prediction. The fabricated microsupercapactiors exhibit a maximum areal capacitance of 65.1 mF cm(-2) (a volumetric capacitance of 93.0 F cm(-3)) and an energy density of 0.011 mWh cm(-2) (a volumetric energy density of 16.4 mWh cm(-3)) which substantially surpass previously reported values for all-solid-state flexible microsupercapacitors. The devices show good electrochemical stability under extended voltammetry cycles and bending cycles. It is demonstrated that they can sustain a radio frequency (rf) microsystem in a temporary absence of a power supply. These results suggest the potential utility of our 3D microsupercapactiors as miniaturized power sources in wearable and implantable medical devices. PMID:27176134

  12. High-Q planar organic-inorganic Perovskite-based microcavity.

    PubMed

    Han, Zheng; Nguyen, Hai-Son; Boitier, Fabien; Wei, Yi; Abdel-Baki, Katia; Lauret, Jean-Sébastien; Bloch, Jacqueline; Bouchoule, Sophie; Deleporte, Emmanuelle

    2012-12-15

    We report on the fabrication of a perovskite-based ((C6H5C2H4 - NH3)2 PbI4) planar microcavity with a technique of a top dielectric mirror's migration in liquid, avoiding the degradation of the perovskite material. This approach allows for increasing the cavity Q-factor, without degrading the fragile molecular material. Strong coupling of the perovskite exciton to both the cavity mode and the first Bragg mode is evidenced from angle-resolved reflectivity and microphotoluminescence measurements at room temperature; an efficient relaxation toward the minimum of the main polariton branch is observed. The measured quality factor is significantly increased compared to previous reports where a top metallic mirror was used, showing the decisive advantage of the present fabrication technique toward the achievement of stimulated effects and polariton lasing with perovskite materials. PMID:23258005

  13. Micro-cavity lasers with large device size for directional emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chang-ling; Li, Peng; Shi, Jian-wei; Feng, Yuan; Hao, Yong-qin; Zhu, Dongda

    2014-10-01

    Optical micro-cavity structures, which can confine light in a small mode volume with high quality factors, have become an important platform not only for optoelectronic applications with densely integrated optical components, but also for fundamental studies such as cavity quantum electrodynamics and nonlinear optical processes. Micro-cavity lasers with directional emission feature are becoming a promising resonator for the compact laser application. In this paper, we presented the limason-shaped cavity laser with large device size, and fabricated this type of micro-cavity laser with quantum cascade laser material. The micro-cavity laser with large device size was fabricated by using InP based InGaAs/InAlAs quantum cascade lasers material at about 10um emitting wavelength, and the micro-cavity lasers with the large device size were manufactured and characterized with light output power, threshold current, and the far-field pattern.

  14. Fermi Edge Polaritons in a Microcavity Containing a High Density Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, A.; Preezant, Yulia; Cohen, E.; Ashkinadze, B. M.; Pfeiffer, L. N.

    2007-10-01

    Sharp, near band gap lines are observed in the reflection and photoluminescence spectra of GaAs/AlGaAs structures consisting of a modulation doped quantum well (MDQW) that contains a high density two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) and is embedded in a microcavity (MC). The energy dependence of these lines on the MC-confined photon energy shows level anticrossings and Rabi splittings very similar to those observed in systems of undoped QW’s embedded in a MC. The spectra are analyzed by calculating the optical susceptibility of the MDQW in the near band gap spectral range and using it within the transfer matrix method. The calculated reflection spectra indicate that the sharp spectral lines are due to k∥=0 cavity polaritons that are composed of e-h pair excitations just above the 2DEG Fermi edge and are strongly coupled to the MC-confined photons.

  15. Optofluidic laser array based on stable high-Q Fabry-Pérot microcavities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhou, Chunhua; Zhang, Tingting; Chen, Jingdong; Liu, Shaoding; Fan, Xudong

    2015-10-01

    We report the development of an optofluidic laser array fabricated on a chip using stable plano-concave Fabry-Pérot (FP) microcavities, which are far less susceptible to optical misalignment during device assembly than the commonly used plano-plano FP microcavities. The concave mirrors in our FP microcavities were created by first generating an array of microwells of a few micrometers in depth and a few tens of micrometers in diameter on a fused silica chip using a CO2 laser, followed by coating of distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) layers. The plano-concave FP microcavity had a Q-factor of 5.6 × 10(5) and finesse of 4 × 10(3), over 100 times higher than those for the FP microcavities in existing optofluidic lasers. 1 mM R6G dye in ethanol was used to test the plano-concave FP microcavities, showing an ultralow lasing threshold of only 90 nJ mm(-2), over 10 times lower than that in the corresponding unstable plano-plano FP microcavities formed by the same DBR coatings on the same chip. Simultaneous laser emission from the optofluidic laser array on the chip and single-mode lasing operation were also demonstrated. Our work will lead to the development of optofluidic laser-based biochemical sensors and novel on-chip photonic devices with extremely low lasing thresholds (nJ mm(-2)) and mode volumes (fL). PMID:26304622

  16. Label-free detection with high-Q microcavities: a review of biosensing mechanisms for integrated devices

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Optical microcavities that confine light in high-Q resonance promise all of the capabilities required for a successful next-generation microsystem biodetection technology. Label-free detection down to single molecules as well as operation in aqueous environments can be integrated cost-effectively on microchips, together with other photonic components, as well as electronic ones. We provide a comprehensive review of the sensing mechanisms utilized in this emerging field, their physics, engineering and material science aspects, and their application to nanoparticle analysis and biomolecular detection. We survey the most recent developments such as the use of mode splitting for self-referenced measurements, plasmonic nanoantennas for signal enhancements, the use of optical force for nanoparticle manipulation as well as the design of active devices for ultra-sensitive detection. Furthermore, we provide an outlook on the exciting capabilities of functionalized high-Q microcavities in the life sciences. PMID:26918228

  17. High-Polarization-Discriminating Infrared Detection Using a Single Quantum Well Sandwiched in Plasmonic Micro-Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Li, ZhiFeng; Li, Ning; Chen, XiaoShuang; Chen, PingPing; Shen, XueChu; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities. PMID:25208580

  18. High-Polarization-Discriminating Infrared Detection Using a Single Quantum Well Sandwiched in Plasmonic Micro-Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Li, Zhifeng; Li, Ning; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chen, Pingping; Shen, Xuechu; Lu, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities.

  19. High-polarization-discriminating infrared detection using a single quantum well sandwiched in plasmonic micro-cavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Li, ZhiFeng; Li, Ning; Chen, XiaoShuang; Chen, PingPing; Shen, XueChu; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Polarimetric imaging has proved its value in medical diagnostics, bionics, remote sensing, astronomy, and in many other wide fields. Pixel-level solid monolithically integrated polarimetric imaging photo-detectors are the trend for infrared polarimetric imaging devices. For better polarimetric imaging performance the high polarization discriminating detectors are very much critical. Here we demonstrate the high infrared light polarization resolving capabilities of a quantum well (QW) detector in hybrid structure of single QW and plasmonic micro-cavity that uses QW as an active structure in the near field regime of plasmonic effect enhanced cavity, in which the photoelectric conversion in such a plasmonic micro-cavity has been realized. The detector's extinction ratio reaches 65 at the wavelength of 14.7 μm, about 6 times enhanced in such a type of pixel-level polarization long wave infrared photodetectors. The enhancement mechanism is attributed to artificial plasmonic modulation on optical propagation and distribution in the plasmonic micro-cavities. PMID:25208580

  20. Ultrasmooth silver thin film electrodes with high polar liquid wettability for OLED microcavity application.

    PubMed

    Cioarec, Cristina; Melpignano, Patrizia; Gherardi, Nicolas; Clergereaux, Richard; Villeneuve, Christina

    2011-04-01

    For a lab-on-chip application, we fabricate a blue bottom emitting strong microcavity organic light emitting diode (OLED), using very smooth and optically thin (25 nm) silver film as anode on a glass substrate. To improve the hole injection in the OLED device, PEDOT-PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonic acid)) has been used, so the silver anode must present not only a very smooth surface but also a strong adherence on the glass and a high wettability to allow a good PEDOT-PSS spin coating deposition. To obtain these physical properties, different 5 nm thick nucleation layers (germanium, chromium, and hydrogenated amorphous carbon) have been used to grow the silver thin films by e-beam deposition. The Ge/Ag bilayer presents all the desired properties: this bilayer, investigated by ellipsometry, optical profilometry, contact angle measurements, and XPS analysis, highlights an ultrasmooth surface correlated with the film growth mode and a high wettability related to its surface chemical composition. PMID:21391637

  1. Mode characteristics and directional emission for square microcavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue-De; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Square microcavities with high quality factor whispering-gallery-like modes have a series of novel optical properties and can be employed as compact-size laser resonators. In this paper, the mode characteristics of square optical microcavities and the lasing properties of directional-emission square semiconductor microlasers are reviewed for the realization of potential light sources in the photonic integrated circuits and optical interconnects. A quasi-analytical model is introduced to describe the confined modes in square microcavities, and high quality factor whispering-gallery-like modes are predicted by the mode-coupling theory and confirmed by the numerical simulation. An output waveguide directly coupled to the position with weak mode field is used to achieve directional emission and control the lasing mode. Electrically-pumped InP-based directional-emission square microlasers are realized at room temperature, and the lasing spectra agree well with the mode analysis. Different kinds of square microcavity lasers, including dual-mode laser with a tunable interval, single-mode laser with a wide tunable wavelength range, and high-speed direct-modulated laser are also demonstrated experimentally.

  2. Photonic crystal microcavity lasers and laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jiang-Rong

    As a state-of-the-art technology, photonic crystal microcavity lasers have great potentials to resolve many semiconductor laser performance challenges, owing to their compact size, high spontaneous emission factor, and inherent advantages in dimension scalability. This thesis describes efficient numerical analyzing methods for multimode photonic crystal microcavities, including a parallel computing three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method combined with Pade interpolation, point group projection, and vectorial Green's function method. With the help of these analyzing tools, various experimental photonic crystal microcavity devices fabricated in InGaAsP/InP based materials were studies. Room temperature optical pumped InGaAsP suspended membrane photonic crystal microcavity lasers were demonstrated. Their lithographical fine-tuning, above room temperature operations, mode identifications and polarizations were demonstrated. Room temperature continuous wave (CW) optically pumped photonic crystal microcavity lasers at diameter less than 3.2 mum were demonstrated with crystalline alpha-Al 2O3 (sapphire) as a cladding layer to the InGaAsP membrane. The far-field radiation profiles from these microcavity lasers were measured and compared with our numerical modeling predictions. Two electrical injection scenes for photonic crystal microcavity lasers were introduced, together with some preliminary results including the demonstrations of optically pumped lasing of highly doped cavities and cavities with an electrical conduction post underneath. Electrically excited photonic crystal microcavity light emitting diodes (LEDs) were also experimentally demonstrated.

  3. Semiconductor microcavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Wendt, J.R.; Vawter, G.A.; Warren, M.E.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1994-02-01

    New kinds of semiconductor microcavity lasers are being created by modern semiconductor technologies like molecular beam epitaxy and electron beam lithography. These new microcavities exploit 3-dimensional architectures possible with epitaxial layering and surface patterning. The physical properties of these microcavities are intimately related to the geometry imposed on the semiconductor materials. Among these microcavities are surface-emitting structures which have many useful properties for commercial purposes. This paper reviews the basic physics of these microstructured lasers.

  4. High-temperature continuous-wave laser realized in hollow microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhifeng; Zhang, Yuantao; Cui, Xijun; Zhuang, Shiwei; Wu, Bin; Dong, Xin; Zhang, Baolin; Du, Guotong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, an urgent requirement of ultraviolet (UV) semiconductor laser with lower cost and higher performance has motivated our intensive research in zinc oxide (ZnO) material owing to its wide direct band gap and large exciton binding energy. Here, we demonstrate for the first time continuous-wave laser in electrically-pumped hollow polygonal microcavities based on epitaxial ZnO/MgO-core/shell nanowall networks structures, and whispering gallery type resonant modes are responsible for the lasing action. The laser diodes exhibit an ultralow threshold current density (0.27 A/cm2), two or three orders of magnitude smaller than other reported UV-light semiconductor laser diodes to our knowledge. More importantly, the continuous-current-driven diode can achieve lasing up to ~430 K, showing a good temperature tolerance. This study indicates that nano-size injection lasers can be made from epitaxial semiconductor microcavities, which is a considerable advance towards the realization of practical UV coherent light sources, facilitating the existing applications and suggesting new potentials. PMID:25417966

  5. Silicon on-chip side-coupled high-Q micro-cavities for the multiplexing of high sensitivity photonic crystal integrated sensors array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Daquan; Wang, Chunhong; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Bo; Yang, Yujie; Ji, Yuefeng

    2016-09-01

    A novel two-dimensional (2D) silicon (Si) photonic crystal (PC) α-H0-slot micro-cavity with high Q-factor and high sensitivity (S) is presented. Based on the proposed α-H0-Slot micro-cavities, an optimal design of photonic crystal integrated sensors array (PC-ISA) on monolithic silicon on insulator (SOI) is displayed. By using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the simulation results demonstrate that both large S of 200 nm/RIU (RIU=refractive index unit) and high Q-factor >104 at telecom wavelength range can be achieved simultaneously. And the sensor figure of merit (FOM)>7000 is featured, an order of magnitude improvement over previous 2D PC sensors array. In addition, for the proposed 2D PC-ISA device, each sensor unit is shown to independently shift its resonance wavelength in response to the changes in refractive index (RI) and does not perturb the others. Thus, it is potentially an ideal platform for realizing ultra-compact lab-on-a-chip applications with dense arrays of functionalized spots for multiplexed sensing, and also can be used as an opto-fluidic architecture for performing highly parallel detection of biochemical interactions in aqueous environments.

  6. Fabry-Perot microcavity for diamond-based photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janitz, Erika; Ruf, Maximilian; Dimock, Mark; Bourassa, Alexandre; Sankey, Jack; Childress, Lilian

    2015-10-01

    Open Fabry-Perot microcavities represent a promising route for achieving a quantum electrodynamics (cavity-QED) platform with diamond-based emitters. In particular, they offer the opportunity to introduce high-purity, minimally fabricated material into a tunable, high quality factor optical resonator. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-based microcavity incorporating a thick (>10 μ m ) diamond membrane with a finesse of 17 000, corresponding to a quality factor Q ˜106 . Such minimally fabricated thick samples can contain optically stable emitters similar to those found in bulk diamond. We observe modified microcavity spectra in the presence of the membrane, and we develop analytic and numerical models to describe the effect of the membrane on cavity modes, including loss and coupling to higher-order transverse modes. We estimate that a Purcell enhancement of approximately 20 should be possible for emitters within the diamond in this device, and we provide evidence that better diamond surface treatments and mirror coatings could increase this value to 200 in a realistic system.

  7. Ultrasensitive detection of mode splitting in active optical microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lina; Oezdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhu Jiangang; Yang Lan

    2010-11-15

    Scattering-induced mode splitting in active microcavities is demonstrated. Below the lasing threshold, quality factor enhancement by optical gain allows resolving, in the wavelength-scanning transmission spectrum, of resonance dips of the split modes which otherwise would not be detected in a passive resonator. In the lasing regime, mode splitting manifests itself as two lasing modes with extremely narrow linewidths. Mixing these lasing modes in a detector leads to a heterodyne beat signal whose frequency corresponds to the mode-splitting amount. Lasing regime not only allows ultra-high sensitivity for mode-splitting measurements but also provides an easily accessible scheme by eliminating the need for wavelength scanning around resonant modes. Mode splitting in active microcavities has an immediate impact in enhancing the sensitivity of subwavelength scatterer detection and in studying light-matter interactions in a strong-coupling regime.

  8. Spherical silicon photonic microcavities: From amorphous to polycrystalline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenollosa, R.; Garín, M.; Meseguer, F.

    2016-06-01

    Shaping silicon as a spherical object is not an obvious task, especially when the object size is in the micrometer range. This has the important consequence of transforming bare silicon material in a microcavity, so it is able to confine light efficiently. Here, we have explored the inside volume of such microcavities, both in their amorphous and in their polycrystalline versions. The synthesis method, which is based on chemical vapor deposition, causes amorphous microspheres to have a high content of hydrogen that produces an onionlike distributed porous core when the microspheres are crystallized by a fast annealing regime. This substantially influences the resonant modes. However, a slow crystallization regime does not yield pores, and produces higher-quality-factor resonances that could be fitted to the Mie theory. This allows the establishment of a procedure for obtaining size calibration standards with relative errors of the order of 0.1%.

  9. A tunable microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Russell J.; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Curran, Arran; Nowak, Kris M.; Baker, Howard J.; Hall, Denis R.; Stoltz, Nick G.; Petroff, Pierre M.; Warburton, Richard J.

    2011-09-01

    We present a generic microcavity platform for cavity experiments on optically active nanostructures, such as quantum dots, nanocrystals, color centers, and carbon nanotubes. The cavity is of the Fabry-Pérot type with a planar back mirror and a miniature concave top mirror with radius of curvature ˜ 100 μm. Optical access is achieved by free beam coupling, allowing good mode-matching to the cavity mode. The cavity has a high Q-factor, reasonably small mode volume, open access, spatial and spectral tunability, and operates at cryogenic temperatures. Spectral and spatial tuning of the Purcell effect (weak coupling regime) on a single InGaAs quantum dot is demonstrated.

  10. Aqueous-filled polymer microcavity arrays: versatile & stable lipid bilayer platforms offering high lateral mobility to incorporated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Basit, Hajra; Gaul, Vinnie; Maher, Sean; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2015-05-01

    A key prerequisite in an ideal supported lipid bilayer based cell membrane model is that the mobility of both the lipid matrix and its components are unhindered by the underlying support. This is not trivial and with the exception of liposomes, many of even the most advanced approaches, although accomplishing lipid mobility, fail to achieve complete mobility of incorporated membrane proteins. This is addressed in a novel platform comprising lipid bilayers assembled over buffer-filled, arrays of spherical cap microcavities formed from microsphere template polydimethoxysilane. Prior to bilayer assembly the PDMS is rendered hydrophilic by plasma treatment and the lipid bilayer prepared using Langmuir Blodgett assembly followed by liposome/proteoliposome fusion. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy confirmed the pore suspended lipid bilayer exhibits diffusion coefficients comparable to free-standing vesicles in solution. The bilayer modified arrays are highly reproducible and stable over days. As the bilayers are suspended over deep aqueous reservoirs, reconstituted membrane proteins experience an aqueous interface at both membrane interfaces and attain full lateral mobility. Their utility as membrane protein platforms was exemplified in two case studies with proteins of different dimensions in their extracellular and cytoplasmic domains reconstituted into DOPC lipid bilayers; Glycophorin A, and Integrin αIIbβ3. In both cases, the proteins exhibited 100% mobility with high lateral diffusion coefficients. PMID:25798456

  11. Femtosecond laser 3D fabrication of whispering-gallery-mode microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, HuaiLiang; Sun, HongBo

    2015-11-01

    Whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microcavities with high-quality factors and small volumes have attracted intense interests in the past decades because of their potential applications in various research fields such as quantum information, sensing, and optoelectronics. This leads to rapid advance in a variety of processing technologies that can create high-quality WGM micro- cavities. Due to the unique characteristics of femtosecond laser pulses with high peak intensity and ultrashort pulse duration, femtosecond laser shows the ability to carry out ultrahigh precision micromachining of a variety of transparent materials through nonlinear multiphoton absorption and tunneling ionization. This review paper describes the basic principle of femtosecond laser direct writing, and presents an overview of recent progress concerning femtosecond laser three-dimensional (3D) fabrications of optical WGM microcavities, which include the advances in the fabrications of passive and active WGMs microcavities in a variety of materials such as polymer, glass and crystals, as well as in processing the integrated WGM-microcavity device. Lastly, a summary of this dynamic field with a future perspective is given.

  12. Low-threshold indium gallium nitride quantum dot microcavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Alexander J.

    Gallium nitride (GaN) microcavities with embedded optical emitters have long been sought after as visible light sources as well as platforms for cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) experiments. Specifically, materials containing indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum dots (QDs) offer an outstanding platform to study light matter interactions and realize practical devices, such as on-chip light emitting diodes and nanolasers. Inherent advantages of nitride-based microcavities include low surface recombination velocities, enhanced room-temperature performance (due to their high exciton binding energy, as high as 67 meV for InGaN QDs), and emission wavelengths in the blue region of the visible spectrum. In spite of these advantages, several challenges must be overcome in order to capitalize on the potential of this material system. Such diffculties include the processing of GaN into high-quality devices due to the chemical inertness of the material, low material quality as a result of strain-induced defects, reduced carrier recombination effciencies due to internal fields, and a lack of characterization of the InGaN QDs themselves due to the diffculty of their growth and therefore lack of development relative to other semiconductor QDs. In this thesis we seek to understand and address such issues by investigating the interaction of light coupled to InGaN QDs via a GaN microcavity resonator. Such coupling led us to the demonstration of the first InGaN QD microcavity laser, whose performance offers insights into the properties and current limitations of the nitride materials and their emitters. This work is organized into three main sections. Part I outlines the key advantages and challenges regarding indium gallium nitride (InGaN) emitters embedded within gallium nitride (GaN) optical microcavities. Previous work is also discussed which establishes context for the work presented here. Part II includes the fundamentals related to laser operation, including the

  13. Mechanism of directional emission from a peanut-shaped microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Shu Fangjie; Zou Changling; Sun Fangwen; Xiao Yunfeng

    2011-05-15

    Collimated directional emission is essentially required for an asymmetric resonant cavity. In this paper, we theoretically investigate a type of peanut-shaped microcavity which can support highly directional emission with a beam divergence as small as 2.5 deg. The mechanism of the collimated emission of this type of peanut-shaped microcavity is explained with a short-term ray trajectory. Moreover, the explanations are also confirmed by a numerical wave simulation. This extremely narrow divergence of the emission holds great potential in highly collimated lasing from on-chip microcavities.

  14. Multi-directional ultra-high sensitive pressure sensor based on the integration of optimized double 60° bend waveguides and modified center-defect photonic crystal microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Yang, Daquan; Tian, Huiping; Huang, Lijun; Zhang, Pan; Ji, Yuefeng

    2015-06-01

    In the previous work [1], we have proposed a method to realize multi-directional pressure sensor. This follow-up work provides an optimized structure design based on the integration of double 60° bend waveguides and modified center-defect photonic crystal microcavity to further improve sensitivity. By applying two-dimensional finite difference time domain technologies (2D-FDTD) and finite-element methods (FEM), we systematically investigate the variations of optical properties under applied pressure. Linear relationships between the resonant wavelength shift and the applied pressure are obtained in three directions. The ultra-high sensitivities and the low minimum detectable pressure in longitudinal, transverse and upright directions are 39.7 nm/μN and 1.08 nN, 30.20 nm/μN and 1.43 nN, and 0.12 nm/nN and 0.36 nN respectively.

  15. A small mode volume tunable microcavity: Development and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greuter, Lukas; Starosielec, Sebastian; Najer, Daniel; Ludwig, Arne; Duempelmann, Luc; Rohner, Dominik; Warburton, Richard J.

    2014-09-01

    We report the realization of a spatially and spectrally tunable air-gap Fabry-Pérot type microcavity of high finesse and cubic-wavelength-scale mode volume. These properties are attractive in the fields of opto-mechanics, quantum sensing, and foremost cavity quantum electrodynamics. The major design feature is a miniaturized concave mirror with atomically smooth surface and radius of curvature as low as 10 μm produced by CO2 laser ablation of fused silica. We demonstrate excellent mode-matching of a focussed laser beam to the microcavity mode and confirm from the frequencies of the resonator modes that the effective optical radius matches the physical radius. With these small radii, we demonstrate wavelength-size beam waists. We also show that the microcavity is sufficiently rigid for practical applications: in a cryostat at 4 K, the root-mean-square microcavity length fluctuations are below 5 pm.

  16. Radiative rate modification in CdSe quantum dot-coated microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veluthandath, Aneesh V.; Bisht, Prem B.

    2015-12-01

    Whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of the microparticles with spherical or cylindrical symmetry have exceptionally high quality factors and small mode volume. Quantum dots (QDs) are zero dimensional systems with variable band gap as well as luminescent properties with applications in photonics. In this paper, the WGMs have been observed in the luminescence spectra of CdSe QD-coated single silica microspheres. Theoretical estimations of variation of resonance frequency, electric field, and Q-values have been done for a multilayer coating of QDs on silica microspheres. Observed WGMs have been identified for their mode number and polarization using Mie theory. Broadening of modes due to material absorption has been observed. Splitting of WGMs has also been observed due to coherent coupling of counter propagating waves in the microcavity due to the presence of QDs. At room temperature, the time-resolved study indicates the modification of the radiative rate due to coupling of WGMs of the microcavity-QD hybrid system.

  17. Radiative rate modification in CdSe quantum dot-coated microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Veluthandath, Aneesh V.; Bisht, Prem B.

    2015-12-21

    Whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of the microparticles with spherical or cylindrical symmetry have exceptionally high quality factors and small mode volume. Quantum dots (QDs) are zero dimensional systems with variable band gap as well as luminescent properties with applications in photonics. In this paper, the WGMs have been observed in the luminescence spectra of CdSe QD-coated single silica microspheres. Theoretical estimations of variation of resonance frequency, electric field, and Q-values have been done for a multilayer coating of QDs on silica microspheres. Observed WGMs have been identified for their mode number and polarization using Mie theory. Broadening of modes due to material absorption has been observed. Splitting of WGMs has also been observed due to coherent coupling of counter propagating waves in the microcavity due to the presence of QDs. At room temperature, the time-resolved study indicates the modification of the radiative rate due to coupling of WGMs of the microcavity-QD hybrid system.

  18. Dispersion engineering for vertical microcavities using subwavelength gratings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaorong; Zhang, Bo; Deng, Hui

    2015-02-20

    We show that the energy-momentum dispersion of a vertical semiconductor microcavity can be modified by design using a high-index-contrast subwavelength grating (SWG) as a cavity mirror. We analyze the angular dependence of the reflection phase of the SWG to illustrate the principles of dispersion engineering. We show examples of engineered dispersions such as ones with much reduced or increased energy density of states and one with a double-well-shaped dispersion. This method of dispersion engineering is compatible with maintaining a high cavity quality factor and incorporating fully protected active media inside the cavity, thus enabling the creation of new types of cavity quantum electrodynamics systems. PMID:25763957

  19. Precision laser-based decontamination of microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, S. M.; Deshmukh, A. V.; Brooks, T. D.; van de Burgt, L. J.

    1998-05-01

    The removal of oil-based contaminants from microcavities with narrow apertures and comparatively long axial dimensions presents a number of challenges in an industrial production line environment. Traditional solvent-based approaches are costly to implement, inefficient in cleaning such microcavity geometries, and increasingly unacceptable from an environmental standpoint. An attractive alternative is to employ high-energy laser pulses to selectively remove the contaminants without introducing damage to the component undergoing the cleaning procedure. This paper will present results of initial ablation trials on example industrial oil-based organic contaminants whose residues within microcavities in steel-based components are to be removed. At present, higher order lines from a frequency tripled/quadrupled Nd:YAG laser are used to study the optimum fluence for removal of the oil-based contaminant without inflicting damage to the steel. Absorption spectroscopy of the contaminant fluid indicates that photon wavelengths shorter than ˜370 nm will interact with the material. Initial results show that the required intensity at 355 nm (>25 J/cm 2) also damages the type of steel under investigation, but that exposure to even single pulses at 266 nm (˜100 mJ/cm 2) shows adequate removal of the contaminant without significant damage to the steel. Monitoring of the removal process is achieved through exploitation of the blue fluorescence of the oil-based contaminant that occurs as a result of ultraviolet pumping.

  20. Synthetic holography based on scanning microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, A.; Farina, M.

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic optical holography (SOH) is an imaging technique, introduced in scanning microscopy to record amplitude and phase of a scattered field from a sample. In this paper, it is described a novel implementation of SOH through a lens-free low-coherence system, based on a scanning optical microcavity. This technique combines the low-coherence properties of the source with the mutual interference of scattered waves and the resonant behavior of a micro-cavity, in order to realize a high sensitive imaging system. Micro-cavity is compact and realized by approaching a cleaved optical fiber to the sample. The scanning system works in an open-loop configuration without the need for a reference wave, usually required in interferometric systems. Measurements were performed over calibration samples and a lateral resolution of about 1 μm is achieved by means of an optical fiber with a Numerical Aperture (NA) equal to 0.1 and a Mode Field Diameter (MDF) of 5.6 μm.

  1. Integrated waveguide-DBR microcavity opto-mechanical system.

    PubMed

    Pruessner, Marcel W; Stievater, Todd H; Khurgin, Jacob B; Rabinovich, William S

    2011-10-24

    Cavity opto-mechanics exploits optical forces acting on mechanical structures. Many opto-mechanics demonstrations either require extensive alignment of optical components for probing and measurement, which limits the number of opto-mechanical devices on-chip; or the approaches limit the ability to control the opto-mechanical parameters independently. In this work, we propose an opto-mechanical architecture incorporating a waveguide-DBR microcavity coupled to an in-plane micro-bridge resonator, enabling large-scale integration on-chip with the ability to individually tune the optical and mechanical designs. We experimentally characterize our device and demonstrate mechanical resonance damping and amplification, including the onset of coherent oscillations. The resulting collapse of the resonance linewidth implies a strong increase in effective mechanical quality-factor, which is of interest for high-resolution sensing. PMID:22109043

  2. High-Q contacted ring microcavities with scatterer-avoiding “wiggler” Bloch wave supermode fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yangyang Popović, Miloš A.

    2014-05-19

    High-Q ring resonators with contacts to the waveguide core provide a versatile platform for various applications in chip-scale optomechanics, thermo-, and electro-optics. We propose and demonstrate azimuthally periodic contacted ring resonators based on multi-mode Bloch matching that support contacts on both the inner and outer radius edges with small degradation to the optical quality factor (Q). Radiative coupling between degenerate modes of adjacent radial spatial order leads to imaginary frequency (Q) splitting and a scatterer avoiding high-Q “wiggler” supermode field. We experimentally measure Qs up to 258 000 in devices fabricated in a silicon device layer on buried oxide undercladding and up to 139 000 in devices fully suspended in air using an undercut step. Wiggler supermodes are true modes of the microphotonic system that offer additional degrees of freedom in electrical, thermal, and mechanical design.

  3. Quantum-dot-induced phase shift in a pillar microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A. B.; Hu, C. Y.; Rarity, J. G.; Oulton, R.; Thijssen, A. C. T.; Schneider, C.; Reitzenstein, S.; Kamp, M.; Hoefling, S.; Worschech, L.; Forchel, A.

    2011-07-15

    We perform high-resolution reflection spectroscopy of a quantum dot resonantly coupled to a pillar microcavity. We show the change in reflectivity as the quantum dot is tuned through the cavity resonance and measure the quantum-dot-induced phase shift using an ultrastable interferometer. The macroscopic phase shift we measure could be extended to the study of charged quantum dot pillar microcavity systems, where it could be exploited to realize a high-efficiency spin photon interface for hybrid quantum information schemes.

  4. Flip-chip light emitting diode with resonant optical microcavity

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Bogart, Katherine H.A.; Fischer, Arthur J.

    2005-11-29

    A flip-chip light emitting diode with enhanced efficiency. The device structure employs a microcavity structure in a flip-chip configuration. The microcavity enhances the light emission in vertical modes, which are readily extracted from the device. Most of the rest of the light is emitted into waveguided lateral modes. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on dielectric substrates (e.g., gallium nitride LEDs grown on sapphire substrates) in general due to better thermal dissipation and lower series resistance. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for microcavity LEDs in particular because (a) one of the reflectors is a high-reflectivity metal ohmic contact that is already part of the flip-chip configuration, and (b) current conduction is only required through a single distributed Bragg reflector. Some of the waveguided lateral modes can also be extracted with angled sidewalls used for the interdigitated contacts in the flip-chip configuration.

  5. Ultraviolet light detection using an optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Harker, Audrey; Mehrabani, Simin; Armani, Andrea M

    2013-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light exposure is connected to both physical and psychological diseases. As such, there is significant interest in developing sensors that can detect UV light in the mW/cm2 intensity range with a high signal-to-noise ratio. In this Letter, we demonstrate a UV sensor based on a silica integrated optical microcavity that has a linear operating response in both the forward and backward directions from 14 to 53 mW/cm2. The sensor response agrees with the developed predictive theory based on a thermodynamic model. Additionally, the signal-to-noise ratio is above 100 at physiologically relevant intensity levels. PMID:23988974

  6. Optical bistability in semiconductor microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Baas, A.; Karr, J.Ph.; Giacobino, E.; Eleuch, H.

    2004-02-01

    We report the observation of polaritonic bistability in semiconductor microcavities in the strong-coupling regime. The origin of bistability is the polariton-polariton interaction, which gives rise to a Kerr-like nonlinearity. The experimental results are in good agreement with a simple model taking transverse effects into account.

  7. Recyclable optical microcavities for label-free sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Heather K.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2011-10-01

    High-sensitivity, label-free biosensors, such as optical microcavities, have shown tremendous potential in medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food safety evaluation, particularly when paired with a biochemical recognition element that grants high specificity towards a target of interest. Their primary limitation is that these systems are single-use, unless the recognition element can be regenerated. Therefore, the ability to selectively functionalize the optical microcavity for a specific target molecule and then recycle the system, without degrading device performance, is extremely important. Here, we present a bioconjugation strategy that not only imparts specificity to optical microcavities, but also allows for biosensor recycling. In this approach, we selectively functionalize the surface of silica microtoroids with a biotin recognition element. We then use a non-destructive O2 plasma treatment to remove the surface chemistry, refresh the recognition element, and recycle the device. The surface chemistry and optical performance of the functionalized and recycled devices are characterized by microcavity analysis, and typical spectroscopic techniques, respectively. The resulting devices can be recycled several times without performance degradation, and show high density surface coverage of biologically active recognition elements. This work represents one of the first examples of a recyclable, bioconjugation strategy for optical microtoroid resonators.

  8. Tuning the resonance of a photonic crystal microcavity with an AFM probe.

    PubMed

    Märki, Iwan; Salt, Martin; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2006-04-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results on switching and tuning of a two-dimensional photonic crystal resonant microcavity by means of a silicon AFM tip, probing the highly localized optical field in the vicinity of the cavity. On-off switching and modulation of the transmission signal in the kHz range is achieved by bringing an AFM tip onto the center of the microcavity, inducing a damping effect on the transmission resonance. Tuning of the resonant wavelength in the order of several nanometers becomes possible by inserting the AFM tip into one of the holes of the Bragg mirror forming the microcavity in the propagation direction. PMID:19516436

  9. Fabrication and optical properties of non-polar III-nitride air-gap distributed Bragg reflector microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Renchun Kako, Satoshi; Arita, Munetaka; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-11

    Using the thermal decomposition technique, non-polar III-nitride air-gap distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) microcavities (MCs) with a single quantum well have been fabricated. Atomic force microscopy reveals a locally smooth DBR surface, and room-temperature micro-photoluminescence measurements show cavity modes. There are two modes per cavity due to optical birefringence in the non-polar MCs, and a systematic cavity mode shift with cavity thickness was also observed. Although the structures consist of only 3 periods (top) and 4 periods (bottom), a quality factor of 1600 (very close to the theoretical value of 2100) reveals the high quality of the air-gap DBR MCs.

  10. Strong light-matter coupling in bulk GaN-microcavities with double dielectric mirrors fabricated by two different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Reveret, F.; Disseix, P.; Vasson, A.; Leymarie, J.; Bejtka, K.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W.; Chenot, S.; Sellers, I. R.; Duboz, J. Y.; Leroux, M.; Semond, F.

    2010-08-15

    Two routes for the fabrication of bulk GaN microcavities embedded between two dielectric mirrors are described, and the optical properties of the microcavities thus obtained are compared. In both cases, the GaN active layer is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (111) Si, allowing use of selective etching to remove the substrate. In the first case, a three period Al{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/AlN Bragg mirror followed by a {lambda}/2 GaN cavity are grown directly on the Si. In the second case, a crack-free 2 {mu}m thick GaN layer is grown, and progressively thinned to a final thickness of {lambda}. Both devices work in the strong coupling regime at low temperature, as evidenced by angle-dependent reflectivity or transmission experiments. However, strong light-matter coupling in emission at room temperature is observed only for the second one. This is related to the poor optoelectronic quality of the active layer of the first device, due to its growth only 250 nm above the Si substrate and its related high defect density. The reflectivity spectra of the microcavities are well accounted for by using transfer matrix calculations.

  11. Lasing spiral and square-shaped optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Grace D.

    Optical microcavities, which confine light to small dimensions by total internal reflection (TIR), possess unique characteristics that depend on its morphology. The following dissertation presents experimental results from two-dimensional optical microcavities of various cross-sectional shapes. This includes a novel design, specifically a spiral-shaped InGaN multiple-quantum well microcavity, which is the first known microdisk device to produce unidirectional lasing emission from a single output beam when selectively optically-excited with a ring-shaped beam. The spiral microcavities also perform successfully under pulsed as well as continuous-wave current-injection conditions. Furthermore, the output intensity of the spiral microlaser is shown to increase with the addition of semicircle-based microdisks, which serve as optical amplifiers. Square-shaped dye-doped polymer micro-pillars are also examined which could be useful as add/drop filters for wavelength-division-multiplexing. Lasing emission is detected from the square corners due to completely TIR-confined modes which correspond to ray orbits with an incident angle theta inc at or near 45°. Additionally, surprising strong emission from the sidewalls is observed, which is associated with modes that are only partially TIR-confined but still have a high enough reflection coefficient to be sustained.

  12. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF₂ microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  13. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF2 microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  14. Microcavity-Integrated Graphene Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using graphene1,2 for optoelectronic applications.3−19 However, because graphene is an inherently weak optical absorber (only ≈2.3% absorption), novel concepts need to be developed to increase the absorption and take full advantage of its unique optical properties. We demonstrate that by monolithically integrating graphene with a Fabry-Pérot microcavity, the optical absorption is 26-fold enhanced, reaching values >60%. We present a graphene-based microcavity photodetector with responsivity of 21 mA/W. Our approach can be applied to a variety of other graphene devices, such as electro-absorption modulators, variable optical attenuators, or light emitters, and provides a new route to graphene photonics with the potential for applications in communications, security, sensing and spectroscopy. PMID:22563791

  15. Fermi resonance in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Chil-Min

    2015-04-01

    Fermi resonance is a phenomenon of quantum mechanical superposition, which most often occurs between normal and overtone modes in molecular systems that are nearly coincident in energy. We find that scarred resonances in deformed dielectric microcavities are the very phenomenon of Fermi resonance, that is, a pair of quasinormal modes interact with each other due to coupling and a pair of resonances are generated through an avoided resonance crossing. Then the quantum number difference of a pair of quasinormal modes, which is a consequence of quantum mechanical superposition, equals periodic orbits, whereby the resonances are localized on the periodic orbits. We derive the relation between the quantum number difference and the periodic orbits and confirm it in an elliptic, a rectangular, and a stadium-shaped dielectric microcavity.

  16. Low Dimensional Polariton Systems in Subwavelength-Grating Based Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo

    Semiconductor microcavity exciton-polaritons have recently emerged as a unique, open system for studying non-equilibrium quantum order. Macroscopic quantum phenomenon, Bose-Einstein condensation, has been realized and observed in two dimensional polariton systems utilizing the traditional distributed-Bragg-reflector based samples. Such foundational work on two-dimensional systems has inspired theoretical schemes for polariton-based quantum circuits, quantum light sources and novel quantum phases. Experimental implementation of these schemes requires the control, confinement and coupling of polariton systems, which still remain challenging in conventional microcavity structures. In this thesis, we use the sub-wavelength grating-based microcavities to demonstrate confinement and coupling for the polariton systems. We demonstrated a zero-dimensional polariton device in the sub-wavelength grating-based microcavity. Efficient confinement has been realized in such unconventional microcavity. These confinement features have also been observed in the spectroscopic characterization with discretized energy levels from the device. In addition, the polaritons are highly linear polarized, which is unique to the sub-wavelength grating based devices. The establishment of the polariton lasing/condensation was with non-linear increase of the emission intensity, line-width narrowing and continuous energy shift. Single-mode lasing of polaritons was also demonstrated for the first time. Following the work of single zero-dimensional polariton device, we demonstrated that the coupling among multiple zero-dimensional polariton quantum devices could be readily achieved, leading to de-coupled, coupled and quasi-one-dimensional polariton systems. These coupling effects were controlled and realized by design of the tethering patterns around the sub-wavelength grating based devices. Such devices enable advanced mode engineering and provide the building blocks for polariton-based quantum

  17. Variable deflection response of sensitive CNT-on-fiber artificial hair sensors from CNT synthesis in high aspect ratio microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Keith; Maschmann, Matthew R.; Kondash, Corey; Severin, Benjamin; Phillips, David; Dickinson, Benjamin T.; Reich, Gregory; Baur, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    Crickets, locusts, bats, and many other animals detect changes in their environment with distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hairs. Here we discuss the fabrication and characterization of a relatively new class of pore-based, artificial hair sensors that take advantage of the mechanical properties of structural microfibers and the electromechanical properties of self-aligned carbon nanotube arrays to rapidly transduce changes in low speed air flow. The radially aligned nanotubes are able to be synthesized along the length of the fibers inside the high aspect ratio cavity between the fiber surface and the wall of a microcapillary pore. The growth self-positions the fibers within the capillary and forms a conductive path between detection electrodes. As the hair is deflected, nanotubes are compressed to produce a typical resistance change of 1-5% per m/s of air speed which we believe are the highest sensitivities reported for air velocities less than 10 m/s. The quasi-static response of the sensors to point loads is compared to that from the distributed loads of air flow. A plane wave tube is used to measure their dynamic response when perturbed at acoustic frequencies. Correlation of the nanotube height profile inside the capillary to a diffusion transport model suggests that the nanotube arrays can be controllably tapered along the fiber. Like their biological counterparts, many applications can be envisioned for artificial hair sensors by tailoring their individual response and incorporating them into arrays for detecting spatio-temporal flow patterns over rigid surfaces such as aircraft.

  18. Ultra High Quality Factor Microtoroid for Chemical and Biomedical Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woosung

    Optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) microcavities have drawn attentions in various types of sensing, such as chemical- and bio-sensing. Even though various types of microcavity geometries have been investigated, research about on-chip WGM toroidal resonator has been discontinued for the sensing applications in aquatic environment. The strong benefits of the microtoroid are ultra-high-Q and small mode volume leading to high sensitivity to small change of environment, surrounding media refractive index change or light scatterer induced effective refractive index change. By using this ultra high-Q WGM resonator, radius >75nm polystyrene nanoparticle are detected in aquatic environment. In addition to polystyrene nanoparticle sensing, individual synthetic hemozoin crystals are detected and its size is measured. The hemozoin crystal sensing ultimately leads to malaria infection diagnose. A sol-gel method fabricated microlaser, co-work with Lina He, extended the sensing capability, detecting >30nm radius polystyrene nanoparticle. Since the water experiment is challenging and tackling the difficulty is main task, theoretical investigations are performed about WGM resonance quality factor, resonator mode volume, and noise to minimum detectable particle size. The research described in this dissertation will shed light on advanced chemical- and bio-sensor developments.

  19. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging. PMID:27181111

  20. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging. PMID:27181111

  1. The Detection of Helicobacter hepaticus Using Whispering-Gallery Mode Microcavity Optical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark E.; O’Brien, Emily C.; Grayek, Emily N.; Hermansen, James K.; Hunt, Heather K.

    2015-01-01

    Current bacterial detection techniques are relatively slow, require bulky instrumentation, and usually require some form of specialized training. The gold standard for bacterial detection is culture testing, which can take several days to receive a viable result. Therefore, simpler detection techniques that are both fast and sensitive could greatly improve bacterial detection and identification. Here, we present a new method for the detection of the bacteria Helicobacter hepaticus using whispering-gallery mode (WGM) optical microcavity-based sensors. Due to minimal reflection losses and low material adsorption, WGM-based sensors have ultra-high quality factors, resulting in high-sensitivity sensor devices. In this study, we have shown that bacteria can be non-specifically detected using WGM optical microcavity-based sensors. The minimum detection for the device was 1 × 104 cells/mL, and the minimum time of detection was found to be 750 s. Given that a cell density as low as 1 × 103 cells/mL for Helicobacter hepaticus can cause infection, the limit of detection shown here would be useful for most levels where Helicobacter hepaticus is biologically relevant. This study suggests a new approach for H. hepaticus detection using label-free optical sensors that is faster than, and potentially as sensitive as, standard techniques. PMID:26262647

  2. Photothermal effects in ultra-precisely stabilized tunable microcavities.

    PubMed

    Brachmann, Johannes F S; Kaupp, Hanno; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2016-09-01

    We study the mechanical stability of a tunable high-finesse microcavity under ambient conditions and investigate light-induced effects that can both suppress and excite mechanical fluctuations. As an enabling step, we demonstrate the ultra-precise electronic stabilization of a microcavity. We then show that photothermal mirror expansion can provide high-bandwidth feedback and improve cavity stability by almost two orders of magnitude. At high intracavity power, we observe self-oscillations of mechanical resonances of the cavity. We explain the observations by a dynamic photothermal instability, leading to parametric driving of mechanical motion. For an optimized combination of electronic and photothermal stabilization, we achieve a feedback bandwidth of 500 kHz and a noise level of 1.1 × 10-13 m rms. PMID:27607722

  3. Tubular optical microcavities of indefinite medium for sensitive liquid refractometers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shiwei; Fang, Yangfu; Liu, Zhaowei; Zhou, Lei; Mei, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Optical microcavities enable circulated light to intensively interact with a detecting liquid, thus promising high sensitivity in fluidic refractometers. Based on Mie scattering theory, we propose a tubular metamaterial device for liquid sensing, which utilizes anisotropic metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion called indefinite media (IM). Besides traditional whispering gallery modes (WGMs), such tubular cavities can support surface plasmon polariton (SPP) WGMs, enabling high sensitivity liquid detection. Three configurations of such metamaterial tubes for sensing are discussed: tube-in-liquid, hollow-tube-in-liquid and liquid-in-tube; these are analyzed using numerical formulas and compared with dielectric and metal materials. Compared with traditional dielectric media (DM), the IM tubular cavity exhibits a higher sensitivity (S), which is close to that of a metal tubular cavity. However, compared with metal media, such an IM cavity can achieve higher quality (Q) factors similar to the DM tubular cavity. Therefore, the IM tubular cavity can offer the highest figures of merit (QS) for the sensing performance among the three types of materials. Our results suggest a novel tubular optofluidic device based on metamaterials, which could be useful for liquid refractometers. PMID:26605851

  4. Microcavities coupled to multilevel atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Sandra Isabelle; Evers, Joerg

    2011-11-15

    A three-level atom in the {Lambda} configuration coupled to a microcavity is studied. The two transitions of the atom are assumed to couple to different counterpropagating mode pairs in the cavity. We analyze the dynamics both in the strong-coupling and the bad-cavity limits. We find that, compared to a two-level setup, the third atomic state and the additional control field modes crucially modify the system dynamics and enable more advanced control schemes. All results are explained using appropriate dressed-state and eigenmode representations. As potential applications, we discuss optical switching and turnstile operations and detection of particles close to the resonator surface.

  5. Detection of single nanoparticles and lentiviruses using microcavity resonance broadening.

    PubMed

    Shao, Linbo; Jiang, Xue-Feng; Yu, Xiao-Chong; Li, Bei-Bei; Clements, William R; Vollmer, Frank; Wang, Wei; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-10-18

    A new label-free sensing mechanism is demonstrated experimentally by monitoring the whispering-gallery mode broadening in microcavities. It is immune to both noise from the probe laser and environmental disturbances, and is able to remove the strict requirement for ultra-high-Q mode cavities for sensitive nanoparticle detection. This ability to sense nanoscale objects and biological analytes is particularly crucial for wide applications. PMID:24303524

  6. Extreme output sensitivity to subwavelength boundary deformation in microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Li; Song, Qinghai; Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate a generic and robust mechanism that leads to an extreme output sensitivity to a deep subwavelength boundary perturbation in wavelength-scale microcavities. A deformation of the cavity boundary on the order of ten-thousandth of a wavelength may flip the output directions by 180∘, corresponding to a variation of 0.1 nm for a 1-μm-radius cavity. Our analysis based on a perturbation theory reveals that such tiny structural change can cause a strong mixing of nearly degenerate cavity resonances with different angular momenta, and their interference is greatly enhanced to have a radical influence on the far-field pattern. Our finding opens the possibility of utilizing carefully designed wavelength-scale microcavities for fast beam steering and high-resolution detection.

  7. Simulation of J-aggregate microcavity photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michetti, Paolo; La Rocca, Giuseppe C.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed a model in order to account for the photoexcitation dynamics of J-aggregate films and strongly coupled J-aggregate microcavities. The J aggregates are described as a disordered Frenkel exciton system in which relaxation occurs due to the presence of a thermal bath of molecular vibrations. The correspondence between the photophysics in J-aggregate films and that in J-aggregate microcavities is obtained by introducing a model polariton wave function mixing cavity photon modes and J-aggregate super-radiant excitons. With the same description of the material properties, we have calculated both absorption and luminescence spectra for the J-aggregate film and the photoluminescence of strongly coupled organic microcavities. The model is able to account for the fast relaxation dynamics in organic microcavities following nonresonant pumping and explains the temperature dependence of the ratio between the upper polariton and the lower polariton luminescence.

  8. Label-free microcavity biosensors: steps towards personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Amarie, Dragos; Glazier, James A

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential to improve our ability to maintain health and treat disease, while ameliorating continuously rising healthcare costs. Translation of basic research findings to clinical applications within regulatory compliance is required for personalized medicine to become the new foundation for practice of medicine. Deploying even a few of the thousands of potential diagnostic biomarkers identified each year as part of personalized treatment workflows requires clinically efficient biosensor technologies to monitor multiple biomarkers in patients in real time. This paper discusses a critical component of a regulatory system, a microcavity optical biosensor for label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions at physiologically-relevant concentrations. While most current biosensor research focuses on improving sensitivity, this paper emphasizes other characteristics a biosensor technology requires to be practical in a clinical setting, presenting robust microcavity biosensors which are easy to manufacture and integrate with microfluidics into flexible and redesignable platforms making the microcavity biosensors deployable for continuous monitoring of biomarkers in body fluids in the clinic,  in dense 2D random arrays for high-throughput applications like drug-library screening in interactomics, and of the secretory behavior of single cells in the laboratory. PMID:23443397

  9. Label-Free Microcavity Biosensors: Steps towards Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Amarie, Dragos; Glazier, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential to improve our ability to maintain health and treat disease, while ameliorating continuously rising healthcare costs. Translation of basic research findings to clinical applications within regulatory compliance is required for personalized medicine to become the new foundation for practice of medicine. Deploying even a few of the thousands of potential diagnostic biomarkers identified each year as part of personalized treatment workflows requires clinically efficient biosensor technologies to monitor multiple biomarkers in patients in real time. This paper discusses a critical component of a regulatory system, a microcavity optical biosensor for label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions at physiologically-relevant concentrations. While most current biosensor research focuses on improving sensitivity, this paper emphasizes other characteristics a biosensor technology requires to be practical in a clinical setting, presenting robust microcavity biosensors which are easy to manufacture and integrate with microfluidics into flexible and redesignable platforms making the microcavity biosensors deployable for continuous monitoring of biomarkers in body fluids in the clinic, in dense 2D random arrays for high-throughput applications like drug-library screening in interactomics, and of the secretory behavior of single cells in the laboratory. PMID:23443397

  10. Two-Dimensional Metal–Chalcogenide Films in Tunable Optical Microcavities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Integration of quasi-two-dimensional (2D) films of metal–chalcogenides in optical microcavities permits new photonic applications of these materials. Here we present tunable microcavities with monolayer MoS2 or few monolayer GaSe films. We observe significant modification of spectral and temporal properties of photoluminescence (PL): PL is emitted in spectrally narrow and wavelength-tunable cavity modes with quality factors up to 7400; a 10-fold PL lifetime shortening is achieved, a consequence of Purcell enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate. PMID:25375802

  11. Mid-infrared silicon-on-sapphire waveguide coupled photonic crystal microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yi E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com Chen, Ray T. E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com; Chakravarty, Swapnajit E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com

    2015-08-24

    We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal (PC) microcavity side coupled to a W1.05 photonic crystal waveguide fabricated in silicon-on-sapphire working in mid-IR regime at 3.43 μm. Using a fixed wavelength laser source, propagation characteristics of PC waveguides without microcavity are characterized as a function of lattice constant to determine the light line position, stop gap, and guided mode transmission behavior. The resonance of an L21 PC microcavity coupled to the W1.05 PCW in the guided mode transmission region is then measured by thermal tuning of the cavity resonance across the source wavelength. Resonance quality factor ∼3500 is measured from the temperature dependency curve.

  12. Signature of Wave Chaos in Spectral Characteristics of Microcavity Lasers.

    PubMed

    Sunada, Satoshi; Shinohara, Susumu; Fukushima, Takehiro; Harayama, Takahisa

    2016-05-20

    We report an experimental investigation on the spectra of fully chaotic and nonchaotic microcavity lasers under continuous-wave operating conditions. It is found that fully chaotic microcavity lasers operate in single mode, whereas nonchaotic microcavity lasers operate in multimode. The suppression of multimode lasing for fully chaotic microcavity lasers is explained by large spatial overlaps of the resonance wave functions that spread throughout the two-dimensional cavity due to the ergodicity of chaotic ray orbits. PMID:27258870

  13. High-quality breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, R Edward

    2014-05-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demands the competing factors of high spatial resolution, good temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratios, and complete bilateral breast coverage. Achieving these competing factors requires modern MRI equipment with high magnetic field strength and homogeneity, high maximum gradient strength with short rise times, dedicated multichannel bilateral breast coils with prone patient positioning, and 3D (volume) gradient-echo MRI pulse sequences with short TR, short TE, high spatial resolution, and reasonably short acquisition times. This article discusses the equipment and pulse sequences needed to achieve high-quality breast MRI and summarizes requirements of the ACR Breast MRI Accreditation Program. PMID:24792656

  14. Microcavity effect using nanoparticles to enhance the efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun Hee; Kim, Do-Hong; Choi, Kyung Cheol

    2015-07-27

    In this paper, in contrast with previously reported approaches, we suggest exploiting a microcavity effect using nanoparticles to improve the optical efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). The method to input the nanoparticles inside the OLED device is simple and cost effective by virtue of employing a solution process using a spin coating fabrication method. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were used to improve the reflection by its high refractive index. In tandem with optimized heights of the organic layers, the increased light reflectance at the anode side, which includes the TiO2 nanoparticle layer, improved the optical efficiency of the OLED device via the microcavity effect. In order to prove that the enhancement of the optical efficiency was due to an enhanced microcavity effect caused by TiO2 nanoparticles, a microcavity simulation was conducted. The electrical characteristics were not affected by the nanoparticles and a clear pixel image was maintained. The results in this paper show that a nanoparticle based microcavity effect can be exploited to enhance the optical efficiency of OLEDs. PMID:26367646

  15. Bi-material crystalline whispering gallery mode microcavity structure for thermo-opto-mechanical stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itobe, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Mizumoto, Yuta; Kangawa, Hiroi; Kakinuma, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2016-05-01

    We fabricated a calcium fluoride (CaF2) whispering gallery mode (WGM) microcavity with a computer controlled ultra-precision cutting process. We observed a thermo-opto-mechanical (TOM) oscillation in the CaF2 WGM microcavity, which may influence the stability of the optical output when the cavity is employed for Kerr comb generation. We studied experimentally and numerically the mechanism of the TOM oscillation and showed that it is strongly dependent on cavity diameter. In addition, our numerical study suggests that a microcavity structure fabricated with a hybrid material (i.e. CaF2 and silicon), which is compatible with an ultra-high Q and high thermal conductivity, will allow us to reduce the TOM oscillation and stabilize the optical output.

  16. Superior performance of organic light-emitting diodes with microcavity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Geon; Mori, Tatsuo; Wang, Haiying

    2014-12-01

    The electro-optics characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with microcavity effect were investigated. The transmittance of the substrate with Ag anode was lower than that of the indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode due to the opaque characteristics of Ag. The current density of the device with Ag anode was high due to the low sheet resistance of Ag anode. The current efficiency of the device with Ag anode was high due to microcavity structure between Ag anode and Al cathode. Especially, the devices of Ag anode show over 43% higher current efficiency than that of conventional ITO anode. The low transmittance of Ag anode using microcavity effect realized as one kind of Fabry-Perot filters was also verified.

  17. Proposal for high-speed and high-fidelity electron-spin initialization in a negatively charged quantum dot coupled to a microcavity in a weak external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Arka; Lin Ziliang; Faraon, Andrei; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-08-15

    We describe a proposal for fast electron-spin initialization in a negatively charged quantum dot coupled to a microcavity without the need for a strong magnetic field. We employ two-photon excitation to access trion states that are spin forbidden by one-photon excitation. Our simulation shows a maximum initialization speed of 1.3 GHz and maximum fidelity of 99.7% with realistic system parameters.

  18. Tuning a microcavity-coupled terahertz laser

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Vezio; Vitiello, Miriam S.; Li, Lianhe; Zhu, Jingxuan; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2015-12-28

    Tunable oscillators are a key component of almost all electronic and photonic systems. Yet, a technology capable of operating in the terahertz (THz)-frequency range and fully suitable for widescale implementation is still lacking. This issue is significantly limiting potential THz applications in gas sensing, high-resolution spectroscopy, hyper-spectral imaging, and optical communications. The THz quantum cascade laser is arguably the most promising solution in terms of output power and spectral purity. In order to achieve reliable, repeatable, and broad tunability, here we exploit the strong coupling between two different cavity mode concepts: a distributed feedback one-dimensional photonic resonator (providing gain) and a mechanically actuated wavelength-size microcavity (providing tuning). The result is a continuously tunable, single-mode emitter covering a 162 GHz spectral range, centered on 3.2 THz. Our source has a few tens of MHz resolution, extremely high differential efficiency, and unprecedented compact and simple design architecture. By unveiling the large potential that lies in this technique, our results provide a robust platform for radically different THz systems exploiting broadly tunable semiconductor lasers.

  19. Tuning a microcavity-coupled terahertz laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Fabrizio; Bianchi, Vezio; Li, Lianhe; Zhu, Jingxuan; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2015-12-01

    Tunable oscillators are a key component of almost all electronic and photonic systems. Yet, a technology capable of operating in the terahertz (THz)-frequency range and fully suitable for widescale implementation is still lacking. This issue is significantly limiting potential THz applications in gas sensing, high-resolution spectroscopy, hyper-spectral imaging, and optical communications. The THz quantum cascade laser is arguably the most promising solution in terms of output power and spectral purity. In order to achieve reliable, repeatable, and broad tunability, here we exploit the strong coupling between two different cavity mode concepts: a distributed feedback one-dimensional photonic resonator (providing gain) and a mechanically actuated wavelength-size microcavity (providing tuning). The result is a continuously tunable, single-mode emitter covering a 162 GHz spectral range, centered on 3.2 THz. Our source has a few tens of MHz resolution, extremely high differential efficiency, and unprecedented compact and simple design architecture. By unveiling the large potential that lies in this technique, our results provide a robust platform for radically different THz systems exploiting broadly tunable semiconductor lasers.

  20. Threshold reduction by multidimensional photonic confinement in metal-organic microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischok, Andreas; Brückner, Robert; Reinhardt, Christoph; Sudzius, Markas; Lyssenko, Vadim G.; Fröb, Hartmut; Leo, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Due to their geometry, optical microcavities allow strong confinement of light between the mirrors and promise single mode operation at lowest possible lasing thresholds. Nevertheless, such devices suffer from losses not only due to parasitic absorption of the active or mirror layers, but especially via outcoupling of leaky and waveguided modes within the active layer. In this work, we present an organic microcavity sandwiched between high quality dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors. A highly conductive silver layer of 40nm thickness is added next to the active layer, leading to the formation of Tamm-Plasmon-Polaritons (TPP), one replacing the original cavity mode and shifting its resonance to the red, another one emerging from the long-wavelength sideband and moving to the blue. To avoid parasitic absorption introduced by such contacts, the silver layer is structured on the micrometer-scale using photolithography, yielding separated areas supporting either original cavity mode or red shifted TPP-resonances. This separation leads to a strong spatial trapping of the modes to only their resonant regions on the sample and can in turn be exploited to achieve complete three-dimensional confinement of photons. In elliptic holes produced in the metal layer, we observe the formation of Mathieu-Modes, leading to a reduction of the lasing threshold by six times. Facilitating triangular cuts in the silver layer, highly confined standing modes develop in the system, allowing a precise optimization of the spatial mode extension and reducing the threshold even further down to one order of magnitude below the threshold of an unstructured organic cavity. These results show that the introduction of absorptive metals, needed for the realization of an electrically driven laser, can in turn be harnessed to improve the characteristics of the device.

  1. Magneto-optical responses of microcavity-integrated graphene photonic crystals in the infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi-Ghaleh, Reza; Sattari, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    The magneto-optical responses and photonic band gap properties of the microcavity-integrated graphene photonic crystals were numerically studied. The structure consists of a graphene sheet embedded between two mirror symmetric Bragg reflectors, under the influence of an external static magnetic field. The properties of the microcavity resonance mode were investigated, considering the right- and left-handed circular polarization transmission coefficients and their phases, together with the Faraday rotation angle and ellipticity of the output light. The effects of the repetition number of the Bragg reflectors, thickness of the microcavity central layer and refractive indices of the graphene adjacent layers were considered. The obtained results revealed that a pure linear polarized output light with no ellipticity and high transmittance enhanced Faraday rotation can be achieved. These results can be utilized in designing a variety of graphene based photonic devices and magneto-optical integrated elements, such as miniaturized isolators or circulators.

  2. Theory and measurement of the soliton self-frequency shift and efficiency in optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xu; Yang, Qi-Fan; Yang, Ki Youl; Vahala, Kerry

    2016-08-01

    Dissipative Kerr cavity solitons experience a so-called self-frequency shift (SFS) as a result of Raman interactions. The frequency shift has been observed in several microcavity systems. The Raman process has also been shown numerically to influence the soliton pumping efficiency. Here, a perturbed Lagrangian approach is used to derive simple analytical expressions for the SFS and the soliton efficiency. The predicted dependences of these quantities on soliton pulse width are compared with measurements in a high-Q silica microcavity. The Raman time constant in silica is also inferred. Analytical expressions for the Raman SFS and soliton efficiency greatly simplify the prediction of soliton behavior over a wide range of microcavity platforms. PMID:27472583

  3. Porous silicon microcavities: synthesis, characterization, and application to photonic barcode devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramiro-Manzano, Fernando; Fenollosa, Roberto; Xifré-Pérez, Elisabet; Garín, Moises; Meseguer, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    We have recently developed a new type of porous silicon we name as porous silicon colloids. They consist of almost perfect spherical silicon nanoparticles with a very smooth surface, able to scatter (and also trap) light very efficiently in a large-span frequency range. Porous silicon colloids have unique properties because of the following: (a) they behave as optical microcavities with a high refractive index, and (b) the intrinsic photoluminescence (PL) emission is coupled to the optical modes of the microcavity resulting in a unique luminescence spectrum profile. The PL spectrum constitutes an optical fingerprint identifying each particle, with application for biosensing. In this paper, we review the synthesis of silicon colloids for developing porous nanoparticles. We also report on the optical properties with special emphasis in the PL emission of porous silicon microcavities. Finally, we present the photonic barcode concept.

  4. Porous silicon microcavities: synthesis, characterization, and application to photonic barcode devices

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We have recently developed a new type of porous silicon we name as porous silicon colloids. They consist of almost perfect spherical silicon nanoparticles with a very smooth surface, able to scatter (and also trap) light very efficiently in a large-span frequency range. Porous silicon colloids have unique properties because of the following: (a) they behave as optical microcavities with a high refractive index, and (b) the intrinsic photoluminescence (PL) emission is coupled to the optical modes of the microcavity resulting in a unique luminescence spectrum profile. The PL spectrum constitutes an optical fingerprint identifying each particle, with application for biosensing. In this paper, we review the synthesis of silicon colloids for developing porous nanoparticles. We also report on the optical properties with special emphasis in the PL emission of porous silicon microcavities. Finally, we present the photonic barcode concept. PMID:22943136

  5. Microcavity-Integrated Carbon Nanotube Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Ma, Ze; Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Nan; Huang, Le; Huang, Huixin; Liu, Huaping; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-07-26

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered to be highly promising nanomaterials for multiwavelength, room-temperature infrared detection applications. Here, we demonstrate a single-tube diode photodetector monolithically integrated with a Fabry-Pérot microcavity. A ∼6-fold enhanced optical absorption can be achieved, because of the confined effect of the designed optical mode. Furthermore, taking advantage of Van-Hove-singularity band structures in CNTs, we open the possibility of developing chirality-specific (n,m) CNT-film-based signal detectors. Utilizing a concept of the "resonance and off-resonance" cavity, we achieved cavity-integrated chirality-sorted CNT-film detectors working at zero bias and resonance-allowed mode, for specific target signal detection. The detectors exhibited a higher suppression ratio until a power density of 0.07 W cm(-2) and photocurrent of 5 pA, and the spectral full width at half-maximum is ∼33 nm at a signal wavelength of 1200 nm. Further, with multiple array detectors aiming at different target signals integrated on a chip, a multiwavelength signal detector system can be expected to have applications in the fields of monitoring, biosensing, color imaging, signal capture, and on-chip or space information transfers. The approach can also bring other nanomaterials into on-chip or information optoelectronics, regardless of the available doping polarity. PMID:27379375

  6. Optically active silica and polymeric materials for microcavity lasers and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armani, A. M.; Deka, N.; Mehrabani, S.; Shi, C.; Maker, A.; Lee, M.; Kovach, A.; Gungor, E.; Kuo, K.; Diep, V.

    2015-03-01

    Silica and silica-doped high quality factor (Q) optical resonators have demonstrated ultra-low threshold lasers based on numerous mechanisms (eg rare earth dopants, Raman). To date, the key focus has been on maintaining a high Q, as that determines the lasing threshold and linewidth. However, equally important criteria are lasing efficiency and wavelength. These parameters are governed by the material, not the cavity Q. Therefore, to fully address this challenge, it is necessary to develop new materials. We have synthesized a suite of silica and polymeric materials with nanoparticle and rare-earth dopants to enable the development of microcavity lasers with emission from the near-IR to the UV. Additionally, the efficiencies and thresholds of many of these devices surpass the previous work. Specifically, the silica sol-gel lasers are co- and tri-doped with metal nanoparticles (eg Ti, Al) and rare-earth materials (eg Yb, Nb, Tm) and are fabricated using conventional micro/nanofabrication methods. The intercalation of the metal in the silica matrix reduces the clustering of the rare-earth ions and reduces the phonon energy of the glass, improving efficiency and overall device performance. Additionally, the silica Raman gain coefficient is enhanced due to the inclusion of the metal nanoparticles, which results in a lower threshold and a higher efficiency silica Raman laser. Finally, we have synthesized several polymer films doped with metal (eg Au, Ag) nanoparticles and deposited them on the surface of our microcavity devices. By pumping on the plasmonic resonant wavelength of the particle, we are able to achieve plasmonic-enhanced upconversion lasing.

  7. Fabrication of silica ultra high quality factor microresonators.

    PubMed

    Maker, Ashley J; Armani, Andrea M

    2012-01-01

    Whispering gallery resonant cavities confine light in circular orbits at their periphery. The photon storage lifetime in the cavity, quantified by the quality factor (Q) of the cavity, can be in excess of 500ns for cavities with Q factors above 100 million. As a result of their low material losses, silica microcavities have demonstrated some of the longest photon lifetimes to date. Since a portion of the circulating light extends outside the resonator, these devices can also be used to probe the surroundings. This interaction has enabled numerous experiments in biology, such as single molecule biodetection and antibody-antigen kinetics, as well as discoveries in other fields, such as development of ultra-low-threshold microlasers, characterization of thin films, and cavity quantum electrodynamics studies.(3-7) The two primary silica resonant cavity geometries are the microsphere and the microtoroid. Both devices rely on a carbon dioxide laser reflow step to achieve their ultra-high-Q factors (Q>100 million). However, there are several notable differences between the two structures. Silica microspheres are free-standing, supported by a single optical fiber, whereas silica microtoroids can be fabricated on a silicon wafer in large arrays using a combination of lithography and etching steps. These differences influence which device is optimal for a given experiment. Here, we present detailed fabrication protocols for both types of resonant cavities. While the fabrication of microsphere resonant cavities is fairly straightforward, the fabrication of microtoroid resonant cavities requires additional specialized equipment and facilities (cleanroom). Therefore, this additional requirement may also influence which device is selected for a given experiment. PMID:22805153

  8. Open-access microcavities for chemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Vallance, Claire; Trichet, Aurelien A P; James, Dean; Dolan, Philip R; Smith, Jason M

    2016-07-01

    The recent development of open-access optical microcavities opens up a number of intriguing possibilities in the realm of chemical sensing. We provide an overview of the different possible sensing modalities, with examples of refractive index sensing, optical absorption measurements, and optical tracking and trapping of nanoparticles. The extremely small mode volumes within an optical microcavity allow very small numbers of molecules to be probed: our current best detection limits for refractive index and absorption sensing are around 10(5) and 10(2) molecules, respectively, with scope for further improvements in the future. PMID:27242174

  9. Optofluidic microcavities: Dye-lasers and biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Lei, L.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; Wang, L.; Li, H.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, Y.; Chan, H. L. W.

    2010-01-01

    Optofluidic microcavities are integrated elements of microfluidics that can be explored for a large variety of applications. In this review, we first introduce the physics basis of optical microcavities and microflow control. Then, we describe four types of optofluidic dye lasers developed so far based on both simple and advanced device fabrication technologies. To illustrate the application potential of such devices, we present two types of laser intracavity measurements for chemical solution and single cell analyses. In addition, the possibility of single molecule detection is discussed. All these recent achievements demonstrated the great importance of the topics in biology and several other disciplines. PMID:24753719

  10. Open-access microcavities for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallance, Claire; Trichet, Aurelien A. P.; James, Dean; Dolan, Philip R.; Smith, Jason M.

    2016-07-01

    The recent development of open-access optical microcavities opens up a number of intriguing possibilities in the realm of chemical sensing. We provide an overview of the different possible sensing modalities, with examples of refractive index sensing, optical absorption measurements, and optical tracking and trapping of nanoparticles. The extremely small mode volumes within an optical microcavity allow very small numbers of molecules to be probed: our current best detection limits for refractive index and absorption sensing are around 105 and 102 molecules, respectively, with scope for further improvements in the future.

  11. Electrically-detected ESR in silicon nanostructures inserted in microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bagraev, Nikolay; Danilovskii, Eduard; Gets, Dmitrii; Klyachkin, Leonid; Kudryavtsev, Andrey; Kuzmin, Roman; Malyarenko, Anna; Gehlhoff, Wolfgang; Mashkov, Vladimir; Romanov, Vladimir

    2014-02-21

    We present the first findings of the new electrically-detected electron spin resonance technique (EDESR), which reveal the point defects in the ultra-narrow silicon quantum wells (Si-QW) confined by the superconductor δ- barriers. This technique allows the ESR identification without application of an external cavity, as well as a high frequency source and recorder, and with measuring the only response of the magnetoresistance, with internal GHz Josephson emission within frameworks of the normal-mode coupling (NMC) caused by the microcavities embedded in the Si-QW plane.

  12. Electrically-detected ESR in silicon nanostructures inserted in microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagraev, Nikolay; Danilovskii, Eduard; Gehlhoff, Wolfgang; Gets, Dmitrii; Klyachkin, Leonid; Kudryavtsev, Andrey; Kuzmin, Roman; Malyarenko, Anna; Mashkov, Vladimir; Romanov, Vladimir

    2014-02-01

    We present the first findings of the new electrically-detected electron spin resonance technique (EDESR), which reveal the point defects in the ultra-narrow silicon quantum wells (Si-QW) confined by the superconductor δ- barriers. This technique allows the ESR identification without application of an external cavity, as well as a high frequency source and recorder, and with measuring the only response of the magnetoresistance, with internal GHz Josephson emission within frameworks of the normal-mode coupling (NMC) caused by the microcavities embedded in the Si-QW plane.

  13. Modified Photoluminescence by Silicon-Based One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, San; Qian, Bo; Wei, Jun-Wei; Chen, Kun-Ji; Xu, Jun; Li, Wei; Huang, Xin-Fan

    2005-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) from one-dimensional photonic band structures is investigated. The doped photonic crystal with microcavities are fabricated by using alternating hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H/a-SiNy:H) layers in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) chamber. It is observed that microcavities strongly modify the PL spectra from active hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNz:H) thin film. By comparison, the wide emission band width 208 nm is strongly narrowed to 11 nm, and the resonant enhancement of the peak PL intensity is about two orders of magnitude with respect to the emission of the λ/2-thick layer of a-SiNz:H. A linewidth of Δλ = 11 nm and a quality factor of Q = 69 are achieved in our one-dimensional a-SiNz photonic crystal microcavities. Measurements of transmittance spectra of the as-grown samples show that the transmittance resonant peak of a cavity mode at 710 nm is introduced into the band gap of one-dimensional photonic crystal distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), which further verifies the microcavity effects.

  14. Demonstration of a stable ultrafast laser based on a nonlinear microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Peccianti, M.; Pasquazi, A.; Park, Y.; Little, B.E.; Chu, S.T.; Moss, D.J.; Morandotti, R.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrashort pulsed lasers, operating through the phenomenon of mode-locking, have had a significant role in many facets of our society for 50 years, for example, in the way we exchange information, measure and diagnose diseases, process materials, and in many other applications. Recently, high-quality resonators have been exploited to demonstrate optical combs. The ability to phase-lock their modes would allow mode-locked lasers to benefit from their high optical spectral quality, helping to realize novel sources such as precision optical clocks for applications in metrology, telecommunication, microchip-computing, and many other areas. Here we demonstrate the first mode-locked laser based on a microcavity resonator. It operates via a new mode-locking method, which we term filter-driven four-wave mixing, and is based on a CMOS-compatible high quality factor microring resonator. It achieves stable self-starting oscillation with negligible amplitude noise at ultrahigh repetition rates, and spectral linewidths well below 130 kHz. PMID:22473009

  15. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  16. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  17. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm−2, and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 104 and 3.1 cdA−1, respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers. PMID:26986944

  18. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm(-2), and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 10(4) and 3.1 cdA(-1), respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers. PMID:26986944

  19. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-03-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm‑2, and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 104 and 3.1 cdA‑1, respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers.

  20. Formation of a suspended lipid membrane on a microcavity covered by a thin SiO2 layer with a nanohole array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Aya; Kashimura, Yoshiaki; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Sumitomo, Koji

    2014-01-01

    To provide a platform for a nanobiodevice, we fabricated microcavities on a Si/SiO2 substrate covered by a thin SiO2 layer with nanohole arrays that we call a pepper shaker substrate. Fluorescence and atomic force microscopy images showed that the structure of the pepper shaker substrate improved both the probability of membrane sealing over the microcavities by rupturing giant unilameller vesicles and the lifetime of the lipid membrane suspended over the microcavities. The success of this study reveals the potential for fabricating an artificial cell array as a tool for the functional and high throughput analysis of membrane proteins.

  1. Finite element method analysis of surface acoustic wave devices with microcavities for detection of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senveli, Sukru U.; Tigli, Onur

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces the use of finite element method analysis tools to investigate the use of a Rayleigh type surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor to interrogate minute amounts of liquids trapped in microcavities placed on the delay line. Launched surface waves in the ST-X quartz substrate couple to the liquid and emit compressional waves. These waves form a resonant cavity condition and interfere with the surface waves in the substrate. Simulations show that the platform operates in a different mechanism than the conventional mass loading of SAW devices. Based on the proposed detection mechanism, it is able to distinguish between variations of 40% and 90% glycerin based on phase relations while using liquid volumes smaller than 10 pl. Results from shallow microcavities show high correlation with sound velocity parameter of the liquid whereas deeper microcavities display high sensitivities with respect to glycerin concentration. Simulated devices yield a maximum sensitivity of -0.77°/(% glycerin) for 16 μm wavelength operation with 8 μm deep, 24 μm wide, and 24 μm long microcavities.

  2. Drag effects in a system of electrons and microcavity polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Oleg L.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2010-09-15

    The theory of the drag effects in the system of spatially separated electrons and excitons in coupled quantum wells (QWs) embedded in an optical microcavity is developed. It is shown that at low temperature an electron current induces the polariton flow, therefore, a transport of photons along the cavity. However, the electron current dragged by the polariton flow is strongly suppressed below polariton superfluid transition temperature and hence, the strong suppression of the induced electron current indicates the superfluidity of polaritons. Therefore, the transport properties of polaritons can be investigated by measuring the current or voltage in the electron subsystem. At high temperatures, we study the exciton-electron drag effects. At high-temperatures regime, from one hand, the existence of the electric current in an electron QW induces the exciton flow in the other QW, from the other hand, the electron current in one QW induces the exciton flow in the other QW via the drag of excitons by the electrons. The drag coefficients for the polariton-electron systems are calculated and analyzed. We discuss the possible experimental observation of the drag effects in the system of electrons and microcavity polaritons, that also allow to observe the cavity polaritons superfluidity.

  3. Planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui; Giannini, Vincenzo; Li, Xiaofeng

    2016-05-21

    Hot-electron photodetectors are attracting increasing interest due to their capability in below-bandgap photodetection without employing classic semiconductor junctions. Despite the high absorption in metallic nanostructures via plasmonic resonance, the fabrication of such devices is challenging and costly due to the use of high-dimensional sub-wavelength nanostructures. In this study, we propose a planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector (MC-HE PD), in which the TCO/semiconductor/metal (TCO: transparent conductive oxide) structure is sandwiched between two asymmetrically distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and a lossless buffer layer. Finite-element simulations demonstrate that the resonant wavelength and the absorption efficiency of the device can be manipulated conveniently by tailoring the buffer layer thickness and the number of top DBR pairs. By benefitting from the largely increased electric field at the resonance frequency, the absorption in the metal can reach 92%, which is a 21-fold enhancement compared to the reference without a microcavity. Analytical probability-based electrical calculations further show that the unbiased responsivity can be up to 239 nA mW(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than that of the reference. Furthermore, the MC-HE PD not only exhibits a superior photoelectron conversion ability compared to the approach with corrugated metal, but also achieves the ability to tune the near infrared multiband by employing a thicker buffer layer. PMID:27128730

  4. Planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui; Giannini, Vincenzo; Li, Xiaofeng

    2016-05-01

    Hot-electron photodetectors are attracting increasing interest due to their capability in below-bandgap photodetection without employing classic semiconductor junctions. Despite the high absorption in metallic nanostructures via plasmonic resonance, the fabrication of such devices is challenging and costly due to the use of high-dimensional sub-wavelength nanostructures. In this study, we propose a planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector (MC-HE PD), in which the TCO/semiconductor/metal (TCO: transparent conductive oxide) structure is sandwiched between two asymmetrically distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and a lossless buffer layer. Finite-element simulations demonstrate that the resonant wavelength and the absorption efficiency of the device can be manipulated conveniently by tailoring the buffer layer thickness and the number of top DBR pairs. By benefitting from the largely increased electric field at the resonance frequency, the absorption in the metal can reach 92%, which is a 21-fold enhancement compared to the reference without a microcavity. Analytical probability-based electrical calculations further show that the unbiased responsivity can be up to 239 nA mW-1, which is more than an order of magnitude larger than that of the reference. Furthermore, the MC-HE PD not only exhibits a superior photoelectron conversion ability compared to the approach with corrugated metal, but also achieves the ability to tune the near infrared multiband by employing a thicker buffer layer.

  5. Solution processing of microcavity for BioMEMS application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Vu Nam; Ukita, Yoshiaki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Mitani, Tadaoki; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Dung Dang, Thi My; Chien Dang, Mau

    2014-09-01

    Compared to the conventional silicon-based technology, the solution process appears to be a revolution in the field of micro/nanofabrication due to its advantages of high efficiency in material and energy consumption and the use of low cost material. In this paper, we introduce a new approach to fabricate BioMEMS devices using this novel technology to make microcavity. Zirconium oxide patterns were formed on the silicon substrate simply by spin coating its precursor and thermal imprinting technique. We used poly-propylene carbonate (PPC) for the sacrificial material due to its unique pyrolysis property. The PPC was coated on the ZrO patterns and excess film was etched by oxygen plasma but retaining PPC structure between the lines of ZrO pattern. Then another ZrO layer was coated to encapsulate the PPC. The final microcavity structures were obtained by just baking the substrate by pyrolyzing the PPC. The obtained results show the approach’s prospect of becoming an ideal alternative for the current BioMEMS micro/nanofabrication technologies

  6. Millisecond Photon Lifetime in a Slow-Light Microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, V.; Rasoloniaina, A.; Guillemé, P.; Rochard, P.; Féron, P.; Mortier, M.; Levenson, A.; Bencheikh, K.; Yacomotti, A.; Dumeige, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Optical microcavities with ultralong photon storage times are of central importance for integrated nanophotonics. To date, record quality (Q ) factors up to 1011 have been measured in millimetric-size single-crystal whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators, and 1010 in silica or glass microresonators. We show that, by introducing slow-light effects in an active WGM microresonator, it is possible to enhance the photon lifetime by several orders of magnitude, thus circumventing both fabrication imperfections and residual absorption. The slow-light effect is obtained from coherent population oscillations in an erbium-doped fluoride glass microsphere, producing strong dispersion of the WGM (group index ng˜106). As a result, a photon lifetime up to 2.5 ms at room temperature has been measured, corresponding to a Q factor of 3 ×1012 at 1530 nm. This system could yield a new type of optical memory microarray with ultralong storage times.

  7. Antenna-coupled microcavities for terahertz emission

    SciTech Connect

    Madéo, J. Todorov, Y.; Sirtori, C.

    2014-01-20

    We have investigated the capacitive coupling between dipolar antennas and metal-dielectric-metal wire microcavities with strong sub-wavelength confinement in the terahertz region. The coupling appears in reflectivity measurements performed on arrays of antenna-coupled elements, which display asymmetric Fano lineshapes. The experimental data are compared to a temporal coupled-mode theory and finite elements electromagnetic simulations. We show that the Fano interferences correspond to coupling between a subradiant mode (microcavity) and a superradiant mode (antennas). This phenomenon allows one to enhance and control the radiative coupling of the strongly confined mode with the vacuum. These concepts are very useful for terahertz optoelectronic devices based on deep-sub-wavelength active regions.

  8. Strain monitoring of bismaleimide composites using embedded microcavity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Amardeep; Anandan, Sudharshan; Yuan, Lei; Watkins, Steve E.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Xiao, Hai; Phan, Nam

    2016-03-01

    A type of extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) fiber optic sensor, i.e., the microcavity strain sensor, is demonstrated for embedded, high-temperature applications. The sensor is fabricated using a femtosecond (fs) laser. The fs-laser-based fabrication makes the sensor thermally stable to sustain operating temperatures as high as 800°C. The sensor has low sensitivity toward the temperature as compared to its response toward the applied strain. The performance of the EFPI sensor is tested in an embedded application. The host material is carbon fiber/bismaleimide (BMI) composite laminate that offer thermally stable characteristics at high ambient temperatures. The sensor exhibits highly linear response toward the temperature and strain. Analytical work done with embedded optical-fiber sensors using the out-of-autoclave BMI laminate was limited until now. The work presented in this paper offers an insight into the strain and temperature interactions of the embedded sensors with the BMI composites.

  9. Facile synthesis of optical microcavities by a rationally designed anodization approach: tailoring photonic signals by nanopore structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Chen, Yuting; Kumeria, Tushar; Ding, Fuyuan; Evdokiou, Andreas; Losic, Dusan; Santos, Abel

    2015-05-13

    Structural engineering of porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanostructures by anodization has been extensively studied in the past two decades. However, the transition of this technique into the fabrication of AAO-based one-dimensional photonic crystal is still challenging. Herein, we report for the first time on the fabrication of AAO optical microcavities by a rationally designed anodization approach. In our study, two feasible methods are used to fabricate microcavities with tunable resonance peak across the visible and near-infrared spectra. Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) nanostructures are first fabricated by pulse anodization approach, in which the anodization voltage was periodically manipulated to achieve pseudosinusoidal modulation of the effective refractive index gradient along the depth of the AAO nanostructures. Microcavities were created by creating a nanoporous layer of constant porosity between two AAO-DBR nanostructures, and by introducing a shift of the phase of the porosity gradient along the depth of AAO. The position of the resonance peak in these microcavities can be linearly tuned by means of the duration of the high voltage anodization. These optical nanostructures are sensitive to alterations of the effective media inside the nanopores. The AAO microcavity shows a central wavelength shift of 2.58 ± 0.37 nm when exposed to water vapor. Our research highlights the feasibility of anodization technique to fabricate AAO-based photonic nanostructures for advanced sensing applications. PMID:25901537

  10. Transient dual-energy lasing in a semiconductor microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Feng-Kuo; Xie, Wei; Lee, Yi-Shan; Lin, Sheng-Di; Lai, Chih Wei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate sequential lasing at two well-separated energies in a highly photoexcited planar microcavity at room temperature. Two spatially overlapped lasing states with distinct polarization properties appear at energies more than 5 meV apart. Under a circularly polarized nonresonant 2 ps pulse excitation, a sub-10-ps transient circularly polarized high-energy (HE) state emerges within 10 ps after the pulse excitation. This HE state is followed by a pulsed state that lasts for 20–50 ps at a low energy (LE) state. The HE state is highly circularly polarized as a result of a spin-preserving stimulated process, while the LE state shows a significantly reduced circular polarization because of a diminishing spin imbalance. PMID:26477277

  11. A porous silicon optical microcavity for sensitive bacteria detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Huang, Jianfeng; Cai, Lintao

    2011-10-01

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSM) is highly sensitive to subtle interface changes due to its high surface area, capillary condensation ability and a narrow resonance peak (~10 nm). Based on the well-defined optical properties of a PSM, we successfully fabricated a bacteria detection chip for molecular or subcellular analysis by surface modification using undecylenic acid (UA), and the specific recognition binding of vancomycin to the D-alanyl-D-alanine of bacteria. The red shift of the PSM resonance peak showed a good linear relationship with bacteria concentration ranging from 100 to 1000 bacteria ml - 1 at the level of relative standard deviation of 0.994 and detection limit of 20 bacteria ml - 1. The resulting PSM sensors demonstrated high sensitivity, good reproducibility, fast response and low cost for biosensing.

  12. Integrated vertical microcavity using a nano-scale deformation for strong lateral confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, Lijian Ding, Fei Stöferle, Thilo Knoll, Armin Jan Offrein, Bert Mahrt, Rainer F.

    2013-12-09

    We report on the realization of a solid state Fabry-Pérot-like microcavity that uses a small Gaussian-shaped deformation inside the cavity to achieve strong lateral photon confinement on the order of the wavelength. Cavities with a mode volume V < 0.4 μm{sup 3} and a quality factor Q > 1000 are fabricated by means of focused ion beam milling, removing the necessity for etched sidewalls as required for micropillar cavities. Perylene-diimide dye doped polystyrene was embedded in the microcavity and probed by time-resolved microphotoluminescence. A Purcell enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate by a factor of 3.5 has been observed at room temperature.

  13. High-quality-factor planar optical cavities with laterally stopped, slowed, or reversed light.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Steven J; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Capasso, Federico

    2016-08-01

    In a planar optical cavity, the resonance frequencies increase as a function of in-plane wavevector according to a standard textbook formula. This has well-known consequences in many different areas of optics, from the shifts of etalon peaks at non-normal angles, to the properties of transverse modes in laser diodes, to the effective mass of microcavity photons, and so on. However, this standard formula is valid only when the reflection phase of each cavity mirror is approximately independent of angle. There is a certain type of mirror-a subwavelength dielectric grating near a guided mode resonance-with not only a strongly angle-dependent reflection phase, but also very high reflectance and low losses. Simulations show that by using such mirrors, high-quality-factor planar cavities can be designed that break all these textbook rules, leading to resonant modes that are slow, stopped or even backward-propagating in the in-plane direction. In particular, we demonstrate experimentally high-Q planar cavities whose resonance frequency is independent of in-plane wavevector-i.e., the resonant modes have zero in-plane group velocity, for one polarization but both in-plane directions. We discuss potential applications in various fields including lasers, quantum optics, and exciton-polariton condensation. PMID:27505803

  14. Tuneable polaritonics at room temperature with strongly coupled Tamm plasmon polaritons in metal/air-gap microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, C.; Coulson, C.; Christmann, G.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Baumberg, J. J.

    2011-06-01

    We report strong coupling between Tamm plasmons and excitons in III-V quantum wells at room temperature in ultracompact sample designs. A high refractive index contrast air-gap mirror together with optical Tamm states at a metal/semiconductor interface tightly confines the intracavity field leading to substantial local field enhancements. Angular-resolved reflectivity spectra give clear evidence for anticrossing in the dispersion relation. Room temperature Rabi splittings of 10 meV are found in excellent agreement with simulations. Electrical control of the polariton modes is realized without need for doped mirror layers. Such air-gap microcavities open innovative possibilites for electrically tunable microcavities and polaritonic microelectromechanics.

  15. Tunable polaritonic molecules in an open microcavity system

    SciTech Connect

    Dufferwiel, S.; Li, Feng Giriunas, L.; Walker, P. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.; Trichet, A. A. P.; Smith, J. M.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2015-11-16

    We experimentally demonstrate tunable coupled cavities based upon open access zero-dimensional hemispherical microcavities. The modes of the photonic molecules are strongly coupled with quantum well excitons forming a system of tunable polaritonic molecules. The cavity-cavity coupling strength, which is determined by the degree of modal overlap, is controlled through the fabricated centre-to-centre distance and tuned in-situ through manipulation of both the exciton-photon and cavity-cavity detunings by using nanopositioners to vary the mirror separation and angle between them. We demonstrate micron sized confinement combined with high photonic Q-factors of 31 000 and lower polariton linewidths of 150 μeV at resonance along with cavity-cavity coupling strengths between 2.5 meV and 60 μeV for the ground cavity state.

  16. Spin–orbit coupling of light in asymmetric microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Ma, L. B.; Li, S. L.; Fomin, V. M.; Hentschel, M.; Götte, J. B.; Yin, Y.; Jorgensen, M. R.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2016-01-01

    When spinning particles, such as electrons and photons, undergo spin–orbit coupling, they can acquire an extra phase in addition to the well-known dynamical phase. This extra phase is called the geometric phase (also known as the Berry phase), which plays an important role in a startling variety of physical contexts such as in photonics, condensed matter, high-energy and space physics. The geometric phase was originally discussed for a cyclically evolving physical system with an Abelian evolution, and was later generalized to non-cyclic and non-Abelian cases, which are the most interesting fundamental subjects in this area and indicate promising applications in various fields. Here, we enable optical spin–orbit coupling in asymmetric microcavities and experimentally observe a non-cyclic optical geometric phase acquired in a non-Abelian evolution. Our work is relevant to fundamental studies and implies promising applications by manipulating photons in on-chip quantum devices. PMID:26987401

  17. Spin-orbit coupling of light in asymmetric microcavities.

    PubMed

    Ma, L B; Li, S L; Fomin, V M; Hentschel, M; Götte, J B; Yin, Y; Jorgensen, M R; Schmidt, O G

    2016-01-01

    When spinning particles, such as electrons and photons, undergo spin-orbit coupling, they can acquire an extra phase in addition to the well-known dynamical phase. This extra phase is called the geometric phase (also known as the Berry phase), which plays an important role in a startling variety of physical contexts such as in photonics, condensed matter, high-energy and space physics. The geometric phase was originally discussed for a cyclically evolving physical system with an Abelian evolution, and was later generalized to non-cyclic and non-Abelian cases, which are the most interesting fundamental subjects in this area and indicate promising applications in various fields. Here, we enable optical spin-orbit coupling in asymmetric microcavities and experimentally observe a non-cyclic optical geometric phase acquired in a non-Abelian evolution. Our work is relevant to fundamental studies and implies promising applications by manipulating photons in on-chip quantum devices. PMID:26987401

  18. Cascaded integrated waveguide linear microcavity filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruessner, Marcel W.; Stievater, Todd H.; Goetz, Peter G.; Rabinovich, William S.; Urick, Vincent J.

    2013-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate cascaded Fabry-Perot microcavity filters fabricated on silicon-on-insulator substrates. The cavities are formed by etching three sets of quarter-wavelength trenches along a rib waveguide, each set forming a Bragg reflector. Various configurations are examined with a view towards maximizing the filter extinction and minimizing the linewidth. We investigate the origin of spurious cavity modes and show how these are minimized. The effect of mode-splitting due to inter-cavity coupling is suppressed by increasing the reflectivity of the center mirror. Experimental results compare well with transfer matrix predictions.

  19. Fresnel filtering of Gaussian beams in microcavities.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Susumu; Harayama, Takahisa; Fukushima, Takehiro

    2011-03-15

    We study the output from the modes described by the superposition of Gaussian beams confined in the quasi-stadium microcavities. We experimentally observe the deviation from Snell's law in the output when the incident angle of the Gaussian beam at the cavity interface is near the critical angle for total internal reflection, providing direct experimental evidence on the Fresnel filtering. The theory of the Fresnel filtering for a planar interface qualitatively reproduces experimental data, and a discussion is given on small deviation between the measured data and the theory. PMID:21403763

  20. Angular Dependence of the Sharply Directed Emission in Organic Light Emitting Diodes with a Microcavity Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Laih, Li-Hong; Lin, Chia-Ju; Hsu, Yu-Jen

    2002-04-01

    An optical microcavity structure was used in organic light emitting diodes. We succeeded in fabricating a device with sharply directed emission vertical to an emission surface. The device shows green emission (bright green) at normal position which turns red (bright red) at the 30° position. The angular dependences of the electroluminescence and the emission patterns versus viewing angle in the microcavity OLED were studied. The resonance wavelength λ decreases with viewing angle. The emission peak at 490 nm is directed vertically to the device surface more sharply than that at 632 nm. The microcavity structure shows non-Lambertian emission. The spectra appear more blue off-axis and the intensity of the green-like emission decreases rapidly with increasing viewing angle. A significantly narrow linewidth of 7.4 nm in the 0° direction for the 490 nm peak was observed. The full-widths at half maximum (FWHM) of the green-like spectra are much smaller than those of the red-like ones, indicating better cavity quality.

  1. Scalable photonic quantum computing assisted by quantum-dot spin in double-sided optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2013-07-29

    We investigate the possibility of achieving scalable photonic quantum computing by the giant optical circular birefringence induced by a quantum-dot spin in a double-sided optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We construct a deterministic controlled-not gate on two photonic qubits by two single-photon input-output processes and the readout on an electron-medium spin confined in an optical resonant microcavity. This idea could be applied to multi-qubit gates on photonic qubits and we give the quantum circuit for a three-photon Toffoli gate. High fidelities and high efficiencies could be achieved when the side leakage to the cavity loss rate is low. It is worth pointing out that our devices work in both the strong and the weak coupling regimes. PMID:23938640

  2. Intensity modulated SMF cascaded tapers with a hollow core PCF based microcavity for curvature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dass, Sumit; Narayan Dash, Jitendra; Jha, Rajan

    2016-03-01

    We propose a highly sensitive curvature sensor based on cascaded single mode fiber (SMF) tapers with a microcavity. The microcavity is created by splicing a small piece of hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) at the end of an SMF to obtain a sharp interference pattern. Experimental results show that two SMF tapers enhance the curvature sensitivity of the system and by changing the tapering parameters of the second taper, the curvature sensitivity of the system can be tailored, together with the fringe contrast of the interference pattern. A maximum curvature sensitivity of 10.4 dB/m-1 is observed in the curvature range 0 to 1 m-1 for a second taper diameter of 18 μm. The sensing setup is highly stable and shows very low temperature sensitivity. As the interrogation is intensity based, a low cost optical power meter can be utilized to determine the curvature.

  3. Excellence through High-Quality Individualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Richard W.; Klingstedt, Joe Lars

    1988-01-01

    Proposes a strategy employing challenge, functionalism, high-order learning, and originality to achieve high-quality individualization in course work. Asserts that individualized instruction better prepares students to solve problems, make decisions, and produce original ideas. (MM)

  4. Resonant microcavity light emitters for onboard exhaust emissions IR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Francois; Picard, Emmanuel; Rothmann, Johan; Mottin, Eric; Hadji, Emmanuel; Duhr, Joel

    2005-02-01

    A sensor based on selective optical absorption allows monitoring of hazardous engine exhaust emissions such as gaseous hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The IR components presented here offer the potential to develop a compact, fast and selective sensor reaching the technical and cost requirements for on-board automotive applications. Optical gas monitoring requires light sources above 3&mum since most of the gas species have their fundamental absorption peaks between 3 and 6 &mum. We report here on resonant microcavity light sources emitting at room temperature between 3 and 5&mum. The emitter combines a CdxHg1-xTe light emitting heterostructure and two dielectric multilayered mirrors. It is optically pumped by a commercial III-V laser diode. The principle of the resonant microcavity emitter allows tailoring of the emission wavelength and the line width to fit the absorption band of a specific gas, ensuring a very good selectivity between species. Moreover, this kind of emitter allows fast modulation enabling high detectivity and short response time. We report performances of light sources in the range 3-5&mum allowing the detection of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Association of emitters peaking at different characteristic wavelengths with a single broad band detector allows designing of an optical sensor for several gas species. Sensitivity and time response issues have been characterized: detection of less than 50ppm of CH4 on a 15cm path has been demonstrated on synthetic gas; analysis of exhaust gases from a vehicle has allowed cylinder to cylinder resolution. This optical sensor offers the potential of various on-board automotive applications.

  5. Electrically-detected magnetic resonance in semiconductor nanostructures inserted in microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagraev, Nikolay; Danilovskii, Eduard; Gehlhoff, Wolfgang; Gets, Dmitrii; Klyachkin, Leonid; Kudryavtsev, Andrey; Kuzmin, Roman; Malyarenko, Anna; Mashkov, Vladimir; Romanov, Vladimir

    2013-12-01

    We present the first findings of the new electrically-detected electron spin resonance technique (EDESR), which reveal the point defects in the ultra-narrow silicon quantum wells (Si-QW) confined by the superconductor δ-barriers. This technique allows the ESR identification without application of an external cavity, as well as a high frequency source and recorder, and with measuring the only response of the magnetoresistance caused by the microcavities embedded in the Si-QW plane.

  6. 3D PIC Modeling of Microcavity Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald; Moore, Christopher; Yee, Benjamin; Moorman, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We present a number of techniques and challenges in simulating the transient behavior of a microcavity discharge. Our microcavities are typically cylindrical with diameters approximately 50 - 100 μm, heights of 50 - 200 μm, pressure near atmospheric, and operate at a few hundred volts. We employ a fully kinetic simulation methodology, the Particle-in-Cell (PIC) method, with interparticle collisions handled via methods based on direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). In particular, we explicitly include kinetic electrons. Some of the challenges we encounter include variations in number densities, external circuit coupling, and time step resolution constraints. By employing dynamic particle weighting (particle weights vary over time by species and location) we can mitigate some of the challenges modeling systems with 107 variations in number densities. Smoothing mechanisms have been used to attempt to mitigate external circuit response. We perform our simulations on hundreds or thousands of processing cores to accommodate the computational work inherent in using relatively small time step sizes (e.g., 50 fs for a 100 ns calculation). In addition, particle weighting issues inherent to three-dimensional low temperature plasma systems will be mentioned. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Weak-microcavity organic light-emitting diodes with improved light out-coupling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang-Hwan; Song, Young-Woo; Lee, Joon-gu; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Ha, Jaeheung; Oh, Jong-Suk; Lee, So Young; Lee, Sun Young; Hwang, Kyu Hwan; Zang, Dong-Sik; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2008-08-18

    We propose and demonstrate weak-microcavity organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays with improved light-extraction and viewing-angle characteristics. A single pair of low- and high-index layers is inserted between indium tin oxide (ITO) and a glass substrate. The electroluminescent (EL) efficiencies of discrete red, green, and blue weak-microcavity OLEDs are enhanced by 56%, 107%, and 26%, respectively, with improved color purity. Moreover, full-color passive-matrix bottom-emitting OLED displays are fabricated by employing low-index layers of two thicknesses. As a display, the EL efficiency of white color was 27% higher than that of a conventional OLED display. PMID:18711500

  8. One- and two-photon photocurrents from tunable organic microcavity photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeppe, R.; Müller, J. G.; Lupton, J. M.; Feldmann, J.; Scherf, U.; Lemmer, U.

    2003-04-01

    We have constructed multilayer thin-film organic microcavity photodiodes with the photoactive layer comprised of a spin-coated conjugated polymer and an evaporated C60 layer. The electrodes are designed as semitransparent mirrors which form a resonant cavity structure. The photocurrent spectra show distinct maxima at the optical resonances of the cavities, which are located up to 200 nm below the fundamental optical transition of the polymer. The design allows a simple tuning of the spectral response by varying the layer thickness. Microcavity photodiodes are also shown to be highly sensitive two-photon detectors, which exhibit a factor 500 improvement in the two-photon response compared to devices without photonic confinement.

  9. Tuning the Microcavity of Organic Light Emitting Diodes by Solution Processable Polymer-Nanoparticle Composite Layers.

    PubMed

    Preinfalk, Jan B; Schackmar, Fabian R; Lampe, Thomas; Egel, Amos; Schmidt, Tobias D; Brütting, Wolfgang; Gomard, Guillaume; Lemmer, Uli

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we present a simple method to tune and take advantage of microcavity effects for an increased fraction of outcoupled light in solution-processed organic light emitting diodes. This is achieved by incorporating nonscattering polymer-nanoparticle composite layers. These tunable layers allow the optimization of the device architecture even for high film thicknesses on a single substrate by gradually altering the film thickness using a horizontal dipping technique. Moreover, it is shown that the optoelectronic device parameters are in good agreement with transfer matrix simulations of the corresponding layer stack, which offers the possibility to numerically design devices based on such composite layers. Lastly, it could be shown that the introduction of nanoparticles leads to an improved charge injection, which combined with an optimized microcavity resulted in a maximum luminous efficacy increase of 85% compared to a nanoparticle-free reference device. PMID:26744904

  10. Efficient single-photon emitters based on Bragg microcavities containing selectively positioned InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gaisler, V. A. Gaisler, A. V.; Jaroshevich, A. S.; Derebezov, I. A.; Kachanova, M. M.; Zhivodkov, Yu. A.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Medvedev, A. S.; Nenasheva, L. A.; Grachev, K. V.; Sandyrev, V. K.; Kozhuhov, A. S.; Shayahmetov, V. M.; Kalagin, A. K.; Bakarov, A. K.; Dmitriev, D. V.; Toropov, A. I.; Shcheglov, D. V.; Latyshev, A. V.; Aseev, A. L.

    2015-01-15

    A semiconductor Bragg microcavity structure for single photon emitters is designed and implemented. The design provides the efficient current pumping of selectively positioned InAs quantum dots within a micrometer-size aperture, high external quantum yield, and low divergence of the emitted radiation.

  11. Surface-plasmon-enhanced microcavity organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Chen, Shufen; Zhao, Dewei

    2014-12-15

    Efficiency enhancement of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) can be obtained by the combination of microcavity effect and Au nanoparticles based surface plasmons. Au nanoparticles are thermally deposited on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR)-coated glass substrate, leading to realization of microcavity effect and localized surface plasmon effect. Our results show the current efficiency of OLEDs with DBR/Au nanoparticles as anode is increased by 72% compared to that with ITO as anode. PMID:25607492

  12. Pool boiling on surfaces with mini-fins and micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2012-11-01

    The experimental studies presented here focused on pool boiling heat transfer on mini-fin arrays, mini-fins with perforated covering and surfaces with micro-cavities. The experiments were carried out for water and fluorinert FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. Mini-fins of 0.5 and 1 mm in height were uniformly spaced on the base surface. The copper foil with holes of 0.1 mm in diameter (pitch 0.2/0.4 mm), sintered with the fin tips, formed a system of connected perpendicular and horizontal tunnels. The micro-cavities were obtained through spark erosion. The maximal depth of the craters of these cavities was 15 - 30 μm and depended on the parameters of the branding-pen settings. At medium and small heat fluxes, structures with mini-fins showed the best boiling heat transfer performance both for water and FC-72. At medium and high heat fluxes (above 70 kW/m2 for water and 25 kW/m2 for FC-72), surfaces with mini-fins without porous covering and micro-cavities produced the highest heat transfer coefficients. The surfaces obtained with spark erosion require a proper selection of geometrical parameters for particular liquids - smaller diameters of cavities are suitable for liquids with lower surface tension (FC-72).

  13. Assuring quality in high-consequence engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, Marcey L.; Kolb, Rachel R.

    2014-03-01

    In high-consequence engineering organizations, such as Sandia, quality assurance may be heavily dependent on staff competency. Competency-dependent quality assurance models are at risk when the environment changes, as it has with increasing attrition rates, budget and schedule cuts, and competing program priorities. Risks in Sandia's competency-dependent culture can be mitigated through changes to hiring, training, and customer engagement approaches to manage people, partners, and products. Sandia's technical quality engineering organization has been able to mitigate corporate-level risks by driving changes that benefit all departments, and in doing so has assured Sandia's commitment to excellence in high-consequence engineering and national service.

  14. Squeezed state generation in photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Banaee, M G; Young, Jeff F

    2008-12-01

    The feasibility of using a parametric down-conversion process to generate squeezed electromagnetic states in three dimensional photonic crystal microcavity structures is investigated for the first time. The spectrum of the squeezed light is theoretically calculated by using an open cavity quantum mechanical formalism. The cavity communicates with two main channels, which model vertical radiation losses and coupling into a single-mode waveguide respectively. The amount of squeezing is determined by the correlation functions relating the field quadratures of light coupled into the waveguide. All of the relevant model parameters are realistically estimated for structures made in Al0.3Ga0.7As, using finite-difference time-domain simulations. Squeezing up to approximately 30% below the shot noise level is predicted for 10 mW average power, 80 MHz repetition, 500 ps excitation pulses using in a [111] oriented wafer. PMID:19065230

  15. Are high-quality mates always attractive?

    PubMed Central

    Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Verhulst, Simon; Fawcett, Tim W

    2010-01-01

    Sexual selection theory posits that females should choose mates in a way that maximizes their reproductive success. But what exactly is the optimal choice? Most empirical research is based on the assumption that females seek a male of the highest possible quality (in terms of the genes or resources he can provide), and hence show directional preferences for indicators of male quality. This implies that attractiveness and quality should be highly correlated. However, females frequently differ in what they find attractive. New theoretical and empirical insights provide mounting evidence that a female’s own quality biases her judgement of male attractiveness, such that male quality and attractiveness do not always coincide. A recent experiment in songbirds demonstrated for the first time that manipulation of female condition can lead to divergent female preferences, with low-quality females actively preferring low-quality males over high-quality males. This result is in line with theory on state-dependent mate choice and is reminiscent of assortative mating preferences in humans. Here we discuss the implications of this work for the study of mate preferences. PMID:20714411

  16. Millisecond Photon Lifetime in a Slow-Light Microcavity.

    PubMed

    Huet, V; Rasoloniaina, A; Guillemé, P; Rochard, P; Féron, P; Mortier, M; Levenson, A; Bencheikh, K; Yacomotti, A; Dumeige, Y

    2016-04-01

    Optical microcavities with ultralong photon storage times are of central importance for integrated nanophotonics. To date, record quality (Q) factors up to 10^{11} have been measured in millimetric-size single-crystal whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators, and 10^{10} in silica or glass microresonators. We show that, by introducing slow-light effects in an active WGM microresonator, it is possible to enhance the photon lifetime by several orders of magnitude, thus circumventing both fabrication imperfections and residual absorption. The slow-light effect is obtained from coherent population oscillations in an erbium-doped fluoride glass microsphere, producing strong dispersion of the WGM (group index n_{g}∼10^{6}). As a result, a photon lifetime up to 2.5 ms at room temperature has been measured, corresponding to a Q factor of 3×10^{12} at 1530 nm. This system could yield a new type of optical memory microarray with ultralong storage times. PMID:27081979

  17. Setting standards for high-quality placements.

    PubMed

    Aitkenhead, Susan; Farran, Sean; Bateman, Ian

    As part of a project undertaken by a local education and training board, a wide range of stakeholders across South London were asked what makes a high-quality practice placement for student nurses, and how that quality could be effectively measured. This article outlines the drafting and testing of a set of quality standards in a mix of provider settings. Although further refinement is required, the standards enabled placement sites to question themselves about their own education and training processes, strengthened their partnership with the training and education board and facilitated the assurance that student nurses receive safe, effective and compassionate preparation when they are on placement. PMID:26434190

  18. Students' Perceptions of High Quality Science Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David

    1999-01-01

    Describes a study that sought to identify the attributes of high-quality science teachers at the junior high school level from the point of view of recent ex-students. Students described their best science teachers as presenting interesting and well-integrated hands-on activities, using a range of strategies to make lessons fun and interesting for…

  19. Room-temperature light emission from an airbridge double-heterostructure microcavity of Er-doped Si photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; An, Jun-ming; Wu, Yuan-da; Hu, Xiong-wei

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient enhancement of luminescence from two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal photonic crystal (PC) airbridge double-heterostructure microcavity with Er-doped silicon (Si) as light emitters on siliconon-insulator (SOI) wafer at room temperature. A single sharp resonant peak at 1 529.6 nm dominates the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum with the pumping power of 12.5 mW. The obvious red shift and the degraded quality factor (Q-factor) of resonant peak appear with the pumping power increasing, and the maximum measured Q-factor of 4 905 is achieved at the pumping power of 1.5 mW. The resonant peak is observed to shift depending on the structural parameters of PC, which indicates a possible method to control the wavelength of enhanced luminescence for Si-based light emitters based on PC microcavity.

  20. Characteristics of High-Quality Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jason E.; Gulek, James C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of high-quality teachers who used a structured mathematics program for teaching, namely the Math Achievement Program (MAP[superscript 2]D), which demonstrated significant gains on student achievement as measured by California's Standards Test (CST) in mathematics. Specifically, the…

  1. GaN hemispherical micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiyun; Feng, Cong; Wang, T.; Choi, H. W.

    2016-01-01

    GaN-based micro-dome optical cavities supported on Si pedestals have been demonstrated by dry etching through gradually shrinking microspheres followed by wet-etch undercutting. Optically pumped whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) have been observed in the near-ultraviolet within the mushroom-like cavities, which do not support Fabry-Pérot resonances. The WGMs blue-shift monotonously as the excitation energies are around the lasing threshold. Concurrently, the mode-hopping effect is observed as the gain spectrum red-shifts under higher excitations. As the excitation energy density exceeds ˜15.1 mJ/cm2, amplified spontaneous emission followed by optical lasing is attained at room temperature, evident from a super-linear increase in emission intensity together with linewidth reduction to ˜0.7 nm for the dominant WGM. Optical behaviors within these WGM microcavities are further investigated using numerical computations and three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations.

  2. Microcavity single virus detection and sizing with molecular sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantham, V. R.; Holler, S.; Kolchenko, V.; Wan, Z.; Arnold, S.

    2013-02-01

    We report the label-free detection and sizing of the smallest individual RNA virus, MS2 by a spherical microcavity. Mass of this virus is ~6 ag and produces a theoretical resonance shift ~0.25 fm upon adsorbing an individual virus at the equator of the bare microcavity, which is well below the r.m.s background noise of 2 fm. However, detection was accomplished with ease (S/N = 8, Q = 4x105) using a single dipole stimulated plasmonic-nanoshell as a microcavity wavelength shift enhancer. Analytical expressions based on the "reactive sensing principle" are developed to extract the radius of the virus from the measured signals. Estimated limit of detection for these experiments was ~0.4 ag or 240 kDa below the size of all known viruses, largest globular and elongated proteins [Phosphofructokinase (345 kDa) and Fibrinogen (390 kDa), respectively].

  3. Spontaneous emission and oscillation in a planar microcavity dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuge, Michihiro; Ujihara, Kikuo

    1994-09-01

    Characteristics of a planar microcavity laser using rhodamine 6G with pulsed excitation is studied. Theoretical aspects of controlled spontaneous emission and oscillation in a planar microcavity laser are discussed. The measured spectrum and the angular divergence of spontaneous emission below threshold are in good agreement with theory. The angular divergence yields the radius of the cavity quasimode. The spontaneous emission coupling ratio obtained from the measured input-output characteristics is in reasonable agreement with the theoretical value. The expression for the coupling ratio derived for a Fabry-Perot-type microcavity is shown to be essentially equal to that of a closed cavity or guided mode cavity derived by Yamamoto, Machida, and Bjoerk (1991). The observed spectral behavior near the threshold approximately follows the Schawlow-Townes formula, but for a limited range of output power. The observed spectrum and divergence above threshold indicate incoherence much worse than the Schawlow-Townes limit.

  4. Spin noise amplification and giant noise in optical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, A. V.; Lagoudakis, P. V.

    2015-06-14

    When studying the spin-noise-induced fluctuations of Kerr rotation in a quantum-well microcavity, we have found a dramatic increase of the noise signal (by more than two orders of magnitude) in the vicinity of anti-crossing of the polariton branches. The effect is explained by nonlinear optical instability of the microcavity giving rise to the light-power-controlled amplification of the polarization noise signal. In the framework of the developed model of built-in amplifier, we also interpret the nontrivial spectral and intensity-related properties of the observed noise signal below the region of anti-crossing of polariton branches. The discovered effect of optically controllable amplification of broadband polarization signals in microcavities in the regime of optical instability may be of interest for detecting weak oscillations of optical anisotropy in fundamental research and for other applications in optical information processing.

  5. First results with a microcavity plasma panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, R.; Ben-Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Y.; Bensimon, R.; Chapman, J. W.; Davies, M.; Etzion, E.; Ferretti, C.; Friedman, P. S.; Levin, D. S.; Silver, Y.; Varner, R. L.; Weaverdyck, C.; Zhou, B.

    2015-06-01

    A new type of gaseous micropattern particle detector based on a closed-cell microcavity plasma panel sensor is reported. The first device was fabricated with 1×1×2 mm cells. It has shown very clean signals of 0.6-2.5 V amplitude, fast rise time of approximately 2 ns and FWHM of about 2 ns with very uniform signal shapes across all pixels. From initial measurements with β particles from a radioactive source, a maximum pixel efficiency greater than 95% is calculated, for operation of the detector over a 100 V wide span of high voltages (HV). Over this same HV range, the background rate per pixel was measured to be 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than the rate with which the cell was illuminated by the β source. Pixel-to-pixel count rate uniformity is within 3% and stable within 3% for many days. The time resolution is 2.4 ns, and a very low cell-to-cell crosstalk has been measured between cells separated by 2 mm.

  6. First results with a microcavity plasma panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Robert; Ben Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Etzion, E; Ferretti, Claudio; Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Levin, Daniel S.; Silver, Yiftah; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing; Bensimon, R; Davies, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    A new type of gaseous micropattern particle detector based on a closed-cell microcavity plasma panel sensor is reported. The first device was fabricated with 1 x 1 x 2 mm cells. It has shown very clean signals of 0.6-2.5 V amplitude, fast rise time of approximately 2 ns and FWHM of about 2 ns with very uniform signal shapes across all pixels. From initial measurements with beta particles from a radioactive source, a maximum pixel efficiency greater than 95% is calculated, for operation of the detector over a 100 V wide span of high voltages (HV). Over this same HV range, the background rate per pixel was measured to be 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than the rate with which the cell was illuminated by the beta source. Pixel-to-pixel count rate uniformity is within 3% and stable within 3% for many days. The time resolution is 2.4 ns, and a very low cell-to-cell crosstalk has been measured between cells separated by 2 mm. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigation on spectral response of micro-cavity structure by symmetrical tapered fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Yang; Yan, Xiaojun; Li, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a micro-cavity structure made of symmetrical tapered fiber tips. The waist of a conventional fiber taper fabricated from heating and stretching technique is symmetrically cleaved, and the aligned fiber tips with air gap constitute a Fabry-Perot micro-cavity due to the reflection at the tip facet. The spectral responses of such micro-cavity structure have been investigated both in beam propagation models and experiments. The multibeam interference in the micro-cavity and the impact of the waist diameter and cavity length on the spectral response has been successfully demonstrated. And a micro-cavity structure with 45 μm waist diameter was experimentally achieved, the measured spectra agree well with the simulation ones, indicating that the spectral response of the micro-cavity structure is contributed by both the multibeam interference and the Fabry-Perot micro-cavity.

  8. Theory of polariton-mediated Raman scattering in microcavities.

    PubMed

    León Hilario, L M; Bruchhausen, A; Lobos, A M; Aligia, A A

    2007-04-30

    We calculate the intensity of the polariton-mediated inelastic light scattering in semiconductor microcavities. We treat the exciton-photon coupling nonperturbatively and incorporate lifetime effects in both excitons and photons, and a coupling of the photons to the electron-hole continuum. Taking the matrix elements as fitting parameters, the results are in excellent agreement with measured Raman intensities due to optical phonons that are resonant with the upper polariton branches in II-VI microcavities with embedded CdTe quantum wells. PMID:21690956

  9. Low dimensional GaAs/air vertical microcavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gessler, J.; Steinl, T.; Fischer, J.; Höfling, S.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Mika, A.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.

    2014-02-24

    We report on the fabrication of gallium arsenide (GaAs)/air distributed Bragg reflector microresonators with indium gallium arsenide quantum wells. The structures are studied via momentum resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy which allows us to investigate a pronounced optical mode quantization of the photonic dispersion. We can extract a length parameter from these quantized states whose upper limit can be connected to the lateral physical extension of the microcavity via analytical calculations. Laser emission from our microcavity under optical pumping is observed in power dependent investigations.

  10. Antenna-coupled microcavities for enhanced infrared photo-detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nga Chen, Yuk; Todorov, Yanko Askenazi, Benjamin; Vasanelli, Angela; Sirtori, Carlo; Biasiol, Giorgio; Colombelli, Raffaele

    2014-01-20

    We demonstrate mid-infrared detectors embedded into an array of double-metal nano-antennas. The antennas act as microcavities that squeeze the electric field into thin semiconductor layers, thus enhancing the detector responsivity. Furthermore, thanks to the ability of the antennas to gather photons from an area larger than the device's physical dimensions, the dark current is reduced without hindering the photo-generation rate. In these devices, the background-limited performance is improved with a consequent increase of the operating temperature. Our results illustrate how the antenna-coupled microcavity concept can be applied to enhance the performances of infrared opto-electronic devices.

  11. Polariton condensation phase diagram in wide-band-gap planar microcavities: GaN versus ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamadi, O.; Réveret, F.; Mallet, E.; Disseix, P.; Médard, F.; Mihailovic, M.; Solnyshkov, D.; Malpuech, G.; Leymarie, J.; Lafosse, X.; Bouchoule, S.; Li, F.; Leroux, M.; Semond, F.; Zuniga-Perez, J.

    2016-03-01

    The polariton condensation phase diagram is compared in GaN and ZnO microcavities grown on mesa-patterned silicon substrate. Owing to a common platform, these microcavities share similar photonic properties with large quality factors and low photonic disorder, which makes it possible to determine the optimal spot diameter and to realize a thorough phase diagram study. Both systems have been investigated under the same experimental conditions. The experimental results and the subsequent analysis reveal clearly that longitudinal optical phonons have no influence in the thermodynamic region of the condensation phase diagram, while they allow a strong (slight) decrease of the polariton lasing threshold in the trade-off zone (kinetic region). Phase diagrams are compared with numerical simulations using Boltzmann equations, and are in satisfactory agreement. A lower polariton lasing threshold has been measured at low temperature in the ZnO microcavity, as is expected due to a larger Rabi splitting. This study highlights polariton relaxation mechanisms and their importance in polariton lasing.

  12. Near-Field Enhancement and Absorption Properties of Metal-Dielectric-Metal Microcavities in the Mid-Infrared Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Hang; Yang, Li; Ye, Yong-Hong

    2014-01-01

    An important property of optical metamaterials is the ability to concentrate light into extremely tiny volumes, so as to enhance their interaction with quantum objects. In this work, we numerically study the near-field enhancement and absorption properties inside the cylindrical microcavities formed by a Au-GaAs-Au sandwiched structure. At normal incidence, the obtained reflection spectra show that the resonance wavelength of microcavities operates in the range of 5-5.8 μm. We also calculate the contrast C (C = 1 - Rmin), which can be increased to 97% by optimizing the structure's geometry parameters. Moreover, we demonstrate that the multilayer structure with sub-wavelength electromagnetic confinement allows 103-104-fold enhancement of the electromagnetic energy density inside the cavities, which contains the most energy of the incident electromagnetic radiation and has a higher quality factor Q, indicating a narrower linewidth for surface enhanced molecular absorption spectroscopy and the tracking of characteristic molecular vibrational modes in the mid-infrared region. The structure is insensitive to the polarization of the incident wave due to the symmetry of the cylindrical microcavities. The unique properties of the metal-dielectric-metal metamaterials will have potential applications in new plasmonic detectors, bio-sensing and solar cells, etc.

  13. Raman quantum memory based on an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers coupled to a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshami, Khabat; Santori, Charles; Khanaliloo, Behzad; Healey, Chris; Acosta, Victor M.; Barclay, Paul E.; Simon, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    We propose a scheme to realize optical quantum memories in an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond that are coupled to a microcavity. The scheme is based on off-resonant Raman coupling, which allows one to circumvent optical inhomogeneous broadening and store optical photons in the electronic spin coherence. This approach promises a storage time of order 1 s and a time-bandwidth product of order 107. We include all possible optical transitions in a nine-level configuration, numerically evaluate the efficiencies, and discuss the requirements for achieving high efficiency and fidelity.

  14. Multi-state lasing in self-assembled ring-shaped green fluorescent protein microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Christof P.; Höfling, Sven; Gather, Malte C.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient lasing from multiple photonic states in microcavities filled with self-assembled rings of recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in its solid state form. The lasing regime is achieved at very low excitation energies of 13 nJ and occurs from cavity modes dispersed in both energy and momentum. We attribute the momentum distribution to very efficient scattering of incident light at the surface of the eGFP rings. The distribution of lasing states in energy is induced by the large spectral width of the gain spectrum of recombinant eGFP (FWHM ≅ 25 nm).

  15. Weak-microcavity organic light-emitting diodes with improved light-extraction and wide viewing-angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Yong-Hee; Song, Young-Woo; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Lee, Joon-Gu; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Hwang, Kyu Hwan; Zang, Dong-Sik

    2009-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate weak-microcavity organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays that deliver both a high light-extraction efficiency and wide viewing-angle characteristics. A single pair of low- and high-index layers is inserted between indium tin oxide (ITO) and a glass substrate. The electroluminescent (EL) efficiencies of discrete red, green, and blue weak-microcavity OLEDs (WMOLEDs) are enhanced by 56%, 107%, and 26%, respectively with minimal changes viewing angle and EL spectra characteristics. The color purity is also improved for all three colors. Moreover, we fabricated full-color 128×160 passive-matrix bottom-emitting WMOLED displays to prove their manufacturability. This design is realized by simple one-step 20-nm etching of the low-index layer of red/green subpixels. The EL efficiency of white color in the WMOLED display is 27% higher than that of a conventional OLED display.

  16. Q-factor of (In,Ga)N containing III-nitride microcavity grown by multiple deposition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gačević, Ž. Calleja, E.; Réveret, F.

    2013-12-21

    A 3λ/2 (In,Ga)N/GaN resonant cavity, designed for ∼415 nm operation, is grown by molecular beam epitaxy and is sandwiched between a 39.5-period (In,Al)N/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), grown on c-plane GaN-on-sapphire pseudo-substrate by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and an 8-period SiO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} DBR, deposited by electron beam evaporation. Optical characterization reveals an improvement in the cavity emission spectral purity of approximately one order of magnitude due to resonance effects. The combination of spectrophotometric and micro-reflectivity measurements confirms the strong quality (Q)-factor dependence on the excitation spot size. We derive simple analytical formulas to estimate leak and residual absorption losses and propose a simple approach to model the Q-factor and to give a quantitative estimation of the weight of cavity disorder. The model is in good agreement with both transfer-matrix simulation and the experimental findings. We point out that the realization of high Q-factor (In,Ga)N containing microcavities on GaN pseudo-substrates is likely to be limited by the cavity disorder.

  17. Plasmon coupled Fabry-Perot lasing enhancement in graphene/ZnO hybrid microcavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jitao; Jiang, Mingming; Xu, Chunxiang; Wang, Yueyue; Lin, Yi; Lu, Junfeng; Shi, Zengliang

    2015-01-01

    The response of graphene surface plasmon (SP) in the ultraviolet (UV) region and the realization of short-wavelength semiconductor lasers not only are two hot research areas of great academic and practical significance, but also are two important issues lacked of good understanding. In this work, a hybrid Fabry-Perot (F-P) microcavity, comprising of monolayer graphene covered ZnO microbelt, was constructed to investigate the fundamental physics of graphene SP and the functional extension of ZnO UV lasing. Through the coupling between graphene SP modes and conventional optical microcavity modes of ZnO, improved F-P lasing performance was realized, including the lowered lasing threshold, the improved lasing quality and the remarkably enhanced lasing intensity. The underlying mechanism of the improved lasing performance was proposed based on theoretical simulation and experimental characterization. The results are helpful to design new types of optic and photoelectronic devices based on SP coupling in graphene/semiconductor hybrid structures. PMID:25786359

  18. High quality factor indium oxide mechanical microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolomé, Javier Cremades, Ana; Piqueras, Javier

    2015-11-09

    The mechanical resonance behavior of as-grown In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods has been studied in this work by in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) electrically induced mechanical oscillations. Indium oxide microrods grown by a vapor–solid method are naturally clamped to an aluminum oxide ceramic substrate, showing a high quality factor due to reduced energy losses during mechanical vibrations. Quality factors of more than 10{sup 5} and minimum detectable forces of the order of 10{sup −16} N/Hz{sup 1/2} demonstrate their potential as mechanical microresonators for real applications. Measurements at low-vacuum using the SEM environmental operation mode were performed to study the effect of extrinsic damping on the resonators behavior. The damping coefficient has been determined as a function of pressure.

  19. Exciton condensation in microcavities under three-dimensional quantization conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kochereshko, V. P. Platonov, A. V.; Savvidis, P.; Kavokin, A. V.; Bleuse, J.; Mariette, H.

    2013-11-15

    The dependence of the spectra of the polarized photoluminescence of excitons in microcavities under conditions of three-dimensional quantization on the optical-excitation intensity is investigated. The cascade relaxation of polaritons between quantized states of a polariton Bose condensate is observed.

  20. Enhancement of the blue photoluminescence intensity for the porous silicon with HfO2 filling into microcavities.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ran; Du, Xianghao; Sun, Weideng; Han, Zuyin; Wu, Zhengran

    2015-01-01

    With HfO2 filled into the microcavities of the porous single-crystal silicon, the blue photoluminescence was greatly enhanced at room temperature. On one hand, HfO2 contributes to the light emission with the transitions of the defect levels for oxygen vacancy. On the other hand, the special filling-into-microcavities structure of HfO2 leads to the presence of ferroelectricity, which greatly enhances the blue emission from porous silicon. Since both HfO2 and Si are highly compatible with Si-based electronic industry, combined the low-cost and convenient process, the HfO2-filled porous Si shows a promising application prospect. PMID:26503804

  1. Strong coupling and laser action of ladder-type oligo(p-phenylene)s in a microcavity.

    PubMed

    Höfner, Michael; Kobin, Björn; Hecht, Stefan; Henneberger, Fritz

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the coupling of ladder-type quarterphenyl to the photon modes of a dielectric ZrOx /SiOx microcavity at ultraviolet wavelengths. For a relatively long cavity (≈10 μm) with high-reflectivity mirrors (0.998), optically pumped laser action is demonstrated in the weak-coupling regime. We observe single-mode operation with a threshold of 0.4 mJ cm(-2) . Strong coupling is achieved by using a short λ/2 cavity. We find pronounced anti-crossing features of the molecular (0,0) and (0,1) vibronic transitions and the cavity mode in angle-dependent reflectivity measurements providing Rabi splittings of (90±10) meV. All these features occur spectrally resonant to the exciton transition of ZnO demonstrating the potential of ladder-type oligo(p-phenylene)s for the construction of inorganic/organic hybrid microcavities. PMID:25234768

  2. Enhancement of the blue photoluminescence intensity for the porous silicon with HfO2 filling into microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ran; Du, Xianghao; Sun, Weideng; Han, Zuyin; Wu, Zhengran

    2015-01-01

    With HfO2 filled into the microcavities of the porous single-crystal silicon, the blue photoluminescence was greatly enhanced at room temperature. On one hand, HfO2 contributes to the light emission with the transitions of the defect levels for oxygen vacancy. On the other hand, the special filling-into-microcavities structure of HfO2 leads to the presence of ferroelectricity, which greatly enhances the blue emission from porous silicon. Since both HfO2 and Si are highly compatible with Si-based electronic industry, combined the low-cost and convenient process, the HfO2-filled porous Si shows a promising application prospect. PMID:26503804

  3. Near-field radiative heat transfer between two parallel SiO{sub 2} plates with and without microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiro, T.; Yamada, N.

    2015-01-12

    Near-to-far-field radiative heat transfer between two macroscopic SiO{sub 2} plates—with and without microcavities—was observed using a highly precise and accurate optical gap-measurement method. The experiments, conducted near 300 K, measured heat transfer as a function of gap separation from 1.0 μm to 50 μm and also as a function of temperature differences between 4.1 and 19.5 K. The gap-dependent heat flux was in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the effects of microcavities on the plate surfaces were clearly observed and significant enhancement of near-field radiative heat transfer was confirmed between gold-coated microcavities with narrow vacuum separation.

  4. Germanium-on-silicon Vernier-effect photonic microcavities for the mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    Troia, Benedetto; Penades, Jordi Soler; Khokhar, Ali Z; Nedeljkovic, Milos; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos; Passaro, Vittorio M N; Mashanovich, Goran Z

    2016-02-01

    We present Vernier-effect photonic microcavities based on a germanium-on-silicon technology platform, operating around the mid-infrared wavelength of 3.8 μm. Cascaded racetrack resonators have been designed to operate in the second regime of the Vernier effect, and typical Vernier comb-like spectra have been successfully demonstrated with insertion losses of ∼5  dB, maximum extinction ratios of ∼23  dB, and loaded quality factors higher than 5000. Furthermore, an add-drop racetrack resonator designed for a Vernier device has been characterized, exhibiting average insertion losses of 1 dB, extinction ratios of up to 18 dB, and a quality factor of ∼1700. PMID:26907436

  5. Computational Modeling of Photonic Crystal Microcavity Single-Photon Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulnier, Nicole A.

    Conventional cryptography is based on algorithms that are mathematically complex and difficult to solve, such as factoring large numbers. The advent of a quantum computer would render these schemes useless. As scientists work to develop a quantum computer, cryptographers are developing new schemes for unconditionally secure cryptography. Quantum key distribution has emerged as one of the potential replacements of classical cryptography. It relics on the fact that measurement of a quantum bit changes the state of the bit and undetected eavesdropping is impossible. Single polarized photons can be used as the quantum bits, such that a quantum system would in some ways mirror the classical communication scheme. The quantum key distribution system would include components that create, transmit and detect single polarized photons. The focus of this work is on the development of an efficient single-photon source. This source is comprised of a single quantum dot inside of a photonic crystal microcavity. To better understand the physics behind the device, a computational model is developed. The model uses Finite-Difference Time-Domain methods to analyze the electromagnetic field distribution in photonic crystal microcavities. It uses an 8-band k · p perturbation theory to compute the energy band structure of the epitaxially grown quantum dots. We discuss a method that combines the results of these two calculations for determining the spontaneous emission lifetime of a quantum dot in bulk material or in a microcavity. The computational models developed in this thesis are used to identify and characterize microcavities for potential use in a single-photon source. The computational tools developed are also used to investigate novel photonic crystal microcavities that incorporate 1D distributed Bragg reflectors for vertical confinement. It is found that the spontaneous emission enhancement in the quasi-3D cavities can be significantly greater than in traditional suspended slab

  6. A low-threshold high-index-contrast grating (HCG)-based organic VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayesteh, Mohammad Reza; Darvish, Ghafar; Ahmadi, Vahid

    2015-12-01

    We propose a low-threshold high-index-contrast grating (HCG)-based organic vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (OVCSEL). The device has the feasibility to apply both electrical and optical excitation. The microcavity of the laser is a hybrid photonic crystal (HPC) in which the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) is replaced by a sub-wavelength high-contrast-grating layer, and provides a high-quality factor. The simulated quality factor of the microcavity is shown to be as high as 282,000. We also investigate the threshold behavior and the dynamics of the OVCSEL optically pumped with sub-picosecond pulses. Results from numerical simulation show that lasing threshold is 75 nJ/cm2.

  7. A guide to highly effective quality programs.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, John; Fifer, Joe

    2010-01-01

    To dramatically improve quality while decreasing costs, hospitals should: ensure all executives are vocal and visible supporters of quality improvement; focus the board of directors on quality as a strategic priority; strategically target quality resources to improve care for the majority of patients; use the finance system as the foundation for automated quality reporting; form a strong alliance between the CFO and chief quality officer, with each playing a leadership role in the quality program; rely on a well-executed quality program to improve efficiency and decrease the cost of care. PMID:20088475

  8. An economical route to high quality lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, J.P.; Hahn, S.K.; Kwon, S.H.; Min, W.

    1996-12-01

    The current rends in the automotive and industrial markets toward more efficient engines, longer drain intervals, and lower emissions all contribute to placing increasingly stringent performance requirements on lubricants. The demand for higher quality synthetic and non-conventional basestocks is expected to grow at a much faster rate than that of conventional lube basestocks to meet these higher performance standards. Yukong Limited has developed a novel technology (the Yukong UCO Lube Process) for the economic production of high quality, high-viscosity-index lube basestocks from a fuels hydrocracker unconverted oil stream. A pilot plant based on this process has been producing oils for testing purposes since May 1994. A commercial facility designed to produce 3,500 BPD of VHVI lube basestocks cane on-stream at Yukong`s Ulsan refinery in October 1995. The Badger Technology Center of Raytheon Engineers and Constructors assisted Yukong during the development of the technology and prepared the basic process design package for the commercial facility. This paper presents process aspects of the technology and comparative data on investment and operating costs. Yukong lube basestock product properties and performance data are compared to basestocks produced by conventional means and by lube hydrocracking.

  9. Synthesis of High-Quality Forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Minato; Himura, Kenji; Tsunooka, Tsutomu; Kagomiya, Isao; Ohsato, Hitoshi

    2007-10-01

    To establish a process that produces high-quality forsterite stably, calcining and sintering conditions were investigated chiefly and two kinds of silica with different forms, and grain sizes were used as starting raw materials. On the basis of the quality factor (\\mathit{Qf}) for forsterite, the sintered samples prepared using powders calcined for 10-24 h, were found to be more stable than those in the case of 2-4 h, and in the case of 24 h of calcination, the samples showed a single phase of forsterite with fine grains. Silica with an amorphous form and a small grain size of 0.25 μm brought a higher \\mathit{Qf} value and a wider permissible temperature range of sintering than silica with a crystalline form and a coarse grain size of 0.82 μm. Concerning the sintering temperature, the sample sintered above 1400 °C showed a high \\mathit{Qf} value. The \\mathit{Qf} value of the sample calcined at 1175 °C for 24 h and sintered at 1450 °C for 2 h using fine-grain amorphous silica of 0.25 μm size, was improved to 219,200 GHz.

  10. Tunable open-access microcavities for on-chip cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, C. A.; Melnyk, A.; Ramp, H.; Bitarafan, M. H.; Vick, D.; LeBlanc, L. J.; Davis, J. P.; DeCorby, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the development of on-chip microcavities and show their potential as a platform for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. Microcavity arrays were formed by the controlled buckling of SiO2/Ta2O5 Bragg mirrors and exhibit a reflectance-limited finesse of 3500 and mode volumes as small as 35 λ 3 . We show that the cavity resonance can be thermally tuned into alignment with the D2 transition of 87Rb and outline two methods for providing atom access to the cavity. Owing to their small mode volume and high finesse, these cavities exhibit single-atom cooperativities as high as C 1 = 65 . A unique feature of the buckled-dome architecture is that the strong-coupling parameter g 0 / κ is nearly independent of the cavity size. Furthermore, strong coupling should be achievable with only modest improvements in mirror reflectance, suggesting that these monolithic devices could provide a robust and scalable solution to the engineering of light-matter interfaces.

  11. Unidirectional resonance modes supported by secondary islands in a microcavity comprised of two half-ellipses

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jinhyung; Rim, Sunghwan; Cho, Jinhang; Kim, Chil-Min

    2011-03-15

    We propose a simple and robust mechanism to achieve unidirectional emission in a microcavity comprised of two half-ellipses. The microcavity has two geometrical parameters, two eccentricities, which permit a control of the directional emissions. For the microcavity with two small eccentricities, the positions of secondary islands near primary islands in the survival probability distributions determine the directionality of emissions. We obtain the optimized values of the eccentricities for unidirectional emission.

  12. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    as the detection of less than 1 kDa intercalating small molecules[1]. [1] M. D. Baaske, M. R. Foreman, and F. Vollmer, "Single molecule nucleic acid interactions monitored on a label-free microcavity biosensing platform," Nature Nanotechnology, vol. 9, pp. 933-939, 2014. [2] Y. Wu, D. Y. Zhang, P. Yin, and F. Vollmer, "Ultraspecific and Highly Sensitive Nucleic Acid Detection by Integrating a DNA Catalytic Network with a Label-Free Microcavity," Small, vol. 10, pp. 2067-2076, 2014. [3] M. R. Foreman, W.-L. Jin, and F. Vollmer, "Optimizing Detection Limits in Whispering Gallery Mode Biosensing," Optics Express, vol. 22, pp. 5491-5511, 2014. [4] M. A. Santiago-Cordoba, S. V. Boriskina, F. Vollmer, and M. C. Demirel, "Nanoparticle-based protein detection by optical shift of a resonant microcavity," Applied Physics Letters, vol. 99, Aug 2011. [5] M. R. Foreman and F. Vollmer, "Theory of resonance shifts of whispering gallery modes by arbitrary plasmonic nanoparticles," New Journal of Physics, vol. 15, p. 083006, Aug 2013. [6] M. R. Foreman and F. Vollmer "Level repulsion in hybrid photonic-plasmonic microresonators for enhanced biodetection" Phys. Rev. A 88, 023831 (2013).

  13. Document segmentation for high-quality printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancin, Hakan

    1997-04-01

    A technique to segment dark texts on light background of mixed mode color documents is presented. This process does not perceptually change graphics and photo regions. Color documents are scanned and printed from various media which usually do not have clean background. This is especially the case for the printouts generated from thin magazine samples, these printouts usually include text and figures form the back of the page, which is called bleeding. Removal of bleeding artifacts improves the perceptual quality of the printed document and reduces the color ink usage. By detecting the light background of the document, these artifacts are removed from background regions. Also detection of dark text regions enables the halftoning algorithms to use true black ink for the black text pixels instead of composite black. The processed document contains sharp black text on white background, resulting improved perceptual quality and better ink utilization. The described method is memory efficient and requires a small number of scan lines of high resolution color documents during processing.

  14. Specific features of the hybridization of Frenkel and Wannier-Mott excitons in a microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovskii, O. A.; Agranovich, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    Polariton states have been investigated in a microcavity, where the energy of the Frenkel exciton in an organic quantum well and the energy of the semiconductor Wannier-Mott exciton in an inorganic quantum well are close to the microcavity optical mode. It has been shown that the interaction of each of these excitons with the microcavity optical mode leads to their interaction with each other and to the formation of mutually coupled hybrid excitations. The influence of the location of the quantum wells in a microcavity on the spectra of hybrid states with different polarizations has been analyzed.

  15. Method for synthesis of high quality graphene

    DOEpatents

    Lanzara, Alessandra; Schmid, Andreas K.; Yu, Xiaozhu; Hwang, Choonkyu; Kohl, Annemarie; Jozwiak, Chris M.

    2012-03-27

    A method is described herein for the providing of high quality graphene layers on silicon carbide wafers in a thermal process. With two wafers facing each other in close proximity, in a first vacuum heating stage, while maintained at a vacuum of around 10.sup.-6 Torr, the wafer temperature is raised to about 1500.degree. C., whereby silicon evaporates from the wafer leaving a carbon rich surface, the evaporated silicon trapped in the gap between the wafers, such that the higher vapor pressure of silicon above each of the wafers suppresses further silicon evaporation. As the temperature of the wafers is raised to about 1530.degree. C. or more, the carbon atoms self assemble themselves into graphene.

  16. Adjustable YAG : Ce3+ photoluminescence from photonic crystal microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yigang; Almeida, Rui M.

    2013-04-01

    Four different photonic bandgap (PBG) structures embedding a YAG : Ce3+ layer inside two three-period Bragg mirrors were prepared by sol-gel processing, forming Fabry-Perot microcavities whose defect peaks moved from red to green. Under irradiation of blue Ar+ laser light, the typical broad YAG : Ce3+ photoluminescence (PL) emission band was highly narrowed in these four samples, with the new position of the modified PL peaks corresponding to the resonance wavelength of each microcavity sample, while the simultaneous colour changes could be easily observed by the human eye. The adjustable range demonstrated here was wide enough to generate white light with colour temperatures from warm white (˜2700 K) to daylight white (˜5600 K), by mixing the modified PL with light from any usual blue LED excitation source. This result provides a novel technique to solve the red-deficiency problem in the white LED industry: instead of relying on the development of new phosphors, the well-known PL of YAG : Ce3+ can be conveniently adjusted by 1D PBG structures.

  17. Microcavity substrates casted from self-assembled microsphere monolayers for spheroid cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Keyue; Lee, Jungwoo; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids are an important 3-dimensional cell culture model that reflects many key aspects of in vivo microenvironments. This paper presents a scalable, self-assembly based approach for fabricating microcavity substrates for multicellular spheroid cell culture. Hydrophobic glass microbeads were self-assembled into a tightly packed monolayer through the combined actions of surface tension, gravity, and lateral capillary forces at the water-air interface of a polymer solution. The packed bead monolayer was subsequently embedded in the dried polymer layer. The surface was used as a template for replicating microcavity substrates with perfect spherical shapes. We demonstrated the use of the substrate in monitoring the formation process of tumor spheroids, a proof-of-concept scale-up fabrication procedure into standard microplate formats, and its application in testing cancer drug responses in the context of bone marrow stromal cells. The presented technique offers a simple and effective way of forming high-density uniformlysized spheroids without microfabrication equipment for biological and drug screening applications. PMID:24781882

  18. Light–matter interaction in a microcavity-controlled graphene transistor

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.; Avouris, Phaedon; Krupke, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has extraordinary electronic and optical properties and holds great promise for applications in photonics and optoelectronics. Demonstrations including high-speed photodetectors, optical modulators, plasmonic devices, and ultrafast lasers have now been reported. More advanced device concepts would involve photonic elements such as cavities to control light–matter interaction in graphene. Here we report the first monolithic integration of a graphene transistor and a planar, optical microcavity. We find that the microcavity-induced optical confinement controls the efficiency and spectral selection of photocurrent generation in the integrated graphene device. A twenty-fold enhancement of photocurrent is demonstrated. The optical cavity also determines the spectral properties of the electrically excited thermal radiation of graphene. Most interestingly, we find that the cavity confinement modifies the electrical transport characteristics of the integrated graphene transistor. Our experimental approach opens up a route towards cavity-quantum electrodynamics on the nanometre scale with graphene as a current-carrying intra-cavity medium of atomic thickness. PMID:22713748

  19. Creating High-Quality Classroom Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumura, Lindsay Clare; Gallimore, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Research indicates that the quality of classroom assignments makes a difference in student learning. Moreover, assignment quality varies between teachers even within the same school and there is room for improvement in many of the assignments that teachers provide to students. Assignment quality, as described in this book, puts into practice…

  20. Design and analysis of photonic crystal micro-cavity based optical sensor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Amit Kumar; Dutta, Hemant Sankar; Pal, Suchandan

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the design of a two-dimensional photonic crystal micro-cavity based integrated-optic sensor platform is proposed. The behaviour of designed cavity is analyzed using two-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The structure is designed by deliberately inserting some defects in a photonic crystal waveguide structure. Proposed structure shows a quality factor (Q) of about 1e5 and the average sensitivity of 500nm/RIU in the wavelength range of 1450 - 1580 nm. Sensing technique is based on the detection of shift in upper-edge cut-off wavelength for a reference signal strength of -10 dB in accordance with the change in refractive index of analyte.

  1. Microcavity properties of 2D photonic crystal made by silica matrix doped with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukhtari, R.; Hocini, A.; Khedrouche, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this present paper, quality factor of two-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals microcavity fabricated by SiO2/ZrO2 or SiO2/TiO2 matrix doped with magnetic nanoparticles, in which the refractive index varied in the range of 1.51 to 1.58, has been investigated. Finite difference time domain method (3D FDTD) with perfectly matched layers (PML) was used to calculate the transmission spectrum. We demonstrate that the Q factor for the designed cavity increases as the refractive index increases, and found that the Q factor decreases as the volume fraction VF% increases. The obtained results are useful for better designs of magneto photonic crystal devices.

  2. Applications of Optical Microcavity Resonators in Analytical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, James H.; Bailey, Ryan C.

    2016-06-01

    Optical resonator sensors are an emerging class of analytical technologies that use recirculating light confined within a microcavity to sensitively measure the surrounding environment. Bolstered by advances in microfabrication, these devices can be configured for a wide variety of chemical or biomolecular sensing applications. We begin with a brief description of optical resonator sensor operation, followed by discussions regarding sensor design, including different geometries, choices of material systems, methods of sensor interrogation, and new approaches to sensor operation. Throughout, key developments are highlighted, including advancements in biosensing and other applications of optical sensors. We discuss the potential of alternative sensing mechanisms and hybrid sensing devices for more sensitive and rapid analyses. We conclude with our perspective on the future of optical microcavity sensors and their promise as versatile detection elements within analytical chemistry.

  3. Nonlinear resonance-assisted tunneling induced by microcavity deformation

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hojeong; Shin, Younghoon; Moon, Songky; Lee, Sang-Bum; Yang, Juhee; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Noncircular two-dimensional microcavities support directional output and strong confinement of light, making them suitable for various photonics applications. It is now of primary interest to control the interactions among the cavity modes since novel functionality and enhanced light-matter coupling can be realized through intermode interactions. However, the interaction Hamiltonian induced by cavity deformation is basically unknown, limiting practical utilization of intermode interactions. Here we present the first experimental observation of resonance-assisted tunneling in a deformed two-dimensional microcavity. It is this tunneling mechanism that induces strong inter-mode interactions in mixed phase space as their strength can be directly obtained from a separatrix area in the phase space of intracavity ray dynamics. A selection rule for strong interactions is also found in terms of angular quantum numbers. Our findings, applicable to other physical systems in mixed phase space, make the interaction control more accessible. PMID:25759322

  4. Microcavity-array superhydrophobic surfaces: Limits of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Oliveira, M. R. S.; Spirin, R.; Teixeira, F. S.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2013-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces formed of microcavities can be designed with specific desired advancing and receding contact angles using a new model described by us in prior work. Here, we discuss the limits of validity of the model, and explore the application of the model to surfaces fabricated with small cavities of radius 250 nm and with large cavities of radius 40 μm. The Wenzel model is discussed and used to calculate the advancing and receding contact angles for samples for which our model cannot be applied. We also consider the case of immersion of a sample containing microcavities in pressurized water. A consideration that then arises is that the air inside the cavities can be dissolved in the water, leading to complete water invasion into the cavities and compromising the superhydrophobic character of the surface. Here, we show that this effect does not destroy the surface hydrophobia when the surface is subsequently removed from the water.

  5. Strong light-matter coupling in plasmonic microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijian; Xi, Fuchun; Xu, Jie; Qian, Qinbai; Gou, Peng; An, Zhenghua

    2014-11-01

    We numerically study the strong coupling between quantum well (QW) intersubband transitions (ISBT) and the plasmonic resonance of metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) microcavities. In this system, the lowest-order energy state of plasmonic resonance is a hybrid mode of propagating surface plasmons (PSP) and localized surface plasmons (LSP). For a given lowest-order resonance, the mode transformation can be realized between PSP mode and LSP mode by varying the plasmonic microcavity structure, which opens a new freedom to modulate the coupling interaction of light and matter. With the cavity mode transforming from LSP mode to PSP mode, the coupling strength increases from 20.75% to 25.75%, which is mainly dominated by the polarization conversion ratio / of plasmonic modes.

  6. Unidirectional emission from a cardioid-shaped microcavity laser.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Goo; Go, Sung-Min; Ryu, Jin-Hyeok; Yi, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Bock; Oh, Kwang Ryung; Kim, Chil-Min

    2016-02-01

    We find unidirectional emission in a cardioid-shaped microcavity laser. When a deformation parameter is well adjusted, rays starting around a period-5 unstable periodic orbit emit unidirectionally. To confirm the emission direction, we fabricate a laser by using an InGaAsP semiconductor and investigate emission characteristics. When the laser is excited by current injection with a dc current, resonances localized on the period-5 unstable periodic orbit emit unidirectionally. PMID:26906801

  7. Coupling polariton quantum boxes in sub-wavelength grating microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Zhaorong; Deng, Hui; Brodbeck, Sebastian; Kamp, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven

    2015-02-02

    We report the construction of decoupled, coupled, and quasi-one dimensional polariton systems from zero dimensional polariton quantum boxes using microcavities with sub-wavelength gratings as the top mirror. By designing the tethering patterns around the suspended sub-wavelength gratings, we control the coupling between individual quantum boxes through different optical potentials. Energy levels and real-space or momentum space distributions of the confined modes were measured, which agreed well with simulations.

  8. Multi-objective optimization of microcavity OLEDs with DBR mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Albert W.; Chan, J.; Ng, Alan Man Ching; Djurišić, A. B.; Rakić, A. D.

    2007-02-01

    In this work, the emission efficiency and spectral shift with respect to viewing angle were optimized by optimizing the design of the multi-layer top mirror of a microcavity OLED device. We first established criteria for the emission side mirror in order to optimize light intensity and spectral shift with viewing angle. Then we designed mirror using metallic and dielectric layers based on the target defined. The electroluminescence emission spectra of a microcavity OLED consisting of widely used organic materials, N,N'-di(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (NPB) as a hole transport layer and tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq 3) as emitting and electron transporting layer was then calculated. Silver was used as the anode and back reflection mirror for the microcavity OLED. The simulation was performed for both the conventional LiF/Al cathode/top mirror and the optimized 5-layered top mirror. Our results indicate that by following the design procedure outlined, we simultaneously optimize the device for better light intensity and spectral shift with viewing angle.

  9. Lanthanide luminescence enhancements in porous silicon resonant microcavities.

    PubMed

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Pace, Stephanie; Sciacca, Beniamino; Brooks, Robert D; Plush, Sally E; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-08-13

    In this paper, the covalent immobilization and luminescence enhancement of a europium (Eu(III)) complex in a porous silicon (pSi) layer with a microcavity (pSiMC) structure are demonstrated. The alkyne-pendant arm of the Eu(III) complex was covalently immobilized on the azide-modified surface via ligand-assisted "click" chemistry. The design parameters of the microcavity were optimized to obtain an efficient luminescence-enhancing device. Luminescence enhancements by a factor of 9.5 and 3.0 were observed for Eu(III) complex bound inside the pSiMC as compared to a single layer and Bragg reflector of identical thickness, respectively, confirming the increased interaction between the immobilized molecules and the electric field in the spacer of the microcavity. When comparing pSiMCs with different resonance wavelength position, luminescence was enhanced when the resonance wavelength overlapped with the maximum emission wavelength of the Eu(III) complex at 614 nm, allowing for effective coupling between the confined light and the emitting molecules. The pSiMC also improved the spectral color purity of the Eu(III) complex luminescence. The ability of a pSiMC to act as an efficient Eu(III) luminescence enhancer, combined with the resulting sharp linelike emission, can be exploited for the development of ultrasensitive optical biosensors. PMID:25032481

  10. Nonlinear novel oscillation of polaritons in the optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongchang; Zhou, Xiangfa; Guo, Guangcan; Zhou, Xingxiang; Pu, Han; Zhou, Zhengwei

    2014-03-01

    As a kind of new state of matter, Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in a dilute gas of trapped atoms is able to exhibit quantum phenomena on macroscopic scales. Recently, BEC of microcavity polaritons had been experimentally demonstrated. As a kind of bosonic quasi-particle which generates from the strong light-matter coupling, the polariton can be manipulated by the external laser field, and it provides a platform to simulate strongly correlated many-body models in the photon-coupled microcavity array. In this talk we present a scheme for simulating the nonlinear tunneling between two bosonic condensations in the microcavity system. Due to the controllability of the polariton, the effective nonlinear tunneling between two condensates of polaritons can be easily induced by the external controlling fields. In our work, a kind of two modes polariton model is derived, in which nonlinear tunneling strength depends on the difference of the particles in such two kinds of modes. We investigate the mean-field behaviors for such kind of double-mode polariton model, and we find that it is analogous to the model of the pendulum with variable pendulum length. Furthermore, some novel oscillation modes are revealed.

  11. Integrating Quality into the Textile and Apparel High School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Deborah J. C.; Kadolph, Sara J.; Cosbey, Sarah; Hillery, Julie; Haar, Sherry; Day, Marla; Keiser, Sandra; Brandes, Kendra

    2001-01-01

    Explains the importance of quality assurance in high school textiles and apparel instruction. Describes educational activities that integrate quality assurance concepts (teamwork, continuous improvement, customer focus, and empowerment). (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  12. High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

    2008-03-31

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown. In

  13. Whispering gallery modes in a spherical microcavity with a photoluminescent shell

    SciTech Connect

    Grudinkin, S. A. Dontsov, A. A.; Feoktistov, N. A.; Baranov, M. A.; Bogdanov, K. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Golubev, V. G.

    2015-10-15

    Whispering-gallery mode spectra in optical microcavities based on spherical silica particles coated with a thin photoluminescent shell of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide are studied. The spectral positions of the whispering-gallery modes for spherical microcavities with a shell are calculated. The dependence of the spectral distance between the TE and TM modes on the shell thickness is examined.

  14. Generation of high-quality petawatt pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mourou, G; Bado, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    CPA sources need a front-end capable of generating very short seed pulses. To meet this requirement, present CPA sources rely on actively modelocked solid-state oscillators used in conjunction with non-linear fiber stages. This approach generates pulses with a residual frequency chirp, resulting in a limited peak-to-background intensity contrast ratio. The availability of an oscillator capable of producing directly (i.e. without fiber stage) picosecond or sub-picosecond pulses would significantly improve the quality of CPA sources. We have pursued different approaches to replace the standard modelocked oscillator front-end. In an initial phase, we investigated the possible use of Additive Pulse Modelocking (APM) color-center lasers as oscillators for CPA Nd:glass sources. Lately we have developed a Ti:Sapphire modelocked oscillator operating in the one-micron range. In order to generate pulses with very high peak to background contrast ratio, we have built a non-linear coupled-cavity oscillator generating 200-fs pulses. This color-center laser operates in the 1.5--1.6 micron range. A diagram of the oscillator is shown in Fig. 1. The laser is pumped with a modelocked Nd:YAG source. Both KCl and NaCl crystals were tested as gain media. NaCl was found to have a larger tuning range and to generate a higher average power (up to 150 mW). When synchronously mode-locked, the color-center generates pulses in the 10--20 ps range. Once interferometrically coupled to non-linear external-cavity, this oscillator produces very short pulses (85 to 260 fs). This oscillator was first operated with a 2 mm birefringent plate. 85 fs, near transform-limited pulses were generated at 1.54 micron. As the laser was tuned to longer wavelength, the pulse duration increased, as well as the bandwidth-duration product. With a 4 mm birefringent plate, 125 fs, transform-limited pulses were generated over the full tuning range.

  15. All-optical diode structure based on asymmetrical coupling by a micro-cavity and FP cavity at two sides of photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Yun-Feng; Jia, Chen; He, Xing-Dao

    2016-06-01

    A high efficiency all-optical diode based on photonic crystal (PC) waveguide has been proposed and numerically investigated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The structure is asymmetrically coupled by a micro-cavity containing nonlinear Kerr medium and a FP cavity at sides of PC waveguide. Because of interference between two cavities, Fano peak and FP peak can both appear in transmission spectra and unidirectional transmission can be achieved. The working wavelength can set between two peaks and near to the Fano peak. For forward launch with suitable light intensity, nonlinear Kerr effect of micro-cavity can been excited. It will result in red shift of Fano peak and achieving forward transmission. But for backward launch, a stronger incidence light is needed to the excite Kerr effect due to the design of asymmetric structure. This design has many advantages, including high maximum transmittance, high transmittance contrast ratio, low power threshold, short response time, and ease of integration.

  16. Hybrid quantum gates between flying photon and diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers assisted by optical microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Lu Long, Gui

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid quantum gates hold great promise for quantum information processing since they preserve the advantages of different quantum systems. Here we present compact quantum circuits to deterministically implement controlled-NOT, Toffoli, and Fredkin gates between a flying photon qubit and diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers assisted by microcavities. The target qubits of these universal quantum gates are encoded on the spins of the electrons associated with the diamond NV centers and they have long coherence time for storing information, and the control qubit is encoded on the polarizations of the flying photon and can be easily manipulated. Our quantum circuits are compact, economic, and simple. Moreover, they do not require additional qubits. The complexity of our schemes for universal three-qubit gates is much reduced, compared to the synthesis with two-qubit entangling gates. These schemes have high fidelities and efficiencies, and they are feasible in experiment. PMID:26271899

  17. A compact photonic crystal micro-cavity on a single-mode lithium niobate photonic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Lutong; Zhang, Shaomei; Hu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The properties of the guided modes, including the single-mode conditions and the coupling of different polarized modes in the single-crystal lithium niobate photonic wires, were analyzed in detail. One-dimensional photonic crystal micro-cavities with several different patterns, which could be used as an ultra-compact optical filter, were designed and simulated in order to get high transmission at the resonant wavelength and the best preferment. The designed structure, with the whole size of 6.5 × 0.7 μm2, was fabricated on a single-mode photonic wire. A measured peak transmission of 0.34 at 1400 nm, an extinction ratio of 12.5 dB and a Q factor of 156 were obtained. The measured transmission spectrum was basically consistent with the simulation, although a slight shift of resonant wavelength occurred due to the fabrication errors.

  18. Looking through the mirror: optical microcavity-mirror image photonic interaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Xifré-Pérez, E; García de Abajo, F J; Meseguer, F

    2012-05-01

    Although science fiction literature and art portray extraordinary stories of people interacting with their images behind a mirror, we know that they are not real and belong to the realm of fantasy. However, it is well known that charges or magnets near a good electrical conductor experience real attractive or repulsive forces, respectively, originating in the interaction with their images. Here, we show strong interaction between an optical microcavity and its image under external illumination. Specifically, we use silicon nanospheres whose high refractive index makes well-defined optical resonances feasible. The strong interaction produces attractive and repulsive forces depending on incident wavelength, cavity-metal separation and resonance mode symmetry. These intense repulsive photonic forces warrant a new kind of optical levitation that allows us to accurately manipulate small particles, with important consequences for microscopy, optical sensing and control of light by light at the nanoscale. PMID:22565747

  19. Thermomagnetic writing into magnetophotonic microcavities controlling thermal diffusion for volumetric magnetic holography.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Yuichi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Goto, Taichi; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2016-01-11

    Holographic memory is expected to become a high-capacity data storage. Magnetic volumetric holograms are rewritable holograms that are recorded as magnetization directions through thermomagnetic recording. However, the effective depth of magnetic holograms is limited by thermal diffusion that causes merging of magnetic fringes. In this study, we propose the insertion of heat-sink layers (HSLs) for retaining well-defined magnetic fringes during volumetric writing. Magnetophotonic microcavity media were used for demonstrating the HSL effect, and the structural design principle was established in numerical calculations. The results indicate that deep and clear magnetic fringes and an improvement in the diffraction efficiency can be achieved by the insertion of HSLs. PMID:26832282

  20. Enhanced nonlinear optics in coupled optical microcavities with an unbroken and broken parity-time symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Zhan, Xiaogui; Ding, Chunling; Zhang, Duo; Wu, Ying

    2015-10-01

    We present a perturbation technique to study the linear and nonlinear output characteristics of coherent photon transport in a parity-time (PT )-symmetric double-microcavity system where one passive cavity contains a single quantum emitter. It is found that (i) for the linear transmission of a low-power input probe field, the output spectra of the proposed PT -symmetric system exhibit a single transparent resonance dip and two symmetric, strongly amplifying sidebands, i.e., an inverted dipole-induced transparency; and (ii) for the nonlinear transmission of the input probe field, giant optical third-order nonlinearities with high linear transmission rate and vanishing nonlinear absorption can be achieved efficiently when the system parameters are tuned properly so that a PT -symmetry phase transition occurs. The obtained results can be useful for quantum information processing, quantum nondemolition measurements of photons, and optical signal processing.

  1. Far off-resonant coupling between photonic crystal microcavity and single quantum dot with resonant excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Banihashemi, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Vahid; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Kojima, Takanori; Kojima, Kazunobu; Noda, Susumu

    2013-12-16

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate that with sub-nanowatt coherent s-shell excitation of a single InAs quantum dot, off-resonant coupling of 4.1 nm is possible between L3 photonic crystal microcavity and the quantum dot at 50 K. This resonant excitation reduces strongly the effect of surrounding charges to quantum dot, multiexciton complexes and pure dephasing. It seems that this far off-resonant coupling is the result of increased number of acoustical phonons due to high operating temperature of 50 K. The 4.1 nm detuning is the largest amount for this kind of coupling.

  2. Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Judith L.; Schaeffer, Sheldon

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the Coordinator's Notebook focuses on the quality of Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) programs. The bulk of the issue is devoted to an article "Quality in ECCD: Everyone's Concern" (Judith Evans), which reviews the need for a definition of high quality in ECCD programs and discusses how diverse stakeholders define quality.…

  3. Polaritons in a nonideal periodic array of microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, Vladimir; Fedorov, Stanislav; Gumennyk, Kostyantyn; Sychanova, Marina; Kavokin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The virtual crystal approximation is employed to numerically model the propagation of localized electromagnetic excitations through a two-dimensional array of coupled microcavities containing atomic clusters (quantum dots). The constructed model allows for the presence of defects (absence of cavities and/or quantum dots) at certain sites of the supercrystal. We derive the dispersion relations for polaritonic modes as functions of defect concentrations. This permits to evaluate the densities of states of polaritons and their effective masses as well as the band gaps for any prescribed values of defect concentrations.

  4. Development of a deformation-tunable quadrupolar microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juhee; Moon, Songky; Lee, Sang-Bum; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon; Shim, Jeong-Bo; Lee, Hai-Woong; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2006-08-01

    We have developed a technique for realizing a two-dimensional quadrupolar microcavity with its deformation variable from 0% to 20% continuously. We employed a microjet ejected from a noncircular orifice in order to generate a stationary column with modulated quadrupolar deformation in its cross section. Wavelength redshifts of low-order cavity modes due to shape deformation were measured and were found to be in good agreement with the wave calculation for the same deformation, indicating that the observed deformation is quadrupolar in nature.

  5. Resonant self-pulsations in coupled nonlinear microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Victor; Biancalana, Fabio

    2011-04-15

    A different point of view on the phenomenon of self-pulsations is presented, which shows that they are a balanced state formed by two counteracting processes: beating of modes and bistable switching. A structure based on two coupled nonlinear microcavities provides a generic example of a system with enhanced ability to support this phenomenon. The specific design of such a structure in the form of multilayered media is proposed, and the coupled-mode theory is applied to describe its dynamical properties. It is emphasized that the frequency of self-pulsations is related to the frequency splitting between resonant modes and can be adjusted over a broad range.

  6. Spatiotemporal Chaos Induces Extreme Events in an Extended Microcavity Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmi, F.; Coulibaly, S.; Loghmari, Z.; Sagnes, I.; Beaudoin, G.; Clerc, M. G.; Barbay, S.

    2016-01-01

    Extreme events such as rogue waves in optics and fluids are often associated with the merging dynamics of coherent structures. We present experimental and numerical results on the physics of extreme event appearance in a spatially extended semiconductor microcavity laser with an intracavity saturable absorber. This system can display deterministic irregular dynamics only, thanks to spatial coupling through diffraction of light. We have identified parameter regions where extreme events are encountered and established the origin of this dynamics in the emergence of deterministic spatiotemporal chaos, through the correspondence between the proportion of extreme events and the dimension of the strange attractor.

  7. Theory of optical spin control in quantum dot microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, D. S.; Glazov, M. M.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Lanco, L.

    2015-09-01

    We present a microscopic theory of optical initialization, control, and detection for a single electron spin in a quantum dot embedded into a zero-dimensional microcavity. The strong coupling regime of the trion and the cavity mode is addressed. We demonstrate that efficient spin orientation by a single circularly polarized pulse is possible in relatively weak transverse magnetic fields. The possibilities for spin control by additional circularly polarized pulse are analyzed. Under optimal conditions the Kerr and Faraday rotation angles induced by the spin polarized electron may reach tens of degrees.

  8. Ring-shaped polariton lasing in pillar microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kalevich, V. K. Afanasiev, M. M.; Lukoshkin, V. A.; Kavokin, K. V.; Tsintzos, S. I.; Savvidis, P. G.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2014-03-07

    Optically generated exciton-polaritons in cylindric semiconductor pillar microcavity with embedded GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells demonstrate a clear polariton lasing regime. When exciting in the center of the pillar, we detect a ring-shaped emission, where the peak of intensity can be separated from the excitation spot by more than 10 μm. The spatial coherence of the ring emission is verified by interferometry measurements. These observations are interpreted by drift of the exciton polariton condensate away from the excitation spot due to its repulsion from the exciton reservoir and by its spatial confinement by the pillar boundary.

  9. Spatiotemporal Chaos Induces Extreme Events in an Extended Microcavity Laser.

    PubMed

    Selmi, F; Coulibaly, S; Loghmari, Z; Sagnes, I; Beaudoin, G; Clerc, M G; Barbay, S

    2016-01-01

    Extreme events such as rogue waves in optics and fluids are often associated with the merging dynamics of coherent structures. We present experimental and numerical results on the physics of extreme event appearance in a spatially extended semiconductor microcavity laser with an intracavity saturable absorber. This system can display deterministic irregular dynamics only, thanks to spatial coupling through diffraction of light. We have identified parameter regions where extreme events are encountered and established the origin of this dynamics in the emergence of deterministic spatiotemporal chaos, through the correspondence between the proportion of extreme events and the dimension of the strange attractor. PMID:26799020

  10. Quality evaluation of extra high quality images based on key assessment word

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Masashi; Hayashi, Hidehiko; Akamatsu, Shigeru; Miyahara, Makoto M.

    2001-06-01

    An all encompassing goal of our research is to develop an extra high quality imaging system which is able to convey a high level artistic impression faithfully. We have defined a high order sensation as such a high level artistic impression, and it is supposed that the high order sensation is expressed by the combination of the psychological factor which can be described by plural assessment words. In order to pursue the quality factors that are important for the reproduction of the high order sensation, we have focused on the image quality evaluation of the extra high quality images using the assessment words considering the high order sensation. In this paper, we have obtained the hierarchical structure between the collected assessment words and the principles of European painting based on the conveyance model of the high order sensation, and we have determined a key assessment word 'plasticity' which is able to evaluate the reproduction of the high order sensation more accurately. The results of the subjective assessment experiments using the prototype of the developed extra high quality imaging system have shown that the obtained key assessment word 'plasticity' is the most appropriate assessment word to evaluate the image quality of the extra high quality images quasi-quantitatively.

  11. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes. Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Del Bianco, M.; Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  12. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes: Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Del Bianco, M.; Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) Teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  13. Strategies that promote high quality care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Gertler, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate factors predicting the quality of care received using a nationally representative dataset from Indonesia. Data Sources The study combines two surveys in 13 provinces: a household survey of 2451 women who delivered a live birth in 1992-1998, and a facility survey that measured quality available from outpatient providers. Study design Multivariate regressions are used to explain the quality of care received. Explanatory variables are high facility quality, maternal education, household wealth, ethnicity, and insurance. Data collection methods Facility quality available is measured by adherence to prenatal protocols using a clinical case scenario. Quality received is measured by maternal reports about routine prenatal services received. Principle findings High facility quality predicts an increase in quality received. Although poor households have access to the same or higher quality care compared with the least poor, the poor receive lower levels of quality. In remote regions, quality received rises with increasing levels of maternal education and household wealth. Conclusions Improving health provider knowledge, and increasing household financial resources and information could redress inequalities in quality received among the poor and least educated. PMID:18501988

  14. Toward automatic recognition of high quality clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Kilicoglu, Halil; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Rindflesch, Thomas C; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Haynes, R Brian

    2008-01-01

    Automatic methods for recognizing topically relevant documents supported by high quality research can assist clinicians in practicing evidence-based medicine. We approach the challenge of identifying articles with high quality clinical evidence as a binary classification problem. Combining predictions from supervised machine learning methods and using deep semantic features, we achieve 73.5% precision and 67% recall. PMID:18998881

  15. High-Quality Curriculum: A Lesson in Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Jennifer G.

    2012-01-01

    The Curriculum Studies Network focuses on promoting and creating high-quality curriculum to meet the needs of academically advanced learners. Staff at Curriculum Studies Network are proud of the collaboration they promote among educators, but in order for high-quality curriculum to continue to be the standard in the field, they realize the…

  16. Inequality in Preschool Quality? Community-Level Disparities in Access to High-Quality Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassok, Daphna; Galdo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, unequal access to high-quality preschool has emerged as a growing public policy concern. Because of data limitations, it is notoriously difficult to measure disparities in access to early learning opportunities across communities and particularly challenging to quantify gaps in access to "high-quality" programs. Research…

  17. Vertical Single-Crystalline Organic Nanowires on Graphene: Solution-Phase Epitaxy and Optical Microcavities.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Yao; Xu, Hongjun; Wang, Jing Jing; Winters, Sinéad; Motta, Carlo; Karademir, Ertuğrul; Zhu, Weigang; Varrla, Eswaraiah; Duesberg, Georg S; Sanvito, Stefano; Hu, Wenping; Donegan, John F

    2016-08-10

    Vertically aligned nanowires (NWs) of single crystal semiconductors have attracted a great deal of interest in the past few years. They have strong potential to be used in device structures with high density and with intriguing optoelectronic properties. However, fabricating such nanowire structures using organic semiconducting materials remains technically challenging. Here we report a simple procedure for the synthesis of crystalline 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl) anthracene (BPEA) NWs on a graphene surface utilizing a solution-phase van der Waals (vdW) epitaxial strategy. The wires are found to grow preferentially in a vertical direction on the surface of graphene. Structural characterization and first-principles ab initio simulations were performed to investigate the epitaxial growth and the molecular orientation of the BPEA molecules on graphene was studied, revealing the role of interactions at the graphene-BPEA interface in determining the molecular orientation. These free-standing NWs showed not only efficient optical waveguiding with low loss along the NW but also confinement of light between the two end facets of the NW forming a microcavity Fabry-Pérot resonator. From an analysis of the optical dispersion within such NW microcavities, we observed strong slowing of the waveguided light with a group velocity reduced to one-tenth the speed of light. Applications of the vertical single-crystalline organic NWs grown on graphene will benefit from a combination of the unique electronic properties and flexibility of graphene and the tunable optical and electronic properties of organic NWs. Therefore, these vertical organic NW arrays on graphene offer the potential for realizing future on-chip light sources. PMID:27438189

  18. Enhanced out-coupling factor of microcavity organic light-emitting devices with irregular microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jongsun; Oh, Seung Seok; Youp Kim, Doo; Cho, Sang Hee; Kim, In Tae; Han, S. H.; Takezoe, Hideo; Choi, Eun Ha; Cho, Guang Sup; Seo, Yoon Ho; Oun Kang, Seung; Park, Byoungchoo

    2006-07-01

    We studied microcavity organic light-emitting devices with a microlens system. A microcavity for organic light-emitting devices (OLED) was fabricated by stacks of SiO2 and SiNx layers and a metal cathode together with the microlens array. Electroluminescence of the devices showed that color variation under the viewing angle due to the microcavity is suppressed remarkably by microlens arrays, which makes the use of devices acceptable in many applications. It was also demonstrated that the external out-coupling factor of the devise increases by a factor of ~1.8 with wide viewing angles compared to conventional OLEDs.

  19. Enhanced out-coupling factor of microcavity organic light-emitting devices with irregular microlens array.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jongsun; Oh, Seung Seok; Kim, Doo Youp; Cho, Sang Hee; Kim, In Tae; Han, S H; Takezoe, Hideo; Choi, Eun Ha; Cho, Guang Sup; Seo, Yoon Ho; Kang, Seung Oun; Park, Byoungchoo

    2006-07-10

    We studied microcavity organic light-emitting devices with a microlens system. A microcavity for organic light-emitting devices (OLED) was fabricated by stacks of SiO(2) and SiN(x) layers and a metal cathode together with the microlens array. Electroluminescence of the devices showed that color variation under the viewing angle due to the microcavity is suppressed remarkably by microlens arrays, which makes the use of devices acceptable in many applications. It was also demonstrated that the external out-coupling factor of the devise increases by a factor of ~1.8 with wide viewing angles compared to conventional OLEDs. PMID:19516834

  20. Narrow dark polariton due to coupled coherence in a quantum well microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Li, Cui Li; Zhang, Rui; Zhuo, Zhong Chang; Su, Xue Mei

    2015-10-01

    A scheme is proposed to obtain slow light in a coulped quantum wells microcavity with tunneling induced transparency between intersubband electronic transitions. Three prolaritons are created by intracavity Fano interference between fundamental mode photon and two quantum oscillators of coherent subband electronic excitations. A narrow middle dark polariton of the three can be produced, which can be used to suppress the line profiles of the transmission or reflection spectra for the incident light. This leads to slow propagation of the incident light in the microcavity. The semiconductor optical microcavity can be an alternative choice of quantum photoelectronic devices in nanoscale.

  1. Composite modulation of Fano resonance in plasmonic microstructures by electric-field and microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Chenyun; Yang, Hong; Hu, Xiaoyong Gong, Qihuang

    2014-11-03

    Composite modulation of Fano resonance by using electric-field and microcavity simultaneously is realized in a plasmonic microstructure, which consists of a gold nanowire grating inserted into a Fabry-Perot microcavity composited of a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between two indium tin oxide layers. The Fano resonance wavelength varies with the applied voltage and the microcavity resonance. A large shift of 48 nm in the Fano resonance wavelength is achieved when the applied voltage is 20 V. This may provide a new way for the study of multi-functional integrated photonic circuits and chips based on plasmonic microstructures.

  2. Interaction of coherent confined optical modes in neighboring 3D cylindrical ZnO microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzintsev, A. N. Volkov, V. T.; Knyazev, M. A.; Yakimov, E. E.

    2006-11-15

    Luminescent properties of pairs of neighboring variously spaced 3D cylindrical ZnO microcavities 1.8 {mu}m in diameter, produced by electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching, are studied. Narrow luminescence peaks in the ZnO exciton spectral region, related to single-mode lasing, were observed. The energy of exchange interaction of coupled modes of two microcavities was calculated as a function of the intercavity distance. Broadening of the line of stimulated UV luminescence associated with coupled photonic modes of two microcavities was observed as the intercavity distance decreased.

  3. Plasmonic improvement of microcavity biomedical sensor spectroscopic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas; Ghadiri, Reza

    2014-03-01

    New opportunity to improve a sensetivity of a label-free biomolecule detection in sensing systems based on microcavity evanescent wave optical sensors has been recently found and is being under intensive development. Novel technique based on combination of optical resonance on microring structures with plasmon resonance. Recently developed tools based on neural network data processing can realize real-time identification of biological agents. So combining advantages of plasmon enhancing optical microcavity resonance with identification tools can give a new platform for ulta sensitive label-free biomedical sensor. Our developed technique used standard glass and polymer microspheres as sensetive elements. They are fixed in the solution flow by adhesive layer on the surface being in the field of evanescence wave. Sensitive layer have been treated by gold nanoparticel (GN) solution. Another technique used thin film gold layers deposited on the substrate below adhesive. The light from a tuneable diode laser is coupled into the microsphere through a prism and was sharply focussed on the single microsphere. Images were recorded by CMOS camera. Normalized by free spectral range resonance shift of whispering gallery mode (WGM) and a relative efficiency of their excitation were used as input data for biomolecule classification. Both biomolecules and NP injection was obtained caused WGM spectra modification. But after NP treatment spectral shift and intensity of WGM resonances in biomolecule solutions increased. WGM resonances in microspheres fixed on substrate with gold layer with optimized layer thickness in biomolecule solutions also had higher intensity and spectra modification then without gold layer.

  4. Total quality management: A management philosophy for providing high quality construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Paul D.

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is not a new concept. Only recently (within the past ten years or so) have American companies started to realize the potential of TQM as a means of ensuring high quality products and services. With this realization has come implementation in manufacturing and service companies. A commercial construction company, like any other business, must provide a top quality finished product to its customer if it intends to stay in business. TQM is one way to work to that end. This report explores the quality problems facing my fictitious construction company, which I believe are fairly typical among the commercial construction industry, existing management methods, and the TQM method to ensure top quality production. It will be shown why I believe TQM or a variation thereof is the best method for controlling the quality of products and service during the construction process. Under the philosophy of TQM, we build quality into the finished product.

  5. Homoepitaxial nonpolar (10-10) ZnO/ZnMgO monolithic microcavities: Towards reduced photonic disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuniga-Perez, J.; Kappei, L.; Deparis, C.; Reveret, F.; Grundmann, M.; de Prado, E.; Jamadi, O.; Leymarie, J.; Chenot, S.; Leroux, M.

    2016-06-01

    Nonpolar ZnO/ZnMgO-based optical microcavities have been grown on (10-10) m-plane ZnO substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate an exponential increase of the cavity quality factor with the number of layers in the distributed Bragg reflectors. Most importantly, microreflectivity spectra recorded with a spot size in the order of 2 μm show a negligible photonic disorder (well below 1 meV), leading to local quality factors equivalent to those obtained by macroreflectivity. The anisotropic character of the nonpolar heterostructures manifests itself both in the surface features, elongated parallel to the in-plane c direction, and in the optical spectra, with two cavity modes being observed at different energies for orthogonal polarizations.

  6. High-quality work, job satisfaction, and occupational injuries.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Kelloway, E Kevin; Iverson, Roderick D

    2003-04-01

    The authors investigated whether and how 1 element of a high-performance work system, namely high-quality jobs (composed of extensive training, variety, and autonomy), affects occupational injuries. On the basis of data from the Australian WIRS95 database (N = 16,466; Department of Workplace Relations and Small Business, 1997), high-quality jobs exerted a direct effect on injuries and an indirect effect through the mediating influence of job satisfaction. Conceptual, methodological, and practical issues are discussed. PMID:12731711

  7. Boiler for generating high quality vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H.; Marto, P. J.; Joslyn, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Boiler supplies vapor for use in turbines by imparting a high angular velocity to the liquid annulus in heated rotating drum. Drum boiler provides a sharp interface between boiling liquid and vapor, thereby, inhibiting the formation of unwanted liquid droplets.

  8. Light manipulation with Bacteriorhodopsin membrane self-assembled on high-Q photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2008-03-01

    Resonant photonic structures such as ring resonators and photonic crystal nanocavities interact evanescently with biological material assembled on a reflecting interface. Quality (Q-) factors ˜10^6 and sub-wavelength modal (V-) volumes significantly enhance the interaction so that tuning of microcavity resonances by only few molecules is feasible. Since only few constituents are required, the molecular-photonic interface can be fashioned from self-organizing principles that govern interaction of organic and biological polymers. We demonstrate this bottom-up approach with photochromic Bacteriorhodopsin membrane which we self-assemble on various microcavities. The hybrid molecular-photonic architectures exhibit high Q/V-values and are sensitive to photoinduced molecular transitions and other non-linearities which we utilize for demonstrations of all-optical switching, routing and molecular analysis.

  9. Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case

    SciTech Connect

    Drake Kirkham; Amy Powell; Lucas Rich

    2011-02-01

    Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case Drake Kirkham1, Amy Powell2, Lucas Rich3 1Quality Manager, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 M/S 6122, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6122 2Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory 3Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory Contact: Voice: (208) 533-7550 Email: Drake.Kirkham@inl.gov Abstract. The Radioisotope Power Systems Program of the Idaho National Laboratory makes an empirical case for a highly integrated Quality Assurance function pertaining to the preparation, assembly, testing, storage and transportation of 238Pu fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Case data represents multiple campaigns including the Pluto/New Horizons mission, the Mars Science Laboratory mission in progress, and other related projects. Traditional Quality Assurance models would attempt to reduce cost by minimizing the role of dedicated Quality Assurance personnel in favor of either functional tasking or peer-based implementations. Highly integrated Quality Assurance adds value by placing trained quality inspectors on the production floor side-by-side with nuclear facility operators to enhance team dynamics, reduce inspection wait time, and provide for immediate, independent feedback. Value is also added by maintaining dedicated Quality Engineers to provide for rapid identification and resolution of corrective action, enhanced and expedited supply chain interfaces, improved bonded storage capabilities, and technical resources for requirements management including data package development and Certificates of Inspection. A broad examination of cost-benefit indicates highly integrated Quality Assurance can reduce cost through the mitigation of risk and reducing administrative burden thereby allowing engineers to be engineers, nuclear operators to be nuclear operators, and the cross-functional team to operate more efficiently. Applicability of this case

  10. The Equitable Distribution of High-Quality Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumgardner, Stan

    2010-01-01

    A new report by the National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality (TQ Center) highlights efforts across the nation to address a key point in the No Child Left Behind law and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)--the equitable distribution of high-quality teachers across all schools. Research consistently has pointed to effective…